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Sample records for acid-washed samples ranges

  1. Does bottle type and acid-washing influence trace element analyses by ICP-MS on water samples? A test covering 62 elements and four bottle types: high density polyethene (HDPE), polypropene (PP), fluorinated ethene propene copolymer (FEP) and perfluoroalkoxy polymer (PFA).

    PubMed

    Reimann, C; Siewers, U; Skarphagen, H; Banks, D

    1999-10-01

    Groundwater samples from 15 boreholes in crystalline bedrock aquifers in South Norway (Oslo area) have been collected in parallel in five different clear plastic bottle types (high density polyethene [HDPE], polypropene [PP, two manufacturers], fluorinated ethene propene copolymer [FEP] and perfluoroalkoxy polymer [PFA]. In the cases of polyethene and polypropene, parallel samples have been collected in factory-new (unwashed) bottles and acid-washed factory-new bottles. Samples have been analysed by ICP-MS techniques for a wide range of inorganic elements down to the ppt (ng/l) range. It was found that acid-washing of factory-new flasks had no clear systematic beneficial effect on analytical result. On the contrary, for the PP-bottles concentrations of Pb and Sn were clearly elevated in the acid-washed bottles. Likewise, for the vast majority of elements, bottle type was of no importance for analytical result. For six elements (Al, Cr, Hf, Hg, Pb and Sn) some systematic differences for one or more bottle types could be tentatively discerned, but in no case was the discrepancy of major cause for concern. The most pronounced effect was for Cr, with clearly elevated concentrations returned from the samples collected in HDPE bottles, regardless of acid-washing or not. For the above six elements, FEP or PFA bottles seemed to be marginally preferable to PP and HDPE. In general, cheap HDPE, factory new, unwashed flasks are suitable for sampling waters for ICP-MS ultra-trace analysis of the elements tested.

  2. Validation of acid washes as critical control points in hazard analysis and critical control point systems.

    PubMed

    Dormedy, E S; Brashears, M M; Cutter, C N; Burson, D E

    2000-12-01

    A 2% lactic acid wash used in a large meat-processing facility was validated as an effective critical control point (CCP) in a hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) plan. We examined the microbial profiles of beef carcasses before the acid wash, beef carcasses immediately after the acid wash, beef carcasses 24 h after the acid wash, beef subprimal cuts from the acid-washed carcasses, and on ground beef made from acid-washed carcasses. Total mesophilic, psychrotrophic, coliforms, generic Escherichia coli, lactic acid bacteria, pseudomonads, and acid-tolerant microorganisms were enumerated on all samples. The presence of Salmonella spp. was also determined. Acid washing significantly reduced all counts except for pseudomonads that were present at very low numbers before acid washing. All other counts continued to stay significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those on pre-acid-washed carcasses throughout all processing steps. Total bacteria, coliforms, and generic E. coli enumerated on ground beef samples were more than 1 log cycle lower than those reported in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Baseline data. This study suggests that acid washes may be effective CCPs in HACCP plans and can significantly reduce the total number of microorganisms present on the carcass and during further processing. PMID:11131890

  3. Effects of acid-washing filter treatment on quantification of aerosol organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liming; Lim, Jaehyun; Yu, Liya E.

    The tests of standard mixtures and four sets of atmospheric particulate samples showed that an acid-wash (AW) pretreatment of fluorocarbon-coated glass fiber filters prior to aerosol sampling enhanced the quantifiable organic compounds for more than 29% (or 66 ng m -3); in particular, 47-273 ng m -3 (21-366%) more water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) were measured. When the acid-pretreated filters were employed, up to nine more organic species were measured in the individual daily samples. Because the acid pretreatment reduced the metal contaminants in the glass fiber filters, using the AW filters for aerosol sampling allows higher extraction recoveries of organic compounds. Since the fingerprinting compounds were more accurately determined when the aerosol samples were collected on the AW filters, better assessment of emission sources and toxicity of air pollutants can be obtained.

  4. Effects of acid washing on stable isotope ratios of C and N in penaeid shrimp and seagrass: Implications for food-web studies using multiple stable isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, S.E.; Kempster, M.A.; Loneragan, N.R.

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effects of acid washing on the carbon and nitrogen composition and stable isotope ratios of C and N in shrimp (Metapenaeus spp.) and seagrass (Enhalus acoroides). Acid washing did not affect the mean {delta}{sup 13}C ratios for juvenile Metapenaeus moyebi and resulted in only an ecologically insignificant change (0.3%) in mean {delta}{sup 13}C ratios for larger metapenaeus bennettae. In contrast, acid washing increased the mean {delta}{sup 15}N signatures of shrimp tissue ({approximately}3%) and decreased that of seagrass ({approximately}1.8%) to a degree that may confound the interpretation of food webs. The increase in %C and %N in both shrimp and seagrass after acid washing suggests that the changes in isotope ratios are due to loss of molecules comparatively low in C and N. Treating samples by acid washing also resulted in an increase in the variation among individuals for both {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 13}C, which would lead to a loss of statistical power for testing differences between species, sites, or seasons. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Using acid-washed waste tire rubber in soilless media for tomato production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Cerasiforne’ tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was grown in soilless potting media contained different substrate formulas including 25:25:50 volume ratio of acid-washed (AWR) or non-washed shredded rubber (NAWR): vermiculite or zeolite: perlite. Additionally, plants were grown in a peat: perli...

  6. Hydrothermal hexagonal SrFe12O19 ferrite powders: Phase composition, microstructure and acid washing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ailin; Hu, Xuzhao; Li, Diankai; Chen, Lu; Jin, Chuangui; Zuo, Conghua; Su, Shubing

    2014-03-01

    A series of hexagonal m-type SrFe12O19 ferrite powders were hydrothermally synthesized, and their phase composition, microstructure and magnetic properties before/after acid washing were studied. In the synthesis of these specimens, the atomic ratio of Fe/Sr ( R F/S ) in starting materials was set to 4, 5 and 12, respectively. When R F/S = 12, the specimen has morphology of round flat cakes, not typical hexagonal plate-like structure. The results of SEM images and XRD patterns indicate that the specimen with R F/S = 12 was mostly composed of Fe2O3. When R F/S = 4 or 5, the hexagonal plate-like SrFe12O19 ferrite powders were successfully synthesized with only a small quantity of Fe2O3 and SrCO3 impurities. It is also found that acid washing can eliminate the impurities in as-synthesized specimens effectively, and also change their topography, which enhances the saturation magnetization. However, the coercivity changed irregularly after acid washing, which is ascribed to the combination of the changed morphology, introduced stress and lattice defects.

  7. Effects of four types of dilute acid washing on moso bamboo pyrolysis using Py-GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qing; Zhang, Shuping; Zhang, Li; Ding, Kuan; Xiong, Yuanquan

    2015-06-01

    The influences of four types of dilute acid washing (H2SO4, HCl, HF, HNO3) on moso bamboo pyrolysis were investigated via pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The effects of acid washings on the inorganics contents and the chemical structure were also analyzed. The results indicated that all the acid washings could effectively remove a large portion of inorganics and disrupt the chemical structure to a certain extent. HCl-washing behaved the best in removing inorganics and had the most marked disruption effect on bamboo structure. Acid washings promoted the bamboo pyrolysis and increased the contents of both phenols and sugars. HCl-washing had the most significant promotion effect on the levoglucosan formation with the absolute peak area increasing from 8.12×10(8) to 1.92×10(9). The absolute peak areas of 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran decreased more or less after acid washings. All the acid washings except H2SO4-washing could significantly increase the absolute peak area of methoxyeugenol. PMID:25755014

  8. Removal of arsenic in coal fly ash by acid washing process using dilute H2SO4 solvent.

    PubMed

    Kashiwakura, Shunsuke; Ohno, Hajime; Matsubae-Yokoyama, Kazuyo; Kumagai, Yuichi; Kubo, Hiroshi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2010-09-15

    Coal fly ash emitted from coal thermal power plants generally contains tens ppm of arsenic, one of the hazardous elements in coal, during combustion and their elution to soil or water has become a public concern. In this study, the acid washing process developed by the authors was applied to the removal of arsenic from coal fly ash. Laboratory- and bench-scale investigations on the dissolution behavior of arsenic from various coal fly ash samples into dilute H(2)SO(4) were conducted. Arsenic in the coal fly ash samples were dissolved into H(2)SO(4) solutions rapidly. However, its concentrations decreased with an increase in the pH of H(2)SO(4) solution in some cases. The species of arsenic in the dilute H(2)SO(4) was estimated as H(3)AsO(4), and its anionic species was considered to adsorb with the elevation of pH under the presence of ash particle. Such adsorption behavior was enhanced under the presence of Fe ion in the solution. The sufficient removal of arsenic was achieved by controlling pH and avoiding the adsorption of arsenic on the surface of coal fly ash particles, and the elution of arsenic from coal fly ash sample was successfully below the regulation limit.

  9. Thermoluminescence survey of 12 meteorites collected by the European 1988 Antarctic meteorite expedition to Allan Hills and the importance of acid washing for thermoluminescence sensitivity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1991-01-01

    Natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) data are reported for 12 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica by the European field party during the 1988/1989 field season. The samples include one with extremely high natural TL, ALH88035, suggestive of exposure to unusually high radiation doses (i.e., low degrees of shielding), and one, ALH88034, whose low natural TL suggests reheating within the last 100,000 years. The remainder have natural TL values suggestive of terrestrial ages similar to those of other meteorites from Allan Hills. ALH88015 (L6) has induced TL data suggestive of intense shock. TL sensitivities of these meteorites are generally lower than observed falls of their petrologic types, as is also observed for Antarctic meteorites in general. Acid-washing experiments indicate that this is solely the result of terrestrial weathering rather than a nonterrestrial Antarctic-non-Antarctic difference. However, other TL parameters, such as natural TL and induced peak temperature-width, are unchanged by acid washing and are sensitive indicators of a meteorite's metamorphic and recent radiation history.

  10. Thermoluminescence survey of 12 meteorites collected by the European 1988 Antarctic meteorite expedition to Allan Hills and the importance of acid washing for thermoluminescence sensitivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, P.H.; Sears, H.; Sears, D.W.G. )

    1991-06-01

    Natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) data are reported for 12 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica by the European field party during the 1988/1989 field season. The samples include one with extremely high natural TL, ALH88035, suggestive of exposure to unusually high radiation doses (i.e., low degrees of shielding), and one, ALH88034, whose low natural TL suggests reheating within the last 100,000 years. The remainder have natural TL values suggestive of terrestrial ages similar to those of other meteorites from Allan Hills. ALH88015 (L6) has induced TL data suggestive of intense shock. TL sensitivities of these meteorites are generally lower than observed falls of their petrologic types, as is also observed for Antarctic meteorites in general. Acid-washing experiments indicate that this is solely the result of terrestrial weathering rather than a nonterrestrial Antarctic-non-Antarctic difference. However, other TL parameters, such as natural TL and induced peak temperature-width, are unchanged by acid washing and are sensitive indicators of a meteorite's metamorphic and recent radiation history. 16 refs.

  11. Effective sampling range for protein-based lures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective sampling range is defined as the maximum distance from which an insect can reach an attractive source in a given period of time. Information on sampling range is valuable for determining appropriate coverage of traps for use in population delimitation, mass trapping control strategies, or...

  12. Application of edible coating and acidic washing for extending the storage life of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Naser; Zahedi, Younes

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocolloid-based materials have been extensively used to coat fruit and vegetables to prolong shelf-life. The effects of different concentrations of acidic washing (acetic, ascorbic, citric and malic acids) followed by coating with gum arabic (GA), carboxymethyl cellulose and emulsified gum arabic (EGA) were evaluated on the weight loss (WL), firmness and color of mushroom. The WL of the uncoated mushrooms was significantly (p < 0.05) greater than that of the coated ones, and the minimum WL was obtained with EGA coating. The mushrooms washed with malic and ascorbic acids showed minimum and maximum of WL, respectively. Loss in firmness of the EGA-coated mushrooms was by 21% (the minimum of loss), while loss value of the uncoated ones was by 39% (the maximum of loss). Firmness of mushrooms was not influenced by the acid type. Concentration of the acid significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the firmness of mushrooms, and at the lowest concentration of acid (1%), the mushrooms tissue was firmest. The L* value of the mushrooms coated with GA was higher than that of others. A significant (p < 0.05) decrease in L* value and a significant (p < 0.05) increase in a* and b* values occurred in the mushrooms washed with acetic acid. Overall, washing with 1% citric or malic acid followed by coating with EGA resulted in minimum decrease in WL and firmness of the mushrooms.

  13. Effects of sample size on KERNEL home range estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seaman, D.E.; Millspaugh, J.J.; Kernohan, Brian J.; Brundige, Gary C.; Raedeke, Kenneth J.; Gitzen, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Kernel methods for estimating home range are being used increasingly in wildlife research, but the effect of sample size on their accuracy is not known. We used computer simulations of 10-200 points/home range and compared accuracy of home range estimates produced by fixed and adaptive kernels with the reference (REF) and least-squares cross-validation (LSCV) methods for determining the amount of smoothing. Simulated home ranges varied from simple to complex shapes created by mixing bivariate normal distributions. We used the size of the 95% home range area and the relative mean squared error of the surface fit to assess the accuracy of the kernel home range estimates. For both measures, the bias and variance approached an asymptote at about 50 observations/home range. The fixed kernel with smoothing selected by LSCV provided the least-biased estimates of the 95% home range area. All kernel methods produced similar surface fit for most simulations, but the fixed kernel with LSCV had the lowest frequency and magnitude of very poor estimates. We reviewed 101 papers published in The Journal of Wildlife Management (JWM) between 1980 and 1997 that estimated animal home ranges. A minority of these papers used nonparametric utilization distribution (UD) estimators, and most did not adequately report sample sizes. We recommend that home range studies using kernel estimates use LSCV to determine the amount of smoothing, obtain a minimum of 30 observations per animal (but preferably a?Y50), and report sample sizes in published results.

  14. Additional sampling directions improve detection range of wireless radiofrequency probes

    PubMed Central

    Mada, Marius; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Williams, Guy B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While MRI is enhancing our knowledge about the structure and function of the human brain, subject motion remains a problem in many clinical applications. Recently, the use of wireless radiofrequency markers with three one‐dimensional (1D) navigators for prospective correction was demonstrated. This method is restricted in the range of motion that can be corrected, however, because of limited information in the 1D readouts. Methods Here, the limitation of techniques for disambiguating marker locations was investigated. It was shown that including more sampling directions extends the tracking range for head rotations. The efficiency of trading readout resolution for speed was explored. Results Tracking of head rotations was demonstrated from −19.2 to 34.4°, −2.7 to 10.0°, and −60.9 to 70.9° in the x‐, y‐, and z‐directions, respectively. In the presence of excessive head motion, the deviation of marker estimates from SPM8 was reduced by 17.1% over existing three‐projection methods. This was achieved by using an additional seven directions, extending the time needed for readouts by a factor of 3.3. Much of this increase may be circumvented by reducing resolution, without compromising accuracy. Conclusion Including additional sampling directions extends the range in which markers can be used, for patients who move a lot. Magn Reson Med 76:913–918, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26418189

  15. Fluorescence temperature sensing on rotating samples in the cryogenic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresson, F.; Devillers, R.

    1999-07-01

    A surface temperature measurement technique for rotating samples is proposed. It is based on the concept of fluorescence thermometry. The fluorescent and phosphorescent phenomena have been applied in thermometry for ambient and high-temperature measurement but not the cryogenic domain, which is explored using thermocouple- or platinum resistor-based thermometers. However, thermal behavior of Yb2+ ions in fluoride matrices seems to be interesting for thermometry in the range 20-120 K. We present here a remote sensing method which uses fluorescence behavior of Yb2+ ion-doped fluoride crystals. The fluorescence decay time of such crystals is related to its temperature. Since we developed a specific sol-gel process (OrMoSils) to make strongly adherent fluorescent layers, we applied the fluorescence thermometry method for rotating object surface temperature measurement. The main application is the monitoring of surface temperature of the ball bearing or turbopump axis in liquid propulsion rocket engines. Our method is presented and discussed, and we give some experimental results. An accurate calibration of the decay time of CaF2:Yb2+ versus temperature is also given.

  16. Removal of chromium (VI) by acid-washed zero-valent iron under various groundwater geochemistry conditions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Keith C K; Lo, Irene M C

    2008-02-15

    The hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) removal capacity of acid-washed zerovalent iron (AW-Fe0) was evaluated under different groundwater geochemistry conditions through column experiments. It was found that each gram of the AW-Fe0 could remove 0.65-1.76 mg of Cr(VI) from synthetic groundwater in the absence of bicarbonate (HCO3-), magnesium and/or calcium ions. Groundwater geochemistry was found to exert various degrees of impact on Cr(VI) removal by the AW-Fe0, in which HCO3- alone gave the mildest impact whereas the copresence of calcium and HCO3- exerted the greatest impact In comparison with the unwashed Fe0, the AW-Fe0 showed a poorer Cr(VI) removal capacity and was also more susceptible to the influence of the dissolved groundwater constituents on Cr(VI) removal,thereby indicating the unsuitability of using AW-Fe0 in permeable reactive barriers for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater. On the AW-Fe0 surface, where the indigenous iron precipitates were almost erased, trivalent chromium including chromium (III) oxides, hydroxides, and oxyhydroxides in irregular strip, chick footmark-liked or boulder-liked forms as well as Cr(III)-Cr(VI) mixed oxides were detected.

  17. Enhanced antimicrobial effect of organic acid washing against foodborne pathogens on broccoli by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-01-18

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of vacuum impregnation applied to the washing process for removal of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes from broccoli surfaces. Broccoli was inoculated with the two foodborne pathogens and treated with simple dipping washing or with vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 5, 10, 20, or 30 min. There were two methods of vacuum impregnation: continuous and intermittent. After 30 min of 101.3 kPa (=14.7 psi, simple dipping), 61.3 kPa (=8.9 psi), and 21.3 kPa (=3.1 psi) of continuous vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.5, 1.7, and 2.3 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. After 30 min of 101.3, 61.3, and 21.3 kPa of intermittent vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.5, 2.3, and 3.7 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.6, 2.1, and 3.2 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. Scanning electron photomicrographs showed that bacteria tend to attach to or become entrapped in protective sites after simple wash processing (dipping). However, most bacteria were washed out of protective sites after intermittent treatment. Direct treatment of cell suspensions with vacuum impregnation showed that it had no inactivation capacity in itself since there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05) between the reduction rates of non- and vacuum impregnation treatment. These results demonstrate that the increased antimicrobial effect of vacuum impregnation can be attributed to increased accessibility of sanitizer and an enhanced washing effect in protected sites on produce. Color, texture and titratable acidity values of broccoli treated with intermittent vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 30 min were not significantly (P ≥ 0.05) different from those of untreated samples even though a storage interval was needed for titratable acidity values to be reduced to levels comparable to those of

  18. Enhanced antimicrobial effect of organic acid washing against foodborne pathogens on broccoli by vacuum impregnation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-01-18

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of vacuum impregnation applied to the washing process for removal of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes from broccoli surfaces. Broccoli was inoculated with the two foodborne pathogens and treated with simple dipping washing or with vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 5, 10, 20, or 30 min. There were two methods of vacuum impregnation: continuous and intermittent. After 30 min of 101.3 kPa (=14.7 psi, simple dipping), 61.3 kPa (=8.9 psi), and 21.3 kPa (=3.1 psi) of continuous vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.4 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.5, 1.7, and 2.3 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. After 30 min of 101.3, 61.3, and 21.3 kPa of intermittent vacuum impregnation treatment, there were 1.5, 2.3, and 3.7 log 10 CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and 1.6, 2.1, and 3.2 log 10 CFU/g reductions of L. monocytogenes, respectively. Scanning electron photomicrographs showed that bacteria tend to attach to or become entrapped in protective sites after simple wash processing (dipping). However, most bacteria were washed out of protective sites after intermittent treatment. Direct treatment of cell suspensions with vacuum impregnation showed that it had no inactivation capacity in itself since there were no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05) between the reduction rates of non- and vacuum impregnation treatment. These results demonstrate that the increased antimicrobial effect of vacuum impregnation can be attributed to increased accessibility of sanitizer and an enhanced washing effect in protected sites on produce. Color, texture and titratable acidity values of broccoli treated with intermittent vacuum impregnation in 2% malic acid for 30 min were not significantly (P ≥ 0.05) different from those of untreated samples even though a storage interval was needed for titratable acidity values to be reduced to levels comparable to those of

  19. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel; Douglas, David R.; Legg, Robert A.; Tennant, Christopher D.

    2013-05-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  20. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Douglas, David R.

    2013-06-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  1. Accuracy of Range Restriction Correction with Multiple Imputation in Small and Moderate Samples: A Simulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffel, Andreas; Spiel, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Approaches to correcting correlation coefficients for range restriction have been developed under the framework of large sample theory. The accuracy of missing data techniques for correcting correlation coefficients for range restriction has thus far only been investigated with relatively large samples. However, researchers and evaluators are…

  2. Predicting range performance of sampled imagers by treating aliased signal as target-dependent noise.

    PubMed

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H; Driggers, Ronald G; Wilson, David L

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents a new theory to predict the impact of sampling on target acquisition. The aliased signal that results from sampling is treated as noise. The aliased signal is different from detector noise in two ways. First, aliasing disappears as the target contrast decreases. Second, the image corruption due to aliasing gets worse with increased range. This is because sampling is constant in angle space, and targets become poorly sampled as range increases. The theory is presented, along with the results of three experiments. The match between model and experiment is excellent.

  3. Simulation analyses of space use: Home range estimates, variability, and sample size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bekoff, M.; Mech, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Simulations of space use by animals were run to determine the relationship among home range area estimates, variability, and sample size {number of locations}. As sample size increased, home range size increased asymptotically, whereas variability decreased among mean home range area estimates generated by multiple simulations for the same sample size. Our results suggest that field workers should ascertain between 100 and 200 locations in order to estimate reliably home range area. In some cases, this suggested guideline is higher than values found in the few published studies in which the relationship between home range area and number of locations is addressed. Sampling differences for small species occupying relatively small home ranges indicate that fewer locations may be sufficient to allow for a reliable estimate of home range. Intraspecffic variability in social status (group member, loner, resident, transient), age, sex, reproductive condition, and food resources also have to be considered, as do season, habitat, and differences in sampling and analytical methods. Comparative data still are needed.

  4. Effects of sample size and sampling frequency on studies of brown bear home ranges and habitat use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, Steve M.; Schwartz, Charles C.

    1999-01-01

    We equipped 9 brown bears (Ursus arctos) on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, with collars containing both conventional very-high-frequency (VHF) transmitters and global positioning system (GPS) receivers programmed to determine an animal's position at 5.75-hr intervals. We calculated minimum convex polygon (MCP) and fixed and adaptive kernel home ranges for randomly-selected subsets of the GPS data to examine the effects of sample size on accuracy and precision of home range estimates. We also compared results obtained by weekly aerial radiotracking versus more frequent GPS locations to test for biases in conventional radiotracking data. Home ranges based on the MCP were 20-606 km2 (x = 201) for aerial radiotracking data (n = 12-16 locations/bear) and 116-1,505 km2 (x = 522) for the complete GPS data sets (n = 245-466 locations/bear). Fixed kernel home ranges were 34-955 km2 (x = 224) for radiotracking data and 16-130 km2 (x = 60) for the GPS data. Differences between means for radiotracking and GPS data were due primarily to the larger samples provided by the GPS data. Means did not differ between radiotracking data and equivalent-sized subsets of GPS data (P > 0.10). For the MCP, home range area increased and variability decreased asymptotically with number of locations. For the kernel models, both area and variability decreased with increasing sample size. Simulations suggested that the MCP and kernel models required >60 and >80 locations, respectively, for estimates to be both accurate (change in area <1%/additional location) and precise (CV < 50%). Although the radiotracking data appeared unbiased, except for the relationship between area and sample size, these data failed to indicate some areas that likely were important to bears. Our results suggest that the usefulness of conventional radiotracking data may be limited by potential biases and variability due to small samples. Investigators that use home range estimates in statistical tests should consider the

  5. Mechanism of Long-Range Penetration of Low-Energy Ions in Botanic Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Yu-Gang; Xue, Jian-Ming; Wang, Si-Xue; Du, Guang-Hua; Yan, Sha; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2002-03-01

    We present experimental evidence to reveal the mechanism of long-range penetration of low-energy ions in botanic samples. In the 100 keV Ar+ ion transmission measurement, the result confirmed that low-energy ions could penetrate at least 60 µm thick kidney bean slices with the probability of about 1.0×10-5. The energy spectrum of 1 MeV He+ ions penetrating botanic samples has shown that there is a peak of the count of ions with little energy loss. The probability of the low-energy ions penetrating the botanic sample is almost the same as that of the high-energy ions penetrating the same samples with little energy loss. The results indicate that there are some micro-regions with mass thickness less than the projectile range of low-energy ions in the botanic samples and they result in the long-range penetration of low-energy ions in botanic samples.

  6. Effective sampling range of food-based attractants for female Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Release/recapture studies were conducted with both feral and sterile females of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), to determine sampling range for a liquid protein bait (hydrolyzed torula yeast) and for a two-component synthetic lure (ammonium acetate and putrescine). Tests were d...

  7. Effective sampling range of a synthetic protein-based attractant for Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted in Honduras to determine sampling range for female-targeted food-based synthetic attractants for pest tephritid fruit flies. Field studies were conducted in shaded coffee and adults of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), were captured. Traps (38 traps ...

  8. Automated combustion accelerator mass spectrometry for the analysis of biomedical samples in the low attomole range.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Esther; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Mocking, Johannes A J; Coulier, Leon; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2014-08-01

    The increasing role of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in biomedical research necessitates modernization of the traditional sample handling process. AMS was originally developed and used for carbon dating, therefore focusing on a very high precision but with a comparably low sample throughput. Here, we describe the combination of automated sample combustion with an elemental analyzer (EA) online coupled to an AMS via a dedicated interface. This setup allows direct radiocarbon measurements for over 70 samples daily by AMS. No sample processing is required apart from the pipetting of the sample into a tin foil cup, which is placed in the carousel of the EA. In our system, up to 200 AMS analyses are performed automatically without the need for manual interventions. We present results on the direct total (14)C count measurements in <2 μL human plasma samples. The method shows linearity over a range of 0.65-821 mBq/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.65 mBq/mL (corresponding to 0.67 amol for acetaminophen). At these extremely low levels of activity, it becomes important to quantify plasma specific carbon percentages. This carbon percentage is automatically generated upon combustion of a sample on the EA. Apparent advantages of the present approach include complete omission of sample preparation (reduced hands-on time) and fully automated sample analysis. These improvements clearly stimulate the standard incorporation of microtracer research in the drug development process. In combination with the particularly low sample volumes required and extreme sensitivity, AMS strongly improves its position as a bioanalysis method.

  9. Automated combustion accelerator mass spectrometry for the analysis of biomedical samples in the low attomole range.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, Esther; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Mocking, Johannes A J; Coulier, Leon; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2014-08-01

    The increasing role of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in biomedical research necessitates modernization of the traditional sample handling process. AMS was originally developed and used for carbon dating, therefore focusing on a very high precision but with a comparably low sample throughput. Here, we describe the combination of automated sample combustion with an elemental analyzer (EA) online coupled to an AMS via a dedicated interface. This setup allows direct radiocarbon measurements for over 70 samples daily by AMS. No sample processing is required apart from the pipetting of the sample into a tin foil cup, which is placed in the carousel of the EA. In our system, up to 200 AMS analyses are performed automatically without the need for manual interventions. We present results on the direct total (14)C count measurements in <2 μL human plasma samples. The method shows linearity over a range of 0.65-821 mBq/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.65 mBq/mL (corresponding to 0.67 amol for acetaminophen). At these extremely low levels of activity, it becomes important to quantify plasma specific carbon percentages. This carbon percentage is automatically generated upon combustion of a sample on the EA. Apparent advantages of the present approach include complete omission of sample preparation (reduced hands-on time) and fully automated sample analysis. These improvements clearly stimulate the standard incorporation of microtracer research in the drug development process. In combination with the particularly low sample volumes required and extreme sensitivity, AMS strongly improves its position as a bioanalysis method. PMID:25033319

  10. Consistency analysis of plastic samples based on similarity calculation from limited range of the Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, B. W.; Wu, Z. X.; Dong, X. P.; Lu, D.; Tao, S. C.

    2016-07-01

    We proposed a novel method to calculate the similarity between samples with only small differences at unknown and specific positions in their Raman spectra, using a moving interval window scanning across the whole Raman spectra. Two ABS plastic samples, one with and the other without flame retardant, were tested in the experiment. Unlike the traditional method in which the similarity is calculated based on the whole spectrum, we do the calculation by using a window to cut out a certain segment from Raman spectra, each at a time as the window moves across the entire spectrum range. By our method, a curve of similarity versus wave number is obtained. And the curve shows a large change where the partial spectra of the two samples is different. Thus, the new similarity calculation method identifies samples with tiny difference in their Raman spectra better.

  11. Laboratory scale Clean-In-Place (CIP) studies on the effectiveness of different caustic and acid wash steps on the removal of dairy biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Philip J; Fillery, Suzanne; McQuillan, A James

    2006-02-15

    A laboratory scale, bench top flow system was used to partially reproduce dairy plant conditions under which biofilms form and to quantify the effectiveness of caustic and acid wash steps in reducing the number of viable bacteria attached to stainless steel (SS) surfaces. Once bacteria attached to surfaces, a standard clean-in-place (CIP) regime (water rinse, 1% sodium hydroxide at 65 degrees C for 10 min, water rinse, 1.0% nitric acid at 65 degrees C for 10 min, water rinse) did not reproducibly ensure their removal. Standard CIP effectiveness was compared to alternative cleaning chemicals such as: caustic blends (Alkazolv 48, Ultrazolv 700, Concept C20, and Reflex B165); a caustic additive (Eliminator); acid blends (Nitroplus and Nitrobrite); and sanitizer (Perform). The addition of a caustic additive, Eliminator, enhanced biofilm removal compared to the standard CIP regime and further increases in cleaning efficiency occurred when nitric acid was substituted with Nitroplus. The combination of NaOH plus Eliminator and Nitroplus achieved a 3.8 log reduction in the number of cells recovered from the stainless steel surface. The incorporation of a sanitizer step into the CIP did not appear to enhance biofilm removal. This study has shown that the effectiveness of a "standard" CIP can possibly be enhanced through the testing and use of caustic and acid blends. There are many implications of these findings, including: the development of improved cleaning regimes and improved product quality, plant performance, and economic returns.

  12. Variable range hopping conduction in n-CdSe samples at very low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errai, M.; El Kaaouachi, A.; El Idrissi, H.

    2015-12-01

    We reanalyzed experimental data already published in Friedman J R, Zhang Y, Dai P, et al. Phys Rev B, 1996, 53(15): 9528. Variable range hopping (VRH) conduction in the insulating three-dimensional n-CdSe samples has been studied over the entire temperature range from 0.03 to 1 K. In the absence of a magnetic field, the low temperature conductivity σ of the three samples (A, B and C) obeys the Mott VRH conduction with an appropriate temperature dependence in the prefactor (σ = σ0 exp[-(T0/T)]p with p ≈ 0.25). This behavior can be explained by a VRH model where the transport occurs by hopping between localized states in the vicinity of the Fermi level, EF, without creation of the Coulomb gap (CG). On the contrary, no Efros-Shklovskii VRH is observed, suggesting that the density is constant in the vicinity of the EF.

  13. Unmanned platform for long-range remote analysis of volatile compounds in air samples.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Eric T; Neves, Carlos A; Hotta, Guilherme M; Vidal, Denis T R; Barros, Marcelo F; Ayon, Arturo A; Garcia, Carlos D; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes a long-range remotely controlled CE system built on an all-terrain vehicle. A four-stroke engine and a set of 12-V batteries were used to provide power to a series of subsystems that include drivers, communication, computers, and a capillary electrophoresis module. This dedicated instrument allows air sampling using a polypropylene porous tube, coupled to a flow system that transports the sample to the inlet of a fused-silica capillary. A hybrid approach was used for the construction of the analytical subsystem combining a conventional fused-silica capillary (used for separation) and a laser machined microfluidic block, made of PMMA. A solid-state cooling approach was also integrated in the CE module to enable controlling the temperature and therefore increasing the useful range of the robot. Although ultimately intended for detection of chemical warfare agents, the proposed system was used to analyze a series of volatile organic acids. As such, the system allowed the separation and detection of formic, acetic, and propionic acids with signal-to-noise ratios of 414, 150, and 115, respectively, after sampling by only 30 s and performing an electrokinetic injection during 2.0 s at 1.0 kV.

  14. Unmanned platform for long-range remote analysis of volatile compounds in air samples.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Eric T; Neves, Carlos A; Hotta, Guilherme M; Vidal, Denis T R; Barros, Marcelo F; Ayon, Arturo A; Garcia, Carlos D; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes a long-range remotely controlled CE system built on an all-terrain vehicle. A four-stroke engine and a set of 12-V batteries were used to provide power to a series of subsystems that include drivers, communication, computers, and a capillary electrophoresis module. This dedicated instrument allows air sampling using a polypropylene porous tube, coupled to a flow system that transports the sample to the inlet of a fused-silica capillary. A hybrid approach was used for the construction of the analytical subsystem combining a conventional fused-silica capillary (used for separation) and a laser machined microfluidic block, made of PMMA. A solid-state cooling approach was also integrated in the CE module to enable controlling the temperature and therefore increasing the useful range of the robot. Although ultimately intended for detection of chemical warfare agents, the proposed system was used to analyze a series of volatile organic acids. As such, the system allowed the separation and detection of formic, acetic, and propionic acids with signal-to-noise ratios of 414, 150, and 115, respectively, after sampling by only 30 s and performing an electrokinetic injection during 2.0 s at 1.0 kV. PMID:22965708

  15. Studies on the optimum conditions using acid-washed zero-valent iron/aluminum mixtures in permeable reactive barriers for the removal of different heavy metal ions from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Han, Weijiang; Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing; Wu, Shijiao

    2016-01-25

    The method of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) is considered as one of the most practicable approaches in treating heavy metals contaminated surface and groundwater. The mixture of acid-washed zero-valent iron (ZVI) and zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) as reactive medium in PRBs to treat heavy metal wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) was investigated. The performance of column filled with the mixture of acid-washed ZVI and ZVAl was much better than the column filled with ZVI or ZVAl alone. At initial pH 5.4 and flow rates of 1.0 mL/min, the time that the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) were all above 99.5% can keep about 300 h using 80 g/40 g acid-washed ZVI/ZVAl when treating wastewater containing each heavy metal ions (Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) concentration of 20.0 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize ZVI/ZVAl before and after reaction and the reaction mechanism of the heavy metal ions with ZVI/ZVAl was discussed.

  16. Compact range reflector analysis using the plane wave spectrum approach with an adjustable sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, James P.; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1991-06-01

    An improved method for determining the test zone field of compact range reflectors is presented. The plane wave spectrum (PWS) approach is used to obtain the test zone field from knowledge of the reflector aperture field distribution. The method is particularly well suited to the analysis of reflectors with a linearly serrated rim for reduced edge diffraction. Computation of the PWS of the reflector aperture field is facilitated by a closed-form expression for the Fourier transform of a polygonal window function. Inverse transformation in the test zone region is accomplished using a fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm with a properly adjusted sampling rate (which is a function of both the reflector size and the distance from the reflector). The method is validated by comparison with results obtained using surface current and aperture field integration techniques. The performance of several serrated reflectors is evaluated in order to observe the effects of edge diffraction on the test zone fields.

  17. Analytical results and sample locality map of heavy-mineral- concentrate and rock samples from the Kingston Range Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-222), San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adrian, B.M.; Frisken, J.G.; Malcolm, M.J.; Crock, J.G.; Briggs, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    During 1984, 60 stream sites were sampled for the presence of Giardia sp. cysts. The sampling sites ranged in elevation from 6 ,000 to 12,000 feet, and were distributed over a distance of more than 200 miles, from the Lake Tahoe basin in the north to Mt. Whitney in the south. Cysts of Giardia were detected in 27 of 78 samples. The number of cysts detected ranged from 1 to 41. Of the 27 samples positive for Giardia, only 1 cyst was detected in each of 10 samples, 2 cysts were detected in each of 8 samples, 3 cysts were detected in each of 3 samples, 4 cysts were detected in each of 2 samples, and 5, 6, 14, and 41 cysts were detected in 1 sample each. (USGS)

  18. High dynamic range optical scanning of sediments and rock samples: More than colour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Martin; Fabian, Karl; Knies, Jochen

    2015-04-01

    An automated high dynamic range (HDR) scanning procedure for cores and single sediment samples has been developed based on the GeoTek core scanner equipped with a 3* 2048 pixel CCD array GeoScan colour line-scan camera and a Sigma AF 105mm F2.8 EX DG MACRO lens. Repeated colour line scans of the same core sequence using different illumination and exposure time settings, but equal aperture, can be combined into single HDR images. This yields improved colour definition especially if layers of highly variable brightness occur in the same sequence. Colour calibration is performed automatically during image processing based on synchronization of colour charts. Polarized light is used to minimize gloss on wet surfaces. Beyond improved colour detection, high resolution scans with pixel size down to 25 µm provide the possibility of quantifying fabric, texture, and colour contrast between mottle and matrix. We present examples from marine sediments, lake sediments, hard rock cores, and individual soil samples. Due to the high resolution in sediment sequences, the improved images provide important background information to interpret synchronous measurements of density, magnetic susceptibility, or X-ray fluorescence with respect to their respective measurement footprint. If for example an XRF measurement indicates a 2% increase in Fe at a location of a thin black layer of 1/10 of the XRF measurement footprint, within an otherwise homogenous sequence, it can be inferred that the real Fe abundance within the layer is probably 20% higher than in the surrounding sediment. HDR scanning can therefore help to provide high resolution informed interpolation and deconvolution of measurements with larger sensor footprints.

  19. Automated Broad-Range Molecular Detection of Bacteria in Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Budding, Andries E; Hoogewerf, Martine; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Savelkoul, Paul H M

    2016-04-01

    Molecular detection methods, such as quantitative PCR (qPCR), have found their way into clinical microbiology laboratories for the detection of an array of pathogens. Most routinely used methods, however, are directed at specific species. Thus, anything that is not explicitly searched for will be missed. This greatly limits the flexibility and universal application of these techniques. We investigated the application of a rapid universal bacterial molecular identification method, IS-pro, to routine patient samples received in a clinical microbiology laboratory. IS-pro is a eubacterial technique based on the detection and categorization of 16S-23S rRNA gene interspace regions with lengths that are specific for each microbial species. As this is an open technique, clinicians do not need to decide in advance what to look for. We compared routine culture to IS-pro using 66 samples sent in for routine bacterial diagnostic testing. The samples were obtained from patients with infections in normally sterile sites (without a resident microbiota). The results were identical in 20 (30%) samples, IS-pro detected more bacterial species than culture in 31 (47%) samples, and five of the 10 culture-negative samples were positive with IS-pro. The case histories of the five patients from whom these culture-negative/IS-pro-positive samples were obtained suggest that the IS-pro findings are highly clinically relevant. Our findings indicate that an open molecular approach, such as IS-pro, may have a high added value for clinical practice.

  20. Passive Range of Motion in a Population-Based Sample of Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy Who Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Brona C.; Salazar-Torres, Jose J.; Kerr, Claire; Cosgrove, Aidan P.

    2012-01-01

    -While passive range of motion (PROM) is commonly used to inform decisions on therapeutic management, knowledge of PROM of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) is limited. A population-based sample of 178 children with spastic CP (110 male; unilateral, n = 94; bilateral, n = 84; age range 4-17 years) and 68 typically developing children (24…

  1. Automated Broad-Range Molecular Detection of Bacteria in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Hoogewerf, Martine; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular detection methods, such as quantitative PCR (qPCR), have found their way into clinical microbiology laboratories for the detection of an array of pathogens. Most routinely used methods, however, are directed at specific species. Thus, anything that is not explicitly searched for will be missed. This greatly limits the flexibility and universal application of these techniques. We investigated the application of a rapid universal bacterial molecular identification method, IS-pro, to routine patient samples received in a clinical microbiology laboratory. IS-pro is a eubacterial technique based on the detection and categorization of 16S-23S rRNA gene interspace regions with lengths that are specific for each microbial species. As this is an open technique, clinicians do not need to decide in advance what to look for. We compared routine culture to IS-pro using 66 samples sent in for routine bacterial diagnostic testing. The samples were obtained from patients with infections in normally sterile sites (without a resident microbiota). The results were identical in 20 (30%) samples, IS-pro detected more bacterial species than culture in 31 (47%) samples, and five of the 10 culture-negative samples were positive with IS-pro. The case histories of the five patients from whom these culture-negative/IS-pro-positive samples were obtained suggest that the IS-pro findings are highly clinically relevant. Our findings indicate that an open molecular approach, such as IS-pro, may have a high added value for clinical practice. PMID:26763956

  2. Improvement spatial resolution of frequency modulated continuous wave laser ranging system by splicing equal optical frequency interval sampled signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guang; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua

    2015-02-01

    A dual interferometry FMCW laser ranging system is presented. The auxiliary interferometer for generating the clock pulses at equally spaced optical frequencies is incorporated into the main interferometer to simplify the system configuration and to compensate the tuning linearity of the laser source. The need of widely tunable laser limits the practical application of the FMCW laser ranging for precision industrial measurement. Splicing sampled signal method is proposed to break though the tuning range of the laser source limitation against the special resolution. In the experiments, 50 μm range resolution at 8.7 m is demonstrated, and this resolution is maintained over the entire measuring range. The measuring range depending on the power and coherence length of the source can reach more than 20 m. The system structure is simple, and the requirement on the tuning range of laser source is reduced in this system.

  3. Sample transfer system for surface studies in wide pressure range (10-7-106 Pa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Shinichi; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1987-02-01

    An inexpensive sample transfer system suitable for surface studies with in situ prepared model catalysts is described. Experiments from ultrahigh vacuum to 10 atm and 50-cm travel with negligible pressure spikes were made possible by the use of double-seal glands with spring-loaded Teflon O-rings and a guided rotational transport rod.

  4. Long-range out-of-sample properties of autoregressive neural networks.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    We consider already-trained discrete autoregressive neural networks in their most general representations, with the exclusion of time-varying input though, and we provide tight sufficient conditions and elementary proofs for the existence of an attractor, uniqueness, and global convergence. Those conditions can be used as easy-to-check criteria when convergence (or not) of long-range predictions is desirable.

  5. Chroma sampling and modulation techniques in high dynamic range video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Krishnan, Madhu; Topiwala, Pankaj

    2015-09-01

    High Dynamic Range and Wide Color Gamut (HDR/WCG) Video Coding is an area of intense research interest in the engineering community, for potential near-term deployment in the marketplace. HDR greatly enhances the dynamic range of video content (up to 10,000 nits), as well as broadens the chroma representation (BT.2020). The resulting content offers new challenges in its coding and transmission. The Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) of the International Standards Organization (ISO) is currently exploring coding efficiency and/or the functionality enhancements of the recently developed HEVC video standard for HDR and WCG content. FastVDO has developed an advanced approach to coding HDR video, based on splitting the HDR signal into a smoothed luminance (SL) signal, and an associated base signal (B). Both signals are then chroma downsampled to YFbFr 4:2:0 signals, using advanced resampling filters, and coded using the Main10 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard, which has been developed jointly by ISO/IEC MPEG and ITU-T WP3/16 (VCEG). Our proposal offers both efficient coding, and backwards compatibility with the existing HEVC Main10 Profile. That is, an existing Main10 decoder can produce a viewable standard dynamic range video, suitable for existing screens. Subjective tests show visible improvement over the anchors. Objective tests show a sizable gain of over 25% in PSNR (RGB domain) on average, for a key set of test clips selected by the ISO/MPEG committee.

  6. Determination of dissolved aluminum in water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afifi, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A technique has been modified for determination of a wide range of concentrations of dissolved aluminum (Al) in water and has been tested. In this technique, aluminum is complexed with 8-hydroxyquinoline at pH 8.3 to minimize interferences, then extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The extract is analyzed colorimetrically at 395 nm. This technique is used to analyze two forms of monomeric Al, nonlabile (organic complexes) and labile (free, Al, Al sulfate, fluoride and hydroxide complexes). A detection limit 2 ug/L is possible with 25-ml samples and 10-ml extracts. The detection limit can be decreased by increasing the volume of the sample and (or) decreasing the volume of the methyl isobutyl ketone extract. The analytical uncertainty of this method is approximately + or - 5 percent. The standard addition technique provides a recovery test for this technique and ensures precision in samples of low Al concentrations. The average percentage recovery of the added Al plus the amount originally present was 99 percent. Data obtained from analyses of filtered standard solutions indicated that Al is adsorbed on various types of filters. However, the relationship between Al concentrations and adsorption remains linear. A test on standard solutions also indicated that Al is not adsorbed on nitric acid-washed polyethylene and polypropylene bottle wells. (USGS)

  7. Geospatial compilation of results from field sample collection in support of mineral resource investigations, Western Alaska Range, Alaska, July 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michaela R.; Graham, Garth E.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Benzel, William M.

    2015-07-16

    This Data Series summarizes results from July 2013 sampling in the western Alaska Range near Mount Estelle, Alaska. The fieldwork combined in situ and camp-based spectral measurements of talus/soil and rock samples. Five rock and 48 soil samples were submitted for quantitative geochemi­cal analysis (for 55 major and trace elements), and the 48 soils samples were also analyzed by x-ray diffraction to establish mineralogy and geochemistry. The results and sample photo­graphs are presented in a geodatabase that accompanies this report. The spectral, mineralogical, and geochemical charac­terization of these samples and the sites that they represent can be used to validate existing remote-sensing datasets (for example, ASTER) and future hyperspectral studies. Empiri­cal evidence of jarosite (as identified by x-ray diffraction and spectral analysis) corresponding with gold concentrations in excess of 50 parts per billion in soil samples suggests that surficial mapping of jarosite in regional surveys may be use­ful for targeting areas of prospective gold occurrences in this sampling area.

  8. Geospatial compilation of results from field sample collection in support of mineral resource investigations, Western Alaska Range, Alaska, July 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michaela R.; Graham, Garth E.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Benzel, William M.

