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Sample records for acidic class iii

  1. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  2. Pseudo Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance "modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow," some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month.

  3. Rheological and molecular weight comparisons of approved hyaluronic acid products - preliminary standards for establishing class III medical device equivalence.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Gavin J C; Daley, Michael J; Toledo-Velasquez, David

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid of various molecular weights has been in use for the treatment of osteoarthritis knee pain for decades. Worldwide, these products are regulated as either as drugs or devices and in some countries as both. In the US, this class of products is regulated as Class III medical devices, which places specific regulatory requirements on developers of these materials under a Pre-Market Approval process, typically requiring data from prospective randomized controlled clinical studies. In 1984 pharmaceutical manufacturers became able to file an Abbreviated New Drug Application for approval of a generic drug, thus establishing standards for demonstrating equivalence to an existing chemical entity. Recently, the first biosimilar, or 'generic biologic', was approved. Biosimilars are biological products that are approved by the FDA because they are 'highly similar' to a reference product, and have been shown to have no clinically meaningful differences from the reference product. For devices, Class II medical devices have a pathway for declaring equivalence to an existing product by filing a 510 k application for FDA clearance. However, until recently no equivalent regulatory pathway was available to Class III devices. In this paper, we consider the critical mechanical performance parameters for intra-articular hyaluronic products to demonstrate indistinguishable characteristics. Analogous to the aforementioned pathways that allow for a demonstration of equivalence, we examine these parameters for an existing, marketed device and compare molecular weight and rheological properties of multiple batches of a similar product. We propose that this establishes a scientific rationale for establishing Class III medical device equivalence.

  4. An acidic class III chitinase in sugar beet: induction by Cercospora beticola, characterization, and expression in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K K; Mikkelsen, J D; Kragh, K M; Bojsen, K

    1993-01-01

    An acidic chitinase (SE) was found to accumulate in leaves of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) during infection with Cercospora beticola. Two isoforms, SE1 and SE2, with MW of 29 kDa and pI of approximately 3.0 were purified to homogeneity. SE2 is an endochitinase that also exhibits exochitinase activity, i.e., it is capable of hydrolyzing chito-oligosaccharides, including chitobiose, into N-acetyl-glucosamine. Partial amino acid sequence data for SE2 were used to obtain a cDNA clone by polymerase chain reaction. The clone was used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding SE2. The deduced amino acid sequence for SE2 is 58-67% identical to the class III chitinases from cucumber, Arabidopsis, and tobacco. A transient induction of SE2 mRNA during the early stages of infection with C. beticola is much stronger in tolerant plants than in susceptible plants. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) plants constitutively accumulate SE2 protein in the intercellular space of their leaves. In a preliminary infection experiment, the transgenic plants did not show increase in resistance against C. nicotianae.

  5. Class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase--Beclin1 complex mediates the amino acid-dependent regulation of autophagy in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Tassa, Amina; Roux, Marie Paule; Attaix, Didier; Bechet, Daniel M

    2003-01-01

    Increased proteolysis contributes to muscle atrophy that prevails in many diseases. Elucidating the signalling pathways responsible for this activation is of obvious clinical importance. Autophagy is a ubiquitous degradation process, induced by amino acid starvation, that delivers cytoplasmic components to lysosomes. Starvation markedly stimulates autophagy in myotubes, and the present studies investigate the mechanisms of this regulation. In C(2)C(12) myotubes incubated with serum growth factors, amino acid starvation stimulated autophagic proteolysis independently of p38 and p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinases, but in a PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)-dependent manner. Starvation, however, did not alter activities of class I and class II PI3Ks, and was not sufficient to affect major signalling proteins downstream from class I PI3K (glycogen synthase kinase, Akt/protein kinase B and protein S6). In contrast, starvation increased class III PI3K activity in whole-myotube extracts. In fact, this increase was most pronounced for a population of class III PI3K that coimmunoprecipitated with Beclin1/Apg6 protein, a major determinant in the initiation of autophagy. Stimulation of proteolysis was reproduced by feeding myotubes with synthetic dipalmitoyl-PtdIns3 P, the class III PI3K product. Conversely, protein transfection of anti-class III PI3K inhibitory antibody into starved myotubes inverted the induction of proteolysis. Therefore, independently of class I PI3K/Akt, protein S6 and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, amino acid starvation stimulates proteolysis in myotubes by regulating class III PI3K-Beclin1 autophagic complexes. PMID:12967324

  6. Functional characterization of a class III acid endochitinase from the traps of the carnivorous pitcher plant genus, Nepenthes.

    PubMed

    Rottloff, Sandy; Stieber, Regina; Maischak, Heiko; Turini, Florian G; Heubl, Günther; Mithöfer, Axel

    2011-08-01

    Carnivory in plants is an adaptation strategy to nutrient-poor environments and soils. Carnivorous plants obtain some additional mineral nutrients by trapping and digesting prey; the genus Nepenthes is helped by its specialized pitcher traps. To make the nutrients available, the caught prey needs to be digested, a process that requires the concerted activity of several hydrolytic enzymes. To identify and investigate the various enzymes involved in this process, fluid from Nepenthes traps has been analysed in detail. In this study, a novel type of Nepenthes endochitinase was identified in the digestion fluid of closed pitchers. The encoding endochitinase genes have been cloned from eight different Nepenthes species. Among these, the deduced amino acid sequence similarity was at least 94.9%. The corresponding cDNA from N. rafflesiana was heterologously expressed, and the purified protein, NrChit1, was biochemically characterized. The enzyme, classified as a class III acid endochitinase belonging to family 18 of the glycoside hydrolases, is secreted into the pitcher fluid very probably due to the presence of an N-terminal signal peptide. Transcriptome analyses using real-time PCR indicated that the presence of prey in the pitcher up-regulates the endochitinase gene not only in the glands, which are responsible for enzyme secretion, but at an even higher level, in the glands' surrounding tissue. These results suggest that in the pitchers' tissues, the endochitinase as well as other proteins from the pitcher fluid might fulfil a different, primary function as pathogenesis-related proteins.

  7. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  8. Genes, genetics, and Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Xue, F; Wong, R W K; Rabie, A B M

    2010-05-01

    To present current views that are pertinent to the investigation of the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion. Class III malocclusion is thought to be a polygenic disorder that results from an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental factors. However, research on family pedigrees has indicated that Class III malocclusion might also be a monogenic dominant phenotype. Recent studies have reported that genes that encode specific growth factors or other signaling molecules are involved in condylar growth under mechanical strain. These genes, which include Indian hedgehog homolog (IHH), parathyroid-hormone like hormone (PTHLH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and variations in their levels of expression play an important role in the etiology of Class III malocclusion. In addition, genome-wide scans have revealed chromosomal loci that are associated with Class III malocclusion. It is likely that chromosomal loci 1p36, 12q23, and 12q13 harbor genes that confer susceptibility to Class III malocclusion. In a case-control association study, we identified erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1 (EPB41) to be a new positional candidate gene that might be involved in susceptibility to mandibular prognathism. Most of the earlier studies on the genetic etiology of Class III malocclusion have focused on the patterns of inheritance of this phenotype. Recent investigations have focused on understanding the genetic variables that affect Class III malocclusion and might provide new approaches to uncovering the genetic etiology of this phenotype.

  9. Timely management of developing class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Yelampalli, M R; Rachala, M R

    2012-01-01

    Timing of orthodontic treatment, especially for children with developing class III malocclusions, has always been somewhat controversial, and definitive treatment tends to be delayed for severe class III cases. Developing class III patients with moderate to severe anterior crossbite and deep bite may need early intervention in some selected cases. Class III malocclusion may develop in children as a result of an inherent growth abnormality, i.e. true class III malocclusion, or as a result of premature occlusal contacts causing forward functional shift of the mandible, which is known as pseudo class III malocclusion. These cases, if not treated at the initial stage of development, interfere with normal growth of the jaw bases and may result in severe facial deformities. The treatment should be carried out as early as possible for permitting normal growth of the skeletal bases. This paper deals with the selection of an appropriate appliance from the various current options available for early intervention in developing class III malocclusion through two case reports.

  10. A Novel Class of Plant Type III Polyketide Synthase Involved in Orsellinic Acid Biosynthesis from Rhododendron dauricum

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Futoshi; Iijima, Miu; Yamanaka, Eriko; Takahashi, Hironobu; Kenmoku, Hiromichi; Saeki, Haruna; Morimoto, Satoshi; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Kurosaki, Fumiya; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rhododendron dauricum L. produces daurichromenic acid, the anti-HIV meroterpenoid consisting of sesquiterpene and orsellinic acid (OSA) moieties. To characterize the enzyme responsible for OSA biosynthesis, a cDNA encoding a novel polyketide synthase (PKS), orcinol synthase (ORS), was cloned from young leaves of R. dauricum. The primary structure of ORS shared relatively low identities to those of PKSs from other plants, and the active site of ORS had a unique amino acid composition. The bacterially expressed, recombinant ORS accepted acetyl-CoA as the preferable starter substrate, and produced orcinol as the major reaction product, along with four minor products including OSA. The ORS identified in this study is the first plant PKS that generates acetate-derived aromatic tetraketides, such as orcinol and OSA. Interestingly, OSA production was clearly enhanced in the presence of Cannabis sativa olivetolic acid cyclase, suggesting that the ORS is involved in OSA biosynthesis together with an unidentified cyclase in R. dauricum. PMID:27729920

  11. Evolution of Class III treatment in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Peter; Moon, Won

    2015-07-01

    Angle, Tweed, and Moyers classified Class III malocclusions into 3 types: pseudo, dentoalveolar, and skeletal. Clinicians have been trying to identify the best timing to intercept a Class III malocclusion that develops as early as the deciduous dentition. With microimplants as skeletal anchorage, orthopedic growth modification became more effective, and it also increased the scope of camouflage orthodontic treatment for patients who were not eligible for orthognathic surgery. However, orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery remains the only option for patients with a severe skeletal Class III malocclusion or a craniofacial anomaly. Distraction osteogenesis can now be performed intraorally at an earlier age. The surgery-first approach can minimize the length of time that the malocclusion needs to worsen before orthognathic surgery. Finally, the use of computed tomography scans for 3-dimensional diagnosis and treatment planning together with advances in imaging technology can improve the accuracy of surgical movements and the esthetic outcomes for these patients.

  12. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  13. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  14. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  15. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  16. 46 CFR 50.30-20 - Class III pressure vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class III pressure vessels. 50.30-20 Section 50.30-20... Fabrication Inspection § 50.30-20 Class III pressure vessels. (a) Class III pressure vessels shall be subject... specifically exempted by other regulations in this subchapter. (b) For Class III welded pressure vessels,...

  17. ScChi, Encoding an Acidic Class III Chitinase of Sugarcane, Confers Positive Responses to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yachun; Xu, Liping; Fu, Zhiwei; Yang, Yuting; Guo, Jinlong; Wang, Shanshan; Que, Youxiong

    2014-01-01

    Chitinases (EC 3.2.2.14), expressed during the plant-pathogen interaction, are associated with plant defense against pathogens. In the present study, a positive correlation between chitinase activity and sugarcane smut resistance was found. ScChi (GenBank accession no. KF664180), a Class III chitinase gene, encoded a 31.37 kDa polypeptide, was cloned and identified. Subcellular localization revealed ScChi targeting to the nucleus, cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) results showed that ScChi was highly expressed in leaf and stem epidermal tissues. The ScChi transcript was both higher and maintained longer in the resistance cultivar during challenge with Sporisorium scitamineum. The ScChi also showed an obvious induction of transcription after treatment with SA (salicylic acid), H2O2, MeJA (methyl jasmonate), ABA (abscisic acid), NaCl, CuCl2, PEG (polyethylene glycol) and low temperature (4 °C). The expression levels of ScChi and six immunity associated marker genes were upregulated by the transient overexpression of ScChi. Besides, histochemical assay of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves overexpressing pCAMBIA 1301-ScChi exhibited deep DAB (3,3′-diaminobenzidinesolution) staining color and high conductivity, indicating the high level of H2O2 accumulation. These results suggest a close relationship between the expression of ScChi and plant immunity. In conclusion, the positive responses of ScChi to the biotic and abiotic stimuli reveal that this gene is a stress-related gene of sugarcane. PMID:24552874

  18. Treatment of Class III with Facemask Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Snigdha; Mishra, Sumita

    2016-01-01

    Class III malocclusion is one of the most difficult problems to treat in the mixed dentition. It has a multifactorial etiology involving both genetic and environmental causes. The dental and skeletal effects of maxillary protraction with a facemask are well documented in several studies. Although treatment in the late mixed or early permanent dentition can be successful, results are generally better in the deciduous or early mixed dentition. The following case shows early treatment of a young patient with severe sagittal and transverse discrepancy of the maxilla and mandible, using a facemask. PMID:26925273

  19. AUTOCLASS III - AUTOMATIC CLASS DISCOVERY FROM DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, P. C.

    1994-01-01

    The program AUTOCLASS III, Automatic Class Discovery from Data, uses Bayesian probability theory to provide a simple and extensible approach to problems such as classification and general mixture separation. Its theoretical basis is free from ad hoc quantities, and in particular free of any measures which alter the data to suit the needs of the program. As a result, the elementary classification model used lends itself easily to extensions. The standard approach to classification in much of artificial intelligence and statistical pattern recognition research involves partitioning of the data into separate subsets, known as classes. AUTOCLASS III uses the Bayesian approach in which classes are described by probability distributions over the attributes of the objects, specified by a model function and its parameters. The calculation of the probability of each object's membership in each class provides a more intuitive classification than absolute partitioning techniques. AUTOCLASS III is applicable to most data sets consisting of independent instances, each described by a fixed length vector of attribute values. An attribute value may be a number, one of a set of attribute specific symbols, or omitted. The user specifies a class probability distribution function by associating attribute sets with supplied likelihood function terms. AUTOCLASS then searches in the space of class numbers and parameters for the maximally probable combination. It returns the set of class probability function parameters, and the class membership probabilities for each data instance. AUTOCLASS III is written in Common Lisp, and is designed to be platform independent. This program has been successfully run on Symbolics and Explorer Lisp machines. It has been successfully used with the following implementations of Common LISP on the Sun: Franz Allegro CL, Lucid Common Lisp, and Austin Kyoto Common Lisp and similar UNIX platforms; under the Lucid Common Lisp implementations on VAX/VMS v5

  20. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class...

  1. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class...

  2. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class...

  3. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class...

  4. 25 CFR 522.12 - Revocation of class III gaming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Revocation of class III gaming. 522.12 Section 522.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.12 Revocation of class...

  5. [Class III alcohol dehydrogenase and its role in the human body].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Sani, Tufik Alizade; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    Class III alcohol dehydrogenase is composed of two chi subunits, encoded by the ADH5 gene and existing in all tissues examined. It possesses a great ability to metabolize long-chain alcohols, while its capacity to oxidize ethanol is very limited. The amino-acid sequence homology and identical structural and kinetic properties indicate that class III alcohol dehydrogenase and formaldehyde dehydrogenase are identical enzymes. ADH III plays a significant role in the metabolism of formaldehyde in the human body.

  6. ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT ALTERNATIVE TO A CLASS III SUBDIVISION MALOCCLUSION

    PubMed Central

    Janson, Guilherme; de Souza, José Eduardo Prado; Barros, Sérgio Estelita Cavalcante; Andrade, Pedro; Nakamura, Alexandre Yudi

    2009-01-01

    Class III malocclusions are considered one of the most complex and difficult orthodontic problems to diagnose and treat. Skeletal and/or dental asymmetries in patients presenting with Class III malocclusions can worsen the prognosis. Recognizing the dentoalveolar and skeletal characteristics of subdivision malocclusions and their treatment possibilities is essential for a favorable nonsurgical correction. Therefore, this article presents a nonsurgical asymmetric extraction approach to Class III subdivision malocclusion treatment which can significantly improve the occlusal and facial discrepancies. PMID:19668997

  7. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI). Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI) were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p < 0.05); significantly lower condylar volume was observed in class II subjects, respect to class I and class III (p < 0.05). In the whole sample condylar volume (699.8 ± 63.07 mm3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p < 0.01) as well as condylar surface (423.24 ± 63.03 mm2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p < 0.01) were significantly higher in males than in females. Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population. PMID:23241136

  8. [Prosthetic rehabilitation in patient with forced class III malocclusion].

    PubMed

    Krunić, N; Kostić, M; Janośević, P; Petrović, D; Kostić, I; Petrović, M; Igić, M

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents clinical case of 63 years old edentulous patient with slight class III malocclusion. For 15 years he was using inadequately fabricated dentures causing forced severe class III malocclusion. Forced progeny was corrected by newly fabricated dentures which restored normal orofacial function and facial harmony.

  9. Expansion/Facemask Treatment of an Adult Class III Malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Gregory W; Kravitz, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    The orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion with a maxillary deficiency is often treated with maxillary protraction with or without expansion. Skeletal and dental changes have been documented which have combined for the protraction of the maxilla and the correction of the class III malocclusion. Concerning the ideal time to treat a developing class III malocclusion, studies have reported that, although early treatment may be the most effective, face mask therapy can provide a viable option for older children as well. But what about young adults? Can the skeletal and dental changes seen in expansion/facemask therapy in children and adolescents be demonstrated in this age group as well, possibly eliminating the need for orthodontic dental camouflage treatment or orthognathic surgery? A case report is presented of an adult class III malocclusion with a Class III skeletal pattern and maxillary retrusion. Treatment was with nonextraction, comprehensive edgewise mechanics with slow maxillary expansion with a bonded expander and protraction facemask.

  10. Occlusal rehabilitation of pseudo-class III patient.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Antônio Carlos; Ferreira, Cimara Fortes; Oderich, Elisa; Pedroso, Moira Leão; Wicks, Russell

    2015-01-01

    To treat a patient with anterior crossbite, the clinician should first assess if it is a genuine class III or a pseudo-class III malocclusion. Cephalometric analysis is important; however, registering a patient's centric relation (CR) is simple, quick, and costless and can play a decisive role in a differential diagnosis for this type of patient profile. This clinical report depicts a patient clinically diagnosed as class III. After mandible manipulation in CR, it was noted that the patient in question was a pseudo-class III. The treatment was based on the pseudo-class III diagnosis. Therefore, the patient was rehabilitated by occlusal adjustments and conventional and implant-supported prostheses and without the need for invasive orthognathic surgery.

  11. The early management of Class III malocclusions using protraction headgear.

    PubMed

    Macey-Dare, L V

    2000-12-01

    Class III malocclusions affect approximately 3% of Caucasians. Treatment options include; growth modification, dental camouflage and, once growth has ceased, orthognathic surgery. Originally, Class III malocclusions were thought to arise primarily from an overdevelopment of the mandible, but it is now known that maxillary retrusion contributes in up to 60% of cases. Maxillary retrusion is best treated with a combination of protraction headgear and rapid maxillary expansion, preferably before the age of 9 years. This article provides an overview of the management of skeletal Class III cases using protraction headgear with particular guidance for the general dental practitioner on when and how to treat.

  12. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pseudo-Class III Malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Ariel; Serret, Luis; Peguero, Marcos; Tanaka, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Pseudo-Class III malocclusion is characterized by the presence of an anterior crossbite due to a forward functional displacement of the mandible; in most cases, the maxillary incisors present some degree of retroclination, and the mandibular incisors are proclined. Various types of appliances have been described in the literature for the early treatment of pseudo-Class III malocclusion. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the importance of making the differential diagnosis between a skeletal and a pseudo-Class III malocclusion and to describe the correction of an anterior crossbite. The association of maxillary expansion and a 2 × 4 appliance can successfully be used to correct anterior crossbites.

  13. Archform Comparisons between Skeletal Class II and III Malocclusions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, JiuHui; Xu, TianMin; Li, CuiYing

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional research was to explore the relationship of the mandibular dental and basal bone archforms between severe Skeletal Class II (SC2) and Skeletal Class III (SC3) malocclusions. We also compared intercanine and intermolar widths in these two malocclusion types. Thirty-three virtual pretreatment mandibular models (Skeletal Class III group) and Thirty-five Skeletal Class II group pretreatment models were created with a laser scanning system. FA (the midpoint of the facial axis of the clinical crown)and WALA points (the most prominent point on the soft-tissue ridge)were employed to produce dental and basal bone archforms, respectively. Gained scatter diagrams of the samples were processed by nonlinear regression analysis via SPSS 17.0. The mandibular dental and basal bone intercanine and intermolar widths were significantly greater in the Skeletal Class III group compared to the Skeletal Class II group. In both groups, a moderate correlation existed between dental and basal bone arch widths in the canine region, and a high correlation existed between dental and basal bone arch widths in the molar region. The coefficient of correlation of the Skeletal Class III group was greater than the Skeletal Class II group. Fourth degree, even order power functions were used as best-fit functions to fit the scatter plots. The radius of curvature was larger in Skeletal Class III malocclusions compared to Skeletal Class II malocclusions (rWALA3>rWALA2>rFA3>rFA2). In conclusion, mandibular dental and basal intercanine and intermolar widths were significantly different between the two groups. Compared with Skeletal Class II subjects, the mandibular archform was more flat for Skeletal Class III subjects. PMID:24971597

  14. Archform comparisons between skeletal class II and III malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Wu, JiaQi; Jiang, JiuHui; Xu, TianMin; Li, CuiYing

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional research was to explore the relationship of the mandibular dental and basal bone archforms between severe Skeletal Class II (SC2) and Skeletal Class III (SC3) malocclusions. We also compared intercanine and intermolar widths in these two malocclusion types. Thirty-three virtual pretreatment mandibular models (Skeletal Class III group) and Thirty-five Skeletal Class II group pretreatment models were created with a laser scanning system. FA (the midpoint of the facial axis of the clinical crown)and WALA points (the most prominent point on the soft-tissue ridge)were employed to produce dental and basal bone archforms, respectively. Gained scatter diagrams of the samples were processed by nonlinear regression analysis via SPSS 17.0. The mandibular dental and basal bone intercanine and intermolar widths were significantly greater in the Skeletal Class III group compared to the Skeletal Class II group. In both groups, a moderate correlation existed between dental and basal bone arch widths in the canine region, and a high correlation existed between dental and basal bone arch widths in the molar region. The coefficient of correlation of the Skeletal Class III group was greater than the Skeletal Class II group. Fourth degree, even order power functions were used as best-fit functions to fit the scatter plots. The radius of curvature was larger in Skeletal Class III malocclusions compared to Skeletal Class II malocclusions (rWALA3>rWALA2>rFA3>rFA2). In conclusion, mandibular dental and basal intercanine and intermolar widths were significantly different between the two groups. Compared with Skeletal Class II subjects, the mandibular archform was more flat for Skeletal Class III subjects.

  15. Exclusion of Class III malocclusion candidate loci in Brazilian families.

    PubMed

    Cruz, R M; Hartsfield, J K; Falcão-Alencar, G; Koller, D L; Pereira, R W; Mah, J; Ferrari, I; Oliveira, S F

    2011-10-01

    The role played by genetic components in the etiology of the Class III phenotype, a class of dental malocclusion, is not yet understood. Regions that may be related to the development of Class III malocclusion have been suggested previously. The aim of this study was to search for genetic linkage with 6 microsatellite markers (D1S234, D4S3038, D6S1689, D7S503, D10S1483, and D19S566), near previously proposed candidate regions for Class III. We performed a two-point parametric linkage analysis for 42 affected individuals from 10 Brazilian families with a positive Class III malocclusion segregation. Analysis of our data indicated that there was no evidence for linkage of any of the 6 microsatellite markers to a Class III locus at = zero, with data supporting exclusion for 5 of the 6 markers evaluated. The present work reinforces that Class III is likely to demonstrate locus heterogeneity, and there is a dependency of the genetic background of the population in linkage studies.

  16. Non-surgical treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Romina M; Shah, Adit P; Diyora, Shamil D; Rathva, Vandana J

    2014-04-10

    The incidence of skeletal class III malocclusion has a mean of 3% in the Caucasian population, 5% in African-American adolescents and about 14% in the Asian population. In India, the incidence of class III malocclusion is reported to be 3.4%. A patient having class III malocclusion shows findings ranging from edge-to-edge bite to large reverse overjet, with extreme variations of underlying skeletal jaw bases and craniofacial form. This is a case report of a 20-year-old man having skeletal class III malocclusion with concave profile, anterior crossbite and a negative overjet of 3 mm treated non-surgically with extraction of only one lower left first premolar.

  17. Conservative treatment of Angle Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, João Hélder Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by anteroposterior dental discrepancy which might be associated or not with skeletal changes. Class III molar relationship is associated with vertical or lingually tipped mandibular incisors and a usually concave profile. These characteristics seriously affect facial esthetics and most frequently are the reason why patients seek orthodontic treatment. This case was presented to the committee of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO) as part of the requisites to become a BBO Diplomate.

  18. Conservative treatment of Angle Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite

    PubMed Central

    de Aguiar, João Hélder Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by anteroposterior dental discrepancy which might be associated or not with skeletal changes. Class III molar relationship is associated with vertical or lingually tipped mandibular incisors and a usually concave profile. These characteristics seriously affect facial esthetics and most frequently are the reason why patients seek orthodontic treatment. This case was presented to the committee of the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO) as part of the requisites to become a BBO Diplomate. PMID:26352851

  19. The simple class II and class III corrector: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Spary, David John; Little, Rachel Ann

    2015-03-01

    This article illustrates three case reports which describe a very simple appliance that is used to correct both class II and class III buccal segments. A class I molar relationship is achieved within 2-6 months. Hundreds of cases have been treated with these appliances over a number of years at Queen's Hospital, Burton upon Trent with great success.

  20. Early treatment protocol for skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima; de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues; Fernandes, Leandra Sant'Anna Ferreira Parron

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal Class III malocclusion, with its unpredictable and unfavorable nature, has been characterized by a growth pattern with doubtful prognosis regarding orthodontic mechanics, even when performed early. For a long time, Class III malocclusion was regarded as a synonym of mandibular prognathism, regardless of the affected skeletal structures. Mandibular growth, essentially determined by genetic factors, could barely be controlled by early orthodontic interventions. Therefore, the treatment choice was to wait for the patient to grow, and then make an orthodontic intervention associated with an orthognathic surgery. Maxillary involvement in the etiology of Class III malocclusion was conclusive to change orthodontic therapeutics. Maxillary intramembranous growth has a better response to orthopedic treatment, based on growth control and redirection, thus contributing for early intervention success. In several cases, excellent results have been achieved with rapid maxillary expansion and protraction. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss the treatment of a patient with Class III malocclusion, whose treatment planning comprised two phases: interceptive (mechanical orthopedic appliances) and comprehensive (fixed orthodontic appliance). The results of this case showed that Class III malocclusion should be intercepted as early as possible to permit growth redirection, mainly when the maxilla is the primary etiologic factor or dental and/or functional factors are involved. Diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis depend on patient age, growth potential and severity of malocclusion. Early intervention, adequate indication of appliances, and patient compliance are key factors for good outcomes.

  1. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming... GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.10 Individually owned class II and class...

  2. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming... GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.10 Individually owned class II and class...

  3. Nebraska School Facilities: Educational Adequacy of Class III School District Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidner, John M., Sr.

    2009-01-01

    In 2009, a replication of the Pool study was conducted. This study, however, focused on the school systems classified as Class III districts. Nebraska has 252 Class III districts. Compared with Class II (21), Class IV (1), and Class V(1) districts, the Class III districts offer a wide array of school settings, from urban to extremely rural, and…

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pseudo-Class III Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Ariel; Serret, Luis; Peguero, Marcos; Tanaka, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Pseudo-Class III malocclusion is characterized by the presence of an anterior crossbite due to a forward functional displacement of the mandible; in most cases, the maxillary incisors present some degree of retroclination, and the mandibular incisors are proclined. Various types of appliances have been described in the literature for the early treatment of pseudo-Class III malocclusion. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the importance of making the differential diagnosis between a skeletal and a pseudo-Class III malocclusion and to describe the correction of an anterior crossbite. The association of maxillary expansion and a 2 × 4 appliance can successfully be used to correct anterior crossbites. PMID:25525526

  5. Ortho-surgical management of skeletal Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rahul Kumar; Tikku, Tripti; Khanna, Rohit; Gupta, Hemant; Srivastava, Kamna; Verma, Sneh Lata

    2015-01-01

    Class III malocclusions are considered to be one of the most difficult problems to treat. Establishment of the treatment plan is based on the efficacy and thoughtful application by the clinician and easy acceptance by the patient. We are presenting a case report of an adult male patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion who was treated by orthosurgical approach in Department of Orthodontics in collaboration with Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. The treatment was complete with a positive overbite and acceptable occlusion and satisfactory facial esthetics using a combination approach. PMID:26668466

  6. Ortho-surgical management of skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rahul Kumar; Tikku, Tripti; Khanna, Rohit; Gupta, Hemant; Srivastava, Kamna; Verma, Sneh Lata

    2015-01-01

    Class III malocclusions are considered to be one of the most difficult problems to treat. Establishment of the treatment plan is based on the efficacy and thoughtful application by the clinician and easy acceptance by the patient. We are presenting a case report of an adult male patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion who was treated by orthosurgical approach in Department of Orthodontics in collaboration with Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. The treatment was complete with a positive overbite and acceptable occlusion and satisfactory facial esthetics using a combination approach.

  7. 25 CFR 291.5 - Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures be filed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.5 Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures be filed? Any proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures must be filed with...

  8. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or...

  9. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or...

  10. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or...

  11. 25 CFR 291.5 - Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures be filed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.5 Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures be filed? Any proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures must be filed with...

  12. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or...

  13. 25 CFR 291.5 - Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures be filed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.5 Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures be filed? Any proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures must be filed with...

  14. 25 CFR 291.5 - Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures be filed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.5 Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures be filed? Any proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures must be filed with...

  15. 25 CFR 291.5 - Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures be filed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.5 Where must the proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures be filed? Any proposal requesting Class III gaming procedures must be filed with...

  16. 25 CFR 522.8 - Publication of class III ordinance and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Publication of class III ordinance and approval. 522.8... AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.8 Publication of class III ordinance and approval. The Chairman shall publish a class III tribal...

  17. 49 CFR 232.211 - Class III brake tests-trainline continuity inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class III brake tests-trainline continuity... § 232.211 Class III brake tests-trainline continuity inspection. (a) A Class III brake test shall be... configuration of the train has changed in certain ways. In particular, a Class III brake test shall be...

  18. 25 CFR 291.15 - How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect... ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.15 How long do Class III gaming procedures remain in effect? Class III gaming procedures remain in effect for the duration specified in the procedures or...

  19. The abundant class III chitinase homolog in young developing banana fruits behaves as a transient vegetative storage protein and most probably serves as an important supply of amino acids for the synthesis of ripening-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Peumans, Willy J; Proost, Paul; Swennen, Rony L; Van Damme, Els J M

    2002-10-01

    Analyses of the protein content and composition revealed dramatic changes in gene expression during in situ banana (Musa spp.) fruit formation/ripening. The total banana protein content rapidly increases during the first 60 to 70 d, but remains constant for the rest of fruit formation/ripening. During the phase of rapid protein accumulation, an inactive homolog of class III chitinases accounts for up to 40% (w/v) of the total protein. Concomitant with the arrest of net protein accumulation, the chitinase-related protein (CRP) progressively decreases and several novel proteins appear in the electropherograms. Hence, CRP behaves as a fruit-specific vegetative storage protein that accumulates during early fruit formation and serves as a source of amino acids for the synthesis of ripening-associated proteins. Analyses of individual proteins revealed that a thaumatin-like protein, a beta-1,3-glucanase, a class I chitinase, and a mannose-binding lectin are the most abundant ripening-associated proteins. Because during the ripening of prematurely harvested bananas, similar changes take place as in the in situ ripening bananas, CRP present in immature fruits is a sufficient source of amino acids for a quasi-normal synthesis of ripening-associated proteins. However, it is evident that the conversion of CRP in ripening-associated proteins takes place at an accelerated rate, especially when climacteric ripening is induced by ethylene. The present report also includes a discussion of the accumulation of the major banana allergens and the identification of suitable promoters for the production of vaccines in transgenic bananas.

  20. The Abundant Class III Chitinase Homolog in Young Developing Banana Fruits Behaves as a Transient Vegetative Storage Protein and Most Probably Serves as an Important Supply of Amino Acids for the Synthesis of Ripening-Associated Proteins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Proost, Paul; Swennen, Rony L.; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of the protein content and composition revealed dramatic changes in gene expression during in situ banana (Musa spp.) fruit formation/ripening. The total banana protein content rapidly increases during the first 60 to 70 d, but remains constant for the rest of fruit formation/ripening. During the phase of rapid protein accumulation, an inactive homolog of class III chitinases accounts for up to 40% (w/v) of the total protein. Concomitant with the arrest of net protein accumulation, the chitinase-related protein (CRP) progressively decreases and several novel proteins appear in the electropherograms. Hence, CRP behaves as a fruit-specific vegetative storage protein that accumulates during early fruit formation and serves as a source of amino acids for the synthesis of ripening-associated proteins. Analyses of individual proteins revealed that a thaumatin-like protein, a β-1,3-glucanase, a class I chitinase, and a mannose-binding lectin are the most abundant ripening-associated proteins. Because during the ripening of prematurely harvested bananas, similar changes take place as in the in situ ripening bananas, CRP present in immature fruits is a sufficient source of amino acids for a quasi-normal synthesis of ripening-associated proteins. However, it is evident that the conversion of CRP in ripening-associated proteins takes place at an accelerated rate, especially when climacteric ripening is induced by ethylene. The present report also includes a discussion of the accumulation of the major banana allergens and the identification of suitable promoters for the production of vaccines in transgenic bananas. PMID:12376669

  1. Class III correction of a non-growing patient.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Thomas Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to suggest that the previously held postulation that we cannot functionally treat non-growing individuals may not be entirely true. It contains a class III case treated after stage 5 growth and possibly into stage 6.

  2. Early orthopedic treatment for Class III skeletal pattern.

    PubMed

    Kocadereli, I

    1998-01-01

    An eight-year-old female, Class III due to maxillary retrusion with brachyfacial growth pattern was treated with a functional regulator appliance (FR-3). By initiating treatment at an early age, developing skeletal imbalances were corrected. At postretention six years she had balanced profile and stable functional occlusion.

  3. 25 CFR 522.8 - Publication of class III ordinance and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 522.8 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.8 Publication of class III ordinance and approval. The Chairman shall publish a class III tribal...

  4. 25 CFR 522.8 - Publication of class III ordinance and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 522.8 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.8 Publication of class III ordinance and approval. The Chairman shall publish a class III tribal...

  5. Class III treatment using facial mask: Stability after 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Adilson Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Early Class III malocclusion treatment may not have long-term stability due to mandibular growth. Although some features of this malocclusion point to a better prognosis, it is practically impossible for the orthodontist to foresee cases that require new intervention. Many patients need retreatment, whether compensatory or orthodontic-surgical. The present study reports the case of a Class III patient treated at the end of the mixed dentition with the use of a face mask followed by conventional fixed appliances. The case remains stable 10 years after treatment completion. It was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:25715726

  6. 21 CFR 807.94 - Format of a class III certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Format of a class III certification. 807.94... IMPORTERS OF DEVICES Premarket Notification Procedures § 807.94 Format of a class III certification. (a) A class III certification submitted as part of a premarket notification shall state as follows: I...

  7. 25 CFR 522.6 - Approval requirements for class III ordinances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Approval requirements for class III ordinances. 522.6... AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.6 Approval requirements for class III ordinances. No later than 90 days after the submission to the Chairman under §...

  8. 77 FR 48167 - Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact; Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY... the purpose of engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. The Compact permits the...

  9. 14 CFR 21.333 - Issue of export airworthiness approval tags for Class III products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for Class III products. 21.333 Section 21.333 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Approvals § 21.333 Issue of export airworthiness approval tags for Class III products. (a) An applicant is entitled to an export airworthiness approval tag for Class III products if that applicant shows, except...