    2015-01-01

    This Data Series summarizes results from July 2013 sampling in the western Alaska Range near Mount Estelle, Alaska. The fieldwork combined in situ and camp-based spectral measurements of talus/soil and rock samples. Five rock and 48 soil samples were submitted for quantitative geochemi­cal analysis (for 55 major and trace elements), and the 48 soils samples were also analyzed by x-ray diffraction to establish mineralogy and geochemistry. The results and sample photo­graphs are presented in a geodatabase that accompanies this report. The spectral, mineralogical, and geochemical charac­terization of these samples and the sites that they represent can be used to validate existing remote-sensing datasets (for example, ASTER) and future hyperspectral studies. Empiri­cal evidence of jarosite (as identified by x-ray diffraction and spectral analysis) corresponding with gold concentrations in excess of 50 parts per billion in soil samples suggests that surficial mapping of jarosite in regional surveys may be use­ful for targeting areas of prospective gold occurrences in this sampling area.

  9. Ultra-high dynamic range electro-optic sampling for detecting millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Akram; Férachou, Denis; Sharma, Gargi; Singh, Kanwarpal; Kirouac-Turmel, Marie; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki

    2016-01-01

    Time-domain spectroscopy using coherent millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation (also known as terahertz radiation) is rapidly expanding its application, owing greatly to the remarkable advances in generating and detecting such radiation. However, many current techniques for coherent terahertz detection have limited dynamic range, thus making it difficult to perform some basic experiments that need to directly compare strong and weak terahertz signals. Here, we propose and demonstrate a novel technique based on cross-polarized spectral-domain interferometry to achieve ultra-high dynamic range electro-optic sampling measurement of coherent millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation. In our scheme, we exploit the birefringence in a single-mode polarization maintaining fiber in order to measure the phase change induced by the electric field of terahertz radiation in the detection crystal. With our new technique, we have achieved a dynamic range of 7 × 10(6), which is 4 orders of magnitude higher than conventional electro-optic sampling techniques, while maintaining comparable signal-to-noise ratio. The present technique is foreseen to have great impact on experiments such as linear terahertz spectroscopy of optically thick materials (such as aqueous samples) and nonlinear terahertz spectroscopy, where the higher dynamic range is crucial for proper interpretation of experimentally obtained results.

  10. Full-range spectral domain optical coherence tomography using fiber-based sample scanner as self-phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Eun Jung; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Jae Hwi; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-06-01

    We propose full-range spectral domain optical coherence tomography equipped with a fiber-based sample scanner, which is used for sample scanning and phase shifting for full-range image at the same time. For a fiber-based sample scanner, since the fiber tip oscillates as a free standing cantilever in general, unintentional phase shift occurs inevitably. The unintentional phase shift was used for eliminating the bothersome complex conjugate ghost image of OCT. In addition, fiber was tilted a few degree to give proper phase shift. In this scheme, moreover, image can be obtained without any physical modification of the scanner. To realize this technique, we constructed the SD-OCT system and fabricated a magnetically actuated single-body lensed fiber scanner due to advantages of simple design, low operating voltage, cost-effectiveness and low insertion loss. The scanner was made of lensed fiber loaded with an iron-based bead and a solenoid which is placed perpendicular to the lensed fiber. When a sinusoidal current is applied into the solenoid, the lensed fiber oscillated due to magnetic force between the iron-based bead and the solenoid. With the suggested full range method, we obtained contrast enhanced full-range SD OCT images of pearl and tooth. This simple and effective method can be applied to any fiber-based scanner and it has great potential as a handheld probe/endoscopic probe in biomedical imaging field.

  11. Ultra-high dynamic range electro-optic sampling for detecting millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Akram; Férachou, Denis; Sharma, Gargi; Singh, Kanwarpal; Kirouac-Turmel, Marie; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki

    2016-01-01

    Time-domain spectroscopy using coherent millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation (also known as terahertz radiation) is rapidly expanding its application, owing greatly to the remarkable advances in generating and detecting such radiation. However, many current techniques for coherent terahertz detection have limited dynamic range, thus making it difficult to perform some basic experiments that need to directly compare strong and weak terahertz signals. Here, we propose and demonstrate a novel technique based on cross-polarized spectral-domain interferometry to achieve ultra-high dynamic range electro-optic sampling measurement of coherent millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation. In our scheme, we exploit the birefringence in a single-mode polarization maintaining fiber in order to measure the phase change induced by the electric field of terahertz radiation in the detection crystal. With our new technique, we have achieved a dynamic range of 7 × 106, which is 4 orders of magnitude higher than conventional electro-optic sampling techniques, while maintaining comparable signal-to-noise ratio. The present technique is foreseen to have great impact on experiments such as linear terahertz spectroscopy of optically thick materials (such as aqueous samples) and nonlinear terahertz spectroscopy, where the higher dynamic range is crucial for proper interpretation of experimentally obtained results. PMID:26976363

  12. A geochemical sampling technique for use in areas of active alpine glaciation: an application from the central Alaska Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, G.C.; Evenson, E.B.; Detra, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    In mountainous regions containing extensive glacier systems there is a lack of suitable material for conventional geochemical sampling. As a result, in most geochemical sampling programs a few stream-sediment samples collected at, or near, the terminus of valley glaciers are used to evaluate the mineral potential of the glaciated area. We have developed and tested a technique which utilizes the medial moraines of valley glaciers for systematic geochemical exploration of the glacial catchment area. Moraine sampling provides geochemical information that is site-specific in that geochemical anomalies can be traced directly up-ice to bedrock sources. Traverses were made across the Trident and Susitna glaciers in the central Alaska Range where fine-grained (clay to sand size) samples were collected from each medial moraine. These samples were prepared and chemically analyzed to determine the concentration of specific elements. Fifty pebbles were collected at each moraine for archival purposes and for subsequent lithologic identification. Additionally, fifty cobbles and fifty boulders were examined and described at each sample site to determine the nature and abundance of lithologies present in the catchment area, the extent and nature of visible mineralization, the presence and intensity of hydrothermal alteration and the existence of veins, dikes and other minor structural features. Results from the central Alaska Range have delineated four distinct multi-element anomalies which are a response to potential mineralization up-ice from the medial moraine traverse. By integrating the lithologic, mineralogical and geochemical data the probable geological setting of the geochemical anomalies is determined. ?? 1990.

  13. Isolation of Legionella from water samples using various culture methods.

    PubMed

    Kusnetsov, J M; Jousimies-Somer, H R; Nevalainen, A I; Martikainen, P J

    1994-02-01

    The efficacy of a non-selective medium and two selective media were compared for the isolation of legionellas from water samples. The effect of acid wash treatment for decontamination of the water samples on the isolation frequency of legionellas was also studied. The 236 samples were taken from cooling, humidifying and drinking water systems; 21% were legionella-positive when inoculated directly on modified Wadowsky-Yee (MWY) medium and 26% were positive when concentrated (x 200) before cultivation on MWY or CCVC media. Inoculation on MWY medium after concentration followed by decontamination by the acid-wash technique gave the highest isolation frequency (31%). The lowest frequency (8%) was found with the non-selective BCYE alpha medium. An isolation frequency of 28% was achieved with the BCYE alpha medium after concentration and acid-wash treatment of the samples. Forty per cent of the samples were positive for legionellas when the results from all the culture methods were combined. Not all the legionella-positive samples were identified by a single culture method. Ninety-three of the 95 positive samples were detected with the two best combinations of three culture methods. The best culture method for detecting legionellas depended on the source of the water sample. Some water quality characteristics, like temperature and organic matter content, affected the isolation frequency of Legionella spp.

  14. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories/NM, Tonopah Test Range environs, 1994-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Deola, Regina Anne; Oldewage, Hans D.; Herrera, Heidi M.; Miller, Mark Laverne

    2006-05-01

    From 1994 through 2005, the Environmental Management Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), NV, has collected soil samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for the purpose of determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at TTR. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory of metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were increasing or decreasing trends which indicated that further investigation may be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Management Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  15. Two-phase Neogene extension in the northwestern basin and range recorded in a single thermochronology sample

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colgan, J.P.; Shuster, D.L.; Reiners, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    We use a combination of apatite 4He/3He, (U-Th)/ He, and fission-track thermochronology to date slip on the Surprise Valley fault in northeastern California by analyzing a single sample from the Warner Range in the footwall of the fault. This sample, a granitic clast from a conglomerate, yielded a fission-track age of 11.6 ?? 2.8 Ma and a (U-Th)/He age of 3.02 ?? 0.52 Ma. Geologic relationships indicate that this sample was buried to a depth of ???3.3 km prior to exhumation during slip on the Surprise Valley fault. Fission-track age and length data indicate that the sample was fully reset (>120 ??C) prior to exhumation, which began sometime after 14 Ma. A single aliquot of nine apatite grains was step-heated for 4He/3He analysis; modeling of the resulting 4He distribution indicates that cooling from <80 ??C to ???20 ??C occurred between 3 and 1 Ma. Interconsistent time-temperature (t-T) solutions to the combined 4He/3He, (U-Th)/He, and fission-track data require two distinct periods of cooling, consistent with non-continuous slip on the Surprise Valley fault. Early cooling and fault slip took place between 14 and 8 Ma, followed by more recent fault slip ca. 3 Ma. This timing is consistent with both local geologic relationships and with the regional timing of faulting along the western margin of the Basin and Range Province. These data demonstrate the resolving power of combined fission-track, (U-Th)/He, and 4He/3He thermochronometric data to extract low-temperature t-T information from a single sample close to Earth's surface. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Two-phase Neogene extension of the northwestern Basin and Range deduced from thermochronology of a single sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J. P.; Shuster, D. L.; Reiners, P. W.

    2007-12-01

    We use a combination of apatite 4He/3He, (U-Th)/He, and fission-track thermochronology to date slip on the Surprise Valley Fault in northeastern California by analyzing a single granitic boulder from a conglomerate lens near the base of the adjacent Warner Range. Apatite from this sample yielded a fission-track age of 11.6 ± 1.4 Ma and a (U-Th)/He age of 3.12 ± 0.2 Ma. Regional geologic relationships indicate that this sample was buried to a depth of about 3.3 km prior to exhumation during slip on the Surprise Valley Fault. Apatite fission-track data indicate that the sample was fully reset (>120°C) prior to exhumation, which began sometime after 14 Ma. A single aliquot of nine apatite grains was step-heated for 4He/3He analysis; modeling of the resulting 4He distribution indicates cooling from >80°C to ~20°C between 3 and 1 Ma. Internally consistent time-temperature (t-T) solutions to the combined 4He/3He, (U-Th)/He, and fission-track data require two periods of cooling, consistent with non-continuous slip on the Surprise Valley Fault. Early cooling and fault slip took place between 14 and 8 Ma, and was followed by a more recent pulse of cooling at about 3 Ma. This timing is consistent with both local geologic relationships and with the regional timing of faulting along the western margin of the Basin and Range. These data demonstrate the resolving power of combined fission-track, (U-Th)/He, and 4He/3He thermochronometric data to extract high-resolution and ultra low temperature t-T information from a single sample close to the earth's surface.

  17. The effects of sampling frequency on the climate statistics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.J.; Gates, W.L. ); Arpe, K. )

    1992-12-20

    The effects of sampling frequency on the first- and second-moment statistics of selected European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model variables are investigated in a simulation of perpetual July' with a diurnal cycle included and with surface and atmospheric fields saved at hourly intervals. The shortest characteristic time scales are those of ground heat fluxes and temperatures, precipitation and runoff, convective processes, cloud properties, and atmospheric vertical motion, while the longest time scales are exhibited by soil temperature and moisture, surface pressure, and atmospheric specific humidity, temperature, and wind. The time scales of surface heat and momentum fluxes and of convective processes are substantially shorter over land than over oceans. An appropriate sampling frequency for each model variable is obtained by comparing the estimates of first- and second-moment statistics determined at intervals ranging from 2 to 24 hours with the best' estimates obtained from hourly sampling. Relatively accurate estimation of first- and second-moment climate statistics can be achieved by sampling a model variable at intervals that usually are longer than the bandwidth of its time series but that often are shorter than its characteristic time scale. The superior estimates of first-moment statistics are accompanied by inferior estimates of the variance of the daily means due to the presence of systematic biases, but these probably can be avoided by defining a different measure of low-frequency variability. Estimates of the intradiurnal variance of accumulated precipitation and surface runoff also are strongly impacted by the length of the storage interval. In light of these results, several alternative strategies for storage of the EMWF model variables are recommended. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Smart thorium and uranium determination exploiting renewable solid-phase extraction applied to environmental samples in a wide concentration range.

    PubMed

    Avivar, Jessica; Ferrer, Laura; Casas, Montserrat; Cerdà, Víctor

    2011-07-01

    A smart fully automated system is proposed for determination of thorium and uranium in a wide concentration range, reaching environmental levels. The hyphenation of lab-on-valve (LOV) and multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA), coupled to a long path length liquid waveguide capillary cell, allows the spectrophotometric determination of thorium and uranium in different types of environmental sample matrices achieving high selectivity and sensitivity levels. Online separation and preconcentration of thorium and uranium is carried out by means of Uranium and TEtraValents Actinides resin. The potential of the LOV-MSFIA makes possible the full automation of the system by the in-line regeneration of the column and its combination with a smart methodology is a step forward in automation. After elution, thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) are spectrophotometrically detected after reaction with arsenazo-III. We propose a rapid, inexpensive, and fully automated method to determine thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) in a wide concentration range (0-1,200 and 0-2,000 μg L(-1) Th and U, respectively). Limits of detection reached are 5.9 ηg L(-1) of uranium and 60 ηg L(-1) of thorium. Different water sample matrices (seawater, well water, freshwater, tap water, and mineral water), and a channel sediment reference material which contained thorium and uranium were satisfactorily analyzed with the proposed method. PMID:21573729

  19. Smart thorium and uranium determination exploiting renewable solid-phase extraction applied to environmental samples in a wide concentration range.

    PubMed

    Avivar, Jessica; Ferrer, Laura; Casas, Montserrat; Cerdà, Víctor

    2011-07-01

    A smart fully automated system is proposed for determination of thorium and uranium in a wide concentration range, reaching environmental levels. The hyphenation of lab-on-valve (LOV) and multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA), coupled to a long path length liquid waveguide capillary cell, allows the spectrophotometric determination of thorium and uranium in different types of environmental sample matrices achieving high selectivity and sensitivity levels. Online separation and preconcentration of thorium and uranium is carried out by means of Uranium and TEtraValents Actinides resin. The potential of the LOV-MSFIA makes possible the full automation of the system by the in-line regeneration of the column and its combination with a smart methodology is a step forward in automation. After elution, thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) are spectrophotometrically detected after reaction with arsenazo-III. We propose a rapid, inexpensive, and fully automated method to determine thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) in a wide concentration range (0-1,200 and 0-2,000 μg L(-1) Th and U, respectively). Limits of detection reached are 5.9 ηg L(-1) of uranium and 60 ηg L(-1) of thorium. Different water sample matrices (seawater, well water, freshwater, tap water, and mineral water), and a channel sediment reference material which contained thorium and uranium were satisfactorily analyzed with the proposed method.

  20. Sensitivity Gains, Linearity, and Spectral Reproducibility in Nonuniformly Sampled Multidimensional MAS NMR Spectra of High Dynamic Range.

    SciTech Connect

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David M.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David S.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2014-04-22

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C,15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high quality artifact-free datasets.

  1. Sensitivity gains, linearity, and spectral reproducibility in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional MAS NMR spectra of high dynamic range

    PubMed Central

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C, 15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high-quality artifact-free datasets. PMID:24752819

  2. The effects of sampling frequency on the climate statistics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Thomas J.; Gates, W. Lawrence; Arpe, Klaus

    1992-12-01

    The effects of sampling frequency on the first- and second-moment statistics of selected European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model variables are investigated in a simulation of "perpetual July" with a diurnal cycle included and with surface and atmospheric fields saved at hourly intervals. The shortest characteristic time scales (as determined by the e-folding time of lagged autocorrelation functions) are those of ground heat fluxes and temperatures, precipitation and runoff, convective processes, cloud properties, and atmospheric vertical motion, while the longest time scales are exhibited by soil temperature and moisture, surface pressure, and atmospheric specific humidity, temperature, and wind. The time scales of surface heat and momentum fluxes and of convective processes are substantially shorter over land than over oceans. An appropriate sampling frequency for each model variable is obtained by comparing the estimates of first- and second-moment statistics determined at intervals ranging from 2 to 24 hours with the "best" estimates obtained from hourly sampling. Relatively accurate estimation of first- and second-moment climate statistics (10% errors in means, 20% errors in variances) can be achieved by sampling a model variable at intervals that usually are longer than the bandwidth of its time series but that often are shorter than its characteristic time scale. For the surface variables, sampling at intervals that are nonintegral divisors of a 24-hour day yields relatively more accurate time-mean statistics because of a reduction in errors associated with aliasing of the diurnal cycle and higher-frequency harmonics. The superior estimates of first-moment statistics are accompanied by inferior estimates of the variance of the daily means due to the presence of systematic biases, but these probably can be avoided by defining a different measure of low-frequency variability. Estimates of the intradiurnal variance of accumulated

  3. Analysis of sampling strategies for estimating annual average indoor NO2 concentrations in residences with gas ranges.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, C R; Koontz, M D; Billick, I H

    1996-09-01

    Range gas consumption in households tends to follow an annual cycle resembling a sinusoid, with peak consumption during the winter. When outdoor NO2 concentrations have a constant or small impact, the resulting indoor NO2 concentrations also tend to resemble an annual sinusoid. Optimal monitoring strategies can be designed to take advantage of this knowledge to obtain a better estimate of the true annual average gas consumption or indoor NO2 concentration. Gas consumption data, together with measured outdoor concentrations, house volumes, sampled emission rates, air exchange rates, and NO2 decay rates, are used to model weekly indoor NO2 concentrations throughout the year. Based on the modeling results, various monitoring strategies are evaluated for their accuracy in estimating the annual mean. Analysis of the results indicates that greater accuracy is attained using samples equally spaced throughout the year. In addition, the expected error for various monitoring strategies and various numbers of equally spaced samples is quantified, and their ability to classify homes into correct concentration categories is assessed.

  4. Evaluation of Methods for Estimating Long-Range Dependence in Water Quality Time Series with Missing Data and Irregular Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Harman, C. J.; Ball, W. P.

    2014-12-01

    Water-quality time series have been observed to exhibit long-range dependence (LRD) phenomena (e.g., Kirchner & Neal, PNAS 110(30), 2013). LRD means that the autocorrelation between values decays more slowly than exponential and presents challenges to the identification of deterministic trends. To quantify the strength of LRD, a variety of methods have been developed, e.g., rescaled range analysis, detrended fluctuation analysis, and spectral analysis. However, these methods are generally inapplicable to water-quality monitoring data that may be sampled irregularly or have missing values. This work systematically evaluates and compares two broad types of methods for estimating LRD in gappy water-quality time series using Monte Carlo simulation. The first type uses several forms of interpolation to fill in gaps, thus making the data analyzable by the traditional methods. The second type of methods, which includes some newly developed wavelet techniques, can be directly applied to gappy data. However, such methods have not been evaluated in the context of water-quality data, which usually contain irregularly distributed gaps. Here we present the simulation results obtained in three steps: first, we generate an ensemble of 1,000 replicates of synthetic data with known LRD using the fractional auto-regressive integrated moving average model. Second, we remove portions of the data to create the irregular sampling intervals that are typical of a water-quality time series. Third, we apply the candidate methods to estimate the LRD for the irregular data. The performances of the candidate methods are evaluated for values of the fractional differencing parameter (d) ranging from 0 (i.e., no LRD) to 0.499 (strong LRD yet stationary). For practicality, the simulations have been designed to mimic the Chesapeake Non-tidal Monitoring Program data, which are typical long-term water-quality data in terms of sampling frequency (weekly to monthly), length (15-40 years), and gaps

  5. A Dynamic Range Expansion Technique for CMOS Image Sensors with Dual Charge Storage in a Pixel and Multiple Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Shafie, Suhaidi; Kawahito, Shoji; Itoh, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic range expansion technique for CMOS image sensors with dual charge storage in a pixel and multiple sampling technique is presented. Each pixel contains a photodiode and a storage diode which is connected to the photodiode via a separation gate. The sensitivity of the signal charge in the storage diode can be controlled either by a separation gate which limits the charge to flow into the storage diode or by controlling the accumulation time in the storage diode. The operation of the sensitivity control with separation gate techniques is simulated and it is found that a blocking layer to the storage diode plays an important role for high controllability of sensitivity of the storage diode. A prototype chip for testing multiple short time accumulations is fabricated and measured.

  6. Blubber cortisol: a potential tool for assessing stress response in free-ranging dolphins without effects due to sampling.

    PubMed

    Kellar, Nicholas M; Catelani, Krista N; Robbins, Michelle N; Trego, Marisa L; Allen, Camryn D; Danil, Kerri; Chivers, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    When paired with dart biopsying, quantifying cortisol in blubber tissue may provide an index of relative stress levels (i.e., activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis) in free-ranging cetacean populations while minimizing the effects of the act of sampling. To validate this approach, cortisol was extracted from blubber samples collected from beach-stranded and bycaught short-beaked common dolphins using a modified blubber steroid isolation technique and measured via commercially available enzyme immunoassays. The measurements exhibited appropriate quality characteristics when analyzed via a bootstraped stepwise parallelism analysis (observed/expected = 1.03, 95%CI: 99.6 - 1.08) and showed no evidence of matrix interference with increasing sample size across typical biopsy tissue masses (75-150 mg; r(2) = 0.012, p = 0.78, slope = 0.022 ng(cortisol deviation)/ul(tissue extract added)). The relationships between blubber cortisol and eight potential cofactors namely, 1) fatality type (e.g., stranded or bycaught), 2) specimen condition (state of decomposition), 3) total body length, 4) sex, 5) sexual maturity state, 6) pregnancy status, 7) lactation state, and 8) adrenal mass, were assessed using a Bayesian generalized linear model averaging technique. Fatality type was the only factor correlated with blubber cortisol, and the magnitude of the effect size was substantial: beach-stranded individuals had on average 6.1-fold higher cortisol levels than those of bycaught individuals. Because of the difference in conditions surrounding these two fatality types, we interpret this relationship as evidence that blubber cortisol is indicative of stress response. We found no evidence of seasonal variation or a relationship between cortisol and the remaining cofactors.

  7. Blubber Cortisol: A Potential Tool for Assessing Stress Response in Free-Ranging Dolphins without Effects due to Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Kellar, Nicholas M.; Catelani, Krista N.; Robbins, Michelle N.; Trego, Marisa L.; Allen, Camryn D.; Danil, Kerri; Chivers, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    When paired with dart biopsying, quantifying cortisol in blubber tissue may provide an index of relative stress levels (i.e., activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis) in free-ranging cetacean populations while minimizing the effects of the act of sampling. To validate this approach, cortisol was extracted from blubber samples collected from beach-stranded and bycaught short-beaked common dolphins using a modified blubber steroid isolation technique and measured via commercially available enzyme immunoassays. The measurements exhibited appropriate quality characteristics when analyzed via a bootstraped stepwise parallelism analysis (observed/expected = 1.03, 95%CI: 99.6 – 1.08) and showed no evidence of matrix interference with increasing sample size across typical biopsy tissue masses (75–150mg; r2 = 0.012, p = 0.78, slope = 0.022ngcortisol deviation/ultissue extract added). The relationships between blubber cortisol and eight potential cofactors namely, 1) fatality type (e.g., stranded or bycaught), 2) specimen condition (state of decomposition), 3) total body length, 4) sex, 5) sexual maturity state, 6) pregnancy status, 7) lactation state, and 8) adrenal mass, were assessed using a Bayesian generalized linear model averaging technique. Fatality type was the only factor correlated with blubber cortisol, and the magnitude of the effect size was substantial: beach-stranded individuals had on average 6.1-fold higher cortisol levels than those of bycaught individuals. Because of the difference in conditions surrounding these two fatality types, we interpret this relationship as evidence that blubber cortisol is indicative of stress response. We found no evidence of seasonal variation or a relationship between cortisol and the remaining cofactors. PMID:25643144

  8. A Standardized Sampling Procedure for the Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) Determined in Snow Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, G.; Ariya, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    Snow samples were collected from different semi-remote and urban environments using a standardized sampling procedure in order to minimize sampling errors. Samples were collected in pre-cleaned amber glass and sterile HDPE containers. Glass bottles and all non-sterilized equipment were washed with low nutrient detergent, acid washed and rinsed with ultra-pure water. Samples were collected using pre-sterilized or acid-washed sampling tools and blanks, consisting of ultra-pure water, which were treated identically to the collected samples in to monitor contamination from sampling equipment and the different types of containers. Analysis for VOC was carried out with a previously described, but modified solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) pre-concentration method and determination of compounds using gas-chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC-MS) (1). Low concentrations required the use of larger sample volumes and splitless injection mode. Samples analyzed were collected in and around Montreal, Quebec (45.28 N/73.45 W) at Mont-Saint Hilaire (altitude: 415 m a.s.l.), Downtown Montreal and Parc Tremblant. We will present and compare results from all sites, and the implication for atmospheric processes will be discussed. References (1) Kos G, Ariya PA (2004), Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Snow Using Solid Phase Micro Extraction, Eos Trans. AGU, 85 (47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract A11B-53

  9. The Gogebic Iron Range - A Sample of the Northern Margin of the Penokean Fold and Thrust Belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, William F.; LaBerge, Gene L.; Klasner, John S.; Schulz, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    The Gogebic iron range is an elongate belt of Paleoproterozoic strata extending from the west shore of Lake Gogebic in the upper peninsula of Michigan for about 125 km westward into northern Wisconsin. It is one of six major informally named iron ranges in the Lake Superior region and produced about 325 million tons of direct-shipping ore between 1887 and 1967. A significant resource of concentrating-grade ore remains in the western and eastern parts of the range. The iron range forms a broad, gently southward-opening arc where the central part of the range exposes rocks that were deposited somewhat north of the eastern and western parts. A fundamental boundary marking both the tectonic setting of deposition and the later deformation within the Penokean orogen lies fortuitously in an east-west direction along the range so that the central part of the range preserves sediments deposited north of that boundary, whereas the eastern and western parts of the range were deposited south of the boundary. Thus, the central part of the range provides a record of sedimentation and very mild deformation in a part of the Penokean orogen farthest from the interior of the orogen to the south. The eastern and western parts of the range, in contrast, exhibit a depositional and deformational style typical of parts closer to the interior of the orogen. A second fortuitous feature of the iron range is that the entire area was tilted from 40 degrees to 90 degrees northward by Mesoproterozoic deformation so that the map view offers an oblique cross section of the Paleoproterozoic sedimentary sequence and structures. Together, these features make the Gogebic iron range a unique area in which to observe (1) the lateral transition from deposition on a stable platform to deposition in a tectonically and volcanically active region, and (2) the transition from essentially undeformed Paleoproterozoic strata to their folded and faulted equivalents. Paleoproterozoic strata in the Gogebic iron

  10. Mass attenuation coefficient of the Earth, Moon and Mars samples over 1keV-100GeV energy range.

    PubMed

    Camargo Moreira, Anderson; Roberto Appoloni, Carlos

    2006-09-01

    This work presents the calculation of the mass attenuation coefficient (micro) of lunar, Martian and terrestrial samples in function of the energy. WinXCOM software was employed to determine the micro values for the samples in the range from 1 keV to 100 GeV. The obtained values were practically the same for energies larger than 100 keV, but marked differences among the samples were observed for energies below 25 keV, which is the energy range of interest for the XRF system used in space probes.

  11. High accuracy measurement line in microwave range for polymer samples weak doped with BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutanu, C.; Tulbure, A.; Ciortea, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    The nowadays tendencies regarding the process of making microprocessors presume architectures that, in the nearby future, it would be possible, to work on a frequency located between the range 5-10 GHz. In this context, it is imperious to know the behaving of the plastic materials that build the microchip in the microwave frequency range, as well as the behaving of the polymeric capsule of the electrical capacitors from the electric circuits. The aim of this contribution is to demonstrate throughout high-level experimental analysis how the main electric parameters of plastic materials, which build the microchip capsule and the one of electric capacitors, depend on the frequencies on which they work from the microwave range.

  12. Validation of a Novel Collection Device for Non-Invasive Urine Sampling from Free-Ranging Animals

    PubMed Central

    Danish, Lisa Michelle; Heistermann, Michael; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in non-invasively collected samples have opened up new and exciting opportunities for wildlife research. Different types of samples, however, involve different limitations and certain physiological markers (e.g., C-peptide, oxytocin) can only be reliably measured from urine. Common collection methods for urine to date work best for arboreal animals and large volumes of urine. Sufficient recovery of urine is thus still difficult for wildlife biologists, particularly for terrestrial and small bodied animals. We tested three collection devices (two commercially available saliva swabs, Salivette synthetic and cotton, and cotton First aid swabs) against a control to permit the collection of small volumes of urine from the ground. We collected urine samples from captive and wild macaques, and humans, measured volume recovery, and analyzed concentrates of selected physiological markers (creatinine, C-peptide, and neopterin). The Salivette synthetic device was superior to the two alternative devices. Concentrations of creatinine, absolute C-peptide, C-peptide per creatinine, absolute neopterin, and neopterin per creatinine measured in samples collected with this device did not differ significantly from the control and were also strongly correlated to it. Fluid recovery was also best for this device. The least suitable device is the First aid collection device; we found that while absolute C-peptide and C-peptide per creatinine concentrations did not differ significantly from the control, creatinine concentrations were significantly lower than the control. In addition, these concentrations were either not or weakly correlated to the control. The Salivette cotton device provided intermediate results, although these concentrations were strongly correlated to the control. Salivette synthetic swabs seem to be useful devices for the collection of small amounts of urine from the ground destined for the assessment of physiological parameters. They thus provide new

  13. Short-range screening potentials for classical Coulomb fluids: Reanalysis of Monte Carlo sampling and cluster model studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Yaakov

    1996-02-01

    Results for the short-range screening potentials of classical Coulomb fluids, which were significantly different from existing theory and from earlier approaches, were obtained by Ichimaru et al. by their analyses of extra long simulations. In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. E 50, 2977 (1994)], Ichimaru, Ogata, and Tsuruta (IOT) summarize these results and attempt to support them with more simulations and with cluster model studies. In this paper I present an alternative analysis of the same data, which is in contradiction with the analyses of Ichimaru et al., as portrayed by IOT. I present an analysis of general axially symmetric clusters that is different from that of IOT and provides insight into the short-range screening potentials of strongly coupled plasmas. In particular, I give an exact mathematical proof that questions the main conclusion of IOT from their cluster model studies [their Eq. (49b)].

  14. A cylindrical guarded capacitor for spectral permittivity measurements of hard rock samples in the MHz-range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, V.; Wilting, W.; Gruse, M.; Wagner, N.

    2015-10-01

    A shielded and guarded capacitor for non-destructive measurement of the complex permittivity of cylindrical rock samples has been developed. In combination with a vector network analyzer, the measurement system allows for rapid determination of spectral permittivity. The geometrical construction of the capacitor allows for scanning the properties of cylindrical samples, such as drill cores, and determination of anisotropy. The complex permittivity is calculated from the scattering parameters, which are determined using a network analyzer. The calculation is based on a π-network model for the cell and takes stray capacitances and capacitances related to the guard electrode into account. Using this method, good measurement accuracy is achieved between 10 MHz and 200 MHz. The validity of this method was proven by finite element modeling of the field distributions in the cell based on 3D electromagnetic simulation. The influence of typical geometrical imperfections of drill cores, such as varying diameter, finite length and heterogeneities has been studied and quantified by extensive measurements of test samples. These tests confirmed that due to the short shielded electrode, spatial variations in permittivity can be resolved on a sub-centimeter scale.

  15. Fast, long-scan-range pump-probe measurement based on asynchronous sampling using a dual-wavelength mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Zheng, Zheng; Liu, Lei; Wang, Qi; Chen, Haiwei; Liu, Jiansheng

    2012-11-01

    A simple, fast and long-scan-range pump-probe scheme is experimentally demonstrated using a dual-wavelength passively mode-locked fiber laser. The pulse trains from the dual-wavelength laser have a small difference in their repetition frequencies inherently determined by the intracavity dispersion. This enables the realization of the asynchronous sampling scheme with a tens-of-nanosecond-long delay range and a picosecond scan step at a millisecond scan speed. Instead of two synchronized ultrafast lasers in the traditional asynchronous sampling scheme, just one fiber laser is needed in our scheme, which could significantly simplify the system setup.

  16. Application of a Halbach magnetic array for long-range cell and particle separations in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joo H.; Driscoll, Harry; Super, Michael; Ingber, Donald E.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we describe a versatile application of a planar Halbach permanent magnet array for an efficient long-range magnetic separation of living cells and microparticles over distances up to 30 mm. A Halbach array was constructed from rectangular bar magnets using 3D-printed holders and compared to a conventional alternating array of identical magnets. We theoretically predicted the superiority of the Halbach array for a long-range magnetic separation and then experimentally validated that the Halbach configuration outperforms the alternating array for isolating magnetic microparticles or microparticle-bound bacterial cells at longer distances. Magnetophoretic velocities (ymag) of magnetic particles (7.9 μm diameter) induced by the Halbach array in a microfluidic device were significantly higher and extended over a larger area than those induced by the alternating magnet array (ymag = 178 versus 0 μm/s at 10 mm, respectively). When applied to 50 ml tubes (˜30 mm diameter), the Halbach array removed >95% of Staphylococcus aureus bacterial cells bound with 1 μm magnetic particles compared to ˜70% removed using the alternating array. In addition, the Halbach array enabled manipulation of 1 μm magnetic beads in a deep 96-well plate for ELISA applications, which was not possible with the conventional magnet arrays. Our analysis demonstrates the utility of the Halbach array for the future design of devices for high-throughput magnetic separations of cells, molecules, and toxins.

  17. Comparison of atmospheric pesticide concentrations measured at three sampling sites: local, regional and long-range transport.

    PubMed

    Sanusi, A; Millet, M; Mirabe, P; Wortham, H

    2000-12-18

    We present the comparison of atmospheric concentrations of eleven currently used pesticides (HCB, alpha-HCH, gamma-HCH, trifluraline, mecoprop, phosalone, atrazine, carbofuran, carbaryl, diuron and isoproturon) measured in remote (Aubure), rural (Colmar) and urban (Strasbourg) areas of Alsace and Vosges regions (cast France). Pesticides samples were collected simultaneously on two of the three sites during the summer season of 1993 and 1994, using a Hi-Vol sampler with Whatman filter paper and XAD-2 resin. The particle and gas phases were collected separately during 24 h. The relative importance of local emissions and local, regional and long distance transport on the contamination of the atmosphere in the three environments (remote, rural and urban) were investigated. To facilitate the interpretation of the results, the alpha/gamma-HCH ratio was used as a tracer of pesticide emissions.

  18. The Clark Phase-able Sample Size Problem: Long-Range Phasing and Loss of Heterozygosity in GWAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halldórsson, Bjarni V.; Aguiar, Derek; Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    A phase transition is taking place today. The amount of data generated by genome resequencing technologies is so large that in some cases it is now less expensive to repeat the experiment than to store the information generated by the experiment. In the next few years it is quite possible that millions of Americans will have been genotyped. The question then arises of how to make the best use of this information and jointly estimate the haplotypes of all these individuals. The premise of the paper is that long shared genomic regions (or tracts) are unlikely unless the haplotypes are identical by descent (IBD), in contrast to short shared tracts which may be identical by state (IBS). Here we estimate for populations, using the US as a model, what sample size of genotyped individuals would be necessary to have sufficiently long shared haplotype regions (tracts) that are identical by descent (IBD), at a statistically significant level. These tracts can then be used as input for a Clark-like phasing method to obtain a complete phasing solution of the sample. We estimate in this paper that for a population like the US and about 1% of the people genotyped (approximately 2 million), tracts of about 200 SNPs long are shared between pairs of individuals IBD with high probability which assures the Clark method phasing success. We show on simulated data that the algorithm will get an almost perfect solution if the number of individuals being SNP arrayed is large enough and the correctness of the algorithm grows with the number of individuals being genotyped.

  19. Exploring the cellular and tissue uptake of nanomaterials in a range of biological samples using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Helinor J; Mouras, Rabah; Brown, David M; Elfick, Alistair; Stone, Vicki

    2015-12-18

    The uptake of nanomaterials (NMs) by cells is critical in determining their potential biological impact, whether beneficial or detrimental. Thus, investigation of NM internalization by cells is a common consideration in hazard and efficacy studies. There are currently a number of approaches that are routinely used to investigate NM-cell interactions, each of which have their own advantages and limitations. Ideally, imaging modalities used to investigate NM uptake by cells should not require the NM to be labelled (e.g. with fluorophores) to facilitate its detection. We present a multimodal imaging approach employing a combination of label-free microscopies that can be used to investigate NM-cell interactions. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy was used in combination with either two-photon photoluminescence or four-wave mixing (FWM) to visualize the uptake of gold or titanium dioxide NMs respectively. Live and fixed cell imaging revealed that NMs were internalized by J774 macrophage and C3A hepatocyte cell lines (15-31 μg ml(-1)). Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to NMs (intratracheal instillation, 62 μg) and NMs were detected in blood and lung leucocytes, lung and liver tissue, demonstrating that NMs could translocate from the exposure site. Obtained data illustrate that multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy may help overcome current challenges in the assessment of NM cellular uptake and biodistribution. It is therefore a powerful tool that can be used to investigate unlabelled NM cellular and tissue uptake in three dimensions, requires minimal sample preparation, and is applicable to live and fixed cells. PMID:26584818

  20. Exploring the cellular and tissue uptake of nanomaterials in a range of biological samples using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Helinor J.; Mouras, Rabah; Brown, David M.; Elfick, Alistair; Stone, Vicki

    2015-12-01

    The uptake of nanomaterials (NMs) by cells is critical in determining their potential biological impact, whether beneficial or detrimental. Thus, investigation of NM internalization by cells is a common consideration in hazard and efficacy studies. There are currently a number of approaches that are routinely used to investigate NM-cell interactions, each of which have their own advantages and limitations. Ideally, imaging modalities used to investigate NM uptake by cells should not require the NM to be labelled (e.g. with fluorophores) to facilitate its detection. We present a multimodal imaging approach employing a combination of label-free microscopies that can be used to investigate NM-cell interactions. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy was used in combination with either two-photon photoluminescence or four-wave mixing (FWM) to visualize the uptake of gold or titanium dioxide NMs respectively. Live and fixed cell imaging revealed that NMs were internalized by J774 macrophage and C3A hepatocyte cell lines (15-31 μg ml-1). Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to NMs (intratracheal instillation, 62 μg) and NMs were detected in blood and lung leucocytes, lung and liver tissue, demonstrating that NMs could translocate from the exposure site. Obtained data illustrate that multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy may help overcome current challenges in the assessment of NM cellular uptake and biodistribution. It is therefore a powerful tool that can be used to investigate unlabelled NM cellular and tissue uptake in three dimensions, requires minimal sample preparation, and is applicable to live and fixed cells.

  1. Evaluating the roles of biotransformation, spatial concentration differences, organism home range, and field sampling design on trophic magnification factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaeshin; Gobas, Frank A P C; Arnot, Jon A; Powell, David E; Seston, Rita M; Woodburn, Kent B

    2016-05-01

    Trophic magnification factors (TMFs) are field-based measurements of the bioaccumulation behavior of chemicals in food-webs. TMFs can provide valuable insights into the bioaccumulation behavior of chemicals. However, bioaccumulation metrics such as TMF may be subject to considerable uncertainty as a consequence of systematic bias and the influence of confounding variables. This study seeks to investigate the role of systematic bias resulting from spatially-variable concentrations in water and sediments and biotransformation rates on the determination of TMF. For this purpose, a multibox food-web bioaccumulation model was developed to account for spatial concentration differences and movement of organisms on chemical concentrations in aquatic biota and TMFs. Model calculated and reported field TMFs showed good agreement for persistent polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and biotransformable phthalate esters (PEs) in a marine aquatic food-web. Model testing showed no systematic bias and good precision in the estimation of the TMF for PCB congeners but an apparent underestimation of model calculated TMFs, relative to reported field TMFs, for PEs. A model sensitivity analysis showed that sampling designs that ignore the presence of concentration gradients may cause systematically biased and misleading TMF values. The model demonstrates that field TMFs are most sensitive to concentration gradients and species migration patterns for substances that are subject to a low degree of biomagnification or trophic dilution. The model is useful in anticipating the effect of spatial concentration gradients on the determination of the TMF; guiding species collection strategies in TMF studies; and interpretation of the results of field bioaccumulation studies in study locations where spatial differences in chemical concentration exist.

  2. In vitro inflammatory and cytotoxic effects of size-segregated particulate samples collected during long-range transport of wildfire smoke to Helsinki

    SciTech Connect

    Jalava, Pasi I. . E-mail: Pasi.Jalava@ktl.fi; Salonen, Raimo O.; Haelinen, Arja I.; Penttinen, Piia; Pennanen, Arto S.; Sillanpaeae, Markus; Sandell, Erik; Hillamo, Risto; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2006-09-15

    The impact of long-range transport (LRT) episodes of wildfire smoke on the inflammogenic and cytotoxic activity of urban air particles was investigated in the mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages. The particles were sampled in four size ranges using a modified Harvard high-volume cascade impactor, and the samples were chemically characterized for identification of different emission sources. The particulate mass concentration in the accumulation size range (PM{sub 1-0.2}) was highly increased during two LRT episodes, but the contents of total and genotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in collected particulate samples were only 10-25% of those in the seasonal average sample. The ability of coarse (PM{sub 10-2.5}), intermodal size range (PM{sub 2.5-1}), PM{sub 1-0.2} and ultrafine (PM{sub 0.2}) particles to cause cytokine production (TNF{alpha}, IL-6, MIP-2) reduced along with smaller particle size, but the size range had a much smaller impact on induced nitric oxide (NO) production and cytotoxicity or apoptosis. The aerosol particles collected during LRT episodes had a substantially lower activity in cytokine production than the corresponding particles of the seasonal average period, which is suggested to be due to chemical transformation of the organic fraction during aging. However, the episode events were associated with enhanced inflammogenic and cytotoxic activities per inhaled cubic meter of air due to the greatly increased particulate mass concentration in the accumulation size range, which may have public health implications.

  3. Experimental Procedure for Determination of the Dielectric Properties of Biological Samples in the 2-50 GHz Range

    PubMed Central

    Odelstad, Elias; Raman, Sujith; Rydberg, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to test and evaluate an experimental procedure for providing data on the complex permittivity of different cell lines in the 2–50-GHz range at room temperature, for the purpose of future dosimetric studies. The complex permittivity measurements were performed on cells suspended in culture medium using an open-ended coaxial probe. Maxwell’s mixture equation then allows the calculation of the permittivity profiles of the cells from the difference in permittivity between the cell suspensions and pure culture medium. The open-ended coaxial probe turned out to be very sensitive to disturbances affecting the measurements, resulting in poor precision. Permittivity differences were not large in relation to the spread of the measurements and repeated measurements were performed to improve statistics. The 95% confidence intervals were computed for the arithmetic means of the measured permittivity differences in order to test the statistical significance. The results showed that for bone cells at the lowest tested concentration (33 500/ml), there were significance in the real part of the permittivity at frequencies above 30 GHz, and no significance in the imaginary part. For the second lowest concentration (67 000/ml) there was no significance at all. For a medium concentration of bone cells (135 000/ml) there was no significance in the real part, but there was significance in the imaginary part at frequencies below about 25 GHz. The cell suspension with a concentration of 1 350 000/ml had significance in the real part for both high (above 30 GHz) and low (below 15 GHz) frequencies. The imaginary part showed significance for frequencies below 25 GHz. In the case of an osteosarcoma cell line with a concentration of 2 700 000/ml, only the imaginary part showed significance, and only for frequencies below 15 GHz. For muscle cells at a concentration of 743 450/ml, there was only significance in the imaginary part for frequencies below 5 GHz

  4. A medium-bright quasar sample - New quasar surface densities in the magnitude range from 16.4 to 17.65 for B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, K. J.; Warnock, A., III; Usher, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    A new medium-bright quasar sample (MBQS) is constructed from spectroscopic observations of 140 bright objects selected for varying degrees of blue and ultraviolet excess (B-UVX) in five Palomar 1.2 m Schmidt fields. The MBQS contains 32 quasars with B less than 17.65 mag. The new integral surface densities in the B range from 16.45 to 17.65 mag are approximately 40 percent (or more) higher than expected. The MBQS and its redshift distribution increase the area of the Hubble diagram covered by complete samples of quasars. The general spectroscopic results indicate that the three-color classification process used to catalog the spectroscopic candidates (1) has efficiently separated the intrinsically B-UVX stellar objects from the Population II subdwarfs and (2) has produced samples of B-UVX objects which are more complete than samples selected by (U - B) color alone.

  5. Development of a PLS based method for determination of the quality of beers by use of NIR: spectral ranges and sample-introduction considerations.

    PubMed

    Iñón, Fernando A; Llario, Rafael; Garrigues, Salvador; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2005-08-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) has been used to determine important indicators of the quality of beers, for example original and real extract and alcohol content, using a partial least squares (PLS) calibration approach. A population of 43 samples, obtained commercially in Spain and including different types of beer, was used. Cluster hierarchical analysis was used to select calibration and validation data sets. Absorbance sample spectra, in transmission mode, were obtained in triplicate by using a 1-mm pathlength quartz flow cell and glass chromatography vials of 6.5 mm internal diameter. The two methods of sample introduction were compared critically, on the basis of spectral reproducibility for triplicate measurements and after careful selection of the best spectral pre-processing and the spectral range for building the PLS model, to obtain the best predictive capability. For each mode of sample introduction two calibration sets were assayed, one based on the use of 15 samples and a second extended based on use of 30 samples, thus leaving 28 and 13 samples, respectively, for validation. The best results were obtained for 1 mm flow cell measurements. For this method original zero-order spectra data in the ranges 2220-2221 and 2250-2350 nm were chosen. For the real extract, original extract, and alcohol d(x-y) and s(x-y) values of -0.04 and 0.07% w/w, -0.01 and 0.13% w/w, and -0.01 and 0.1% v/v, respectively, were obtained. The maximum errors in the prediction of any of these three indicators for a new sample were 2.2, 1.2, and 1.9%, respectively. This method compares favorably with the automatic reference method in terms of speed, reagent consumed, and waste generated.

  6. Comparison between a Broad-Range Real-Time and a Broad-Range End-Point PCR Assays for the Detection of Bacterial 16S rRNA in Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Meddeb, Mariam; Koebel, Christelle; Jaulhac, Benoît; Schramm, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Broad range PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene is widely used to test clinical samples for the presence of bacterial DNA. End-point 16S PCR is both time-consuming and at high risk of cross-contamination. Prior to the replacement of the 16S end-point PCR assay routinely used in our clinical laboratory by a new 16S real-time PCR assay, we aimed to compare the performances of both techniques for the direct diagnosis of bacterial infections in clinical samples. In this prospective study, 129 clinical samples were included for direct comparison of both techniques. The sensitivity of 16S real-time PCR assay (76%) was significantly higher than that of end-point 16S PCR assay (41%) (p<0.01). Specificities of both PCR assays did not differ significantly (p=0.43). The 16S real-time PCR assay yielded an etiological diagnosis in 19% of culture-negative samples. It constitutes a reliable and complementary diagnostic tool to the bacterial culture.

  7. Field sampling and analysis plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The former YS-860 Firing Ranges are located at the eastern end of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant outside the primary facility fence line and west of Scarboro Road within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. A decision has been made by the US Department of Energy to conduct a removal action of lead-contaminated soils at this site as part of early source actions within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed. This non-time critical removal action of bullets and lead-contaminated soil from the YS-860 Firing Ranges is being conducted as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 action. These actions are consistent with the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. The removal action will focus on the excavation of bullets and lead-contaminated soil from the shooting range berms, transportation of the material to a permitted treatment facility for disposal, demolition and land filling of a concrete trench and asphalt pathways at the site, and grading and revegetating of the entire site. This report is the field sampling and analysis plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges. The field sampling and analysis plan addresses environmental sampling for lead after the removal of lead-contaminated soil from the target berm area. The objective of this sampling plan is to obtain sufficient analytical data to confirm that the removal action excavation has successfully reduced lead levels in soil to below the action level of 1,400 micrograms/g.

  8. A comparison of geochemical exploration techniques and sample media within accretionary continental margins: an example from the Pacific Border Ranges, Southern Alaska, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutley, S.J.; Goldfarb, R.J.; O'Leary, R. M.; Tripp, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Pacific Border Ranges of the southern Alaskan Cordillera are composed of a number of allochthonous tectonostratigraphic terranes. Within these terranes are widespread volcanogenic, massive sulfide deposits in and adjacent to portions of accreted ophiolite complexes, bands and disseminations of chromite in accreted island-arc ultramafic rocks, and epigenetic, gold-bearing quartz veins in metamorphosed turbidite sequences. A geochemical pilot study was undertaken to determine the most efficient exploration strategy for locating these types of mineral deposits within the Pacific Border Ranges and other typical convergent continental margin environments. High-density sediment sampling was carried out in first- and second-order stream channels surrounding typical gold, chromite and massive sulfide occurrences. At each site, a stream-sediment and a panned-concentrate sample were collected. In the laboratory, the stream sediments were sieved into coarse-sand, fine- to medium-sand, and silt- to clay-size fractions prior to analysis. One split of the panned concentrates was retained for analysis; a second split was further concentrated by gravity separation in heavy liquids and then divided into magnetic, weakly magnetic and nonmagnetic fractions for analysis. A number of different techniques including atomic absorption spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and semi-quantitative emission spectrography were used to analyze the various sample media. Comparison of the various types of sample media shows that in this tectonic environment it is most efficient to include a silt- to clay-size sediment fraction and a panned-concentrate sample. Even with the relatively low detection limits for many elements by plasma spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry, anomalies reflecting the presence of gold veins could not be identified in any of the stream-sediment fractions. Unseparated panned-concentrate samples should be analyzed by emission

  9. Sample preparation in determination of lead in garden vegetables by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Preer, J R; Stephens, B R; Bland, C W

    1982-07-01

    Dry and wet ashing methods have been used in the analysis of garden vegetables for Pb. The reliability of wet ashing has been verified by the method of standard additions. Comparison of dry and wet ashing showed good agreement for a variety of garden vegetables. Sample size was more strictly limited for the wet-ashed samples, which led to lower sensitivity. Vegetable samples are commonly analyzed for a number of trace elements, which introduces additional constraints on sample preparation, notably because of Cd loss on dry ashing. Pretreatment with HNO3/H2SO4 ash aid eliminated Cd loss. Reliability of dry ashing with pretreatment was shown with NBS SRM Orchard Leaves, Pine Needles, Spinach, and Tomato Leaves. The analysis was insensitive to ashing temperature in the range 480-625 degrees C. A practical detection limit for the method is about 2 ppm Pb, dry weight basis (DWB). Care must be exercised to avoid contamination of the sample with lead at this level by improper handling. Segregation and acid washing of glassware and protection of the sample from contact with any object not demonstrably clean was necessary. No evidence was found of Pb contamination at this level from tap water washing of fresh vegetables, forced-air oven drying, or grinding with mortar and pestle. No special clean room facilities or laboratory air purification measures were used. Sensitivity was increased 3-fold by extraction with dithizone in CHCl3 followed by back-extraction into dilute HCl. Detection limits were not improved, however, because of variation in the extraction results. The instrumental method for assessing effective correction for back-ground absorbance showed adequate compensation, although comparison of direct and extractive determinations showed a small but significant difference between the methods of about 1 ppm Pb (DWB).

  10. Free-flow zone electrophoresis of peptides and proteins in PDMS microchip for narrow pI range sample prefractionation coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-Ak; Chan, Michael; Celio, Chris; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Wishnok, John S; Han, Jongyoon

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, we are evaluating the strategy of sorting peptides/proteins based on the charge to mass without resorting to ampholytes and/or isoelectric focusing, using a single- and two-step free-flow zone electrophoresis. We developed a simple fabrication method to create a salt bridge for free-flow zone electrophoresis in PDMS chips by surface printing a hydrophobic layer on a glass substrate. Since the surface-printed hydrophobic layer prevents plasma bonding between the PDMS chip and the substrate, an electrical junction gap can be created for free-flow zone electrophoresis. With this device, we demonstrated a separation of positive and negative peptides and proteins at a given pH in standard buffer systems and validated the sorting result with LC/MS. Furthermore, we coupled two sorting steps via off-chip titration and isolated peptides within specific pI ranges from sample mixtures, where the pI range was simply set by the pH values of the buffer solutions. This free-flow zone electrophoresis sorting device, with its simplicity of fabrication, and a sorting resolution of 0.5 pH unit, can potentially be a high-throughput sample fractionation tool for targeted proteomics using LC/MS.

  11. An 8-bit 100-MS/s digital-to-skew converter embedded switch with a 200-ps range for time-interleaved sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoshi, Zhu; Chixiao, Chen; Jialiang, Xu; Fan, Ye; Junyan, Ren

    2013-03-01

    A sampling switch with an embedded digital-to-skew converter (DSC) is presented. The proposed switch eliminates time-interleaved ADCs' skews by adjusting the boosted voltage. A similar bridged capacitors' charge sharing structure is used to minimize the area. The circuit is fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process and achieves sub-1 ps resolution and 200 ps timing range at a rate of 100 MS/s. The power consumption is 430 μW at maximum. The measurement result also includes a 2-channel 14-bit 100 MS/s time-interleaved ADCs (TI-ADCs) with the proposed DSC switch's demonstration. This scheme is widely applicable for the clock skew and aperture error calibration demanded in TI-ADCs and SHA-less ADCs.

  12. Multivariate optimization and simultaneous determination of hydride and non-hydride-forming elements in samples of a wide pH range using dual-mode sample introduction with plasma techniques: application on leachates from cement mortar material.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta, Mesay; Wibetoe, Grethe; Engelsen, Christian J; Asfaw, Alemayehu

    2009-02-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for the simultaneous determination of hydride-forming (As, Sb) and non-hydride-forming (Cr, Mo, V) elements in aqueous samples of a wide pH range (pH 3-13). The methods used dual-mode (DM) sample introduction with ICP-AES and ICP-MS instruments. The effect of selected experimental variables, i.e., sample pH and concentrations of HNO(3), thiourea, and NaBH(4), were studied in a multivariate way using face-centered central composite design (FC-CCD). Compromised optimum values of the experimental parameters were identified using a response optimizer. The statistically found optimum values were verified experimentally. The methods provided improved sensitivities for the hydride-forming elements compared with the respective conventional nebulization (Neb) systems by factors of 67 (As) and 64 (Sb) for ICP-AES and 36 (As) and 54 (Sb) for ICP-MS. Slight sensitivity improvements were also observed for the non-hydride-forming elements. The limits of detection (LOD) of As and Sb were lowered, respectively, to 0.8 and 0.9 microg L(-1) with the DM-ICP-AES system and to 0.01 and 0.02 microg L(-1) with the DM-ICP-MS system. The short-term stabilities of both methods were between 2.1 and 5.4%. The methods were applied for the analysis of leachates of a cement mortar material prepared in the pH range 3-13. The elemental concentration of the leachates determined by the two DM methods were statistically compared with the values obtained from Neb-ICP-MS analysis; the values showed good agreement at the 95% confidence level. Quantitative spike recoveries were obtained for the analytes from most of the leachates using both DM methods.

  13. Development and validation of a whole genome amplification long-range PCR sequencing method for ADPKD genotyping of low-level DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Liu, Genyan; Tan, Adrian Y; Michaeel, Alber; Blumenfeld, Jon; Donahue, Stephanie; Bobb, Warren; Parker, Tom; Levine, Daniel; Rennert, Hanna

    2014-10-15

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations in two large genes, PKD1 and PKD2, but genetic testing is complicated by the large transcript sizes and the duplication of PKD1 exons 1-33 as six pseudogenes on chromosome 16. Long-range PCR (LR-PCR) represents the gold standard approach for PKD1 genetic analysis. However, a major issue with this approach is that it requires large quantities of genomic DNA (gDNA) material limiting its application primarily to DNA extracted from blood. In this study, we have developed a whole genome amplification (WGA)-based genotyping assay for PKD1 and PKD2, and examined whether this approach can be applied to biosamples with low DNA yield, including blood, buccal cells and urine. DNA samples were amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA) and a high-fidelity DNA polymerase followed by LR-PCR and exon-specific amplifications of PKD1 and PKD2 respectively, and Sanger sequencing. This method has generated large amounts of DNA with high average product length (>10 kb), which were uniformly amplified across all sequences assessed. When compared to the gDNA direct sequencing method for six ADPKD samples, a total of 89 variants were detected including all 86 variations previously reported, in addition to three new variations, including one pathogenic mutation not previously detected by the standard gDNA-based analysis. We have further applied WGA to ADPKD mutation analysis of low DNA-yield specimens, successfully detecting all 63 gene variations. Compared to the gDNA method the WGA-based assay had a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. In conclusion, WGA-based LR-PCR represents a major technical improvement for PKD genotyping from trace amounts of DNA.

  14. Analysis of ectoparasites (chigger mites, gamasid mites, fleas and sucking lice) of the Yunnan red-backed vole (Eothenomys miletus) sampled throughout its range in southwest China.

    PubMed

    Peng, P-Y; Guo, X-G; Song, W-Y; Hou, P; Zou, Y-J; Fan, R; He, X-S

    2015-12-01

    The Yunnan red-backed vole Eothenomys miletus (Rodentia: Cricetidae) is an endemic rodent species and reservoir host of zoonoses in southwest China. Based on a large host sample (2463 voles collected from 39 localities between 2001 and 2013), a general analysis of four categories of ectoparasite (fleas, sucking lice, chigger mites and gamasid mites) on E. miletus across its entire range of distribution was made. This analysis identified a total of 71 895 ectoparasites belonging to 320 species (30 species of flea, 9 of sucking louse, 106 of gamasid mite and 175 of chigger mite) with a high prevalence (87%), mean abundance (29.19) and mean intensity (33.69). Of the 18 vector species of zoonoses found on E. miletus, the flea Ctenophthalmus quadratus (Siphonaptera: Hystrichopsyllidae) and chigger mite Leptotrombidium scutellare (Trombidiformes: Trombiculidae) were the dominant species; these are the main vectors of zoonoses in China. All of the dominant parasite species showed an aggregated distribution pattern. Male voles harboured more species of parasite than females. Chigger mites represented the most abundant species group on voles and their prevalence was positively correlated with mean abundance (r = 0.73; P < 0.05). As a single rodent species, E. miletus has a high potential to harbour abundant ectoparasites with high species diversity and high rates of infestation. The sex of the vole affects ectoparasite infestation. PMID:26345365

  15. Crave, Like, Eat: Determinants of Food Intake in a Sample of Children and Adolescents with a Wide Range in Body Mass

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Johannes; Meule, Adrian; Reichenberger, Julia; Weghuber, Daniel; Ardelt-Gattinger, Elisabeth; Blechert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a heterogeneous condition with obese individuals displaying different eating patterns. Growing evidence suggests that there is a subgroup of obese adults that is marked by frequent and intense food cravings and addiction-like consumption of high-calorie foods. Little is known, however, about such a subgroup of obese individuals in childhood and adolescence. In the present study, a sample of children and adolescents with a wide range in body mass was investigated and trait food craving, liking for and intake of high- and low-calorie foods was measured. One-hundred and forty-two children and adolescents (51.4% female, n = 73; Mage = 13.7 years, SD = 2.25; MBMI-SDS = 1.26, SD = 1.50) completed the Food Cravings Questionnaire-Trait, then viewed pictures of high- and low-calorie foods and rated their liking for them, and subsequently consumed some of these foods in a bogus taste test. Contrary to expectations, higher body mass was associated with lower consumption of high-calorie foods. However, there was an interaction between body mass and trait food craving when predicting food consumption: in obese participants, higher trait food craving was associated with higher consumption of high-calorie foods and this association was not found in normal-weight participants. The relationship between trait food craving and high-calorie food consumption within obese individuals was mediated by higher liking for high-calorie foods (but not by liking for low-calorie foods). Thus, similar to adults, a subgroup of obese children and adolescents – characterized by high trait food craving – seems to exist, calling for specific targeted treatment strategies. PMID:27708598

  16. Measuring the New Indices of Religious Orientation at the Cathedral Carol Service: Internal Consistency and Reliability among a Distinctively Wide Ranging Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, David

    2012-01-01

    The New Indices of Religious Orientation (NIRO) proposed and tested by Francis have been found in later studies to satisfy the requirements for internal reliability among samples where there are comparatively high levels of religious activity, and usually of predominantly older adults. The present study takes a sample of 393 individuals who…

  17. Comparison of Performance Characteristics of Aspergillus PCR in Testing a Range of Blood-Based Samples in Accordance with International Methodological Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jan; White, P Lewis; Hamilton, Shanna; Michel, Denise; Barnes, Rosemary A; Einsele, Hermann; Löffler, Juergen

    2016-03-01

    Standardized methodologies for the molecular detection of invasive aspergillosis (IA) have been established by the European Aspergillus PCR Initiative for the testing of whole blood, serum, and plasma. While some comparison of the performance of Aspergillus PCR when testing these different sample types has been performed, no single study has evaluated all three using the recommended protocols. Standardized Aspergillus PCR was performed on 423 whole-blood pellets (WBP), 583 plasma samples, and 419 serum samples obtained from hematology patients according to the recommendations. This analysis formed a bicenter retrospective anonymous case-control study, with diagnosis according to the revised European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) consensus definitions (11 probable cases and 36 controls). Values for clinical performance using individual and combined samples were calculated. For all samples, PCR positivity was significantly associated with cases of IA (for plasma, P = 0.0019; for serum, P = 0.0049; and for WBP, P = 0.0089). Plasma PCR generated the highest sensitivity (91%); the sensitivities for serum and WBP PCR were 80% and 55%, respectively. The highest specificity was achieved when testing WBP (96%), which was significantly superior to the specificities achieved when testing serum (69%, P = 0.0238) and plasma (53%, P = 0.0002). No cases were PCR negative in all specimen types, and no controls were PCR positive in all specimens. This study confirms that Aspergillus PCR testing of plasma provides robust performance while utilizing commercial automated DNA extraction processes. Combining PCR testing of different blood fractions allows IA to be both confidently diagnosed and excluded. A requirement for multiple PCR-positive plasma samples provides similar diagnostic utility and is technically less demanding. Time

  18. Measurement of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in biological and geological samples in the energy range of 7-12keV.

    PubMed

    Trunova, Valentina; Sidorina, Anna; Kriventsov, Vladimir

    2014-10-17

    Information about X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in different materials is necessary for accurate X-ray fluorescent analysis. The X-ray mass attenuation coefficients for energy of 7-12keV were measured in biological (Mussel and Oyster tissues, blood, hair, liver, and Cabbage leaves) and geological (Baikal sludge, soil, and Alaskite granite) samples. The measurements were carried out at the EXAFS Station of Siberian Synchrotron Radiation Center (VEPP-3). Obtained experimental mass attenuation coefficients were compared with theoretical values calculated for some samples. PMID:25464176

  19. Measurement of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in biological and geological samples in the energy range of 7-12keV.

    PubMed

    Trunova, Valentina; Sidorina, Anna; Kriventsov, Vladimir

    2014-10-17

    Information about X-ray mass attenuation coefficients in different materials is necessary for accurate X-ray fluorescent analysis. The X-ray mass attenuation coefficients for energy of 7-12keV were measured in biological (Mussel and Oyster tissues, blood, hair, liver, and Cabbage leaves) and geological (Baikal sludge, soil, and Alaskite granite) samples. The measurements were carried out at the EXAFS Station of Siberian Synchrotron Radiation Center (VEPP-3). Obtained experimental mass attenuation coefficients were compared with theoretical values calculated for some samples.

  20. Heteronuclear Micro-Helmholtz Coil Facilitates µm-Range Spatial and Sub-Hz Spectral Resolution NMR of nL-Volume Samples on Customisable Microfluidic Chips

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Nils; Höfflin, Jens; Moazenzadeh, Ali; Mager, Dario; MacKinnon, Neil; Badilita, Vlad; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    We present a completely revised generation of a modular micro-NMR detector, featuring an active sample volume of ∼ 100 nL, and an improvement of 87% in probe efficiency. The detector is capable of rapidly screening different samples using exchangeable, application-specific, MEMS-fabricated, microfluidic sample containers. In contrast to our previous design, the sample holder chips can be simply sealed with adhesive tape, with excellent adhesion due to the smooth surfaces surrounding the fluidic ports, and so withstand pressures of ∼2.5 bar, while simultaneously enabling high spectral resolution up to 0.62 Hz for H2O, due to its optimised geometry. We have additionally reworked the coil design and fabrication processes, replacing liquid photoresists by dry film stock, whose final thickness does not depend on accurate volume dispensing or precise levelling during curing. We further introduced mechanical alignment structures to avoid time-intensive optical alignment of the chip stacks during assembly, while we exchanged the laser-cut, PMMA spacers by diced glass spacers, which are not susceptible to melting during cutting. Doing so led to an overall simplification of the entire fabrication chain, while simultaneously increasing the yield, due to an improved uniformity of thickness of the individual layers, and in addition, due to more accurate vertical positioning of the wirebonded coils, now delimited by a post base plateau. We demonstrate the capability of the design by acquiring a 1H spectrum of ∼ 11 nmol sucrose dissolved in D2O, where we achieved a linewidth of 1.25 Hz for the TSP reference peak. Chemical shift imaging experiments were further recorded from voxel volumes of only ∼ 1.5nL, which corresponded to amounts of just 1.5 nmol per voxel for a 1 M concentration. To extend the micro-detector to other nuclei of interest, we have implemented a trap circuit, enabling heteronuclear spectroscopy, demonstrated by two 1H/13C 2D HSQC experiments. PMID

  1. Heteronuclear Micro-Helmholtz Coil Facilitates µm-Range Spatial and Sub-Hz Spectral Resolution NMR of nL-Volume Samples on Customisable Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Nils; Höfflin, Jens; Moazenzadeh, Ali; Mager, Dario; MacKinnon, Neil; Badilita, Vlad; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    We present a completely revised generation of a modular micro-NMR detector, featuring an active sample volume of ∼ 100 nL, and an improvement of 87% in probe efficiency. The detector is capable of rapidly screening different samples using exchangeable, application-specific, MEMS-fabricated, microfluidic sample containers. In contrast to our previous design, the sample holder chips can be simply sealed with adhesive tape, with excellent adhesion due to the smooth surfaces surrounding the fluidic ports, and so withstand pressures of ∼2.5 bar, while simultaneously enabling high spectral resolution up to 0.62 Hz for H2O, due to its optimised geometry. We have additionally reworked the coil design and fabrication processes, replacing liquid photoresists by dry film stock, whose final thickness does not depend on accurate volume dispensing or precise levelling during curing. We further introduced mechanical alignment structures to avoid time-intensive optical alignment of the chip stacks during assembly, while we exchanged the laser-cut, PMMA spacers by diced glass spacers, which are not susceptible to melting during cutting. Doing so led to an overall simplification of the entire fabrication chain, while simultaneously increasing the yield, due to an improved uniformity of thickness of the individual layers, and in addition, due to more accurate vertical positioning of the wirebonded coils, now delimited by a post base plateau. We demonstrate the capability of the design by acquiring a 1H spectrum of ∼ 11 nmol sucrose dissolved in D2O, where we achieved a linewidth of 1.25 Hz for the TSP reference peak. Chemical shift imaging experiments were further recorded from voxel volumes of only ∼ 1.5 nL, which corresponded to amounts of just 1.5 nmol per voxel for a 1 M concentration. To extend the micro-detector to other nuclei of interest, we have implemented a trap circuit, enabling heteronuclear spectroscopy, demonstrated by two 1H/13C 2D HSQC experiments. PMID

  2. Heteronuclear Micro-Helmholtz Coil Facilitates µm-Range Spatial and Sub-Hz Spectral Resolution NMR of nL-Volume Samples on Customisable Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Nils; Höfflin, Jens; Moazenzadeh, Ali; Mager, Dario; MacKinnon, Neil; Badilita, Vlad; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    We present a completely revised generation of a modular micro-NMR detector, featuring an active sample volume of ∼ 100 nL, and an improvement of 87% in probe efficiency. The detector is capable of rapidly screening different samples using exchangeable, application-specific, MEMS-fabricated, microfluidic sample containers. In contrast to our previous design, the sample holder chips can be simply sealed with adhesive tape, with excellent adhesion due to the smooth surfaces surrounding the fluidic ports, and so withstand pressures of ∼2.5 bar, while simultaneously enabling high spectral resolution up to 0.62 Hz for H2O, due to its optimised geometry. We have additionally reworked the coil design and fabrication processes, replacing liquid photoresists by dry film stock, whose final thickness does not depend on accurate volume dispensing or precise levelling during curing. We further introduced mechanical alignment structures to avoid time-intensive optical alignment of the chip stacks during assembly, while we exchanged the laser-cut, PMMA spacers by diced glass spacers, which are not susceptible to melting during cutting. Doing so led to an overall simplification of the entire fabrication chain, while simultaneously increasing the yield, due to an improved uniformity of thickness of the individual layers, and in addition, due to more accurate vertical positioning of the wirebonded coils, now delimited by a post base plateau. We demonstrate the capability of the design by acquiring a 1H spectrum of ∼ 11 nmol sucrose dissolved in D2O, where we achieved a linewidth of 1.25 Hz for the TSP reference peak. Chemical shift imaging experiments were further recorded from voxel volumes of only ∼ 1.5 nL, which corresponded to amounts of just 1.5 nmol per voxel for a 1 M concentration. To extend the micro-detector to other nuclei of interest, we have implemented a trap circuit, enabling heteronuclear spectroscopy, demonstrated by two 1H/13C 2D HSQC experiments.

  3. Residues from low-order energetic materials: the comparative performance of a range of sampling approaches prior to analysis by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Szomborg, Katarzyna; Jongekrijg, Fleur; Gilchrist, Elizabeth; Webb, Tony; Wood, Dan; Barron, Leon

    2013-12-10

    A quantitative study of common forensic evidence collection devices for the recovery of low-explosive residues from non-porous glass and plastic is presented herein. Swabbing materials including cotton, rayon, Nomex(®) (poly(isophthaloylchloride/m-phenylenediamine)), Teflon/Teflon-coated fibreglass (polytetrafluoroethylene) and adhesive-coated tapes were used to collect known quantities of up to 14 forensically relevant inorganic and organic anion and cation species from both surfaces. Analysis was performed using two validated ion chromatography methods. This study revealed that all swabs and surfaces contributed highly variable levels of interfering ionic species and that swabbing materials showed variance in the quantities and total number of analytes recovered from both surfaces. Teflon and Nomex(®) materials demonstrated the most promise due to their ability to collect and release analytes into simple extraction solvents as well as displaying relatively low endogenous interference. In parallel, the ability to extract residue directly from both surfaces via the addition of a suitable extraction solvent was investigated instead of swabbing. This work highlights that direct solvent extraction from a surface should be considered as an alternative approach, especially for small areas or objects. To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the most comprehensive study of the efficiencies of sample collection technologies for low-explosive residues prior to analysis by ion chromatography.

  4. Determination of the thermal diffusivity of bulk and layered samples by time domain thermoreflectance: Interest of lateral heat diffusion investigation in nanoscale time range

    SciTech Connect

    Belliard, L. Charron, E.; Vincent, S.; Perrin, B.; Fournier, D.; Frétigny, C.

    2015-02-14

    We report on thermal investigations performed in a time resolved experimental scheme. The time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) is applied in an unusual geometry where the pump and probe beams are not superimposed but focused and shifted. In this way, the determination of the in-plane thermal diffusivity is achieved from temperature snapshots at different time delays. In the first part, taking into account the specific generation process and the detection inherent to the time domain thermoreflectance approach, an analytical solution for the temperature field is obtained for bulk samples, and compared to experimental data. A comparison with the frequency domain thermoreflectance microscopy is also outlined. In Part II section, the lateral heat diffusion in a layered structure is investigated. The comparison of the heat diffusion spreading in case of a highly conductive layer deposited on an insulator substrate and the reverse situation are carefully studied. Finally, we show how the time dependence is efficient to probe and identify material thermal properties or thermal interfacial resistance.

  5. Determination of the thermal diffusivity of bulk and layered samples by time domain thermoreflectance: Interest of lateral heat diffusion investigation in nanoscale time range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belliard, L.; Frétigny, C.; Charron, E.; Vincent, S.; Perrin, B.; Fournier, D.

    2015-02-01

    We report on thermal investigations performed in a time resolved experimental scheme. The time domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) is applied in an unusual geometry where the pump and probe beams are not superimposed but focused and shifted. In this way, the determination of the in-plane thermal diffusivity is achieved from temperature snapshots at different time delays. In the first part, taking into account the specific generation process and the detection inherent to the time domain thermoreflectance approach, an analytical solution for the temperature field is obtained for bulk samples, and compared to experimental data. A comparison with the frequency domain thermoreflectance microscopy is also outlined. In Part II section, the lateral heat diffusion in a layered structure is investigated. The comparison of the heat diffusion spreading in case of a highly conductive layer deposited on an insulator substrate and the reverse situation are carefully studied. Finally, we show how the time dependence is efficient to probe and identify material thermal properties or thermal interfacial resistance.

  6. Residues from low-order energetic materials: the comparative performance of a range of sampling approaches prior to analysis by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Szomborg, Katarzyna; Jongekrijg, Fleur; Gilchrist, Elizabeth; Webb, Tony; Wood, Dan; Barron, Leon

    2013-12-10

    A quantitative study of common forensic evidence collection devices for the recovery of low-explosive residues from non-porous glass and plastic is presented herein. Swabbing materials including cotton, rayon, Nomex(®) (poly(isophthaloylchloride/m-phenylenediamine)), Teflon/Teflon-coated fibreglass (polytetrafluoroethylene) and adhesive-coated tapes were used to collect known quantities of up to 14 forensically relevant inorganic and organic anion and cation species from both surfaces. Analysis was performed using two validated ion chromatography methods. This study revealed that all swabs and surfaces contributed highly variable levels of interfering ionic species and that swabbing materials showed variance in the quantities and total number of analytes recovered from both surfaces. Teflon and Nomex(®) materials demonstrated the most promise due to their ability to collect and release analytes into simple extraction solvents as well as displaying relatively low endogenous interference. In parallel, the ability to extract residue directly from both surfaces via the addition of a suitable extraction solvent was investigated instead of swabbing. This work highlights that direct solvent extraction from a surface should be considered as an alternative approach, especially for small areas or objects. To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the most comprehensive study of the efficiencies of sample collection technologies for low-explosive residues prior to analysis by ion chromatography. PMID:24314502

  7. Hydroxy fatty acids in fresh snow samples from northern Japan: long-range atmospheric transport of Gram-negative bacteria by Asian winter monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, P.; Yamamoto, S.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxy fatty acids (FAs) in fresh snow from Sapporo, one of the heaviest snowfall regions in the world, have been studied to ascertain the airborne bacterial endotoxin concentrations and their biomass. The presence of β-hydroxy FAs (C9-C28), constituents of the Gram-negative bacterium (GNB), suggests long-range transport of soil microbes. Likewise, the occurrence of α- and ω-hydroxy FAs (C9-C30 and C9-C28, respectively) in snow reveals their contribution from epicuticular waxes and soil microorganisms. Estimated endotoxin and GNB mass can aid in assessing their possible impacts on the diversity and functioning of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, as well as lethal effects on pedestrians through dispersal of microbes. Air mass back trajectories together with hydroxy FAs reveal their sources from Siberia, the Russian Far East and northern China by the Asian monsoon. This study highlights the role of fresh snow that reduces the human health risk of GNB and endotoxin by the scavenging from air.

  8. Hydroxy fatty acids in fresh snow samples from northern Japan: long-range atmospheric transport of Gram-negative bacteria by Asian winter monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, P.; Yamamoto, S.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxy fatty acids (FAs) in fresh snow from Sapporo, one of the heaviest snowfall regions in the world, have been studied to ascertain the airborne bacterial endotoxin concentrations and their biomass. The presence of β-hydroxy FAs (C9-C28), constituents of Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), suggests long-range transport of soil microbes. Likewise, the occurrence of α- and ω-hydroxy FAs (C9-C30 and C9-C28, respectively) in snow reveals their contribution from epicuticular waxes and soil microorganisms. Estimated endotoxin and GNB mass can aid in assessing their possible impacts on the diversity and functioning of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, as well as lethal effects on pedestrians through dispersal of microbes. Air mass back trajectories together with hydroxy FAs unveil their sources from Siberia, Russian Far East and North China by the Asian monsoon. This study highlights the role of fresh snow that reduces the human health risk of GNB and endotoxin by scavenging from the air.

  9. On the range of future Sahel precipitation projections and the selection of a sub-sample of CMIP5 models for impact studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monerie, Paul-Arthur; Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Boé, Julien

    2016-06-01

    The future evolution of the West African Monsoon is studied by analyzing 32 CMIP5 models under the rcp8.5 emission scenario. A hierarchical clustering method based on the simulated pattern of precipitation changes is used to classify the models. Four groups, which do not agree on the simple sign of future Sahel precipitation change, are obtained. We find that the inter-group differences are mainly associated with the large spread in (1) temperature increase over the Sahara and North Atlantic and in (2) the strengthening of low and mid-level winds. A wetter Sahel is associated with a strong increase in temperature over the Sahara (>6 °C), a northward shift of the monsoon system and a weakening of the African Easterly jet. A dryer Sahel is associated with subsidence anomalies, a strengthening of the 600 hPa wind speed, and a weaker warming over the Northern Hemisphere. Moreover, the western (central) Sahel is projected to become dryer (wetter) during the first months (last months) of the rainy season in a majority of models. We propose several methods to select a sub-sample of models that captures both the ensemble mean pattern and/or the spread of precipitation changes from the full ensemble. This methodology is useful in all the situations for which it is not possible to deal with a large ensemble of models, and in particular most impact studies. We show that no relationship exists between the climatological mean biases in precipitation and temperature and the future changes in the monsoon intensity. This indicates that the mean bias is therefore not a reliable metric for the model selection. For this reason, we propose several methodologies, based on the projected precipitation changes: The "diversity" method, which consists in the selection of one model from each group is the most appropriate to capture the spread in precipitation change. The "pattern selection" method, which consists in the selection of models in a single group allows to select models for the

  10. Bacillus polymachus sp. nov., with a broad range of antibacterial activity, isolated from forest topsoil samples by using a modified culture method.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Manh; Kim, Jaisoo

    2015-02-01

    A new, modified culture method that utilizes a transwell plate with a 0.4 µm pore-size microporous membrane was developed. This system allows only trace nutrients from the soil into the liquid culture through the microporous membrane. The method is a more powerful tool for the discovery of novel species from soils than are traditional methods. Such newly identified species could potentially produce useful metabolites. A bacterial strain, T515(T), was isolated using this modified culture method. Growth of strain T515(T) occurred at pH 4-9 in a temperature range between 20 °C and 40 °C and in the presence of 0-2 % (w/v) NaCl on R2A agar. Colonies on the agar plates were tiny, white, and convex after 5 days incubation at 28 °C. Comparative analysis of the nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain T515(T) revealed close pairwise similarity with species of the genus Bacillus, and strain T515(T) was most closely related to Bacillus panaciterrae Gsoil 1517(T) (96.7 %) and Bacillus funiculus NAF001(T) (96.0 %). The major quinone of strain T515(T) was menaquinone-7 (MK-7) and the major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 (45.5 %), anteiso-C15 : 0 (23.2 %) and C16 : 0 (10.9 %). The predominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. Strain T515(T) was sensitive to streptomycin and tetracycline, but resistant to rifampicin (0.125 µg ml(-1)), ampicillin (0.5 µg ml(-1)) and chloramphenicol (1 µg ml(-1)). The strain showed antimicrobial activities against the six strains tested: Bacillus subtilis KEMB 51201-001, Staphylococcus aureus KEMB 4659, Pseudomonas aeruginosa KACC 10185, Staphylococcus epidermidis KACC 13234, Paenibacillus larvae KACC 14031 and Escherichia coli KEMB 212-234. Based on these results, strain T515(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus with the proposed name, Bacillus polymachus sp. nov. The type strain is T515(T) ( = KEMB 9005-168(T) = KACC 18242(T) = NBRC 110614(T)).

  11. Bacillus polymachus sp. nov., with a broad range of antibacterial activity, isolated from forest topsoil samples by using a modified culture method.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Manh; Kim, Jaisoo

    2015-02-01

    A new, modified culture method that utilizes a transwell plate with a 0.4 µm pore-size microporous membrane was developed. This system allows only trace nutrients from the soil into the liquid culture through the microporous membrane. The method is a more powerful tool for the discovery of novel species from soils than are traditional methods. Such newly identified species could potentially produce useful metabolites. A bacterial strain, T515(T), was isolated using this modified culture method. Growth of strain T515(T) occurred at pH 4-9 in a temperature range between 20 °C and 40 °C and in the presence of 0-2 % (w/v) NaCl on R2A agar. Colonies on the agar plates were tiny, white, and convex after 5 days incubation at 28 °C. Comparative analysis of the nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain T515(T) revealed close pairwise similarity with species of the genus Bacillus, and strain T515(T) was most closely related to Bacillus panaciterrae Gsoil 1517(T) (96.7 %) and Bacillus funiculus NAF001(T) (96.0 %). The major quinone of strain T515(T) was menaquinone-7 (MK-7) and the major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 (45.5 %), anteiso-C15 : 0 (23.2 %) and C16 : 0 (10.9 %). The predominant polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. Strain T515(T) was sensitive to streptomycin and tetracycline, but resistant to rifampicin (0.125 µg ml(-1)), ampicillin (0.5 µg ml(-1)) and chloramphenicol (1 µg ml(-1)). The strain showed antimicrobial activities against the six strains tested: Bacillus subtilis KEMB 51201-001, Staphylococcus aureus KEMB 4659, Pseudomonas aeruginosa KACC 10185, Staphylococcus epidermidis KACC 13234, Paenibacillus larvae KACC 14031 and Escherichia coli KEMB 212-234. Based on these results, strain T515(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus with the proposed name, Bacillus polymachus sp. nov. The type strain is T515(T) ( = KEMB 9005-168(T) = KACC 18242(T) = NBRC 110614(T)). PMID

  12. Color light-emitting diode reflection topography: validation of keratometric repeatability in a large sample of wide cylindrical-range corneas

    PubMed Central

    Kanellopoulos, Anastasios John; Asimellis, George

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate repeatability of steep and flat keratometry measurements, as well as astigmatism axis in cohorts with normal range and regular astigmatic such as: eyes following laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and normal population, as well as cohorts of high and irregular astigmatism such as keratoconic eyes, and keratoconic eyes following corneal collagen cross-linking, employing a novel corneal reflection topography device. Methods Steep and flat keratometry and astigmatism axis measurement repeatability was investigated employing a novel multicolored-spot reflection topographer (Cassini) in four study groups, namely a post myopic LASIK-treated Group A, a keratoconus Group B, a post-CXL keratoconus Group C, and a control Group D of routine healthy patients. Three separate, maps were obtained employing the Cassini, enabling investigation of the intra-individual repeatability by standard deviation. Additionally we investigated in all groups,the Klyce surface irregularity indices for keratoconus, the SAI (surface asymmetry index) and the SRI (surface regularity index). Results Flat keratometry repeatability was 0.74±0.89 (0.03 to 5.26) diopters (D) in the LASIK Group A, 0.88±1.45 (range minimum to maximum, 0.00 to 7.84) D in the keratoconic Group B, and 0.71±0.94 (0.02 to 6.23) D in the cross-linked Group C. The control Group D had flat keratometry repeatability 0.36±0.46 (0.00 to 2.71) D. Steep keratometry repeatability was 0.64±0.82 (0.01 to 4.81) D in the LASIK Group A, 0.89±1.22 (0.02 to 7.85) D in the keratoconic Group B, and 0.93±1.12 (0.04 to 5.93) D in the cross-linked Group C. The control Group D had steep keratometry repeatability 0.41±0.50 (0.00 to 3.51) D. Axis repeatability was 3.45±1.62° (0.38 to 7.78°) for the LASIK Group A, 4.12±3.17° (0.02 to 12.13°) for the keratoconic Group B, and 3.20±1.99° (0.17 to 8.61°) for the cross-linked Group C. The control Group D had axis repeatability 2.16±1.39° (0.05 to 5.86

  13. Characterization of polybacterial clinical samples using a set of group-specific broad-range primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene followed by DNA sequencing and RipSeq analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lekang, Katrine; Langeland, Nina; Wiker, Harald G.

    2011-01-01

    The standard use of a single universal broad-range PCR in direct 16S rDNA sequencing from polybacterial samples leaves the minor constituents at risk of remaining undetected because all bacterial DNA will be competing for the same reagents. In this article we introduce a set of three broad-range group-specific 16S rDNA PCRs that together cover the clinically relevant bacteria and apply them in the investigation of 25 polybacterial clinical samples. Mixed DNA chromatograms from samples containing more than one species per primer group were analysed using RipSeq Mixed (iSentio, Norway), a web-based application for the interpretation of chromatograms containing up to three different species. The group-specific PCRs reduced complexity in the resulting DNA chromatograms and made the assay more sensitive in situations with unequal species concentrations. Together this allowed for identification of a significantly higher number of bacterial species than did standard direct sequencing with a single universal primer pair and RipSeq analysis (95 vs 51). The method could improve microbiological diagnostics for important groups of patients and can be established in any laboratory with experience in direct 16S rDNA sequencing. PMID:21436365

  14. Measurement of the total spectrum of electrons and positrons in the energy range of 300–1500 GeV in the PAMELA experiment with the aid of a sampling calorimeter and a neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Karelin, A. V. Voronov, S. A.; Galper, A. M.; Koldobskiy, S. A.; Collaboration: on behalf of the PAMELA Collaboration

    2015-03-15

    A method based on the use of a sampling calorimeter was developed for measuring the total energy spectrum of electrons and positrons from high-energy cosmic rays in the PAMELA satellite-borne experiment. This made it possible to extend the range of energies accessible to measurements by the magnetic system of the PAMELA spectrometer. Themethod involves a procedure for selecting electrons on the basis of features of a secondary-particle shower in the calorimeter. The results obtained by measuring the total spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range of 300–1500 GeV by the method in question are presented on the basis of data accumulated over a period spanning 2006 and 2013.

  15. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  16. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  17. Regional atmospheric deposition patterns of Ag, As, Bi, Cd, Hg, Mo, Sb and Tl in a 188,000 km 2 area in the European arctic as displayed by terrestrial moss samples-long-range atmospheric transport vs local impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, Clemens; De Caritat, Patrice; Halleraker, Jo H.; Finne, Tor Erik; Boyd, Rognvald; Jæger, Øystein; Volden, Tore; Kashulina, Galina; Bogatyrev, Igor; Chekushin, Viktor; Pavlov, Vladimir; Äyräs, Matti; Räisänen, Marja Liisa; Niskavaara, Heikki

    The regional atmospheric deposition patterns of Ag, As, Bi, Cd, Hg, Mo, Sb and Tl have been mapped in a 188,000 km2 area of the European Arctic (N Finland, N Norway, NW Russia) using the moss technique. The Russian nickel mining and smelting industry (Nikel and Zapoljarnij (Pechenganikel) and Monchegorsk (Severonikel)) in the eastern part of the survey area represents two of the largest point sources for S0 2 and metal emissions on a world wide basis. In contrast, parts of northern Finland and northern Norway represent still some of the most pristine areas in Europe. The terrestrial mosses Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi were used as monitors of airborne deposition. Samples in all three countries were collected during the summer of 1995 and analysed in one laboratory using ICP-MS. Maps for most elements clearly show elevated element concentrations near the industrial sites and delineate the extent of contamination. Pollution follows the main wind and topographical directions in the area (N-S). The gradients of deposition are rather steep. Background levels for all the elements are reached within 150-200 km from the industrial plants. The relative importance of long-range atmospheric transport of air pollutants from industrial point sources on the world wide increase of heavy metals observed in the atmosphere is thus debatable for many elements. Increasing population and traffic density, accompanied by increasing local dust levels, may play a much more important role than industrial emissions. The regional distribution patterns as displayed in the maps show some striking differences between the elements. The regional distribution of Hg and TI in the survey area is completely dominated by sources other than industry.

  18. SAMPLING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOEpatents

    Sugarman, R.M.

    1960-08-30

    An oscilloscope is designed for displaying transient signal waveforms having random time and amplitude distributions. The oscilloscopc is a sampling device that selects for display a portion of only those waveforms having a particular range of amplitudes. For this purpose a pulse-height analyzer is provided to screen the pulses. A variable voltage-level shifter and a time-scale rampvoltage generator take the pulse height relative to the start of the waveform. The variable voltage shifter produces a voltage level raised one step for each sequential signal waveform to be sampled and this results in an unsmeared record of input signal waveforms. Appropriate delay devices permit each sample waveform to pass its peak amplitude before the circuit selects it for display.

  19. Surface chemical reactivity in selected zero-valent iron samples used in groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, N; Seal, S; Reinhart, D

    2000-12-30

    Permeable iron barriers have become a popular choice as a passive, cost-effective in situ remediation technology for chlorinated solvents. However, loss of reactivity over time, due to a build up of corrosion products or other precipitates on the iron surface, is a great concern. Because first-order rate constants for trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation have differed by iron pre-treatment and sonication history, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to explore the changes in near surface chemistry of several iron samples. Both sonicated and unsonicated filings were analyzed in unwashed and groundwater-soaked conditions. Unsonicated acid-washed iron, with the highest first-order rate constant for TCE degradation, was characterized by greater surface oxygen content and was more ionic relative to the unwashed samples. The unsonicated, unwashed sample, with the lowest rate constant, exhibited a mixture of nonstoichiometric iron oxide and oxyhydroxide species. Sonication of groundwater-soaked iron removed weakly bonded iron hydroxide species and decreased the ionic character of the surface as was observed in the unwashed samples. Thus, this type of study might provide a better understanding of the chemical reactivity of selected iron samples and design better material in remediation technology.

  20. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crea, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    In the area of crop specie identification, it has been found that temporal data analysis, preliminary stratification, and unequal probability analysis were several of the factors that contributed to high identification accuracies. Single data set accuracies on fields of greater than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) are in the 70- to 90-percent range; however, with the use of temporal data, accuracies of 95 percent have been reported. Identification accuracy drops off significantly on areas of less than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) as does measurement accuracy. Forest stratification into coniferous and deciduous areas has been accomplished to a 90- to 95-percent accuracy level. Using multistage sampling techniques, the timber volume of a national forest district has been estimated to a confidence level and standard deviation acceptable to the Forest Service at a very favorable cost-benefit time ratio. Range specie/plant community vegetation mapping has been accomplished at various levels of success (69- to 90-percent accuracy). However, several investigators have obtained encouraging initial results in range biomass (forage production) estimation and range readiness predictions. Soil association map correction and soil association mapping in new area appear to have been proven feasible on large areas; however, testing in a complex soil area should be undertaken.

  1. Vibration of the human tympanic membrane measured with OCT in a range between 0.4 kHz and 6.4 kHz on an ex vivo sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, Anke; Kirsten, Lars; Bornitz, Matthias; Zahnert, Thomas; Koch, Edmund

    2013-06-01

    Vibrations of the tympanic membrane (TM) play a key role for the transmission of sound to the inner ear. Today, there exist still problems in measuring the movement of the TM and there are unresolved issues in understanding the TM and its behavior. A non-invasive and contact-free in vivo investigation of the structure and the functional behavior of the TM would be a big step forward. In the presented study, the suitability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for measuring the oscillation patterns of the TM in the frequency range covering the range of the human speech perception should be tested. For functional imaging a sound chirp was generated in the frequency range between 0.4 kHz - 6.4 kHz. To obtain the movement within a sufficient resolution, a grid of 25 x 25 measurement points was generated over the whole TM. The information of the oscillatory movement was encoded in the Doppler signal, provided by M-scans at several points of the TM. The frequency response functions of each frequency showed different oscillation patterns on the TM. The acquisition time of one single M-scan was only 8.5 ms and of the entire TM 5.3 s, emphasizing the potential of the method for future in vivo applications. Furthermore, the morphology was acquired with the same OCT-system, showing the feasibility for structural imaging and differentiation between typical regions of the TM. Thus, OCT was shown as a suitable method for the simultaneous measurement of the functional and structural behavior of the TM.