  10. Diverse functions and reactions of class III peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Jun; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Higher plants contain plant-specific peroxidases (class III peroxidase; Prxs) that exist as large multigene families. Reverse genetic studies to characterize the function of each Prx have revealed that Prxs are involved in lignification, cell elongation, stress defense and seed germination. However, the underlying mechanisms associated with plant phenotypes following genetic engineering of Prx genes are not fully understood. This is because Prxs can function as catalytic enzymes that oxidize phenolic compounds while consuming hydrogen peroxide and/or as generators of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, biochemical efforts to characterize Prxs responsible for lignin polymerization have revealed specialized activities of Prxs. In conclusion, not only spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and protein distribution, but also differentiated oxidation properties of each Prx define the function of this class of peroxidases.

  11. Treatment of pseudo Class III malocclusion by modified Hawleys appliance with inverted labial bow.

    PubMed

    Negi, K S; Sharma, K R

    2011-01-01

    Pseudo Class III malocclusion is characterized by an anterior crossbite with functional forward mandibular displacement. Various appliances have been devised for early treatment of a pseudo Class III. The aim of this article is to highlight the method of construction and use a simple removable appliance termed as "Modified Hawleys appliance with inverted labial bow" to treat psuedo class III malocclusion in the mixed dentition period. It also emphasizes the importance of differentiating between true Class III and pseudo Class III. This appliance in this type of malocclusion enabled the correction of a dental malocclusion in a few months and therapeutic stability of a mesially positioned mandible encouraging favorable skeletal growth.

  12. 25 CFR 522.7 - Disapproval of a class III ordinance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Disapproval of a class III ordinance. 522.7 Section 522.7 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.7 Disapproval of a class...

  13. 25 CFR 522.7 - Disapproval of a class III ordinance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Disapproval of a class III ordinance. 522.7 Section 522.7 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.7 Disapproval of a class...

  14. 25 CFR 522.7 - Disapproval of a class III ordinance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disapproval of a class III ordinance. 522.7 Section 522.7 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.7 Disapproval of a class...

  15. Treatment of Class III Malocclusion: Atypical Extraction Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fernando Pedrin Carvalho; de Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues; Conti, Ana Claudia de Castro Ferreira; Cardoso, Maurício de Almeida

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of Angle Class III malocclusion is rather challenging, because the patient's growth pattern determines the success of long-term treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment are still highly discussed issues in orthodontic literature. This type of early intervention has been indicated more frequently in order to eliminate primary etiological factors and prevent an already present malocclusion from becoming severe. However, when a patient is diagnosed in adulthood, manipulation of the bone bases becomes extremely limited, as there is no longer any potential for growth. Treatments are restricted to dental compensations when possible or orthognathic surgery. However, owing to the high cost and inherent risk of the surgical procedure, this treatment option is often denied by the patient; in such a case, the orthodontist has little choice but to perform, where possible, compensatory treatments to restore a functional occlusion and improve facial esthetics. This article reports a case of Class III malocclusion in a patient who opted for compensatory treatment with lower molar extraction that allowed for correction of the midline and the overjet. Good facial esthetics and functional normal occlusion were achieved at the end of the treatment. PMID:28265473

  16. TMJ in facial class III deformity. Condylar morphology relations

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Gonzalo; Olate, Sergio; Cantín, Mario; Vásquez, Bélgica; del Sol, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Class III dentofacial deformities (DF-III) are classified as a severe functional and esthetic anomaly. This work aims to describe the condylar morphology of subjects with DF-III and indication of correction through orthognatic surgery. A descriptive study was designed in the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Universidad de La Frontera, Chile, where 14 patients were examined with conventional cephalometric studies to determine the surgical indication; then, cone beam CT images were recorded for the morphometric analyses on the coronal and axial slices, considering linear measurements in the middle, basal and anteroposterior areas. The data were analyzed with the student’s t-test, considering p < 0.05 statistically significant. The results revealed condylar size differences of less than 1 mm between the left and right condyles, considering average widths of 17.03 mm in the right condyle and 17.86 mm in the left condyle. Vertically, the observed averages were 17.17 mm in the right condyle and 17.04 mm in the left condyle; no statistical differences were observed. It can be concluded that there are no differences in the measurements when the two condyles are compared in this type of subject. PMID:25356190

  17. The shape and size of the sella turcica in skeletal Class I, Class II, and Class III Saudi subjects.

    PubMed

    Alkofide, Eman A

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the shape and measure the size of the sella turcica in Saudi subjects with different skeletal types. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 180 individuals (90 males and 90 females) with an age range of 11-26 years were taken and distributed according to skeletal classification; 60 Class I, 60 Class II, and 60 Class III. The sella turcica on each radiograph was analysed and measured to determine the shape of the sella, in addition to the linear dimensions of length, depth, and diameter. A Student's t-test was used to calculate differences in linear dimensions, while a one-way analysis of variance was performed to study the relationship between skeletal type and sella size. The results show that the sella turcica presented with a normal morphology in the majority of subjects (67 per cent). No significant differences in linear dimensions between genders could be found. When age was evaluated, significant differences were found between the older (15 years or more) and the younger (11-14 years) age groups at the 0.01 and 0.001 levels for length, depth, and diameter. Sella size of the older age group was larger than in the younger age group. When skeletal type was compared with sella size, a significant difference was found in the diameter of sella between the Class II and Class III subjects (P < 0.01). Larger diameter values were present in the skeletal Class III subjects, while smaller diameter sizes were apparent in Class II subjects (multiple comparison tests). When gender, age, and skeletal type were all compared with the size of the sella (regression analyses), age was significantly related to a change of length (P < 0.01) and diameter (P < 0.001). Sella shape and dimensions reported in the current study can be used as reference standards for further investigations involving the sella turcica area in Saudi subjects.

  18. Sunshine Heart C-Pulse: device for NYHA Class III and ambulatory Class IV heart failure.

    PubMed

    Black, Matthew C; Schumer, Erin M; Rogers, Michael; Trivedi, Jaimin; Slaughter, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Advanced heart failure (HF) patients not meeting criteria for ventricular assist device or heart transplant with life-limiting symptoms are limited to medical and resynchronization therapy. The Sunshine Heart C-Pulse, based on intra-aortic balloon pump physiology, provides implantable, on-demand, extra-aortic counterpulsation, which reduces afterload and improves cardiac perfusion in New York Heart Association Class III and ambulatory Class IV HF. The C-Pulse reduces New York Heart Association Class, improves 6-min walk distances, inotrope requirements and HF symptom questionnaires. Advantages include shorter operative times without cardiopulmonary bypass, no reported strokes or thrombosis and no need for anticoagulation. Driveline exit site infections, inability to provide full circulatory support and poor function with intractable arrhythmias remain concerns. Current randomized controlled studies will evaluate long-term efficacy and safety compared with medical and resynchronization therapy.

  19. Surgical treatment of dental and skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Brunharo, Ione Helena Vieira Portella

    2013-01-01

    Orthodontic preparation for surgical treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion involves joint planning with an oral and maxillofacial surgeon to address the functional and esthetic needs of the patient. In order to allow surgical manipulation of the jaws in the preoperative phase, the need to achieve a negative overjet through incisor decompensation often leads the orthodontist to extract the upper first premolars. This report illustrates an orthodontic preparation case where due to specific factors inherent in the patient's psychological makeup retroclination of the upper incisors and proclination of the mandibular incisors was achieved without removing any teeth. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO) in partial fulfillment of the requirements for obtaining the BBO Diploma.

  20. Latent Class Analysis of Differential Item Functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Mi-young Lee; Cohen, Allan S.; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of latent class analysis for the detection of differences in item functioning on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Third Edition (PPVT-III). A two-class solution for a latent class model appeared to be defined in part by ability because Class 1 was lower in ability than Class 2 on both the PPVT-III and the…

  1. Crystal structure of class III chitinase from pomegranate provides the insight into its metal storage capacity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taro; Zhao, Guanghua; Mikami, Bunzo

    2015-01-01

    Chitinase hydrolyzes the β-1,4-glycosidic bond in chitin. In higher plants, this enzyme has been regarded as a pathogenesis-related protein. Recently, we identified a class III chitinase, which functions as a calcium storage protein in pomegranate (Punica granatum) seed (PSC, pomegranate seed chitinase). Here, we solved a crystal structure of PSC at 1.6 Å resolution. Although its overall structure, including the structure of catalytic site and non-proline cis-peptides, was closely similar to those of other class III chitinases, PSC had some unique structural characteristics. First, there were some metal-binding sites with coordinated water molecules on the surface of PSC. Second, many unconserved aspartate residues were present in the PSC sequence which rendered the surface of PSC negatively charged. This acidic electrostatic property is in contrast to that of hevamine, well-characterized plant class III chitinase, which has rather a positively charged surface. Thus, the crystal structure provides a clue for metal association property of PSC.

  2. 76 FR 43701 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Tribal State Gaming Compact Process...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... collection is currently authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0172, which expires November 30, 2011. DATES... guarantee that we will be able to do so. III. Data OMB Control Number: 1076-0172. Title: Class III...

  3. Evaluation depth of the curve of Spee in class I, class II, and class III malocclusion: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Dinakarsamy, V.; Santhosh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long-span posterior restorations are designed. When restorations are added to an existing tooth arrangement characterized by rotated, tipped, or extruded teeth, excursive interferences may be incorporated, resulting in detrimental squeal. The curve of Spee, which exists in the ideal natural dentition, allows harmony to exist between the anterior tooth and condylar guidance. This curve exists in the sagittal plane and is the best viewed from a lateral aspect. It permits total posterior disclusion on mandibular protrusion, given proper anterior tooth guidance. It is unclear that whether the curve of Spee is a description of the occlusal surface of each arch separately or in maximal intercuspation. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in the depth of curve of Spee between the class I, class II, class III and to investigate the relationship of depth of curve of Spee with over jet, over-bite. PMID:26015764

  4. 25 CFR 291.14 - How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the Secretary be amended?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.14 How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the Secretary be amended? An Indian tribe may ask the Secretary to amend approved Class III...

  5. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under...

  6. 25 CFR 291.14 - How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the Secretary be amended?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.14 How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the Secretary be amended? An Indian tribe may ask the Secretary to amend approved Class III...

  7. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under...

  8. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under...

  9. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under...

  10. 25 CFR 291.14 - How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the Secretary be amended?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.14 How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the Secretary be amended? An Indian tribe may ask the Secretary to amend approved Class III...

  11. 25 CFR 291.14 - How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the Secretary be amended?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.14 How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the Secretary be amended? An Indian tribe may ask the Secretary to amend approved Class III...

  12. 25 CFR 291.13 - When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.13 When do Class III gaming procedures for an Indian tribe become effective? Upon approval of Class III gaming procedures for the Indian tribe under...

  13. 25 CFR 291.14 - How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the Secretary be amended?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the... ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.14 How can Class III gaming procedures approved by the Secretary be amended? An Indian tribe may ask the Secretary to amend approved Class III...

  14. 25 CFR 291.3 - When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.3 When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures? An Indian tribe may ask the Secretary to issue Class III... of Class III gaming activities; (b) The State and the Indian tribe failed to negotiate a compact...

  15. Management of pseudo Class III malocclusion--synergistic approach with fixed and functional appliance.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Tandon, Pradeep; Singh, Gyan P

    2013-01-01

    Class III malocclusion has been divided into two subtypes: skeletal and pseudo-Class III. A pseudo Class III malocclusion should be treated as early as possible to reduce the functional shift of the mandible and increase maxillary arch length. A case of pseudo-Class III malocclusion was presented here. A 11-year-old boy came with an anterior cross bite, the treatment was done with Fixed appliance (Roth prescription) and Reverse Twin block therapy. This case demonstrated that an anterior cross bite was corrected after 10 months of treatment.

  16. Early treatment of Class III malocclusion by RME and modified Tandem appliance.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Juhi; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Patients with a skeletal Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency can be treated successfully using a combined protraction facemask and alternate rapid maxillary expansions and contractions (Alt-RAMEC). However, due to poor patient compliance during facemask therapy there has been growing interest in intraoral appliances for correcting Class III malocclusion. The tandem traction bow appliance (TTBA) is an intraoral appliance which has been used successfully for the treatment of growing Class III patients. This case report describes the management of a 10-year-old boy with a Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency treated with modified TTBA appliance.

  17. Evaluation and Comparison of Intermaxillary Tooth Size Discrepancy among Class I, Class II Division 1, and Class III Subjects Using Bolton’s Analysis: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, A Lakshmi; Venkatramana, V; Aryasri, A Srikanth; Katta, Anil Kumar; Santhanakrishnan, K; Maheshwari, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluation and comparison of intermaxillary tooth size discrepancy among Class I, Class II division 1, and Class III subjects using Bolton’s analysis. Materials and Methods: The pre-treatment casts were selected from the records of patients attending the Department of Orthodontics of Meenakshi Ammal Dental College, Chennai. The sample consists of 180 pre-treatment casts with both sexes evenly distributed with 60 casts in each type of malocclusion, i.e., Class I, Class II div 1, and Class III malocclusion. The sample was selected according to angles classification. All patients were Indian nationals, between the age group of 12 to 20 years and Bolton’s analysis done on all the casts. Results: Statistically no significant difference in all types of malocclusion except anterior Bolton’s discrepancy in Class III. Conclusion: Mean Bolton’s anterior ratio for angles Class III subjects was significantly greater than for Class I and Class II subjects. When Bolton’s overall ratio was compared there was no statistically significant difference among Class I, Class II div 1, and Class III malocclusions. PMID:26435619

  18. TMJ in facial class III deformity. Condyle/fossa relations

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Gonzalo; Olate, Sergio; Cantín, Mario; Vásquez, Bélgica; del Sol, Mariano; Fariña, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the joint space present in the TMJ of subjects diagnosed with Class III dentofacial deformity with an indication for orthognathic surgery. Fourteen subjects were recruited from the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Universidad de La Frontera, Chile. All subjects were admitted to the study after signing an informed consent and undergoing cephalometric analyses to define the severity of the deformity. Then, the joint space was analyzed, studying a cone beam CT image of the TMJ, which was evaluated in the coronal and sagittal views, defining the most anterior, median and posterior joint space (sagittal view), as well as the lateral, median and medial joint space (coronal view). The data were recorded in millimeters by an observer and data were analyzed after measuring the same parameter at three different times. A student’s t-test was used for the analyses. Differences observed in both joints were not greater than 0.2 mm with spaces between 2 mm and 1.5 mm, thereby establishing the homogeneity of the sample, which presented no significant differences between the two joint spaces (right and left). It can be concluded that the joint space is symmetrical in both condyles and that no important changes are present compared to the results indicated in the international literature. PMID:25356133

  19. TMJ in facial class III deformity. Condyle/fossa relations.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Gonzalo; Olate, Sergio; Cantín, Mario; Vásquez, Bélgica; Del Sol, Mariano; Fariña, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the joint space present in the TMJ of subjects diagnosed with Class III dentofacial deformity with an indication for orthognathic surgery. Fourteen subjects were recruited from the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Universidad de La Frontera, Chile. All subjects were admitted to the study after signing an informed consent and undergoing cephalometric analyses to define the severity of the deformity. Then, the joint space was analyzed, studying a cone beam CT image of the TMJ, which was evaluated in the coronal and sagittal views, defining the most anterior, median and posterior joint space (sagittal view), as well as the lateral, median and medial joint space (coronal view). The data were recorded in millimeters by an observer and data were analyzed after measuring the same parameter at three different times. A student's t-test was used for the analyses. Differences observed in both joints were not greater than 0.2 mm with spaces between 2 mm and 1.5 mm, thereby establishing the homogeneity of the sample, which presented no significant differences between the two joint spaces (right and left). It can be concluded that the joint space is symmetrical in both condyles and that no important changes are present compared to the results indicated in the international literature.

  20. Improving Clinical Outcomes for Patients With Class III Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Melissa; Bires, Angela Macci; Waterstram-Rich, Kristen; Cline, Thomas W

    Heart failure (HF) is a serious medical problem in the United States and is placing a financial strain on the health care system. It is the leading cause of mortality and as the overall incidence continues to increase, so does the economic impact on the health care system. Innovative treatment options, in the form of disease management programs and implantable cardiac devices, such as the CorVue capable implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) pacemaker, offer the promise of an enhanced quality of life and reduced mortality. Even with these advances, HF continues to be a challenge. Studies reviewing HF management programs have shown promising results. However, more studies are needed to determine which combination of HF management interventions has the greatest financial impact and yields the best patient outcomes. The objective of the research study was to compare 30-day readmission rates of patients implanted with the CorVue capable ICD pacemaker with patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) with no implanted device. The aim of the research focused on the usefulness of intrathoracic impedance monitoring alerts in guiding empirical treatment of patients with CHF to prevent HF readmissions. Methodology included a retrospective medical chart review, comparing 30-day readmission events among patients with class III CHF who received home health intervention with similar patients implanted with the CorVue ICD.

  1. Class I to III histone deacetylases differentially regulate inflammation-induced matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression in primary amnion cells.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Marin; Lim, Ratana; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2014-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 plays an important role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix in fetal membranes, and pathological activation of MMP-9 can lead to preterm birth. In nongestational tissues, modulation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulates MMP-9 expression. The aim of this study was to determine whether class I to III HDACs regulate MMP-9 expression and activity in primary amnion cells. Class I and II HDAC regulation of MMP-9 was assessed using the general class I and II HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the class I HDACi MS-275, and the class II HDACi MC1568. Class III HDAC regulation of MMP-9 was assessed using the SIRT1 activators resveratrol and SRT1720 as well as SIRT1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Primary amnion epithelial cells were incubated with 1 ng/mL interleukin (IL) 1β in the absence or presence of 0.3 μmol/L TSA, 5 μmol/L SAHA, 2.5 μmol/L MS-275, 2.5 μmol/L MC1568, 50 μmol/L resveratrol, or 10 μmol/L SRT1720 for 20 hours. We found that the class I and II HDACi TSA and SAHA and the class II HDACi MC1568 significantly decreased IL-β-induced MMP-9 gene and pro-MMP-9 expression in primary amnion cells. There was, however, no effect of the class I HDACi MS-275 on IL-β-induced MMP-9 expression. On the other hand, inhibition of class III HDAC SIRT1 using siRNA significantly augmented IL-1β-induced MMP-9, and SIRT1 activation using resveratrol and SRT1720 inhibited IL-1β-induced MMP-9 expression. In summary, class I to III HDACs differentially regulate inflammation-induced MMP-9 expression in primary amnion cells.

  2. 49 CFR 1150.34 - Caption summary-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Caption summary-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. 1150.34 Section 1150.34 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to....34 Caption summary—transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. The caption summary...

  3. 49 CFR 1150.34 - Caption summary-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Caption summary-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. 1150.34 Section 1150.34 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to....34 Caption summary—transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. The caption summary...

  4. 49 CFR 1150.34 - Caption summary-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Caption summary-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. 1150.34 Section 1150.34 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to....34 Caption summary—transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. The caption summary...

  5. 49 CFR 1150.34 - Caption summary-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Caption summary-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. 1150.34 Section 1150.34 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to....34 Caption summary—transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. The caption summary...

  6. 49 CFR 1150.34 - Caption summary-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Caption summary-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. 1150.34 Section 1150.34 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to....34 Caption summary—transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. The caption summary...

  7. Splint therapy for skeletal Class III malocclusion in the primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Franchi, L; Baccetti, T

    1998-01-01

    An orthopedic appliance for the correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion in the primary dentition is described. The appliance consists of two resin splints with hooks for Class III elastic intraoral traction. Construction features and biomechanical aspects of the device are described along with the clinical evaluation of treatment effects in two case reports.

  8. Early correction of class III malocclusion with rapid maxillary expansion and face mask therapy.

    PubMed

    Karthi, Muthukumar; Anbuselvan, Gobichettipalayam Jagatheeswaran; Kumar, Bhandari Pawan

    2013-07-01

    A case report is presented of a class III malocclusion with a class III skeletal pattern and maxillary retrusion. Patient, a 10-year-old boy was treated with an orthopedic face mask in conjunction with rapid maxillary expansion and standard pre-adjusted edgewise appliance. Treatment was completed after 3 years and proved to be stable following the active treatment.

  9. Transcriptional activation of Xenopus class III genes in chromatin isolated from sperm and somatic nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Wolffe, A P

    1989-01-01

    Xenopus sperm chromatin lacks class III transcription complexes and somatic histone H1. Inactive class III genes in sperm chromatin are easily programmed with transcription complexes de novo and transcribed in Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. In contrast, repressed class III genes in somatic chromatin are not transcribed in the oocyte nuclear extract. Class III genes that are initially inactive or repressed in both types of chromatin can be efficiently transcribed in a cell free preparation of Xenopus eggs. Chromatin mediated repression of class III genes in somatic nuclei is reversible in Xenopus egg extract, but not in the oocyte nuclear extract. Any inhibition of transcription attributed to chromatin assembly onto a gene, will therefore depend on the extract in which transcription is assayed. Images PMID:2915929

  10. The Oropharyngeal Airway in Young Adults with Skeletal Class II and Class III Deformities: A 3-D Morphometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jayaratne, Yasas Shri Nalaka; Zwahlen, Roger Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 1) To determine the accuracy and reliability of an automated anthropometric measurement software for the oropharyngeal airway and 2) To compare the anthropometric dimensions of the oropharyngeal airway in skeletal class II and III deformity patients. Methods Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans of 62 patients with skeletal class II or III deformities were used for this study. Volumetric, linear and surface area measurements retroglossal (RG) and retropalatal (RP) compartments of the oropharyngeal airway was measured with the 3dMDVultus software. Accuracy of automated anthropometric pharyngeal airway measurements was assessed using an airway phantom. Results The software was found to be reasonably accurate for measuring dimensions of air passages. The total oropharyngeal volume was significantly greater in the skeletal class III deformity group (16.7 ± 9.04 mm3) compared with class II subjects (11.87 ± 4.01 mm3). The average surface area of both the RG and RP compartments were significantly larger in the class III deformity group. The most constricted area in the RG and RP airway was significantly larger in individuals with skeletal class III deformity. The anterior-posterior (AP) length of this constriction was significantly greater in skeletal class III individuals in both compartments, whereas the width of the constriction was not significantly different between the two groups in both compartments. The RP compartment was larger but less uniform than the RG compartment in both skeletal deformities. Conclusion Significant differences were observed in morphological characteristics of the oropharyngeal airway in individuals with skeletal class II and III deformities. This information may be valuable for surgeons in orthognathic treatment planning, especially for mandibular setback surgery that might compromise the oropharyngeal patency. PMID:26901313

  11. The biowaiver extension for BCS class III drugs: the effect of dissolution rate on the bioequivalence of BCS class III immediate-release drugs predicted by computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gordon L

    2010-08-02

    The Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) guidance issued by the FDA allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release (IR) solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I drugs. However, a number of drugs within BCS class III have been proposed to be eligible for biowaivers. The World Health Organization (WHO) has shortened the requisite dissolution time of BCS class III drugs on their Essential Medicine List (EML) from 30 to 15 min for extended biowaivers; however, the impact of the shorter dissolution time on AUC(0-inf) and C(max) is unknown. The objectives of this investigation were to assess the ability of gastrointestinal simulation software to predict the oral absorption of the BCS class I drugs propranolol and metoprolol and the BCS class III drugs cimetidine, atenolol, and amoxicillin, and to perform in silico bioequivalence studies to assess the feasibility of extending biowaivers to BCS class III drugs. The drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted using physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of test drugs provided by GastroPlus (version 6.0). Virtual trials with a 200 mL dose volume at different drug release rates (T(85%) = 15 to 180 min) were performed to predict the oral absorption (C(max) and AUC(0-inf)) of the above drugs. Both BCS class I drugs satisfied bioequivalence with regard to the release rates up to 120 min. The results with BCS class III drugs demonstrated bioequivalence using the prolonged release rate, T(85%) = 45 or 60 min, indicating that the dissolution standard for bioequivalence is dependent on the intestinal membrane permeability and permeability profile throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The results of GastroPlus simulations indicate that the dissolution rate of BCS class III drugs could be prolonged to the point where dissolution, rather than permeability, would control the overall absorption. For BCS class III drugs with intestinal absorption patterns

  12. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. 522.10 Section 522.10 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN... gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. For licensing of individually...

  13. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. 522.10 Section 522.10 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN... gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. For licensing of individually...

  14. 25 CFR 522.10 - Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Individually owned class II and class III gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. 522.10 Section 522.10 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN... gaming operations other than those operating on September 1, 1986. For licensing of individually...

  15. Civilization III and Whole-Class Play in High School Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, John K.; Probert, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This study examined an 11th grade high school class as they played the game Civilization III. Over nine class sessions students played the game in support of other activities related to several predetermined and emergent topics in U. S. history. Gameplay was whole-class oriented and involved students taking turns at the computer controlling…

  16. Rotation of the upper first molar in Class I, II, and III patients

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Viganó, Cristiane; da Rocha, Viviane Ekerman; Junior, Laerte Ribeiro Menezes; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Ramos, Adilson Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the mean rotation of the upper first molar (U1st M) in cast models from nontreated patients presenting: Class I, skeletal Class II, dental Class II, and skeletal Class III, comparing with Class I orthodontically treated patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred cast models were evaluated with five groups, composed of nontreated Class I (n = 20), dental Class II (n = 20), skeletal Class II (n = 20), skeletal Class III (n = 20), and treated Class I (n = 20). Measurements were taken from photocopies of the upper arches. The angle formed between a line crossing the mesiopalatal and the distal-buccalcusps of the U1st M and a line traced on mid palatal junction were measured in all samples. Results: One-way variance analysis showed that dental Class II group presented great mean rotation of the 1st molar (x = 78.95°, SD = 6.19) (P < 0.05), and in 85% of the patients from this group this angle was higher than 73°. Conclusions: The skeletal Class II and skeletal Class III groups showed similar mean position of the 1st molar, presenting rotation in approximately 50% of the patients. It can be concluded that upper molar rotation occurs mainly in dental Class II patients and shows higher mesial rotation angle. PMID:27011741

  17. Non-surgical Management of Skeletal Class III Malocclusion with Bilateral Posterior Crossbite: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Lalima; Nayan, Kamal

    2016-12-01

    A 16-year-old female patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion and bilateral posterior cross bite complaining of difficulty in chewing was treated orthodontically without surgery (camouflage treatment). The treatment comprised of fixed orthodontic treatment with MBT prescription (0.022˝×0.028˝ slot) using quad helix appliance for bilateral expansion of maxillary arch and Class III elastics for occlusal correction. Post-treatment records showed normal overbite and overjet with acceptable occlusion. So with this treatment strategy of expanding the maxillary arch using a quad helix appliance and use of Class III elastics, we achieved a good result with optimal occlusion.

  18. Non-surgical Management of Skeletal Class III Malocclusion with Bilateral Posterior Crossbite: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nayan, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old female patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion and bilateral posterior cross bite complaining of difficulty in chewing was treated orthodontically without surgery (camouflage treatment). The treatment comprised of fixed orthodontic treatment with MBT prescription (0.022˝×0.028˝ slot) using quad helix appliance for bilateral expansion of maxillary arch and Class III elastics for occlusal correction. Post-treatment records showed normal overbite and overjet with acceptable occlusion. So with this treatment strategy of expanding the maxillary arch using a quad helix appliance and use of Class III elastics, we achieved a good result with optimal occlusion. PMID:28209011

  19. 40 CFR Figure C-3 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 10-2,5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 10-2,5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-3 to Subpart C of...—Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 10-2,5 Candidate...

  20. 40 CFR Figure C-2 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 2.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part...—Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 2.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  1. 40 CFR Figure C-2 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 2.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part...—Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 2.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  2. 40 CFR Figure C-3 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 10-2.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 10-2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-3 to Subpart C of...—Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM 10-2.5 Candidate...

  3. 40 CFR Figure C-2 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part 53... of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  4. 40 CFR Figure C-2 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part 53... of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  5. Mini-III, a fourth class of RNase III catalyses maturation of the Bacillus subtilis 23S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Gabriela; Guzmán, Plinio

    2008-06-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) type of enzymes are double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-specific endoribonucleases that have important roles in RNA maturation and mRNA decay. They are involved in processing precursors of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in bacteria as well as precursors of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) in eukaryotes. RNase III proteins have been grouped in three major classes according to their domain organization. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Redko et al. identified a novel class of bacterial RNase III, named Mini-III, consisting only of the RNase III catalytic domain and functioning in the maturation of the 23S rRNA in Bacillus subtilis. Its absence from proteobacteria reveals that this step is mechanistically different from the corresponding step in Escherichia coli. The fact that Mini-III orthologues are present in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes and in plants opens new opportunities for functional studies of this type of RNases.

  6. Amphibian alcohol dehydrogenase, the major frog liver enzyme. Relationships to other forms and assessment of an early gene duplication separating vertebrate class I and class III alcohol dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Cederlund, E.; Joernvall, H. ); Peralba, J.M.; Pares, X. )

    1991-03-19

    Submammalian alcohol dehydrogenase structures can be used to evaluate the origins and functions of different types of the mammalian enzyme. Two avian forms were recently reported, and the authors now define the major amphibian alcohol dehydrogenase. The enzyme from the liver of the Green frog Rana perezi was purified, carboxymethylated, and submitted to amino acid sequence determination by peptide analysis of six different digest. The protein has a 375-residue subunit and is a class I alcohol dehydrogenase, bridging the gap toward the original separation of the classes that are observable in the human alcohol dehydrogenase system. In relation to the human class I enzyme, the amphibian protein has residue identities exactly halfway (68%) between those for the corresponding avian enzyme (74%) and the human class III enzyme (62%), suggesting an origin of the alcohol dehnydrogenase classes very early in or close to the evolution of the vertebrate line. This conclusion suggests that these enzyme classes are more universal among animals than previously realized and constitutes the first real assessment of the origin of the duplications leading to the alcohol dehydrogenase classes. In conclusion, the amphibian enzyme allows a rough positioning of the divergence of the alcohol dehydrogenase classes, shows that the class I type is widesprread in vertebrates, and functionally conforms with greater variations at the substrate-binding than the coenzyme-binding site.

  7. 25 CFR 291.3 - When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... III gaming procedures? 291.3 Section 291.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.3 When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures? An Indian tribe may ask the Secretary to issue Class...

  8. 25 CFR 291.3 - When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... III gaming procedures? 291.3 Section 291.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.3 When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures? An Indian tribe may ask the Secretary to issue Class...

  9. 25 CFR 291.12 - Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Class III gaming procedures? 291.12 Section 291.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.12 Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures? The Indian tribe and the State may have an...

  10. 25 CFR 291.12 - Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Class III gaming procedures? 291.12 Section 291.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.12 Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures? The Indian tribe and the State may have an...

  11. 25 CFR 291.3 - When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... III gaming procedures? 291.3 Section 291.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.3 When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures? An Indian tribe may ask the Secretary to issue Class...

  12. 25 CFR 291.12 - Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Class III gaming procedures? 291.12 Section 291.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.12 Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures? The Indian tribe and the State may have an...

  13. 25 CFR 291.12 - Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Class III gaming procedures? 291.12 Section 291.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.12 Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures? The Indian tribe and the State may have an...

  14. 25 CFR 291.12 - Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Class III gaming procedures? 291.12 Section 291.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ECONOMIC ENTERPRISES CLASS III GAMING PROCEDURES § 291.12 Who will monitor and enforce tribal compliance with the Class III gaming procedures? The Indian tribe and the State may have an...

  15. 76 FR 71600 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact Process...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Tribal- State Gaming... collection of information for the Class III Tribal State Gaming Compact Process. The information collection... renewal of the approval for the information collection conducted under 25 CFR 293, Class III Tribal...

  16. Bioadhesive Drug Delivery System for Enhancing the Permeability of a BCS Class III Drug via Hot-Melt Extrusion Technology.

    PubMed

    Mendonsa, Nicole S; Thipsay, Priyanka; Kim, Dong Wuk; Martin, Scott T; Repka, Michael A

    2017-02-28

    As the buccal route of administration has the ability to avoid the GI tract and first-pass effect by directing the absorption toward the cheek area, the bioavailability of BCS class III drugs can be increased through this route. Only a handful of studies have been conducted using oleic acid as a permeation enhancer in any transbuccal drug delivery system. Therefore, the objectives of this novel study were to develop a buccal tablet using two concentrations of oleic acid for a model BCS class III drug via hot-melt extrusion technology and to investigate the effects of oleic acid on the physicochemical properties of the tablet. The model drug selected was ondansetron hydrochloride. Formulations consisting of polymers (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and polyethylene oxide) and two concentrations of oleic acid were prepared by hot-melt extrusion techniques. A melting point depression of the drug was obtained in the extruded granules as seen by the DSC thermograms. The ex vivo permeation studies showed a greater permeation of the drug in the formulation containing 10% oleic acid (F2) as compared to the formulation containing 20% oleic acid (F1), although not statistically significant. The in vitro bioadhesion studies, swelling studies, and surface pH measurements of the tablets were also conducted. In conclusion, permeation studies exhibited the potential of oleic acid as a buccal permeation enhancer as a significant permeation of the drug was obtained in the formulations. Hot-melt extrusion technology was successfully employed to formulate buccal tablets of ondansetron hydrochloride.

  17. A Ferredoxin Disulfide Reductase Delivers Electrons to the Methanosarcina barkeri Class III Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two subtypes of class III anaerobic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) studied so far couple the reduction of ribonucleotides to the oxidation of formate, or the oxidation of NADPH via thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. Certain methanogenic archaea contain a phylogenetically distinct third subtype of class III RNR, with distinct active-site residues. Here we report the cloning and recombinant expression of the Methanosarcina barkeri class III RNR and show that the electrons required for ribonucleotide reduction can be delivered by a [4Fe-4S] protein ferredoxin disulfide reductase, and a conserved thioredoxin-like protein NrdH present in the RNR operon. The diversity of class III RNRs reflects the diversity of electron carriers used in anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26536144

  18. 40 CFR 146.10 - Plugging and abandoning Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a Class III project which underlies or is in an aquifer which has been exempted under § 146.04, also demonstrate adequate protection of USDWs. The Director shall prescribe aquifer cleanup and monitoring where...

  19. 40 CFR 146.10 - Plugging and abandoning Class I, II, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... a Class III project which underlies or is in an aquifer which has been exempted under § 146.04, also demonstrate adequate protection of USDWs. The Director shall prescribe aquifer cleanup and monitoring where...

  20. Reverse twin block for interceptive management of developing class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Meenu; Singh, Harpreet; Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Poonam

    2017-01-01

    Early correction of developing class III malocclusions remains a complex challenge. Treatment approaches for these young patients have been directed at growth modification. Encouraging outcomes have been reported with the use of Class III functional appliances including reverse twin block (RTB) appliance. The present paper tries to provide an insight into RTB appliance used for successful interceptive management of developing class III malocclusion in two children. RTBs were fabricated with bite registered in the position of maximum possible retrusion of mandible with interincisal clearance of 2 mm and vertical clearance of 5 mm in the buccal segments. Anterior crossbite was corrected, and there was a marked improvement in facial appearance of the children. RTB can be a viable and effective functional appliance treatment modality for early management of developing class III malocclusion.

  1. Acid Hydrolysis of Trioxalatocobaltate (III) Ion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggans, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an investigation involving acid hydrolysis and using both volumetric and kinetic techniques. Presents examples of the determination of the rate constant and its variation with temperature. (GS)

  2. Treatment Options for Class III Malocclusion in Growing Patients with Emphasis on Maxillary Protraction

    PubMed Central

    Azamian, Zeinab; Shirban, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    It is very difficult to diagnose and treat Class III malocclusion. This type of malocclusion involves a number of cranial base and maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental compensation components. In Class III malocclusion originating from mandibular prognathism, orthodontic treatment in growing patients is not a good choice and in most cases orthognathic surgery is recommended after the end of growth. Approximately 30–40% of Class III patients exhibit some degree of maxillary deficiency; therefore, devices can be used for maxillary protraction for orthodontic treatment in early mixed dentition. In cases in which dental components are primarily responsible for Class III malocclusion, early therapeutic intervention is recommended. An electronic search was conducted using the Medline database (Entrez PubMed), the Cochrane Collaboration Oral Health Group Database of Clinical Trials, Science Direct, and Scopus. In this review article, we described the treatment options for Class III malocclusion in growing patient with an emphasis on maxillary protraction. It seems that the most important factor for treatment of Class III malocclusion in growing patient is case selection. PMID:27144056

  3. Treatment Options for Class III Malocclusion in Growing Patients with Emphasis on Maxillary Protraction.

    PubMed

    Azamian, Zeinab; Shirban, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    It is very difficult to diagnose and treat Class III malocclusion. This type of malocclusion involves a number of cranial base and maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental compensation components. In Class III malocclusion originating from mandibular prognathism, orthodontic treatment in growing patients is not a good choice and in most cases orthognathic surgery is recommended after the end of growth. Approximately 30-40% of Class III patients exhibit some degree of maxillary deficiency; therefore, devices can be used for maxillary protraction for orthodontic treatment in early mixed dentition. In cases in which dental components are primarily responsible for Class III malocclusion, early therapeutic intervention is recommended. An electronic search was conducted using the Medline database (Entrez PubMed), the Cochrane Collaboration Oral Health Group Database of Clinical Trials, Science Direct, and Scopus. In this review article, we described the treatment options for Class III malocclusion in growing patient with an emphasis on maxillary protraction. It seems that the most important factor for treatment of Class III malocclusion in growing patient is case selection.

  4. 25 CFR 522.6 - Approval requirements for class III ordinances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 522.6 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.6 Approval...) The tribe shall have the sole proprietary interest in and responsibility for the conduct of any...

  5. 25 CFR 522.6 - Approval requirements for class III ordinances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 522.6 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR APPROVAL OF CLASS II AND CLASS III ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS SUBMISSION OF GAMING ORDINANCE OR RESOLUTION § 522.6 Approval...) The tribe shall have the sole proprietary interest in and responsibility for the conduct of any...

  6. Regulation of MIR165/166 by class II and class III homeodomain leucine zipper proteins establishes leaf polarity

    PubMed Central

    Merelo, Paz; Ram, Hathi; Pia Caggiano, Monica; Ohno, Carolyn; Ott, Felix; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz; Cho, Seok Keun; Yang, Seong Wook; Wenkel, Stephan; Heisler, Marcus G.

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of plant leaves is their flattened shape. This shape depends on an antagonism between the genes that specify adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) tissue identity; however, the molecular nature of this antagonism remains poorly understood. Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factors are key mediators in the regulation of adaxial–abaxial patterning. Their expression is restricted adaxially during early development by the abaxially expressed microRNA (MIR)165/166, yet the mechanism that restricts MIR165/166 expression to abaxial leaf tissues remains unknown. Here, we show that class III and class II HD-ZIP proteins act together to repress MIR165/166 via a conserved cis-element in their promoters. Organ morphology and tissue patterning in plants, therefore, depend on a bidirectional repressive circuit involving a set of miRNAs and its targets. PMID:27698117

  7. Regulation of MIR165/166 by class II and class III homeodomain leucine zipper proteins establishes leaf polarity.

    PubMed

    Merelo, Paz; Ram, Hathi; Pia Caggiano, Monica; Ohno, Carolyn; Ott, Felix; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz; Cho, Seok Keun; Yang, Seong Wook; Wenkel, Stephan; Heisler, Marcus G

    2016-10-18

    A defining feature of plant leaves is their flattened shape. This shape depends on an antagonism between the genes that specify adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) tissue identity; however, the molecular nature of this antagonism remains poorly understood. Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factors are key mediators in the regulation of adaxial-abaxial patterning. Their expression is restricted adaxially during early development by the abaxially expressed microRNA (MIR)165/166, yet the mechanism that restricts MIR165/166 expression to abaxial leaf tissues remains unknown. Here, we show that class III and class II HD-ZIP proteins act together to repress MIR165/166 via a conserved cis-element in their promoters. Organ morphology and tissue patterning in plants, therefore, depend on a bidirectional repressive circuit involving a set of miRNAs and its targets.

  8. Extracellular assembly and activation principles of oncogenic class III receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Savvides, Savvas N

    2012-11-01

    Intracellular signalling cascades initiated by class III receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK-IIIs) and their cytokine ligands contribute to haematopoiesis and mesenchymal tissue development. They are also implicated in a wide range of inflammatory disorders and cancers. Recent snapshots of RTK-III ectodomains in complex with cognate cytokines have revealed timely insights into the structural determinants of RTK-III activation, evolution and pathology. Importantly, candidate 'driver' and 'passenger' mutations that have been identified in RTK-IIIs can now be collectively mapped for the first time to structural scaffolds of the corresponding RTK-III ectodomains. Such insights will generate a renewed interest in dissecting the mechanistic effects of such mutations and their therapeutic relevance.

  9. A missense mutation in DUSP6 is associated with Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Nikopensius, T; Saag, M; Jagomägi, T; Annilo, T; Kals, M; Kivistik, P A; Milani, L; Metspalu, A

    2013-10-01

    Class III malocclusion is a common dentofacial phenotype with a variable prevalence according to ethnic background. The etiology of Class III malocclusion has been attributed mainly to interactions between susceptibility genes and environmental factors during the morphogenesis of the mandible and maxilla. Class III malocclusion shows familial recurrence, and family-based studies support a predominance of an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance. We performed whole-exome sequencing on five siblings from an Estonian family affected by Class III malocclusion. We identified a rare heterozygous missense mutation, c.545C>T (p.Ser182Phe), in the DUSP6 gene, a likely causal variant. This variant co-segregated with the disease following an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Transcriptional activation of DUSP6 has been presumed to be regulated by FGF/FGFR and MAPK/ERK signaling during fundamental processes at early stages of skeletal development. Several candidate genes within a linkage region on chromosome 12q22-q23--harboring DUSP6--are implicated in the regulation of maxillary or mandibular growth. The current study reinforces that the 12q22-q23 region is biologically relevant to craniofacial development and may be genetically linked to the Class III malocclusion.

  10. Influence of surgical orthodontic treatment on masticatory function in skeletal Class III patients.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Yagi, T; Tomonari, H; Ikemori, T; Miyawaki, S

    2015-10-01

    Skeletal Class III patients exhibit malocclusion characterised by Angle Class III and anterior crossbite, and their occlusion shows total or partially lateral crossbite of the posterior teeth. Most patients exhibit lower bite force and muscle activity than non-affected subjects. While orthognathic surgery may help improve masticatory function in these patients, its effects have not been fully elucidated. The aims of the study were to evaluate jaw movement and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of masticatory muscles before and after orthognathic treatment in skeletal Class III patients in comparison with control subjects with normal occlusion. Jaw movement variables and EMG data were recorded in 14 female patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion and 15 female controls with good occlusion. Significant changes in jaw movement, from a chopping to a grinding pattern, were observed after orthognathic treatment (closing angle P < 0.01; cycle width P < 0.01), rendering jaw movement in the patient group similar to that of the control group. However, the grinding pattern in the patient group was not as broad as that of controls. The activity indexes, indicating the relative contributions of the masseter and temporalis muscles (where a negative value corresponds to relatively more temporalis activity and vice versa) changed from negative to positive after treatment (P < 0.05), becoming similar to those of control subjects. Our findings suggest that orthognathic treatment in skeletal Class III patients improves the masticatory chewing pattern and muscle activity. However, the chewing pattern remains incomplete compared with controls.

  11. No differences in morphological characteristics between hyperplastic condyle and class III condyle.

    PubMed

    Goulart, D R; Muñoz, P; Olate, S; de Moraes, M; Fariña, R

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this research was to compare the condylar morphology of patients with unilateral condylar hyperplasia (UCH) and patients with a class III skeletal relationship using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). A prospective study was conducted on patients with facial asymmetry attending the division of oral and maxillofacial surgery of the study university in Chile. Fifteen patients with UCH and 15 with a class III skeletal relationship were selected. Linear measurements of the condylar processes were obtained at a scale of 1:1 using the software Ez3D Viewer Plus. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the paired t-test were used, considering P<0.05. Patients with UCH presented statistical differences between the hyperplastic condyle and non-hyperplastic condyle for anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters, condylar neck length, and ramus height. Patients with a class III skeletal relationship showed no differences between the right and left sides; the morphology of their condyles was similar to the condyles with hyperplasia and presented statistical differences when compared with the non-hyperplastic condyles (one-way ANOVA, P<0.05). The condylar morphology of UCH patients could be related to the development of a class III skeletal relationship. These findings provide an insight into the possibility of some class III patients presenting bilateral condylar hyperplasia.

  12. Satisfaction of skeletal class III patients treated with different types of orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Dantas, J F C; Neto, J N N; de Carvalho, S H G; Martins, I M C L deB; de Souza, R F; Sarmento, V A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the satisfaction of skeletal class III patients following treatment with three different methods of orthognathic surgery. Eighty-two patients were divided into three groups according to the surgical procedure performed to correct their class III dentofacial deformity, and answered a questionnaire designed to determine the patient's opinion of the aesthetic and functional treatment outcomes. Differences in the patterns of responses to questions in the questionnaire related to satisfaction between the three clinical groups were evaluated by χ(2) and Fisher's exact tests (α=5%). Eighty patients (97.6%) reported being satisfied with the treatment received. There was no significant difference in response patterns among clinical groups when assessing the improvement in facial appearance, chewing, speech, and socialization. Maxillary advancement led to higher levels of improvement in breathing (P<0.0003). Class III patients treated by orthognathic surgery had high levels of satisfaction with the aesthetic and functional outcomes of their treatment.

  13. Glass ionomer cement as an occlusive barrier in Class III furcation defect.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Rameshwari

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the prognosis of molars that have experienced furcation invasion, is often a frustrating experience to the dental clinician and disappointing report to the patient involved. Although multiple treatment modalities have been attempted to retain teeth with severe furcation invasion, clinical success has not been predictable. A case report involving the use of glass ionomer cement (GIC) as an occlusive barrier in the management of Class III furcation defect involving mandibular first molar is presented. A literature review on the subject matter was conducted using Medline, Google search engines, and manual library search. GIC restoration of Class III furcation invasion gives a satisfactory result. Surgical and nonsurgical treatment options are available for the management of the condition. GIC as an occlusive barrier in Class III furcation invasion is an economical and less invasive treatment option. It also makes home care easy for the patient.

  14. Morphometric analysis of treatment effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction in growing Class III patients

    PubMed Central

    De Clerck, H. J.; Cevidanes, L. H.; Franchi, L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present morphometric investigation was to evaluate the effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) in the treatment of growing patients with Class III malocclusion. The shape and size changes in the craniofacial configuration of a sample of 26 children with Class III malocclusions consecutively treated with the BAMP protocol were compared with a matched sample of 15 children with untreated Class III malocclusions. All subjects in the two groups were at a prepubertal stage of skeletal development at time of first observation. Average duration of treatment was 14 months. Significant treatment-induced modifications involved both the maxilla and the mandible. The most evident deformation consisted of marked forward displacement of the maxillary complex with more moderate favourable effects in the mandible. Deformations in the vertical dimension were not detected. The significant deformations were associated with significant differences in size in the group treated with the BAMP protocol. PMID:21187527

  15. 40 CFR 147.500 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Florida § 147.500 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV, and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV, and V wells in the State of Florida, except for those on Indian lands is... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program-Class...

  16. 40 CFR 147.850 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS Kansas § 147.850 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV and V wells in the State of Kansas, except those on Indian lands as described in § 147... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program-Class...

  17. 40 CFR 147.700 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Illinois § 147.700 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV, and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV and V wells in the State of Illinois, except those on Indian lands, is the... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program-Class...

  18. Palladium(III)-Catalyzed Fluorination of Arylboronic Acid Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Pingping; Murphy, Jennifer M.; Ritter, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    A practical, palladium-catalyzed synthesis of aryl fluorides from arylboronic acid derivatives is presented. The reaction is operationally simple and amenable to multi-gram-scale synthesis. Evaluation of the reaction mechanism suggests a single-electron-transfer pathway, involving a Pd(III) intermediate that has been isolated and characterized. PMID:24040932

  19. Palladium(III)-catalyzed fluorination of arylboronic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mazzotti, Anthony R; Campbell, Michael G; Tang, Pingping; Murphy, Jennifer M; Ritter, Tobias

    2013-09-25

    A practical, palladium-catalyzed synthesis of aryl fluorides from arylboronic acid derivatives is presented. The reaction is operationally simple and amenable to multigram-scale synthesis. Evaluation of the reaction mechanism suggests a single-electron-transfer pathway, involving a Pd(III) intermediate that has been isolated and characterized.

  20. Class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase/VPS34 and dynamin are critical for apical endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, Sarah; N'Kuli, Francisca; Grieco, Giuseppina; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Janssens, Virginie; Emonard, Hervé; Bilanges, Benoît; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Gaide Chevronnay, Héloïse P; Pierreux, Christophe E; Tyteca, Donatienne; Courtoy, Pierre J

    2013-08-01

    Recycling is a limiting step for receptor-mediated endocytosis. We first report three in vitro or in vivo evidences that class III PI3K/VPS34 is the key PI3K isoform regulating apical recycling. A substractive approach, comparing in Opossum Kidney (OK) cells a pan-class I/II/III PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) with a class I/II PI3K inhibitor (ZSTK474), suggested that class III PI3K/VPS34 inhibition induced selective apical endosome swelling and sequestration of the endocytic receptor, megalin/LRP-2, causing surface down-regulation. GFP-(FYVE)x2 overexpression to sequester PI(3)P caused undistinguishable apical endosome swelling. In mouse kidney proximal tubular cells, conditional Vps34 inactivation also led to vacuolation and intracellular megalin redistribution. We next report that removal of LY294002 from LY294002-treated OK cells induced a spectacular burst of recycling tubules and restoration of megalin surface pool. Acute triggering of recycling tubules revealed recruitment of dynamin-GFP and dependence of dynamin-GTPase, guidance directionality by microtubules, and suggested that a microfilamentous net constrained endosomal swelling. We conclude that (i) besides its role in endosome fusion, PI3K-III is essential for endosome fission/recycling; and (ii) besides its role in endocytic entry, dynamin also supports tubulation of recycling endosomes. The unleashing of recycling upon acute reversal of PI3K inhibition may help study its dynamics and associated machineries.

  1. Severe Angle Class III skeletal malocclusion associated to mandibular prognathism: orthodontic-surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Souki, Marcelo Quiroga

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a young adult patient (18y / 1m), Class III skeletal malocclusion, with mandibular prognathism and significant dental compensation. The canine relation was Class III, incisors with tendency to crossbite and open bite, moderate inferior crowding, and concave profile. Skeletal correction of malocclusion, facial profile harmony with satisfactory labial relationship, correction of tooth compensation and normal occlusal relationship were obtained with orthodontic treatment associated to orthognathic surgery. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO), as part of the requirements to become a BBO diplomate. PMID:28125146

  2. Phylogeny, topology, structure and functions of membrane-bound class III peroxidases in vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Lüthje, Sabine; Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Hopff, David; Möller, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Peroxidases are key player in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. Membrane-bound isoenzymes have been described for peroxidase superfamilies in plants and animals. Recent studies demonstrated a location of peroxidases of the secretory pathway (class III peroxidases) at the tonoplast and the plasma membrane. Proteomic approaches using highly enriched plasma membrane preparations suggest organisation of these peroxidases in microdomains, a developmentally regulation and an induction of isoenzymes by oxidative stress. Phylogenetic relations, topology, putative structures, and physiological function of membrane-bound class III peroxidases will be discussed.

  3. Two-phase treatment of patients with crossbite and tendency toward skeletal Class III malocclusion*

    PubMed Central

    Bayerl, Maria de Lourdes Machado

    2014-01-01

    Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by an inadequate anteroposterior dental relationship which may or may not be accompanied by skeletal changes. In general, patients are distressed by a significantly compromised facial aspect which, when associated with a deficient middle third, encourages patients to seek treatment. This article reports a two-phase treatment carried out in a female patient aged six years and six months with a tendency towards a Class III skeletal pattern. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO). It is representative of the Discrepancy Index (DI) category, and fulfills part of the requirements for obtaining BBO Diploma. PMID:25279531

  4. New approach of maxillary protraction using modified C-palatal plates in Class III patients

    PubMed Central

    Bayome, Mohamed; Park, Jae Hyun; Kim, Ki Beom; Kim, Seong-Hun; Chung, Kyu-Rhim

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary protraction is the conventional treatment for growing Class III patients with maxillary deficiency, but it has undesirable dental effects. The purpose of this report is to introduce an alternative modality of maxillary protraction in patients with dentoskeletal Class III malocclusion using a modified C-palatal plate connected with elastics to a face mask. This method improved skeletal measurements, corrected overjet, and slightly improved the profile. The patients may require definitive treatment in adolescence or adulthood. The modified C-palatal plate enables nonsurgical maxillary advancement with maximal skeletal effects and minimal dental side effects. PMID:26258067

  5. Phenotypic Diversity in Caucasian Adults with Moderate to Severe Class III Malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Uribe, Lina M.; Vela, Kaci C.; Kummet, Colleen; Dawson, Deborah V.; Southard, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Class III malocclusion is characterized by a composite of dento-skeletal patterns that lead to the forward positioning of the mandibular teeth in relation to the maxillary teeth and a concave profile. Environmental and genetic factors are associated with this condition, which affects 1% of the US population and imposes significant esthetic and functional burdens on affected individuals. The purpose of this study was to capture the phenotypic variation present in a large sample of white adults with Class III malocclusion by using multivariate reduction methods. METHODS Sixty-three lateral cephalometric variables were measured from pre-treatment records of 292 Class II Caucasian adults (126 males, 166 females; ages 16-57 years). Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to capture the phenotypic variation and identify the most homogeneous groups of individuals to reduce genetic heterogeneity. RESULTS Principal component analysis resulted in 6 principal components that accounted for 81.2% of the variation. The first three components represented variations in mandibular horizontal and vertical position, maxillary horizontal position, and mandibular incisor angulation, respectively. The cluster model identified 5 distinct subphenotypes of Class III malocclusion. CONCLUSIONS A spectrum of phenotypic definitions was obtained replicating results of previous studies and supporting the validity of these phenotypic measures in future research of genetic and environmental etiology of Class III malocclusion. PMID:23810043

  6. Management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with face mask therapy and comprehensive orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumar, Kirthika; Vijaykumar, N. M.; Sainath, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion in a growing patient is crucial as it can circumvent future surgical procedures. Further, as surgery is done only at a later stage, early treatment helps to avoid the detrimental effects produced by the facial disfigurement on the patient's social life. This case report describes the treatment of a child aged 9 years 6 months who had a skeletal Class III malocclusion. The treatment plan involved the use of a reverse pull headgear (facemask) and multibracket appliance therapy resulting in successful correction of the malocclusion. The treatment results were highly satisfactory resulting in improved facial esthetics, a skeletal Class I with a Dental Class I molar and canine relationship, an ideal overjet and overbite. Thus, dentoalveolar camouflage, if done in properly selected cases, alleviates the need for surgical intervention. The patient is being monitored until the end of growth to ensure the stability of treatment results. PMID:27041912

  7. Management of skeletal Class III malocclusion with face mask therapy and comprehensive orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Kirthika; Vijaykumar, N M; Sainath, M C

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion in a growing patient is crucial as it can circumvent future surgical procedures. Further, as surgery is done only at a later stage, early treatment helps to avoid the detrimental effects produced by the facial disfigurement on the patient's social life. This case report describes the treatment of a child aged 9 years 6 months who had a skeletal Class III malocclusion. The treatment plan involved the use of a reverse pull headgear (facemask) and multibracket appliance therapy resulting in successful correction of the malocclusion. The treatment results were highly satisfactory resulting in improved facial esthetics, a skeletal Class I with a Dental Class I molar and canine relationship, an ideal overjet and overbite. Thus, dentoalveolar camouflage, if done in properly selected cases, alleviates the need for surgical intervention. The patient is being monitored until the end of growth to ensure the stability of treatment results.

  8. Solvent extraction of Sc(III), Zr(IV), Th(IV), Fe(III), and Lu(III) with thiosubstituted organophosphinic acid extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Li, D.

    1995-05-01

    The solvent extraction of Sc(III), Zr(IV), Th(IV), Fe(III) and Lu(III) with Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)monothiphosphinic acid) and Cyanex 301 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid) in n-hexane from acidic aqueous solutions has been investigated systematically. The effect of equilibrium aqueous acidity on the extraction with these reagents was studied. The separation of Th(IV), Fe(III) and Lu(III) from Sc(III), or the separation of other metals from Lu(III) with Cyanex 302, can be achieved by controlling the aqueous acidity. However, Cyanex 301 exhibited a poor selectivity for the above metals, except for Lu(III). The extraction of these metals with Cyanex 272, Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 301 has been compared. The stripping percentages of Sc(III) for Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 301 in a single stage are near 78% and 75% with 3.5 mol/L and 5.8 mol/L sulphuric acid solutions, respectively. The effects of extractant concentration and temperature on the extraction of Sc(III) were investigated. The stoichiometry of the extraction of Sc(III) with Cyanex 302 was determined. The role of different components of Cyanex 302 in the extraction of Sc(III) was discussed. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Molecular characterization of fruit-specific class III peroxidase genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chii-Jeng; Chan, Yuan-Li; Shien, Chin Hui; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, expression of four peroxidase genes, LePrx09, LePrx17, LePrx35 and LePrxA, was identified in immature tomato fruits, and the function in the regulation of fruit growth was characterized. Analysis of amino acid sequences revealed that these genes code for class III peroxidases, containing B, D and F conserved domains, which bind heme groups, and a buried salt bridge motif. LePrx35 and LePrxA were identified as novel peroxidase genes in Solanum lycopersicum (L.). The temporal expression patterns at various fruit growth stages revealed that LePrx35 and LePrxA were expressed only in immature green (IMG) fruits, whereas LePrx17 and LePrx09 were expressed in both immature and mature green fruits. Tissue-specific expression profiles indicated that only LePrx09 was expressed in the mesocarp but not the inner tissue of immature fruits. The effects of hormone treatments and stresses on the four genes were examined; only the expression levels of LePrx17 and LePrx09 were altered. Transcription of LePrx17 was up-regulated by jasmonic acid (JA) and pathogen infection and expression of LePrx09 was induced by ethephon, salicylic acid (SA) and JA, in particular, as well as wounding, pathogen infection and H2O2 stress. Tomato plants over-expressing LePrx09 displayed enhanced resistance to H2O2 stress, suggesting that LePrx09 may participate in the H2O2 signaling pathway to regulate fruit growth and disease resistance in tomato fruits.

  10. Class I versus Class III radical hysterectomy in stage IB1 (tumor ≤ 2 cm) cervical cancer: a matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Shang, Chun-liang; Du, Qi-qiao; Wu, Di; Liang, Yan-chun; Liu, Tian-yu; Huang, Jia-ming; Yao, Shu-zhong

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims: The long-term oncological outcome of Class I hysterectomy to treat stage IB1 cervical cancer is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare the surgical and long-term oncological outcomes of Class I hysterectomy and Class III radical hysterectomy for treatment of stage IB1 cervical cancer (tumor ≤ 2 cm). Methods: Seventy stage IB1 cervical cancer patients (tumor ≤ 2 cm) underwent Class I hysterectomy and 577 stage IB1 cervical cancer patients (tumor ≤ 2 cm) underwent Class III radical hysterectomy were matched with known risk factors for recurrence by greedy algorithm. Clinical, pathologic and follow-up data were retrospectively collected. Five-year survival outcomes were assessed using Kaplan-Meier model. Results: After matching, a total of 70 patient pairs (Class I - Class III) were included. The median follow-up times were 75 (range, 26-170) months in the Class III group and 75 (range, 27-168) months in the Class I group. The Class I and Class III group had similar 5-year recurrence-free survival rates (RFS) (98.6% vs. 97.1%, P = 0.56) and overall survival rates (OS) (100.0% vs. 98.5%, P = 0.32). Compared with the Class III group, the Class I group resulted in significantly shorter operating time, less intra-operative blood loss, less intraoperative complications, less postoperative complications, and shorter hospital stay. Conclusions: These findings suggest that Class I hysterectomy is an oncological safe alternative to Class III radical hysterectomy in treatment of stage IB1 cervical cancer (tumor ≤ 2 cm) and Class I hysterectomy is associated with fewer perioperative complication and earlier recovery.

  11. Lanthanide(III) and Yttrium(III) Complexes of Benzimidazole-2-Acetic Acid: Synthesis, Characterisation and Effect of La(III) Complex on Germination of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gudasi, Kalagouda B.; Shenoy, Rashmi V.; Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Patil, Manjula S.; Patil, Siddappa A.; Hanchinal, Rayappa R.; Desai, Srinivas A.; Lohithaswa, H.

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of lanthanide(III) and yttrium(III) nitrate complexes of benzimidazole-2-acetic acid (HBIA) are reported. The complexes have been characterised by elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic studies, IR, 1H NMR, UV-visible, EPR, and TG/DTA studies. They have the stoichiometry [Ln3(BIA)2(NO3)7(H2O)4] · 3H2O where Ln=La(III), Pr(III), Nd(II), Sm(III), Eu(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), and Y(III). The effect of La(III) complex on germination, coleoptile, and root length of two local varieties of wheat DWR-195 and GW-349 for different treatment periods has been investigated. The complex was found to exhibit enhanced activity, compared to HBIA or metal salt alone at lower treatment periods. PMID:17497017

  12. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-12-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ({approximately}55{degrees}C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  13. Kinetics of Fe(III)*EDTA reduction by ascorbic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Harkness, J.B.L.; Mendelsohn, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of ferric chelate by ascorbic acid have been determined at a typical flue-gas scrubber-system operating temperature ([approximately]55[degrees]C). The ascorbic acid reaction has the same reduction rate expression as the reduction by bisulfite ions, namely, first order with respect to the concentrations of both Fe(III)*EDTA and monoionic species of ascorbic acid. The reaction rate isnegative first order with respect to Fe(II)*EDTA concentration. In the pH range of 6--8, reduction of the hydrolyzed form of the metal chelate compound was negligible. The rate constant for the ascorbic acid reduction reaction is almost 400 times larger than that for the bisulfite reduction reaction under the same reaction conditions. There was no contribution associated with the nonionized form of ascorbic acid.

  14. Alterations in Soluble Class III Peroxidases of Maize Shoots by Flooding Stress

    PubMed Central

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Buck, Friedrich; Lüthje, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Due to changing climate, flooding (waterlogged soils and submergence) becomes a major problem in agriculture and crop production. In the present study, the effect of waterlogging was investigated on peroxidases of maize (Zea mays L.) leaves. The plants showed typical adaptations to flooding stress, i.e., alterations in chlorophyll a/b ratios and increased basal shoot diameter. Seven peroxidase bands could be detected by first dimension modified SDS-PAGE and 10 bands by first dimension high resolution Clear Native Electrophoresis that altered in dependence on plant development and time of waterlogging. Native isoelectric focusing revealed three acidic to neutral and four alkaline guaiacol peroxidases that could be further separated by high resolution Clear Native Electrophorese in the second dimension. One neutral peroxidase (pI 7.0) appeared to be down-regulated within four hours after flooding, whereas alkaline peroxidases (pI 9.2, 8.0 and 7.8) were up-regulated after 28 or 52 h. Second dimensions revealed molecular masses of 133 kDa and 85 kDa for peroxidases at pI 8.0 and 7.8, respectively. Size exclusion chromatography revealed native molecular masses of 30–58 kDa for peroxidases identified as class III peroxidases and ascorbate peroxidases by mass spectrometry. Possible functions of these peroxidases in flooding stress will be discussed. PMID:28250383

  15. Phenotyping of human complement component C4, a class-III HLA antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Sim, E; Cross, S J

    1986-01-01

    The plasma complement protein C4 is encoded at two highly polymorphic loci, A and B, within the class-III region of the major histocompatibility complex. At least 34 different polymorphic variants of human C4 have been identified, including non-expressed or 'null' alleles. The main method of identification of C4 polymorphic allotypes is separation on the basis of charge by agarose-gel electrophoresis of plasma. On staining by immunofixation with anti-C4 antibodies, each C4 type gives three major bands, but, since individuals can have up to five allotypes, the overlapping banding pattern is difficult to interpret. We show that digestion of plasma samples with carboxypeptidase B, which removes C-terminal basic amino acids, before electrophoresis, produces a single, sharp, distinct band for each allotype and allows identification of the biochemical basis of the multiple banding pattern previously observed in C4 phenotype determination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3103606

  16. 78 FR 20268 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Three Class III Preamendments Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a proposed administrative order to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for the following three class III preamendments devices: Sorbent hemoperfusion devices for the treatment of hepatic coma and metabolic disturbances; cranial electrotherapy stimulator......

  17. Facial anthropometrics versus cephalometry as predictors for surgical treatment in patients with Class III dentofacial deformities.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, A E; Stella, J P; Epker, B N

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine statistically the relative importance of facial anthropometrics and cephalometry in diagnosing the specific jaw deformity in patients with Class III relationships, ie, the contribution that maxillary deficiency and/or mandibular prognathism made to the Class III deformity. Frontal and right profile photographic views and pretreatment lateral cephalometric radiographs of 20 randomly selected Class III patients were analyzed. Correlation and multiple-regression analyses were utilized to determine the relative importance of clinical diagnosis and cephalometric diagnosis in determining the actual surgery performed. In addition, these analyses determined the relative importance of the various facial anthropometrics and cephalometric parameters critical to making the specific diagnosis of maxillary deficiency and/ or mandibular prognathism. It was concluded that a jaw-specific diagnosis of the Class III population studied was best made with facial anthropometrics rather than cephalometry, and the most important predictive facial features on which to based this diagnosis were paranasal configuration and chin projection. Although the overall cephalometric diagnosis had no statistically significant correlation to the actual surgery preformed, two individual cephalometric parameters, maxillary first molar to pterygoid vertical and mandibular plane angle, were found to statistically correlate to the actual surgery performed. These cephalometric parameters should be scrutinized along with the facial anthropometric data when the jaw-specific surgery is selected.

  18. 40 CFR 147.3011 - Plugging and abandonment of Class III wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of Class III uranium projects underlying or in aquifers containing up to 5,000 mg/l TDS which have... plan a plan for aquifer clean-up and monitoring which demonstrates adequate protection of surrounding... concentrations of contaminants to which aquifers must be cleaned up in order to protect surrounding USDWs....

  19. 40 CFR 147.3011 - Plugging and abandonment of Class III wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Class III uranium projects underlying or in aquifers containing up to 5,000 mg/l TDS which have... plan a plan for aquifer clean-up and monitoring which demonstrates adequate protection of surrounding... concentrations of contaminants to which aquifers must be cleaned up in order to protect surrounding USDWs....

  20. 40 CFR 147.3011 - Plugging and abandonment of Class III wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of Class III uranium projects underlying or in aquifers containing up to 5,000 mg/l TDS which have... plan a plan for aquifer clean-up and monitoring which demonstrates adequate protection of surrounding... concentrations of contaminants to which aquifers must be cleaned up in order to protect surrounding USDWs....

  1. 40 CFR 147.753 - Existing Class I and III wells authorized by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I and III wells authorized by rule. 147.753 Section 147.753 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... pressure at the wellhead in pounds per square inch Sg=specific gravity of injected fluid (unitless)...

  2. 40 CFR 147.753 - Existing Class I and III wells authorized by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I and III wells authorized by rule. 147.753 Section 147.753 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... pressure at the wellhead in pounds per square inch Sg=specific gravity of injected fluid (unitless)...

  3. 40 CFR 147.753 - Existing Class I and III wells authorized by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I and III wells authorized by rule. 147.753 Section 147.753 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... pressure at the wellhead in pounds per square inch Sg=specific gravity of injected fluid (unitless)...

  4. 40 CFR 147.753 - Existing Class I and III wells authorized by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I and III wells authorized by rule. 147.753 Section 147.753 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... pressure at the wellhead in pounds per square inch Sg=specific gravity of injected fluid (unitless)...

  5. 40 CFR 147.753 - Existing Class I and III wells authorized by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I and III wells authorized by rule. 147.753 Section 147.753 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... pressure at the wellhead in pounds per square inch Sg=specific gravity of injected fluid (unitless)...

  6. 77 FR 45370 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Gaming; Tribal Revenue Allocation Plans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... 1076-0149, Tribal Revenue Allocation Plans authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0152, and Gaming on Trust Lands Acquired After October 17, 1988 authorized by OMB Control Number 1076- 0158. These.... Data OMB Control Number: 1076-0149. Title: Class III Gaming Procedures, 25 CFR Part 291....

  7. 77 FR 68812 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Class III Gaming; Tribal Revenue Allocation Plans...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... collection of information for Class III Gaming Procedures authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0149, Tribal Revenue Allocation Plans authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0152, and Gaming on Trust Lands Acquired After October 17, 1988 authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0158. These information collections...

  8. 76 FR 50663 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Three Class III Preamendments Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) or a notice of completion of a product development protocol (PDP) for the following three class III preamendments devices: Ventricular bypass (assist... current (2010) Implicit Price Deflator for the Gross Domestic Product. FDA does not expect this final...

  9. Zygomatic miniplates for skeletal anchorage in orthopedic correction of Class III malocclusion: A controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Alime Sema; Bozkaya, Süleyman

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of facemask therapy, which was anchored from the zygomatic buttresses of the maxilla by using two miniplates, in skeletal Class III patients with maxillary deficiency. Methods Eighteen skeletal Class III patients (10 girls and 8 boys; mean age, 11.4 ± 1.28 years) with maxillary deficiency were treated using miniplate-anchored facemasks, and their outcomes were compared with those of a Class III control group (9 girls and 9 boys; mean age, 10.6 ± 1.12 years). Two I-shaped miniplates were placed on the right and left zygomatic buttresses of the maxilla, and a facemask was applied with a 400 g force per side. Intragroup comparisons were made using the Wilcoxon test, and intergroup comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U-test (p < 0.05). Results In the treatment group, the maxilla moved 3.3 mm forward, the mandible showed posterior rotation by 1.5°, and the lower incisors were retroclined after treatment. These results were significantly different from those in the control group (p < 0.05). No significant anterior rotation of the palatal plane was observed after treatment. Moreover, changes in the sagittal positions of the maxillary incisors and molars were similar between the treatment and control groups. Conclusions Skeletally anchored facemask therapy is an effective method for correcting Class III malocclusions, which also minimizes the undesired dental side effects of conventional methods in the maxilla. PMID:28337421

  10. Short-term and long-term treatment outcomes with Class III activator

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyo-kyung; Chong, Hyun-Jeong; An, Ki-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate short-term and long-term skeletodental outcomes of Class III activator treatment. Methods A Class III activator treatment group (AG) comprised of 22 patients (9 boys, 13 girls) was compared with a Class III control group (CG) comprised of 17 patients (6 boys, 11 girls). The total treatment period was divided into three stages; the initial stage (T1), the post-activator treatment or post-mandibular growth peak stage (T2), and the long-term follow-up stage (T3). Cephalometric changes were evaluated statistically via the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Friedman test. Results The AG exhibited significant increases in the SNA angle, ANB angle, Wits appraisal, A point-N perpendicular, Convexity of A point, and proclination of the maxillary incisors, from T1 to T2. In the long-term follow-up (T1-T3), the AG exhibited significantly greater increases in the ANB angle, Wits appraisal, and Convexity of A point than the CG. Conclusions Favorable skeletal outcomes induced during the Class III activator treatment period were generally maintained until the long-term follow-up period of the post-mandibular growth peak stage. PMID:26445717

  11. 78 FR 4094 - Effective Date of Requirement for Premarket Approval for Two Class III Preamendments Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... the following two class III preamendments devices: Hip joint metal/metal semi- constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis; and hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented.... Hip Joint Metal/Metal Semi-Constrained, With a Cemented Acetabular Component, Prosthesis (21 CFR...