  2. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typically sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream. 2 figs.

  3. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Marion W.

    1990-01-01

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

  4. Automated sample preparation for radiogenic and non-traditional metal isotope analysis by MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, M. P.; Romaniello, S. J.; Gordon, G. W.; Anbar, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    High throughput analysis is becoming increasingly important for many applications of radiogenic and non-traditional metal isotopes. While MC-ICP-MS instruments offer the potential for very high sample throughout, the requirement for labor-intensive sample preparation and purification procedures remains a substantial bottleneck. Current purification protocols require manually feeding gravity-driven separation columns, a process that is both costly and time consuming. This bottleneck is eliminated with the prepFAST-MC™, an automated, low-pressure ion exchange chromatography system that can process from 1 to 60 samples in unattended operation. The syringe-driven system allows sample loading, multiple acid washes, column conditioning and elution cycles necessary to isolate elements of interest and automatically collect up to 3 discrete eluent fractions at user-defined intervals (time, volume and flow rate). Newly developed protocols for automated purification of uranium illustrates high throughput (>30 per run), multiple samples processed per column (>30), complete (>99%) matrix removal, high recovery (> 98%, n=25), and excellent precision (2 sigma =0.03 permil, n=10). The prepFAST-MC™ maximizes sample throughput and minimizes costs associated with personnel and consumables providing an opportunity to greatly expand research horizons in fields where large isotopic data sets are required, including archeology, geochemistry, and climate/environmental science

  5. Sample Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Kenneth N.

    1987-01-01

    This article considers various kinds of probability and non-probability samples in both experimental and survey studies. Throughout, how a sample is chosen is stressed. Size alone is not the determining consideration in sample selection. Good samples do not occur by accident; they are the result of a careful design. (Author/JAZ)

  6. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... using capillary blood sampling. Disadvantages to capillary blood sampling include: Only a limited amount of blood can be drawn using this method. The procedure has some risks (see below). Capillary ...

  7. Aerosol sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Masquelier, Donald A.

    2004-02-10

    A system for sampling air and collecting particulate of a predetermined particle size range. A low pass section has an opening of a preselected size for gathering the air but excluding particles larger than the sample particles. An impactor section is connected to the low pass section and separates the air flow into a bypass air flow that does not contain the sample particles and a product air flow that does contain the sample particles. A wetted-wall cyclone collector, connected to the impactor section, receives the product air flow and traps the sample particles in a liquid.

  8. Telemetry Ranging: Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2015-11-01

    Telemetry ranging is a proposed alternative to conventional two-way ranging for determining the two-way time delay between a Deep Space Station (DSS) and a spacecraft. The advantage of telemetry ranging is that the ranging signal on the uplink is not echoed to the downlink, so that telemetry alone modulates the downlink carrier. The timing information needed on the downlink, in order to determine the two-way time delay, is obtained from telemetry frames. This article describes the phase and timing estimates required for telemetry ranging, and how two-way range is calculated from these estimates. It explains why the telemetry ranging architecture does not require the spacecraft transponder to have a high-frequency or high-quality oscillator, and it describes how a telemetry ranging system can be infused in the Deep Space Network.

  9. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0-10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10-50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower temperatures and increasing relative humidity, though use of apron and enriched belt was not affected by variation in these measures. These data support previous findings that outer range areas tend to be

  10. Powder sampling.

    PubMed

    Venables, Helena J; Wells, J I

    2002-01-01

    The factors involved when sampling powder mixes have been reviewed. The various methods are evaluated (manual, automatic, and sub-sampling) and the errors incurred are discussed. Certain rules have been applied to various samplers and their suitability for powder mixtures are described. The spinning riffler is apparently the most suitable, while the use of sample thieves should be avoided due to error and bias.

  11. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  12. SAR ambiguous range suppression.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Pulsed Radar systems suffer range ambiguities, that is, echoes from pulses transmitted at different times arrive at the receiver simultaneously. Conventional mitigation techniques are not always adequate. However, pulse modulation schemes exist that allow separation of ambiguous ranges in Doppler space, allowing easy filtering of problematic ambiguous ranges.

  13. Sampling Development

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of the enterprise. This article discusses how to sample development in order to accurately discern the shape of developmental change. The ideal solution is daunting: to summarize behavior over 24-hour intervals and collect daily samples over the critical periods of change. We discuss the magnitude of errors due to undersampling, and the risks associated with oversampling. When daily sampling is not feasible, we offer suggestions for sampling methods that can provide preliminary reference points and provisional sketches of the general shape of a developmental trajectory. Denser sampling then can be applied strategically during periods of enhanced variability, inflections in the rate of developmental change, or in relation to key events or processes that may affect the course of change. Despite the challenges of dense repeated sampling, researchers must take seriously the problem of sampling on a developmental time scale if we are to know the true shape of developmental change. PMID:22140355

  14. A Mars Sample Return Sample Handling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David; Stroker, Carol

    2013-01-01

    We present a sample handling system, a subsystem of the proposed Dragon landed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission [1], that can return to Earth orbit a significant mass of frozen Mars samples potentially consisting of: rock cores, subsurface drilled rock and ice cuttings, pebble sized rocks, and soil scoops. The sample collection, storage, retrieval and packaging assumptions and concepts in this study are applicable for the NASA's MPPG MSR mission architecture options [2]. Our study assumes a predecessor rover mission collects samples for return to Earth to address questions on: past life, climate change, water history, age dating, understanding Mars interior evolution [3], and, human safety and in-situ resource utilization. Hence the rover will have "integrated priorities for rock sampling" [3] that cover collection of subaqueous or hydrothermal sediments, low-temperature fluidaltered rocks, unaltered igneous rocks, regolith and atmosphere samples. Samples could include: drilled rock cores, alluvial and fluvial deposits, subsurface ice and soils, clays, sulfates, salts including perchlorates, aeolian deposits, and concretions. Thus samples will have a broad range of bulk densities, and require for Earth based analysis where practical: in-situ characterization, management of degradation such as perchlorate deliquescence and volatile release, and contamination management. We propose to adopt a sample container with a set of cups each with a sample from a specific location. We considered two sample cups sizes: (1) a small cup sized for samples matching those submitted to in-situ characterization instruments, and, (2) a larger cup for 100 mm rock cores [4] and pebble sized rocks, thus providing diverse samples and optimizing the MSR sample mass payload fraction for a given payload volume. We minimize sample degradation by keeping them frozen in the MSR payload sample canister using Peltier chip cooling. The cups are sealed by interference fitted heat activated memory

  15. Telemetry Ranging: Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the details of the signal processing used in a telemetry ranging system in which timing information is extracted from the downlink telemetry signal in order to compute spacecraft range. A previous article describes telemetry ranging concepts and architecture, which are a slight variation of a scheme published earlier. As in that earlier work, the telemetry ranging concept eliminates the need for a dedicated downlink ranging signal to communicate the necessary timing information. The present article describes the operation and performance of the major receiver functions on the spacecraft and the ground --- many of which are standard tracking loops already in use in JPL's flight and ground radios --- and how they can be used to provide the relevant information for making a range measurement. It also describes the implementation of these functions in software, and performance of an end-to-end software simulation of the telemetry ranging system.

  16. Telemetry-Based Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon; Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Shambayati, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    A telemetry-based ranging scheme was developed in which the downlink ranging signal is eliminated, and the range is computed directly from the downlink telemetry signal. This is the first Deep Space Network (DSN) ranging technology that does not require the spacecraft to transmit a separate ranging signal. By contrast, the evolutionary ranging techniques used over the years by NASA missions, including sequential ranging (transmission of a sequence of sinusoids) and PN-ranging (transmission of a pseudo-noise sequence) whether regenerative (spacecraft acquires, then regenerates and retransmits a noise-free ranging signal) or transparent (spacecraft feeds the noisy demodulated uplink ranging signal into the downlink phase modulator) relied on spacecraft power and bandwidth to transmit an explicit ranging signal. The state of the art in ranging is described in an emerging CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) standard, in which a pseudo-noise (PN) sequence is transmitted from the ground to the spacecraft, acquired onboard, and the PN sequence is coherently retransmitted back to the ground, where a delay measurement is made between the uplink and downlink signals. In this work, the telemetry signal is aligned with the uplink PN code epoch. The ground station computes the delay between the uplink signal transmission and the received downlink telemetry. Such a computation is feasible because symbol synchronizability is already an integral part of the telemetry design. Under existing technology, the telemetry signal cannot be used for ranging because its arrival-time information is not coherent with any Earth reference signal. By introducing this coherence, and performing joint telemetry detection and arrival-time estimation on the ground, a high-rate telemetry signal can provide all the precision necessary for spacecraft ranging.

  17. Sampling Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  18. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  19. Elevating sampling

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Joseph M.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Sampling – the process of collecting, preparing, and introducing an appropriate volume element (voxel) into a system – is often under appreciated and pushed behind the scenes in lab-on-a-chip research. What often stands in the way between proof-of-principle demonstrations of potentially exciting technology and its broader dissemination and actual use, however, is the effectiveness of sample collection and preparation. The power of micro- and nanofluidics to improve reactions, sensing, separation, and cell culture cannot be accessed if sampling is not equally efficient and reliable. This perspective will highlight recent successes as well as assess current challenges and opportunities in this area. PMID:24781100

  20. Automatic range selector

    DOEpatents

    McNeilly, Clyde E.

    1977-01-04

    A device is provided for automatically selecting from a plurality of ranges of a scale of values to which a meter may be made responsive, that range which encompasses the value of an unknown parameter. A meter relay indicates whether the unknown is of greater or lesser value than the range to which the meter is then responsive. The rotatable part of a stepping relay is rotated in one direction or the other in response to the indication from the meter relay. Various positions of the rotatable part are associated with particular scales. Switching means are sensitive to the position of the rotatable part to couple the associated range to the meter.

  1. SAMPLING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hannaford, B.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Segaser, C.L.; Terry, C.L.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus is given for the batch sampling of radioactive liquids such as slurries from a system by remote control, while providing shielding for protection of operating personnel from the harmful effects of radiation.

  2. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  3. Home range and travels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  4. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    to the shed in free-range flocks. This study suggests that hens in the outer range engaged more in walking and foraging activities and showed signs of better welfare than those closer to the shed. Abstract In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0–10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10–50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower

  5. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Norman R.; King, Lloyd L.; Jackson, Peter O.; Zulich, Alan W.

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

  6. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  7. Changes in sample collection and analytical techniques and effects on retrospective comparability of low-level concentrations of trace elements in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivahnenko, T.; Szabo, Z.; Gibs, J.

    2001-01-01

    Ground-water sampling techniques were modified to reduce random low-level contamination during collection of filtered water samples for determination of trace-element concentrations. The modified sampling techniques were first used in New Jersey by the US Geological Survey in 1994 along with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis to determine the concentrations of 18 trace elements at the one microgram-per-liter (??g/L) level in the oxic water of the unconfined sand and gravel Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system. The revised technique tested included a combination of the following: collection of samples (1) with flow rates of about 2L per minute, (2) through acid-washed single-use disposable tubing and (3) a single-use disposable 0.45-??m pore size capsule filter, (4) contained within portable glove boxes, (5) in a dedicated clean sampling van, (6) only after turbidity stabilized at values less than 2 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU), when possible. Quality-assurance data, obtained from equipment blanks and split samples, indicated that trace element concentrations, with the exception of iron, chromium, aluminum, and zinc, measured in the samples collected in 1994 were not subject to random contamination at 1??g/L.Results from samples collected in 1994 were compared to those from samples collected in 1991 from the same 12 PVC-cased observation wells using the available sampling and analytical techniques at that time. Concentrations of copper, lead, manganese and zinc were statistically significantly lower in samples collected in 1994 than in 1991. Sampling techniques used in 1994 likely provided trace-element data that represented concentrations in the aquifer with less bias than data from 1991 when samples were collected without the same degree of attention to sample handling. Copyright ?? 2001 .

  8. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  9. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  10. Mu-2 ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    The Mu-II Dual-Channel Sequential Ranging System designed as a model for future Deep Space Network ranging equipment is described. A list of design objectives is followed by a theoretical explanation of the digital demodulation techniques first employed in this machine. Hardware and software implementation are discussed, together with the details relating to the construction of the device. Two appendixes are included relating to the programming and operation of this equipment to yield the maximum scientific data.

  11. Ranging Behaviour of Commercial Free-Range Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Chielo, Leonard Ikenna; Pike, Tom; Cooper, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    to the shed in free-range flocks. This study suggests that hens in the outer range engaged more in walking and foraging activities and showed signs of better welfare than those closer to the shed. Abstract In this study, the range use and behaviour of laying hens in commercial free-range flocks was explored. Six flocks were each visited on four separate days and data collected from their outdoor area (divided into zones based on distance from shed and available resources). These were: apron (0–10 m from shed normally without cover or other enrichments); enriched belt (10–50 m from shed where resources such as manmade cover, saplings and dust baths were provided); and outer range (beyond 50 m from shed with no cover and mainly grass pasture). Data collection consisted of counting the number of hens in each zone and recording behaviour, feather condition and nearest neighbour distance (NND) of 20 birds per zone on each visit day. In addition, we used techniques derived from ecological surveys to establish four transects perpendicular to the shed, running through the apron, enriched belt and outer range. Number of hens in each 10 m × 10 m quadrat was recorded four times per day as was the temperature and relative humidity of the outer range. On average, 12.5% of hens were found outside. Of these, 5.4% were found in the apron; 4.3% in the enriched zone; and 2.8% were in the outer range. This pattern was supported by data from quadrats, where the density of hens sharply dropped with increasing distance from shed. Consequently, NND was greatest in the outer range, least in the apron and intermediate in the enriched belt. Hens sampled in outer range and enriched belts had better feather condition than those from the apron. Standing, ground pecking, walking and foraging were the most commonly recorded activities with standing and pecking most likely to occur in the apron, and walking and foraging more common in the outer range. Use of the outer range declined with lower

  12. Laser Ranging Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazolla, Sabino; Hemmati, Hamid; Tratt, David

    2003-01-01

    Laser Ranging Simulation Program (LRSP) is a computer program that predicts selected aspects of the performances of a laser altimeter or other laser ranging or remote-sensing systems and is especially applicable to a laser-based system used to map terrain from a distance of several kilometers. Designed to run in a more recent version (5 or higher) of the MATLAB programming language, LRSP exploits the numerical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB. LRSP generates a graphical user interface that includes a pop-up menu that prompts the user for the input of data that determine the performance of a laser ranging system. Examples of input data include duration and energy of the laser pulse, the laser wavelength, the width of the laser beam, and several parameters that characterize the transmitting and receiving optics, the receiving electronic circuitry, and the optical properties of the atmosphere and the terrain. When the input data have been entered, LRSP computes the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of range, signal and noise currents, and ranging and pointing errors.

  13. Sampling Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Three locations to the right of the test dig area are identified for the first samples to be delivered to the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL), and the Optical Microscope (OM) on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. These sampling areas are informally labeled 'Baby Bear', 'Mama Bear', and 'Papa Bear' respectively. This image was taken on the seventh day of the Mars mission, or Sol 7 (June 1, 2008) by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Reconfigurable laser ranging instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiter, John

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a fast, flexible, non-contact, eye-safe laser ranging instrument useful in a variety of industrial metrology situations, such as in-process machining control and part inspection. The system has variable computer-controlled standoff and depth of field, and can obtain 3-D images of surfaces within a range of from 1.5 ft to almost 10 ft from the final optical element. The minimum depth of field is about 3.5 in. at 1.5 ft and about 26 in. at the far range. The largest depth of field for which useful data are available is about 41 in. Resolution, with appropriate averaging, is about one part in 4000 of the depth of field, which implies a best case resolution for this prototype of 0.00075 in. System flexibility is achieved by computer controlled relative positioning of optical components.

  15. The range scheduling aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbfinger, Eliezer M.; Smith, Barry D.

    1991-01-01

    The Air Force Space Command schedules telemetry, tracking and control activities across the Air Force Satellite Control network. The Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is a rapid prototype combining a user-friendly, portable, graphical interface with a sophisticated object-oriented database. The RSA has been a rapid prototyping effort whose purpose is to elucidate and define suitable technology for enhancing the performance of the range schedulers. Designing a system to assist schedulers in their task and using their current techniques as well as enhancements enabled by an electronic environment, has created a continuously developing model that will serve as a standard for future range scheduling systems. The RSA system is easy to use, easily ported between platforms, fast, and provides a set of tools for the scheduler that substantially increases his productivity.

  16. BENTON RANGE ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin H.; Rains, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, two parts of the Benton Range Roadless Area, California are considered to have mineral-resource potential. The central and southern part of the roadless area, near several nonoperating mines, has a probable potential for tungsten and gold-silver mineralization in tactite zones. The central part of the area has a substantiated resource potential for gold and silver in quartz veins. Detailed mapping and geochemical sampling for tungsten, gold, and silver in the central and southern part of the roadless area might indicate targets for shallow drilling exploration.

  17. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  18. Himalayan Mountain Range, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Snow is present the year round in most of the high Himalaya Mountain Range (33.0N, 76.5E). In this view taken at the onset of winter, the continuous snow line can be seen for hundreds of miles along the south face of the range in the Indian states of Punjab and Kashmir. The snow line is at about 12,000 ft. altitude but the deep Cenab River gorge is easily delineated as a break along the south edge of the snow covered mountains. '

  19. Satellite Laser Ranging operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is currently providing precision orbit determination for measurements of: 1) Ocean surface topography from satellite borne radar altimetry, 2) Spatial and temporal variations of the gravity field, 3) Earth and ocean tides, 4) Plate tectonic and regional deformation, 5) Post-glacial uplift and subsidence, 6) Variations in the Earth's center-of-mass, and 7) Variations in Earth rotation. SLR also supports specialized programs in time transfer and classical geodetic positioning, and will soon provide precision ranging to support experiments in relativity.

  20. Satellite laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, J. P.

    1992-03-01

    Laser ranging to satellites is one of the most precise methods for positio ning on the surface of the Earth. Reference is made to the need for precise posi tioning and to the improvement brought by the use of space techniques. Satellite Laser Ranging system is then described and in view of the high precision of the results derived from its measurements comments are made to some of the more important applications: high precision networks tectonic plate motion polar motion and earth''s rotation. Finally plans for system improvement in the near future are also presented.

  1. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  2. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  3. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A description is given of a super-regenerative oscillator ranging device provided with radiating and receiving means and being capable of indicating the occurrence of that distance between itself and a reflecting object which so phases the received echo of energy of a preceding emitted oscillation that the intervals between oscillations become uniform.

  4. Agriculture, forest, and range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the panel for developing a satellite remote-sensing global information system in the next decade are reported. User requirements were identified in five categories: (1) cultivated crops, (2) land resources, (3)water resources, (4)forest management, and (5) range management. The benefits from the applications of satellite data are discussed.

  5. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The necessary elements to perform global inventories of agriculture, forestry, and range resources are being brought together through the use of satellites, sensors, computers, mathematics, and phenomenology. Results of ERTS-1 applications in these areas, as well as soil mapping, are described.

  6. Institutional Long Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell Community Coll. and Technical Inst., Lenoir, NC.

    Long-range institutional planning has been in effect at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute since 1973. The first step in the process was the identification of planning areas: administration, organization, educational programs, learning resources, student services, faculty, facilities, maintenance/operation, and finances. The major…

  7. STDN ranging equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Final results of the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) Ranging Equipment program are summarized. Basic design concepts and final design approaches are described. Theoretical analyses which define requirements and support the design approaches are presented. Design verification criteria are delineated and verification test results are specified.

  8. Laser ranging data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Center for Space Research efforts have focused on the near real-time analysis of Lageos laser ranging data and on the production of predictive ephemerides. The data are analyzed in terms of range bias, time bias, and internal precision, and estimates for the Earth orientation parameters X(sub p), Y(sub p) and UT1 are obtained. The results of these analyses are reported in a variety of formats. In addition several additional stations began sending not only quick-look observations but also normal points created on-site with new software. These normal points are transmitted in a new standard format different from either current quick-look or MERIT-II full-rate formats. Thus new preprocessing software was written and successfully tested on these data. Inspection of the Bendix produced Lageos full-rate normal points continued, with detailed analyses and filtering of all 1991 A and B release normal points for Lageos through the beginning of 1992. A summary of the combined full-rate and quick-look normal point data set created for 1991 is provided. New long-term ephemerides for Lageos satellite, as well as for Etalon-1 and Etalon-2 (the so-called high satellites used for laser ranging) were produced and distributed to the network stations in cooperation with the Crustal Dynamics Project and Eurolas. These predictions are used by essentially every laser ranging site obtaining regular returns from any of these three satellites.

  9. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  10. Fact Sheet: Range Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelson, C.; Fretter, E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Ames has a long tradition in leadership with the use of ballistic ranges and shock tubes for the purpose of studying the physics and phenomena associated with hypervelocity flight. Cutting-edge areas of research run the gamut from aerodynamics, to impact physics, to flow-field structure and chemistry. This legacy of testing began in the NACA era of the 1940's with the Supersonic Free Flight Tunnel, and evolved dramatically up through the late 1950s with the pioneering work in the Ames Hypersonic Ballistic Range. The tradition continued in the mid-60s with the commissioning of the three newest facilities: the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) in 1964, the Hypervelocity Free Flight Facility (HFFF) in 1965 and the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) in 1966. Today the Range Complex continues to provide unique and critical testing in support of the Nation's programs for planetary geology and geophysics; exobiology; solar system origins; earth atmospheric entry, planetary entry, and aerobraking vehicles; and various configurations for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft.

  11. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  12. Mobile satellite ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    A brief review of the constraints which have limited satellite ranging hardware and an outline of the steps which are underway to improve the status of the equipment in this area are given. In addition, some suggestions are presented for the utilization of newer instruments and for possible future research and development work in this area.

  13. Remote sensing applications for range management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of satellite information for range management is discussed. The use of infrared photography and color photography for analysis of vegetation cover is described. The methods of interpreting LANDSAT imagery are highlighted and possible applications of such interpretive methods to range management are considered. The concept of using LANDSAT as a sampling frame for renewable natural resource inventories was examined. It is concluded that a blending of LANDSAT vegetation data with soils and digital terrain data, will define a basic sampling unit that is appropriate for range management utilization.

  14. Gas cooking range

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, R.K.; Narang, K.

    1984-02-14

    An energy-efficient gas cooking range features an oven section with improved heat circulation and air preheat, a compact oven/broiler burner, a smoke-free drip pan, an efficient piloted ignition, flame-containing rangetop burner rings, and a small, portable oven that can be supported on the burner rings. Panels spaced away from the oven walls and circulation fans provide very effective air flow within the oven. A gas shutoff valve automatically controls the discharge of heated gases from the oven so that they are discharged only when combustion is occurring.

  15. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  16. Monocular visual ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witus, Gary; Hunt, Shawn

    2008-04-01

    The vision system of a mobile robot for checkpoint and perimeter security inspection performs multiple functions: providing surveillance video, providing high resolution still images, and providing video for semi-autonomous visual navigation. Mid-priced commercial digital cameras support the primary inspection functions. Semi-autonomous visual navigation is a tertiary function whose purpose is to reduce the burden of teleoperation and free the security personnel for their primary functions. Approaches to robot visual navigation require some form of depth perception for speed control to prevent the robot from colliding with objects. In this paper present the initial results of an exploration of the capabilities and limitations of using a single monocular commercial digital camera for depth perception. Our approach combines complementary methods in alternating stationary and moving behaviors. When the platform is stationary, it computes a range image from differential blur in the image stack collected at multiple focus settings. When the robot is moving, it extracts an estimate of range from the camera auto-focus function, and combines this with an estimate derived from angular expansion of a constellation of visual tracking points.

  17. Range Process Simulation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dave; Haas, William; Barth, Tim; Benjamin, Perakath; Graul, Michael; Bagatourova, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Range Process Simulation Tool (RPST) is a computer program that assists managers in rapidly predicting and quantitatively assessing the operational effects of proposed technological additions to, and/or upgrades of, complex facilities and engineering systems such as the Eastern Test Range. Originally designed for application to space transportation systems, RPST is also suitable for assessing effects of proposed changes in industrial facilities and large organizations. RPST follows a model-based approach that includes finite-capacity schedule analysis and discrete-event process simulation. A component-based, scalable, open architecture makes RPST easily and rapidly tailorable for diverse applications. Specific RPST functions include: (1) definition of analysis objectives and performance metrics; (2) selection of process templates from a processtemplate library; (3) configuration of process models for detailed simulation and schedule analysis; (4) design of operations- analysis experiments; (5) schedule and simulation-based process analysis; and (6) optimization of performance by use of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. The main benefits afforded by RPST are provision of information that can be used to reduce costs of operation and maintenance, and the capability for affordable, accurate, and reliable prediction and exploration of the consequences of many alternative proposed decisions.

  18. Sampling in landscape genomics.

    PubMed

    Manel, Stéphanie; Albert, Cécile H; Yoccoz, Nigel G

    2012-01-01

    Landscape genomics, based on the sampling of individuals genotyped for a large number of markers, may lead to the identification of regions of the genome correlated to selection pressures caused by the environment. In this chapter, we discuss sampling strategies to be used in a landscape genomics approach. We suggest that designs based on model-based stratification using the climatic and/or biological spaces are in general more efficient than designs based on the geographic space. More work is needed to identify designs that allow disentangling environmental selection pressures versus other processes such as range expansions or hierarchical population structure.

  19. Long-range connectomics.

    PubMed

    Jbabdi, Saad; Behrens, Timothy E

    2013-12-01

    Decoding neural algorithms is one of the major goals of neuroscience. It is generally accepted that brain computations rely on the orchestration of neural activity at local scales, as well as across the brain through long-range connections. Understanding the relationship between brain activity and connectivity is therefore a prerequisite to cracking the neural code. In the past few decades, tremendous technological advances have been achieved in connectivity measurement techniques. We now possess a battery of tools to measure brain activity and connections at all available scales. A great source of excitement are the new in vivo tools that allow us to measure structural and functional connections noninvasively. Here, we discuss how these new technologies may contribute to deciphering the neural code.

  20. Range aliasing in frequency coherent geoacoustic inversion.

    PubMed

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S

    2011-10-01

    This paper discusses the effects of frequency selection on source localization and geoacoustic inversion methods that use frequency coherent objective functions. Matched-field processors based on frequency-coherent objective functions often have rapidly fluctuating range ambiguity surfaces. Insufficient sampling in frequency domain results in range aliasing terms that affect geoacoustic inversion. Range aliasing and its effects on source localization and environmental parameter inversion are demonstrated on data collected during the MAPEX2000 experiment. Guidance for frequency selection to avoid range aliasing is provided.

  1. Nonadiabatic transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, M. C.; Corcelli, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) is combined with transition path sampling (TPS) to produce a new method called nonadiabatic path sampling (NAPS). The NAPS method is validated on a model electron transfer system coupled to a Langevin bath. Numerically exact rate constants are computed using the reactive flux (RF) method over a broad range of solvent frictions that span from the energy diffusion (low friction) regime to the spatial diffusion (high friction) regime. The NAPS method is shown to quantitatively reproduce the RF benchmark rate constants over the full range of solvent friction. Integrating FSSH within the TPS framework expands the applicability of both approaches and creates a new method that will be helpful in determining detailed mechanisms for nonadiabatic reactions in the condensed-phase.

  2. Explosives characterization in terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrojuán, I.; Palacios, I.; Etayo, D.; Iriarte, J. C.; Teniente, J.; Ederra, I.; Gonzalo, R.

    2011-11-01

    A Thz spectral characterization of the behaviour of different explosives is presented in this paper. This characterization will be done in the frequency range from 20 GHz to 4 THz using a Teraview Spectra 3000. This system has a capacity of measuring from 20 GHz to 4 THz fed by a laser source. With the Teraview Spectra 3000 equipment will be possible to calculate the refractive index, the absorbance and other important parameters of the explosive samples. With this study it will be possible to characterize some of the most common used explosives, i.e., gun explosive, gunpowder mine, pent, TNT, RDX, etc, and it will allow to determine their electromagnetic peculiarities in order to design a future imaging system that allow detecting them in security and defense sectors.

  3. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  4. Synthetic range profiling in ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, Pawel; Lapiński, Marian; Silko, Dariusz

    2009-06-01

    The paper describes stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) ground penetrating radar (GPR), where signal's frequency is discretely increased in N linear steps, each separated by a fixed ▵f increment from the previous one. SFCW radar determines distance from phase shift in a reflected signal, by constructing synthetic range profile in spatial time domain using the IFFT. Each quadrature sample is termed a range bin, as it represents the signal from a range window of length cτ/2, where τ is duration of single frequency segment. IFFT of those data samples resolves the range bin in into fine range bins of c/2N▵f width, thus creating the synthetic range profile in a GPR - a time domain approximation of the frequency response of a combination of the medium through which electromagnetic waves propagates (soil) and any targets or dielectric interfaces (water, air, other types of soil) present in the beam width of the radar. In the paper, certain practical measurements done by a monostatic SFCW GPR were presented. Due to complex nature of signal source, E5062A VNA made by Agilent was used as a signal generator, allowing number of frequency steps N to go as high as 1601, with generated frequency ranging from 300kHz to 3 GHz.

  5. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety [global positioning system (GPS) metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay] and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California, USA) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit (RSU) provided real-time video for three days during the historic Global Flyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California, USA) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This paper discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  6. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety (global positioning system metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay) and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit provided real-time video for three days during the historic GlobalFlyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This report discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  7. Effect of Nitric Acid ``Washing'' Procedure on Electrochemical Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes and Glassy Carbon μ-Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anik, Ülkü; Çevik, Serdar; Pumera, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The electroanalytic performances of glassy carbon paste electrode (GCPE), multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-GCPE and double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT)-GCPE, which include HNO3 washed/unwashed materials, were compared by monitoring cyclic voltammograms of potassium ferricyanide and catechol. Electrodes were prepared by introducing proper amount of DWCNT and MWCNT into GCPE. First untreated materials (DWCNT, MWCNT, GC μ-particles) were used in the electrodes and then HNO3-treated materials were utilized for comparing difference in electrochemical performances. The effect of treatment procedure was also examined by applying Raman spectroscopy to treated and untreated materials. Moreover, TEM images were obtained for further investigation of MWCNT and DWCNT.

  8. Sequential ranging: How it works

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugh, Harold W.

    1993-01-01

    This publication is directed to the users of data from the Sequential Ranging Assembly (SRA), and to others who have a general interest in range measurements. It covers the hardware, the software, and the processes used in acquiring range data; it does not cover analytical aspects such as the theory of modulation, detection, noise spectral density, and other highly technical subjects. In other words, it covers how ranging is done, but not the details of why it works. The publication also includes an appendix that gives a brief discussion of PN ranging, a capability now under development.

  9. Laser Ranging Experiment on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: Clocks and Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, D.; Rowlands, D. D.; McGarry, J.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Torrence, M. H.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.; Sun, X.; Zagwodzki, T. W.; Cavanaugh, J. F.; Ramos-Izquierdo, L.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate ranges from Earth to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft Laser Ranging (LR) system supplement the precision orbit determination (POD) of LRO. LRO is tracked by ten LR stations from the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), using H-maser, GPS steered Rb, and Cs standard oscillators as reference clocks. The LR system routinely makes one-way range measurements via laser time-of-flight from Earth to LRO. Uplink photons are received by a telescope mounted on the high-gain antenna on LRO , transferred through a fiber optic cable to the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), and timed-tagged by the spacecraft clock. The range from the LR Earth station to LRO is derived from paired outgoing and received times. Accurate ranges can only be obtained after solving for both the spacecraft and ground station clock errors. The drift rate and aging rate of the LRO clock are calculated from data provided by the primary LR station, NASA's Next Generation Satellite Laser Ranging System (NGSLR) in Greenbelt, Maryland. The results confirm the LRO clock oscillator mid to long term stability measured during ground testing. These rates also agree well with those determined through POD. Simultaneous and near-simultaneous ranging to LRO from multiple LR stations in America, Europe, and Australia has been successfully achieved within a 10 hour window. Data analysis of these ranging experiments allows for precision modeling of the clock behaviors of each LR ground station and characterization of the station ground fire times.

  10. Metrological large range scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Pohlenz, Frank; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Xu, Min; Hasche, Klaus; Wilkening, Guenter

    2004-04-01

    We describe a metrological large range scanning probe microscope (LR-SPM) with an Abbe error free design and direct interferometric position measurement capability, aimed at versatile traceable topographic measurements that require nanometer accuracy. A dual-stage positioning system was designed to achieve both a large measurement range and a high measurement speed. This dual-stage system consists of a commercially available stage, referred to as nanomeasuring machine (NMM), with a motion range of 25 mm×25 mm×5 mm along x, y, and z axes, and a compact z-axis piezoelectric positioning stage (compact z stage) with an extension range of 2 μm. The metrological LR-SPM described here senses the surface using a stationary fixed scanning force microscope (SFM) head working in contact mode. During operation, lateral scanning of the sample is performed solely by the NMM. Whereas the z motion, controlled by the SFM signal, is carried out by a combination of the NMM and the compact z stage. In this case the compact z stage, with its high mechanical resonance frequency (greater than 20 kHz), is responsible for the rapid motion while the NMM simultaneously makes slower movements over a larger motion range. To reduce the Abbe offset to a minimum the SFM tip is located at the intersection of three interferometer measurement beams orientated in x, y, and z directions. To improve real time performance two high-end digital signal processing (DSP) systems are used for NMM positioning and SFM servocontrol. Comprehensive DSP firmware and Windows XP-based software are implemented, providing a flexible and user-friendly interface. The instrument is able to perform large area imaging or profile scanning directly without stitching small scanned images. Several measurements on different samples such as flatness standards, nanostep height standards, roughness standards as well as sharp nanoedge samples and 1D gratings demonstrate the outstanding metrological capabilities of the instrument.

  11. Contactless Calorimetry for Levitated Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Dokko, W.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and specific heat of hot sample measured with pyrometer in proposed experimental technique. Technique intended expecially for contactless calorimetry of such materials as undercooled molten alloys, samples of which must be levitated to prevent contamination and premature crystallization. Contactless calorimetry technique enables data to be taken over entire undercooling temperature range with only one sample. Technique proves valuable in study of undercooling because difference in specific heat between undercooled-liquid and crystalline phases at same temperature provides driving force to convert metastable undercooled phase to stable crystalline phase.

  12. Revisiting sample entropy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindan, R. B.; Wilson, J. D.; Eswaran, H.; Lowery, C. L.; Preißl, H.

    2007-03-01

    We modify the definition of sample entropy (SaEn) by incorporating a time delay between the components of the block (from which the densities are estimated) and show that the modified method characterizes the complexity of the system better than the original version. We apply the modified SaEn to the standard deterministic systems and stochastic processes (uncorrelated and long range correlated (LRC) processes) and show that the underlying complexity of the system is better quantified by the modified method. We extend this analysis to the RR intervals of the normal and congestive heart failure (CHF) subjects (available via www.physionet.org) and show that there is a good degree of separation between the two groups.

  13. Hematology and serum chemistry reference ranges of free-ranging moose (Alces alces) in Norway.

    PubMed

    Rostal, Melinda K; Evans, Alina L; Solberg, Erling J; Arnemo, Jon M

    2012-07-01

    Baseline reference ranges of serum chemistry and hematology data can be important indicators for the status of both individuals or populations of wild animals that are affected by emerging pathogens, toxicants, or other causes of disease. Frequently, reference ranges for these values are not available for wildlife species or subspecies. We present hematologic and serum chemistry reference ranges for moose (Alces alces) adults, yearlings, and calves in Norway sampled from 1992-2000. Additionally, we demonstrated that both induction time and chase time were correlated with initial rectal temperature, although they were not significantly correlated with cortisol, aspartate aminotransferase, glucose, or creatine kinase. Overall, the reference ranges given here are similar to those given for American moose, with a few differences that can be attributed to environment, testing methodology, or subspecies or species status. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of reference ranges for moose in Norway.

  14. PN ranging/telemetry transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deerkoski, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    System can transmit range-indicating pseudonoise (PN) codes and simultaneously transmit auxiliary information as binary data at a rate at least on order of pseudonoise chipping rate. PN code is modulated by data stream with relatively low bit rate. Data stream with high bit rate can be transmitted in same frequency band as PN ranging code.

  15. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Robert C.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  16. Institutional Long-Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, John G.

    This booklet presents a general outline for conducting a long-range planning study that can be adapted for use by any institution of higher education. The basic components of an effective long-range plan should include: (1) purposes of the plan, which define the scope of the study and provide the setting in which it will be initiated; (2) a set of…

  17. Range indices of geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.F.; Green, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest index of geomagnetic activity is the range in nT from maximum to minimum value of the field in a given time interval. The hourly range R was recommended by IAGA for use at observatories at latitudes greater than 65??, but was superceded by AE. The most used geomagnetic index K is based on the range of activity in a 3 h interval corrected for the regular daily variation. In order to take advantage of real time data processing, now available at many observatories, it is proposed to introduce a 1 h range index and also a 3 h range index. Both will be computed hourly, i.e. each will have a series of 24 per day, the 3 h values overlapping. The new data will be available as the range (R) of activity in nT and also as a logarithmic index (I) of the range. The exponent relating index to range in nT is based closely on the scale used for computing K values. The new ranges and range indices are available, from June 1987, to users in real time and can be accessed by telephone connection or computer network. Their first year of production is regarded as a trial period during which their value to the scientific and commercial communities will be assessed, together with their potential as indicators of regional and global disturbances' and in which trials will be conducted into ways of eliminating excessive bias at quiet times due to the rate of change of the daily variation field. ?? 1988.

  18. Foraging optimally for home ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Economic models predict behavior of animals based on the presumption that natural selection has shaped behaviors important to an animal's fitness to maximize benefits over costs. Economic analyses have shown that territories of animals are structured by trade-offs between benefits gained from resources and costs of defending them. Intuitively, home ranges should be similarly structured, but trade-offs are difficult to assess because there are no costs of defense, thus economic models of home-range behavior are rare. We present economic models that predict how home ranges can be efficient with respect to spatially distributed resources, discounted for travel costs, under 2 strategies of optimization, resource maximization and area minimization. We show how constraints such as competitors can influence structure of homes ranges through resource depression, ultimately structuring density of animals within a population and their distribution on a landscape. We present simulations based on these models to show how they can be generally predictive of home-range behavior and the mechanisms that structure the spatial distribution of animals. We also show how contiguous home ranges estimated statistically from location data can be misleading for animals that optimize home ranges on landscapes with patchily distributed resources. We conclude with a summary of how we applied our models to nonterritorial black bears (Ursus americanus) living in the mountains of North Carolina, where we found their home ranges were best predicted by an area-minimization strategy constrained by intraspecific competition within a social hierarchy. Economic models can provide strong inference about home-range behavior and the resources that structure home ranges by offering falsifiable, a priori hypotheses that can be tested with field observations.

  19. Home range analysis using a mechanistic home range model

    SciTech Connect

    Moorcroft, P.R. . Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology); Lewis, M.A. . Dept. of Mathematics) Crabtree, R.L. . Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources)

    1999-07-01

    The traditional models used to characterize animal home ranges have no mechanistic basis underlying their descriptions of space use, and as a result, the analysis of animal home ranges has primarily been a descriptive endeavor. In this paper, the authors characterize coyote (Canis latrans) home range patterns using partial differential equations for expected space use that are formally derived from underlying descriptions of individual movement behavior. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that mechanistic models have been used to characterize animal home ranges. The results provide empirical support for a model formulation of movement response to scent marks, and suggest that having relocation data for individuals in adjacent groups is necessary to capture the spatial arrangement of home range boundaries. The authors then show how the model fits can be used to obtain predictions for individual movement and scent marking behavior and to predict changes in home range patterns. More generally, the findings illustrate how mechanistic models permit the development of a predictive theory for the relationship between movement behavior and animal spatial distribution.

  20. The eclipse of species ranges.

    PubMed

    Hemerik, Lia; Hengeveld, Rob; Lippe, Ernst

    2006-01-01

    This paper distinguishes four recognisably different geographical processes in principle causing species to die out. One of these processes, the one we dub "range eclipse", holds that one range expands at the expense of another one, thereby usurping it. Channell and Lomolino (2000a, Journal of Biogeography 27: 169-179; 2000b, Nature 403: 84-87; see also Lomolino and Channell, 1995, Journal of Mammalogy 76: 335-347) measured the course of this process in terms of the proportion of the total range remaining in its original centre, thereby essentially assuming a homogeneous distribution of animals over the range. However, part of their measure seems mistaken. By giving a general, analytical formulation of eclipsing ranges, we estimate the exact course of this process. Also, our formulation does not partition a range into two spatially equal parts, its core and its edge, but it assumes continuity. For applying this model to data on the time evolution of species, individual time series should be available for each of them. For practical purposes we give an alternative way of plotting and interpreting such time series. Our approach, being more sensitive than Channell and Lomolino's, gives a less optimistic indication of range eclipses than theirs once these have started. PMID:17318329

  1. The alteration of icy samples during sample acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungas, G.; Bearman, G.; Beegle, L. W.; Hecht, M.; Peters, G. H.; Glucoft, J.; Strothers, K.

    2006-12-01

    Valid in situ scientific studies require both that samples be analyzed in as pristine condition as possible and that any modification from the pristine to the sampled state be well understood. While samples with low to high ice concentration are critical for the study of astrobiology and geology, they pose problems with respect to the sample acquisition, preparation and distribution systems (SPAD) upon which the analytical instruments depend. Most significant of the processes that occur during SPAD is sublimation or melting caused by thermal loading from drilling, coring, etc. as well as exposure to a dry low pressure ambient environment. These processes can alter the sample, as well as generating, meta-stable liquid water that can refreeze in the sample transfer mechanisms, interfering with proper operation and creating cross-contamination. We have investigated and quantified loss of volatiles such as H2O, CO, CO2, and organics contained within icy and powdered samples when acquired, processed and transferred. During development of the MSL rock crusher, for example, ice was observed to pressure-fuse and stick to the side even at -70C. We have investigated sublimation from sample acquisition at Martian temperature and pressure for a samples ranging from 10 to 100 water/dirt ratios. Using the RASP that will be on Phoenix, we have measured sublimation of ice during excavation at Martian pressure and find that the sublimation losses can range from 10 to 50 percent water. It is the thermal conductivity of the soil that determines local heat transport, and how much of the sample acquisition energy is wicked away into the soil and how much goes into the sample. Modeling of sample acquisition methods requires measurement of these parameters. There is a two phase model for thermal conductivity as a function of dirt/ice ratio but it needed to be validated. We used an ASTM method for measuring thermal conductivity and implemented it in the laboratory. The major conclusion is

  2. Alternative wavelengths for laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel

    1993-01-01

    The following are considered to be necessary to accomplish multicolor laser ranging: the nature of the atmospheric dispersion and absorption, the satellite/lunar/ground retro-array characteristics, and ground/satellite ranging machine performance. The energy balance and jitter budget have to be considered as well. It is concluded that the existing satellite/laser retroreflectors seem inadequate for future experiments. The Raman Stokes/Anti-Stokes (0.68/0.43 micron) plus solid state detector appear to be promising instrumentation that satisfy the ground/satellite and satellite/ground ranging machine requirements on the precision, compactness, and data processing.

  3. GPS test range mission planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Iris P.; Hancock, Thomas P.

    The principal features of the Test Range User Mission Planner (TRUMP), a PC-resident tool designed to aid in deploying and utilizing GPS-based test range assets, are reviewed. TRUMP features time history plots of time-space-position information (TSPI); performance based on a dynamic GPS/inertial system simulation; time history plots of TSPI data link connectivity; digital terrain elevation data maps with user-defined cultural features; and two-dimensional coverage plots of ground-based test range assets. Some functions to be added during the next development phase are discussed.

  4. Long range target discrimination using UV fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Mark; Lepley, Jason

    2011-06-01

    An active imaging system using UV fluorescence for target discrimination is proposed. The emission wavelength is characteristic of the target material and allows spectral discrimination of targets from clutter. The burst-illumination-LIDAR system transmits a laser pulse and the fluorescent return is detected with a synchronised gated imaging receiver. The short gate length (~ns) allowed by a micro-channel plate CCD reduces solar clutter. Detector noise is not the limiting factor because of the high MCP-CCD detectivity. Laser choice is constrained by the required laser pulse energy, laser size and robustness. The COTS solution identified is a diode-pumped, 4th harmonic converted, 1064nm laser. Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF and Nd:Alexandrite lasers have superior performance but require some development for this application. A pessimistic range model evaluates the optical powers. Comparison of the received fluorescent energy to the detector noise equivalent energy and the solar energy received provides the detection range limit. Performance of the proposed systems exceeds the detection range requirement for all samples evaluated and all varying conditions explored. The lowest range is for black paint with the COTS laser system and is 2860m; the best ranges exceed 5km.

  5. Airborne 2 color ranging experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millar, Pamela S.; Abshire, James B.; Mcgarry, Jan F.; Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Pacini, Linda K.

    1993-01-01

    Horizontal variations in the atmospheric refractivity are a limiting error source for many precise laser and radio space geodetic techniques. This experiment was designed to directly measure horizontal variations in atmospheric refractivity, for the first time, by using 2 color laser ranging measurements to an aircraft. The 2 color laser system at the Goddard Optical Research Facility (GORF) ranged to a cooperative laser target package on a T-39 aircraft. Circular patterns which extended from the southern edge of the Washington D.C. Beltway to the southern edge of Baltimore, MD were flown counter clockwise around Greenbelt, MD. Successful acquisition, tracking, and ranging for 21 circular paths were achieved on three flights in August 1992, resulting in over 20,000 two color ranging measurements.

  6. Range charts and no-space graphs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    No-space graphs present one solution to the familiar problem: given data on the occurrence of fossil taxa in separate, well-sampled sections, determine a range chart; that is, a reasonable working hypothesis of the total range in the area in question of each taxon studied. The solution presented here treats only the relative sequence of biostratigraphic events (first and last occurrences of taxa) and does not attempt to determine an amount of spacing between events. Relative to a hypothesized sequence, observed events in any section may be in-place or out-of-place. Out-of-place events may indicate (1) the event in question reflects a taxon that did not fill its entire range (unfilled-range event), or (2) the event in question indicates a need for the revision of the hypothesized sequence. A graph of relative position only (no-space graph) can be used to facilitate the recognition of in-place and out-of-place events by presenting a visual comparison of the observations from each section with the hypothesized sequence. The geometry of the graph as constructed here is such that in-place events will lie along a line series and out-of-place events will lie above or below it. First-occurrence events below the line series and last-occurrence events above the line series indicate unfilled ranges. First-occurrence events above the line series and last-occurrence events below the line series indicate a need for the revision of the hypothesis. Knowing this, the stratigrapher considers alternative positionings of the line series as alternative range hypotheses and seeks the line series that best fits his geologic and paleontologic judgment. No-space graphs are used to revise an initial hypothesis until a final hypothesis is reached. In this final hypothesis every event is found in-place in at least one section, and all events in all sections may be interpreted to represent in-place events or unfilled-range events. No event may indicate a need for further range revision. The

  7. Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-05-26

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control.

  8. Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-05-26

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. 14 figs.

  9. Optical range and range rate estimation for teleoperator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, N. L., Jr.; Kirkpatrick, M., III; Malone, T. B.; Huggins, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    Range and range rate are crucial parameters which must be available to the operator during remote controlled orbital docking operations. A method was developed for the estimation of both these parameters using an aided television system. An experiment was performed to determine the human operator's capability to measure displayed image size using a fixed reticle or movable cursor as the television aid. The movable cursor was found to yield mean image size estimation errors on the order of 2.3 per cent of the correct value. This error rate was significantly lower than that for the fixed reticle. Performance using the movable cursor was found to be less sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio variation than was that for the fixed reticle. The mean image size estimation errors for the movable cursor correspond to an error of approximately 2.25 per cent in range suggesting that the system has some merit. Determining the accuracy of range rate estimation using a rate controlled cursor will require further experimentation.

  10. Geographic range limits: achieving synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the determinants of species' geographic range limits remains poorly integrated. In part, this is because of the diversity of perspectives on the issue, and because empirical studies have lagged substantially behind developments in theory. Here, I provide a broad overview, drawing together many of the disparate threads, considering, in turn, how influences on the terms of a simple single-population equation can determine range limits. There is theoretical and empirical evidence for systematic changes towards range limits under some circumstances in each of the demographic parameters. However, under other circumstances, no such changes may take place in particular parameters, or they may occur in a different direction, with limitation still occurring. This suggests that (i) little about range limitation can categorically be inferred from many empirical studies, which document change in only one demographic parameter, (ii) there is a need for studies that document variation in all of the parameters, and (iii) in agreement with theoretical evidence that range limits can be formed in the presence or absence of hard boundaries, environmental gradients or biotic interactions, there may be few general patterns as to the determinants of these limits, with most claimed generalities at least having many exceptions. PMID:19324809

  11. High-Grading Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Sellar, Glenn; Nunez, Jorge; Mosie, Andrea; Schwarz, Carol; Parker, Terry; Winterhalter, Daniel; Farmer, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts on long-duration lunar missions will need the capability to high-grade their samples to select the highest value samples for transport to Earth and to leave others on the Moon. We are supporting studies to define the necessary and sufficient measurements and techniques for high-grading samples at a lunar outpost. A glovebox, dedicated to testing instruments and techniques for high-grading samples, is in operation at the JSC Lunar Experiment Laboratory. A reference suite of lunar rocks and soils, spanning the full compositional range found in the Apollo collection, is available for testing in this laboratory. Thin sections of these samples are available for direct comparison. The Lunar Sample Compendium, on-line at http://www-curator.jsc.nasa.gov/lunar/compendium.cfm, summarizes previous analyses of these samples. The laboratory, sample suite, and Compendium are available to the lunar research and exploration community. In the first test of possible instruments for lunar sample high-grading, we imaged 18 lunar rocks and four soils from the reference suite using the Multispectral Microscopic Imager (MMI) developed by Arizona State University and JPL (see Farmer et. al. abstract). The MMI is a fixed-focus digital imaging system with a resolution of 62.5 microns/pixel, a field size of 40 x 32 mm, and a depth-of-field of approximately 5 mm. Samples are illuminated sequentially by 21 light emitting diodes in discrete wavelengths spanning the visible to shortwave infrared. Measurements of reflectance standards and background allow calibration to absolute reflectance. ENVI-based software is used to produce spectra for specific minerals as well as multi-spectral images of rock textures.

  12. APOLLO: millimeter lunar laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, T. W., Jr.; Adelberger, E. G.; Battat, J. B. R.; Hoyle, C. D.; Johnson, N. H.; McMillan, R. J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Swanson, H. E.

    2012-09-01

    Lunar laser ranging (LLR) has for decades stood at the forefront of tests of gravitational physics, including tests of the equivalence principle (EP). Current LLR results on the EP achieve a sensitivity of Δa/a ≈ 10-13 based on few-centimeter data/model fidelity. A recent push in LLR, called APOLLO (the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation) produces millimeter-quality data. This paper demonstrates the few-millimeter range precision achieved by APOLLO, leading to an expectation that LLR will be able to extend EP sensitivity by an order-of-magnitude to Δa/a ˜ 10-14, once modeling efforts improve to this level.

  13. Acoustic detection and ranging using solvable chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corron, Ned J.; Stahl, Mark T.; Chase Harrison, R.; Blakely, Jonathan N.

    2013-06-01

    Acoustic experiments demonstrate a novel approach to ranging and detection that exploits the properties of a solvable chaotic oscillator. This nonlinear oscillator includes an ordinary differential equation and a discrete switching condition. The chaotic waveform generated by this hybrid system is used as the transmitted waveform. The oscillator admits an exact analytic solution that can be written as the linear convolution of binary symbols and a single basis function. This linear representation enables coherent reception using a simple analog matched filter and without need for digital sampling or signal processing. An audio frequency implementation of the transmitter and receiver is described. Successful acoustic ranging measurements in the presence of noise and interference from a second chaotic emitter are presented to demonstrate the viability of the approach.

  14. Acoustic detection and ranging using solvable chaos.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Stahl, Mark T; Harrison, R Chase; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2013-06-01

    Acoustic experiments demonstrate a novel approach to ranging and detection that exploits the properties of a solvable chaotic oscillator. This nonlinear oscillator includes an ordinary differential equation and a discrete switching condition. The chaotic waveform generated by this hybrid system is used as the transmitted waveform. The oscillator admits an exact analytic solution that can be written as the linear convolution of binary symbols and a single basis function. This linear representation enables coherent reception using a simple analog matched filter and without need for digital sampling or signal processing. An audio frequency implementation of the transmitter and receiver is described. Successful acoustic ranging measurements in the presence of noise and interference from a second chaotic emitter are presented to demonstrate the viability of the approach. PMID:23822484

  15. Long Range Interactions Between Neutral Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gattobigio, G. L.; Michaud, F.; Labeyrie, G.; Kaiser, R.; Pohl, T.

    2006-10-18

    In a magneto-otpical trap (MOT) where atoms can be cooled and trapped using quasi-resonant laser light, the effect of rescattered light limits the spatial density of the atoms. Here we draw an analogy between the forces associated to this multiple scattering and a Coulomb type long range interaction. A MOT in the density limited regime can thus be interpreted as a non neutral plasma with weakly charged particles. For very large samples, non linear terms in the cooling and trapping forces can lead to self sustained instabilities via a supercritical Hopf bifurcation.

  16. RANGE INCREASER FOR PNEUMATIC GAUGES

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, A.H.; Seaborn, G.B. Jr.

    1960-09-27

    An improved pneumatic gage is offered in which the linear range has been increased without excessive air consumption. This has been accomplished by providing an expansible antechamber connected to the nozzle of the gage so that the position of the nozzle with respect to the workpiece is varied automatically by variation in pressure within the antechamber. This arrangement ensures that the nozzle-to-workpiece clearance is maintained within certain limits, thus obtaining a linear relation of air flow to nozzle-to-workpiece clearance over a wider range.

  17. Impulse radar with swept range gate

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-09-08

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. The antennas can be arranged in a side-by-side parallel spaced apart configuration or in a coplanar opposed configuration which significantly reduces main bang coupling. 25 figs.

  18. Impulse radar with swept range gate

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-09-08

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna (10), so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive (24) and transmit cavities (22) by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. The antennas can be arranged in a side-by-side parallel spaced apart configuration or in a coplanar opposed configuration which significantly reduces main bang coupling.

  19. Sample Return Primer and Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, Kirk; Cheuvront, Allan; Faris, Grant; Hirst, Edward; Mainland, Nora; McGee, Michael; Szalai, Christine; Vellinga, Joseph; Wahl, Thomas; Williams, Kenneth; Lee, Gentry; Duxbury, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This three-part Sample Return Primer and Handbook provides a road map for conducting the terminal phase of a sample return mission. The main chapters describe element-by-element analyses and trade studies, as well as required operations plans, procedures, contingencies, interfaces, and corresponding documentation. Based on the experiences of the lead Stardust engineers, the topics include systems engineering (in particular range safety compliance), mission design and navigation, spacecraft hardware and entry, descent, and landing certification, flight and recovery operations, mission assurance and system safety, test and training, and the very important interactions with external support organizations (non-NASA tracking assets, landing site support, and science curation).

  20. Atmospheric effects and ultimate ranging accuracy for lunar laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Douglas G.; Prochazka, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    The deployment of next generation lunar laser retroreflectors is planned in the near future. With proper robotic deployment, these will support single shot single photo-electron ranging accuracy at the 100 micron level or better. There are available technologies for the support at this accuracy by advanced ground stations, however, the major question is the ultimate limit imposed on the ranging accuracy due to the changing timing delays due to turbulence and horizontal gradients in the earth's atmosphere. In particular, there are questions of the delay and temporal broadening of a very narrow laser pulse. Theoretical and experimental results will be discussed that address estimates of the magnitudes of these effects and the issue of precision vs. accuracy.

  1. Selecting a Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of sampling methods that are appropriate for conducting online surveys. The authors review some of the basic concepts relevant to online survey sampling, present some probability and nonprobability techniques for selecting a sample, and briefly discuss sample size determination and nonresponse bias. Although some…

  2. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  3. Anatomy of a Mountain Range.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Berkeley

    1993-01-01

    Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

  4. Back Home on the Range.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breining, Greg

    1992-01-01

    Presents the history of the buffalo's demise and reemergence in the United States and Canada. Discusses the problems facing herds today caused by a small genetic pool, disease, range concerns, lack of predation, and culling. Points out the benefits of buffalo raising as compared to cattle raising, including the marketing advantages. (MCO)

  5. Relativity in Satellite Laser Ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, John C.

    2009-05-01

    Satellite laser ranging (SLR) is the measurement of the round-trip light time of ultra-short laser pulses to satellites deploying specifically designed retroreflectors. The ranging data are used to determine cm-precision satellite orbits, temporal variations in the Earth's gravity field, mm/yr accuracy determinations of station motion on a global scale, and fundamental physical constants. The SLR stations form an important part of the international network of space geodetic observatories that define and maintain the International Terrestrial Reference System. Starting in 1964, the precision of satellite laser ranging has improved from a few meters to a few mm for the better stations. With a measurement accuracy better than the part-per-billion level, the effects General Relativity must be considered. These include additional perturbations to the orbit dynamics, corrections to the round-trip light-time computation, and fundamental aspects of space-time in the definition of the geocentric reference frame. While these effects are significant, they are generally not large enough to provide useful tests of General Relativity. An important exception, however, is the relativistic prediction of the Lense-Thirring orbit precession, i.e the effect of `frame-dragging’ on the satellite orbit due to the spinning Earth's mass. While the signal is large enough to be easily observed with satellite laser ranging, the Lense-Thirring measurement uncertainty is limited by the knowledge of the even zonal harmonics of the Earth's gravity field that also produce Newtonian secular orbit precessions. However, this problem has been overcome with the dramatically improved models resulting from the joint NASA-DLR Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission. Using laser ranging to the LAGEOS satellites, it is possible to confirm the General Relativity prediction of the Lense-Thirring precession with an uncertainty better than 15%. This research was supported by the National

  6. Digital adaptive sampling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breazeale, G. J.; Jones, L. E.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of digital adaptive sampling, which is consistently better than fixed sampling in noise-free cases. Adaptive sampling is shown to be feasible and, it is considered, should be studied further. It should be noted that adaptive sampling is a class of variable rate sampling in which the variability depends on system signals. Digital rather than analog laws should be studied, because cases can arise in which the analog signals are not even available. An extremely important problem is implementation.

  7. Optimizing triangular mesh generation from range images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tianyu; Yun, David Y.

    2000-03-01

    An algorithm for the automatic reconstruction of triangular mesh surface model form range images is presented. The optimal piecewise linear surface approximation problem is defined as: given a set S of points uniformly sampled from a vibrate function f(x,y) on a rectangular grid of dimension W X H, find a minimum triangular mesh approximating the surface with vertices anchored at a subset S' of S, such that the deviation at any sample point is within a given bound of (epsilon) > 0. The algorithm deploys a multi- agent resource planning approach to achieve adaptive, accurate and concise piecewise linear approximation using the L-(infinity) norm. The resulting manifold triangular mesh can be directly used as 3D rendering model for visualization with controllable and guaranteed quality. Due to this dual optimality, the algorithm achieves both storage efficiency and visual quality. The error control scheme further facilitates the construction of models in multiple levels of details, which is desirable in animation and virtual reality moving scenes. Experiments with various benchmark range images form smooth functional surfaces to satellite terrain images yield succinct, accurate and visually pleasant triangular meshes. Furthermore, the independence and multiplicity of agents suggest a natural parallelism for triangulation computation, which provides a promising solution for the real-time exploration of large data sets.

  8. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Along its Oregon segment, the Cascade Range is almost entirely volcanic in origin. The volcanoes and their eroded remnants are the visible magmatic expression of the Cascadia subduction zone, where the offshore Juan de Fuca tectonic plate is subducted beneath North America. Subduction occurs as two lithospheric plates collide, and an underthrusted oceanic plate is commonly dragged into the mantle by the pull of gravity, carrying ocean-bottom rock and sediment down to where heat and pressure expel water. As this water rises, it lowers the melting temperature in the overlying hot mantle rocks, thereby promoting melting. The molten rock supplies the volcanic arcs with heat and magma. Cascade Range volcanoes are part of the Ring of Fire, a popular term for the numerous volcanic arcs that encircle the Pacific Ocean.

  9. Long range handheld thermal imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, Edward; Struckhoff, Andrew; McDaniel, Robert; Shamai, Shlomo

    2006-05-01

    Today's warfighter requires a lightweight, high performance thermal imager for use in night and reduced visibility conditions. To fill this need, the United States Marine Corps issued requirements for a Thermal Binocular System (TBS) Long Range Thermal Imager (LRTI). The requirements dictated that the system be lightweight, but still have significant range capabilities and extended operating time on a single battery load. Kollsman, Inc. with our partner Electro-Optics Industries, Ltd. (ElOp) responded to this need with the CORAL - a third-generation, Military Off-the-Shelf (MOTS) product that required very little modification to fully meet the LRTI specification. This paper will discuss the LRTI, a successful result of size, weight and power (SWaP) tradeoffs made to ensure a lightweight, but high performance thermal imager.

  10. Contrails reduce daily temperature range.

    PubMed

    Travis, David J; Carleton, Andrew M; Lauritsen, Ryan G

    2002-08-01

    The potential of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years, but was difficult to verify until an opportunity arose as a result of the three-day grounding of all commercial aircraft in the United States in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. Here we show that there was an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001. Because persisting contrails can reduce the transfer of both incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation and so reduce the daily temperature range, we attribute at least a portion of this anomaly to the absence of contrails over this period. PMID:12167846

  11. Contrails reduce daily temperature range.

    PubMed

    Travis, David J; Carleton, Andrew M; Lauritsen, Ryan G

    2002-08-01

    The potential of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years, but was difficult to verify until an opportunity arose as a result of the three-day grounding of all commercial aircraft in the United States in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. Here we show that there was an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001. Because persisting contrails can reduce the transfer of both incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation and so reduce the daily temperature range, we attribute at least a portion of this anomaly to the absence of contrails over this period.

  12. Hammersley Range, northern Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The oval shaped basin of the sedimentary rocks of the Hammersley Range, northern Western Australia (23.0S, 119.0E) dominates the center of this near nadir view. The Fortescue River is the remarkably straight, fault controlled feature bordering the Hammersley on the north. Sand dunes are the main surface features in the northeast and southwest. Many dry lakebeds can be seen to the east as light grey colored patches along the watercourses.

  13. Propagator for finite range potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Cacciari, Ilaria; Moretti, Paolo

    2006-12-15

    The Schroedinger equation in integral form is applied to the one-dimensional scattering problem in the case of a general finite range, nonsingular potential. A simple expression for the Laplace transform of the transmission propagator is obtained in terms of the associated Fredholm determinant, by means of matrix methods; the particular form of the kernel and the peculiar aspects of the transmission problem play an important role. The application to an array of delta potentials is shown.

  14. Range determination for scannerless imaging

    DOEpatents

    Muguira, Maritza Rosa; Sackos, John Theodore; Bradley, Bart Davis; Nellums, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A new method of operating a scannerless range imaging system (e.g., a scannerless laser radar) has been developed. This method is designed to compensate for nonlinear effects which appear in many real-world components. The system operates by determining the phase shift of the laser modulation, which is a physical quantity related physically to the path length between the laser source and the detector, for each pixel of an image.

  15. Range expansion of heterogeneous populations.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Matthias; Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

    2014-04-11

    Risk spreading in bacterial populations is generally regarded as a strategy to maximize survival. Here, we study its role during range expansion of a genetically diverse population where growth and motility are two alternative traits. We find that during the initial expansion phase fast-growing cells do have a selective advantage. By contrast, asymptotically, generalists balancing motility and reproduction are evolutionarily most successful. These findings are rationalized by a set of coupled Fisher equations complemented by stochastic simulations. PMID:24766021

  16. Range Expansion of Heterogeneous Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Matthias; Rulands, Steffen; Frey, Erwin

    2014-04-01

    Risk spreading in bacterial populations is generally regarded as a strategy to maximize survival. Here, we study its role during range expansion of a genetically diverse population where growth and motility are two alternative traits. We find that during the initial expansion phase fast-growing cells do have a selective advantage. By contrast, asymptotically, generalists balancing motility and reproduction are evolutionarily most successful. These findings are rationalized by a set of coupled Fisher equations complemented by stochastic simulations.

  17. Short-range communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A short-range communication system includes an antenna, a transmitter, and a receiver. The antenna is an electrical conductor formed as a planar coil with rings thereof being uniformly spaced. The transmitter is spaced apart from the plane of the coil by a gap. An amplitude-modulated and asynchronous signal indicative of a data stream of known peak amplitude is transmitted into the gap. The receiver detects the coil's resonance and decodes same to recover the data stream.

  18. The International Laser Ranging Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, M. R.; Degnan, J. J.; Bosworth, J. M.

    2002-07-01

    The International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) was established in September 1998 to support programs in geodetic, geophysical, and lunar research activities and to provide the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) with products important to the maintenance of an accurate International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Now in operation for nearly two years, the ILRS develops (1) the standards and specifications necessary for product consistency, and (2) the priorities and tracking strategies required to maximize network efficiency. The Service collects, merges, analyzes, archives and distributes satellite and lunar laser ranging data to satisfy a variety of scientific, engineering, and operational needs and encourages the application of new technologies to enhance the quality, quantity, and cost effectiveness of its data products. The ILRS works with (1) new satellite missions in the design and building of retroreflector targets to maximize data quality and quantity, and (2) science programs to optimize scientific data yield. The ILRS is organized into permanent components: (1) a Governing Board, (2) a Central Bureau, (3) Tracking Stations and Subnetworks, (4) Operations Centers, (5) Global and Regional Data Centers, and (6) Analysis, Lunar Analysis, and Associate Analysis Centers. The Governing Board, with broad representation from the international Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) community, provides overall guidance and defines service policies, while the Central Bureau oversees and coordinates the daily service activities, maintains scientific and technological data bases, and facilitates communications. Active Working Groups in (1) Missions, (2) Networks and Engineering, (3) Data Formats and Procedures, (4) Analysis, and (5) Signal Processing provide key operational and technical expertise to better exploit current capabilities and to challenge the ILRS participants to keep pace with evolving user needs. The ILRS currently

  19. Dual range infinitely variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Eichenberger, P.

    1989-10-31

    This patent describes in a transaxle assembly comprising an infinitely variably belt and sheave assembly driving sheave portions and driven sheave portions, a housing assembly enclosing the sheave portions. It includes a torque input shaft coaxially disposed with respect to the driving sheave portions, means for drivably connecting the driving sheave portions and the input shaft; a secondary shaft having an axis in spaced parallel relationship with respect to the torque input shaft. The driven sheave portions being mounted for rotation on the axis of the secondary shaft; a flexible drive member driveable connected to the input sheave portions and the output sheave portions. The flexible drive member engaging the input and output sheave portions at an effective pitch diameter for each sheave portion; fluid pressure servo means for adjustable positioning the sheave portions to effect variations in the effective pitch diameters of the driving sheave portions and the driven sheave portions; a countershaft mounted in spaced parallel dispositions with respect to the secondary shaft, a bearing assembly means for journalling the countershaft in the housing assembly, a high speed range gear train connecting the secondary shaft with the countershaft; fluid pressure operated clutch means for activating and deactivating selectively the high speed range gear train and the low speed range gear train; and planetary forward and reverse means disposed concentrically with respect to the countershaft including clutch means.

  20. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  1. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  2. Apollo 14 rock samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, I. C.

    1978-01-01

    Petrographic descriptions of all Apollo 14 samples larger than 1 cm in any dimension are presented. The sample description format consists of: (1) an introductory section which includes information on lunar sample location, orientation, and return containers, (2) a section on physical characteristics, which contains the sample mass, dimensions, and a brief description; (3) surface features, including zap pits, cavities, and fractures as seen in binocular view; (4) petrographic description, consisting of a binocular description and, if possible, a thin section description; and (5) a discussion of literature relevant to sample petrology is included for samples which have previously been examined by the scientific community.

  3. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  4. Stardust Sample: Investigator's Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carl

    2006-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust spacecraft returned the first in situ collection of samples from a comet, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust. Stardust is the first US sample return mission from a planetary body since Apollo, and the first ever from beyond the moon. This handbook is a basic reference source for allocation procedures and policies for Stardust samples. These samples consist of particles and particle residues in aerogel collectors, in aluminum foil, and in spacecraft components. Contamination control samples and unflown collection media are also available for allocation.

  5. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  6. Variable Sampling Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey, S.; Aronstein, David L.; Dean, Bruce H.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of an optical system (for example, a telescope) is limited by the misalignments and manufacturing imperfections of the optical elements in the system. The impact of these misalignments and imperfections can be quantified by the phase variations imparted on light traveling through the system. Phase retrieval is a methodology for determining these variations. Phase retrieval uses images taken with the optical system and using a light source of known shape and characteristics. Unlike interferometric methods, which require an optical reference for comparison, and unlike Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors that require special optical hardware at the optical system's exit pupil, phase retrieval is an in situ, image-based method for determining the phase variations of light at the system s exit pupil. Phase retrieval can be used both as an optical metrology tool (during fabrication of optical surfaces and assembly of optical systems) and as a sensor used in active, closed-loop control of an optical system, to optimize performance. One class of phase-retrieval algorithms is the iterative transform algorithm (ITA). ITAs estimate the phase variations by iteratively enforcing known constraints in the exit pupil and at the detector, determined from modeled or measured data. The Variable Sampling Mapping (VSM) technique is a new method for enforcing these constraints in ITAs. VSM is an open framework for addressing a wide range of issues that have previously been considered detrimental to high-accuracy phase retrieval, including undersampled images, broadband illumination, images taken at or near best focus, chromatic aberrations, jitter or vibration of the optical system or detector, and dead or noisy detector pixels. The VSM is a model-to-data mapping procedure. In VSM, fully sampled electric fields at multiple wavelengths are modeled inside the phase-retrieval algorithm, and then these fields are mapped to intensities on the light detector, using the properties

  7. N-pulse logic peak detection for laser radar range measurement of distributed range targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluckiger, David U.

    1988-08-01

    In this report N-pulse detection logic is discussed in the context of high angular resolution laser radar range processing. In the event that a resolved target is obscured by one or more unresolved scatterers such as wires, tree branches, camouflage netting, antennas, and the like, one sees multiple returns in the range I.F. due to the multiple scatterers in the line-of-sight path to the target. A laser radar that peak detects the N largest pulses in the range I.F. utilizes N-pulse peak detection logic. This report contains a discussion of the utility of N-pulse logic and also samples of data of N-pulse returns from trees and wires. A limit is found for the average resolvable distance between two scatterers based on Gaussian pulse shapes but not taking into account noise and target fluctuations (speckle).

  8. Superposition Enhanced Nested Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiniani, Stefano; Stevenson, Jacob D.; Wales, David J.; Frenkel, Daan

    2014-07-01

    The theoretical analysis of many problems in physics, astronomy, and applied mathematics requires an efficient numerical exploration of multimodal parameter spaces that exhibit broken ergodicity. Monte Carlo methods are widely used to deal with these classes of problems, but such simulations suffer from a ubiquitous sampling problem: The probability of sampling a particular state is proportional to its entropic weight. Devising an algorithm capable of sampling efficiently the full phase space is a long-standing problem. Here, we report a new hybrid method for the exploration of multimodal parameter spaces exhibiting broken ergodicity. Superposition enhanced nested sampling combines the strengths of global optimization with the unbiased or athermal sampling of nested sampling, greatly enhancing its efficiency with no additional parameters. We report extensive tests of this new approach for atomic clusters that are known to have energy landscapes for which conventional sampling schemes suffer from broken ergodicity. We also introduce a novel parallelization algorithm for nested sampling.

  9. GROUND WATER SAMPLING ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and
    remedial performance monitoring objectives. Issues which must be considered prior to initiating a ground-water monitoring program include defining monitoring goals and objectives, sampling point...

  10. Improved Sampling Method Reduces Isokinetic Sampling Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karels, Gale G.

    The particulate sampling system currently in use by the Bay Area Air Pollution Control District, San Francisco, California is described in this presentation for the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. The method represents a practical, inexpensive tool that can…

  11. Parallelized nested sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, R. Wesley; Goggans, Paul M.

    2014-12-01

    One of the important advantages of nested sampling as an MCMC technique is its ability to draw representative samples from multimodal distributions and distributions with other degeneracies. This coverage is accomplished by maintaining a number of so-called live samples within a likelihood constraint. In usual practice, at each step, only the sample with the least likelihood is discarded from this set of live samples and replaced. In [1], Skilling shows that for a given number of live samples, discarding only one sample yields the highest precision in estimation of the log-evidence. However, if we increase the number of live samples, more samples can be discarded at once while still maintaining the same precision. For computer code running only serially, this modification would considerably increase the wall clock time necessary to reach convergence. However, if we use a computer with parallel processing capabilities, and we write our code to take advantage of this parallelism to replace multiple samples concurrently, the performance penalty can be eliminated entirely and possibly reversed. In this case, we must use the more general equation in [1] for computing the expectation of the shrinkage distribution: E [- log t]= (N r-r+1)-1+(Nr-r+2)-1+⋯+Nr-1, for shrinkage t with Nr live samples and r samples discarded at each iteration. The equation for the variance Var (- log t)= (N r-r+1)-2+(Nr-r+2)-2+⋯+Nr-2 is used to find the appropriate number of live samples Nr to use with r > 1 to match the variance achieved with N1 live samples and r = 1. In this paper, we show that by replacing multiple discarded samples in parallel, we are able to achieve a more thorough sampling of the constrained prior distribution, reduce runtime, and increase precision.

  12. High Precision Laser Range Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge (Inventor); Lay, Oliver P. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is an improved distance measuring interferometer that includes high speed phase modulators and additional phase meters to generate and analyze multiple heterodyne signal pairs with distinct frequencies. Modulation sidebands with large frequency separation are generated by the high speed electro-optic phase modulators, requiring only a single frequency stable laser source and eliminating the need for a fist laser to be tuned or stabilized relative to a second laser. The combination of signals produced by the modulated sidebands is separated and processed to give the target distance. The resulting metrology apparatus enables a sensor with submicron accuracy or better over a multi- kilometer ambiguity range.

  13. Long range planning at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, Ivan

    1987-01-01

    NASA's current plans for the U.S. space program are described. Consideration is given to the debate between manned or unmanned exploration of space, missions to the moon versus missions to Mars, and the exploration of space applications or science. NASA has created the Office of Policy and Planning and the Office of Exploration in order to improve the planning of future space activities. Long-range trends such as second-generation Shuttles, cargo launch vehicles with large capacity systems, an advanced Space Station, the use of robotics, closed cycle life support, health maintenance techniques, and the processing of extraterrestrial materials are considered.

  14. Extended-range tiltable micromirror

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.; Wiens, Gloria J.; Bronson, Jessica R.

    2009-05-05

    A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

  15. Wide-range CCD spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Elena A.; Reyes Cortes, Santiago D.

    1996-08-01

    The utilization of wide range spectrometers is a very important feature for the design of optical diagnostics. This paper describes an innovative approach, based on charged coupled device, which allows to analyze different spectral intervals with the same diffraction grating. The spectral interval is varied by changing the position of the entrance slit when the grating is stationary. The optical system can also include a spherical mirror. In this case the geometric position of the mirror is calculated aiming at compensating the first order astigmatism and the meridional coma of the grating. This device is planned to be used in Thomson scattering diagnostic of the TOKAMAK of Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (ISTTOK).

  16. Wide-ranging sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The next time you sip a glass of wine from California's Napa Valley, you may want to offer a toast to NASA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). A new partnership between the two agencies could help to improve the management of vineyards there. The partnership, which will apply remote-sensing data from satellites to 13 initial research issues, also could improve scientists' understanding of wildfires, range management, floodplain drainage, and other resources.The goal of the research, according to NASA, is to accelerate the movement of remote sensing research results and data into the operational arena.

  17. Developing Water Sampling Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Participants in the D-19 symposium on aquatic sampling and measurement for water pollution assessment were informed that determining the extent of waste water stream pollution is not a cut and dry procedure. Topics discussed include field sampling, representative sampling from storm sewers, suggested sampler features and application of improved…

  18. SAMPLING OF CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of characterization of the amount and species of contamination of a hazardous waste site is the sampling plan developed for that site. f the sampling plan is not thoroughly conceptualized before sampling takes place, then certain critical aspects of the limits o...

  19. ORGANIC SPECIATION SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling artifacts for molecular markers from organic speciation of particulate matter were investigated by analyzing forty-one samples collected in Philadelphia as a part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NEOPS). Samples were collected using a high volume sampler ...

  20. Decision by Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Chater, Nick; Brown, Gordon D. A.

    2006-01-01

    We present a theory of decision by sampling (DbS) in which, in contrast with traditional models, there are no underlying psychoeconomic scales. Instead, we assume that an attribute's subjective value is constructed from a series of binary, ordinal comparisons to a sample of attribute values drawn from memory and is its rank within the sample. We…

  1. Short range radio locator system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers to sample the ether for the radar pulse. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information.

  2. The Ames Vertical Gun Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karcz, J. S.; Bowling, D.; Cornelison, C.; Parrish, A.; Perez, A.; Raiche, G.; Wiens, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) is a national facility for conducting laboratory- scale investigations of high-speed impact processes. It provides a set of light-gas, powder, and compressed gas guns capable of accelerating projectiles to speeds up to 7 km s(exp -1). The AVGR has a unique capability to vary the angle between the projectile-launch and gravity vectors between 0 and 90 deg. The target resides in a large chamber (diameter approximately 2.5 m) that can be held at vacuum or filled with an experiment-specific atmosphere. The chamber provides a number of viewing ports and feed-throughs for data, power, and fluids. Impacts are observed via high-speed digital cameras along with investigation-specific instrumentation, such as spectrometers. Use of the range is available via grant proposals through any Planetary Science Research Program element of the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) calls. Exploratory experiments (one to two days) are additionally possible in order to develop a new proposal.

  3. Range-Measuring Video Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Briscoe, Jeri M.; Corder, Eric L.; Broderick, David

    2006-01-01

    Optoelectronic sensors of a proposed type would perform the functions of both electronic cameras and triangulation- type laser range finders. That is to say, these sensors would both (1) generate ordinary video or snapshot digital images and (2) measure the distances to selected spots in the images. These sensors would be well suited to use on robots that are required to measure distances to targets in their work spaces. In addition, these sensors could be used for all the purposes for which electronic cameras have been used heretofore. The simplest sensor of this type, illustrated schematically in the upper part of the figure, would include a laser, an electronic camera (either video or snapshot), a frame-grabber/image-capturing circuit, an image-data-storage memory circuit, and an image-data processor. There would be no moving parts. The laser would be positioned at a lateral distance d to one side of the camera and would be aimed parallel to the optical axis of the camera. When the range of a target in the field of view of the camera was required, the laser would be turned on and an image of the target would be stored and preprocessed to locate the angle (a) between the optical axis and the line of sight to the centroid of the laser spot.

  4. Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1993-08-01

    The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  5. Range Imaging without Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Scott, V. Stanley, III; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Range-imaging instruments of a type now under development are intended to generate the equivalent of three-dimensional images from measurements of the round-trip times of flight of laser pulses along known directions. These instruments could also provide information on characteristics of targets, including roughnesses and reflectivities of surfaces and optical densities of such semi-solid objects as trees and clouds. Unlike in prior range-imaging instruments based on times of flight along known directions, there would be no moving parts; aiming of the laser beams along the known directions would not be accomplished by mechanical scanning of mirrors, prisms, or other optical components. Instead, aiming would be accomplished by using solid-state devices to switch input and output beams along different fiber-optic paths. Because of the lack of moving parts, these instruments could be extraordinarily reliable, rugged, and long-lasting. An instrument of this type would include an optical transmitter that would send out a laser pulse along a chosen direction to a target. An optical receiver coaligned with the transmitter would measure the temporally varying intensity of laser light reflected from the target to determine the distance and surface characteristics of the target. The transmitter would be a combination of devices for generating precise directional laser illumination. It would include a pulsed laser, the output of which would be coupled into a fiber-optic cable with a fan-out and solid-state optical switches that would enable switching of the laser beam onto one or more optical fibers terminated at known locations in an array on a face at the focal plane of a telescope. The array would be imaged by the telescope onto the target space. The receiver optical system could share the aforementioned telescope with the transmitter or could include a separate telescope aimed in the same direction as that of the transmitting telescope. In either case, light reflected

  6. Rockballer Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Cook, Brant T.

    2013-01-01

    It would be desirable to acquire rock and/or ice samples that extend below the surface of the parent rock or ice in extraterrestrial environments such as the Moon, Mars, comets, and asteroids. Such samples would allow measurements to be made further back into the geologic history of the rock, providing critical insight into the history of the local environment and the solar system. Such samples could also be necessary for sample return mission architectures that would acquire samples from extraterrestrial environments for return to Earth for more detailed scientific investigation.

  7. Rehearsal: Sample Canister in Cleanroom (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Rehearsal: Sample Canister in Cleanroom animation

    This movie shows rehearsal of the initial processing of the sample return capsule when it is taken to a temporary cleanroom at Utah's Test and Training Range.

  8. The Hera TGIP Sample Collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, M. A.; Sears, D. W. G.; Roe, L.; Buffington, J.; Venechuk, E.; Azouggagh-McBride, S.

    2004-11-01

    We are entering a phase of solar system exploration in which sample return is playing an increasingly important role. Many sample collectors have been developed or proposed, depending on the nature of the surface to be sampled and the complexity and cost of the mission. A collector for low-cost missions to bodies with regoliths is now being developed by the University of Arkansas as a touch-and-go-impregnable-pad (TGIP). TGIP is the collector on the Hera near-Earth asteroid sample return Discovery mission recently proposed to NASA. TGIP consists of a 1 cm deep layer of silicone grease, a high viscosity version of the oil used by NASA's cosmic dust collection program. The grease is encased within a retractable aluminum ring. A 12 cm disk can collect on the order of 100 g of material, ranging from dust to centimeter-sized fragments. By stacking collectors, the collected sample is protected from physical and chemical alteration until processing in the laboratory. We have recently completed collection, temperature, vacuum, impact, and radiation tests on this collector. The TGIP has a high collection efficiency, satisfactory vacuum performance, can withstand impacts of 2000 g (equivalent to direct re-entry without a parachute),and exposure to 640 times the radiation dose expected on a six-year mission. We are now developing procedures for processing the returned collectors, based on those used for the cosmic dust program.

  9. Spin models and boson sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Ripoll, Juan Jose; Peropadre, Borja; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    Aaronson & Arkhipov showed that predicting the measurement statistics of random linear optics circuits (i.e. boson sampling) is a classically hard problem for highly non-classical input states. A typical boson-sampling circuit requires N single photon emitters and M photodetectors, and it is a natural idea to rely on few-level systems for both tasks. Indeed, we show that 2M two-level emitters at the input and output ports of a general M-port interferometer interact via an XY-model with collective dissipation and a large number of dark states that could be used for quantum information storage. More important is the fact that, when we neglect dissipation, the resulting long-range XY spin-spin interaction is equivalent to boson sampling under the same conditions that make boson sampling efficient. This allows efficient implementations of boson sampling using quantum simulators & quantum computers. We acknowledge support from Spanish Mineco Project FIS2012-33022, CAM Research Network QUITEMAD+ and EU FP7 FET-Open Project PROMISCE.

  10. Sample Caching Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G.; Collins, Curtis L.

    2007-01-01

    A paper describes the Sample Caching Subsystem (SCS), a method for storing planetary core and soil samples in a container that seals the samples away from the environment to protect the integrity of the samples and any organics they might contain. This process places samples in individual sleeves that are sealed within a container for use by either the current mission or by following missions. A sample container is stored with its sleeves partially inserted. When a sample is ready to be contained, a transfer arm rotates over and grasps a sleeve, pulls it out of the container from below, rotates over and inserts the sleeve into a funnel where it is passively locked into place and then released from the arm. An external sampling tool deposits the sample into the sleeve, which is aligned with the tool via passive compliance of the funnel. After the sampling tool leaves the funnel, the arm retrieves the sleeve and inserts it all the way into the sample container. This action engages the seal. Full containers can be left behind for pick-up by subsequent science missions, and container dimensions are compatible for placement in a Mars Ascent Vehicle for later return to Earth.

  11. The Lunar Sample Compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Sample Compendium is a succinct summary of the data obtained from 40 years of study of Apollo and Luna samples of the Moon. Basic petrographic, chemical and age information is compiled, sample-by-sample, in the form of an advanced catalog in order to provide a basic description of each sample. The LSC can be found online using Google. The initial allocation of lunar samples was done sparingly, because it was realized that scientific techniques would improve over the years and new questions would be formulated. The LSC is important because it enables scientists to select samples within the context of the work that has already been done and facilitates better review of proposed allocations. It also provides back up material for public displays, captures information found only in abstracts, grey literature and curatorial databases and serves as a ready access to the now-vast scientific literature.

  12. Phylogenetic effective sample size.

    PubMed

    Bartoszek, Krzysztof

    2016-10-21

    In this paper I address the question-how large is a phylogenetic sample? I propose a definition of a phylogenetic effective sample size for Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes-the regression effective sample size. I discuss how mutual information can be used to define an effective sample size in the non-normal process case and compare these two definitions to an already present concept of effective sample size (the mean effective sample size). Through a simulation study I find that the AICc is robust if one corrects for the number of species or effective number of species. Lastly I discuss how the concept of the phylogenetic effective sample size can be useful for biodiversity quantification, identification of interesting clades and deciding on the importance of phylogenetic correlations. PMID:27343033

  13. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  14. Curation of Frozen Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, L. A.; Allen, C. C.; Bastien, R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Astromaterials Curator are charged by NPD 7100.10D with the curation of all of NASA s extraterrestrial samples, including those from future missions. This responsibility includes the development of new sample handling and preparation techniques; therefore, the Astromaterials Curator must begin developing procedures to preserve, prepare and ship samples at sub-freezing temperatures in order to enable future sample return missions. Such missions might include the return of future frozen samples from permanently-shadowed lunar craters, the nuclei of comets, the surface of Mars, etc. We are demonstrating the ability to curate samples under cold conditions by designing, installing and testing a cold curation glovebox. This glovebox will allow us to store, document, manipulate and subdivide frozen samples while quantifying and minimizing contamination throughout the curation process.

  15. Lunar Sample Compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Sample Compendium is a succinct summary of what has been learned from the study of Apollo and Luna samples of the Moon. Basic information is compiled, sample-by-sample, in the form of an advanced catalog in order to provide a basic description of each sample. Information presented is carefully attributed to the original source publication, thus the Compendium also serves as a ready access to the now vast scientific literature pertaining to lunar smples. The Lunar Sample Compendium is a work in progress (and may always be). Future plans include: adding sections on additional samples, adding new thin section photomicrographs, replacing the faded photographs with newly digitized photos from the original negatives, attempting to correct the age data using modern decay constants, adding references to each section, and adding an internal search engine.

  16. Urine sample collection protocols for bioassay samples

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.; McFadden, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In vitro radiobioassay analyses are used to measure the amount of radioactive material excreted by personnel exposed to the potential intake of radioactive material. The analytical results are then used with various metabolic models to estimate the amount of radioactive material in the subject's body and the original intake of radioactive material. Proper application of these metabolic models requires knowledge of the excretion period. It is normal practice to design the bioassay program based on a 24-hour excretion sample. The Hanford bioassay program simulates a total 24-hour urine excretion sample with urine collection periods lasting from one-half hour before retiring to one-half hour after rising on two consecutive days. Urine passed during the specified periods is collected in three 1-L bottles. Because the daily excretion volume given in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1975, p. 354) for Reference Man is 1.4 L, it was proposed to use only two 1-L bottles as a cost-saving measure. This raised the broader question of what should be the design capacity of a 24-hour urine sample kit.

  17. Urine sample collection protocols for bioassay samples

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.; McFadden, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In vitro radiobioassay analyses are used to measure the amount of radioactive material excreted by personnel exposed to the potential intake of radioactive material. The analytical results are then used with various metabolic models to estimate the amount of radioactive material in the subject`s body and the original intake of radioactive material. Proper application of these metabolic models requires knowledge of the excretion period. It is normal practice to design the bioassay program based on a 24-hour excretion sample. The Hanford bioassay program simulates a total 24-hour urine excretion sample with urine collection periods lasting from one-half hour before retiring to one-half hour after rising on two consecutive days. Urine passed during the specified periods is collected in three 1-L bottles. Because the daily excretion volume given in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1975, p. 354) for Reference Man is 1.4 L, it was proposed to use only two 1-L bottles as a cost-saving measure. This raised the broader question of what should be the design capacity of a 24-hour urine sample kit.

  18. Wind dynamic range video camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, G. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A television camera apparatus is disclosed in which bright objects are attenuated to fit within the dynamic range of the system, while dim objects are not. The apparatus receives linearly polarized light from an object scene, the light being passed by a beam splitter and focused on the output plane of a liquid crystal light valve. The light valve is oriented such that, with no excitation from the cathode ray tube, all light is rotated 90 deg and focused on the input plane of the video sensor. The light is then converted to an electrical signal, which is amplified and used to excite the CRT. The resulting image is collected and focused by a lens onto the light valve which rotates the polarization vector of the light to an extent proportional to the light intensity from the CRT. The overall effect is to selectively attenuate the image pattern focused on the sensor.

  19. Extended range tankless water heater

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.A.

    1993-04-18

    In this research program, a laboratory test facility was built for the purpose of testing a gas-fired water heating appliance. This test facility can be used to examine the important performance characteristics of efficiency, dynamic response, and quality of combustion. An innovative design for a tankless water heater was built and then tested to determine its performance characteristics. This unit was tested over a 5:1 range in input (20,000 to 100,000 btuh heat input). The unit was then configured as a circulating hot water boiler, and a specially designed heat exchanger was used with it to generate domestic hot water. This unit was also tested, and was found to offer performance advantages with regard to low flow and temperature stability.

  20. Wide Range SET Pulse Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L.; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    A method for measuring a wide range of SET pulses is demonstrated. Use of dynamic logic, faster than ordinary CMOS, allows capture of short pulses. A weighted binning of SET lengths allows measurement of a wide range of pulse lengths with compact circuitry. A pulse-length-conservative pulse combiner tree routes SETs from combinational logic to the measurement circuit, allowing SET measurements in circuits that cannot easily be arranged in long chains. The method is applied to add-multiplex combinational logic, and to an array of NFET routing switches, at .35 micron. Pulses are captured in a chain of Domino Logic AND gates. Propagation through the chain is frozen on the trailing edge by dropping low the second "enable" input to the AND gates. Capacitive loading is increased in the latter stages to create an approximately logarithmic weighted binning, so that a broad range of pulse lengths can be captured with a 10 stage capture chain. Simulations show pulses can be captured which are 1/5th the length of those typically captured with leading edge triggered latch methods, and less than the length of those captured with a trailing edge latch method. After capture, the pulse pattern is transferred to an SEU protected shift register for readout. 64 instances of each of two types of logic are used as targets. One is a full adder with a 4 to 1 mux on its inputs. The other is a 4 x 4 NFET routing matrix. The outputs are passed through buffered XNOR comparators to identify pulses, which are merged in a buffered not-nand (OR) tree designed to avoid pulse absorption as much as possible. The output from each of the two test circuits are input into separate pulse measurement circuits. Test inputs were provided so that the circuit could be bench tested and calibrated. A third SET measurement circuit with no inputs was used to judge the contribution from direct hits on the measurement circuit. Heavy ions were used with an LET range from 12 to 176. At LET of 21 and below, the very

  1. Space - The long range future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Puttkamer, J.

    1985-01-01

    Space exploration goals for NASA in the year 2000 time frame are examined. A lunar base would offer the opportunity for continuous earth viewing, further cosmogeochemical exploration and rudimentary steps at self-sufficiency in space. The latter two factors are also compelling reasons to plan a manned Mars base. Furthermore, competition and cooperation in a Mars mission and further interplanetary exploration is an attractive substitute for war. The hardware requirements for various configurations of Mars missions are briefly addressed, along with other, unmanned missions to the asteroid belt, Mercury, Venus, Jupiter and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Finally, long-range technological requirements for providing adequate living/working facilities for larger human populations in Space Station environments are summarized.