  12. Class III Pistil-Specific Extensin-Like Proteins from Tobacco Have Characteristics of Arabinogalactan Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Maurice; Knudsen, Jens Sommer; Derksen, Jan; Mariani, Celestina

    2001-01-01

    Class III pistil-specific extensin-like proteins (PELPIII) are specifically localized in the intercellular matrix of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) styles. After pollination the majority of PELPIII are translocated into the callosic layer and the callose plugs of the pollen tubes, which could suggest a function of PELPIII in pollen tube growth. PELPIII may represent one of the chemical and/or physical factors from the female sporophytic tissue that contributes to the difference between in vivo and in vitro pollen tube growth. PELPIII glycoproteins were purified and biochemically characterized. Because of their high proline (Pro) and hydroxy-Pro (Hyp) content, PELPIII proteins belong to the class of Pro/Hyp-rich glycoproteins. The carbohydrate moiety of PELPIII is attached through O-glycosidic linkages and comprises more than one-half the total glycoprotein. Deglycosylation of PELPIII revealed two backbones, both reacting with PELPIII-specific antibodies. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of these backbones showed that PELPIII is encoded by the MG14 and MG15 genes. Two heterogeneous N-terminal sequences of MG14 and MG15, both starting downstream of the predicted signal peptide cleavage site, seem to be present, which indicates a novel N-terminal processing. Monosaccharide analysis showed that the carbohydrate moiety of PELPIII almost completely consists of arabinose and galactose in an equal molar ratio. Carbohydrate linkage analysis showed terminal and 2-linked arabinofuranosyl residues, as well as terminal and 6-, 3-, and 3,6-linked galactopyranosyl residues to be present, indicating the presence of both extensin-like and Type II arabinogalactan oligosaccharide units. The ability of β-glucosyl Yariv reagent to bind with PELPIII confirmed the arabinogalactan protein-like characteristics of these proteins. PMID:11299397

  13. Complexation and molecular modeling studies of europium(III)-gallic acid-amino acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohamed; Khan, Imran; Coutinho, João A P

    2016-04-01

    With many metal-based drugs extensively used today in the treatment of cancer, attention has focused on the development of new coordination compounds with antitumor activity with europium(III) complexes recently introduced as novel anticancer drugs. The aim of this work is to design new Eu(III) complexes with gallic acid, an antioxida'nt phenolic compound. Gallic acid was chosen because it shows anticancer activity without harming health cells. As antioxidant, it helps to protect human cells against oxidative damage that implicated in DNA damage, cancer, and accelerated cell aging. In this work, the formation of binary and ternary complexes of Eu(III) with gallic acid, primary ligand, and amino acids alanine, leucine, isoleucine, and tryptophan was studied by glass electrode potentiometry in aqueous solution containing 0.1M NaNO3 at (298.2 ± 0.1) K. Their overall stability constants were evaluated and the concentration distributions of the complex species in solution were calculated. The protonation constants of gallic acid and amino acids were also determined at our experimental conditions and compared with those predicted by using conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation (COSMO-RS) model. The geometries of Eu(III)-gallic acid complexes were characterized by the density functional theory (DFT). The spectroscopic UV-visible and photoluminescence measurements are carried out to confirm the formation of Eu(III)-gallic acid complexes in aqueous solutions.

  14. Prevalence of class III malocclusion and crossbite among children and adolescents with craniomandibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Nenad; Drinkuth, Nicole; Toll, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have been devoted to the causes of craniomandibular dysfunction (CMD). This investigation addressed the effect of class III malocclusion and crossbite on CMD based on a sample of 115 prepubertal and adolescent patients of both sexes. Although class III malocclusion only accounted for 12.2% of the total sample, thus, being the smallest group, the percentage of crossbite (71.4%) among these patients was disproportionately higher than among the other classes. Of the total sample, the prevalence of crossbite was 30.4%. We compared these findings to a large-scale (n=4727) study by Thilander et al. (2002), who reported a strikingly high percentage of class I patients compared to our findings (72.7% versus 27.8%) and a lower percentage of crossbite cases (8.0% versus 30.4%). In accordance with the "orthodontic risk child" concept by Grabowski et al. (2007) and Stahl et al. (2007), we conclude that class III malocclusion and crossbite are keys in the pathogenesis of CMD.

  15. Guide to preemption of state-law claims against Class III PMA medical devices.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    There is a perception that the express preemption holding of the Supreme Court in Riegel v. Medtronic, 552 U.S. 312(2008), immunizes medical device manufacturers from common law personal injury actions involving Class III devices that received FDA clearance under a premarket approval application (PMA). In the aftermath of Riegel, many lawsuits involving Class III PMA devices have been dismissed by district courts applying the new heightened pleading standard of Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544 (2007). Other lawsuits involving Class III PMA devices premised on fraud-on-FDA have been dismissed based on the implied preemption holding of the Supreme Court in Buckman v. Plaintiffs' Legal Comm., 531 U.S. 341 (2001). When these decisions are carefully analyzed together with Medtronic, Inc. v. Lohr, 518 U.S. 470 (1996), which found no preemption regarding a Class III device receiving FDA clearance through the 510(k) mechanism, it is apparent that the preemption defense does not apply universally to Class III PMA devices. The overall methodology for framing a non-preempted claim is to first identify conduct which violated the PMA or other specific requirements related to safety or efficacy. If such conduct can also be stated in terms of a breach of a parallel common law duty (e.g, failure to warn under strict liability or negligence, manufacturing defect or breach of warranty), then it would appear the claim is not preempted. Alternatively, regardless of a specific violation, common law remedies are not preempted by general CGMP requirements.

  16. Suspension cell culture as a tool for the characterization of class III peroxidases in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Creste, Silvana; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Secreted class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) are implicated in a broad range of physiological processes throughout the plant life cycle. However, the unambiguous determination of the precise biological role of an individual class III peroxidase isoenzyme is still a difficult task due to genetic redundancy and broad substrate specificity in vitro. In addition, many difficulties are encountered during extraction and analysis of cell wall proteins. Since class III peroxidases are also secreted into the apoplast, the use of suspension cell cultures can facilitate isolation and functional characterization of individual isoforms. Here, we report on the characterization of class III peroxidases secreted in the spent medium of sugarcane suspension cell cultures. After treatment with specific inducers of cell wall lignification, peroxidases were isolated and activities assayed with guaiacol, syringaldazine and coniferyl alcohol. Enzymatic activity was not significantly different after treatments, regardless of the substrate, with the exception of methyl-jasmonate treatment, which led to a decreased guaiacol peroxidase activity. Remarkably, peroxidases isolated from the medium were capable of oxidizing syringaldazine, an analog to sinapyl alcohol, suggesting that sugarcane cultures can produce peroxidases putatively correlated to lignification. A proteomic approach using activity staining of 2-DE gels revealed a complex isoperoxidase profile, composed predominantly of cationic isoforms. Individual spots were excised and analyzed by LC-ESI-Q-TOF and homology-based search against the Sugarcane EST Database resulted in the identification of several proteins. Spatio-temporal expression pattern of selected genes was determined for validation of identified class III peroxidases that were preferentially expressed during sugarcane stem development.

  17. The Effect of Chin-cup Therapy in Class III Malocclusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mousoulea, Sophia; Tsolakis, Ioannis; Ferdianakis, Efstratios; Tsolakis, Apostolos I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The treatment of Class III malocclusion has been challenging for orthodontists. Among a plethora of treatment modalities, the chin-cup is considered a traditional appliance for early orthopedic intervention. Objective: The present study aims to investigate the current scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of chin-cup therapy in Class III malocclusion of prognathic growing patients. Method: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed/Medline and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from January 1954 to October 2015. Articles were selected based on established inclusion/ exclusion criteria. Results: The search strategy resulted in 3285 articles.14 studies were selected for the final analysis. They were all CCTs, 13 of retrospective and 1 of prospective design. Methodological quality was evaluated by a risk of bias assessment, as suggested by the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Non-Randomized Studies on Interventions. The reported evidence presented favorable short-term outcomes both in hard and soft tissues improving the Class III profile, as well as desirable dento-alveolar changes, positively affecting the Class III malocclusion. Conclusion: There is considerable agreement between studies that chin-cup therapy can be considered for the short-term treatment of growing patients with Class III malocclusion, as indicated by favorable changes both in the hard and soft tissues. The existence of considerable risk of bias in all selected studies and the unclear long-term effectiveness of chin-cup therapy highlight the need for further investigation to draw reliable conclusions. PMID:28077971

  18. Management of severe skeletal Class III malocclusion with bimaxillary orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Haryani, Jitesh; Nagar, Amit; Mehrotra, Divya; Ranabhatt, Rani

    2016-01-01

    Orthognathic surgery in conjunction with fixed orthodontics is a common indication for interdisciplinary management of severe skeletal Class III malocclusion. A thorough analysis of pretreatment investigations and development of a surgical visual treatment objective is essential to plan the type of surgical technique required. Bimaxillary orthognathic surgery is the most common type of surgical procedure for severe skeletal discrepancies. The present case report is a combined ortho-surgical team management of a skeletally Class III patient. The severity of the case required bilateral upper first premolar extraction for dentoalveolar decompensation and simultaneous “Two-jaw surgery” with maxillary advancement of 4 mm and mandibular setback of 7 mm. Postsurgery, a pleasing good facial profile was achieved with Class II molar relation and positive overjet. PMID:27994433

  19. Management of severe skeletal Class III malocclusion with bimaxillary orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Haryani, Jitesh; Nagar, Amit; Mehrotra, Divya; Ranabhatt, Rani

    2016-01-01

    Orthognathic surgery in conjunction with fixed orthodontics is a common indication for interdisciplinary management of severe skeletal Class III malocclusion. A thorough analysis of pretreatment investigations and development of a surgical visual treatment objective is essential to plan the type of surgical technique required. Bimaxillary orthognathic surgery is the most common type of surgical procedure for severe skeletal discrepancies. The present case report is a combined ortho-surgical team management of a skeletally Class III patient. The severity of the case required bilateral upper first premolar extraction for dentoalveolar decompensation and simultaneous "Two-jaw surgery" with maxillary advancement of 4 mm and mandibular setback of 7 mm. Postsurgery, a pleasing good facial profile was achieved with Class II molar relation and positive overjet.

  20. Orthodontic camouflage of skeletal Class III malocclusion with miniplate: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Farret, Marcel Marchiori; Farret, Milton M. Benitez; Farret, Alessandro Marchiori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Skeletal Class III malocclusion is often referred for orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery. However, with the aid of miniplates, some moderate discrepancies become feasible to be treated without surgery. Objective: To report the case of a 24-year-old man with severe skeletal Angle Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite and a consequent concave facial profile. Methods: The patient refused to undergo orthognathic surgery; therefore, orthodontic camouflage treatment with the aid of miniplates placed on the mandibular arch was proposed. Results: After 18 months of treatment, a Class I molar and canine relationship was achieved, while anterior crossbite was corrected by retraction of mandibular teeth. The consequent decrease in lower lip fullness and increased exposure of maxillary incisors at smiling resulted in a remarkable improvement of patient's facial profile, in addition to an esthetically pleasing smile, respectively. One year later, follow-up revealed good stability of results. PMID:27653269

  1. Orthodontic retreatment using anchorage with miniplate to camouflage a Class III skeletal pattern

    PubMed Central

    Farret, Marcel Marchiori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This manuscript describes the treatment of a 27-year-old patient who was previously treated with two maxillary first premolar extractions. The patient had skeletal Class III malocclusion, Class III canine relationship, anterior crossbite, and a concave profile. As the patient refused orthognathic surgery, a miniplate was used on the right side of the lower arch as an anchorage unit after the extraction of mandibular first premolars, aiding the retraction of anterior teeth. At the end of treatment, anterior crossbite was corrected, in which first molars and canines were in a Class I relationship, and an excellent intercuspation was reached. Furthermore, patient's profile remarkably improved as a result of mandibular incisor retraction. A 30-month follow-up showed good stability of the results obtained. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as one of the requirements to become diplomate by the BBO. PMID:27409659

  2. 40 CFR 147.251 - EPA-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells and Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells and Indian lands. 147.251 Section 147.251 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Indian lands. (a) Contents. The UIC program in the State of California for Class I, III, IV and V...

  3. 49 CFR 1150.32 - Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. 1150.32 Section 1150.32 Transportation Other Regulations Relating.... 10901 § 1150.32 Procedures and relevant dates—transactions that involve creation of Class III...

  4. 49 CFR 1150.32 - Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. 1150.32 Section 1150.32 Transportation Other Regulations Relating.... 10901 § 1150.32 Procedures and relevant dates—transactions that involve creation of Class III...

  5. 49 CFR 1150.32 - Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. 1150.32 Section 1150.32 Transportation Other Regulations Relating.... 10901 § 1150.32 Procedures and relevant dates—transactions that involve creation of Class III...

  6. 49 CFR 1150.32 - Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. 1150.32 Section 1150.32 Transportation Other Regulations Relating.... 10901 § 1150.32 Procedures and relevant dates—transactions that involve creation of Class III...

  7. 49 CFR 1150.32 - Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures and relevant dates-transactions that involve creation of Class III carriers. 1150.32 Section 1150.32 Transportation Other Regulations Relating.... 10901 § 1150.32 Procedures and relevant dates—transactions that involve creation of Class III...

  8. 40 CFR 147.1801 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Ohio § 147.1801 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV, and V wells in the State of Ohio, other than those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the Ohio Environmental...

  9. 40 CFR 144.21 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. 144.21 Section 144.21 Protection of Environment... hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. (a) An existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... decision; or (9) For Class II wells (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage), five years...

  10. 40 CFR 144.21 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. 144.21 Section 144.21 Protection of Environment... hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. (a) An existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... decision; or (9) For Class II wells (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage), five years...

  11. 40 CFR 144.21 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. 144.21 Section 144.21 Protection of Environment... hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. (a) An existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... decision; or (9) For Class II wells (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage), five years...

  12. 40 CFR 144.21 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. 144.21 Section 144.21 Protection of Environment... hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. (a) An existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... decision; or (9) For Class II wells (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage), five years...

  13. 40 CFR 144.21 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. 144.21 Section 144.21 Protection of Environment... hydrocarbon storage) and III wells. (a) An existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon... decision; or (9) For Class II wells (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage), five years...

  14. 40 CFR 147.1250 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Mississippi § 147.1250 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV, and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV and V wells in the State of Mississippi, except those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources approved by EPA pursuant...

  15. 40 CFR 147.1250 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Mississippi § 147.1250 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV, and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV and V wells in the State of Mississippi, except those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources approved by EPA pursuant...

  16. 40 CFR 147.1250 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Mississippi § 147.1250 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV, and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV and V wells in the State of Mississippi, except those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources approved by EPA pursuant...

  17. 40 CFR 147.1250 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Mississippi § 147.1250 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV, and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV and V wells in the State of Mississippi, except those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources approved by EPA pursuant...

  18. 40 CFR 147.1250 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL PROGRAMS Mississippi § 147.1250 State-administered program—Class I, III, IV, and V wells. The UIC program for Class I, III, IV and V wells in the State of Mississippi, except those on Indian lands, is the program administered by the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources approved by EPA pursuant...

  19. Nicotinamide: a class III HDACi delays in vitro aging of mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Reum; Kishigami, Satoshi; Amano, Tomoko; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Hosoi, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Postovulatory mammalian oocyte developmental potential decreases with aging in vivo and in vitro. Aging oocytes typically show cellular fragmentation and chromosome scattering with an abnormally shaped spindle over time. Previously, it was shown that histone acetylation in the mouse oocyte increased during aging and that treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor for class I and II histone deacetylases (HDACs), enhanced the acetylation, that is, aging. In this study, we examined the effect of nicotinamide (NAM), an inhibitor for class III HDACs, on in vitro aging of mouse oocytes as well as TSA. We found that treatment with NAM significantly inhibited cellular fragmentation, spindle elongation and astral microtubules up to 48 h of culture. Although presence of TSA partially inhibited cellular fragmentation and spindle elongation up to 36 h of culture, treatment with TSA induced chromosome scattering at 24 h of culture and more severe cellular fragmentation at 48 h of culture. Further, we found that α-tubulin, a nonhistone protein, increased acetylation during aging, suggesting that not only histone but nonhistone protein acetylation may also increase with oocyte aging. Thus, these data indicate that protein acetylation is abnormally regulated in aging oocytes, which are associated with a variety of aging phenotypes, and that class I/II and class III HDACs may play distinct roles in aging oocytes.

  20. Two-Step Extraction of the Lower First Molar for Class III Treatment in Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Ricardo Fabris; Raveli, Taísa Barnabé; Raveli, Dirceu Barnabé

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe a case report of Class III malocclusion treatment with lower first molar extraction. The 27-year-old Caucasian male patient presented a symmetric face with a straight profile, hyperdivergent growth pattern, molar and cuspid Class III relation, and an anterior crossbite as well as a mild crowding on cuspids area, in both upper and lower arches and a tendency to posterior crossbite. The treatment was performed by the use of Haas expansion appliance followed by an initial alignment and leveling of the upper and lower arches with a fixed edgewise appliance, extraction of lower teeth aiming the correction of the incisors proclination and end the treatment with a Class I molar relationship. It resulted in a significant change in the patient's profile, dentoalveolar Class III correction, upper arch expansion, leveling and alignment of the upper and lower arches, and improvement of tipping of the upper and lowers incisors. In cases of a dentoalveolar compensation in well positioned bone bases the treatment with fixed appliances is an alternative and extraction of lower teeth is considered. PMID:27699072

  1. Orthodontists' and laypersons' aesthetic assessment of Class III subjects referred for orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Fabré, M; Mossaz, C; Christou, P; Kiliaridis, S

    2009-08-01

    This study was undertaken to compare laypersons' and professionals' perception of soft tissue profiles of Class III adults, and to evaluate which cephalometric variables are likely to influence the profile assessment score (PAS). Lateral headfilms and coloured profile photographs of 18 skeletal Class III Caucasian adult patients (10 males, 8 females with a mean age of 24.5 years) prior to surgery, and nine adult Caucasian patients (four males, five females with a mean age of 27.4 years) with a dental Class I occlusion and no major skeletal discrepancy were included in the study. The headfilms were hand traced and digitized. Various cephalometric variables were calculated by computer software. Each printed profile photograph was evaluated aesthetically by 18 laypersons and 18 orthodontists using a 10-graded visual analogue scale (VAS) and a standard profile for calibration. Intra-observer reliability was tested and no significant error was found. Paired and unpaired t-tests were used to compare the scores. The association between various cephalometric variables and the PAS was tested. In general, compared with orthodontists, laypersons were less critical in their evaluation of the Class III profiles (+0.3 grade on the VAS) as well as the reference profiles (+0.7). The reference profiles were found to be more attractive than the Class III profiles by both laypersons and orthodontists (+2.3 grades). The degree of facial concavity had a negatively predictive value for the orthodontists' and laypersons' evaluations. The degree of facial concavity together with the steepness of the mandibular plane were negatively predictive factors for the PAS given by the orthodontists.

  2. Specificity of aminoacylase III-mediated deacetylation of mercapturic acids.

    PubMed

    Newman, Debra; Abuladze, Natalia; Scholz, Karoline; Dekant, Wolfgang; Tsuprun, Vladimir; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Bondar, Galyna; Sassani, Pakan; Kurtz, Ira; Pushkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and other halogenated alkenes are known environmental contaminants with cytotoxic and nephrotoxic effects, and are potential carcinogens. Their metabolism via the mercapturate metabolic pathway was shown to lead to their detoxification. The final products of this pathway, mercapturic acids or N-acetyl-l-cysteine S-conjugates, are secreted into the lumen in the renal proximal tubule. The proximal tubule may also deacetylate mercapturic acids, and the resulting cysteine S-conjugates are transformed by cysteine S-conjugate beta-lyases to nephrotoxic reactive thiols. The specificity and rate of mercapturic acid deacetylation may determine the toxicity of certain mercapturic acids; however, the exact enzymologic processes involved are not known in detail. In the present study we characterized the kinetics of the recently cloned mouse aminoacylase III (AAIII) toward a wide spectrum of halogenated mercapturic acids and N-acetylated amino acids. In general, the V(max) value of AAIII was significantly larger with chlorinated and brominated mercapturic acids, whereas fluorination significantly decreased it. The enzyme deacetylated mercapturic acids derived from the TCE metabolism including N-acetyl-S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (NA-1,2-DCVC) and N-acetyl-S-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (NA-2,2-DCVC). Both mercapturic acids induced cytotoxicity in mouse proximal tubule mPCT cells expressing AAIII, which was decreased by an inhibitor of beta-lyase, aminooxyacetate. The toxic effect of NA-2,2-DCVC was smaller than that of NA-1,2-DCVC, indicating that factors other than the intracellular activity of AAIII mediate the cytotoxicity of these mercapturic acids. Our results indicate that in proximal tubule cells, AAIII plays an important role in deacetylating several halogenated mercapturic acids, and this process may be involved in their cyto- and nephrotoxicity.

  3. Extraction mechanism of Sc(III) and separation from Th(IV), Fe(III) and Lu(III) with bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid in n-hexane from sulphuric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun; Li, Deqian )

    1994-06-01

    The extraction equilibrium data of sulphuric acid and scandium(III) with bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid (H[BTMPP]) from sulphuric acid solutions have been obtained. There are two extraction mechanisms of scandium(III) with H[BTMPP] at different ranges of aqueous acidity. The extraction of Sc(III) proceeds according to a cation exchange reaction at lower aqueous acidity and to a solvating reaction at higher acidity. The practicability of separating Sc(III) from Th(IV),Fe(III) and Lu(III) by controlling the aqueous acidity was discussed. The effect of temperature on extraction of Sc(III) was observed and thermodynamic functions were calculated. IR and NMR spectra were made for organic extracts. The extraction characteristics of H[BTMPP] and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphinic acid (H[DEHP]) were contrasted to obtain more information about extraction with H[BTMPP]. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Gap junctions enhancer combined with Vaughan Williams class III antiarrhythmic drugs, a promising antiarrhythmic method?

    PubMed

    Li, Lian-dong; Zhang, Cun-tai; Ruan, Lei; Ni, Ming-ke; Quan, Xiao-qing

    2011-01-01

    Arrhythmias is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Current antiarrhythmic drugs are limited by unsatisfactory efficacy and adverse effects such as proarrhythmias. Reentry mechanism plays an important role in persistence of arrhythmias. Reentry can only continue when reentry path-length is longer than cardiac wavelength which is equal to the product of conduction velocity (CV) and effective refractory period (ERP). Gap junctions uncoupling is associated with proarrhythmic CV slowing and transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) increasing in many cardiac diseases. Vaughan Williams class III antiarrhythmic drugs prolong ERP with an augmented TDR which is the main mechanism of the proarrhythmic effects. Gap junctions enhancer can augment CV and diminish TDR. As a result, gap junctions enhancer combined with class III drugs may be a promising antiarrhythmic method.

  5. A new modified tandem appliance for management of developing Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Sukh, Ram; Singh, Gyan P; Tandon, Pradeep

    2013-01-01

    Most developing Class III patients display a retruded maxilla. Early intervention in mixed dentition is associated with better patient compliance and possibly a better orthopedic response, which can produce favorable results. The aim of this article is to present the fabrication of the new modified tandem appliance and its use in management of developing Class III malocclusion. The therapeutic results of a new modified tandem appliance are presented in an 8 year-old male patient with anterior cross bite and retrognathic maxilla at the mixed dentition stage. Anterior cross bite was corrected in 3 months and the positive overjet of 4 mm after continued use of the appliance for 1 year. There was a significant improvement in profile of the patient. The use of this appliance in this type of malocclusion enabled the correction of malocclusion in a few months and encouraging favorable skeletal growth in the future. PMID:24403800

  6. Two-phase treatment of patients with crossbite and tendency toward skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Bayerl, Maria de Lourdes Machado

    2014-01-01

    Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by an inadequate anteroposterior dental relationship which may or may not be accompanied by skeletal changes. In general, patients are distressed by a significantly compromised facial aspect which, when associated with a deficient middle third, encourages patients to seek treatment. This article reports a two-phase treatment carried out in a female patient aged six years and six months with a tendency towards a Class III skeletal pattern. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO). It is representative of the category with Discrepancy Index (DI) equal or greater than 10, and fulfills part of the requirements for obtaining BBO Diploma.

  7. A new modified tandem appliance for management of developing Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Sukh, Ram; Singh, Gyan P; Tandon, Pradeep

    2013-10-01

    Most developing Class III patients display a retruded maxilla. Early intervention in mixed dentition is associated with better patient compliance and possibly a better orthopedic response, which can produce favorable results. The aim of this article is to present the fabrication of the new modified tandem appliance and its use in management of developing Class III malocclusion. The therapeutic results of a new modified tandem appliance are presented in an 8 year-old male patient with anterior cross bite and retrognathic maxilla at the mixed dentition stage. Anterior cross bite was corrected in 3 months and the positive overjet of 4 mm after continued use of the appliance for 1 year. There was a significant improvement in profile of the patient. The use of this appliance in this type of malocclusion enabled the correction of malocclusion in a few months and encouraging favorable skeletal growth in the future.

  8. Early Treatment of Class III Malocclusion: A Boon or a Burden?

    PubMed

    Begum Khan, Mohammadi; Karra, Arjun

    2014-05-01

    This article presents a case of class III malocclusion, a female patient aged 8 years treated in early stage of its recognition, i.e. treated in early mixed dentition stage, utilizing orthopedic appliance for its correction, utilizing both rapid maxillary expansion and face mask approach. After the skeletal base correction as part of phase of phase I therapy, a retentive plate was given and patient was asked to report every 6 months for review and monitoring of her growth pattern and phase II treatment planning after the eruption of all permanent teeth. How to cite this article: Khan MB, Karra A. Early Treatment of Class III Malocclusion: A Boon or a Burden? Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):130-136.

  9. Correction of class III malocclusion using modified tandem appliance-two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jeevarathan, J; Koora, Kiran; Sudhakar, V; Muthu, M S; Prabhu, Rathna V

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal discrepancies in growing children can have great physical and psychological impact on their appearance. These deformities require orthopedic correction at an appropriate age to avoid future extensive management. Managing a midfacial deficiency or true mandibular prognathism is perhaps the most challenging situation for the clinician. Many orthopedic appliances like chin cup, facemask, and so on have been advocated to correct class III malocclusion. The major problems with these appliances are physical appearance, skin irritation from the anchorage pads and hence, less patient compliance. We present management of class III malocclusion in two children with modified tandem appliance (MTA), which is an intraoral appliance, with no extraoral anchorage, and has better patient compliance and cooperation.

  10. Factors influencing orthodontic treatment time for non-surgical Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Bichara, Lívia Monteiro; de Aragón, Mônica Lídia Castro; Brandão, Gustavo Antônio Martins; Normando, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To improve orthodontic treatment efficiency, orthodontists must know which variables could interfere with orthodontic treatment time. Objective: To identify variables and their effect size on orthodontic treatment time of Class III malocclusion. Material and Methods: Forty-five Class III malocclusion cases were selected from 2008 patients’ records. Clinical charts, cephalometric radiographs, and pre and posttreatment dental casts were evaluated. Age, sex, PAR index at T1 and T2, overjet, missing teeth, extractions, number of treatment phases, missed appointments, appliance breakages, and cephalometric variables SNA, SNB, ANB, Wits, SnGoGn, CoA, CoGn, IMPA, 1.PP were investigated by multiple linear regression analysis and stepwise method at p<0.05. The sample was also divided into two groups: Group 0-2 (patients who had missed two clinical appointments or less) and Group >2 (patients who missed more than 2 appointments), to detect the influence of this data on treatment time and the quality of the treatment (PAR T2). Results: Average treatment time was 30.27 months. Multiple regression analysis showed that missed appointment (R2=0.4345) and appliance breakages (R2=0.0596) are the only variables able to significantly predict treatment duration. Treatment time for patients who missed more than 2 appointments was nearly one year longer. However, no significant influence on PAR T2 was observed for those patients. Conclusion: Orthodontic treatment duration in Class III patients is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. Patients who missed more appointments did not show worse orthodontic finishing, but longer treatment. No occlusal, cephalometric, or demographic variable obtained before treatment was able to give some significant prediction about treatment time in Class III patients. PMID:27812612

  11. Early treatment of patient with Class III skeletal and dental patterns

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Marcos Alan Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Class III skeletal pattern is characterized by disharmony between maxillary and mandibular basal bones anteroposteriorly, and might or might not be associated with dental changes. In general, facial esthetics is hindered significantly, which most of times is the reason why patients or patient's guardians seek treatment. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Diplomate recertification and revalidation. PMID:26691976

  12. Ehrlichia secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mingqun; Liu, Hongyan; Xiong, Qingming; Niu, Hua; Cheng, Zhihui; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that causes a potentially fatal emerging zoonosis, human monocytic ehrlichiosis. E. chaffeensis has a limited capacity for biosynthesis and metabolism and thus depends mostly on host-synthesized nutrients for growth. Although the host cell cytoplasm is rich with these nutrients, as E. chaffeensis is confined within the early endosome-like membrane-bound compartment, only host nutrients that enter the compartment can be used by this bacterium. How this occurs is unknown. We found that ehrlichial replication depended on autophagy induction involving class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) activity, BECN1 (Beclin 1), and ATG5 (autophagy-related 5). Ehrlichia acquired host cell preincorporated amino acids in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner and ehrlichial growth was enhanced by treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy inducer. Moreover, ATG5 and RAB5A/B/C were routed to ehrlichial inclusions. RAB5A/B/C siRNA knockdown, or overexpression of a RAB5-specific GTPase-activating protein or dominant-negative RAB5A inhibited ehrlichial infection, indicating the critical role of GTP-bound RAB5 during infection. Both native and ectopically expressed ehrlichial type IV secretion effector protein, Etf-1, bound RAB5 and the autophagy-initiating class III PtdIns3K complex, PIK3C3/VPS34, and BECN1, and homed to ehrlichial inclusions. Ectopically expressed Etf-1 activated class III PtdIns3K as in E. chaffeensis infection and induced autophagosome formation, cleared an aggregation-prone mutant huntingtin protein in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner, and enhanced ehrlichial proliferation. These data support the notion that E. chaffeensis secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy to repurpose the host cytoplasm and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III PtdIns3K, while avoiding autolysosomal killing. PMID:27541856

  13. Ehrlichia secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingqun; Liu, Hongyan; Xiong, Qingming; Niu, Hua; Cheng, Zhihui; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2016-11-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that causes a potentially fatal emerging zoonosis, human monocytic ehrlichiosis. E. chaffeensis has a limited capacity for biosynthesis and metabolism and thus depends mostly on host-synthesized nutrients for growth. Although the host cell cytoplasm is rich with these nutrients, as E. chaffeensis is confined within the early endosome-like membrane-bound compartment, only host nutrients that enter the compartment can be used by this bacterium. How this occurs is unknown. We found that ehrlichial replication depended on autophagy induction involving class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) activity, BECN1 (Beclin 1), and ATG5 (autophagy-related 5). Ehrlichia acquired host cell preincorporated amino acids in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner and ehrlichial growth was enhanced by treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy inducer. Moreover, ATG5 and RAB5A/B/C were routed to ehrlichial inclusions. RAB5A/B/C siRNA knockdown, or overexpression of a RAB5-specific GTPase-activating protein or dominant-negative RAB5A inhibited ehrlichial infection, indicating the critical role of GTP-bound RAB5 during infection. Both native and ectopically expressed ehrlichial type IV secretion effector protein, Etf-1, bound RAB5 and the autophagy-initiating class III PtdIns3K complex, PIK3C3/VPS34, and BECN1, and homed to ehrlichial inclusions. Ectopically expressed Etf-1 activated class III PtdIns3K as in E. chaffeensis infection and induced autophagosome formation, cleared an aggregation-prone mutant huntingtin protein in a class III PtdIns3K-dependent manner, and enhanced ehrlichial proliferation. These data support the notion that E. chaffeensis secretes Etf-1 to induce autophagy to repurpose the host cytoplasm and capture nutrients for its growth through RAB5 and class III PtdIns3K, while avoiding autolysosomal killing.

  14. Inheritance of craniofacial features in Colombian families with class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Otero, L; Quintero, L; Champsaur, D; Simanca, E

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The inheritance of class III malocclusion has been well documented, but the inheritance of craniofacial structures in Colombian families with this malocclusion has been not yet reported. Patients and methods The study sample of 25 families comprised 186 untreated orthodontic individuals from 8 to 60 years old. Pedigrees were drawn using Cyrillic software. Complete family histories for each proband were ascertained and the affection status of relatives was confirmed by lateral cephalograms and facial and dental photographs. Analysis of variance and odds ratio test for each parameter was performed to estimate inheritance from parents to offspring and to determine similar phenotypic features in relatives. Results The analysis of the pedigrees suggests autosomal dominant inheritance. The craniofacial characteristics that showed more resemblance between parents and offspring were middle facial height, shorter anterior cranial base and mandibular prognathism. In contrast the protrusion of upper lip and maxillary retrusion were the phenotypic features that contributed to class III in the majority of families. Conclusion Knowledge of the inheritance of craniofacial phenotypes in class III malocclusion will enable the design of new therapies to treat this malocclusion. PMID:23776347

  15. Management of an Adult with Spaced Dentition, Class III Malocclusion and Open-bite Tendency

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Demet; Taner, Tulin Ugur

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to present the orthodontic treatment of an adult with spaced dentition, Class III malocclusion, and open-bite tendency. A 28.4-year-old adult woman was concerned about the unesthetic appearance of her spaced dentition localized at both upper and lower arches while smiling. She had a mild tongue thrust, hypertropic upper frenum, and mild speech difficulty while pronouncing “s”. Her profile was straight with prominent lips. Molar relationship was Class III on both sides. Anterior teeth were in an end-to-end relationship. Lower dental midline was deviated to the left side. Cephalometric analysis revealed a skeletal Class III relationship with hyperdivergent facial pattern. The treatment plan included myotherapeutic exercises for the tongue thrust habit and a diagnostic set-up for closure of diastemas. A strict retention protocol was followed combined with gingivoplasty, fiberotomy, and frenectomy procedures. All spaces were closed successfully, adequate overbite and overjet relationships were obtained, and tongue thrust habit and speech difficulty while pronouncing “s” were eliminated. Clinical and cephalometric results indicated the maintenance of the treatment outcome at 6-months post-retention period. PMID:21228963

  16. The effects of two methods of Class III malocclusion treatment on temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Hanefi; Alioğlu, Ceylan; Karayazgan, Banu; Tuncer, Necat; Kılıçoğlu, Hülya

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate, within a controlled clinical study, the effects of a Delaire-type facemask or a modified Jasper Jumper (JJ) used in the treatment of children with Class III malocclusions due to maxillary retrognathia on temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Forty-six patients with Class III malocclusions referred for orthodontic treatment were divided into two groups, a test and a control. The test group comprised 33 randomly chosen patients (15 females, 18 males) aged 8-11 years. The control group included 13 patients (eight females, five males) with similar features. TMD assessment was performed before and after treatment using a two-axis questionnaire, the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMDs). Qualitative data were evaluated using chi-square and McNemar tests. No statistically significant differences related to the presence of TMD were observed pre- or post-treatment (P > 0.05). The most commonly encountered diagnosis was arthralgia in the JJ group both before and after treatment. Evaluation of joint and muscle regions showed decreased symptoms, apart from the diagnosed discomforts, in the JJ group (P < 0.05). Reduced symptoms were observed in the Delaire group; however, this reduction was not statistically significant. An increase, not considered to be statistically significant, was observed in the control group. The Delaire-type facemask and modified JJ used in the early phase of Class III malocclusion treatment did not result in TMD.

  17. Nonsurgical orthodontic treatment of an adolescent girl with Class III malocclusion and asymmetric maxillary narrowing.

    PubMed

    Hamamci, Nihal; Başaran, Güvenç; Tümen, E Caner; Ozdemir, Eylem

    2008-08-01

    Class III malocclusion is a difficult anomaly to understand. Because not all Class III patients are candidates for surgical correction, patient assessment and selection are especially important in diagnosis and treatment planning. In this article, we report the orthopedic treatment of a teenage girl with a severe skeletal Class III malocclusion. Her ANB angle was -4.5 degrees, and she had a 2-mm anterior crossbite, a 1-mm overbite, and a posterior asymmetric crossbite (greater on the left side). The patient refused surgery. We used a rapid palatal expansion appliance to expand the maxilla, standard edgewise brackets to align the teeth, and reverse headgear to bring the maxilla forward. We performed symmetric expansion, but, because of the asymmetric crossbite in the maxilla, we designed a modified apparatus that permitted greater relapse on 1 side. In this way, the posterior crossbite was ideally corrected by the end of treatment, and ideal overjet and overbite relationships, functional occlusion, and an esthetic facial appearance were all achieved.

  18. Asymmetric class III malocclusion: association with cranial base deformation and occult torticollis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Joyce T; Teng, Edward; Heller, Justin B; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2012-09-01

    The etiology of Angle class III malocclusion with facial asymmetry has not been fully elucidated. To investigate the etiology, patients with asymmetric prognathism (n = 30) from a single institution were assessed for previously undiagnosed torticollis and cranial base asymmetry. Presence of torticollis was determined by measuring restricted head movement when turning the head against a wall and cranial base tilt with upward gaze. Cranial base asymmetry was evaluated by preoperative three-dimensional computed tomography scans. Thirty-one percent of patients with prognathism presented with concurrent facial asymmetry. In patients with asymmetric prognathism, cranial base tilt was present on upward gaze in all patients; mean angle between head and wall was 31 degrees greater than that in control patients, and a 22% to 36% difference in the angle was present when comparing one side with the other. Based on these findings, all patients with asymmetric prognathism were found to be affected by torticollis. By computed tomography scan, 85% of these torticollis patients showed slight anteromedial displacement of the glenoid fossa ipsilateral to torticollis, and 73% demonstrated temporal fossa shift of 4 mm or greater. The current study demonstrates a strong association between asymmetric class III malocclusion, torticollis, and cranial base asymmetry. We conclude that undiagnosed torticollis is a likely etiology for otherwise idiopathic cranial base asymmetry and that cranial base asymmetry in turn causes facial asymmetry and malocclusion. This study highlights the importance of evaluating cranial base asymmetry and torticollis in patients with class III malocclusion to allow for earlier treatment and improved outcomes.

  19. Transparent aligners: An invisible approach to correct mild skeletal class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Yezdani, A Arif

    2015-04-01

    This case report highlights the treatment of a mild skeletal class III malocclusion with an invisible thermoplastic retainer. A 15-year-old female patient presented with a mild skeletal class III malocclusion with a retrognathic maxilla, orthognathic mandible, a low mandibular plane angle with Angle's class III malocclusion with maxillary lateral incisors in anterior cross-bite with crowding of maxillary anteriors, imbricated and rotated mandibular incisors and deep bite. Accurate upper and lower impressions and a bite registration were taken with polyvinyl siloxane rubber base impression material. This was then sent to the lab for the processing of a series of ClearPath aligners. The ClearPath virtual set-up sent from the lab provided the treatment plan and interproximal reduction estimation complete with posttreatment results. This enabled the clinician to actively participate in the treatment plan and provide the necessary suggestions. The ClearPath three-dimensional aligner was found to have effectively corrected the anterior cross-bite and crowding of the maxillary anteriors.

  20. Transparent aligners: An invisible approach to correct mild skeletal class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Yezdani, A. Arif

    2015-01-01

    This case report highlights the treatment of a mild skeletal class III malocclusion with an invisible thermoplastic retainer. A 15-year-old female patient presented with a mild skeletal class III malocclusion with a retrognathic maxilla, orthognathic mandible, a low mandibular plane angle with Angle's class III malocclusion with maxillary lateral incisors in anterior cross-bite with crowding of maxillary anteriors, imbricated and rotated mandibular incisors and deep bite. Accurate upper and lower impressions and a bite registration were taken with polyvinyl siloxane rubber base impression material. This was then sent to the lab for the processing of a series of ClearPath aligners. The ClearPath virtual set-up sent from the lab provided the treatment plan and interproximal reduction estimation complete with posttreatment results. This enabled the clinician to actively participate in the treatment plan and provide the necessary suggestions. The ClearPath three-dimensional aligner was found to have effectively corrected the anterior cross-bite and crowding of the maxillary anteriors. PMID:26015738

  1. Isolation of a gene encoding for a class III peroxidase in female flower of Corylus avellana L.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Chiara; Torello Marinoni, Daniela; Perrone, Irene; Botta, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Hazelnut is a monoecious species characterized by mid-winter blooming and sporophytic incompatibility. The molecular mechanisms at the basis of the female flower development and of the pollen-stigma interaction are little known, although pollination in this species is a critical factor to ensure good yield. Differential display technique was used to study genes expressed during the female flower development, comparing styles before emergence from the bud and styles at full bloom. The full-length cDNA clone, designated CavPrx (Corylus avellana peroxidase) and isolated in mature styles, was characterized as a sequence encoding for a 330 amino acids protein, containing all the conserved features of class III peroxidases. CavPrx resulted expressed only in styles, with a peak in mature styles pollinated with compatible pollen. Class III peroxidases are expressed in several different plant tissue types and are involved in a broad spectrum of physiological processes. Until now, four peroxidases expressed in the stigma were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and Senecio squalidus: they were assumed to be possibly involved in pollen-pistil interaction, pollen tube penetration/growth and/or in defence against pathogens. CavPrx is the first gene for a floral peroxidase isolated in hazelnut and its expression pattern suggests a possible role in the pollination process.

  2. Three-dimensional evaluation of facial morphology in children aged 5-6 years with a Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Krneta, Bojana; Primožič, Jasmina; Zhurov, Alexei; Richmond, Stephen; Ovsenik, Maja

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate facial morphology in 25 Class III and 46 non-Class III children aged 5-6 years using three-dimensional (3D) laser imaging; 3D facial images were obtained, two average facial templates were constructed for the non-Class III male and female groups, each individual face was superimposed on the corresponding average template and group comparisons were evaluated (facial height, facial convexity, mandibular position and facial surface morphology). Differences between parameters were evaluated by using an analysis of variance and colour deviation maps. The results showed that Class III children had less mid-face prominence and a concave facial profile when compared to non-Class III children (P = 0.002 and P = 0.018). The position of the pg point in the z-axis just failed to reach statistical significance when comparing the two groups (P = 0.051). A vertical analysis showed no statistical significance between the groups, when evaluating middle (n-sn) and lower (sn-pg) facial height. Coincidence of the Class III faces to normal templates with a tolerance set as 0.5 mm was low (less than 30%). The soft tissue characteristics of a Class III face differ significantly from the non-Class III face in the mid-face region and in the facial profile. A 3D laser imaging method evaluated and identified morphological characteristics of Class III children in deciduous dentition, which could in the future become an important diagnostic tool in small children. The most important clinical advantage of this study is the non-invasiveness of the method.

  3. Early orthopedic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion using combined reverse twin block and face mask therapy.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Vinay Kumar; Tandon, Pradeep; Prasad, Veerendra; Chugh, Ankita

    2015-01-01

    A 6-year 8-month-old girl presented with a moderate Class III malocclusion characterized by mid-face deficiency and an anterior cross bite. In the first phase, the patient was treated with combination of reverse twin block and facemask therapy. In phase two, fixed appliances were placed in the permanent dentition. The post treatment results were good and a favorable growth tendency could be observed. The correction of the Class III malocclusion occurred by a combination of skeletal and dental improvements. This report shows successful correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion in the early transitional dentition using combination therapy.

  4. 40 CFR Figure C-2 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part 53... Methods and Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Fig. C-2 Figure C-2 to Subpart C of Part...

  5. Molecular cloning of class III chitinase gene from Avicennia marina and its expression analysis in response to cadmium and lead stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ying; Wang, You-Shao; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Mangrove species have high tolerance to heavy metal pollution. Chitinases have been widely reported as defense proteins in response to heavy metal stress in terrestrial plants. In this study, a full-length cDNA sequence encoding an acidic and basic class III chitinase (AmCHI III) was cloned by using RT-PCR and RACE methods in Avicennia marina. AmCHI III mRNA expression in leaf of A. marina were investigated under Cd, Pb stresses on using real-time quantitative PCR. The deduced AmCHI III protein consists of 302 amino acids, including a signal putative peptide region, and a catalytic domain. Homology modeling of the catalytic domain revealed a typical molecular structure of class III plant chitinases. Results further demonstrated that the regulation of AmCHI III mRNA expression in leaves was strongly dependent on Cd, Pb stresses. AmCHI III mRNA expressions were significantly increased in response to Cd, Pb, and peaked at 7 days Cd-exposure, 7 days Pb-exposure, respectively. AmCHI III mRNA expression exhibited more sensitive to Pb stress than Cd stress. This work was the first time cloing chitinase from A. marina, and it brought evidence on chitinase gene involving in heavy metals (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) resistance or detoxification in plants. Further studies including the promoter and upstream regulation, gene over-expression and the response of mangrove chitinases to other stresses will shed more light on the role of chitinase in mangrove plants.

  6. Bacillus subtilis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase Is a Dimanganese(III)-Tyrosyl Radical Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides, providing the building blocks for DNA replication and repair. It is composed of two proteins: α (NrdE) and β (NrdF). β contains the metallo-cofactor, essential for the initiation of the reduction process. The RNR genes are organized within the nrdI-nrdE-nrdF-ymaB operon. Each protein has been cloned, expressed, and purified from E. coli. As isolated, recombinant (r) rNrdF contained a diferric-tyrosyl radical (Fe(III)2-Y•) cofactor. Alternatively, this cluster could be self-assembled from apo-rNrdF, Fe(II), and O2. Apo-rNrdF loaded using 4 Mn(II)/β2, O2 and reduced NrdI (a flavodoxin), can form a dimanganese(III)-Y• (Mn(III)2-Y•) cofactor. In the presence of rNrdE/ATP/CDP, Mn(III)2-Y• and Fe(III)2-Y• rNrdF generate dCDP at 132 and 10 nmol min-1 mg-1 respectively (both normalized for 1 Y•/β2). To determine the endogenous cofactor of NrdF in B. subtilis, the entire operon was placed behind a Pspank(hy) promoter and integrated into the B. subtilis genome at the amyE site. All four genes were induced in cells grown in LB medium, with levels of NrdE and NrdF elevated 35 fold relative to the wild type (wt) strain. NrdE and NrdF co-purified in a 1:1 ratio from this engineered B. subtilis. The visible, EPR, and atomic absorption spectra of the purified NrdENrdF complex (eNrdF) exhibited characteristics of a Mn(III)2-Y• center with 2 Mn and 0.5 Y•/β2 and activity of 318-363 nmol min-1 mg-1 (normalized for 1 Y•/β2). These data strongly suggest that the B. subtilis class Ib RNR is a Mn(III)2-Y• enzyme. PMID:21561096

  7. Diagnosis and conservative treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite and asymmetric maxillary crowding.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Linda L Y; Chang, Chris H; Roberts, W Eugene

    2016-04-01

    A man, aged 28 years 9 months, came for an orthodontic consultation for a skeletal Class III malocclusion (ANB angle, -3°) with a modest asymmetric Class II and Class III molar relationship, complicated by an anterior crossbite, a deepbite, and 12 mm of asymmetric maxillary crowding. Despite the severity of the malocclusion (Discrepancy Index, 37), the patient desired noninvasive camouflage treatment. The 3-Ring diagnosis showed that treatment without extractions or orthognathic surgery was a viable approach. Arch length analysis indicated that differential interproximal enamel reduction could resolve the crowding and midline discrepancy, but a miniscrew in the infrazygomatic crest was needed to retract the right buccal segment. The patient accepted the complex, staged treatment plan with the understanding that it would require about 3.5 years. Fixed appliance treatment with passive self-ligating brackets, early light short elastics, bite turbos, interproximal enamel reduction, and infrazygomatic crest retraction opened the vertical dimension of the occlusion, improved the ANB angle by 2°, and achieved excellent alignment, as evidenced by a Cast Radiograph Evaluation score of 28 and a Pink and White dental esthetic score of 3.

  8. Surface-active agents from the group of polyoxyethylated glycerol esters of fatty acids. Part III. Surface activity and solubilizing properties of the products of oxyethylation of lard (Adeps suillus, F.P. VIII) in the equilibrium system in relation to lipophilic therapeutic agents (class II and III of BCS).

    PubMed

    Nachajski, Michał J; Piotrowska, Jowita B; Kołodziejczyk, Michał K; Lukosek, Marek; Zgoda, Marian M

    2013-01-01

    Research was conducted into the solubilization processes of diclofenac, ibuprofen, ketoprofen and naproxen in equilibrium conditions in the environment of aqueous solutions of oxyethylated lard's fractions (Adeps suillus, Polish Pharmacopoeia VIII). The determined thermodynamic (cmc, deltaGm(0)) and hydrodynamic (R0, R(obs), omega, M(eta)) parameters characterizing the micelle of the solubilizer and the adduct demonstrate that lipophilic therapeutic agents are adsorbed in a palisade structure of the micelle due to a topologically created so-called "lipophilic adsorption pocket". This shows that the hydrophilicity of the micelle and the adsorption layer decreases at the phase boundary, which is confirmed by the calculated values of coefficients A(m) and r x (a). The results obtained indicate the possibility of making use of the class of non-ionic surfactants which are not ksenobiotics for the modification of the profile of solid oral dosage forms with lipophilic therapeutic agents from the II class of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS).

  9. An evaluation of the condylar position of the temporomandibular joint by computerized tomography in Class III malocclusions: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Seren, E; Akan, H; Toller, M O; Akyar, S

    1994-05-01

    The position of the condyle within the glenoid fossa was investigated in 21 adult patients with untreated skeletal Class III relationships and 18 adult patients with normal occlusions as controls. Axial computerized tomography (CT) was used for precise measurements of the bony structures of the temporamandibular joints. In horizontal sections, the mediolateral dimensions of the condyles of the patient group were found to be statistically higher in the fossa. The anteroposterior glenoid fossa dimensions were found to be smaller in Class III malocclusions. The smaller anterior joint space dimensions in the Class III relationships were also found to be statistically significant. The analysis of the measurements suggests that relative condylar protrusion with a relative mediolateral elongation of the condyle within a relatively smaller glenoid fossa are correlated with the anterior mandibular displacement in skeletal Class III malocclusions.

  10. Long-term outcome of surgical Class III correction as a function of age at surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, L'Tanya J.; Phillips, Ceib; Proffit, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we assessed whether the likelihood of a positive overjet 5 to 10 years after Class III surgery was affected by age at the surgery or the type of surgery and evaluated the amount and pattern of postsurgical growth. Methods Cephalometric measurements including overjet were evaluated from immediately postsurgery and long-term recall cephalograms of 104 patients who had had surgical Class III correction and at least 5-year recalls. The patients were classified as younger (Class III surgery in younger patients. PMID:18331934

  11. 40 CFR 147.903 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.903 Section 147.903 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  12. 40 CFR 147.103 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.103 Section 147.103 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  13. 40 CFR 147.1653 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1653 Section 147.1653 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  14. 40 CFR 147.2153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.2153 Section 147.2153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  15. 40 CFR 147.1653 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1653 Section 147.1653 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  16. 40 CFR 147.1153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1153 Section 147.1153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  17. 40 CFR 147.1353 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1353 Section 147.1353 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  18. 40 CFR 147.1953 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1953 Section 147.1953 Protection of... enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection...

  19. 40 CFR 147.1353 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1353 Section 147.1353 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  20. 40 CFR 147.303 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.303 Section 147.303 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  1. 40 CFR 147.1953 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1953 Section 147.1953 Protection of... enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection...

  2. 40 CFR 147.2153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.2153 Section 147.2153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  3. 40 CFR 147.253 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.253 Section 147.253 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  4. 40 CFR 147.1953 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1953 Section 147.1953 Protection of... enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection...

  5. 40 CFR 147.903 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.903 Section 147.903 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  6. 40 CFR 147.1453 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1453 Section 147.1453 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  7. 40 CFR 147.1653 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1653 Section 147.1653 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  8. 40 CFR 147.1353 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1353 Section 147.1353 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  9. 40 CFR 147.253 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.253 Section 147.253 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  10. 40 CFR 147.1653 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1653 Section 147.1653 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  11. 40 CFR 147.1453 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1453 Section 147.1453 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  12. 40 CFR 147.1453 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1453 Section 147.1453 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  13. 40 CFR 147.1653 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1653 Section 147.1653 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  14. 40 CFR 147.103 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.103 Section 147.103 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  15. 40 CFR 147.2153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.2153 Section 147.2153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  16. 40 CFR 147.303 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.303 Section 147.303 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  17. 40 CFR 147.1453 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1453 Section 147.1453 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  18. 40 CFR 147.1353 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1353 Section 147.1353 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  19. 40 CFR 147.253 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.253 Section 147.253 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  20. 40 CFR 147.303 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.303 Section 147.303 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  1. 40 CFR 147.1153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1153 Section 147.1153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  2. 40 CFR 147.253 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.253 Section 147.253 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  3. 40 CFR 147.1153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1153 Section 147.1153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  4. 40 CFR 147.103 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.103 Section 147.103 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  5. 40 CFR 147.1153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1153 Section 147.1153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  6. 40 CFR 147.1453 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1453 Section 147.1453 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  7. 40 CFR 147.303 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.303 Section 147.303 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  8. 40 CFR 147.2153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.2153 Section 147.2153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  9. 40 CFR 147.103 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.103 Section 147.103 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  10. 40 CFR 147.1953 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1953 Section 147.1953 Protection of... enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection...

  11. 40 CFR 147.303 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.303 Section 147.303 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  12. 40 CFR 147.103 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.103 Section 147.103 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  13. 40 CFR 147.903 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.903 Section 147.903 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  14. 40 CFR 147.1353 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1353 Section 147.1353 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  15. 40 CFR 147.1953 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1953 Section 147.1953 Protection of... enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection...

  16. 40 CFR 147.903 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.903 Section 147.903 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  17. 40 CFR 147.2153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.2153 Section 147.2153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  18. 40 CFR 147.253 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.253 Section 147.253 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  19. 40 CFR 147.1153 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.1153 Section 147.1153 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  20. 40 CFR 147.903 - Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Existing Class I, II (except enhanced recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. 147.903 Section 147.903 Protection of... recovery and hydrocarbon storage) and III wells authorized by rule. Maximum injection pressure. The...

  1. Orthodontic retreatment of a Class III patient with significant midline asymmetry and bilateral posterior crossbite

    PubMed Central

    Brunetto, Ademir R.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior crossbite might cause serious long-term functional problems if not early treated. Nevertheless, in older patients, treatment might include palatal expansion in order to correct such malocclusion. In view of the above, this article aims at reporting late correction of bilateral posterior crossbite associated with Angle Class III malocclusion, right subdivision, with consequent midline shift (good skeletal pattern). The case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO), with DI equal to or greater than 10, as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:25741833

  2. Orthodontic retreatment of a Class III patient with significant midline asymmetry and bilateral posterior crossbite.

    PubMed

    Brunetto, Ademir R

    2015-01-01

    Posterior crossbite might cause serious long-term functional problems if not early treated. Nevertheless, in older patients, treatment might include palatal expansion in order to correct such malocclusion. In view of the above, this article aims at reporting late correction of bilateral posterior crossbite associated with Angle Class III malocclusion, right subdivision, with consequent midline shift (good skeletal pattern). The case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO), with DI equal to or greater than 10, as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO.

  3. Class III malocclusion with maxillary deficiency, mandibular prognathism and facial asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Guilherme de Araújo

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the clinical case of a female patient with history of unsuccessful orthodontic treatment. She presented with Class III malocclusion, mandibular and maxillary constriction, anterior crossbite and facial asymmetry resulting from laterognathism triggered by hyperactivity of the condyle revealed by vertical elongation of the right mandibular ramus. Patient's treatment consisted of orthodontic mechanics and two orthognathic surgical interventions with satisfactory and stable outcomes. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO), as part of the requirements for obtaining the BBO Diplomate title.

  4. Class III malocclusion with maxillary deficiency, mandibular prognathism and facial asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Guilherme de Araújo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article reports the clinical case of a female patient with history of unsuccessful orthodontic treatment. She presented with Class III malocclusion, mandibular and maxillary constriction, anterior crossbite and facial asymmetry resulting from laterognathism triggered by hyperactivity of the condyle revealed by vertical elongation of the right mandibular ramus. Patient's treatment consisted of orthodontic mechanics and two orthognathic surgical interventions with satisfactory and stable outcomes. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO), as part of the requirements for obtaining the BBO Diplomate title. PMID:27901236

  5. The association of tongue posture with the dentoalveolar maxillary and mandibular morphology in Class III malocclusion: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Primozic, Jasmina; Farcnik, Franc; Perinetti, Giuseppe; Richmond, Stephen; Ovsenik, Maja

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of tongue posture with the dentoalveolar maxillary and mandibular morphology in a group of Class III subjects in comparison to a group of Class I subjects. Twenty Class III subjects (9 males, 11 females, 19.2 ± 4.6 years) and 20 Class I subjects (6 males, 14 females, 17.4 ± 1.7 years) were included in the present study. Maxillary and mandibular morphology was defined by the intermolar and intercanine distances, at both the cusps and gingival levels, and by measuring surface area and volume of the palatal vault and mouth floor assessed on three-dimensional digital models. Tongue-to-palate distances were measured on lateral cephalograms. The groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test and correlations between each morphological parameter and the tongue-to-palate distances were calculated using the Spearman correlation coefficient. The mandibular intermolar width at the gingival level was significantly greater in the Class III group (P < 0.01), while the maxillary intercanine widths were significantly smaller in the Class III group (P < 0.05). The mouth floor area and volume and the respective ratios between the mouth floor and palate were significantly greater in the Class III group (P = 0.01). The tongue-to-palate distances were generally greater, i.e. lower tongue posture, for the Class III subjects. Significant correlations were seen between tongue-to-palate distances in the posterior region with the area ratio (rho = 0.44, P < 0.05). Tongue posture is significantly lower in Class III subjects and is associated with the dentoalveolar characteristics of the maxilla and mandible.

  6. Extraction of Am(III), Eu(III) and U(VI) from perchloric acid and mixtures of acids by dialkyl-(diaryl) [diethylcarbamoylmethyl] phosphine oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chmutova, M.K.; Litvina, M.N.; Nesterova, N.P.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Kabachnik, M.I.

    1992-07-01

    Extraction of Am(III), and Eu(III) and U(VI) from perchloric acid solutions by dialkyl(diaryl) [diethyl-carbamoylmethyl] phosphine oxides (CMPO) has been investigated. It has been shown that elements are extracted more effectively from perchloric acid solutions than from nitric acid. An `anomalous aryl effect` increases sufficiently in perchloric media as compared with nitric media. Solvate numbers of elements also increase in perchloric acid, they being extremely high for aryl-substituted reagents and not so high for alkyl-substituted compounds. It has been shown that in HNO{sub 3} and HClO{sub 4} solutions the value of `anomalous aryl effect` directly depends on the difference in values of element solvate numbers in complexes with aryl- and alkyl-substituted CMPO. Am(III), Eu(III) and U(VI) are not practically extracted from phosphoric and sulphuric acids by CMPO solutions. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Extraction of gallium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions by trioctylammonium-based mixed ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Katsuta, Shoichi; Okai, Miho; Yoshimoto, Yuki; Kudo, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    The extractabilities of aluminium(III), gallium(III), and indium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions were investigated using a mixture of two protic ionic liquids, trioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([TOAH][NTf(2)]) and trioctylammonium nitrate ([TOAH][NO(3)]). At a HCl concentration of 4 mol L(-1) or more, gallium(III) was nearly quantitatively extracted and the extractability order was Ga > Al > In. The extractability of gallium(III) increased with increasing [TOAH][NO(3)] content in the mixed ionic liquid. The extracted gallium(III) was quantitatively stripped with aqueous nitric acid solutions. The separation and recovery of gallium(III) from hydrochloric acid solutions containing excess indium(III) was demonstrated using the mixed ionic liquid.

  8. Reduction of Cr (VI) by organic acids in the presence of Al (III).

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Lan, Yeqing; Wang, Bo; Mao, Jingdong

    2013-09-15

    The effects of Al (III) on the reduction of Cr (VI) by three α-hydroxy acids, tartaric, malic and citric acids, were investigated through batch experiments at pH from 2.5 to 4.0 and temperatures from 25 °C to 35 °C. These reactions could be described as pseudo-zero-order with respect to Cr (VI) when the concentrations of α-hydroxy acids were greatly in excess. The transformation rates of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) in the presence of Al (III) without light were in the decreasing order of tartaric acid>malic acid>citric acid. This order suggested that the two α-hydroxyl groups in tartaric acid could play an important role in the reduction of Cr (VI) by organic acids. The possible mechanism was that the formed complex between organic acids and Al (III) significantly enhanced the reductivity of α-hydroxy acids and further led to the more complicated Cr (VI)-tartaric acid-Al (III) cyclic ester which greatly accelerated the reduction rate. The Cr (VI) reduction reaction rate increased with the decrease of pH but with the increase of Al (III) concentration, tartaric acid concentration, and temperature. As the pH decreased, the increase of [H(+)] led to an increase in {Al(III)H₂Tar₂}(+), the most active species, and thus the enhanced reduction rate.

  9. Enzymatic activity and proteomic profile of class III peroxidases during sugarcane stem development.

    PubMed

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Sampaio Mayer, Juliana Lischka; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2012-06-01

    Class III peroxidases are present as large multigene families in all land plants. This large number of genes together with the diversity of processes catalyzed by peroxidases suggests possible functional specialization of each isoform. However, assigning a precise role for each individual peroxidase gene has continued to be a major bottleneck. Here we investigated the enzyme activity and translational profile of class III peroxidases during stem development of sugarcane as a first step in the estimation of physiological functions of individual isoenzymes. Internodes at three different developmental stages (young, developing and mature) were divided into pith (inner tissue) and rind (outer tissue) fractions. The rind of mature internodes presented the highest enzymatic activity and thus could be considered the ideal tissue for the discovery of peroxidase gene function. In addition, activity staining of 2DE gels revealed different isoperoxidase profiles and protein expression regulation among different tissue fractions. In-gel tryptic digestion of excised spots followed by peptide sequencing by LC-MS/MS positively matched uncharacterized peroxidases in the sugarcane database SUCEST. Multiple spots matching the same peroxidase gene were found, which reflects the generation of more than one isoform from a particular gene by post-translational modifications. The identified sugarcane peroxidases appear to be monocot-specific sequences with no clear ortholog in dicot model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

  10. Orthodontic-surgical treatment of Class III malocclusion with mandibular asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Bergamo, Ana Zilda Nazar; Andrucioli, Marcela Cristina Damião; Romano, Fábio Lourenço; Ferreira, José Tarcísio Lima; Matsumoto, Mírian Aiko Nakane

    2011-01-01

    Class III skeletal malocclusion may present several etiologies, among which maxillary deficiency is the most frequent. Bone discrepancy may have an unfavorable impact on esthetics, which is frequently aggravated by the presence of accentuated facial asymmetries. This type of malocclusion is usually treated with association of Orthodontics and orthognathic surgery for correction of occlusion and facial esthetics. This report presents the treatment of a patient aged 15 years and 1 month with Class III skeletal malocclusion, having narrow maxilla, posterior open bite on the left side, anterior crossbite and unilateral posterior crossbite, accentuated negative dentoalveolar discrepancy in the maxillary arch, and maxillary and mandibular midline shift. Clinical examination also revealed maxillary hypoplasia, increased lower one third of the face, concave bone and facial profiles and facial asymmetry with mandibular deviation to the left side. The treatment was performed in three phases: presurgical orthodontic preparation, orthognathic surgery and orthodontic finishing. In reviewing the patient's final records, the major goals set at the beginning of treatment were successfully achieved, providing the patient with adequate masticatory function and pleasant facial esthetics.

  11. EGIS-7229, the new combined class III antiarrhythmic agent: lack of EAD inducing effect.

    PubMed

    Bányász, T; Magyar, J; Varró, A; Kovács, A; Gyönös, I; Szénási, G; Nánási, P P

    1999-03-01

    EGIS-7229 is a novel antiarrhythmic candidate having multiple mechanisms of action with class III predominance. In this study, the effects of EGIS-7229 and sotalol on action potential duration (APD) and incidence of early afterdepolarizations (EADs) were studied and compared in rabbit papillary muscle by using conventional microelectrode techniques. In control bathing solution, both drugs increased APD in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the prolongation of APD was greater with sotalol than with EGIS-7229 when the same drug concentrations were compared. EAD developed in 3 of the 11 preparations (27%) bathed with a solution containing 3.6 mmol/l CsCl + 2 mmol/l KCl within the first 120 min of superfusion. The addition of 100 micromol/l sotalol to this superfusate increased the incidence of EAD to 83% (10 from 12), whereas the addition of the same concentration of EGIS-7229 prevented the development of EAD in all of the 9 preparations studied. These differences in incidence of EAD are likely attributable to differences in drug-induced increases of APD-50 in the presence of CsCl. Prolongation of APD-90 showed less correlation with incidence of EAD than changes in APD-50. On the basis of these in vitro results, high concentrations of EGIS-7229 cannot be expected to be torsadogenic in vivo--in contrast with sotalol--presumably owing to the combined class III + IV activity of the compound.

  12. Influence of morphological parameters on the development of gingival recession in class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Warmuz, Justyna; Jagielak, Maciej; Botzenhart, Ute; Seeliger, Julia; Gedrange, Tomasz; Dominiak, Marzena

    2016-07-01

    Cephalometric analysis, including both basic cranio- and gnathometric measurements and detailed evaluation of the construction of skeletal, muscular and mucosal systems combined with estimation of the risk of recession's occurrence, can be used to determine the direction of therapy and ensure appropriate aesthetic-functional effects of treatment. The objective of the present study was to compare the influence of the chosen morphologic parameters on the development of gingival recession in the front part of the jaw in patients with Angle class III. The research material was based on the medical documentation of 1800 patients. Sixty generally healthy patients qualified for the research with prognathism. On the basis of the side-head cephalograms, measurements were carried out to describe the bone structure in the front section of the lower jaw. The lower incisor teeth set-up was also analyzed. Gum recession of the lower incisor teeth was assessed on the basis of the inside-mouth photos of the patients with class III malocclusion. The occurrence of recession in a further 4 patients resulted from such a positioning of the lower teeth. In patients in the first group, treated with complex ortho-surgical treatment, the lower incisor teeth were adjusted much more vertically in the alveola and, thus, recession occurred only in one patient. Complex orthodontic-surgical therapy contributes to recession development to a lesser degree than the sham treatment and makes it a safe alternative therapy in patients with high diathesis for occurrence or progression of an existing recession.

  13. Exploration of the new class of layered III-VI Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekarek, Thomas; Miotkowski, I.; Ramdas, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    We have explored a new class of quasi-two-dimensional III-VI Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS) exhibiting a wide range of magnetic behavior. Several are good candidates for potential device applications. In In1-xMnxSe, we found a remarkably large thermal hysteresis (Delta T is approximately 200 K) extending up to room temperature. This is an important material because a typical thermal hysteresis in most materials has a Delta T approximately 20 K occurring well below room temperature. The thermal hysteresis is also seen in transport measurements for In1-xMnxSe. To date, we have found good agreement between experiment and theory for the 1st three III-VI DMS systems (In1-xMnxSe, In1-xMnxS, and Ga1-xMnxS). Ga1-xFexSe is unique amount the III-VI DMS exhibiting substantial magnetic anisotropy. In Ga1-xMnxS, we have found a spin glass transition and critical exponents (γ = 4.0, β = 0.8, and δ = 5.5) that are in agreement with the theory. We surprisingly found that the spin glass transition in the 2-D IIIVI DMS similar to spin glass in 3-D II-VI DMS. [This research was supported by the UNF Terry Presidential Professorship, a Purdue University Academic Reinvestment Program and by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant Nos. DMR-07-06593 and DMR-04-05082.

  14. Reaction of the pterygomaxillary fissure and the condylar cartilage to intermaxillary Class III magnetic mechanics.

    PubMed

    Vardimon, A D; Graber, T M; Stutzmann, J; Voss, L; Petrovic, A G

    1994-04-01

    The skeletal reaction to Class III intermaxillary magnetic mechanics was previously found to affect two target areas, the pterygomaxillary fissure (PMF) and the condylar cartilage. The objectives of this study were to analyze, radiographically and histologically, the response of these tissues to Class III intermaxillary functional orthopedic magnetic appliance (FOMA III), and to postulate possible models of their dichotomous biomechanism. Nine Macaca fascicularis monkeys received periodic administration of vital bone procion dye and were treated for 4 months with FOMA III (6 subjects) and sham appliance (3 subjects). The PMF (the target area of the midfacial complex) demonstrated a decreased skeletal reaction in inferosuperior and lateromedial directions. Cephalometrically, the lowermost PMF point was displaced inferiorly 1.98 +/- 1.74 mm and 0.42 +/- 0.38 mm and anteriorly 1.42 +/- 0.96 mm and 0.58 +/- 0.38 mm in the treated and control groups, respectively. The displacement of the uppermost PMF point, compared with the lowermost point, was three to five times lower. Histologically, two modes of response were found; first, a sutural response (disarticulation and osteogenesis) of the palatomaxillary and pterygopalatine sutures, which was distinctive of the lateral PMF aspect, and second, a dentosutural response, which was characteristic of the medial PMF aspect (bony microfractures between the third molar germ and the maxillary tuberosity in conjunction with mild sutural response). In the mandible, a discrepancy was found between the histologic and the cephalometric findings. Radiographically, mandibular length was unaffected after 4 months of treatment, and the distance condylion-pogonion was equally increased in the treated (0.75 +/- 0.78 mm) and the control animals (0.77 +/- 0.32 mm). Histologically, however, the condylar cartilage demonstrated increased osteoclastic activity at the zone of endochondral ossification and a decreased apposition rate at the

  15. Semi-longitudinal Study of the Mcnamara Cephalometric Triangle in Class II and Class III Subjects Grouped by Cervical Vertebrae Maturation Stage.

    PubMed

    Arriola-Guillén, Luis E; Fitzcarrald, Fernando D; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to compare the McNamara cephalometric triangle values in untreated normodivergent Class II and Class III malocclusion subjects of Latin American origin grouped by cervical vertebrae maturation stage to an untreated Class I malocclusion normodivergent control group. The study was conducted on a sample of 610 pretreatment lateral cephalograms (250 male, 360 female), examined and grouped according to their anteroposterior skeletal relationship (Class I, II or III), cervical vertebrae maturation stage (Pre Pubertal Peak P1 = CS1 and CS2, Pubertal Peak P2= CS3 and CS4, and Post Pubertal Peak P3 = CS5 and CS6) and sex. Co-A, Co-Gn and ENA-Me were measured in each lateral cephalogram. ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests were performed to determine differences between the groups. The results showed that in males, the greatest maxillary and mandibular dimensional increases occurred during the P3 stage (CS5 to CS6), while in females, they occurred in the P2 stage (CS3 to CS4). The Co-A and Co-Gn showed significant differences between the malocclusion classes (p<0.05). The maxillary lengths in Class II subjects and the mandibular lengths in Class III subjects were already higher at the beginning of the period evaluated (P1). A worsening trend for the Class II and III malocclusions was identified during the period evaluated. Finally, changes in the McNamara cephalometric triangle values were markedly different in the three normodivergent skeletal malocclusion classes. In these Latin American subjects the pubertal growth spurt occurred at different times with respect to the Caucasian and Asian norms.

  16. Ytterbium (III) Luminescence in m-Methylbenzoic Acid-Containing Compounds.

    PubMed

    Kalinovskaya, I V; Zadorozhnaya, A N

    2015-05-01

    Complex compounds of ytterbium(III) with m-methylbenzoic acid and nitrogen-containing ligands luminescent in near infrared range have been synthesized. Spectral luminescence characteristics of heteroligand compounds of ytterbium(III) have been investigated. It has been established that ytterbium (III) m-methylbenzoate with 1,10-phenanthroline is characterized by the highest luminescence intensity.