  2. Entropy-Based TOA Estimation and SVM-Based Ranging Error Mitigation in UWB Ranging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhendong; Cui, Kai; Wu, Zhilu; Yin, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The major challenges for Ultra-wide Band (UWB) indoor ranging systems are the dense multipath and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) problems of the indoor environment. To precisely estimate the time of arrival (TOA) of the first path (FP) in such a poor environment, a novel approach of entropy-based TOA estimation and support vector machine (SVM) regression-based ranging error mitigation is proposed in this paper. The proposed method can estimate the TOA precisely by measuring the randomness of the received signals and mitigate the ranging error without the recognition of the channel conditions. The entropy is used to measure the randomness of the received signals and the FP can be determined by the decision of the sample which is followed by a great entropy decrease. The SVM regression is employed to perform the ranging-error mitigation by the modeling of the regressor between the characteristics of received signals and the ranging error. The presented numerical simulation results show that the proposed approach achieves significant performance improvements in the CM1 to CM4 channels of the IEEE 802.15.4a standard, as compared to conventional approaches. PMID:26007726

  3. Entropy-Based TOA Estimation and SVM-Based Ranging Error Mitigation in UWB Ranging Systems.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhendong; Cui, Kai; Wu, Zhilu; Yin, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The major challenges for Ultra-wide Band (UWB) indoor ranging systems are the dense multipath and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) problems of the indoor environment. To precisely estimate the time of arrival (TOA) of the first path (FP) in such a poor environment, a novel approach of entropy-based TOA estimation and support vector machine (SVM) regression-based ranging error mitigation is proposed in this paper. The proposed method can estimate the TOA precisely by measuring the randomness of the received signals and mitigate the ranging error without the recognition of the channel conditions. The entropy is used to measure the randomness of the received signals and the FP can be determined by the decision of the sample which is followed by a great entropy decrease. The SVM regression is employed to perform the ranging-error mitigation by the modeling of the regressor between the characteristics of received signals and the ranging error. The presented numerical simulation results show that the proposed approach achieves significant performance improvements in the CM1 to CM4 channels of the IEEE 802.15.4a standard, as compared to conventional approaches.

  4. Understanding synthesis imaging dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.

    2013-03-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution to the visibility data is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact on a complete observation can be assessed when a particular effect is not captured in the instrumental calibration. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget analysis to a wide range of existing and planned telescope systems that will operate between about 100 MHz and 5 GHz to ascertain the magnitude of the calibration challenges that they must overcome to achieve thermal noise limited performance. We conclude that calibration challenges are increased in several respects by small dimensions of the dishes or aperture array stations. It will be more challenging to achieve thermal noise limited performance using 15 m class dishes rather than the 25 m dishes of current arrays. Some of the performance risks are mitigated by the deployment of phased array feeds and more with the choice of an (alt,az,pol) mount, although a larger dish diameter offers the best prospects for risk mitigation. Many improvements to imaging performance can be anticipated at the expense of greater complexity in calibration algorithms. However, a fundamental limitation is ultimately imposed by an insufficient number of data constraints relative to calibration variables. The upcoming aperture array systems will be operating in a regime that has never previously been addressed, where a wide range of effects are expected to exceed the thermal noise by two to three orders of magnitude. Achieving routine thermal noise limited imaging performance with these systems presents an extreme challenge. The magnitude of that challenge is inversely related to the aperture array station diameter.

  5. Wide speed range turboshaft study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, Martin

    1995-01-01

    NASA-Lewis and NASA-Ames have sponsored a series of studies over the last few years to identify key high speed rotorcraft propulsion and airframe technologies. NASA concluded from these studies that for near term aircraft with cruise speeds up to 450 kt, tilting rotor rotorcraft concepts are the most economical and technologically viable. The propulsion issues critical to tilting rotor rotorcraft are: (1) high speed cruise propulsion system efficiency and (2) adequate power to hover safely with one engine inoperative. High speed cruise propeller efficiency can be dramatically improved by reducing rotor speed, yet high rotor speed is critical for good hover performance. With a conventional turboshaft, this wide range of power turbine operating speeds would result in poor engine performance at one or more of these critical operating conditions. This study identifies several wide speed range turboshaft concepts, and analyzes their potential to improve performance at the diverse cruise and hover operating conditions. Many unique concepts were examined, and the selected concepts are simple, low cost, relatively low risk, and entirely contained within the power turbine. These power turbine concepts contain unique, incidence tolerant airfoil designs that allow the engine to cruise efficiently at 51 percent of the hover rotor speed. Overall propulsion system efficiency in cruise is improved as much as 14 percent, with similar improvements in engine weight and cost. The study is composed of a propulsion requirement survey, a concept screening study, a preliminary definition and evaluation of selected concepts, and identification of key technologies and development needs. In addition, a civil transport tilting rotor rotorcraft mission analysis was performed to show the benefit of these concepts versus a conventional turboshaft. Other potential applications for this technology are discussed.

  6. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they have been used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts--as well as the other parameters--can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  7. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    A new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases is described. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they were used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts - as well as the other parameters - can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline - resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  8. Sampling diffusive transition paths

    SciTech Connect

    F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

    2006-10-12

    We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

  9. Compositional range in the Canyon Diablo meteoroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.; Ouyang, Xinwei

    1990-11-01

    The compositional range within the Canyon Diablo (CD) iron meteorites associated with the formation of the Meteor Crater (Arizona) was examined, using the INAA to analyze a set of CD samples consisting of nine irons collected within 7 km of the Meteor Crater, four Arizona IAB irons that were identified by Wasson (1968) as transported CD fragments, and irons from Las Vegas (Nevada) and Moab (Utah) that Buchwald (1975) suggested to be transported CD fragments. Results show that the irons named Helt Township, Idaho, Las Vegas, Mamaroneck, Moab, and Pulaski County are, most likely, mislabeled CD specimens. On the other hand, meteorites named Alexander County, Allan Hills A77283, Ashfork, Fairfield, and Rifle are identified as compositionally distinct independent falls.

  10. Compositional range in the Canyon Diablo meteoroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, John T.; Ouyang, Xinwei

    1990-01-01

    The compositional range within the Canyon Diablo (CD) iron meteorites associated with the formation of the Meteor Crater (Arizona) was examined, using the INAA to analyze a set of CD samples consisting of nine irons collected within 7 km of the Meteor Crater, four Arizona IAB irons that were identified by Wasson (1968) as transported CD fragments, and irons from Las Vegas (Nevada) and Moab (Utah) that Buchwald (1975) suggested to be transported CD fragments. Results show that the irons named Helt Township, Idaho, Las Vegas, Mamaroneck, Moab, and Pulaski County are, most likely, mislabeled CD specimens. On the other hand, meteorites named Alexander County, Allan Hills A77283, Ashfork, Fairfield, and Rifle are identified as compositionally distinct independent falls.

  11. Sample Results from Routine Salt Batch 7 Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.

    2015-05-13

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the “microbatches” of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 7B have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES), and Ion Chromatography Anions (IC-A). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from earlier samples from this and previous macrobatches. The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) continue to show more than adequate Pu and Sr removal, and there is a distinct positive trend in Cs removal, due to the use of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) notes that historically, most measured Concentration Factor (CF) values during salt processing have been in the 12-14 range. However, recent processing gives CF values closer to 11. This observation does not indicate that the solvent performance is suffering, as the Decontamination Factor (DF) has still maintained consistently high values. Nevertheless, SRNL will continue to monitor for indications of process upsets. The bulk chemistry of the DSSHT and SEHT samples do not show any signs of unusual behavior.

  12. Sampling in Qualitative Research

    PubMed Central

    LUBORSKY, MARK R.; RUBINSTEIN, ROBERT L.

    2011-01-01

    In gerontology the most recognized and elaborate discourse about sampling is generally thought to be in quantitative research associated with survey research and medical research. But sampling has long been a central concern in the social and humanistic inquiry, albeit in a different guise suited to the different goals. There is a need for more explicit discussion of qualitative sampling issues. This article will outline the guiding principles and rationales, features, and practices of sampling in qualitative research. It then describes common questions about sampling in qualitative research. In conclusion it proposes the concept of qualitative clarity as a set of principles (analogous to statistical power) to guide assessments of qualitative sampling in a particular study or proposal. PMID:22058580

  13. Sampling functions for geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.; Lunquist, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A set of spherical sampling functions is defined such that they are related to spherical-harmonic functions in the same way that the sampling functions of information theory are related to sine and cosine functions. An orderly distribution of (N + 1) squared sampling points on a sphere is given, for which the (N + 1) squared spherical sampling functions span the same linear manifold as do the spherical-harmonic functions through degree N. The transformations between the spherical sampling functions and the spherical-harmonic functions are given by recurrence relations. The spherical sampling functions of two arguments are extended to three arguments and to nonspherical reference surfaces. Typical applications of this formalism to geophysical topics are sketched.

  14. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  15. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  16. Short range radio locator system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information. 5 figs.

  17. Statistical distribution sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Determining the distribution of statistics by sampling was investigated. Characteristic functions, the quadratic regression problem, and the differential equations for the characteristic functions are analyzed.

  18. Nested sampling with demons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at Skilling's nested sampling from a physical perspective and interprets it as a microcanonical demon algorithm. Using key quantities of statistical physics we investigate the performance of nested sampling on complex systems such as Ising, Potts and protein models. We show that releasing multiple demons helps to smooth the truncated prior and eases sampling from it because the demons keep the particle off the constraint boundary. For continuous systems it is straightforward to extend this approach and formulate a phase space version of nested sampling that benefits from correlated explorations guided by Hamiltonian dynamics.

  19. Wide-range voltage modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, K.R.; Wilson, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider`s Medium Energy Booster Abort (MEBA) kicker modulator will supply a current pulse to the abort magnets which deflect the proton beam from the MEB ring into a designated beam stop. The abort kicker will be used extensively during testing of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the MEB rings. When the Collider is in full operation, the MEBA kicker modulator will abort the MEB beam in the event of a malfunction during the filling process. The modulator must generate a 14-{mu}s wide pulse with a rise time of less than 1 {mu}s, including the delay and jitter times. It must also be able to deliver a current pulse to the magnet proportional to the beam energy at any time during ramp-up of the accelerator. Tracking the beam energy, which increases from 12 GeV at injection to 200 GeV at extraction, requires the modulator to operate over a wide range of voltages (4 kV to 80 kV). A vacuum spark gap and a thyratron have been chosen for test and evaluation as candidate switches for the abort modulator. Modulator design, switching time delay, jitter and pre-fire data are presented.

  20. Gastrointestinal parasites of free-range chickens.

    PubMed

    Tomza-Marciniak, Agnieszka; Pilarczyk, Bogumiła; Tobiańska, Berenika; Tarasewicz, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and intensity of parasitic gastrointestinal infections in free-range chickens from the West Pomerania province. Experimental material for the study was taken from 10 farms. Breeds raised in farms participating in the study included miniature chickens called Polish Lilliputians and Green- legged Partridge. A total of 104 samples of faeces were examined. The Willis-Schlaff flotation method was used to assess the prevalence of infection, and McMaster's method to evaluate the intensity. The presence of gastrointestinal parasites was found in 9 of the 10 farms. Oocysts of the genus Eimeria and eggs of gastrointestinal nematodes Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Trichostrongylus tenuis were isolated from the chicken faeces. Coccidiosis was found to be dominant parasitosis. The prevalence of infections on these farms with protozoa of Eimeria spp. was on average 32.7%, while for nematode species they amounted to 9.6% for Ascaridia galli, 5.7% for Heterakis gallinarum and 12.5% for Trichostrongylus tenuis. The results indicate the need to take preventive measures, designed to eliminate/reduce the risk of parasitoses in poultry from free-range systems. Focus should be placed on the hygiene of the farming conditions.

  1. Evaluation of dynamically dimensioned search algorithm for optimizing SWAT by altering sampling distributions and searching range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary advantage of Dynamically Dimensioned Search algorithm (DDS) is that it outperforms many other optimization techniques in both convergence speed and the ability in searching for parameter sets that satisfy statistical guidelines while requiring only one algorithm parameter (perturbation f...

  2. Trans fatty acids in a range of UK processed foods.

    PubMed

    Roe, Mark; Pinchen, Hannah; Church, Susan; Elahi, Selvarani; Walker, Margaret; Farron-Wilson, Melanie; Buttriss, Judith; Finglas, Paul

    2013-10-01

    A survey to determine the trans fatty acid content of a range of processed foods was carried out in response to recent reformulation work by the food industry to lower the artificial trans fatty acid content of processed products. Sixty two composite samples, made up of between 5 and 12 sub-samples, were collected in 2010 and were analysed for fatty acids, and a range of nutrients. The foods analysed included pizza, garlic bread, breakfast cereals, quiche, fat spreads, a range of fish and meat products, chips, savoury snacks, confectionery and ice cream. Levels of trans fatty acids were reduced considerably compared with previous UK analyses of similar foods where comparisons are possible. Concentrations of trans elaidic acid (t9-C18:1) from hydrogenated oils in all samples were <0.2g/100g food. These results confirm information provided by the food industry in 2007 on the levels of trans fats in key processed food sectors.

  3. Batch Gas-Sampling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Vernon, Jr.; Miller, E. L.; Rollins, F. P.

    1986-01-01

    Sampler collects air or other gases in consistent way and stabilizes them for later chemical analysis. Device used for concentrations ranging from few parts per million to 100 percent. Also separates and collects particles in gas for analysis. Gas flows into vacuum sphere when solenoid valve opened. As it passes through conversion tube, constituent of gas forms stable compound that remains in conversion tube for analysis at later time. Sampler parts made of glass, polytetrafluoroethylene, and stainless steel so they do not react with sample.

  4. Magnetic studies of lunar samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doell, Richard R.; Gromme, S.C.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.

    1970-01-01

    The remanent magnetism of a lunar type C breccia sample includes a large viscous component with a time constant of several hours, and a high coercivity remanence, possibly acquired by impact processes on the lunar surface. Ilmenite(?) and metallic iron in breccias, and ferrous and metallic iron in glass beads separated from lunar fines (type D) were identified by high-field and low-temperature experiments. The iron appears to occur in a wide range of grain sizes including the single domain and multidomain states.

  5. Urine sample (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... catch" urine sample is performed by collecting the sample of urine in midstream. Men or boys should wipe clean the head of the penis. Women or girls need to wash the area between the lips of the vagina with soapy water and rinse well. A small amount of urine ...

  6. National Sample Assessment Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    These protocols represent a working guide for planning and implementing national sample assessments in connection with the national Key Performance Measures (KPMs). The protocols are intended for agencies involved in planning or conducting national sample assessments and personnel responsible for administering associated tenders or contracts,…

  7. Adaptive Sampling Proxy Application

    2012-10-22

    ASPA is an implementation of an adaptive sampling algorithm [1-3], which is used to reduce the computational expense of computer simulations that couple disparate physical scales. The purpose of ASPA is to encapsulate the algorithms required for adaptive sampling independently from any specific application, so that alternative algorithms and programming models for exascale computers can be investigated more easily.

  8. Creating Sample Plans

    1999-03-24

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to bemore » analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.« less

  9. Sampling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  10. Biological sample collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  11. Environmental survey of the B-3 and Ford's Farm ranges.

    SciTech Connect

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Waite, D.A.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1983-08-01

    The Army has been firing depleted-uranium (DU) projectiles into targets on the Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. An environmental survey was conducted of two areas known as the B-3 range and the Ford's Farm range to determine the location of DU in their environments. The survey included ground survey measurements and some environmental sampling. Several special studies were also conducted, including analyses of the isotopic composition of uranium in a limited number of samples and a dissolution rate study to estimate the solubility of DU dust in sea and river water.

  12. Rapid Active Sampling Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    A field-deployable, battery-powered Rapid Active Sampling Package (RASP), originally designed for sampling strong materials during lunar and planetary missions, shows strong utility for terrestrial geological use. The technology is proving to be simple and effective for sampling and processing materials of strength. Although this originally was intended for planetary and lunar applications, the RASP is very useful as a powered hand tool for geologists and the mining industry to quickly sample and process rocks in the field on Earth. The RASP allows geologists to surgically acquire samples of rock for later laboratory analysis. This tool, roughly the size of a wrench, allows the user to cut away swaths of weathering rinds, revealing pristine rock surfaces for observation and subsequent sampling with the same tool. RASPing deeper (.3.5 cm) exposes single rock strata in-situ. Where a geologist fs hammer can only expose unweathered layers of rock, the RASP can do the same, and then has the added ability to capture and process samples into powder with particle sizes less than 150 microns, making it easier for XRD/XRF (x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence). The tool uses a rotating rasp bit (or two counter-rotating bits) that resides inside or above the catch container. The container has an open slot to allow the bit to extend outside the container and to allow cuttings to enter and be caught. When the slot and rasp bit are in contact with a substrate, the bit is plunged into it in a matter of seconds to reach pristine rock. A user in the field may sample a rock multiple times at multiple depths in minutes, instead of having to cut out huge, heavy rock samples for transport back to a lab for analysis. Because of the speed and accuracy of the RASP, hundreds of samples can be taken in one day. RASP-acquired samples are small and easily carried. A user can characterize more area in less time than by using conventional methods. The field-deployable RASP used a Ni

  13. Waste classification sampling plan

    SciTech Connect

    Landsman, S.D.

    1998-05-27

    The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

  14. Sampling video compression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Lum, H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A system for transmitting video signal of compressed bandwidth is described. The transmitting station is provided with circuitry for dividing a picture to be transmitted into a plurality of blocks containing a checkerboard pattern of picture elements. Video signals along corresponding diagonal rows of picture elements in the respective blocks are regularly sampled. A transmitter responsive to the output of the sampling circuitry is included for transmitting the sampled video signals of one frame at a reduced bandwidth over a communication channel. The receiving station is provided with a frame memory for temporarily storing transmitted video signals of one frame at the original high bandwidth frequency.

  15. Sample positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Thomas H.; Johnson, Jr., Charles H.; Lane, Robert L.; Martin, Bradley E.; Tyree, William H.

    1976-01-06

    Apparatus for use in alpha particle counting with such as photomultiplier tubes, comprising a platform and linkage mechanism whereby samples are moved in linear manner toward and away from ends of the photomultiplier tubes.

  16. Lunar sample contracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The major scientific accomplishments through 1971 are reported for the particle track studies of lunar samples. Results are discussed of nuclear track measurements by optical and electron microscopy, thermoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, and differential thermal analysis.

  17. [Foetal sampling techniques].

    PubMed

    Levy, R; Arfi, J-S; Daffos, F

    2003-06-01

    This article describes the current techniques of foetal sampling. All of them are actually ultrasound guided, and therefore generally very safe. Nevertheless, an elaborate learning process remains indispensable, in addition to a particular attention to the quality of the physician-patient dialogue. The choice of a technique depends on the indication and on the term of the pregnancy. The most frequently used technique is amniocentesis which presents a low risk of foetal loss, estimated between 0.2 and 0.5 percent. The interest of chorionic villus sampling is the possibility to obtain results at an earlier stage of pregnancy, with a lower risk taking when compared to early amniocentesis. We prefer the transabdominal chorionic villus sampling to the transvaginal. Foetal blood sampling is still required in some cases, but the risk of complications is higher--around 1 percent. PMID:12865196

  18. Water Sample Concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2009-07-21

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  19. Sealed container sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Sampling device, by means of a tapered needle, pierces a sealed container while maintaining the seal and either evacuates or pressurizes the container. This device has many applications in the chemical, preservative and battery-manufacturing industries.

  20. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-07-12

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  1. Restricted sample variance reduces generalizability.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Kimberley D

    2013-06-01

    One factor that affects the reliability of observed scores is restriction of range on the construct measured for a particular group of study participants. This study illustrates how researchers can use generalizability theory to evaluate the impact of restriction of range in particular sample characteristics on the generalizability of test scores and to estimate how changes in measurement design could improve the generalizability of the test scores. An observer-rated measure of child self-regulation (Response to Challenge Scale; Lakes, 2011) is used to examine scores for 198 children (Grades K through 5) within the generalizability theory (GT) framework. The generalizability of ratings within relatively developmentally homogeneous samples is examined and illustrates the effect of reduced variance among ratees on generalizability. Forecasts for g coefficients of various D study designs demonstrate how higher generalizability could be achieved by increasing the number of raters or items. In summary, the research presented illustrates the importance of and procedures for evaluating the generalizability of a set of scores in a particular research context. PMID:23205627

  2. TRU waste-sampling program

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.L.; Zerwekh, A.

    1985-08-01

    As part of a TRU waste-sampling program, Los Alamos National Laboratory retrieved and examined 44 drums of /sup 238/Pu- and /sup 239/Pu-contaminated waste. The drums ranged in age from 8 months to 9 years. The majority of drums were tested for pressure, and gas samples withdrawn from the drums were analyzed by a mass spectrometer. Real-time radiography and visual examination were used to determine both void volumes and waste content. Drum walls were measured for deterioration, and selected drum contents were reassayed for comparison with original assays and WIPP criteria. Each drum tested at atmospheric pressure. Mass spectrometry revealed no problem with /sup 239/Pu-contaminated waste, but three 8-month-old drums of /sup 238/Pu-contaminated waste contained a potentially hazardous gas mixture. Void volumes fell within the 81 to 97% range. Measurements of drum walls showed no significant corrosion or deterioration. All reassayed contents were within WIPP waste acceptance criteria. Five of the drums opened and examined (15%) could not be certified as packaged. Three contained free liquids, one had corrosive materials, and one had too much unstabilized particulate. Eleven drums had the wrong (or not the most appropriate) waste code. In many cases, disposal volumes had been inefficiently used. 2 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  4. TANK 5 SAMPLING

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettos, N; William Cheng, W; Thomas Nance, T

    2007-11-26

    Tank 5 at the Savannah River Site has been used to store high level waste and is currently undergoing waste removal processes in preparation for tank closure. Samples were taken from two locations to determine the contents in support of Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development for chemical cleaning. These samples were obtained through the use of the Drop Core Sampler and the Snowbank Sampler developed by the Engineered Equipment & Systems (EES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

  5. Lunar Sample Compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Lunar Sample Compendium will be to inform scientists, astronauts and the public about the various lunar samples that have been returned from the Moon. This Compendium will be organized rock by rock in the manor of a catalog, but will not be as comprehensive, nor as complete, as the various lunar sample catalogs that are available. Likewise, this Compendium will not duplicate the various excellent books and reviews on the subject of lunar samples (Cadogen 1981, Heiken et al. 1991, Papike et al. 1998, Warren 2003, Eugster 2003). However, it is thought that an online Compendium, such as this, will prove useful to scientists proposing to study individual lunar samples and should help provide backup information for lunar sample displays. This Compendium will allow easy access to the scientific literature by briefly summarizing the significant findings of each rock along with the documentation of where the detailed scientific data are to be found. In general, discussion and interpretation of the results is left to the formal reviews found in the scientific literature. An advantage of this Compendium will be that it can be updated, expanded and corrected as need be.

  6. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  7. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  8. Dynamic range compression with ProteoMiner™: principles and examples.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in proteomics investigation, protein biomarker research, and protein purity and contamination analysis is how to efficiently enrich and detect low-abundance proteins in biological samples. One approach that makes the detection of rare species possible is the treatment of biological samples with solid-phase combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, ProteoMiner. This method utilizes hexapeptide bead library with huge diversity to bind and enrich low-abundance proteins but remove most of the high-abundance proteins, therefore compresses the protein abundance range in the samples. This work describes optimized protocols and highlights on the successful application of ProteoMiner to protein identification and analysis.

  9. 40 CFR 421.314 - Standards of performance for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the range of 7.5 to 10.0 at all times. (h) Crystallization decant. NSPS for the Secondary Tungsten and.... (i) Acid wash decant. NSPS for the Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory Pollutant or...

  10. 40 CFR 421.314 - Standards of performance for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the range of 7.5 to 10.0 at all times. (h) Crystallization decant. NSPS for the Secondary Tungsten and.... (i) Acid wash decant. NSPS for the Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory Pollutant or...

  11. 40 CFR 421.314 - Standards of performance for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the range of 7.5 to 10.0 at all times. (h) Crystallization decant. NSPS for the Secondary Tungsten and.... (i) Acid wash decant. NSPS for the Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory Pollutant or...

  12. 40 CFR 421.314 - Standards of performance for new sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the range of 7.5 to 10.0 at all times. (h) Crystallization decant. NSPS for the Secondary Tungsten and.... (i) Acid wash decant. NSPS for the Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory Pollutant or...

  13. Multipulse gate-delayed range gating imaging lidar.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Chenfei; Wu, Jie

    2011-04-15

    We present a technique to reconstruct a higher resolution of depth map of range gating imaging lidar by applying the delays of the gates to a typical range gating lidar system during the detection of each returned laser pulse with the encoding of the returned signal. With the consequent delays of the gate, the depth of the scene is extended accordingly. A multipulse gate-delayed range gating lidar system is designed to prove the resolution improvement from 6 to 1.5 m. The unchanged peak power of the laser, the widths of the laser pulse and the sampling period result in a simple structure of the lidar system. PMID:21499358

  14. Two-stage sequential sampling: A neighborhood-free adaptive sampling procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salehi, M.; Smith, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    Designing an efficient sampling scheme for a rare and clustered population is a challenging area of research. Adaptive cluster sampling, which has been shown to be viable for such a population, is based on sampling a neighborhood of units around a unit that meets a specified condition. However, the edge units produced by sampling neighborhoods have proven to limit the efficiency and applicability of adaptive cluster sampling. We propose a sampling design that is adaptive in the sense that the final sample depends on observed values, but it avoids the use of neighborhoods and the sampling of edge units. Unbiased estimators of population total and its variance are derived using Murthy's estimator. The modified two-stage sampling design is easy to implement and can be applied to a wider range of populations than adaptive cluster sampling. We evaluate the proposed sampling design by simulating sampling of two real biological populations and an artificial population for which the variable of interest took the value either 0 or 1 (e.g., indicating presence and absence of a rare event). We show that the proposed sampling design is more efficient than conventional sampling in nearly all cases. The approach used to derive estimators (Murthy's estimator) opens the door for unbiased estimators to be found for similar sequential sampling designs. ?? 2005 American Statistical Association and the International Biometric Society.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance properties of lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, D.; Weeks, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of Na-23, Al-27, and P-31 in fines samples 10084,60 and 14163,168 and in crystalline rock samples 12021,55 and 14321,166, have been recorded over a range of frequencies up to 20 MHz. A shift in the field at which maximum absorption occurs for all of the spectra relative to the field at which maximum absorption occurs for terrestrial analogues is attributed to a sample-dependent magnetic field at the Na, Al, and P sites opposing the laboratory field. The magnitude of these fields internal to the samples is sample dependent and varies from 5 to 10 G. These fields do not correlate with the iron content of the samples. However, the presence of single-domain particles of iron distributed throughout the plagioclase fraction that contains the principal fraction of Na and Al is inferred from electron magnetic resonance spectra shapes.

  16. Sample Acquisition Techniques for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Stratton, David M.; Valentin, Jose R.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Exobiology Flight Experiments involve complex analyses conducted in environments far different than those encountered in terrestrial applications. A major part of the analytical challenge is often the selection, acquisition, delivery and, in some cases, processing of a sample suitable for the analytical requirements of the mission. The added complications of severely limited resources and sometimes rigid time constraints combine to make sample acquisition potentially a major obstacle for successful analyses. Potential samples come in a wide range including planetary atmospheric gas and aerosols (from a wide variety of pressures), planetary soil or rocks, dust and ice particles streaming off of a comet, and cemetery surface ice and rocks. Methods to collect and process sample are often mission specific, requiring continual development of innovative concepts and mechanisms. These methods must also maintain the integrity of the sample for the experimental results to be meaningful. We present here sample acquisition systems employed from past missions and proposed for future missions.

  17. Sample Return Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, K. H.; Allwood, A.; Beegle, L. W.; Bhartia, R.; Flannery, D.; Hoffmann, A.; Mora, M. F.; Orbay, J.; Petrizzo, D. A.; Tuite, M. L., Jr.; Willis, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The first clear identification of an ancient habitable environment on Mars by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission relied on a synthetic analytical approach combining orbital and surface imagery and spectroscopy with sophisticated sample acquisition and handling technology including a rotary percussive drill that provided powdered rock for bulk geochemical analysis [1]. The recent announcement of the instrument package for the proposed NASA Mars2020 rover mission, including micro x-ray fluorescence (PIXL) for elemental mapping as well as scanning ultraviolet laser fluorescence and Raman (SHERLOC) suggests a shift in emphasis of Mars surface science towards spatially resolved geochemical analysis that will support the selection and acquisition of samples for coring, caching, and possible return to Earth for further analysis. During a recent field expedition to investigate Archean and Proterozoic biosignatures in the Pilbara region of Western Australia, we deployed a dry, rotary percussive coring drill with a bit assembly analogous to that being considered for Mars2020. Six targets of varying age and lithology were sampled with the coring drill, and surrounding and adjacent rock samples were collected simultaneously. These samples were subsequently prepared and subsampled for bulk and in situ, spatially resolved analysis using conventional laboratory methods as well as the existing PIXL and SHERLOC platforms currently in development. Here we present new approaches and data from this integrated and ongoing program of "sample return science" designed to simulate, and eventually reduce risk associated with a long-term effort towards Mars sample return. [1] Grotzinger, J.P. et al. 2014. Science 343 DOI: 10.1126/science.1242777.

  18. Sampling methods for phlebotomine sandflies.

    PubMed

    Alexander, B

    2000-06-01

    A review is presented of methods for sampling phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae). Among approximately 500 species of Phlebotominae so far described, mostly in the New World genus Lutzomyia and the Old World genus Phlebotomus, about 10% are known vectors of Leishmania parasites or other pathogens. Despite being small and fragile, sandflies have a wide geographical range with species occupying a considerable diversity of ecotopes and habitats, from deserts to humid forests, so that suitable methods for collecting them are influenced by environmental conditions where they are sought. Because immature phlebotomines occupy obscure terrestrial habitats, it is difficult to find their breeding sites. Therefore, most trapping methods and sampling procedures focus on sandfly adults, whether resting or active. The diurnal resting sites of adult sandflies include tree holes, buttress roots, rock crevices, houses, animal shelters and burrows, from which they may be aspirated directly or trapped after being disturbed. Sandflies can be collected during their periods of activity by interception traps, or by using attractants such as bait animals, CO2 or light. The method of trapping used should: (a) be suited to the habitat and area to be surveyed, (b) take into account the segment of the sandfly population to be sampled (species, sex and reproduction condition) and (c) yield specimens of appropriate condition for the study objectives (e.g. identification of species present, population genetics or vector implication). Methods for preservation and transportation of sandflies to the laboratory also depend on the objectives of a particular study and are described accordingly. PMID:10872855

  19. Quantifying errors without random sampling

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Carl V; LaPole, Luwanna M

    2003-01-01

    Background All quantifications of mortality, morbidity, and other health measures involve numerous sources of error. The routine quantification of random sampling error makes it easy to forget that other sources of error can and should be quantified. When a quantification does not involve sampling, error is almost never quantified and results are often reported in ways that dramatically overstate their precision. Discussion We argue that the precision implicit in typical reporting is problematic and sketch methods for quantifying the various sources of error, building up from simple examples that can be solved analytically to more complex cases. There are straightforward ways to partially quantify the uncertainty surrounding a parameter that is not characterized by random sampling, such as limiting reported significant figures. We present simple methods for doing such quantifications, and for incorporating them into calculations. More complicated methods become necessary when multiple sources of uncertainty must be combined. We demonstrate that Monte Carlo simulation, using available software, can estimate the uncertainty resulting from complicated calculations with many sources of uncertainty. We apply the method to the current estimate of the annual incidence of foodborne illness in the United States. Summary Quantifying uncertainty from systematic errors is practical. Reporting this uncertainty would more honestly represent study results, help show the probability that estimated values fall within some critical range, and facilitate better targeting of further research. PMID:12892568

  20. Fluid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  1. Fluid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  2. Visual Sample Plan

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-25

    VSP selects the appropriate number and location of environmental samples to ensure that the results of statistical tests performed to provide input to risk decisions have the required confidence and performance. VSP Version 5.0 provides sample-size equations or algorithms needed by specific statistical tests appropriate for specific environmental sampling objectives. It also provides data quality assessment and statistical analysis functions to support evaluation of the data and determine whether the data support decisions regarding sites suspected of contamination. The easy-to-use program is highly visual and graphic. VSP runs on personal computers with Microsoft Windows operating systems (98, NT, 2000, Millennium Edition, CE, and XP) Designed primarily for project managers and users without expertise in statistics, VSP is applicable to two- and three-dimensional populations to be sampled (e.g., rooms and buildings, surface soil, a defined layer of subsurface soil, water bodies, and other similar applications) for studies of environmental quality. VSP is also applicable for designing sampling plans for assessing chem./rad/bio threat and hazard identification within rooms and buildings, and for designing geophysical surveys for UXO identification.

  3. Visual Sample Plan

    2007-10-25

    VSP selects the appropriate number and location of environmental samples to ensure that the results of statistical tests performed to provide input to risk decisions have the required confidence and performance. VSP Version 5.0 provides sample-size equations or algorithms needed by specific statistical tests appropriate for specific environmental sampling objectives. It also provides data quality assessment and statistical analysis functions to support evaluation of the data and determine whether the data support decisions regarding sitesmore » suspected of contamination. The easy-to-use program is highly visual and graphic. VSP runs on personal computers with Microsoft Windows operating systems (98, NT, 2000, Millennium Edition, CE, and XP) Designed primarily for project managers and users without expertise in statistics, VSP is applicable to two- and three-dimensional populations to be sampled (e.g., rooms and buildings, surface soil, a defined layer of subsurface soil, water bodies, and other similar applications) for studies of environmental quality. VSP is also applicable for designing sampling plans for assessing chem./rad/bio threat and hazard identification within rooms and buildings, and for designing geophysical surveys for UXO identification.« less

  4. Fluid sampling system

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, E.D.

    1993-12-31

    This invention comprises a fluid sampling system which allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped up into a sampling jet of venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decrease, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodicially leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  5. Designing Intervention Studies: Selected Populations, Range Restrictions, and Statistical Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miciak, Jeremy; Taylor, W. Pat; Stuebing, Karla K.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Vaughn, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate estimate of statistical power is critical for the design of intervention studies. Although the inclusion of a pretest covariate in the test of the primary outcome can increase statistical power, samples selected on the basis of pretest performance may demonstrate range restriction on the selection measure and other correlated…

  6. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  7. Experimental scattershot boson sampling

    PubMed Central

    Bentivegna, Marco; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Flamini, Fulvio; Viggianiello, Niko; Latmiral, Ludovico; Mataloni, Paolo; Brod, Daniel J.; Galvão, Ernesto F.; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Boson sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialized quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, scattershot boson sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric down-conversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. We report the first scattershot boson sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We use recently proposed statistical tools to analyze our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy. PMID:26601164

  8. Experimental scattershot boson sampling.

    PubMed

    Bentivegna, Marco; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Flamini, Fulvio; Viggianiello, Niko; Latmiral, Ludovico; Mataloni, Paolo; Brod, Daniel J; Galvão, Ernesto F; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Boson sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialized quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, scattershot boson sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric down-conversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. We report the first scattershot boson sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We use recently proposed statistical tools to analyze our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy.

  9. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOEpatents

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  10. Thermoluminescence of lunar samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Doell, Richard R.

    1970-01-01

    Appreciable natural thermoluminescence with glow curve peaks at about 350 degrees centigrade for lunar fines and breccias and above 400 degrees centigrade for crystalline rocks has been recognized in lunar samples. Plagioclase has been identified as the principal carrier of thermoluminescence, and the difference in peak temperatures indicates compositional or structural differences between the feldspars of the different rock types. The present thermoluminescence in the lunar samples is probably the result of a dynamic equilibrium between acquisition from radiation and loss in the lunar thermal environment. A progressive change in the glow curves of core samples with depth below the surface suggests the use of thermoluminescence disequilibrium to detect surfaces buried by recent surface activity, and it also indicates that the lunar diurnal temperature variation penetrates to at least 10.5 centimeters.

  11. Dynamic Concrete Beam Deformation Measuremnet with 3d Range Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, X.; Lichti, D.

    2012-07-01

    Concrete beams are used to construct bridges and other structures. Due to the traffic overloading or the decaying state of structures, deformation of bridges or other structures occurs frequently. Therefore, the requirement to measure concrete beam deformation, as integral components of structures, is well recognized. Many imaging techniques such as digital cameras, laser scanners and range cameras have been proven to be accurate and cost-effective methods for large-area measurement of deformation under static loading conditions. However, for obtaining useful information about the behaviour of the beams or monitoring real-time bridge deformation, the ability to measurement deformation under dynamic loading conditions is also necessary. This paper presents a relatively low-cost and high accuracy imaging technique to measure the deformation of concrete beams in response to dynamic loading with range cameras. However, due to the range camera measurement principle, target movement could lead to motion artefacts that degrade range measurement accuracy. The results of simulated and real-data investigation into the motion artefacts show that the lower sampling frequency leads to the more significant motion artefact. The results from real data experiments have indicated that periodic deformation can be recovered with sub-millimetre accuracy when the 3 Hz and 4 mm amplitude target motion is sampled at a rate of least 20 Hz and with 31 MHz range camera modulation frequency. When the modulation frequency is 29 MHz, the best sampling frequency is 20 Hz to keep the error under sub-millimetre.

  12. Aerial radiation survey at a military range.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. P.; Martino, L. E.; Wrobel, J.; Environmental Assessment; U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground

    2001-04-01

    Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) is currently listed on the Superfund National Priorities List because of past waste handling practices at 13 'study areas.' Concern has been expressed that anthropogenic radioisotopes may have been released at some of the study areas, with the potential of posing health risks to human or ecological receptors. This concern was addressed by thoroughly searching archival records, sampling and analyzing environmental media, and performing an aerial radiation survey. The aerial radiation survey techniques employed have been used over all U.S. Department of Energy and commercial reactor sites. Use of the Aerial Measurement System (AMS) allowed investigators to safely survey areas where surveys using hand-held instruments would be difficult to perform. In addition, the AMS delivered a full spectrum of the measured gamma radiation, thereby providing a means of determining which radioisotopes were present at the surface. As a quality check on the aerial measurements, four ground truth measurements were made at selected locations and compared with the aerial data for the same locations. The results of the survey revealed no evidence of surface radioactive contamination. The measured background radiation, including the cosmic contribution, ranged from 4 to 11 {mu}R/h.

  13. Returning Samples from Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Kanik, I.; Brownlee, D.; McKay, C.; Anbar, A.; Glavin, D.; Yano, H.

    2012-12-01

    From the first half century of space exploration, we have obtained samples only from the Moon, comet Wild 2, the Solar Wind and the asteroid Itokawa. The in-depth analyses of these samples in terrestrial laboratories have yielded profound knowledge that could not have been obtained without the returned samples. While obtaining samples from Solar System bodies is crucial science, it is rarely done due to cost and complexity. Cassini's discovery of geysers on Enceladus and organic materials, indicate that there is an exceptional opportunity and science rational to do a low-cost flyby sample return mission, similar to what was done by the Stardust. The earliest low cost possible flight opportunity is the next Discovery Mission [Tsou et al 2012]. Enceladus Plume Discovery - While Voyager provided evidence for young surfaces on Enceladus, the existence of Enceladus plumes was discovered by Cassini. Enceladus and comets are the only known solar system bodies that have jets enabling sample collection without landing or surface contact. Cassini in situ Findings -Cassini's made many discoveries at Saturn, including the break up of large organics in the plumes of Enceladus. Four prime criteria for habitability are liquid water, a heat source, organics and nitrogen [McKay et al. 2008, Waite et al. 2009, Postberg et al. 2011]. Out of all the NASA designated habitability targets, Enceladus is the single body that presents evidence for all four criteria. Significant advancement in the exploration of the biological potential of Enceladus can be made on returned samples in terrestrial laboratories where the full power of state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation and procedures can be used. Without serious limits on power, mass or even cost, terrestrial laboratories provide the ultimate in analytical capability, adaptability, reproducibility and reliability. What Questions can Samples Address? - Samples collected from the Enceladus plume will enable a thorough and replicated

  14. Lunar sample analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Flameless atomic abosrption, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, ferromagnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy, and Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to investigate the evolution of the lunar regolith, the transport of volatile trace metals, and the surface composition of lunar samples. The development of a model for lunar volcanic eruptions is also discussed.

  15. Groundwater sampling: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Qingren; Munoz-Carpena, Rafael; Foster, Adam; Migliaccio, Kati W.; Li, Yuncong; Migliaccio, Kati

    2011-01-01

    Discussing an array of water quality topics, from water quality regulations and criteria, to project planning and sampling activities, this book outlines a framework for improving water quality programs. Using this framework, you can easily put the proper training and tools in place for better management of water resources.

  16. Robotic nuclear sample management

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.M.; Beugelsdijk, T.J.; Temer, D.J.; Hopkins, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory processes in excess of 4000 plutonium metal samples each year. Depending on what specific elements are to be determined, each sample must be cut into fractions for distribution to the various task areas for specific analyses in areas such as mass spectrometry. A unique laboratory automation system has been developed based on a commercially available Zymate II robot. The robot consists of a central arm that operates in a hollow cylindrical work envelop and has four degrees of freedom. Accessible to the arm are standard Zymark laboratory stations, which include an analytical balance, a reagent dispensing station, a capping station, and vial racks. Custom stations designed and constructed by an in-house robotics group for corrosive environments include a vial capping station, a pipette tip shucker, and a vial dispenser. Initial reliability testing is currently in progress. Copper metal samples are being used in lieu of plutonium to identify areas in which mechanical adjustments are needed or in which the software needs modification. The system is projected to be commissioned during January 1988. Future plane include the addition of capabilities to accommodate plutonium oxide samples.

  17. [Samples in Coagulation Test].

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    An understanding and ability to develop a strategy to prevent pre-analytical errors of laboratory tests in the hemostasis area are two of the most important skills of medical technologists and related doctors. Recently, the working group for standardization of sampling in coagulation tests is working towards a consensus. This article reviews a summary of the consensus: (1) The anticoagulant for coagulation tests is 3.13-3.2% sodium citrate at a ratio of 1:9 to whole blood and the accuracy of the ratio is within 10%. (2) Blood sampling is achieved with the use of a 21-23G needle and coagulation. Blood sampling can be achieved by both a syringe and vacuum tube system. After taking blood, laboratory tests such as of the prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) should be completed within one hour and the storage temperature should be at room temperature, not ice-cold conditions. 3) To prepare a plasma sample, citrated blood is centrifuged at 1,500 x g for 15 min at room temperature to minimize the remaining platelets in plasma (below 10,000/microL at least).

  18. Adaptive Sampling Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flournoy, Nancy

    Designs for sequential sampling procedures that adapt to cumulative information are discussed. A familiar illustration is the play-the-winner rule in which there are two treatments; after a random start, the same treatment is continued as long as each successive subject registers a success. When a failure occurs, the other treatment is used until…

  19. Sampling for Chemical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Byron; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This review, designed to make analysts aware of uncertainties introduced into analytical measurements during sampling, is organized under these headings: general considerations; theory; standards; and applications related to mineralogy, soils, sediments, metallurgy, atmosphere, water, biology, agriculture and food, medical and clinical areas, oil…

  20. Randomization and sampling issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    The need for randomly selected routes and other sampling issues have been debated by the Amphibian electronic discussion group. Many excellent comments have been made, pro and con, but we have not reached consensus yet. This paper brings those comments together and attempts a synthesis. I hope that the resulting discussion will bring us closer to a consensus.

  1. Drafting Work Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's interest in and to screen interested students into a training program in basic mechanical drawing. (The course is based on the entry level of an assistant drafter.) Section 1 describes the assessment, correlates the work performed and worker traits required for…

  2. Using Language Sample Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilmann, John J.; Miller, Jon F.; Nockerts, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Over the past 50 years, language sample analysis (LSA) has evolved from a powerful research tool that is used to document children's linguistic development into a powerful clinical tool that is used to identify and describe the language skills of children with language impairment. The Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (SALT; J.…

  3. Minimum variance geographic sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, G. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Resource inventories require samples with geographical scatter, sometimes not as widely spaced as would be hoped. A simple model of correlation over distances is used to create a minimum variance unbiased estimate population means. The fitting procedure is illustrated from data used to estimate Missouri corn acreage.

  4. ANNULAR IMPACTOR SAMPLING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Tait, G.W.C.

    1959-03-31

    A high-rate air sampler capable of sampling alphaemitting particles as small as 0.5 microns is described. The device is a cylindrical shaped cup that fits in front of a suction tube and which has sticky grease coating along its base. Suction forces contaminated air against the periodically monitored particle absorbing grease.

  5. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earths atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  6. Lead exposure at uncovered outdoor firing ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.L.; Hicks, A.M.; O'Leary, L.M.; London, S. )

    1991-06-01

    Excessive lead exposure in shooting instructors at indoor firing ranges and covered outdoor firing ranges has been documented. The City of Los Angeles assessed exposure of its full-time shooting instructors at uncovered outdoor ranges via air monitoring and blood lead-level measurements. Results of these tests revealed that significant lead exposure and absorption can occur at outdoor firing ranges. The use of copper-jacketed ammunition may decrease air lead levels and decrease lead absorption by range instructors.