  17. Camouflage treatment of skeletal class III malocclusion with asymmetry using a bone-borne rapid maxillary expander.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yu-Jin; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Kim, Seong-Hun; Nelson, Gerald

    2015-03-01

    This case report presents the successful use of palatal mini-implants for rapid maxillary expansion and mandibular distalization in a skeletal Class III malocclusion. The patient was a 13-year-old girl with the chief complaint of facial asymmetry and a protruded chin. Camouflage orthodontic treatment was chosen, acknowledging the possibility of need for orthognathic surgery after completion of her growth. A bone-borne rapid expander (BBRME) was used to correct the transverse discrepancy and was then used as indirect anchorage for distalization of the lower dentition with Class III elastics. As a result, a Class I occlusion with favorable inclination of the upper teeth was achieved without any adverse effects. The total treatment period was 25 months. Therefore, BBRME can be considered an alternative treatment in skeletal Class III malocclusion.

  18. Dentofacial effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction: A controlled study of consecutively treated Class III patients

    PubMed Central

    De Clerck, Hugo; Cevidanes, Lucia; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In this cephalometric investigation, we analyzed the treatment effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) with miniplates in the maxilla and mandible connected by Class III elastics in patients with Class III malocclusion. Methods The treated sample consisted of 21 Class III patients consecutively treated with the BAMP protocol before the pubertal growth spurt (mean age, 11.10 ± 1.8 years) and reevaluated after BAMP therapy, about 1 year later. The treated group was compared with a matched control group of 18 untreated Class III subjects. Significant differences between the treated and control groups were assessed with independent-sample t tests (P<0.05). Results Sagittal measurements of the maxilla showed highly significant improvements during active treatment (about 4 mm more than the untreated controls), with significant protraction effects at orbitale and pterygomaxillare. Significant improvements of overjet and molar relationship were recorded, as well as in the mandibular skeletal measures at Point B and pogonion. Vertical skeletal changes and modifications in incisor inclination were negligible, except for a significant proclination of the mandibular incisors in the treated group. Significant soft-tissue changes reflected the underlying skeletal modifications. Conclusions Compared with growth of the untreated Class III subjects, the BAMP protocol induced an average increment on skeletal and soft-tissue advancement of maxillary structures of about 4 mm, and favorable mandibular changes exceeded 2 mm. PMID:21055597

  19. Comparison between dental and basal arch forms in normal occlusion and Class III malocclusions utilizing cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Kyung Eun; Park, Jae Hyun; Bayome, Mohamed; Nam, Young-Ok; Sameshima, Glenn T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the mandibular dental and basal arch forms in subjects with normal occlusion and compare them with those of Class III malocclusion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods CBCT images of 32 normal occlusion (19 males, 13 females; 24.3 years) and 33 Class III malocclusion subjects (20 males, 13 females, 22.2 years) were selected. Facial axis and root center points were identified from the left to right mandibular first molars. Distances between the facial axis and root center points for each tooth were calculated, and 4 linear and 2 ratio variables were measured and calculated for each arch form. The variables were compared between groups by independent t-test. Pearson correlation coefficient was applied to assess the relationships between dental and basal variables within each group. Results The mandibular dental and basal intercanine widths were significantly greater in the Class III group than in normal occlusion subjects (p < 0.05). The dental and basal intercanine widths as well as the dental and basal intermolar widths were strongly correlated in normal occlusion and moderately correlated in Class III malocclusion. Conclusions The dental arch form demon strated a strong positive correlation with the basal arch form in the normal occlusion group and moderate correlation in the Class III malocclusion group. These results might be helpful for clinicians to have a better understanding of the importance of basal arch form in the alveolar bone. PMID:23504406

  20. Changes in the lip closing force of patients with class III malocclusion before and after orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ueki, K; Mukozawa, A; Okabe, K; Miyazaki, M; Moroi, A; Marukawa, K; Nakagawa, K

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in lip pressure before and after orthognathic surgery for skeletal class III patients. The subject groups were 32 female and 31 male patients diagnosed with mandibular prognathism and/or maxillary retrognathism who underwent orthognathic surgery. Control groups consisted of 20 women and 20 men with normal occlusion without dento-alveolar deformity. Maximum and minimum lip closing force was measured with Lip De Cum® for the control groups and subject groups preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. The difference between the pre- and postoperative values of the groups was examined statistically. The maximum lip closing force in men was significantly larger than that in women in both the preoperative class III group (p=0.0330) and the control group (p=0.0097). The preoperative class III group was significantly smaller than the control group in maximum lip closing force in both men (p<0.0001) and women (p<0.0001). The postoperative maximum lip closing force was significantly larger than the preoperative value in both men (p=0.0037) and women (p=0.0273) in the Class III group. This study suggested that the maximum lip closing force increases after orthognathic surgery in Class III patients.

  1. Growth modification of the face: A current perspective with emphasis on Class III treatment.

    PubMed

    De Clerck, Hugo J; Proffit, William R

    2015-07-01

    A summary of the current status of modification of jaw growth indicates the following. 1. Transverse expansion of the maxilla is easy before adolescence, requires heavy forces to create microfractures during adolescence, and can be accomplished only with partial or complete surgical osteotomy after adolescence. Transverse expansion of the mandible or constriction of either jaw requires surgery. 2. Acceleration of mandibular growth in preadolescent or adolescent patients can be achieved, but slower than normal growth afterward reduces or eliminates a long-term increase in size of the mandible. Restraint of maxillary growth occurs with all types of appliances to correct skeletal Class II problems. For short-face Class II patients, increasing the face height during preadolescent or adolescent orthodontic treatment is possible, but it may make the Class II problem worse unless favorable anteroposterior growth occurs. For those with a long face, controlling excessive vertical growth during adolescence is rarely successful. 3. Attempts to restrain mandibular growth in Class III patients with external forces largely result in downward and backward rotation of the mandible. Moving the maxilla forward with external force is possible before adolescence; moving it forward and simultaneously restricting forward mandibular growth without rotating the jaw is possible during adolescence with intermaxillary traction to bone anchors. The amount of skeletal change with this therapy often extends to the midface, and the short-term effects on both jaws are greater than with previous approaches, but individual variations in the amount of maxillary vs mandibular response occur, and it still is not possible to accurately predict the outcome for a patient. For all types of growth modification, 3-dimensional imaging to distinguish skeletal changes and better biomarkers or genetic identification of patient types to indicate likely treatment responses are needed.

  2. Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) derivatives with dithiocarbamates derived from alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anita; Sengupta, Soumitra K; Pandey, Om P

    2006-06-01

    Lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) complexes with dithiocarbamates have been synthesized by the reactions of lanthanum(III) and praseodymium(III) chloride with barium dithiocarbamate and complexes of type [LnCl(L)H2O]n have been obtained (where Ln=La(III) or Pr(III); L=barium salt of dithiocarbamate derived from glycine, L-leucine, L-valine, DL-alanine). The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, electronic absorption and fluorescence, infrared, far infrared, 1H NMR spectral studies. The presence of coordinated water molecule is inferred from thermogravimetric analysis which indicates the loss of one water molecule at 150-170 degrees C. The oscillator strength, Judd-Ofelt intensity parameter, stimulated emission cross-section, etc. have been obtained for different transitions of Pr3+.

  3. Complex networks for data-driven medicine: the case of Class III dentoskeletal disharmony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, A.; Auconi, P.; Scazzocchio, M.; Caldarelli, G.; McNamara, JA; Franchi, L.

    2014-11-01

    In the last decade, the availability of innovative algorithms derived from complexity theory has inspired the development of highly detailed models in various fields, including physics, biology, ecology, economy, and medicine. Due to the availability of novel and ever more sophisticated diagnostic procedures, all biomedical disciplines face the problem of using the increasing amount of information concerning each patient to improve diagnosis and prevention. In particular, in the discipline of orthodontics the current diagnostic approach based on clinical and radiographic data is problematic due to the complexity of craniofacial features and to the numerous interacting co-dependent skeletal and dentoalveolar components. In this study, we demonstrate the capability of computational methods such as network analysis and module detection to extract organizing principles in 70 patients with excessive mandibular skeletal protrusion with underbite, a condition known in orthodontics as Class III malocclusion. Our results could possibly constitute a template framework for organising the increasing amount of medical data available for patients’ diagnosis.

  4. Orthognathic Surgery for the Correction of Severe Skeletal Class III Malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Kafle, D; Upadhayaya, C; Chaurasia, N; Agarwal, A

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal Malocclusions results from the abnormal position of maxilla and mandible in relation with cranial base. These types of malocclusion are commonly treated by orthodontic teeth movement known as camouflage orthodontics. However severe skeletal malocclusions cannot be treated by orthodontics alone. Such cases need surgical intervention to align the position of the jaw along with orthodontic correction. This procedure is commonly known as Orthognathic Surgery. Orthognathic Surgery dates back to early eighteenth century but became popular on mid twentieth century. Though the prevalence of skeletal malocclusion is more than 1% the treatment facility was not available in Nepal till 2012. Here we present a case of Skeletal Class III malocclusion treated at Dhulikhel Hospital, Kathmandu University Hospital. For this case, double jaw surgery was performed by le-Fort I osteotomy and Bilateral Sagital Split Osteotomy. Orthognathic surgery has been routinely performed at this centre since then.

  5. Localisation of deformations of the midfacial complex in subjects with class III malocclusions employing thin-plate spline analysis

    PubMed Central

    SINGH, G. D.; McNAMARA JR, J. A.; LOZANOFF, S.

    1997-01-01

    This study determines deformations of the midface that contribute to a class III appearance, employing thin-plate spline analysis. A total of 135 lateral cephalographs of prepubertal children of European-American descent with either class III malocclusions or a class I molar occlusion were compared. The cephalographs were traced and checked, and 7 homologous landmarks of the midface were identified and digitised. The data sets were scaled to an equivalent size and subjected to Procrustes analysis. These statistical tests indicated significant differences (P<0.05) between the averaged class I and class III morphologies. Thin-plate spline analysis indicated that both affine and nonaffine transformations contribute towards the total spline for the averaged midfacial configuration. For nonaffine transformations, partial warp 3 had the highest magnitude, indicating the large scale deformations of the midfacial configuration. These deformations affected the palatal landmarks, and were associated with compression of the midfacial complex in the anteroposterior plane predominantly. Partial warp 4 produced some vertical compression of the posterior aspect of the midfacial complex whereas partial warps 1 and 2 indicated localised shape changes of the maxillary alveolus region. Large spatial-scale deformations therefore affect the midfacial complex in an anteroposterior axis, in combination with vertical compression and localised distortions. These deformations may represent a developmental diminution of the palatal complex anteroposteriorly that, allied with vertical shortening of midfacial height posteriorly, results in class III malocclusions with a retrusive midfacial profile. PMID:9449078

  6. Application of Protocols Devised to Study Bi(III) Complex Formation by Voltammetry: The Bi(III)-Picolinic Acid System.

    PubMed

    Billing, Caren; Cukrowski, Ignacy

    2016-12-22

    Bi(III) coordination chemistry has been largely neglected due to the difficulties faced when studying these systems even though Bi(III) is used in various medicinal applications. This study of the Bi(III)-picolinic acid system by voltammetry applies the rigorous methodologies already developed to enable the study of Bi(III) systems starting in very acidic solutions to prevent precipitation. This includes calibrating the glass electrode accurately at these low pHs, compensating for the diffusion junction potential below pH 2 and determining the reduction potential of uncomplexed Bi(III) which cannot be directly measured. The importance of including nitrate from the background electrolyte as a competing species is highlighted, especially for data acquired below pH ∼ 2. From analysis of the voltammetric data, it was not clear whether a ML3OH species formed in solution or whether it was a combination of ML4 and ML4OH. Information from crystal structures and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry measurements was thus used to propose the most probable species model. The log β values determined were 7.77 ± 0.07 for ML, 13.89 ± 0.07 for ML2, 18.61 ± 0.01 for ML3, 22.7 ± 0.2 for ML4, and 31.4 ± 0.2 for ML4OH. Application of these methodologies thus opens the door to broaden our understanding of Bi(III) complexation.

  7. Class III peroxidases are activated in proanthocyanidin-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Liguo; Xu, Weifeng; Li, Wenrao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Shi, Lu; Bin Rahman, A. N. M. Rubaiyath; Fan, Mingshou; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims It has previously been shown that proanthocyanidins (PAs) in the seed coat of Arabidopsis thaliana have the ability to scavenge superoxide radicals (O2−). However, the physiological processess in PA-deficit seeds are not clear. It is hypothesized that there exist alternative ways in PA-deficient seeds to cope with oxidative stress. Methods The content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and its relevance to the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidases was investigated in both wild-type and PA-deficit mutant seeds. A biochemical staining approach was used to detect tissue localizations of peroxidase activities in PA-deficit mutant seeds. Key Results PA-deficient mutants possess significantly lower levels of H2O2 than the wild-type, despite their higher accumulation of superoxide radicals. Screening of the key antioxidant enzymes revealed that peroxidase activity was significantly over-activated in mutant seeds. This high peroxidase activity was mainly confined to the seed coat zone. Interestingly, neither ascorbate peroxidase nor glutathione peroxidase, just the guaiacol peroxidases (class III peroxidases), was specifically activated in the seed coat. However, no significant difference in peroxidase activity was observed in embryos of either mutants or the wild-type, although gene expressions of several candidate peroxidases were down-regulated in the embryos of PA-deficient seeds. Conclusions The results suggest that enhanced class III peroxidase activity in the seed coat of PA-deficient mutants is an adaptive strategy for seed development and survival. PMID:23448691

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a class of mitochondrially-targeted gadolinium(III) agents.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Daniel E; Aitken, Jade B; de Jonge, Martin D; Issa, Fatiah; Harris, Hugh H; Rendina, Louis M

    2014-12-08

    A structure-activity relationship study of a library of novel bifunctional Gd(III) complexes covalently linked to arylphosphonium cations is reported. Such complexes have been designed for potential application in binary cancer therapies such as neutron capture therapy and photon activation therapy. A positive correlation was found between lipophilicity and cytotoxicity of the complexes. Mitochondria uptake was determined by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and Gd uptake was determined by means of quantification using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging. A negative correlation between lipophilicity and tumour selectivity of the Gd(III) complexes was demonstrated. This study highlights the delicate balance required to minimise in vitro cytotoxicity and optimise in vitro tumour selectivity and mitochondrial localisation for this new class of mitochondrially-targeted binary therapy agents. We also report the highest in vitro tumour selectivity for any Gd agent reported to date, with a T/N (tumour/normal cell) ratio of up to 23.5±6.6.

  9. Apelin-13 impedes foam cell formation by activating Class III PI3K/Beclin-1-mediated autophagic pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Feng; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Zhang, Min; Xie, Wei; Tan, Yu-Lin; Gong, Duo; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Liu, Dan; Li, Liang; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Xi-Long; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2015-10-30

    Apelin-13, an adipokine, promotes cholesterol efflux in macrophages with antiatherosclerotic effect. Autophagy, an evolutionarily ancient response to cellular stress, has been involved in atherosclerosis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether apelin-13 regulates macrophage foam cell cholesterol metabolism through autophagy, and also explore the underlying mechanisms. Here, we revealed that apelin-13 decreased lipid accumulation in THP-1 derived macrophages through markedly enhancing cholesterol efflux. Our study further demonstrated that apelin-13 induced autophagy via activation of Class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Beclin-1. Inhibition of Class III PI3K and Beclin-1 suppressed the stimulatory effects of apelin-13 on autophagy activity. The present study concluded that apelin-13 reduces lipid accumulation of foam cells by activating autophagy via Class III PI3K/Beclin-1 pathway. Therefore, our results provide brand new insight about apelin-13 inhibiting foam cell formation and highlight autophagy as a promising therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

  10. Orthodontic decompensation and correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion with gradual dentoalveolar remodeling in a growing patient.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Zhao, Xiao-Guang; Xiang, Lu-Sai

    2014-03-01

    An 8-year-old girl with a skeletal Class III malocclusion was treated in 2 phases. Maxillary expansion and protraction were carried out as the early intervention. However, her maxillary hypoplasia and mandibular hyperplasia deteriorated with age. The phase 2 comprehensive treatment began with proper mechanics when she was 12 years old with growth potential. In the maxillary arch, an auxiliary rectangular wire was used with a round main wire and an opening spring to create space for the impacted teeth and to bodily move the anterior teeth forward. Decompensation of mandibular incisors and correction of the Class III malocclusion were achieved by short Class III elastics with light forces and a gentle interaction between the rectangular wires and the lingual root-torque slots. The phase 2 active treatment period was 4 years 8 months. The 2-year follow-up indicated that our treatment results were quite stable.

  11. Amino acids of the Murchison meteorite. III - Seven carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra

    1986-01-01

    All of the eighteen possible seven-carbon acyclic primary alpha-amino alkanoic acids have been positively identified in a hot-water extract of the Murchison meteorite by the combined use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, ion exchange chromatography and reversed-phase chromatography. None of these amino acids has previously been found in meteorites or in any other natural material. They range in concentration from less than or equal to 0.5 to 5.3 nmol/g. Configuration assignments were made for 2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and allo-2-amino-3,4-dimethylpentanoic acid and the diasteromer ratio was determined. Fifty-five amino acids have now been positively identified in the Murchison meteorite, 36 of which are unknown in terrestrial materials. This unique suite of amino acids is characterized by the occurrence of all structural isomers within the two major classes of amino acids represented, by the predominance of branched chain isomers, and by an exponential decline in amount with increasing carbon chain length within homologous series. These characteristics of the Murchison amino acids are suggestive of synthesis before incorporation into a parent body.

  12. The quantum mixed-spin heme state of barley peroxidase: A paradigm for class III peroxidases.

    PubMed Central

    Howes, B D; Schiodt, C B; Welinder, K G; Marzocchi, M P; Ma, J G; Zhang, J; Shelnutt, J A; Smulevich, G

    1999-01-01

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values, at both room temperature and 20 K, are reported, together with electron paramagnetic resonance spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species coexists with 6- and 5-cHS hemes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the currently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling may be necessary for the QS state. PMID:10388773

  13. The Quantum Mixed-Spin Heme State of Barley Peroxidase: A Paradigm for Class III Peroxidases

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, B.D.; Ma, J.; Marzocchi, M.P.; Schiodt, C.B.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Smulevich, G.; Welinder, K.G.; Zhang, J.

    1999-03-23

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values both at room temperature and 20 K are . reported, together with EPR spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species co-exists with 6- and 5-cHS heroes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the presently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling maybe necessary for the QS state.

  14. Long maximal incremental tests accurately assess aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men.

    PubMed

    Lanzi, Stefano; Codecasa, Franco; Cornacchia, Mauro; Maestrini, Sabrina; Capodaglio, Paolo; Brunani, Amelia; Fanari, Paolo; Salvadori, Alberto; Malatesta, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to compare two different maximal incremental tests with different time durations [a maximal incremental ramp test with a short time duration (8-12 min) (STest) and a maximal incremental test with a longer time duration (20-25 min) (LTest)] to investigate whether an LTest accurately assesses aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men. Twenty obese men (BMI≥35 kg.m-2) without secondary pathologies (mean±SE; 36.7±1.9 yr; 41.8±0.7 kg*m-2) completed an STest (warm-up: 40 W; increment: 20 W*min-1) and an LTest [warm-up: 20% of the peak power output (PPO) reached during the STest; increment: 10% PPO every 5 min until 70% PPO was reached or until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.0, followed by 15 W.min-1 until exhaustion] on a cycle-ergometer to assess the peak oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] and peak heart rate (HRpeak) of each test. There were no significant differences in [Formula: see text] (STest: 3.1±0.1 L*min-1; LTest: 3.0±0.1 L*min-1) and HRpeak (STest: 174±4 bpm; LTest: 173±4 bpm) between the two tests. Bland-Altman plot analyses showed good agreement and Pearson product-moment and intra-class correlation coefficients showed a strong correlation between [Formula: see text] (r=0.81 for both; p≤0.001) and HRpeak (r=0.95 for both; p≤0.001) during both tests. [Formula: see text] and HRpeak assessments were not compromised by test duration in class II and III obese men. Therefore, we suggest that the LTest is a feasible test that accurately assesses aerobic fitness and may allow for the exercise intensity prescription and individualization that will lead to improved therapeutic approaches in treating obesity and severe obesity.

  15. Class III correction using an inter-arch spring-loaded module

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A retrospective study was conducted to determine the cephalometric changes in a group of Class III patients treated with the inter-arch spring-loaded module (CS2000®, Dynaflex, St. Ann, MO, USA). Methods Thirty Caucasian patients (15 males, 15 females) with an average pre-treatment age of 9.6 years were treated consecutively with this appliance and compared with a control group of subjects from the Bolton-Brush Study who were matched in age, gender, and craniofacial morphology to the treatment group. Lateral cephalograms were taken before treatment and after removal of the CS2000® appliance. The treatment effects of the CS2000® appliance were calculated by subtracting the changes due to growth (control group) from the treatment changes. Results All patients were improved to a Class I dental arch relationship with a positive overjet. Significant sagittal, vertical, and angular changes were found between the pre- and post-treatment radiographs. With an average treatment time of 1.3 years, the maxillary base moved forward by 0.8 mm, while the mandibular base moved backward by 2.8 mm together with improvements in the ANB and Wits measurements. The maxillary incisor moved forward by 1.3 mm and the mandibular incisor moved forward by 1.0 mm. The maxillary molar moved forward by 1.0 mm while the mandibular molar moved backward by 0.6 mm. The average overjet correction was 3.9 mm and 92% of the correction was due to skeletal contribution and 8% was due to dental contribution. The average molar correction was 5.2 mm and 69% of the correction was due to skeletal contribution and 31% was due to dental contribution. Conclusions Mild to moderate Class III malocclusion can be corrected using the inter-arch spring-loaded appliance with minimal patient compliance. The overjet correction was contributed by forward movement of the maxilla, backward and downward movement of the mandible, and proclination of the maxillary incisors. The molar relationship was

  16. Early treatment of class III malocclusion with modified tandem traction bow appliance and a brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Akhilesh; Joshi, Sourabh Ramesh; Hegde, Amitha M; Shetty, Rajmohan

    2014-09-01

    The accurate diagnosis and clinical management of class III malocclusion continues to be a challenging task for the pediatric dentist due to the poor compliance of patient and high rate of relapse. Two cases of early treatment of class III malocclusion are presented which were treated by modified tandem traction bow appliance. The correction in the cross bite was achieved in six to seven months. Children's compliance and acceptance for the appliance was good. Follow up of two years and one years showed no relapse.

  17. Intrinsic acidity of aluminum, chromium (III) and iron (III) μ 3-hydroxo functional groups from ab initio electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Dixon, David A.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2000-05-01

    Density functional calculations are performed on M 3(OH) 7(H 2O) 62+ and M 3O(OH) 6(H 2O) 6+ clusters for MAl, Cr(III), and Fe(III), allowing determination of the relative acidities of the μ 3-hydroxo and aquo functional groups. Contrary to previous predictions and rationalizations, Fe 3OH and Al 3OH groups have nearly the same intrinsic acidity, while Cr 3OH groups are significantly more acidic. The gas-phase acidity of the Fe 3OH site is in good agreement with the value predicted by the molecular mechanics model previously used to estimate the relative acidities of surface sites on iron oxides. [ J. R. Rustad et al. (1996)Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 1563]. Acidities of aquo functional groups were also computed for Al and Cr. The AlOH 2 site is more acidic than the Al 3OH site, whereas the Cr 3OH site is more acidic than the CrOH 2 site. These findings predict that the surface charging behavior of chromium oxides/oxyhydroxides should be distinguishable from their Fe, Al counterparts. The calculations also provide insight into why the lepidocrocite/boehmite polymorph is not observed for CrOOH.

  18. Self-esteem in adolescents with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusion in a Peruvian sample

    PubMed Central

    Florián-Vargas, Karla; Honores, Marcos J. Carruitero; Bernabé, Eduardo; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare self-esteem scores in 12 to 16-year-old adolescents with different Angle malocclusion types in a Peruvian sample. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 276 adolescents (159, 52 and 65 with Angle Class I, II and III malocclusions, respectively) from Trujillo, Peru. Participants were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and were also clinically examined, so as to have Angle malocclusion classification determined. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare RSES scores among adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions, with participants' demographic factors being controlled. Results: Mean RSES scores for adolescents with Class I, II and III malocclusions were 20.47 ± 3.96, 21.96 ± 3.27 and 21.26 ± 4.81, respectively. The ANCOVA test showed that adolescents with Class II malocclusion had a significantly higher RSES score than those with Class I malocclusion, but there were no differences between other malocclusion groups. Supplemental analysis suggested that only those with Class II, Division 2 malocclusion might have greater self-esteem when compared to adolescents with Class I malocclusion. Conclusion: This study shows that, in general, self-esteem did not vary according to adolescents' malocclusion in the sample studied. Surprisingly, only adolescents with Class II malocclusion, particularly Class II, Division 2, reported better self-esteem than those with Class I malocclusion. A more detailed analysis assessing the impact of anterior occlusal features should be conducted. PMID:27275616

  19. Complexation of Am(III) and Nd(III) by 1,10-Phenanthroline-2,9-Dicarboxylic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Mark D.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Nilsson, Mikael; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Hancock, Robert D.; Nash, Ken L.

    2013-01-01

    The complexant 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid (PDA) is a planar tetradentate ligand that is more preorganized for metal complexation than its unconstrained analogue ethylendiiminodiacetic acid (EDDA). Furthermore, the backbone nitrogen atoms of PDA are aromatic, hence are softer than the aliphatic amines of EDDA. It has been hypothesized that PDA will selectively bond to trivalent actinides over lanthanides. In this report, the results of spectrophotometric studies of the complexation of Nd(III) and Am(III) by PDA are reported. Because the complexes are moderately stable, it was necessary to conduct these titrations using competitive equilibrium methods, competitive cation omplexing between PDA and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, and competition between ligand protonation and complex formation. Stability constants and ligand protonation constants were determined at 0.1 mol/L ionic strength and at 0.5 mol/L ionic strength nitrate media at 21 ± 1 C. The stability constants are lower than those predicted from first principles and speciation calculations indicate that Am(III) selectivity over Nd(III) is less than that exhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline.

  20. Mitochondria are the main target organelle for trivalent monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III))-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Naranmandura, Hua; Xu, Shi; Sawata, Takashi; Hao, Wen Hui; Liu, Huan; Bu, Na; Ogra, Yasumitsu; Lou, Yi Jia; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2011-07-18

    Excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered to play an important role in arsenic-induced carcinogenicity in the liver, lungs, and urinary bladder. However, little is known about the mechanism of ROS-based carcinogenicity, including where the ROS are generated, and which arsenic species are the most effective ROS inducers. In order to better understand the mechanism of arsenic toxicity, rat liver RLC-16 cells were exposed to arsenite (iAs(III)) and its intermediate metabolites [i.e., monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III))]. MMA(III) (IC(50) = 1 μM) was found to be the most toxic form, followed by DMA(III) (IC(50) = 2 μM) and iAs(III) (IC(50) = 18 μM). Following exposure to MMA(III), ROS were found to be generated primarily in the mitochondria. DMA(III) exposure resulted in ROS generation in other organelles, while no ROS generation was seen following exposures to low levels of iAs(III). This suggests the mechanisms of induction of ROS are different among the three arsenicals. The effects of iAs(III), MMA(III), and DMA(III) on activities of complexes I-IV in the electron transport chain (ETC) of rat liver submitochondrial particles and on the stimulation of ROS production in intact mitochondria were also studied. Activities of complexes II and IV were significantly inhibited by MMA(III), but only the activity of complexes II was inhibited by DMA(III). Incubation with iAs(III) had no inhibitory effects on any of the four complexes. Generation of ROS in intact mitochondria was significantly increased following incubation with MMA(III), while low levels of ROS generation were observed following incubation with DMA(III). ROS was not produced in mitochondria following exposure to iAs(III). The mechanism underlying cell death is different among As(III), MMA(III), and DMA(III), with mitochondria being one of the primary target organelles for MMA(III)-induced cytotoxicity.

  1. Involvement of a membrane-bound class III adenylate cyclase in regulation of anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Charania, M A; Brockman, K L; Zhang, Y; Banerjee, A; Pinchuk, G E; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  2. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  3. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  4. CaPrx, a Coffea arabica gene encoding a putative class III peroxidase induced by root-knot nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Severino, Fábio E; Brandalise, Marcos; Costa, Carolina S; Wilcken, Sílvia R S; Maluf, Mirian P; Gonçalves, Wallace; Maia, Ivan G

    2012-08-01

    Class III peroxidases (Prxs) are enzymes involved in a multitude of physiological and stress-related processes in plants. Here, we report on the characterization of a putative peroxidase-encoding gene from Coffea arabica (CaPrx) that is expressed in early stages of root-knot nematode (RKN) infection. CaPrx showed enhanced expression in coffee roots inoculated with RKN (at 12 h post-inoculation), but no significant difference in expression was observed between susceptible and resistant plants. Assays using transgenic tobacco plants harboring a promoter-β-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion revealed that the CaPrx promoter was exclusively active in the galls induced by RKN. In cross sections of galls, GUS staining was predominantly localized in giant cells. Up-regulation of GUS expression in roots of transgenic plants following RKN inoculation was observed within 16 h. Moreover, no increase in GUS expression after treatment with jasmonic acid was detected. Altogether, these results point to a putative role of this peroxidase in the general coffee response to RKN infection.

  5. The lived experience of middle-aged women with New York Heart Association class III heart failure: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jennifer Wayment; Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Lynch-Sauer, Judith

    2009-09-01

    Although heart failure (HF) is equally prevalent in men and women, women with HF are more likely to report decreased quality of life and are more likely to die of the disease compared with men. Moreover, HF has been studied less extensively in women and no study has specifically addressed women with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III HF using a qualitative method. This pilot study sought to gain insight into the lived experience of women with NYHA class III HF. Using a phenomenological approach, interviews obtained from 4 middle-aged women with NYHA class III HF were analyzed using the Giorgi method of data analysis. Five themes emerged: (1) developing a new conception of self, (2) conceding physical limitations, (3) enduring emotional heartache, (4) accepting support, and (5) rejuvenating through rest. This study provides a beginning to our understanding of the lived experience of women with NYHA class III HF. However, further exploration is needed to increase our knowledge of HF in women, particularly among diverse populations.

  6. Interdisciplinary treatment of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta, a skeletal Class III relationship, and an anterior open bite.

    PubMed

    Marşan, Gülnaz; Aksu, Irem Sakarya; Kurt, Hanefi; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Cura, Nil

    2010-01-01

    An adult woman with amelogenesis imperfecta, a skeletal Class III relationship, long face syndrome, and a severe anterior open bite received interdisciplinary treatment (orthodontics, orthognathic surgery, and prosthodontics). Presurgical orthodontic treatment was followed by a maxillary posterior impaction with anterior advancement and a mandibular setback. After surgery, the patient received ceramic crowns. Function and esthetics were successfully re-established.

  7. Class III PI3K regulates organismal glucose homeostasis by providing negative feedback on hepatic insulin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Nemazanyy, Ivan; Montagnac, Guillaume; Russell, Ryan C.; Morzyglod, Lucille; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Guan, Kun-Liang; Pende, Mario; Panasyuk, Ganna

    2015-01-01

    Defective hepatic insulin receptor (IR) signalling is a pathogenic manifestation of metabolic disorders including obesity and diabetes. The endo/lysosomal trafficking system may coordinate insulin action and nutrient homeostasis by endocytosis of IR and the autophagic control of intracellular nutrient levels. Here we show that class III PI3K—a master regulator of endocytosis, endosomal sorting and autophagy—provides negative feedback on hepatic insulin signalling. The ultraviolet radiation resistance-associated gene protein (UVRAG)-associated class III PI3K complex interacts with IR and is stimulated by insulin treatment. Acute and chronic depletion of hepatic Vps15, the regulatory subunit of class III PI3K, increases insulin sensitivity and Akt signalling, an effect that requires functional IR. This is reflected by FoxO1-dependent transcriptional defects and blunted gluconeogenesis in Vps15 mutant cells. On depletion of Vps15, the metabolic syndrome in genetic and diet-induced models of insulin resistance and diabetes is alleviated. Thus, feedback regulation of IR trafficking and function by class III PI3K may be a therapeutic target in metabolic conditions of insulin resistance. PMID:26387534

  8. 25 CFR 291.3 - When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... action in Federal district court against the State alleging that the State did not respond, or did not... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When may an Indian tribe ask the Secretary to issue Class III gaming procedures? 291.3 Section 291.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF...

  9. 40 CFR 147.2250 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV, and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for Class I, III, IV, and V wells in the State of Utah, except those on Indian lands, is administered... of the Federal Register on June 25, 1984. (1) Utah Water Pollution Control Act, Utah Code Annotated... Executive Secretary of Utah Water Pollution Control Committee on August 16, 1990). (b) Other laws....

  10. 40 CFR 147.2550 - State-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells. 147.2550 Section 147.2550 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Wyoming §...

  11. Complexation of indium(III), gallium(III), iron(III), gadolinium(III), and neodymium(III) ions with amino diphosphonic acids in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, J.E.; Roundhill, D.M. )

    1993-06-23

    The compounds (Me[sub 2]N)CH(PO[sup 3]H[sub 2])[sub 2](MAMDP) and MeC(NH[sub 2])(PO[sub 3]H[sub 2])[sub 2](AEDP) have been synthesized. These compounds have been titrated with base and the protonation constants determined. Titration data of pH against added acid or base show that AEDP acts as a ligand toward In[sup 3+] and that MAMDP binds as a ligand to In[sup 3+], Ga[sup 3+], Fe[sup 3+], Gd[sub 3+], and Nd[sub 3+]. From a least-squares fit of the pH titration curves, the stability and protonation constants have been obtained for solutions containing these ligands and these trivalent metal ions. The ligands bind to the trivalent metal ions via the phosphonate oxygens, although it is likely that hydrogen bonding occurs between water and the phosphonate ligand. For the ions In[sup 3+], Ga[sup 3+], and Fe[sup 3+], the logarithms of the stability constants log K[sub 101] and log K[sub 102] (where K[sub 101] = [ML[sup [minus

  12. 40 CFR Figure C-3 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10−2.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10â2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-3 to Subpart C of Part...—Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10−2.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  13. 40 CFR Figure C-3 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10−2.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10â2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-3 to Subpart C of Part...—Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10−2.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  14. 40 CFR Figure C-3 to Subpart C of... - Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10−2.5 Candidate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10â2.5 Candidate Equivalent Methods C Figure C-3 to Subpart C of Part...—Illustration of the Slope and Intercept Limits for Class II and Class III PM10−2.5 Candidate Equivalent...

  15. Photoluminescence studies on the complexation of Eu(III) and Tb(III) with acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) in nitrate medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, P. N.; Mohapatra, M.; Godbole, S. V.

    2013-11-01

    UREX process has been proposed for selective extraction of U(VI) and Tc(VII) from nitric acid medium (∼1 M HNO3) using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as extractant and retaining Pu, Np and fission products in the aqueous phase. The feasibility of the use of luminescence spectroscopy as a technique to understand the complexation of trivalent f-elements cations viz. Eu(III) and Tb(III) with acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) in nitric acid medium has been examined. The luminescence lifetimes for the 1 × 10-3 M Eu(III) and AHA complex system decreased with increased AHA concentration from 116 ± 0.2 μs (no AHA) to 1.6 ± 0.1 μs (0.1 M AHA) which was attributed to dynamic quenching. The corrected fluorescence intensities were used to calculate the stability constant (log K) for the formation of 1:1 Eu3+-AHA complex as 1.42 ± 0.64 under the conditions of this study. By contrast, the Tb(III)-AHA system at pH 3 (HNO3) did not show any significant variation in the life times of the excited state (364 ± 9 μs) suggesting the absence of dynamic quenching. The spectral changes in Tb(III)-AHA system showed the formation of 1:1 complex (log K: 1.72 ± 0.21). These studies suggest that the extent of AHA complexation with the rare earth elements will be insignificant as compared to tetravalent metal ions Pu(IV) and Np(IV) under UREX process conditions.