  7. Evaluating range-expansion models for calculating nonnative species' expansion rate.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Sonja; Low, Matthew; Cassel-Lundhagen, Anna; Berggren, Asa

    2014-07-01

    Species range shifts associated with environmental change or biological invasions are increasingly important study areas. However, quantifying range expansion rates may be heavily influenced by methodology and/or sampling bias. We compared expansion rate estimates of Roesel's bush-cricket (Metrioptera roeselii, Hagenbach 1822), a nonnative species currently expanding its range in south-central Sweden, from range statistic models based on distance measures (mean, median, 95(th) gamma quantile, marginal mean, maximum, and conditional maximum) and an area-based method (grid occupancy). We used sampling simulations to determine the sensitivity of the different methods to incomplete sampling across the species' range. For periods when we had comprehensive survey data, range expansion estimates clustered into two groups: (1) those calculated from range margin statistics (gamma, marginal mean, maximum, and conditional maximum: ˜3 km/year), and (2) those calculated from the central tendency (mean and median) and the area-based method of grid occupancy (˜1.5 km/year). Range statistic measures differed greatly in their sensitivity to sampling effort; the proportion of sampling required to achieve an estimate within 10% of the true value ranged from 0.17 to 0.9. Grid occupancy and median were most sensitive to sampling effort, and the maximum and gamma quantile the least. If periods with incomplete sampling were included in the range expansion calculations, this generally lowered the estimates (range 16-72%), with exception of the gamma quantile that was slightly higher (6%). Care should be taken when interpreting rate expansion estimates from data sampled from only a fraction of the full distribution. Methods based on the central tendency will give rates approximately half that of methods based on the range margin. The gamma quantile method appears to be the most robust to incomplete sampling bias and should be considered as the method of choice when sampling the entire

  8. Evaluating range-expansion models for calculating nonnative species' expansion rate

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Sonja; Low, Matthew; Cassel-Lundhagen, Anna; Berggren, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Species range shifts associated with environmental change or biological invasions are increasingly important study areas. However, quantifying range expansion rates may be heavily influenced by methodology and/or sampling bias. We compared expansion rate estimates of Roesel's bush-cricket (Metrioptera roeselii, Hagenbach 1822), a nonnative species currently expanding its range in south-central Sweden, from range statistic models based on distance measures (mean, median, 95th gamma quantile, marginal mean, maximum, and conditional maximum) and an area-based method (grid occupancy). We used sampling simulations to determine the sensitivity of the different methods to incomplete sampling across the species' range. For periods when we had comprehensive survey data, range expansion estimates clustered into two groups: (1) those calculated from range margin statistics (gamma, marginal mean, maximum, and conditional maximum: ˜3 km/year), and (2) those calculated from the central tendency (mean and median) and the area-based method of grid occupancy (˜1.5 km/year). Range statistic measures differed greatly in their sensitivity to sampling effort; the proportion of sampling required to achieve an estimate within 10% of the true value ranged from 0.17 to 0.9. Grid occupancy and median were most sensitive to sampling effort, and the maximum and gamma quantile the least. If periods with incomplete sampling were included in the range expansion calculations, this generally lowered the estimates (range 16–72%), with exception of the gamma quantile that was slightly higher (6%). Care should be taken when interpreting rate expansion estimates from data sampled from only a fraction of the full distribution. Methods based on the central tendency will give rates approximately half that of methods based on the range margin. The gamma quantile method appears to be the most robust to incomplete sampling bias and should be considered as the method of choice when sampling the entire

  9. Air sampling with solid phase microextraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martos, Perry Anthony

    There is an increasing need for simple yet accurate air sampling methods. The acceptance of new air sampling methods requires compatibility with conventional chromatographic equipment, and the new methods have to be environmentally friendly, simple to use, yet with equal, or better, detection limits, accuracy and precision than standard methods. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) satisfies the conditions for new air sampling methods. Analyte detection limits, accuracy and precision of analysis with SPME are typically better than with any conventional air sampling methods. Yet, air sampling with SPME requires no pumps, solvents, is re-usable, extremely simple to use, is completely compatible with current chromatographic equipment, and requires a small capital investment. The first SPME fiber coating used in this study was poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a hydrophobic liquid film, to sample a large range of airborne hydrocarbons such as benzene and octane. Quantification without an external calibration procedure is possible with this coating. Well understood are the physical and chemical properties of this coating, which are quite similar to those of the siloxane stationary phase used in capillary columns. The log of analyte distribution coefficients for PDMS are linearly related to chromatographic retention indices and to the inverse of temperature. Therefore, the actual chromatogram from the analysis of the PDMS air sampler will yield the calibration parameters which are used to quantify unknown airborne analyte concentrations (ppb v to ppm v range). The second fiber coating used in this study was PDMS/divinyl benzene (PDMS/DVB) onto which o-(2,3,4,5,6- pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) was adsorbed for the on-fiber derivatization of gaseous formaldehyde (ppb v range), with and without external calibration. The oxime formed from the reaction can be detected with conventional gas chromatographic detectors. Typical grab sampling times were as small as 5 seconds

  10. High Dynamic Range Complex Impedance Measurement System for Petrophysical Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; He, X.; Yao, H.; Tan, S.; Shi, H.; Shen, R.; Yan, C.; Zeng, P.; He, L.; Qiao, N.; Xi, F.; Zhang, H.; Xie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization method (SIP) or complex resistivity method is increasing its application in metalliferous ore exploration, hydrocarbon exploration, underground water exploration, monitoring of environment pollution, and the evaluation of environment remediation. And the measurement of complex resistivity or complex impedance of rock/ore sample and polluted water plays a fundamental role in improving the application effect of SIP and the application scope of SIP. However, current instruments can't guaranty the accuracy of measurement when the resistance of sample is less than 10Ω or great than 100kΩ. A lot of samples, such as liquid, polluted sea water, igneous rock, limestone, and sandstone, can't be measured with reliable complex resistivity result. Therefore, this problem projects a shadow in the basic research and application research of SIP. We design a high precision measurement system from the study of measurement principle, sample holder, and measurement instrument. We design input buffers in a single board. We adopt operation amplifier AD549 in this system because of its ultra-high input impedance and ultra-low current noise. This buffer is good in acquiring potential signal across high impedance sample. By analyzing the sources of measurement error and errors generated by the measurement system, we propose a correction method to remove the error in order to achieve high quality complex impedance measurement for rock and ore samples. This measurement system can improve the measurement range of the complex impedance to 0.1 Ω ~ 10 GΩ with amplitude error less than 0.1% and phase error less than 0.1mrad when frequency ranges as 0.01 Hz ~ 1 kHz. We tested our system on resistors with resistance as 0.1Ω ~ 10 GΩ in frequency range as 1 Hz ~ 1000 Hz, and the measurement error is less than 0.1 mrad. We also compared the result with LCR bridge and SCIP, we can find that the bridge's measuring range only reaches 100 MΩ, SCIP's measuring range

  11. NASA Range Safety Annual Report 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2007-01-01

    As always, Range Safety has been involved in a number of exciting and challenging activities and events. Throughout the year, we have strived to meet our goal of protecting the public, the workforce, and property during range operations. During the past year, Range Safety was involved in the development, implementation, and support of range safety policy. Range Safety training curriculum development was completed this year and several courses were presented. Tailoring exercises concerning the Constellation Program were undertaken with representatives from the Constellation Program, the 45th Space Wing, and the Launch Constellation Range Safety Panel. Range Safety actively supported the Range Commanders Council and it subgroups and remained involved in updating policy related to flight safety systems and flight safety analysis. In addition, Range Safety supported the Space Shuttle Range Safety Panel and addressed policy concerning unmanned aircraft systems. Launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, the Eastern and Western ranges, Dryden Flight Research Center, and Wallops Flight Facility were addressed. Range Safety was also involved in the evaluation of a number of research and development efforts, including the space-based range (formerly STARS), the autonomous flight safety system, the enhanced flight termination system, and the joint advanced range safety system. Flight safety system challenges were evaluated. Range Safety's role in the Space Florida Customer Assistance Service Program for the Eastern Range was covered along with our support for the Space Florida Educational Balloon Release Program. We hope you have found the web-based format both accessible and easy to use. Anyone having questions or wishing to have an article included in the 2008 Range Safety Annual Report should contact Alan Dumont, the NASA Range Safety Program Manager located at the Kennedy Space Center, or Michael Dook at NASA Headquarters.

  12. Comparative sampling molds evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pierrard, L.; Jarry, P.; Charbonnier, J.; Rigaut, C.

    1996-10-01

    The metallurgical industry needs to cast alloys with narrow tolerances in their chemical composition in order to reduce variability of their use properties. Therefore appropriate sampling practices and analytical methods are required. Both accuracy and precision of the analytical results are limited by the non-homogeneity of as-cast disk or cylinder samples, which results from macrosegregation phenomenon. This paper presents a comparison between six commonly used molds: four molds recommended by ASTM standards (center-pour molds type B and vacuum mold), mushroom shaped and cylinder molds. Two complementary approaches are exhibited for the different molds designs: (1) solidification modeling in order to predict macrosegregation localization using the Simulor software; (2) experimental characterization. Radial and axial segregation profiles are determined by Analytical Scanning Electron Microscopy in addition to analytical precision evaluation by spark optical emission and X-Ray fluorescence spectrometries for a given machining depth.

  13. Seabed observation & sampling system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackwood, D.; Parolski, K.

    2001-01-01

    SEABOSS has proved to be a valuable addition to the USGS data-acquisition and processing field program. It has allowed researchers to collect high-quality images and seabed samples in a timely manner. It is a simple, dependable and trouble-free system with a track record of over 3,000 deployments. When used as part of the USGS seafloor mapping acquisition, processing, and ground-truth program, SEABOSS has been invaluable in providing information quickly and efficiently, with a minimum of downtime. SEABOSS enables scientists to collect high-quality images and samples of the seabed, essential to the study of sedimentary environments and biological habitats and to the interpretation of side-scan sonar and multibeam imagery, the most common tools for mapping the seabed.

  14. Microprocessor realizations of range rate filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The performance of five digital range rate filters is evaluated. A range rate filter receives an input of range data from a radar unit and produces an output of smoothed range data and its estimated derivative range rate. The filters are compared through simulation on an IBM 370. Two of the filter designs are implemented on a 6800 microprocessor-based system. Comparisons are made on the bases of noise variance reduction ratios and convergence times of the filters in response to simulated range signals.

  15. Water sample filtration unit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skougstad, M.W.; Scarbro, G.F.

    1968-01-01

    A readily portable, all plastic, pressure filtration unit is described which greatly facilitates rapid micropore membrane field filtration of up to several liters of water with a minimum risk of inorganic chemical alteration or contamination of the sample. The unit accommodates standard 10.2-cm. (4-inch) diameter filters. The storage and carrying case serves as a convenient filter stand for both field and laboratory use.

  16. Advanced hierarchical distance sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we cover a number of important extensions of the basic hierarchical distance-sampling (HDS) framework from Chapter 8. First, we discuss the inclusion of “individual covariates,” such as group size, in the HDS model. This is important in many surveys where animals form natural groups that are the primary observation unit, with the size of the group expected to have some influence on detectability. We also discuss HDS integrated with time-removal and double-observer or capture-recapture sampling. These “combined protocols” can be formulated as HDS models with individual covariates, and thus they have a commonality with HDS models involving group structure (group size being just another individual covariate). We cover several varieties of open-population HDS models that accommodate population dynamics. On one end of the spectrum, we cover models that allow replicate distance sampling surveys within a year, which estimate abundance relative to availability and temporary emigration through time. We consider a robust design version of that model. We then consider models with explicit dynamics based on the Dail and Madsen (2011) model and the work of Sollmann et al. (2015). The final major theme of this chapter is relatively newly developed spatial distance sampling models that accommodate explicit models describing the spatial distribution of individuals known as Point Process models. We provide novel formulations of spatial DS and HDS models in this chapter, including implementations of those models in the unmarked package using a hack of the pcount function for N-mixture models.

  17. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  18. Sustainable Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Christie; Hancock, Sean; Laub, Joshua; Perry, Christopher; Ash, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The proposed Mars sample return mission will be completed using natural Martian resources for the majority of its operations. The system uses the following technologies: In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP), a methane-oxygen propelled Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), a carbon dioxide powered hopper, and a hydrogen fueled balloon system (large balloons and small weather balloons). The ISPP system will produce the hydrogen, methane, and oxygen using a Sabatier reactor. a water electrolysis cell, water extracted from the Martian surface, and carbon dioxide extracted from the Martian atmosphere. Indigenous hydrogen will fuel the balloon systems and locally-derived methane and oxygen will fuel the MAV for the return of a 50 kg sample to Earth. The ISPP system will have a production cycle of 800 days and the estimated overall mission length is 1355 days from Earth departure to return to low Earth orbit. Combining these advanced technologies will enable the proposed sample return mission to be executed with reduced initial launch mass and thus be more cost efficient. The successful completion of this mission will serve as the next step in the advancement of Mars exploration technology.

  19. Recommended Maximum Temperature For Mars Returned Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaty, D. W.; McSween, H. Y.; Czaja, A. D.; Goreva, Y. S.; Hausrath, E.; Herd, C. D. K.; Humayun, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; McLennan, S. M.; Hays, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    The Returned Sample Science Board (RSSB) was established in 2015 by NASA to provide expertise from the planetary sample community to the Mars 2020 Project. The RSSB's first task was to address the effect of heating during acquisition and storage of samples on scientific investigations that could be expected to be conducted if the samples are returned to Earth. Sample heating may cause changes that could ad-versely affect scientific investigations. Previous studies of temperature requirements for returned mar-tian samples fall within a wide range (-73 to 50 degrees Centigrade) and, for mission concepts that have a life detection component, the recommended threshold was less than or equal to -20 degrees Centigrade. The RSSB was asked by the Mars 2020 project to determine whether or not a temperature requirement was needed within the range of 30 to 70 degrees Centigrade. There are eight expected temperature regimes to which the samples could be exposed, from the moment that they are drilled until they are placed into a temperature-controlled environment on Earth. Two of those - heating during sample acquisition (drilling) and heating while cached on the Martian surface - potentially subject samples to the highest temperatures. The RSSB focused on the upper temperature limit that Mars samples should be allowed to reach. We considered 11 scientific investigations where thermal excursions may have an adverse effect on the science outcome. Those are: (T-1) organic geochemistry, (T-2) stable isotope geochemistry, (T-3) prevention of mineral hydration/dehydration and phase transformation, (T-4) retention of water, (T-5) characterization of amorphous materials, (T-6) putative Martian organisms, (T-7) oxidation/reduction reactions, (T-8) (sup 4) He thermochronometry, (T-9) radiometric dating using fission, cosmic-ray or solar-flare tracks, (T-10) analyses of trapped gasses, and (T-11) magnetic studies.

  20. Gaseous radiocarbon measurements of small samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, M.; Szidat, S.; Gäggeler, H. W.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Wacker, L.

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a well-established method for samples containing carbon in the milligram range. However, the measurement of small samples containing less than 50 μg carbon often fails. It is difficult to graphitise these samples and the preparation is prone to contamination. To avoid graphitisation, a solution can be the direct measurement of carbon dioxide. The MICADAS, the smallest accelerator for radiocarbon dating in Zurich, is equipped with a hybrid Cs sputter ion source. It allows the measurement of both, graphite targets and gaseous CO 2 samples, without any rebuilding. This work presents experiences dealing with small samples containing 1-40 μg carbon. 500 unknown samples of different environmental research fields have been measured yet. Most of the samples were measured with the gas ion source. These data are compared with earlier measurements of small graphite samples. The performance of the two different techniques is discussed and main contributions to the blank determined. An analysis of blank and standard data measured within years allowed a quantification of the contamination, which was found to be of the order of 55 ng and 750 ng carbon (50 pMC) for the gaseous and the graphite samples, respectively. For quality control, a number of certified standards were measured using the gas ion source to demonstrate reliability of the data.

  1. 2006 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    TenHaken, Ron; Daniels, B.; Becker, M.; Barnes, Zack; Donovan, Shawn; Manley, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    Throughout 2006, Range Safety was involved in a number of exciting and challenging activities and events, from developing, implementing, and supporting Range Safety policies and procedures-such as the Space Shuttle Launch and Landing Plans, the Range Safety Variance Process, and the Expendable Launch Vehicle Safety Program procedures-to evaluating new technologies. Range Safety training development is almost complete with the last course scheduled to go on line in mid-2007. Range Safety representatives took part in a number of panels and councils, including the newly formed Launch Constellation Range Safety Panel, the Range Commanders Council and its subgroups, the Space Shuttle Range Safety Panel, and the unmanned aircraft systems working group. Space based range safety demonstration and certification (formerly STARS) and the autonomous flight safety system were successfully tested. The enhanced flight termination system will be tested in early 2007 and the joint advanced range safety system mission analysis software tool is nearing operational status. New technologies being evaluated included a processor for real-time compensation in long range imaging, automated range surveillance using radio interferometry, and a space based range command and telemetry processor. Next year holds great promise as we continue ensuring safety while pursuing our quest beyond the Moon to Mars.

  2. Trace Element Analysis of Biological Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veillon, Claude

    1986-01-01

    Reviews background of atomic absorption spectrometry techniques. Discusses problems encountered and precautions to be taken in determining trace elements in the parts-per-billion concentration range and below. Concentrates on determining chromium in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption. Considers other elements, matrices, and…

  3. 2012 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a NASA Range Safety (NRS) overview for current and potential range users. This report contains articles which cover a variety of subject areas, summaries of various NASA Range Safety Program (RSP) activities performed during the past year, links to past reports, and information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be conducted in the future. Specific topics discussed in the 2012 NASA Range Safety Annual Report include a program overview and 2012 highlights; Range Safety Training; Independent Assessments; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch/flight operations; a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities.

  4. 2009 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    This year, NASA Range Safety transitioned to a condensed annual report to allow for Secretariat support to the Range Safety Group, Risk Committee. Although much shorter than in previous years, this report contains full-length articles concerning various subject areas, as well as links to past reports. Additionally, summaries from various NASA Range Safety Program activities that took place throughout the year are presented, as well as information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be done in the future. The sections include a program overview and 2009 highlights; Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy; Independent Assessments Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch operations; a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities.

  5. 340 representative sampling verification tank sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Halgren, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-09

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan contains requirements for characterizing the 340 vault tank 1. The objective of the sampling and characterization is to determine if the tank is homogeneous when agitated and which sampling method provides the most representative sample. A secondary objective is to collect and characterize solid samples.

  6. 340 Representative sampling verification tank sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, A.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-07

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan contains requirements for characterizing the 340 vault tank 1. The objective of the sampling and characterization is to determine if the tank is homogeneous when agitated and which sampling method provides the most representative sample. A secondary objective is to collect and characterize solid samples.

  7. 340 Representative sampling verification tank sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, A.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-21

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan contains requirements for characterizing the 340 vault tank 1. The objective of the sampling and characterization is to determine if the tank is homogeneous when agitated and which sampling method provides the most representative sample. A secondary objective is to collect and characterize solid samples.

  8. Long Range Planning Guide for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGovern, E. Gaye

    This school district guide examines the why of long-range planning, the relationship between long-range planning and educational change, the long-range planning process, community involvement in planning, the communicating of educational quality assessment and other needs assessment results with the public, needs assessment, prioritizing district…

  9. 33 CFR 62.41 - Ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ranges. 62.41 Section 62.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.41 Ranges. Ranges are aids...

  10. 33 CFR 62.41 - Ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ranges. 62.41 Section 62.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.41 Ranges. Ranges are aids...

  11. 33 CFR 62.41 - Ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ranges. 62.41 Section 62.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.41 Ranges. Ranges are aids...

  12. 33 CFR 62.41 - Ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ranges. 62.41 Section 62.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.41 Ranges. Ranges are aids...

  13. 33 CFR 62.41 - Ranges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ranges. 62.41 Section 62.41 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.41 Ranges. Ranges are aids...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.1107 - Sample media and sample system preparation; sample system assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample media and sample system... Special Pollutants Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds § 1065.1107 Sample media and sample system preparation; sample system assembly. This section describes the appropriate types of sample media and the...

  15. Development of a digital receiver for range imaging atmospheric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masayuki K.; Fujita, Toshiyuki; Abdul Aziz, Noor Hafizah Binti; Gan, Tong; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Yu, Tian-You; Yamamoto, Mamoru

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a new digital receiver developed for a 1.3-GHz range imaging atmospheric radar. The digital receiver comprises a general-purpose software-defined radio receiver referred to as the Universal Software Radio Peripheral 2 (USRP2) and a commercial personal computer (PC). The receiver is designed to collect received signals at an intermediate frequency (IF) of 130 MHz with a sample rate of 10 MS s-1. The USRP2 digitizes IF received signals, produces IQ time series, and then transfers the IQ time series to the PC through Gigabit Ethernet. The PC receives the IQ time series, performs range sampling, carries out filtering in the range direction, decodes the phase-modulated received signals, integrates the received signals in time, and finally saves the processed data to the hard disk drive (HDD). Because only sequential data transfer from the USRP2 to the PC is available, the range sampling is triggered by transmitted pulses leaked to the receiver. For range imaging, the digital receiver performs real-time signal processing for each of the time series collected at different frequencies. Further, the receiver is able to decode phase-modulated oversampled signals. Because the program code for real-time signal processing is written in a popular programming language (C++) and widely used libraries, the signal processing is easy to implement, reconfigure, and reuse. From radar experiments using a 1-μs subpulse width and 1-MHz frequency span (i.e., 2-MHz frequency bandwidth), we demonstrate that range imaging in combination with oversampling, which was implemented for the first time by the digital receiver, is able to resolve the fine-scale structure of turbulence with a vertical scale as small as 100 m or finer.

  16. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  17. Space-use scaling and home range overlap in primates

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Fiona; Carbone, Chris; Cowlishaw, Guy; Isaac, Nick J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Space use is an important aspect of animal ecology, yet our understanding is limited by a lack of synthesis between interspecific and intraspecific studies. We present analyses of a dataset of 286 estimates of home range overlap from 100 primate species, with comparable samples for other space-use traits. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first multispecies study using overlap data estimated directly from field observations. We find that space-use traits in primates are only weakly related to body mass, reflecting their largely arboreal habits. Our results confirm a theory that home range overlap explains the differences in allometric scaling between population density and home range size. We then test a suite of hypotheses to explain home range overlap, both among and within species. We find that overlap is highest for larger-bodied species living in large home ranges at high population densities, where annual rainfall is low, and is higher for arboreal than terrestrial species. Most of these results are consistent with the economics of resource defence, although the predictions of one specific theory of home range overlap are not supported. We conclude that home range overlap is somewhat predictable, but the theoretical basis of animal space use remains patchy. PMID:23193124

  18. Stack sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

    2014-09-16

    An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

  19. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  20. Phobos Sample Return mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Zakharov, A.; Martynov, M.; Polischuk, G.

    Very mysterious objects of the Solar system are the Martian satellites, Phobos and Deimos. Attempt to study Phobos in situ from an orbiter and from landers have been done by the Russian mission FOBOS in 1988. However, due to a malfunction of the onboard control system the landers have not been delivered to the Phobos surface. A new robotics mission to Phobos is under development now in Russia. Its main goal is the delivery of samples of the Phobos surface material to the Earth for laboratory studies of its chemical, isotopic, mineral composition, age etc. Other goals are in situ studies of Phobos (regolith, internal structure, peculiarities in orbital and proper rotation), studies of Martian environment (dust, plasma, fields). The payload includes a number of scientific instruments: gamma and neutron spectrometers, gaschromatograph, mass spectrometers, IR spectrometer, seismometer, panoramic camera, dust sensor, plasma package. To implement the tasks of this mission a cruise-transfer spacecraft after the launch and the Earth-Mars interplanetary flight will be inserted into the first elliptical orbit around Mars, then after several corrections the spacecraft orbit will be formed very close to the Phobos orbit to keep the synchronous orbiting with Phobos. Then the spacecraft will encounter with Phobos and will land at the surface. After the landing the sampling device of the spacecraft will collect several samples of the Phobos regolith and will load these samples into the return capsule mounted at the returned vehicle. This returned vehicle will be launched from the mother spacecraft and after the Mars-Earth interplanetary flight after 11 monthes with reach the terrestrial atmosphere. Before entering into the atmosphere the returned capsule will be separated from the returned vehicle and will hopefully land at the Earth surface. The mother spacecraft at the Phobos surface carrying onboard scientific instruments will implement the "in situ" experiments during an year

  1. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, Roger M.; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint.

  2. High dynamic range optical projection tomography (HDR-OPT).

    PubMed

    Fei, Peng; Yu, Zhilong; Wang, Xu; Lu, Peter J; Fu, Yusi; He, Zi; Xiong, Jingwei; Huang, Yanyi

    2012-04-01

    Traditional optical projection tomography (OPT) acquires a single image at each rotation angle, thereby suffering from limitations in CCD dynamic range; this conventional usage cannot resolve features in samples with highly heterogeneous absorption, such as in small animals with organs of varying size. We present a novel technique, applying multiple-exposure high dynamic range (HDR) imaging to OPT, and demonstrate its ability to resolve fine details in zebrafish embryos, without complicated chemical clearing. We implement the tomographic reconstruction algorithm on the GPU, yielding a performance increase of two orders of magnitude. These features give our method potential application in high-throughput, high-resolution in vivo 3D imaging.

  3. Soil Sampling Techniques For Alabama Grain Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. N.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Touchton, J. T.; Rickman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial variability of nutrients facilitates precision soil sampling. Questions exist regarding the best technique for directed soil sampling based on a priori knowledge of soil and crop patterns. The objective of this study was to evaluate zone delineation techniques for Alabama grain fields to determine which method best minimized the soil test variability. Site one (25.8 ha) and site three (20.0 ha) were located in the Tennessee Valley region, and site two (24.2 ha) was located in the Coastal Plain region of Alabama. Tennessee Valley soils ranged from well drained Rhodic and Typic Paleudults to somewhat poorly drained Aquic Paleudults and Fluventic Dystrudepts. Coastal Plain s o i l s ranged from coarse-loamy Rhodic Kandiudults to loamy Arenic Kandiudults. Soils were sampled by grid soil sampling methods (grid sizes of 0.40 ha and 1 ha) consisting of: 1) twenty composited cores collected randomly throughout each grid (grid-cell sampling) and, 2) six composited cores collected randomly from a -3x3 m area at the center of each grid (grid-point sampling). Zones were established from 1) an Order 1 Soil Survey, 2) corn (Zea mays L.) yield maps, and 3) airborne remote sensing images. All soil properties were moderately to strongly spatially dependent as per semivariogram analyses. Differences in grid-point and grid-cell soil test values suggested grid-point sampling does not accurately represent grid values. Zones created by soil survey, yield data, and remote sensing images displayed lower coefficient of variations (8CV) for soil test values than overall field values, suggesting these techniques group soil test variability. However, few differences were observed between the three zone delineation techniques. Results suggest directed sampling using zone delineation techniques outlined in this paper would result in more efficient soil sampling for these Alabama grain fields.

  4. 46. VIEW OF SAMPLING ROOM FROM SOUTHEAST. TO LEFT, SAMPLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. VIEW OF SAMPLING ROOM FROM SOUTHEAST. TO LEFT, SAMPLING ELEVATOR AND IN CENTER, SAMPLE BINS WITH DISCHARGE CHUTE AND THREE LABELS. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  5. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  6. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall.

  7. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  8. Sampling strategies for radio-tracking coyotes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.J.; Cary, J.R.; Rongstad, O.J.

    1981-01-01

    Ten coyotes radio-tracked for 24 h periods were most active at night and moved little during daylight hours. Home-range size determined from radio-locations of 3 adult coyotes increased with the number of locations until an asymptote was reached at about 35-40 independent day locations or 3 6 nights of hourly radio-locations. Activity of the coyote did not affect the asymptotic nature of the home-range calculations, but home-range sizes determined from more than 3 nights of hourly locations were considerably larger than home-range sizes determined from daylight locations. Coyote home-range sizes were calculated from daylight locations, full-night tracking periods, and half-night tracking periods. Full- and half-lnight sampling strategies involved obtaining hourly radio-locations during 12 and 6 h periods, respectively. The half-night sampling strategy was the best compromise for our needs, as it adequately indexed the home-range size, reduced time and energy spent, and standardized the area calculation without requiring the researcher to become completely nocturnal. Sight tracking also provided information about coyote activity and sociability.

  9. Microfluidic-Based sample chips for radioactive solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, J. L.; Law, J. D.; Smith, T. E.; Rutledge, V. J.; Bauer, W. F.; Ball, R. D.; Hahn, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Historical nuclear fuel cycle process sampling techniques required sample volumes ranging in the tens of milliliters. The radiation levels experienced by analytical personnel and equipment, in addition to the waste volumes generated from analysis of these samples, have been significant. These sample volumes also impacted accountability inventories of required analytes during process operations. To mitigate radiation dose and other issues associated with the historically larger sample volumes, a microcapillary sample chip was chosen for further investigation. The ability to obtain microliter volume samples coupled with a remote automated means of sample loading, tracking, and transporting to the analytical instrument would greatly improve analytical efficiency while reducing both personnel exposure and radioactive waste volumes. Sample chip testing was completed to determine the accuracy, repeatability, and issues associated with the use of microfluidic sample chips used to supply µL sample volumes of lanthanide analytes dissolved in nitric acid for introduction to an analytical instrument for elemental analysis.

  10. Microfluidic-Based Sample Chips for Radioactive Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, J. L.; Law, J. D.; Smith, T. E.; Rutledge, V. J.; Bauer, W. F.; Ball, R. D.; Hahn, P. A.

    2014-02-01

    Historical nuclear fuel cycle process sampling techniques required sample volumes ranging in the tens of milliliters. The radiation levels experienced by analytical personnel and equipment, in addition to the waste volumes generated from analysis of these samples, have been significant. These sample volumes also impacted accountability inventories of required analytes during process operations. To mitigate radiation dose and other issues associated with the historically larger sample volumes, a microcapillary sample chip was chosen for further investigation. The ability to obtain microliter volume samples coupled with a remote automated means of sample loading, tracking, and transporting to the analytical instrument would greatly improve analytical efficiency while reducing both personnel exposure and radioactive waste volumes. Sample chip testing was completed to determine the accuracy, repeatability, and issues associated with the use of microfluidic sample chips used to supply µL sample volumes of lanthanide analytes dissolved in nitric acid for introduction to an analytical instrument for elemental analysis.

  11. GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR VOCS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling protocol should be dictated by the sampling objective(s). It is important to obtain representative ground water samples, regardless of the sampling objective(s). Low-flow (minimum draw-down) purging and sampling techniques are best in most instances, particularly for VOC...

  12. Free-ranging farm cats: home range size and predation on a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kitts-Morgan, Susanna E; Caires, Kyle C; Bohannon, Lisa A; Parsons, Elizabeth I; Hilburn, Katharine A

    2015-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05) on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE) or core home range size (50% KDE). Male cats tended (P = 0.08) to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha) compared to female cats (0.64 ha). Reproductively intact cats (n = 2) had larger (P < 0.0001) diurnal and nocturnal home ranges as compared to altered cats. Feline scat processing separated scat into prey parts, and of the 210 feline scats collected during the study, 75.24% contained hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife.

  13. Free-Ranging Farm Cats: Home Range Size and Predation on a Livestock Unit In Northwest Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Kitts-Morgan, Susanna E.; Caires, Kyle C.; Bohannon, Lisa A.; Parsons, Elizabeth I.; Hilburn, Katharine A.

    2015-01-01

    This study’s objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05) on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE) or core home range size (50% KDE). Male cats tended (P = 0.08) to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha) compared to female cats (0.64 ha). Reproductively intact cats (n = 2) had larger (P < 0.0001) diurnal and nocturnal home ranges as compared to altered cats. Feline scat processing separated scat into prey parts, and of the 210 feline scats collected during the study, 75.24% contained hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife. PMID:25894078

  14. Free-ranging farm cats: home range size and predation on a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia.

    PubMed

    Kitts-Morgan, Susanna E; Caires, Kyle C; Bohannon, Lisa A; Parsons, Elizabeth I; Hilburn, Katharine A

    2015-01-01

    This study's objective was to determine seasonal and diurnal vs. nocturnal home range size, as well as predation for free-ranging farm cats at a livestock unit in Northwest Georgia. Seven adult cats were tracked with attached GPS units for up to two weeks for one spring and two summer seasons from May 2010 through August 2011. Three and five cats were tracked for up to two weeks during the fall and winter seasons, respectively. Feline scat was collected during this entire period. Cats were fed a commercial cat food daily. There was no seasonal effect (P > 0.05) on overall (95% KDE and 90% KDE) or core home range size (50% KDE). Male cats tended (P = 0.08) to have larger diurnal and nocturnal core home ranges (1.09 ha) compared to female cats (0.64 ha). Reproductively intact cats (n = 2) had larger (P < 0.0001) diurnal and nocturnal home ranges as compared to altered cats. Feline scat processing separated scat into prey parts, and of the 210 feline scats collected during the study, 75.24% contained hair. Of these 158 scat samples, 86 contained non-cat hair and 72 contained only cat hair. Other prey components included fragments of bone in 21.43% of scat and teeth in 12.86% of scat. Teeth were used to identify mammalian prey hunted by these cats, of which the Hispid cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) was the primary rodent. Other targeted mammals were Peromyscus sp., Sylvilagus sp. and Microtus sp. Invertebrates and birds were less important as prey, but all mammalian prey identified in this study consisted of native animals. While the free-ranging farm cats in this study did not adjust their home range seasonally, sex and reproductive status did increase diurnal and nocturnal home range size. Ultimately, larger home ranges of free-ranging cats could negatively impact native wildlife. PMID:25894078

  15. Efficient Sample Preparation from Complex Biological Samples Using a Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sample preparation is a major bottleneck in many biological processes. Paramagnetic particles (PMPs) are a ubiquitous method for isolating analytes of interest from biological samples and are used for their ability to thoroughly sample a solution and be easily collected with a magnet. There are three main methods by which PMPs are used for sample preparation: (1) removal of fluid from the analyte-bound PMPs, (2) removal of analyte-bound PMPs from the solution, and (3) removal of the substrate (with immobilized analyte-bound PMPs). In this paper, we explore the third and least studied method for PMP-based sample preparation using a platform termed Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions (SLIDE). SLIDE leverages principles of surface tension and patterned hydrophobicity to create a simple-to-operate platform for sample isolation (cells, DNA, RNA, protein) and preparation (cell staining) without the need for time-intensive wash steps, use of immiscible fluids, or precise pinning geometries. Compared to other standard isolation protocols using PMPs, SLIDE is able to perform rapid sample preparation with low (0.6%) carryover of contaminants from the original sample. The natural recirculation occurring within the pinned droplets of SLIDE make possible the performance of multistep cell staining protocols within the SLIDE by simply resting the lid over the various sample droplets. SLIDE demonstrates a simple easy to use platform for sample preparation on a range of complex biological samples. PMID:24927449

  16. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  17. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  18. Global atmospheric sampling program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lezberg, E. A.; Perkins, P. J.; Englund, D. R.; Gauntner, D. J.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Automated instruments were installed on a commercial B-747 aircraft, during the program, to obtain baseline data and to monitor key atmospheric constituents associated with emissions of aircraft engines in order to determine if aircraft are contributing to pollution of the upper atmosphere. Data thus acquired on a global basis over the commercial air routes for 5 to 10 years will be analyzed. Ozone measurements in the 29,000 to 45,000 foot altitude were expanded over what has been available from ozonesondes. Limited aerosol composition measurements from filter samples show low levels of sulfates and nitrates in the upper troposphere. Recently installed instruments for measurement of carbon monoxide and condensation nuclei are beginning to return data.

  19. Automated Factor Slice Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Tibbits, Matthew M.; Groendyke, Chris; Haran, Murali; Liechty, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms offer a very general approach for sampling from arbitrary distributions. However, designing and tuning MCMC algorithms for each new distribution, can be challenging and time consuming. It is particularly difficult to create an efficient sampler when there is strong dependence among the variables in a multivariate distribution. We describe a two-pronged approach for constructing efficient, automated MCMC algorithms: (1) we propose the “factor slice sampler”, a generalization of the univariate slice sampler where we treat the selection of a coordinate basis (factors) as an additional tuning parameter, and (2) we develop an approach for automatically selecting tuning parameters in order to construct an efficient factor slice sampler. In addition to automating the factor slice sampler, our tuning approach also applies to the standard univariate slice samplers. We demonstrate the efficiency and general applicability of our automated MCMC algorithm with a number of illustrative examples. PMID:24955002

  20. NEO Sample Return mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucci, M. A.; Neo-Sr Team

    The NEOs are representative of the population of asteroids and dead comets thought to be the remnants of the ancient planetesimals that accreted to form the planets. The chemical investigation of NEOs having primitive characteristics is thus essential in the understanding the planet formation and evolution. They carry records of the solar system's birth/early phases and the geological evolution of small bodies in the interplanetary regions. Moreover, collisions of NEOs with Earth represent a serious hazard to life. For all these reasons the exploration and characterization of these objects are particularly interesting and urgent. NEOs are interesting and highly accessible targets for scientific research and robotic exploration. Within this framework, the mission LEONARD including an orbiter and a lander to the primitive double object (1996 FG3) has been studied by CNES, in collaboration with a number of European planetologists (France, Italy, Germany and United Kingdom) and related Space Agencies. A new Sample Return mission is under study within a large European community and possible collaboration with the Japanese Space Agency JAXA to reply to the ESA Cosmic Vision AO. The principal objectives are to investigate on 1) the properties of the building blocks of the terrestrial planets; 2) the major events (e.g. agglomeration, heating, ... . . ) which ruled the history of planetesimals; 3) the primitive asteroids which could contain presolar material unknown in meteoritic samples; 4) the organics in primitive materials; 5) the initial conditions and evolution history of the solar nebula; and 6) how they can shed light on the origin of molecules necessary for life. This type of mission appears clearly to have the potential to revolutionize our understanding of primitive materials.

  1. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  2. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  3. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Yeamans, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis.

  4. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Yeamans, D.R.

    1998-02-03

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

  5. COMPOSITE SAMPLING FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Guidance for selecting a plan to tomposite environmental or biological samples is provided in the form of models, equations, tables, and criteria. Composite sampling procedures can increase sensitivity, reduce sampling variance, and dramatically reduce analytical costs, depending...

  6. Network Sampling with Memory: A proposal for more efficient sampling from social networks

    PubMed Central

    Mouw, Ted; Verdery, Ashton M.

    2013-01-01

    Techniques for sampling from networks have grown into an important area of research across several fields. For sociologists, the possibility of sampling from a network is appealing for two reasons: (1) A network sample can yield substantively interesting data about network structures and social interactions, and (2) it is useful in situations where study populations are difficult or impossible to survey with traditional sampling approaches because of the lack of a sampling frame. Despite its appeal, methodological concerns about the precision and accuracy of network-based sampling methods remain. In particular, recent research has shown that sampling from a network using a random walk based approach such as Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) can result in high design effects (DE)—the ratio of the sampling variance to the sampling variance of simple random sampling (SRS). A high design effect means that more cases must be collected to achieve the same level of precision as SRS. In this paper we propose an alternative strategy, Network Sampling with Memory (NSM), which collects network data from respondents in order to reduce design effects and, correspondingly, the number of interviews needed to achieve a given level of statistical power. NSM combines a “List” mode, where all individuals on the revealed network list are sampled with the same cumulative probability, with a “Search” mode, which gives priority to bridge nodes connecting the current sample to unexplored parts of the network. We test the relative efficiency of NSM compared to RDS and SRS on 162 school and university networks from Add Health and Facebook that range in size from 110 to 16,278 nodes. The results show that the average design effect for NSM on these 162 networks is 1.16, which is very close to the efficiency of a simple random sample (DE=1), and 98.5% lower than the average DE we observed for RDS. PMID:24159246

  7. The MWA GLEAM 4 Jy sample; a new large, bright radio source sample at 151 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C. A.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Seymour, N.; White, S. V.; Murphy, T.; Salder, E. M.; Callingham, J. R.; Hunstead, R. W.; Hughes, J.; Wall, J. V.; Bell, M. E.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Gaensler, B. M.; Hancock, P. J.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapinska, A. D.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2015-10-01

    This paper outlines how the new GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky MWA Survey (GLEAM, Wayth et al. 2015), observed by the Murchison Widefield Array covering the frequency range 72 - 231 MHz, allows identification of a new large, complete, sample of more than 2000 bright extragalactic radio sources selected at 151 MHz. With a flux density limit of 4 Jy this sample is significantly larger than the canonical fully-complete sample, 3CRR (Laing, Riley & Longair 1983). In analysing this small bright subset of the GLEAM survey we are also providing a first- user check of the GLEAM catalogue ahead of its public release (Hurley-Walker et al. in prep). Whilst significant work remains to fully characterise our new bright source sample, in time it will provide important constraints to evolutionary behaviour, across a wide redshift and intrinsic radio power range, as well as being highly complementary to results from targeted, small area surveys.

  8. Laser range profiling for small target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove; Tulldahl, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The detection and classification of small surface and airborne targets at long ranges is a growing need for naval security. Long range ID or ID at closer range of small targets has its limitations in imaging due to the demand on very high transverse sensor resolution. It is therefore motivated to look for 1D laser techniques for target ID. These include vibrometry, and laser range profiling. Vibrometry can give good results but is also sensitive to certain vibrating parts on the target being in the field of view. Laser range profiling is attractive because the maximum range can be substantial, especially for a small laser beam width. A range profiler can also be used in a scanning mode to detect targets within a certain sector. The same laser can also be used for active imaging when the target comes closer and is angular resolved. The present paper will show both experimental and simulated results for laser range profiling of small boats out to 6-7 km range and a UAV mockup at close range (1.3 km). We obtained good results with the profiling system both for target detection and recognition. Comparison of experimental and simulated range waveforms based on CAD models of the target support the idea of having a profiling system as a first recognition sensor and thus narrowing the search space for the automatic target recognition based on imaging at close ranges. The naval experiments took place in the Baltic Sea with many other active and passive EO sensors beside the profiling system. Discussion of data fusion between laser profiling and imaging systems will be given. The UAV experiments were made from the rooftop laboratory at FOI.

  9. Reindeer ranges inventory in western Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of LANDSAT data as a tool for reindeer range inventory on the tundra of northwestern Alaska is addressed. The specific goal is to map the range resource and estimate plant productivity of the Seward Peninsula. Information derived from these surveys is needed to develop range management plans for reindeer herding and to evaluate potential conflicting use between reindeer and caribou. The development of computer image classification techniques is discussed.

  10. An algorithm for segmenting range imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the technical accomplishments of the FY96 Cross Cutting and Advanced Technology (CC&AT) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The project focused on developing algorithms for segmenting range images. The image segmentation algorithm developed during the project is described here. In addition to segmenting range images, the algorithm can fuse multiple range images thereby providing true 3D scene models. The algorithm has been incorporated into the Rapid World Modelling System at Sandia National Laboratory.

  11. Long-range neural synchrony in behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Alexander Z.; Gordon, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-range synchrony between distant brain regions accompanies multiple forms of behavior. This review compares and contrasts the methods by which long-range synchrony is evaluated in both humans and model animals. Three examples of behaviorally-relevant long-range synchrony are discussed in detail: gamma-frequency synchrony during visual perception; hippocampal-prefrontal synchrony during working memory; and prefrontal-amygdala synchrony during anxiety. Implications for circuit mechanism, translation, and clinical relevance are discussed. PMID:25897876

  12. Salmonella prevalence in free-range and certified organic chickens.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J S; Cosby, D E

    2005-11-01

    Many consumers assume that broiler chickens grownunder traditional commercial conditions will have more Salmonella than free-range or organic chickens, which usually are less crowded, have access to outside spaces during grow out, and are fed special diets. Despite these perceptions, there is a lack of published information about the microbiological status of free-range and organic chickens. A total of 135 processed free-range chickens from four different commercial free-range chicken producers were sampled in 14 different lots for the presence of Salmonella. Overall, 9 (64%) of 14 lots and 42 (31%) of 135 of the carcasses were positive for Salmonella. No Salmonella were detected in 5 of the 14 lots, and in one lot 100% of the chickens were positive for Salmonella. An additional 53 all-natural (no meat or poultry meal or antibiotics in the feed) processed chickens from eight lots were tested; 25% ofthe individual chickens from 37% of these lots tested positive for Salmonella. Three lots of chickens from a single organicfree-range producer were tested, and all three of the lots and 60% of the individual chickens were positive for Salmonella.The U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service reported that commercial chickens processed from 2000 to 2003 had a Salmonella prevalence rate of 9.1 to 12.8%. Consumers should not assume that free-range or organicconditions will have anything to do with the Salmonella status of the chicken.

  13. a Review of Hyperspectral Imaging in Close Range Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, T. H.; Buckley, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is an established method for material mapping, which has been conventionally applied from airborne and spaceborne platforms for a range of applications, including mineral and vegetation mapping, change detection and environmental studies. The main advantage of lightweight hyperspectral imagers lies in the flexibility to deploy them from various platforms (terrestrial imaging and from unmanned aerial vehicles; UAVs), as well as the high spectral resolution to cover an expanding wavelength range. In addition, spatial resolution allows object sampling distances from micrometres to tens of centimetres - complementary to conventional nadir-looking systems. When this new type of imaging device was initially released, few instruments were available and the applicability and potential of the method was restricted. Today, a wider range of instruments, with a range of specifications, is available, with significant improvements over the first generation of technology. In this contribution, the state-of-the-art of hyperspectral imaging will be reviewed from a close range measurement perspective, highlighting how the method supplements geometric modelling techniques. An overview of the processing workflow, adjusted to the more complex close range imaging scenario will be given. This includes the integration with 3D laser scanning and photogrammetric models to provide a geometric framework and real world coordinate system for the hyperspectral imagery.

  14. Salmonella prevalence in free-range and certified organic chickens.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J S; Cosby, D E

    2005-11-01

    Many consumers assume that broiler chickens grownunder traditional commercial conditions will have more Salmonella than free-range or organic chickens, which usually are less crowded, have access to outside spaces during grow out, and are fed special diets. Despite these perceptions, there is a lack of published information about the microbiological status of free-range and organic chickens. A total of 135 processed free-range chickens from four different commercial free-range chicken producers were sampled in 14 different lots for the presence of Salmonella. Overall, 9 (64%) of 14 lots and 42 (31%) of 135 of the carcasses were positive for Salmonella. No Salmonella were detected in 5 of the 14 lots, and in one lot 100% of the chickens were positive for Salmonella. An additional 53 all-natural (no meat or poultry meal or antibiotics in the feed) processed chickens from eight lots were tested; 25% ofthe individual chickens from 37% of these lots tested positive for Salmonella. Three lots of chickens from a single organicfree-range producer were tested, and all three of the lots and 60% of the individual chickens were positive for Salmonella.The U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service reported that commercial chickens processed from 2000 to 2003 had a Salmonella prevalence rate of 9.1 to 12.8%. Consumers should not assume that free-range or organicconditions will have anything to do with the Salmonella status of the chicken. PMID:16300088

  15. Biases and caustics in long-range acoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, Walter; Wunsch, Carl

    1985-11-01

    We consider the travel time perturbation δt of acoustic rays in an ocean sound channel. The perturbations arom a straining e(x,z) of the water column. An expansion to second order gives δt ≈ τ + ατ , where < e> and are suitably weighted strain wverages, α is a number of order 1 (except near caustics), and τ is the phase integral (the 'reduced travel time' in the seismic literature); τ is a function of ray steepness and range, and varies from zero for axial rays to order 10 s for steep rays at 1000 km range. The quadratic bais ατ changes sign at the caustics; generally it is negative (warm bias) for a range-dependent ocean as compared to a range-independent ocean with the same average properties. We consider two separate problems: (a) linear inversions for the range-averaged profile in soundspeed (temperature) introduces 0.5 m s -1 (0.1 °C) systematic errors arising from horizontal ocean variability (mesoscal activity), but these errors can be reduced by making corrections for . (b) In the problem of monitoring for climatic changes of large-scale ocean features, the quadratic bias is negligible compared to the sample variability, and there is an inherent advantage to the long-range horizontal integration in acoustic tomography over the traditional local measurements.

  16. Geographical range and speciation in fossil and living molluscs.

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, David; Roy, Kaustuv

    2003-01-01

    The notion of a positive relation between geographical range and speciation rate or speciation probability may go back to Darwin, but a negative relation between these parameters is equally plausible. Here, we test these alternatives in fossil and living molluscan taxa. Late Cretaceous gastropod genera exhibit a strong negative relation between the geographical ranges of constituent species and speciation rate per species per million years; this result is robust to sampling biases against small-bodied taxa and is not attributable to phylogenetic effects. They also exhibit weak inverse or non-significant relations between geographical range and (i) the total number of species produced over the 18 million year timeframe, and (ii) the number of species in a single timeplane. Sister-group comparisons using extant molluscan species also show a non-significant relation between median geographical range and species richness of genera. These results support the view that the factors promoting broad geographical ranges also tend to damp speciation rates. They also demonstrate that a strong inverse relation between per-species speciation rate and geographical range need not be reflected in analyses conducted within a single timeplane, underscoring the inadequacy of treating net speciation as a proxy for raw per-taxon rates. PMID:12639320

  17. 2010 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2010-01-01

    this report provides a NASA Range Safety overview for current and potential range users. This report contains articles which cover a variety of subject areas, summaries of various NASA Range Safety Program activities conducted during the past year, links to past reports, and information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be done in the future. Specific topics discussed in the 2010 NASA Range Safety Annual Report include a program overview and 2010 highlights; Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy revision; Independent Assessments; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch/flight operations; a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. Every effort has been made to include the most current information available. We recommend this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. Once again, the web-based format was used to present the annual report.

  18. Autonomous system for launch vehicle range safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Haley, Sam

    2001-02-01

    The Autonomous Flight Safety System (AFSS) is a launch vehicle subsystem whose ultimate goal is an autonomous capability to assure range safety (people and valuable resources), flight personnel safety, flight assets safety (recovery of valuable vehicles and cargo), and global coverage with a dramatic simplification of range infrastructure. The AFSS is capable of determining current vehicle position and predicting the impact point with respect to flight restriction zones. Additionally, it is able to discern whether or not the launch vehicle is an immediate threat to public safety, and initiate the appropriate range safety response. These features provide for a dramatic cost reduction in range operations and improved reliability of mission success. .

  19. Sample Handling Considerations for a Europa Sample Return Mission: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, M. D.; Calaway, M. L.; Evans, C. A.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2015-01-01

    The intent of this abstract is to provide a basic overview of mission requirements for a generic Europan plume sample return mission, based on NASA Curation experience in NASA sample return missions ranging from Apollo to OSIRIS-REx. This should be useful for mission conception and early stage planning. We will break the mission down into Outbound and Return legs and discuss them separately.

  20. Sample Manipulation System for Sample Analysis at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumm, Erik; Kennedy, Tom; Carlson, Lee; Roberts, Dustyn

    2008-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument will analyze Martian samples collected by the Mars Science Laboratory Rover with a suite of spectrometers. This paper discusses the driving requirements, design, and lessons learned in the development of the Sample Manipulation System (SMS) within SAM. The SMS stores and manipulates 74 sample cups to be used for solid sample pyrolysis experiments. Focus is given to the unique mechanism architecture developed to deliver a high packing density of sample cups in a reliable, fault tolerant manner while minimizing system mass and control complexity. Lessons learned are presented on contamination control, launch restraint mechanisms for fragile sample cups, and mechanism test data.

  1. Late Miocene exhumation and uplift of the Washington Cascade Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, Peter W.; Ehlers, Todd A.; Garver, John I.; Gran Mitchell, Sara; Montgomery, David R.; Vance, Joseph A.; Nicolescu, Stefan

    2002-09-01

    The Washington Cascade Range is a complex, polygenetic mountain range that dominates the topographic, climatic, and cultural configurations of Washington State. Although it has been the locus of ongoing arc magmatism since the Eocene, most of the range is distinct from the southern part of the arc in Oregon and California in that bedrock uplift has produced high surface elevations and topographic relief, rather than volcanic burial or edifice construction. (U-Th)/He and fission-track ages of bedrock samples on the east flank of the range record relatively rapid cooling in the early Tertiary, but slow exhumation rates (˜0.2 km/m.y.) through most of the Oligocene. Samples on the west flank suggest rapid cooling in the late Miocene (8 12 Ma), and age variations in vertical transects are consistent with a pulse of rapid exhumation (0.5 1.0 km/m.y.) at that time. Apatite He ages as young as 1 5 Ma in several areas suggest that high cooling and possibly exhumation rates persist locally. Accelerated exhumation rates ca. 10 Ma are also observed in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia and southeast Alaska, ˜1500 km to the north, suggesting a large-scale mechanism for the exhumation pulse at that time.

  2. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vinegoni, C; Leon Swisher, C; Fumene Feruglio, P; Giedt, R J; Rousso, D L; Stapleton, S; Weissleder, R

    2016-01-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging. PMID:27032979

  3. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-01-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging. PMID:27032979

  4. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-04-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging.

  5. Sample holder with optical features

    DOEpatents

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  6. Deterministic multidimensional nonuniform gap sampling.

    PubMed

    Worley, Bradley; Powers, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Born from empirical observations in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data relating to gaps between sampled points, the Poisson-gap sampling method has enjoyed widespread use in biomolecular NMR. While the majority of nonuniform sampling schemes are fully randomly drawn from probability densities that vary over a Nyquist grid, the Poisson-gap scheme employs constrained random deviates to minimize the gaps between sampled grid points. We describe a deterministic gap sampling method, based on the average behavior of Poisson-gap sampling, which performs comparably to its random counterpart with the additional benefit of completely deterministic behavior. We also introduce a general algorithm for multidimensional nonuniform sampling based on a gap equation, and apply it to yield a deterministic sampling scheme that combines burst-mode sampling features with those of Poisson-gap schemes. Finally, we derive a relationship between stochastic gap equations and the expectation value of their sampling probability densities.

  7. Deterministic multidimensional nonuniform gap sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Bradley; Powers, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Born from empirical observations in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data relating to gaps between sampled points, the Poisson-gap sampling method has enjoyed widespread use in biomolecular NMR. While the majority of nonuniform sampling schemes are fully randomly drawn from probability densities that vary over a Nyquist grid, the Poisson-gap scheme employs constrained random deviates to minimize the gaps between sampled grid points. We describe a deterministic gap sampling method, based on the average behavior of Poisson-gap sampling, which performs comparably to its random counterpart with the additional benefit of completely deterministic behavior. We also introduce a general algorithm for multidimensional nonuniform sampling based on a gap equation, and apply it to yield a deterministic sampling scheme that combines burst-mode sampling features with those of Poisson-gap schemes. Finally, we derive a relationship between stochastic gap equations and the expectation value of their sampling probability densities.

  8. Emperical Tests of Acceptance Sampling Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. Preston, Jr.; Johnson, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Acceptance sampling is a quality control procedure applied as an alternative to 100% inspection. A random sample of items is drawn from a lot to determine the fraction of items which have a required quality characteristic. Both the number of items to be inspected and the criterion for determining conformance of the lot to the requirement are given by an appropriate sampling plan with specified risks of Type I and Type II sampling errors. In this paper, we present the results of empirical tests of the accuracy of selected sampling plans reported in the literature. These plans are for measureable quality characteristics which are known have either binomial, exponential, normal, gamma, Weibull, inverse Gaussian, or Poisson distributions. In the main, results support the accepted wisdom that variables acceptance plans are superior to attributes (binomial) acceptance plans, in the sense that these provide comparable protection against risks at reduced sampling cost. For the Gaussian and Weibull plans, however, there are ranges of the shape parameters for which the required sample sizes are in fact larger than the corresponding attributes plans, dramatically so for instances of large skew. Tests further confirm that the published inverse-Gaussian (IG) plan is flawed, as reported by White and Johnson (2011).

  9. Planetary protection for Mars sample return

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, R.; Adams, M.; Mattingly, R.; Rohatgi, N.; Corliss, J.; Dillman, R.; Fragola, J.; Minarick, J.

    2004-01-01

    A Mars sample return (MSR) mission must deal with two new categories of planetary protection requirements: (1) assuring a very low probability of inadvertent release of the sample in order to provide extra protection against the extremely unlikely possibility of biological hazards in the returned material and (2) keeping the samples free of round-trip Earth organisms to facilitate confirmation of safety after return to Earth. This paper describes the planetary-protection-related technical challenges awaiting an MSR mission as well as the range of capabilities being developed to meet these challenges. Containment assurance requires breaking the chain of contact with Mars: the exterior of the sample container must not be contaminated with Mars material. The sample container and its seals must be designed to survive Earth impacts corresponding to the candidate mission profiles, and the Earth entry vehicle must be designed to withstand the thermal and structural rigors of Earth atmosphere entry (all with an unprecedented degree of confidence). Sample contamination must be avoided by sterilizing the entire spacecraft, a challenge with modern avionics, or by sterilizing the sample collection and containment gear and then isolating it from other parts of the spacecraft.

  10. Characterizing bioaerosol risk from environmental sampling.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tao; Gurian, Patrick L

    2012-06-19

    In the aftermath of a release of microbiological agents, environmental sampling must be conducted to characterize the release sufficiently so that mathematical models can then be used to predict the subsequent dispersion and human health risks. Because both the dose-response and environmental transport of aerosolized microbiological agents are functions of the effective aerodynamic diameter of the particles, environmental assessments should consider not only the total amount of agents but also the size distributions of the aerosolized particles. However, typical surface sampling cannot readily distinguish among different size particles. This study evaluates different approaches to estimating risk from measurements of microorganisms deposited on surfaces after an aerosol release. For various combinations of sampling surfaces, size fractions, HVAC operating conditions, size distributions of release spores, uncertainties in surface measurements, and the accuracy of model predictions are tested in order to assess how much detail can realistically be identified from surface sampling results. The recommended modeling and sampling scheme is one choosing 3, 5, and 10 μm diameter particles as identification targets and taking samples from untracked floor, wall, and the HVAC filter. This scheme provides reasonably accurate, but somewhat conservative, estimates of risk across a range of different scenarios. Performance of the recommended sampling scheme is tested by using data from a large-scale field test as a case study. Sample sizes of 10-25 in each homogeneously mixed environmental compartment are sufficient to develop order of magnitude estimates of risk. Larger sample sizes have little benefit unless uncertainties in sample recoveries can be reduced. PMID:22568610

  11. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed.

  12. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed. PMID:27642456

  13. 2011 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the 2011 edition of the NASA Range Safety Annual Report. Funded by NASA Headquarters, this report provides a NASA Range Safety overview for current and potential range users. As is typical with odd year editions, this is an abbreviated Range Safety Annual Report providing updates and links to full articles from the previous year's report. It also provides more complete articles covering new subject areas, summaries of various NASA Range Safety Program activities conducted during the past year, and information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be done in the future. Specific topics discussed and updated in the 2011 NASA Range Safety Annual Report include a program overview and 2011 highlights; Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy revision; Independent Assessments; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch/flight operations; a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. Every effort has been made to include the most current information available. We recommend this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. Once again the web-based format was used to present the annual report. We continually receive positive feedback on the web-based edition and hope you enjoy this year's product as well. As is the case each year, contributors to this report are too numerous to mention, but we thank individuals from the NASA Centers, the Department of Defense, and civilian organizations for their contributions. In conclusion, it has been a busy and productive year. I'd like to extend a personal Thank You to everyone who contributed to make this year a successful one, and I look forward to working with all of you in the upcoming year.

  14. Super-sample signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Hu, Wayne; Takada, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    When extracting cosmological information from power spectrum measurements, we must consider the impact of super-sample density fluctuations whose wavelengths are larger than the survey scale. These modes contribute to the mean density fluctuation δb in the survey and change the power spectrum in the same way as a change in the cosmological background. They can be simply included in cosmological parameter estimation and forecasts by treating δb as an additional cosmological parameter enabling efficient exploration of its impact. To test this approach, we consider here an idealized measurement of the matter power spectrum itself in the Λ CDM cosmology though our techniques can readily be extended to more observationally relevant statistics or other parameter spaces. Using subvolumes of large-volume N -body simulations for power spectra measured with respect to either the global or local mean density, we verify that the minimum variance estimator of δb is both unbiased and has the predicted variance. Parameter degeneracies arise since the response of the matter power spectrum to δb and cosmological parameters share similar properties in changing the growth of structure and dilating the scale of features especially in the local case. For matter power spectrum measurements, these degeneracies can lead in certain cases to substantial error degradation and motivates future studies of specific cosmological observables such as galaxy clustering and weak lensing statistics with these techniques.

  15. Mesospheric aerosol sampling spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappmiller, Scott; Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kohnert, Rick

    . The Mesospheric Aerosol Sampling Spectrometer (MASS) instrument has been launched on two sounding rockets in August, 2007 from Andoya, Norway to detect charged sub-visible aerosol particles in the polar mesosphere. The MASS instrument is designed to collect charged aerosols, cluster ions, and electrons on four pairs of graphite electrodes, three of which are biased with increasing voltage. The design of the MASS instrument was complicated by the short mean free path in the mesosphere. The opening to MASS was deliberately built to increase the mean free path and to reduce the shock wave within the instrument. The design procedure began with aerodynamics simulations of the flow through the instrument using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) in 3-D. The electric fields within the instrument were calculated using a Laplace solver in 3-D. With the aerodynamic and electric field simulations completed, an algorithm was created to find the trajectories of charged aerosols including collisions within MASS. Using this algorithm the collection efficiencies for each electrode was calculated as a function of the charge to mass ratio of the incoming particle. The simulation results have been confirmed experimentally using an Argon RF ion beam. The data from the August launches have been analyzed and the initial results show the MASS instrument operated as expected. Additional studies are underway to determine if there were effects from payload charging or spurious charge generation within the instrument. This project is supported by NASA.

  16. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    should be analyzed for colloid size and concentration shortly after they have been collected. A prolonged waiting period after sampling will affect the colloid size distribution as well as colloid concentration resulting from the changes of water chemical properties. The data also shows that sample containers, filter materials, and labware that are used for colloid analyses should be cleaned by specially treated low-colloid-containing water. Water used for sample dilution should be verified for total colloidal particle concentration. They then analyzed freshly collected groundwater from NTS wells ER-20-5{number_sign}1 and {number_sign}3. Results show that these groundwater samples have similar colloid concentrations and particle size distributions. For the particle size range between 50- and 200-nm, about ten trillion (1E10) colloidal particles per liter are present in these water samples. Most of these colloidal particles are less than 100 mm in size. For example, more than 98% of the colloids are smaller than 100 nm in size in the ER-20-5 {number_sign}1 sample. Furthermore, it was found that the smaller the sizes of colloid, the higher the colloid concentration present in the water. For another site at NTS, Cheshire, they had analyzed two zones of groundwater samples. For water samples collected from the lower water zone (near the underground detonation cavity about 3,700 feet of slanted depth from the surface), the colloid concentration was about 5E12 particles per liter. About 20 times less than the lower zone of total colloids was found in water samples collected from the upper aquifer (around 2,511 feet of slanted depth), although colloid size distributions from these two zones appear to be rather similar.

  17. Multiphoton cryo microscope with sample temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2013-02-01

    We present a multiphoton microscope system which combines the advantages of multiphoton imaging with precise control of the sample temperature. The microscope provides online insight in temperature-induced changes and effects in plant tissue and animal cells with subcellular resolution during cooling and thawing processes. Image contrast is based on multiphoton fluorescence intensity or fluorescence lifetime in the range from liquid nitrogen temperature up to +600°C. In addition, micro spectra from the imaged regions can be recorded. We present measurement results from plant leaf samples as well as Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  18. 1995-1998 Long Range Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Coll. of Technology, Williamsport.

    At Pennsylvania College of Technology (PCT), in Williamsport, long range planning is used to define institutional philosophy and mission and determine strategies to make the best use of available resources and implement actions to fulfill institutional mission. This document presents PCT's long-range plan for 1995-98 in three parts. Following an…

  19. Long Range Plan: 1992-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Coll. of Technology, Williamsport.

    Intended to enhance strategic planning and enable staff to work as a team toward a shared vision and common goals, this report presents the 1992-95 long-range plan of the Pennsylvania College of Technology (PCT). Part I defines long-range planning; describes the structure and use of the plan at PCT; presents PCT's philosophy, mission, and vision…

  20. Long Range Plan, 1997-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Coll. of Technology, Williamsport. Office of Strategic Planning and Research.

    At Pennsylvania College of Technology (PCT), long range planning is used to define institutional philosophy and mission and determine strategies to make the best use of available resources and implement actions to fulfill institutional mission. This document presents PCT's long-range plan for 1997-2000 in three parts. The first part describes long…

  1. 36 CFR 222.9 - Range improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Grazing and Livestock Use on the National Forest System § 222.9 Range improvements. (a) The Chief... needed to manage the range resource on National Forest System lands and other lands controlled by the... performed by a cooperator or permittee on National Forest System lands shall not confer the exclusive...

  2. 36 CFR 222.9 - Range improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Grazing and Livestock Use on the National Forest System § 222.9 Range improvements. (a) The Chief... needed to manage the range resource on National Forest System lands and other lands controlled by the... performed by a cooperator or permittee on National Forest System lands shall not confer the exclusive...

  3. Long Range Plan, 1991-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Coll. of Technology, Williamsport.

    This long-range plan for the Pennsylvania College of Technology (PCT) is divided into three main sections. Part I provides an overview of planning at PCT, including a definition of long-range planning, the college philosophy, mission, and vision statements, major institutional initiatives for 1991-92, and accreditation agency recommendations…

  4. Lunar laser ranging: 40 years of research

    SciTech Connect

    Kokurin, Yu L

    2003-01-31

    The history of the origin and development of the lunar laser ranging is described. The main results of lunar laser ranging are presented and fundamental problems solved by this technique are listed. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  5. College and University Long-Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Raymond M.

    The system for long-range planning at West Virginia University is described, with emphasis on how it relates to short-range planning and how it is carried out operationally. Planning tools used include (1) an inventory of the past and present of the institution, (2) a statement of the division of labor within the institution and the objectives of…

  6. The Geoscience Laser Altimetry/Ranging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Steven C.; Degnan, John J., III; Bufton, Jack L.; Garvin, James B.; Abshire, James B.

    1987-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimetry/Ranging System (GLARS), a combined laser ranging and altimetry system capable of subcentimeter position determinations of retroflector targets and subdecimeter profiling of topography, is described. The system uses advanced but currently available state-of-the-art components. Laboratory, field, and numerical experiments have indicated the suitability of GLARS as an instrument for Eos and other space platforms.

  7. Undergraduate range management exam: 1999-2014

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Undergraduate Range Management Exam (URME) has been administered to undergraduate students at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Range Management since 1983, with students demonstrating their higher order learning skills and synthesis knowledge of the art and science of rangeland management. ...

  8. Range contraction in large pelagic predators

    PubMed Central

    Worm, Boris; Tittensor, Derek P.

    2011-01-01

    Large reductions in the abundance of exploited land predators have led to significant range contractions for those species. This pattern can be formalized as the range–abundance relationship, a general macroecological pattern that has important implications for the conservation of threatened species. Here we ask whether similar responses may have occurred in highly mobile pelagic predators, specifically 13 species of tuna and billfish. We analyzed two multidecadal global data sets on the spatial distribution of catches and fishing effort targeting these species and compared these with available abundance time series from stock assessments. We calculated the effort needed to reliably detect the presence of a species and then computed observed range sizes in each decade from 1960 to 2000. Results suggest significant range contractions in 9 of the 13 species considered here (between 2% and 46% loss of observed range) and significant range expansions in two species (11–29% increase). Species that have undergone the largest declines in abundance and are of particular conservation concern tended to show the largest range contractions. These include all three species of bluefin tuna and several marlin species. In contrast, skipjack tuna, which may have increased its abundance in the Pacific, has also expanded its range size. These results mirror patterns described for many land predators, despite considerable differences in habitat, mobility, and dispersal, and imply ecological extirpation of heavily exploited species across parts of their range. PMID:21693644

  9. Wide-range pulse-height discriminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cancro, C. A.; Garrahan, N. M.

    1970-01-01

    Improved pulse amplitude discriminator has discriminator level in millivolt range, permits simple adjustment over wide range, and is stable within one percent at temperatures between minus 20 degrees and plus 60 degrees C. The discriminator responds to narrow pulses /500 nsec/, draws little power /milliwatts/, and requires simple circuitry.

  10. Elevated PCDD/F levels and distinctive PCDD/F congener profiles in free range eggs.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jing-Fang; Chen, Chun; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2010-07-14

    Chicken eggs are one of the most important foods in the human diet all over the world, and the demand for eggs from free range hens has steadily increased. Congener-specific analyses of 17 polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) were performed on 6 free range and 12 caged chicken egg samples collected in Taiwan. The mean level of PCDD/Fs in the free range egg samples was 5.7 (1.79/0.314) times higher than those in the caged egg samples. Principle component analysis revealed that at least three characteristic patterns of PCDD/F congener were observed among the 18 egg samples. The different PCDD/F congener patterns between free range and caged egg samples may reflect distinctive exposure scenarios among the free range and caged hens. We suggest that the differences of PCDD/F levels and congener patterns between free range and caged egg samples give rise to the issues related to the safety of eating free range chicken eggs. The present data may provide useful information for further investigation of the possible PCDD/F sources in the contaminated free range eggs.

  11. Seasonal Variation in Daily Temperature Ranges.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruschy, David L.; Baker, Donald G.; Skaggs, Richard H.

    1991-12-01

    Abrupt spring and autumnal changes in the daily temperature range, from low winter values to higher nonwinter values, were noted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul temperature record. Since this feature was even more evident in five rural and small town Minnesota stations, it can be accepted as real.The inverse relationship found between surface albedo and the daily temperature range indicated that the reduced winter temperature range is associated with snow cover. A second factor controlling the temperature range is cloud cover. This led to the conclusion that variation in net solar radiation is the primary factor.A strong statistical relationship between daily temperature range and the three variables considered (solar radiation, albedo, and cloud cover) was limited to the spring and fall. In March-April the statistically significant factors were solar radiation and albedo, while in October-November they were solar radiation and cloud cover. For the October-December period albedo was also statistically important.

  12. Eighth International Workshop on Laser Ranging Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, John J. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The Eighth International Workshop for Laser Ranging Instrumentation was held in Annapolis, Maryland in May 1992, and was sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The workshop is held once every 2 to 3 years under differing institutional sponsorship and provides a forum for participants to exchange information on the latest developments in satellite and lunar laser ranging hardware, software, science applications, and data analysis techniques. The satellite laser ranging (SLR) technique provides sub-centimeter precision range measurements to artificial satellites and the Moon. The data has application to a wide range of Earth and lunar science issues including precise orbit determination, terrestrial reference frames, geodesy, geodynamics, oceanography, time transfer, lunar dynamics, gravity and relativity.

  13. Tests of gravity Using Lunar Laser Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkowitz, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Lunar laser ranging (LLR) has been a workhorse for testing general relativity over the pat four decades. The three retrorefiector arrays put on the Moon by the Apollo astronauts and the French built array on the second Soviet Lunokhod rover continue to be useful targets, and have provided the most stringent tests of the Strong Equivalence Principle and the time variation of Newton's gravitational constant. The relatively new ranging system at the Apache Point :3.5 meter telescope now routinely makes millimeter level range measurements. Incredibly. it has taken 40 years for ground station technology to advance to the point where characteristics of the lunar retrorefiectors are limiting the precision of the range measurements. In this article. we review the gravitational science and technology of lunar laser ranging and discuss prospects for the future.

  14. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of preserving a liquid biological sample, comprising the step of: contacting said liquid biological sample with a preservative comprising, sodium benzoate in an amount of at least about 0.15% of the sample (weight/volume) and citric acid in an amount of at least about 0.025% of the sample (weight/volume).

  15. Importance sampling : promises and limitations.

    SciTech Connect

    West, Nicholas J.; Swiler, Laura Painton

    2010-04-01

    Importance sampling is an unbiased sampling method used to sample random variables from different densities than originally defined. These importance sampling densities are constructed to pick 'important' values of input random variables to improve the estimation of a statistical response of interest, such as a mean or probability of failure. Conceptually, importance sampling is very attractive: for example one wants to generate more samples in a failure region when estimating failure probabilities. In practice, however, importance sampling can be challenging to implement efficiently, especially in a general framework that will allow solutions for many classes of problems. We are interested in the promises and limitations of importance sampling as applied to computationally expensive finite element simulations which are treated as 'black-box' codes. In this paper, we present a customized importance sampler that is meant to be used after an initial set of Latin Hypercube samples has been taken, to help refine a failure probability estimate. The importance sampling densities are constructed based on kernel density estimators. We examine importance sampling with respect to two main questions: is importance sampling efficient and accurate for situations where we can only afford small numbers of samples? And does importance sampling require the use of surrogate methods to generate a sufficient number of samples so that the importance sampling process does increase the accuracy of the failure probability estimate? We present various case studies to address these questions.

  16. 2013 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2013-01-01

    Welcome to the 2013 edition of the NASA Range Safety Annual Report. Funded by NASA Headquarters, this report provides an Agency overview for current and potential range users. This report contains articles which cover a variety of subject areas, summaries of various activities performed during the past year, links to past reports, and information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be conducted in the future. Specific topics discussed in the 2013 NASA Range Safety Annual Report include a program overview and 2013 highlights, Range Safety Training, Independent Assessments, support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch/flight operations, a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies, and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. Every effort has been made to include the most current information available. We recommend this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. As is the case each year, we had a wide variety of contributors to this report from across our NASA Centers and the national range safety community at large, and I wish to thank them all. On a sad note, we lost one of our close colleagues, Dr. Jim Simpson, due to his sudden passing in December. His work advancing the envelope of autonomous flight safety systems software/hardware development leaves a lasting impression on our community. Such systems are being flight tested today and may one day be considered routine in the range safety business. The NASA family has lost a pioneer in our field, and he will surely be missed. In conclusion, it has been a very busy and productive year, and I look forward to working with all of you in NASA Centers/Programs/Projects and with the national Range Safety community in making Flight/Space activities as safe as they can be in the upcoming year.

  17. Illuminating geographical patterns in species' range shifts.

    PubMed

    Grenouillet, Gaël; Comte, Lise

    2014-10-01

    Species' range shifts in response to ongoing climate change have been widely documented, but although complex spatial patterns in species' responses are expected to be common, comprehensive comparisons of species' ranges over time have undergone little investigation. Here, we outline a modeling framework based on historical and current species distribution records for disentangling different drivers (i.e. climatic vs. nonclimatic) and assessing distinct facets (i.e. colonization, extirpation, persistence, and lags) of species' range shifts. We used extensive monitoring data for stream fish assemblages throughout France to assess range shifts for 32 fish species between an initial period (1980-1992) and a contemporary one (2003-2009). Our results provide strong evidence that the responses of individual species varied considerably and exhibited complex mosaics of spatial rearrangements. By dissociating range shifts in climatically suitable and unsuitable habitats, we demonstrated that patterns in climate-driven colonization and extirpation were less marked than those attributed to nonclimatic drivers, although this situation could rapidly shift in the near future. We also found evidence that range shifts could be related to some species' traits and that the traits involved varied depending on the facet of range shift considered. The persistence of populations in climatically unsuitable areas was greater for short-lived species, whereas the extent of the lag behind climate change was greater for long-lived, restricted-range, and low-elevation species. We further demonstrated that nonclimatic extirpations were primarily related to the size of the species' range, whereas climate-driven extirpations were better explained by thermal tolerance. Thus, the proposed framework demonstrated its potential for markedly improving our understanding of the key processes involved in range shifting and also offers a template for informing management decisions. Conservation strategies

  18. Illuminating geographical patterns in species' range shifts.

    PubMed

    Grenouillet, Gaël; Comte, Lise

    2014-10-01

    Species' range shifts in response to ongoing climate change have been widely documented, but although complex spatial patterns in species' responses are expected to be common, comprehensive comparisons of species' ranges over time have undergone little investigation. Here, we outline a modeling framework based on historical and current species distribution records for disentangling different drivers (i.e. climatic vs. nonclimatic) and assessing distinct facets (i.e. colonization, extirpation, persistence, and lags) of species' range shifts. We used extensive monitoring data for stream fish assemblages throughout France to assess range shifts for 32 fish species between an initial period (1980-1992) and a contemporary one (2003-2009). Our results provide strong evidence that the responses of individual species varied considerably and exhibited complex mosaics of spatial rearrangements. By dissociating range shifts in climatically suitable and unsuitable habitats, we demonstrated that patterns in climate-driven colonization and extirpation were less marked than those attributed to nonclimatic drivers, although this situation could rapidly shift in the near future. We also found evidence that range shifts could be related to some species' traits and that the traits involved varied depending on the facet of range shift considered. The persistence of populations in climatically unsuitable areas was greater for short-lived species, whereas the extent of the lag behind climate change was greater for long-lived, restricted-range, and low-elevation species. We further demonstrated that nonclimatic extirpations were primarily related to the size of the species' range, whereas climate-driven extirpations were better explained by thermal tolerance. Thus, the proposed framework demonstrated its potential for markedly improving our understanding of the key processes involved in range shifting and also offers a template for informing management decisions. Conservation strategies

  19. Electrphoretic Sample Excitation Light Assembly.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng

    2002-04-02

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  20. Sampling-interval-dependent stability for linear sampled-data systems with non-uniform sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hanyong; Lam, James; Feng, Zhiguang

    2016-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the sampling-interval-dependent stability of linear sampled-data systems with non-uniform sampling. A new Lyapunov-like functional is constructed to derive sampling-interval-dependent stability results. The Lyapunov-like functional has three features. First, it depends on time explicitly. Second, it may be discontinuous at the sampling instants. Third, it is not required to be positive definite between sampling instants. Moreover, the new Lyapunov-like functional can make use of the information fully of the sampled-data system, including that of both ends of the sampling interval. By making a new proposition for the Lyapunov-like functional, a sampling-interval-dependent stability criterion with reduced conservatism is derived. The new sampling-interval-dependent stability criterion is further extended to linear sampled-data systems with polytopic uncertainties. Finally, examples are given to illustrate the reduced conservatism of the stability criteria.

  1. Ultra-wide Range Gamma Detector System for Search and Locate Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, D. Mackenzie Odell; Harpring, Larry J.; Moore, Frank S. Jr.; French, Phillip J.; Gordon, John R.

    2005-10-26

    Collecting debris samples following a nuclear event requires that operations be conducted from a considerable stand-off distance. An ultra-wide range gamma detector system has been constructed to accomplish both long range radiation search and close range hot sample collection functions. Constructed and tested on a REMOTEC Andros platform, the system has demonstrated reliable operation over six orders of magnitude of gamma dose from 100's of uR/hr to over 100 R/hr. Functional elements include a remotely controlled variable collimator assembly, a NaI(Tl)/photomultiplier tube detector, a proprietary digital radiation instrument, a coaxially mounted video camera, a digital compass, and both local and remote control computers with a user interface designed for long range operations. Long range sensitivity and target location, as well as close range sample selection performance are presented.

  2. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention related to the preservation of a liquid biological sample. The biological sample is exposed to a preservative containing at least about 0.15 g of sodium benzoate and at least about 0.025 g of citric acid per 100 ml of sample. The biological sample may be collected in a vessel or an absorbent mass. The biological sample may also be exposed to a substrate and/or a vehicle.

  3. Trilateration range and range rate system. Volume 1: CDA system manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This document is one of a series of manuals designed to provide the information required to operate and maintain the Command and Data Acquisition (CDA) equipment of the Trilateration Range and Range Rate (TRRR) System. Information pertaining to the equipment in the Trilateration Range and Range Rate System which is designed to interface with existing NASA equipment located at Wallops Island, Virginia is presented.

  4. Demonstration of high sensitivity laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millar, Pamela S.; Christian, Kent D.; Field, Christopher T.

    1994-01-01

    We report on a high sensitivity semiconductor laser ranging system developed for the Gravity and Magnetic Earth Surveyor (GAMES) for measuring variations in the planet's gravity field. The GAMES laser ranging instrument (LRI) consists of a pair of co-orbiting satellites, one which contains the laser transmitter and receiver and one with a passive retro-reflector mounted in an drag-stabilized housing. The LRI will range up to 200 km in space to the retro-reflector satellite. As the spacecraft pair pass over the spatial variations in the gravity field, they experience along-track accelerations which change their relative velocity. These time displaced velocity changes are sensed by the LRI with a resolution of 20-50 microns/sec. In addition, the pair may at any given time be drifting together or apart at a rate of up to 1 m/sec, introducing a Doppler shift into the ranging signals. An AlGaAs laser transmitter intensity modulated at 2 GHz and 10 MHz is used as fine and medium ranging channels. Range is measured by comparing phase difference between the transmit and received signals at each frequency. A separate laser modulated with a digital code, not reported in this paper, will be used for coarse ranging to unambiguously determine the distance up to 200 km.

  5. Range and habitats of the desert tortoise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germano, D.J.; Bury, R.B.; Esque, T.C.; Fritts, T.H.; Bury, R.B.; Germano, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    We determined the current range of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) based on the available latest data from government agencies, the literature, and our experience. We developed the first detailed range map of this species and summarized information about habitat preferences. New records of occurrences were incorporated, and some peripheral localities of questionable authenticity were deleted. The distribution oCG. agassizii covers the broadest range of latitude, climatic regimes, habitats, and biotic regions of any North American tortoise. The northern portion ofits range is in the Mojave Desert of sDuth"eastern California, southern Nevada, southwestern Utah, and northwestern Arizona. The central portion of the range consists of several subdivisions of the Sonaran Desert in southeastern California, western and southern Arizona, and western Sonora, Mexico. The southern edge of its range is in the semitropical Sinaloan thornscrub and Sinaloan deciduous forest of eastern Sonora and northern Sinaloa, Mexico. This species has marked geogi-aphic differences but seems to construct burrows throughout its range.

  6. Perception range prediction for IR pilot sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, A. Robert; Großmann, Peter; Repasi, Endre; Ritt, Gunnar; Wittenstein, Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    The increasing use of IR pilot sight in helicopters calls for a reliable prediction of perception ranges for a variety of objects, especially those needed for orientation and those posing as a potential hazard, like power poles, masts, isolated trees etc. Since the visibility of objects in the IR depends mainly on the temperature differences between those objects and a given background and only marginally on illumination, range prediction techniques used for the visual range or light-amplified vision are only of very limited use. While range predictions based on the Johnson criterion do offer some insight into expected ranges, the inherently nominal nature of distance estimates thus obtained hampers their use for an actual field-deployable pre-flight consulting procedure. In order to overcome those limitations, long-term simultaneous measurements of relevant objects and background temperatures and weather data were carried out and used for temperature prediction from prevalent weather conditions. Together with a perception model derived from extensive observer experiments based on synthetic images of the UH Tiger Pilot Sight Unit we developed a perception range prediction package which is currently evaluated by the weather service of the Bundeswehr. We will present results from the observer experiments together with the derived perception models. These are then compared to actual perception ranges as obtained from flight experiments.

  7. Laser System for Precise, Unambiguous Range Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    The Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Range (MSTAR) architecture is the basis of design of a proposed laser-based heterodyne interferometer that could measure a range (distance) as great as 100 km with a precision and resolution of the order of 1 nm. Simple optical interferometers can measure changes in range with nanometer resolution, but cannot measure range itself because interference is subject to the well-known integer-multiple-of-2 -radians phase ambiguity, which amounts to a range ambiguity of the order of 1 m at typical laser wavelengths. Existing rangefinders have a resolution of the order of 10 m and are therefore unable to resolve the ambiguity. The proposed MSTAR architecture bridges the gap, enabling nanometer resolution with an ambiguity range that can be extended to arbitrarily large distances. The MSTAR architecture combines the principle of the heterodyne interferometer with the principle of extending the ambiguity range of an interferometer by using light of two wavelengths. The use of two wavelengths for this purpose is well established in optical metrology, radar, and sonar. However, unlike in traditional two-color laser interferometry, light of two wavelengths would not be generated by two lasers. Instead, multiple wavelengths would be generated as sidebands of phase modulation of the light from a single frequency- stabilized laser. The phase modulation would be effected by applying sinusoidal signals of suitable frequencies (typically tens of gigahertz) to high-speed electro-optical phase modulators. Intensity modulation can also be used

  8. Titanium Dioxide in Pyroclastic Layers from Volcanoes in the Cascad Range.

    PubMed

    Czamanske, G K; Porter, S C

    1965-11-19

    Rapid determinations of titanium dioxide have been made by x-ray emission techniques to evaluate the potentiality of using the TiO(2) content of samples for checking field correlations and assisting in identification of pyroclastic units from Cascade volcanoes. Preliminary data suggest that the two most wide-spread units have characteristic ranges of TiO(2) content and that other, less extensive layers have ranges which, though characteristic, often overlap the ranges of the more widespread layers. Relative to fresh samples,. weathered samples from B and C soil horizons are enriched in TiO(2).

  9. Titanium dioxide in pyroclastic layers from volcanoes in the cascade range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Porter, S.C.

    1965-01-01

    Rapid determinations of titanium dioxide have been made by x-ray emission techniques to evaluate the potentiality of using the TiO2 content of samples for checking field correlations and assisting in identification of pyroclastic units from Cascade volcanoes. Preliminary data suggest that the two most wide-spread units have characteristic ranges of TiO2 content and that other, less extensive layers have ranges which, though characteristic, often overlap the ranges of the more widespread layers. Relative to fresh samples, weathered samples from B and C soil horizons are enriched in TiO 2.

  10. Standoff Stack Emissions Monitoring Using Short Range Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravel, Jean-Francois Y.; Babin, Francois; Allard, Martin

    2016-06-01

    There are well documented methods for stack emissions monitoring. These are all based on stack sampling through sampling ports in well defined conditions. Once sampled, the molecules are quantified in instruments that often use optical techniques. Unfortunately sampling ports are not found on all stacks/ducts or the use of the sampling ports cannot be planned efficiently because of operational constraints or the emissions monitoring equipment cannot be driven to a remote stack/duct. Emissions monitoring using many of the same optical techniques, but at a standoff distance, through the atmosphere, using short range high spatial resolution lidar techniques was thus attempted. Standoff absorption and Raman will be discussed and results from a field campaign will be presented along with short descriptions of the apparatus. In the first phase of these tests, the molecules that were targeted were NO and O2. Spatially resolved optical measurements allow for standoff identification and quantification of molecules, much like the standardized methods, except for the fact that it is not done in the stack, but in the plume formed by the emissions from the stack. The pros and cons will also be discussed, and in particular the problem of mass emission estimates that require the knowledge of the flow rate and the distribution of molecular concentration in the plane of measurement.

  11. 2008 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamoreaux, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    Welcome to the 2008 edition of the NASA Range Safety Annual Report. Funded by NASA Headquarters, this report provides a NASA Range Safety overview for current and potential range users. This year, along with full length articles concerning various subject areas, we have provided updates to standard subjects with links back to the 2007 original article. Additionally, we present summaries from the various NASA Range Safety Program activities that took place throughout the year, as well as information on several special projects that may have a profound impact on the way we will do business in the future. The sections include a program overview and 2008 highlights of Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy; Independent Assessments and Common Risk Analysis Tools Development; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch operations; a continuing overview of emerging Range Safety-related technologies; Special Interests Items that include recent changes in the ELV Payload Safety Program and the VAS explosive siting study; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. As is the case each year, contributors to this report are too numerous to mention, but we thank individuals from the NASA Centers, the Department of Defense, and civilian organizations for their contributions. We have made a great effort to include the most current information available. We recommend that this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. This is the third year we have utilized this web-based format for the annual report. We continually receive positive feedback on the web-based edition, and we hope you enjoy this year's product as well. It has been a very busy and productive year on many fronts as you will note as you review this report. Thank you to everyone who contributed to make this year a successful one, and I look forward to working with all of you in the

  12. Determination of range parameters of observation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareła, J.; Kastek, M.; Firmanty, K.; Trzaskawka, P.; Dulski, R.; Kucharz, J.

    2012-10-01

    Range parameters of observation devices can be determined on the basis of numerical simulations (NVTherm) or on the basis of measured characteristics. Those measurements can be conducted in both laboratory and field conditions. It is, however, difficult to carry on reliable field measurements of range parameters because they are strongly depended on atmospheric conditions. Thus the laboratory measurements are more favorable option. Analysis of literature and catalogue specifications reveal, that range parameters are given mainly on the basis of Johnson criteria or TTP model. The Johnson criteria has been used since the 50s and most of catalogue range specifications are determined according to it. There are also NATO standards, which describe the measurement procedures and methodology required to define the detection, recognition and identification ranges for standard NATO targets. For the determination of range parameters the following device characteristics must be known: minimal resolvable temperature for thermal imaging devices and minimal resolvable contrast for VIS devices. The TTP model offers a new approach to the determination of range characteristics of observation devices. It has been developed by U.S. Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate since the year 2000. It was created because the modified Johnson criteria did not yield reliable results in case of modern systems with digital image processing. In order to determine the range parameters using TTP model, the modulation transfer function MTF, presample MTF function, and 3D noise of a tested system must be known as well as its basic design data as optical magnification and display type. The paper describes the measurement stand, measurement methodology and the procedure for the determination of range parameters. The results for thermal and VIS cameras are also presented, and they are analyzed and compared with the results obtained from current methods, including the measurement

  13. Evaluating Radionuclide Air Emission Stack Sampling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2002-12-16

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Hanford Site, Washington. These facilities are subject to Clean Air Act regulations that require sampling of radionuclide air emissions from some of these facilities. A revision to an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard on sampling radioactive air emissions has recently been incorporated into federal and state regulations and a re-evaluation of affected facilities is being performed to determine the impact. The revised standard requires a well-mixed sampling location that must be demonstrated through tests specified in the standard. It also carries a number of maintenance requirements, including inspections and cleaning of the sampling system. Evaluations were performed in 2000 – 2002 on two PNNL facilities to determine the operational and design impacts of the new requirements. The evaluation included inspection and cleaning maintenance activities plus testing to determine if the current sampling locations meet criteria in the revised standard. Results show a wide range of complexity in inspection and cleaning activities depending on accessibility of the system, ease of removal, and potential impact on building operations (need for outages). As expected, these High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA)-filtered systems did not show deposition significant enough to cause concerns with blocking of the nozzle or other parts of the system. The tests for sampling system location in the revised standard also varied in complexity depending on accessibility of the sample site and use of a scale model can alleviate many issues. Previous criteria to locate sampling systems at eight duct diameters downstream and two duct diameters upstream of the nearest disturbances is no guarantee of meeting criteria in the revised standard. A computational fluid dynamics model was helpful in understanding flow and

  14. An improved light source for laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel; Richardson, Martin

    1993-01-01

    The development of a new laser material, Cr-doped LiSAF, makes possible the development of a laser source for satellite ranging systems that is more superior in performance capabilities than current Nd:YAG-based laser sources. This new material offers the potential of shorter pulses and more preferable wavelengths (850 and 425 nm) than multiwavelength Nd:YAG systems, leading to superior ranging resolution and greater detection sensitivity. We are embarking on a feasibility study of a two-wavelength, mode-locked laser system based on Cr:LiSAF, providing shorter pulses for improved ranging resolution.

  15. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, M.C.

    1989-03-28

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

  16. Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1989-01-01

    A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

  17. Expert systems and ballistic range data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Wayne; Steinhoff, Mark; Whyte, Robert; Brown, David; Choate, Jeff; Adelgren, Russ

    1992-07-01

    A program aimed at the development of an expert system for the reduction of ballistic range data is described. The program applies expert system and artificial intelligence techniques to develop a mathematically complex state-of-the-art spark range data reduction procedure that includes linear theory and six-degree-of-freedom analysis. The scope of the knowledge base includes both spin and statically stable vehicles. The expert system is expected to improve the quality of the data reduction process while reducing the work load on the senior range engineer.

  18. Passive long range acousto-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Dan

    2006-08-01

    Alexander Graham Bell's photophone of 1880 was a simple free space optical communication device that used the sun to illuminate a reflective acoustic diaphragm. A selenium photocell located 213 m (700 ft) away converted the acoustically modulated light beam back into sound. A variation of the photophone is presented here that uses naturally formed free space acousto-optic communications links to provide passive multichannel long range acoustic sensing. This system, called RAS (remote acoustic sensor), functions as a long range microphone with a demonstrated range in excess of 40 km (25 miles).

  19. GRAVITY STUDIES IN THE CASCADE RANGE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Carol; Williams, David

    1983-01-01

    A compatible set of gravity data has been compiled for the entire Cascade Range. From this data set a series of interpretive color gravity maps have been prepared, including a free air anomaly map, Bouguer anomaly map at a principle, and an alternate reduction density, and filtered and derivative versions of the Bouguer anomaly map. The regional anomaly pattern and gradients outline the various geological provinces adjacent to the Cascade Range and delineate major structural elements in the range. The more local anomalies and gradients may delineate low density basin and caldera fill, faults, and shallow plutons. Refs.

  20. Connecting scaling with short-range correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardo, D.; Barbaro, M. B.; Cenni, R.; Donnelly, T. W.; Molinari, A.

    2011-11-01

    We reexamine several issues related to the physics of scaling in electron scattering from nuclei. A basic model is presented in which an assumed form for the momentum distribution having both long- and short-range contributions is incorporated in the single-particle Green’s function. From this one can obtain saturation of nuclear matter for an NN interaction with medium-range attraction and short-range repulsion and obtain the density-density polarization propagator and, hence, the electromagnetic response and scaling function. For the latter, the shape of the scaling function and how it approaches scaling as a function of momentum transfer are both explored.