  16. Three-dimensional assessment of mandibular and glenoid fossa changes after bone-anchored Class III intermaxillary traction

    PubMed Central

    De Clerck, Hugo; Nguyen, Tung; de Paula, Leonardo Koerich; Cevidanes, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Conventional treatment for young Class III patients involves extraoral devices designed to either protract the maxilla or restrain mandibular growth. The use of skeletal anchorage offers a promising alternative to obtain orthopedic results with fewer dental compensations. Our aim was to evaluate 3-dimensional changes in the mandibles and the glenoid fossae of Class III patients treated with bone-anchored maxillary protraction. Methods Twenty-five consecutive skeletal Class III patients between the ages of 9 and 13 years (mean age, 11.10 ± 1.1 year) were treated with Class III intermaxillary elastics and bilateral miniplates (2 in the infrazygomatic crests of the maxilla and 2 in the anterior mandible). The patients had cone-beam computed tomography images taken before initial loading and at the end of active treatment. Three-dimensional models were generated from these images, registered on the anterior cranial base, and analyzed by using color maps. Results Posterior displacement of the mandible at the end of treatment was observed in all subjects (posterior ramus: mean, 2.74 ± 1.36 mm; condyles: mean, 2.07 ± 1.16 mm; chin: mean, −0.13 ± 2.89 mm). Remodeling of the glenoid fossa at the anterior eminence (mean, 1.38 ± 1.03 mm) and bone resorption at the posterior wall (mean, −1.34 ± 0.6 mm) were observed in most patients. Conclusions This new treatment approach offers a promising alternative to restrain mandibular growth for Class III patients with a component of mandibular prognathism or to compensate for maxillary deficiency in patients with hypoplasia of the midface. Future studies with long-term follow-up and comparisons with facemask and chincup therapies are needed to better understand the treatment effects. PMID:22748987

  17. One-year assessment of surgical outcomes in Class III patients using cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, L.K.; de Oliveira Ruellas, A.C.; Paniagua, B.; Styner, M.; Turvey, T.; Zhu, H.; Wang, J.; Cevidanes, L.H.S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply a novel method to evaluate surgical outcomes at 1 year after orthognathic surgery for Class III patients undergoing two different surgical protocols. Fifty patients divided equally into two groups (maxillary advancement only and combined with mandibular setback) had cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans taken pre-surgery, at splint removal, and at 1-year post-surgery. An automatic cranial base superimposition method was used to register, and shape correspondence was applied to assess, the overall changes between pre-surgery and splint removal (surgical changes) and between splint removal and 1-year post-surgery at the end of orthodontic treatment (post-surgical adaptations). Post-surgical maxillary adaptations were exactly the same for both groups, with 52% of the patients having changes >2 mm. Approximately half of the post-surgical changes in the maxilla for both groups were vertical. The two-jaw group showed significantly greater surgical and post-surgical changes in the ramus, chin, and most of the condylar surfaces (P < 0.05). Post-surgical adaptation on the anterior part of the chin was also more significant in the two-jaw group (P < 0.05). Regardless of the type of surgery, marked post-surgical adaptations were observed in the regions evaluated, which explain the adequate maxillary–mandibular relationship at 1-year post-surgery on average, with individual variability. PMID:23403336

  18. Nonsurgical and nonextraction treatment of skeletal Class III open bite: its long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Kondo, E; Aoba, T J

    2000-03-01

    Two female patients, aged 14 years 5 months and 17 years 3 months with skeletal Class III open bite and temporomandibular dysfunction are presented. They had previously been classified as orthognathic surgical cases, involving first premolar removal. The primary treatment objective was to eliminate those skeletal and neuromuscular factors that were dominant in establishing their malocclusions. These included abnormal behavior of the tongue with short labial and lingual frenula, bilateral imbalance of chewing muscles, a partially blocked nasopharyngeal airway causing extrusion of the molars, with rotation of the mandible and narrowing of the maxillary arch. Resultant occlusal interference caused the mandible to shift to one side, which in turn produced the abnormal occlusal plane and curve of Spee. As a result, the form and function of the joints were adversely affected by the structural and functional asymmetry. These cases were treated by expanding the maxillary arch, which brought the maxilla downward and forward. The mandible moved downward and backward, with a slight increase in anterior facial height. Intruding and uprighting the posterior teeth, combined with a maxillary protraction, reconstructed the occlusal plane. A favorable perioral environment was created with widened tongue space in order to produce an adequate airway. Myofunctional therapy after lingual and labial frenectomy was assisted by vigorous gum chewing during and after treatment, together with a tooth positioner. Normal nasal breathing was achieved.

  19. Orthodontic camouflage versus orthognathic surgery for class III deformity: comparative cephalometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Martinez, P; Bellot-Arcís, C; Llamas, J M; Cibrian, R; Gandia, J L; Paredes-Gallardo, V

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare different cephalometric variables in adult patients with class III malocclusions before and after treatment, in order to determine which variables are indicative of orthodontic camouflage or orthognathic surgery. The cases of 156 adult patients were assessed: 77 treated with orthodontic camouflage and 79 treated with orthodontics and orthognathic surgery. The following cephalometric variables were measured on pre-treatment (T1) and post-treatment (T2) lateral cephalograms: sella-nasion-A-point (SNA), sella-nasion-B-point (SNB), and A-point-nasion-B-point (ANB) angles, Wits appraisal, facial axis angle, mandibular plane angle, upper and lower incisor inclination, and inter-incisal angle. There were statistically significant differences in cephalometric variables before and after treatment between the two groups. The percentage of normal pre-treatment measurements in the camouflage orthodontics group was 30.7%, which worsened slightly to 28.4% post-treatment. However in the group receiving surgery, this was 24.5% pre-treatment, improving to 33.5% after surgery. SNA, SNB, Wits appraisal, lower incisor inclination, and inter-incisal angle showed differences between the two groups before and after treatment. Wits appraisal, lower incisor inclination, and inter-incisal angle were indicative of one or other treatment. Upper and lower incisor decompensation in both groups did not reach ideal values, which impeded complete skeletal correction in 52% of surgical cases.

  20. Class III myosins shape the auditory hair bundles by limiting microvilli and stereocilia growth

    PubMed Central

    Lelli, Andrea; Michel, Vincent; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Cortese, Matteo; Bosch-Grau, Montserrat; Aghaie, Asadollah; Perfettini, Isabelle; Dupont, Typhaine; Avan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The precise architecture of hair bundles, the arrays of mechanosensitive microvilli-like stereocilia crowning the auditory hair cells, is essential to hearing. Myosin IIIa, defective in the late-onset deafness form DFNB30, has been proposed to transport espin-1 to the tips of stereocilia, thereby promoting their elongation. We show that Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− mice lacking myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb are profoundly deaf, whereas Myo3a-cKO Myo3b−/− mice lacking myosin IIIb and losing myosin IIIa postnatally have normal hearing. Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− cochlear hair bundles display robust mechanoelectrical transduction currents with normal kinetics but show severe embryonic abnormalities whose features rapidly change. These include abnormally tall and numerous microvilli or stereocilia, ungraded stereocilia bundles, and bundle rounding and closure. Surprisingly, espin-1 is properly targeted to Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− stereocilia tips. Our results uncover the critical role that class III myosins play redundantly in hair-bundle morphogenesis; they unexpectedly limit the elongation of stereocilia and of subsequently regressing microvilli, thus contributing to the early hair bundle shaping. PMID:26754646

  1. Challenging the paradigms of leaf evolution: Class III HD-Zips in ferns and lycophytes.

    PubMed

    Vasco, Alejandra; Smalls, Tynisha L; Graham, Sean W; Cooper, Endymion D; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Stevenson, Dennis W; Moran, Robbin C; Ambrose, Barbara A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the extraordinary significance leaves have for life on Earth, their origin and development remain vigorously debated. More than a century of paleobotanical, morphological, and phylogenetic research has still not resolved fundamental questions about leaves. Developmental genetic data are sparse in ferns, and comparative studies of lycophytes and seed plants have reached opposing conclusions on the conservation of a leaf developmental program. We performed phylogenetic and expression analyses of a leaf developmental regulator (Class III HD-Zip genes; C3HDZs) spanning lycophytes and ferns. We show that a duplication and neofunctionalization of C3HDZs probably occurred in the ancestor of euphyllophytes, and that there is a common leaf developmental mechanism conserved between ferns and seed plants. We show C3HDZ expression in lycophyte and fern sporangia and show that C3HDZs have conserved expression patterns during initiation of lateral primordia (leaves or sporangia). This expression is maintained throughout sporangium development in lycophytes and ferns and indicates an ancestral role of C3HDZs in sporangium development. We hypothesize that there is a deep homology of all leaves and that a sporangium-specific developmental program was coopted independently for the development of lycophyte and euphyllophyte leaves. This provides molecular genetic support for a paradigm shift in theories of lycophyte leaf evolution.

  2. Soft tissue changes after a mandibular osteotomy for symmetric skeletal class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Seigo; Kohara, Haruka; Koga, Takamitsu; Kawasaki, Takako; Miura, Kei-Ichirou; Yoshida, Noriaki; Asahina, Izumi

    2016-10-31

    The soft tissue profile is crucial to esthetics after orthognathic surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the soft tissue changes of the subnasal and submental regions more than 1 year after a sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) in patients with skeletal class III malocclusion. A total of 22 patients with mandibular prognathism were included in this study. Patients had lateral cephalograms before and more than 1 year after they underwent an isolated SSRO. Soft and hard tissue changes were assessed using the lateral cephalograms. The lower lip, labiomenton, and soft tissue menton moved posteriorly by 85, 89, and 88% compared with the corresponding hard tissue, and the movement of the soft tissue B point and the top of the chin nearly reflected the displacement of the hard tissues, at 96 and 99%, respectively. The labiomenton, stomions, and naso-labial angles were changed after the mandibular set-back and the changes in these angles correlated with either the width of the soft tissue or skeletal displacement. The naso-labial angle could be altered even if an isolated mandibular osteotomy is performed. Changes to the stomions and naso-labial angles were affected by hard tissue movement, while changes to the labiomental angle were affected by the width of the soft tissue after the mandibular osteotomy. It is important to create an accurate preoperative prediction of the esthetic outcomes after a mandibular osteotomy by considering the interrelations between the hard and soft tissues.

  3. Masticatory muscle function three years after surgical correction of class III dentofacial deformity.

    PubMed

    Trawitzki, L V V; Dantas, R O; Mello-Filho, F V; Marques, W

    2010-09-01

    Individuals with dentofacial deformities have masticatory muscle changes. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of interdisciplinary treatment in patients with dentofacial deformities regarding electromyographic activity (EMG) of masticatory muscles three years after surgical correction. Thirteen patients with class III dentofacial deformities were studied, considered as group P1 (before surgery) and group P3 (3 years to 3 years and 8 months after surgery). Fifteen individuals with no changes in facial morphology or dental occlusion were studied as controls. The participants underwent EMG examination of the temporal and masseter muscles during mastication and biting. Evaluation of the amplitude interval of EMG activity revealed a difference between P1 and P3 and no difference between P3 and the control group. In contrast, evaluation of root mean square revealed that, in general, P3 values were higher only when compared with P1 and differed from the control group. There was an improvement in the EMG activity of the masticatory muscles, mainly observed in the masseter muscle, with values close to those of the control group in one of the analyses.

  4. Extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from nitric acid solutions by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid dissolved in kerosene.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Sheng; Tsai, Teh-Hua

    2012-01-04

    The extraction equilibrium of indium(III) from a nitric acid solution using di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as an acidic extractant of organophosphorus compounds dissolved in kerosene was studied. By graphical and numerical analysis, the compositions of indium-D2EHPA complexes in organic phase and stoichiometry of the extraction reaction were examined. Nitric acid solutions with various indium concentrations at 25 °C were used to obtain the equilibrium constant of InR₃ in the organic phase. The experimental results showed that the extraction distribution ratios of indium(III) between the organic phase and the aqueous solution increased when either the pH value of the aqueous solution and/or the concentration of the organic phase extractant increased. Finally, the recovery efficiency of indium(III) in nitric acid was measured.

  5. Rationale, design and organisation of an efficacy and safety study of oxypurinol added to standard therapy in patients with NYHA class III - IV congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Freudenberger, Ronald S; Schwarz, Richard P; Brown, Joanne; Moore, Alan; Mann, Douglas; Givertz, Michael M; Colucci, Wilson S; Hare, Joshua M

    2004-11-01

    Oxypurinol, the active metabolite of allopurinol and a potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor (XOI), is under evaluation as a novel agent for the treatment of congestive heart failure (HF). Several lines of evidence provide the rationale for the hypothesis that XOIs will improve clinical outcomes in patients with HF. First, XOIs have unique positive inotropic effects, improving myocardial contraction and performance while simultaneously improving myocardial energy metabolism. Second, XOIs ameliorate endothelial dysfunction in humans with HF. Finally, XO activity is upregulated in the heart and vasculature of subjects with HF, which may in turn contribute to oxidative stress and/or increased uric acid levels. Together these findings form the rationale for the Controlled Efficacy and Safety Study of Oxypurinol Added to Standard Therapy in Patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III - IV Congestive Heart Failure (OPT-CHF) trial (Food and Drug Administration IND 65,125), a Phase II - III prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, which will include patients with stable symptomatic HF in NYHA class III - IV congestive HF who are deemed clinically stable on a standard and appropriately maximised heart failure therapy regimen. The efficacy end point for OPT-CHF is a composite that incorporates measures of patient outcome and well-being.

  6. Deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase III of Escherichia coli. Purification and properties.

    PubMed

    Livingston, D M; Hinkle, D C; Richardson, C C

    1975-01-25

    DNA polymerase III has been purified 4,500-fold from the Escherichis coli mutant, HMS83, which lacks DNA polymerases I and II. When subjected to disc gel electrophoresis, the most purified fraction exhibits a single major protein band from which enzymatic activity may be recovered. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions produces two protein bands with molecular weights of 140,000 and 40,000. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme is 7.0 S, and the Stokes radius is 62 A. Taken together these tow parameters indicate a native molecular weight of 180,000. Purified DNA polymerase III catalyzes the polymerization of nucleotides into DNA when provided with both a DNA template and a complementary primer strand. The newly synthesized DNA is covalently attached to the 3' terminus of the primer strand. Because the extent of polymerization is only 10 to 100 nucleotides, the best substrates are native DNA molecules with small single-stranded regions. The most purified enzyme preparation is devoid of endonuclease activities. In addition to the two exonuclease activities described in the accompanying paper, purified polymerase III also catalyzes pyrophosphorolysis and the exchange of pyrophosphate into deoxynucleoside triphosphates. DNA polymerase III has also been isolated from wild type E. coli containing the other two known DNA polymerases. Futhermore, the enzyme purified from three different polC mutants exhibits altered polymerase III activity, confirming that polC is the structural gene for DNA polymerase III (Gefter, M., Hirota, Y., Kornberb, T., Wechsler, J., and Barnoux, C. (1971) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 68, 3150-3153).

  7. cap alpha. -Alkenylphenones - A new class of acid corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Frenier, W.W.; Growcock, F.B.; Lopp, V.R. )

    1988-09-01

    In this paper, a new class of corrosion inhibitors for steel in strong HCI is described. When formulated with small amounts of surfactants, ..cap alpha..-Alkenylphenones provide excellent protection for oilfield steel in contact with strong HCI (up to 28%). The protection levels are similar to, and sometimes superior to, those provided by alkynols. In 15% HCI, benzylallyl alcohol (BAA) appears to be a common intermediate, i.e., in the acid after 24 h when any of the four different phenyl ketones are used. Poly(phenylvinyl ketone) (PPVK), which could form on the surface from reaction of absorbed BAA, was the major component of the thin surface film after corrosion tests with the four ketones.

  8. Effect of desferrioxamine B and Suwannee River fulvic acid on Fe(III) release and Cr(III) desorption from goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Angela G.; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A.; Dubbin, William E.

    2016-04-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating ligands that facilitate the solubilisation of Fe(III) and form stable complexes with a range of contaminant metals and therefore may significantly affect their biogeochemical cycling. Desferrioxamine B (DFOB) is a trihydroxamate siderophore that acts synergistically with fulvic acid and low molecular weight organic ligands to release Fe from Fe(III) oxides. We report the results of batch dissolution experiments in which we determine the rates of Cr(III) desorption and Fe(III) release from Cr(III)-treated synthetic goethite as influenced by DFOB, by fulvic acid, and by the two compounds in combination. We observed that adsorbed Cr(III) at 3% surface coverage significantly reduced Fe(III) release from goethite for all combinations of DFOB and fulvic acid. When DFOB (270 μM) was the only ligand present, dissolved Fe(III) and Cr(III) increased approximately 1000-fold and 16-fold, respectively, as compared to the ligand-free system, a difference we attribute to the slow rate of water exchange of Cr(III). Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) acts synergistically with DFOB by (i) reducing the goethite surface charge leading to increased HDFOB+ surface excess and by (ii) forming aqueous Fe(III)-SRFA species whose Fe(III) is subsequently removed by DFOB to yield aqueous Fe(III)-DFOB complexes. These observations shed new light on the synergistic relationship between DFOB and fulvic acid and reveal the mechanisms of Fe(III) acquisition available to plants and micro-organisms in Cr(III) contaminated environments.

  9. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a Vacuolar Class III Peroxidase Involved in the Metabolism of Anticancer Alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus1[C

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Maria Manuela R.; Hilliou, Frederique; Duarte, Patrícia; Pereira, Luís Gustavo; Almeida, Iolanda; Leech, Mark; Memelink, Johan; Barceló, Alfonso Ros; Sottomayor, Mariana

    2008-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces low levels of two dimeric terpenoid indole alkaloids, vinblastine and vincristine, which are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. The dimerization reaction leading to α-3′,4′-anhydrovinblastine is a key regulatory step for the production of the anticancer alkaloids in planta and has potential application in the industrial production of two semisynthetic derivatives also used as anticancer drugs. In this work, we report the cloning, characterization, and subcellular localization of an enzyme with anhydrovinblastine synthase activity identified as the major class III peroxidase present in C. roseus leaves and named CrPrx1. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponds to a polypeptide of 363 amino acids including an N-terminal signal peptide showing the secretory nature of CrPrx1. CrPrx1 has a two-intron structure and is present as a single gene copy. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that CrPrx1 belongs to an evolutionary branch of vacuolar class III peroxidases whose members seem to have been recruited for different functions during evolution. Expression of a green fluorescent protein-CrPrx1 fusion confirmed the vacuolar localization of this peroxidase, the exact subcellular localization of the alkaloid monomeric precursors and dimeric products. Expression data further supports the role of CrPrx1 in α-3′,4′-anhydrovinblastine biosynthesis, indicating the potential of CrPrx1 as a target to increase alkaloid levels in the plant. PMID:18065566

  10. The Class of Type III-L Solar Radio Bursts and Their Associations with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, Robert Thomas

    2011-05-01

    The source protons of Solar Energetic particle Proton events (defined as "SEP" events for this research) not associated with the Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) shock front are thought to come from either the flare site or the reconnection region beneath the CME. The Type III-L, a new class of solar radio burst has been defined by Cane et al. (2002) and MacDowall et al. (2003) as a sub-set of the Type III burst, beginning after the onset of the soft X-ray (SXR) flare, is long lasting and extends down to at least 1 MHz. The emission source region of Type III-Ls is believed to be at the reconnection region beneath the CME or on the flanks of the CME. Past association studies between SEP events and Type III-Ls began with a biased SEP-selected sample set to see if there can be found support for the emission source region of Type III-Ls and SEPs to come from the same accelerator site at the reconnection region beneath the CME. Unlike previous studies using an SEP-selected sample, I find that when using a radio-selected sample for well-connected SEP events with a solar source in the western hemisphere, the majority of the Type III-L events are associated with SEP events, but not all, and that Type III-L events associated with M- and X- class SXR flares, do not appear to be better predictors of SEP events than do Type II bursts which are associated with the CME shock. Also, I find that the occurrence of Type II events in the radio spectra of SEPs is just as common as the occurrence of Type III-Ls. This indicates that Type III-Ls should not be used as a predictor for SEP events, that the emission source region of Type III-Ls might not be at the reconnection region beneath the CME and reduces the strength of the support found by previous SEP-Type III-L association studies, that the source protons for SEP events necessarily come from the reconnection region beneath the CME. I found that Type III-L events have no strong longitude preference, but SEP events do have a 60

  11. Fluorescent complexes of nucleic acids/8-hydroxyquinoline/lanthanum(III) and the fluorometry of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Zhi Huang; Ke An Li; Shen Yang Tong

    1996-07-01

    The ternary fluorescent complexes of nucleic acids/8-hydroxyquinoline/lanthanum (III) were studied. Nucleic acids in the study involve natured and thermally denatured calf thymus DNA, fish sperm DNA and yeast RNA. In the range of PH 8.0-8.4 (controlled by NH{sub 3}-NH{sub 4}Cl buffer) ternary fluorescent complexes are formed which emit at 485.0 nm for calf thymus DNA and at 480.0 nm for fish sperm DNA when excited at 265.0 nm. Based on the fluorescence reactions sensitive fluorometric methods for nucleic acids were proposed. Using optimal conditions, the calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.4 --3.6 {mu}g{sup .}ml{sup -1} for calf thymus DNA, 0.4 -- 4.0 {mu}g{sup .}ml{sup -1} for fish sperm DNA and 0.4 --4.0{mu}g{sup .}ml{sup -1} for yeast RNA, respectively. Five synthetic samples were determined with satisfaction.

  12. MS-551 and KCB-328, two class III drugs aggravated adrenaline-induced arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Xue, Y; Yamada, C; Aye, N N; Hashimoto, K

    1998-08-01

    We investigated the proarrhythmic effects of MS-551 and KCB-328, class III antiarrhythmic drugs using adrenaline-induced arrhythmia models in halothane anaesthetized, closed-chest dogs. In the control period, adrenaline, starting from a low dose of 0.25 to up to 1.0 microg/kg/50 s i.v., was injected to determine the arrhythmia inducing dose and the non-inducing dose. After MS-551 or KCB-328 administration, the adrenaline injection was repeated and the interval between the injection and the occurrence of arrhythmia (latent interval), the changes in arrhythmic ratio (as calculated by dividing the number of ventricular premature contraction by the number of the total heart rate) and the severity of arrhythmia were observed. MS-551 infusion, 1 mg/kg/30 min, decreased the heart rate (HR) by 16% (P<0.01) and prolonged the QTc interval by 20% (P<0.01). During the 30 min of MS-551 infusion, arrhythmias occurred in three out of seven dogs (torsades de pointes (TdP) type VT in one dog). After these arrhythmias disappeared, MS-551 decreased the latent interval of the adrenaline arrhythmias produced by the inducing dose (30+/-2 s compared with 43+/-3 s of the control interval, P < 0.05), increased the arrhythmic ratio (P<0.05) and induced arrhythmias by non-inducing adrenaline doses (P<0.05). Effect of a new class III drug KCB-328 infusion, 0.3 mg/kg/30 min, was compared witih MS-551 using the same model. KCB-328 decreased the HR by 21% (P<0.01) and prolonged the QTc interval by 25% (P<0.01). During the 30 min of infusion, arrhythmias occurred in five out of seven dogs (TdP in two dogs). KCB-328 also decreased the latent interval of the adrenaline arrhythmias produced by the inducing doses (31+/-3 s compared with 49+/-7 s of the control period, P<0.05), but did not significantly alter the arrhythmic ratio. Adrenaline induced TdP only after MS-551 or KCB-328 was administered, i.e. after MS-551, 1 mg/kg/30 min, 3/7 versus 0/7 in the control; KCB, 0.3 mg/kg/30 min, 3/7 versus 0

  13. Role of class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase during programmed nuclear death of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Akematsu, Takahiko; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Attiq, Rizwan; Pearlman, Ronald E

    2014-02-01

    Programmed nuclear death (PND) in the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila is a novel type of autophagy that occurs during conjugation, in which only the parental somatic macronucleus is destined to die and is then eliminated from the progeny cytoplasm. Other coexisting nuclei, however, such as new micro- and macronuclei are unaffected. PND starts with condensation in the nucleus followed by apoptotic DNA fragmentation, lysosomal acidification, and final resorption. Because of the peculiarity in the process and the absence of some ATG genes in this organism, the mechanism of PND has remained unclear. In this study, we focus on the role of class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K, corresponding to yeast Vps34) in order to identify central regulators of PND. We identified the sole Tetrahymena thermophila ortholog (TtVPS34) to yeast Vps34 and human PIK3C3 (the catalytic subunit of PtdIns3K), through phylogenetic analysis, and generated the gene knockdown mutant for functional analysis. Loss of TtVPS34 activity prevents autophagosome formation on the parental macronucleus, and this nucleus escapes from the lysosomal pathway. In turn, DNA fragmentation and final resorption of the nucleus are drastically impaired. These phenotypes are similar to the situation in the ATG8Δ mutants of Tetrahymena, implying an inextricable link between TtVPS34 and TtATG8s in controlling PND as well as general macroautophagy. On the other hand, TtVPS34 does not appear responsible for the nuclear condensation and does not affect the progeny nuclear development. These results demonstrate that TtVPS34 is critically involved in the nuclear degradation events of PND in autophagosome formation rather than with an involvement in commitment to the death program.

  14. Class III Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Acute Leukemia – Biological Functions and Modern Laboratory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Berenstein, Rimma

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex disease caused by deregulation of multiple signaling pathways. Mutations in class III receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have been implicated in alteration of cell signals concerning the growth and differentiation of leukemic cells. Point mutations, insertions, or deletions of RTKs as well as chromosomal translocations induce constitutive activation of the receptor, leading to uncontrolled proliferation of undifferentiated myeloid blasts. Aberrations can occur in all domains of RTKs causing either the ligand-independent activation or mimicking the activated conformation. The World Health Organization recommended including RTK mutations in the AML classification since their detection in routine laboratory diagnostics is a major factor for prognostic stratification of patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)–based methods are well-validated for the detection of fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) mutations and can easily be applied for other RTKs. However, when methodological limitations are reached, accessory techniques can be applied. For a higher resolution and more quantitative approach compared to agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR fragments can be separated by capillary electrophoresis. Furthermore, high-resolution melting and denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography are reliable presequencing screening methods that reduce the sample amount for Sanger sequencing. Because traditional DNA sequencing is time-consuming, next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an innovative modern possibility to analyze a high amount of samples simultaneously in a short period of time. At present, standardized procedures for NGS are not established, but when this barrier is resolved, it will provide a new platform for rapid and reliable laboratory diagnostic of RTK mutations in patients with AML. In this article, the biological and physiological role of RTK mutations in AML as well as possible laboratory methods for their detection will be

  15. Effect of chitinase on resistance to fungal pathogens in sea buckthorn, Hippophae rhamnoides, and cloning of Class I and III chitinase genes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Lin; Hong, Soon-Kwan

    2012-08-01

    Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) is naturally distributed from Asia to Europe. It has been widely planted as an ornamental shrub and is rich in nutritional and medicinal compounds. Fungal pathogens that cause diseases such as dried-shrink disease are threats to the production of this plant. In this study, we isolated the dried-shrink disease pathogen from bark and total chitinase protein from leaves of infected plants. The results of the Oxford Cup experiment suggested that chitinase protein inhibited the growth of this pathogen. To improve pathogen resistance, we cloned chitinase Class I and III genes in H. rhamnoides, designated Hrchi1 and Hrchi3. The full-length cDNA of the open reading frame region of Hrchi1 contained 903 bp encoding 300 amino acids and Hrchi3 contained 894 bp encoding 297 amino acids. Active domain analysis, protein types, and secondary and 3D structures were predicted using online software.

  16. New method for the direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) concentration in acid mine waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    To, T.B.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W.; McCleskey, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    A new method for direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) in acid mine water has been developed. In most present methods, Fe(III) is determined by computing the difference between total dissolved Fe and dissolved Fe(II). For acid mine waters, frequently Fe(II) >> Fe(III); thus, accuracy and precision are considerably improved by determining Fe(III) concentration directly. The new method utilizes two selective ligands to stabilize Fe(III) and Fe(II), thereby preventing changes in Fe reduction-oxidation distribution. Complexed Fe(II) is cleanly removed using a silica-based, reversed-phase adsorbent, yielding excellent isolation of the Fe(III) complex. Iron(III) concentration is measured colorimetrically or by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The method requires inexpensive commercial reagents and simple procedures that can be used in the field. Calcium(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), AI(III), Zn(II), and Cd(II) cause insignificant colorimetric interferences for most acid mine waters. Waters containing >20 mg of Cu/L could cause a colorimetric interference and should be measured by GFAAS. Cobalt(II) and Cr(III) interfere if their molar ratios to Fe(III) exceed 24 and 5, respectively. Iron(II) interferes when its concentration exceeds the capacity of the complexing ligand (14 mg/L). Because of the GFAAS elemental specificity, only Fe(II) is a potential interferent in the GFAAS technique. The method detection limit is 2 ??g/L (40 nM) using GFAAS and 20 ??g/L (0.4 ??M) by colorimetry.A new method for direct determination of dissolved Fe(III) in acid mine water has been developed. In most present methods, Fe(III) is determined by computing the difference between total dissolved Fe and dissolved Fe(II). For acid mine waters, frequently Fe(II)???Fe(III); thus, accuracy and precision are considerably improved by determining Fe(III) concentration directly. The new method utilizes two selective ligands to stabilize Fe(III) and Fe(II), thereby preventing changes

  17. Class III malocclusion with missing maxillary central incisor and facial asymmetry treated with orthodontics and intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Tai, Kiyoshi; Park, Jae Hyun; Sato, Yasumori

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old female with a Class III malocclusion and facial asymmetry was treated with orthodontics combined with intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO). She had severe skeletal Class III (Wits: -9.7 mm). She was missing her maxillary left central incisor and had a fixed three-unit bridge on her maxillary anterior teeth. The patient presented a concave profile with a protrusive mandible. Her dental and mandibular midline was shifted 3 mm toward the left. After presurgical orthodontic treatment, IVRO was performed. The total active treatment time was 16 months including surgery. Both occlusion and facial appearance were significantly improved by the surgical-orthodontic treatment. Posttreatment records after 2 years showed excellent results with good, stable occlusion, facial balance and harmony, and long-term stability.

  18. Inhibition of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III))-induced cell malignant transformation through restoring dysregulated histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yichen; Gong, Zhihong; Olson, James R; Xu, Peilin; Buck, Michael J; Ren, Xuefeng

    2013-10-04

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its high toxic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), are able to induce malignant transformation of human cells. Chronic exposure to these chemicals is associated with an increased risk of developing multiple cancers in human. However, the mechanisms contributing to iAs/MMA(III)-induced cell malignant transformation and carcinogenesis are not fully elucidated. We recently showed that iAs/MMA(III) exposure to human cells led to a decreased level of histone acetylation globally, which was associated with an increased sensitivity to arsenic cytotoxicity. In the current study, it demonstrated that prolonged exposure to low-level MMA(III) in human urothelial cells significantly increased the expression and activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) with an associated reduction of histone acetylation levels both globally and lysine specifically. Administration of the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), at 4 weeks after the initial MMA(III) treatment inhibited the MMA(III)-mediated up-regulation of the expression and activities of HDACs, leading to increase histone acetylation and prevention of MMA(III)-induced malignant transformation. These new findings suggest that histone acetylation dysregulation may be a key mechanism in MMA(III)-induced malignant transformation and carcinogenesis, and that HDAC inhibitors could be targeted to prevent or treat iAs-related cancers.

  19. Is alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction an effective protocol in the treatment of Class III malocclusion? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Santos, Nathalia de Lima; dos Santos, Camila Rangel Barreto; Baião, Felipe Carvalho Souza; Pinheiro, Murilo Costa Rangel; Matos, Manoel; Souza, Ianderlei Andrade; de Paula, Rafael Pereira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: the treatment of Class III malocclusion in early age is one of the greatest challenges for orthodontists, and the establishment of more effective treatment method is a constant concern for these professionals. Thus, the objective of this systematic review is to verify the effectiveness of the therapy protocol for alternate rapid maxillary expansion and constriction (Alt-RAMEC) in the early treatment of Class III malocclusion. Methods: searches were performed in the following electronic databases: Cochrane Library, Medline (EBSCO and PubMed), SciELO, LILACS and Scopus. The following inclusion criteria were used: in vivo studies conducted with early intervention (patient in craniofacial development phase) with the use of the Alt-RAMEC protocol. Reviews, case reports, editorials, and studies with syndromic patients or under use of systemic drug were excluded. Duplicates were also excluded. The studies were assessed for methodological quality using the Cochrane tool for assessment of risk of bias, and classified as high or low risk of bias. Results: 53 articles were found. Duplicates exclusion was thus performed and 35 articles remained. After inclusion analysis, only 5 matched the criteria. Two articles were classified as low risk of bias and three as high risk of bias. It was observed that the Alt-RAMEC enable protraction in less time and with better results, promoting greater effectiveness in the protraction treatment of Class III malocclusion. Conclusions: Although there is positive evidence of the effectiveness of early treatment with the Alt-RAMEC protocol in patients with Class III malocclusion, further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness using long-term methodology. PMID:28125138

  20. Efficacy of orthopedic treatment with protraction facemask on skeletal Class III malocclusion: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cordasco, G; Matarese, G; Rustico, L; Fastuca, S; Caprioglio, A; Lindauer, S J; Nucera, R

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to estimate the efficacy of protraction facemask on the correction of Class III malocclusion in the short term. A systematic review of articles was performed using different electronic databases (PubMed, Ovid, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, LILACS, and Google Scholar). Search terms comprised 'orthopedic treatment' and 'Class III malocclusion'. The selection criteria were set in order to include in this review only randomized clinical trials (RCTs) performed treating with facemask Class III growing patients. Studies' selection, data extraction, and risk of bias's assessment were executed independently by two authors using pre-defined data forms. All pooled analyses of data were based on random effects models. A pre-specified subgroup analysis was planned to evaluate the effect of preliminary rapid palatal expansion on facemask efficacy. Three RCTs met our inclusion criteria. In total, data from 155 patients (92 treated and 63 controls) were collected. The treated group showed the following significant changes: ANB° +3.66° [95%CI (2.58, 4.74)]; SNA° +2.10 [95%CI (1.14, 3.06)]; SNB° -1.54 [95%CI (-2.13, -0.95)]; SN-palatal plane -0.82° [95%CI (-1.62, -0.02)]; and SN-mandibular plane +1.51 [95%CI (0.61, 2.41)]. Heterogeneity varied from low to moderate (mean I(2) value: 41.4 ± 20.8). Facemask is effective correcting Class III malocclusion in the short term. The skeletal modifications induced by facemask are forward displacement of maxilla, backward displacement of mandible, clockwise rotation of the mandibular plane, and counterclockwise rotation of the maxillary plane.

  1. Effects of ionic strength and fulvic acid on adsorption of Tb(III) and Eu(III) onto clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poetsch, Maria; Lippold, Holger

    2016-09-01

    High salinity and natural organic matter are both known to facilitate migration of toxic or radioactive metals in geochemical systems, but little is known on their combined effect. We investigated complexation of Tb(III) and Eu(III) (as analogues for trivalent actinides) with fulvic acid and their adsorption onto a natural clay in the presence of NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2 up to very high ionic strengths. 160Tb, 152Eu and 14C-labelled fulvic acid were employed as radiotracers, allowing investigations at very low concentrations according to probable conditions in far-field scenarios of nuclear waste repositories. A combined Kd approach (Linear Additive Model) was tested for suitability in predicting solid-liquid distribution of metals in the presence of organic matter based on the interactions in the constituent subsystems. In this analysis, it could be shown that high ionic strength does not further enhance the mobilizing potential of humic matter. A quantitative reproduction of the influence of fulvic acid failed for most systems under study. Assumptions and limitations of the model are discussed.

  2. Structure of macrophage colony stimulating factor bound to FMS: Diverse signaling assemblies of class III receptor tyrosine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; He, Xiaolin

    2009-06-12

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), through binding to its receptor FMS, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), regulates the development and function of mononuclear phagocytes, and plays important roles in innate immunity, cancer and inflammation. We report a 2.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of M-CSF bound to the first 3 domains (D1-D3) of FMS. The ligand binding mode of FMS is surprisingly different from KIT, another class III RTK, in which the major ligand-binding domain of FMS, D2, uses the CD and EF loops, but not the {beta}-sheet on the opposite side of the Ig domain as in KIT, to bind ligand. Calorimetric data indicate that M-CSF cannot dimerize FMS without receptor-receptor interactions mediated by FMS domains D4 and D5. Consistently, the structure contains only 1 FMS-D1-D3 molecule bound to a M-CSF dimer, due to a weak, hydrophilic M-CSF:FMS interface, and probably a conformational change of the M-CSF dimer in which binding to the second site is rendered unfavorable by FMS binding at the first site. The partial, intermediate complex suggests that FMS may be activated in two steps, with the initial engagement step distinct from the subsequent dimerization/activation step. Hence, the formation of signaling class III RTK complexes can be diverse, engaging various modes of ligand recognition and various mechanistic steps for dimerizing and activating receptors.

  3. Tongue Size and Posterior Airway Space Changes in Class III Malocclusion After Maxillomandibular Surgery: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Uslu-Akcam, Ozge; Gokalp, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in the airway space after surgical correction of Class III skeletal dentofacial deformity and to determine if orthognathic surgery alters the airway space and improves obstructive sleep apnea. Twenty-four Class III adults treated with orthognathic surgery were divided into two groups as Mandibular set-back (Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy-BSSO, 10 patients) and two jaw surgery (Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy combined with Le Fort I maxillary advancement, 14 patients). Lateral cephalometric radiographs were traced before (T0) and 6 months after surgery (T1). Steiner and McNamara analysis, linear pharyngeal airway measurements (PNS-PPW1, SPT-PPW2, E-PPW3, PNS-SPT), tongue volume measurements (TH, Tt-Eb) and pharyngeal area measurements (nasopharyngeal, upper oropharyngeal, lower oropharyngeal, epiglottis area) were performed. The data obtained was analyzed statistically by repeated measurement ANOVA and Duncan's test. The increase of PNS-PPW1 was important in two jaw surgery group (p < 0.05). The nasopharyngeal area was statistically different between T0 and T1 (p < 0.01), and the lower oropharyngeal area was statistically significant between BSSO and two jaw surgery groups (p < 0.05). Surgical correction of Class III skeletal dentofacial deformity alters posterior airway dimensions. Two jaw surgery is advantageous considering the risk for obstructive sleep apnea, because it evokes an increase in the upper pharyngeal airway dimensions. Keywords: Tongue size, posterior airway space, maxillomandibular surgery.

  4. Long-term stability of surgical-orthodontic correction of class III malocclusions with long-face syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gallego-Romero, David; Llamas-Carrera, José M.; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Paredes, Vanessa; Espinar, Eduardo; Guevara, Eduardo; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: In the first place, to evaluate skeletal changes of the maxilla and mandible induced by surgical-orthodontic correction of malocclusions class III with long-face syndrome and secondly, to analyze the stability of these skeletal changes in the long term (more than 6 years). Design of Study: A retrospective, unicentric and longitudinal study of 19 patients who had undergone surgical and orthodontic therapy for class III skeletal malocclusion with long-face syndrome was undertaken. A cephalometric analysis based on 8 angle measurements, and statistical analyses at three different points in time (before orthodontic treatment, after orthognathic surgery and after a retention period of at least 6 years) were carried out. Results: The changes produced following surgery show that, with the exception of the maxillary plane and the facial axis, all other variables presented changes of great statistical difference. Conclusions: Skeletal changes after orthodontic-surgical correction present maxillary advance, mandibular regression and mandibular anterorotation. The angles that represent the mandibular vertical position (ramus angle, goniac angle and mandibular plane angle) showed statistically significant relapses and no stability in contrast to the facial axis. Key words:Long term results, stability, relapse, orthognathic surgery, class III, long face. PMID:22143741

  5. Structure of putrescine aminotransferase from Escherichia coli provides insights into the substrate specificity among class III aminotransferases.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyung Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Rojviriya, Catleya; Kim, Yeon-Gil

    2014-01-01

    YgjG is a putrescine aminotransferase enzyme that transfers amino groups from compounds with terminal primary amines to compounds with an aldehyde group using pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Previous biochemical data show that the enzyme prefers primary diamines, such as putrescine, over ornithine as a substrate. To better understand the enzyme's substrate specificity, crystal structures of YgjG from Escherichia coli were determined at 2.3 and 2.1 Å resolutions for the free and putrescine-bound enzymes, respectively. Sequence and structural analyses revealed that YgjG forms a dimer that adopts a class III PLP-dependent aminotransferase fold. A structural comparison between YgjG and other class III aminotransferases revealed that their structures are similar. However, YgjG has an additional N-terminal helical structure that partially contributes to a dimeric interaction with the other subunit via a helix-helix interaction. Interestingly, the YgjG substrate-binding site entrance size and charge distribution are smaller and more hydrophobic than other class III aminotransferases, which suggest that YgjG has a unique substrate binding site that could accommodate primary aliphatic diamine substrates, including putrescine. The YgjG crystal structures provide structural clues to putrescine aminotransferase substrate specificity and binding.

  6. The Populus Class III HD ZIP transcription factor POPCORONA affects cell differentiation during secondary growth of woody stems.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Miura, Eriko; Robischon, Marcel; Martinez, Ciera; Groover, Andrew

    2011-02-28

    The developmental mechanisms regulating cell differentiation and patterning during the secondary growth of woody tissues are poorly understood. Class III HD ZIP transcription factors are evolutionarily ancient and play fundamental roles in various aspects of plant development. Here we investigate the role of a Class III HD ZIP transcription factor, POPCORONA, during secondary growth of woody stems. Transgenic Populus (poplar) trees expressing either a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA or a synthetic miRNA targeting POPCORONA were used to infer function of POPCORONA during secondary growth. Whole plant, histological, and gene expression changes were compared for transgenic and wild-type control plants. Synthetic miRNA knock down of POPCORONA results in abnormal lignification in cells of the pith, while overexpression of a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA results in delayed lignification of xylem and phloem fibers during secondary growth. POPCORONA misexpression also results in coordinated changes in expression of genes within a previously described transcriptional network regulating cell differentiation and cell wall biosynthesis, and hormone-related genes associated with fiber differentiation. POPCORONA illustrates another function of Class III HD ZIPs: regulating cell differentiation during secondary growth.

  7. Presurgical orthodontic decompensation alters alveolar bone condition around mandibular incisors in adults with skeletal Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Boyang; Tang, Jun; Xiao, Ping; Ding, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study is to use cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to acquire accurate radiographic images for alveolar bone in lower incisors and the change after presurgical orthodontic treatment. Seventeen patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion, ten normal occlusion subjects, and fifteen patients treated with orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery were included. CBCT images were obtained. The labial and lingual inclinations of mandibular incisors, the thickness of alveolar bone, the vertical alveolar height and root length were measured. Alveolar bone thickness at the apex in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion was thinner than normal subjects. The vertical alveolar bone heights at labial and lingual sides in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion were both reduced compared with normal subjects, especially at the labial side. There were statistically significant correlations between lower incisor inclination and alveolar bone morphology. After orthodontics, the incisors root apex was closer to the lingual side of alveolar bone. The alveolar bone thickness at apex was not statistically changed. The vertical alveolar bone heights at the labial and lingual sides were both significantly reduced especially the lingual side after presurgical orthodontic treatment. The root length was not significantly changed. In conclusion, the alveolar bone thickness at apex is thinner and the vertical alveolar height is reduced at the labial side. Forward movement of lower incisors during presurgical orthodontic treatment can render the lower incisors root apex closer to the lingual side and the vertical alveolar height is reduced. PMID:26550202

  8. Effectiveness of interceptive treatment of class III malocclusions with skeletal anchorage: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez de Guzmán-Barrera, Jorge; Sáez Martínez, Carla; Boronat-Catalá, Montserrat; Montiel-Company, Jose María; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa; Gandía-Franco, José Luís; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Recently, new strategies for treating class III malocclusions have appeared. Skeletal anchorage appears to reduce the dentoalveolar effects while maximising the orthopaedic effect in growing patients. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to examine the effectiveness of bone anchorage devices for interceptive treatment of skeletal class III malocclusions. Searches were made in the Pubmed, Embase, Scopus and Cochrane databases, as well as in a grey literature database, and were complemented by hand-searching. The criteria for eligibility were: patients who had undergone orthodontic treatment with skeletal anchorage (miniplates and miniscrews). Patients with syndromes or craniofacial deformities or who had undergone maxillofacial surgery were excluded. The following variables were recorded for each article: author, year of publication, type of study, sample size, dropouts, demographic variables, treatment carried out, radiographic study (2D or 3D), follow-up time, and quality of the articles on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The means and confidence intervals of the following variables were employed: Wits, overjet, ANB, SNA and SNB. Initially, 239 articles were identified. After removing the duplicates and applying the selection criteria, 9 were included in the qualitative synthesis and 7 in the quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis). It may be concluded that skeletal anchorage is an effective treatment for improving skeletal Class III malocclusion, but when compared with other traditional treatments such as disjunction and face mask, there is no clear evidence that skeletal anchorage improves the results. PMID:28328995

  9. Presurgical orthodontic decompensation alters alveolar bone condition around mandibular incisors in adults with skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Boyang; Tang, Jun; Xiao, Ping; Ding, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study is to use cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to acquire accurate radiographic images for alveolar bone in lower incisors and the change after presurgical orthodontic treatment. Seventeen patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion, ten normal occlusion subjects, and fifteen patients treated with orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery were included. CBCT images were obtained. The labial and lingual inclinations of mandibular incisors, the thickness of alveolar bone, the vertical alveolar height and root length were measured. Alveolar bone thickness at the apex in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion was thinner than normal subjects. The vertical alveolar bone heights at labial and lingual sides in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion were both reduced compared with normal subjects, especially at the labial side. There were statistically significant correlations between lower incisor inclination and alveolar bone morphology. After orthodontics, the incisors root apex was closer to the lingual side of alveolar bone. The alveolar bone thickness at apex was not statistically changed. The vertical alveolar bone heights at the labial and lingual sides were both significantly reduced especially the lingual side after presurgical orthodontic treatment. The root length was not significantly changed. In conclusion, the alveolar bone thickness at apex is thinner and the vertical alveolar height is reduced at the labial side. Forward movement of lower incisors during presurgical orthodontic treatment can render the lower incisors root apex closer to the lingual side and the vertical alveolar height is reduced.

  10. Conservative treatment for a growing patient with a severe, developing skeletal Class III malocclusion and open bite.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Zhu, Ping; Le, Linda; Cai, Bin

    2014-06-01

    An 8-year-old Chinese girl sought treatment for a severe skeletal Class III malocclusion and open-bite skeletal pattern. Traditionally, patients with a skeletal Class III malocclusion are treated after they have stopped growing, and then they are treated with a combined orthodontic and orthognathic surgery approach. But the risks and expenses of this treatment plan are not acceptable to all patients. This young patient was treated with facemask therapy, a maxillary expansion device, and a molar occlusal splint for maxillary developmental stimulation with control of vertical jaw growth. After the completion of orthopedic therapy, 2 × 4 technology was used to adjust molar positions. A bonded tongue crib was used in the early permanent dentition to help the patient break her bad tongue habits. Straight-wire appliances were used for 16 months to adjust the occlusal relationship. This achieved significant improvement in anterior tooth relationships and facial profile esthetics. At the 2-year posttreatment follow-up, the results were satisfactory. The success of the sagittal relationship correction between the maxilla and the mandible for a skeletal Class III malocclusion depends on the coordination of transverse and vertical relationships combined with the growth potential of each patient.

  11. Skeletal stability of surgery-first bimaxillary orthognathic surgery for skeletal class III malocclusion, using standardized criteria.

    PubMed

    Park, K-H; Sandor, G K; Kim, Y-D

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative stability following bimaxillary surgery performed either with or without preoperative orthodontic treatment, in class III malocclusion patients. These patients were enrolled using standardized inclusion criteria. Forty patients with a class III malocclusion were included in this retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were class III malocclusion with and without premolar extraction, <3mm midline deviation, and <5mm arch width discordance. Patients were assigned to the conventional bimaxillary surgery group (n=20) or the surgery-first bimaxillary surgery group (n=20). Serial cephalometric radiographs obtained before surgery (T0), at 2 months after surgery (T1), and at 6 months after surgery (T2) were used to assess the variation in surgical change (T0 to T1) and postsurgical change (T1 to T2). Eight linear and three angular parameters were used to evaluate postoperative stability. With respect to postsurgical changes, significant differences were observed in the changes for the vertical reference plane to the posterior nasal spine, horizontal reference plane to B-point, and occlusal plane angle in both groups. No statistically significant differences in the relapse rates were observed between the two groups. No significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the postoperative stability.

  12. UIC permitting process for class IID and Class III wells: Protection of drinking water in New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Hillenbrand, C.J.

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region II, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program regulates injection wells in the State of New York to protect drinking water; UIC regulations can be found under Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Parts 124, 144, 146 and 147. Operators of solution mining injection wells (UIC Class IIIG) and produced fluid disposal wells (UIC Class IID) are required to obtain an UIC permit for authorization to inject. The permitting process requires submittal of drinking water, geologic and proposed operational data in order to assure that pressure build-up within the injection zone will not compromise confining layers and allow vertical migration of fluid into Underground Sources of Drinking Water (USDW). Additional data is required within an Area of Review (AOR), defined as an area determined by the intersection of the adjusted potentiometric surface produced by injection and a depth 50 feet below the base of the lowermost USDW, or a radius of 1/4 mile around the injection well, whichever is greater. Locations of all wells in the AOR must be identified, and completion reports and plugging reports must be submitted. Requirements are set for maximum injection pressure and flow rates, monitoring of brine properties of the injection well and monitoring of water supply wells in the AOR for possible contamination. Any noncompliance with permit requirements constitutes a violation of the Safe Drinking Water Act and is grounds for enforcement action, including possible revocation of permit. Presently four Class IID wells are authorized under permit in New York State. The Queenston sandstone, Medina sandstone, Salina B, Akron dolomite and Oriskany sandstone have been used for brine disposal; the lower Ordovician-Cambrian section is currently being considered as an injection zone. Over one hundred Class IIIG wells are authorized under permit in New York State and all have been utilized for solution mining of the Syracuse salt.

  13. 2,9-Dicarbonyl-1,10-phenanthroline derivatives with an unprecedented Am(III)/Eu(III) selectivity under highly acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Galletta, Michele; Scaravaggi, Stefano; Macerata, Elena; Famulari, Antonino; Mele, Andrea; Panzeri, Walter; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Mariani, Mario

    2013-12-28

    Four lipophilic 1,10-phenanthroline di(thio)amide, diester or diketone derivatives were studied as ligands for Am(III)/Eu(III) separation from acidic media. The synthesis of these compounds is reported together with the extraction tests in different solvents (kerosene, octanol and o-nitrophenyl hexyl ether), HNO3 concentrations and ratios between the ligand and the synergistic agent (Br-Cosan). The promising results obtained from the large number of solvent extraction tests carried out show that it might be possible to apply this class of ligands to advanced reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The experimental data indicate that, under the conditions that simulate the real radioactive waste, the extraction efficiency and Am/Eu separation factors are particularly high, thus suggesting that the combination of soft heterocyclic N-donor atoms and hard carbonyl groups of ester and amides affords a tetradentate donor set of atoms (ONNO) that gives rise to remarkable selectivities. ESI-MS studies and DFT calculations shed light on the possible structure of the Eu(3+) complexes indicating that the 1 : 1 : 2 (cation : ligand : anion) complex is slightly more stable than the 1 : 2 : 1 species.

  14. Mechanistic studies on class I polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase from Ralstonia eutropha: class I and III synthases share a similar catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y; Yuan, W; Wodzinska, J; Park, C; Sinskey, A J; Stubbe, J

    2001-01-30

    The Class I and III polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases from Ralstonia eutropha and Chromatium vinosum, respectively, catalyze the polymerization of beta-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A (HBCoA) to generate PHB. These synthases have different molecular weights, subunit composition, and kinetic properties. Recent studies with the C. vinosum synthase suggested that it is structurally homologous to bacterial lipases and allowed identification of active site residues important for catalysis [Jia, Y., Kappock, T. J., Frick, T., Sinskey, A. J., and Stubbe, J. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 3927-3936]. Sequence alignments between the Class I and III synthases revealed similar residues in the R. eutropha synthase. Site-directed mutants of these residues were prepared and examined using HBCoA and a terminally saturated trimer of HBCoA (sT-CoA) as probes. These studies reveal that the R. eutropha synthase possesses an essential catalytic dyad (C319-H508) in which the C319 is involved in covalent catalysis. A conserved Asp, D480, was shown not to be required for acylation of C319 by sT-CoA and is proposed to function as a general base catalyst to activate the hydroxyl of HBCoA for ester formation. Studies of the [(3)H]sT-CoA with wild-type and mutant synthases reveal that 0.5 equiv of radiolabel is covalently bound per monomer of synthase, suggesting that a dimeric form of the enzyme is involved in elongation. These studies, in conjunction with search algorithms for secondary structure, suggest that the Class I and III synthases are mechanistically similar and structurally homologous, despite their physical and kinetic differences.

  15. Class III β-tubulin overexpression within the tumor microenvironment is a prognostic biomarker for poor overall survival in ovarian cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant carboplatin/paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Roque, Dana M; Buza, Natalia; Glasgow, Michelle; Bellone, Stefania; Bortolomai, Ileana; Gasparrini, Sara; Cocco, Emiliano; Ratner, Elena; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Rutherford, Thomas J; Schwartz, Peter E; Santin, Alessandro D

    2014-01-01

    Critics have suggested that neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) followed by interval debulking may select for resistant clones or cancer stem cells when compared to primary cytoreduction. β-tubulins are chemotherapeutic targets of taxanes and epothilones. Class III β-tubulin overexpression has been linked to chemoresistance and hypoxia. Herein, we describe changes in class III β-tubulin in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma in response to NACT, in relationship to clinical outcome, and between patients who underwent NACT versus primary debulking; we characterize in vitro chemosensitivity to paclitaxel/patupilone of cell lines established from this patient population, and class III β-tubulin expression following repeated exposure to paclitaxel. Using immunohistochemistry, we observed among 22 paired specimens obtained before/after NACT decreased expression of class III β-tubulin following therapy within stroma (p=0.07), but not tumor (p=0.63). Poor median overall survival was predicted by high levels of class III β-tubulin in both tumor (HR 3.66 [1.11,12.05], p=0.03) and stroma (HR 4.53 [1.28,16.1], p=0.02). Class III β-tubulin expression by quantitative-real-time-polymerase-chain-reaction was higher among patients who received NACT (n=12) compared to primary cytoreduction (n=14) (mean±SD fold-change: 491.2±115.9 vs. 224.1±55.66, p=0.037). In vitro subculture with paclitaxel resulted in class III β-tubulin upregulation, however, cell lines that overexpressed class III β-tubulin remained sensitive to patupilone. Overexpression of class III β-tubulin in patients dispositioned to NACT may thus identify an intrinsically aggressive phenotype, and predict poor overall survival and paclitaxel resistance. Decreases in stromal expression may represent normalization of the tumor microenvironment following therapy. Epothilones warrant study for patients who have received neoadjuvant carboplatin and paclitaxel.

  16. Reduction of carbadox mediated by reaction of Mn(III) with oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Ru; Liu, Cun; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui

    2013-02-05

    Manganese(III) geocomponents are commonly found in the soil environment, yet their roles in many biogeochemical processes remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that Mn(III) generated from the reaction of MnO(2) and oxalic acid caused rapid and extensive decompositions of a quinoxaline-di-N-oxide antibiotics, viz carbadox. The reaction occurred primarily at the quinoxaline-di-N-oxide moiety resulting in the removal of one -O from N1-oxide and formation of desoxycarbadox. The reaction rate was accelerated by increasing amounts of Mn(III), carbadox and oxalate. The critical step in the overall reaction was the formation of a quinoxaline-di-N-oxide/Mn(III)/oxalate ternary complex in which Mn(III) functioned as the central complexing cation and electron conduit in which the arrangement of ligands facilitated electron transfer from oxalate to carbadox. In the complex, the C-C bond in oxalate was cleaved to create CO(2)(-•) radicals, followed by electron transfer to carbadox through the Mn(III) center. This proposed reaction mechanism is supported by the reaction products formed, reaction kinetics, and quantum mechanical calculations. The results obtained from this study suggest that naturally occurring Mn(III)-oxalic acid complexes could reductively decompose certain organic compounds in the environment such as the antibiotic quinoxaline-di-N-oxide.

  17. Investigation of complexes tannic acid and myricetin with Fe(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sungur, Şana; Uzar, Atike

    2008-01-01

    The pH dependence of the complexes was determined by both potentiometric and spectrophotometric studies. Stability constants and stoichiometries of the formed complexes were determined using slope ratio method. Fe(III) was formed complexes with tannic acid of various stoichiometries, which in the 1:1 molar ratio at pH < 3, in the 2:1 molar ratio at pH 3-7 and in the 4:1 molar ratio at pH > 7. Fe(III) was formed complexes with myricetin in the 1:2 molar ratio at pH 4 and 5 and in the 1:1 molar ratio at pH 6. Stability constant values were found to be 10 5 to 10 17 and 10 5 to 10 9 for Fe(III)-tannic acid complexes and Fe(III)-myricetin complexes. Both tannic acid and myricetin were possessed minimum affinities to Cu(II) and Zn(II). They had less affinity for Al(III) than for Fe(III).

  18. Class III/IV POU transcription factors expressed in small cell lung cancer cells are involved in proneural/neuroendocrine differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Jun; Sato, Hanako; Yazawa, Takuya; Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Hiramatsu, Chie; Nakatani, Yukio; Kamma, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    One-third of lung malignancies demonstrate a proneural/neuroendocrine phenotype or type of differentiation. However, it has not been clearly elucidated how proneural/neuroendocrine differentiation is controlled in lung cancers. We recently demonstrated that the POU3F2 gene plays a significant role in proneural/neuroendocrine differentiation of lung cancers. Because class III POU genes (POU3F1, POU3F2, POU3F3, and POU3F4) and class IV POU genes (POU4F1, POU4F2, and POU4F3) share similar properties in neural development, we analyzed the association between class III/IV POU genes and a proneural/neuroendocrine phenotype in lung cancers using seven small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and twelve non-SCLC (NSCLC) cell lines. Class III/IV POU gene expression was generally restricted to SCLC cells. However, the forced expression of class III/IV POU genes in the NSCLC cell lines induced the expression of neuroendocrine-specific markers (neural call adhesion molecule 1, synaptophysin, and chromogranin A) and proneural transcription factors (achaete-scute homolog-like 1, NeuroD1, and thyroid transcription factor 1) in various degrees. Furthermore, each class III/IV POU gene induced other class III/IV POU genes, suggesting the mutual induction of class III/IV POU genes. These findings suggest that the expression of class III/IV POU genes is important for the proneural/neuroendocrine differentiation of lung cancer cells.

  19. Fluorescence sensing of phosdrin pesticide by the luminescent Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-bis(coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Belal H. M.; Khairy, Gasser M.; Kamel, Rasha M.

    2016-04-01

    Luminescence quenching of the Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-bis (coumarin-3-carboxylic acid) (Ln(III)-(CCA)2) probes has been studied in the presence of organophosphorus or organochlorine pesticides; Phosdrin (P1), Malathion (P2), Profenofos (P3), Formothion (P4), Heptachlor (P5), and Endosulfan (P6). The luminescence intensity of lanthanide complex probes Ln(III)-(CCA)2 decreases as the concentration of the Phosdrin pesticide increases, while the other investigated pesticides have no significant influence on the lanthanide fluorescent intensities. It is observed that the quenching of Eu(III) and Tb(III)-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid by Phosdrin proceeds via static quenching processes according to Stern-Volmer plot. The binding constants (K) and the thermodynamic parameters of the interaction of Ln(III)-(CCA)2 with Phosdrin have been determined. A direct method for the determination of the Phosdrin in ethanol has been developed based on the luminescence changes of the Ln(III)-(CCA)2-phosdrin ternary complexes. The detection limits of P1 were 6.28 and 1.07 μM in case of Eu(III) and Tb(III)-complex, respectively. The influence of various interfering species on the detection of P1 has been investigated to assess the analytical applicability of the method. The new method was applied to determine the Phosdrin pesticide in different types of water samples.

  20. Synthesis and iron(III) binding properties of 3-hydroxypyrid-4-ones derived from kojic acid.

    PubMed

    Molenda, J J; Basinger, M A; Hanusa, T P; Jones, M M

    1994-08-01

    In an attempt to reduce the toxicity of the 3-hydroxypyrid-4-ones, the more hydrophilic derivatives of kojic acid were explored and compared to the standard, 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyrid-4-one, L1. The synthesis and iron(III) binding properties of these chelators are described. Neither these compounds nor the clinically effective 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyrid-4 one is able to completely remove all of the iron(III) from the Fe(III)EDTA complex in sodium acetate buffered solutions, when the 3-hydroxypyrid-4-one: Fe(III) ratio is 6:1. The ability of these compounds to enhance the urinary excretion of iron in rats indicates that the behavior of the 3-hydroxypyrid-4-ones derived from kojic acid is comparable to the analogous derivatives of maltol and ethyl maltol. The structure of the iron(III) complex of 3-hydroxy-6-hydroxymethyl-1-methylpyrid-4-one was determined by x-ray diffraction and found to be similar to the previously reported structure of the iron(III) complex of L1.

  1. Three-dimensional changes in the temporomandibular joint after maxillary protraction in children with skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunju; Son, Woo-Sung; Kwak, Chun; Kang, Eun-Hee; Kim, Seong-Sik; Park, Soo-Byung; Kim, Yong-Il

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated 3-dimensional changes in the temporomandibular joints of children with skeletal Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency after facemask therapy for maxillary protraction. Eighteen children with anterior crossbite and a Class III molar relationship underwent facemask therapy for maxillary protraction, after which they exhibited positive overjet and a Class II molar relationship. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography images of the patients were obtained before (T1) and after (T2) facemask protraction, and the 3-dimensional coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in T1 and T2 images were compared. After facemask therapy, the mandibular condyles of the patients were displaced outside, upward, and backward. Additionally, the anterior and posterior walls of the glenoid fossa had negative values for anteroposterior change. Three-dimensional analysis of the temporomandibular joint showed that facemask therapy resulted in bone apposition (to the anterior wall) and bone resorption (of the posterior wall) in the glenoid fossa. This bone remodeling resulted in upward and backward displacement of the condyle.(J Oral Sci 58, 501-508, 2016).

  2. Orthodontic treatment of a transposed maxillary canine and first premolar in a young patient with Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Gracco, Antonio; Siviero, Laura; Perri, Alessandro; Favero, Lorenzo; Stellini, Edoardo

    2015-11-01

    A 12-year-old girl was referred to our clinic for evaluation of an unaesthetic dental appearance. All permanent teeth were erupted, while the deciduous maxillary right canine was retained. Cone-beam computed tomography revealed a complete transposition of the maxillary left canine and first premolar involving both the crowns and the roots. Initial cephalometric analysis showed a skeletal Class III pattern, with a slight maxillary retrusion and a compensated proclination of the upper incisors. The patient's teeth were considered to be in the correct position; therefore, we decided to attempt treatment by correcting the transposition and using only orthodontic compensation of the skeletal Class III malocclusion. After 25 months of active orthodontic treatment, the patient had a Class I molar and canine relationship on both sides, with ideal overbite and overjet values. Her profile was improved, her lips were competent, and cephalometric evaluation showed acceptable maxillary and mandibular incisor inclinations. The final panoramic radiograph showed that good root parallelism was achieved. Two-year follow-up intraoral photography showed stable results.

  3. Cardiac Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Is Blocked by Monomethylarsonous Acid (III)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tianfang; Barnett, Joey V.; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic exposure during embryonic development can cause ischemic heart pathologies later in adulthood which may originate from impairment in proper blood vessel formation. The arsenic-associated detrimental effects are mediated by arsenite (iAsIII) and its most toxic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid [MMA (III)]. The impact of MMA (III) on coronary artery development has not yet been studied. The key cellular process that regulates coronary vessel development is the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). During cardiac EMT, activated epicardial progenitor cells transform to mesenchymal cells to form the cellular components of coronary vessels. Smad2/3 mediated TGFβ2 signaling, the key regulator of cardiac EMT, is disrupted by arsenite exposure. In this study, we compared the cardiac toxicity of MMA (III) with arsenite. Epicardial progenitor cells are 15 times more sensitive to MMA (III) cytotoxicity when compared with arsenite. MMA (III) caused a significant blockage in epicardial cellular transformation and invasion at doses 10 times lower than arsenite. Key EMT genes including TGFβ ligands, TβRIII, Has2, CD44, Snail1, TBX18, and MMP2 were down regulated by MMA (III) exposure. MMA (III) disrupted Smad2/3 activation at a dose 20 times lower than arsenite. Both arsenite and MMA (III) significantly inhibited Erk1/2 and Erk5 phosphorylation. Nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and Erk5 was also blocked by arsenical exposure. However, p38 activation, as well as smooth muscle differentiation, was refractory to the inhibition by the arsenicals. Collectively, these findings revealed that MMA (III) is a selective disruptor of cardiac EMT and as such may predispose to arsenic-associated cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25145660

  4. Chemical reduction of europium(III) in hydrochloric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasyants, A.G.; Gurinov, Yu.S.; Sofenina, E.V.

    1988-07-10

    The authors have devised a method for use at set pH and temperature, in which the volume of hydrogen produced is recorded and samples are taken for europium(II) analysis. The solution is poured into a glass cell with a thermostatic jacket; argon is passed through a capillary tube 2 for 0.5 h before the reduction is started, with the bubbling rate determined from the change in level in a burette. This burette is also used to record the hydrogen volume. The europium(II) concentration is determined by titration with potassium dichromate by a standard method. Europium is reduced by zinc in acid solution. The zinc consumption in hydrogen production can be reduced by operating at pH 2-3, with the precipitant introduced after the reaction starts.

  5. Long-term outcomes in patients with ambulatory new york heart association class III and IV heart failure undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    PubMed

    Rickard, John; Bassiouny, Mohammed; Tedford, Ryan J; Baranowski, Bryan; Spragg, David; Cantillon, Daniel; Varma, Niraj; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Patients with ambulatory New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV heart failure were significantly underrepresented in clinical trials of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The natural long-term trajectory of survival free of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or heart transplant in patients with ambulatory class IV symptoms who underwent CRT has not been established. We extracted clinical data on 723 consecutive patients with NYHA class III or ambulatory class IV heart failure, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%, and a QRS duration ≥120 ms who underwent CRT from September 30, 2003, to August 6, 2007. Chart notes immediately before CRT were reviewed to confirm NYHA class status before CRT. Kaplan-Meier curves and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model were constructed to determine long-term survival free of heart transplant and LVAD based on NYHA class status. Of the 723 patients, 52 had ambulatory class IV symptoms. Over a mean follow-up of 5.0 ± 2.5 years controlling for many possible confounders, ambulatory NYHA class IV status was independently associated with poor long-term outcomes. The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year survival free of LVAD or heart transplant for class III versus ambulatory class IV patients was 92.0%, 84.0%, 75.0%, 68.1%, and 63.2% versus 75.0%, 61.5%, 52.0%, 45%, and 40.4%, respectively. Although patients with ambulatory class IV heart failure receiving CRT have inferior long-term outcomes compared with those with class III symptoms, survival in class IV patients continues to parallel class III patients over an extended follow-up. At 5 years, survival free of LVAD or heart transplant in ambulatory class IV patients receiving CRT is 40%.

  6. Pea formaldehyde-active class III alcohol dehydrogenase: common derivation of the plant and animal forms but not of the corresponding ethanol-active forms (classes I and P).

    PubMed Central

    Shafqat, J; El-Ahmad, M; Danielsson, O; Martínez, M C; Persson, B; Parés, X; Jornvall, H

    1996-01-01

    A plant class III alcohol dehydrogenase (or glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase) has been characterized. The enzyme is a typical class III member with enzymatic parameters and substrate specificity closely related to those of already established animal forms. Km values with the pea enzyme are 6.5 microM for NAD+, 2 microM for S-hydroxymethylglutathione, and 840 microM for octanol versus 9, 4, and 1200 microM, respectively, with the human enzyme. Structurally, the pea/human class III enzymes are closely related, exhibiting a residue identity of 69% and with only 3 of 23 residues differing among those often considered in substrate and coenzyme binding. In contrast, the corresponding ethanol-active enzymes, the long-known human liver and pea alcohol dehydrogenases, differ more (47% residue identities) and are also in functionally important active site segments, with 12 of the 23 positions exchanged, including no less than 7 at the usually much conserved coenzyme-binding segment. These differences affect functionally important residues that are often class-distinguishing, such as those at positions 48, 51, and 115, where the plant ethanol-active forms resemble class III (Thr, Tyr, and Arg, respectively) rather than the animal ethanol-active class I forms (typically Ser, His, and Asp, respectively). Calculations of phylogenetic trees support the conclusions from functional residues in subgrouping plant ethanol-active dehydrogenases and the animal ethanol-active enzymes (class I) as separate descendants from the class III line. It appears that the classical plant alcohol dehydrogenases (now called class P) have a duplicatory origin separate from that of the animal class I enzymes and therefore a paralogous relationship with functional convergence of their alcohol substrate specificity. Combined, the results establish the conserved nature of class III also in plants, and contribute to the molecular and functional understanding of alcohol dehydrogenases by

  7. Mechanistic investigation of food effect on disintegration and dissolution of BCS class III compound solid formulations: the importance of viscosity.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Asma; Amidon, Gordon L; Langguth, Peter

    2012-10-01

    A negative food effect, i.e. a decrease in bioavailability upon the co-administration of compounds together with food, has been attributed particularly with high solubility/low permeability compounds (BCS class III). Different mechanisms have been proposed including intestinal dilution leading to a lower concentration gradient across the intestinal wall as well as binding of the active pharmaceutical ingredient to food components in the intestine and thereby decreasing the fraction of the dose available for absorption. These mechanisms refer primarily to the compound and not to the dosage form. An increase in viscosity of the dissolution fluid will in particular affect the absorption of BCS type III compounds with preferential absorption in the upper small intestine if the API release is delayed from the dosage form. The present study demonstrated that the increase in viscosity of the dissolution medium, following ingestion of a solid meal, may drastically reduce disintegration and dissolution. For that purpose the viscosity of the standard FDA meal was determined and simulated by solutions of HPMC in buffer. As model formulations, three commercially available tablets containing trospium chloride, a BCS class III m-cholinoreceptor antagonist was used. Trospium chloride drug products have been described to undergo a negative food effect of more than 80% following ingestion with food. The tablets showed prolonged disintegration times and reduced dissolution rates in viscous media, which could be attributed to changes in the liquid penetration rates. The effect was particularly significant for film-coated tablets relative to uncoated dosage forms. The results show the necessity of considering media viscosity when designing in vitro models of drug release for BCS type III drug formulations.

  8. Morphological changes induced by class III chitin synthase gene silencing could enhance penicillin production of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Zheng, Zhiming; Wang, Peng; Gong, Guohong; Wang, Li; Zhao, Genhai

    2013-04-01

    Chitin synthases catalyze the formation of β-(1,4)-glycosidic bonds between N-acetylglucosamine residues to form the unbranched polysaccharide chitin, which is the major component of cell walls in most filamentous fungi. Several studies have shown that chitin synthases are structurally and functionally divergent and play crucial roles in the growth and morphogenesis of the genus Aspergillus although little research on this topic has been done in Penicillium chrysogenum. We used BLAST to find the genes encoding chitin synthases in P. chrysogenum related to chitin synthase genes in Aspergillus nidulans. Three homologous sequences coding for a class III chitin synthase CHS4 and two hypothetical proteins in P. chrysogenum were found. The gene which product showed the highest identity and encoded the class III chitin synthase CHS4 was studied in detail. To investigate the role of CHS4 in P. chrysogenum morphogenesis, we developed an RNA interference system to silence the class III chitin synthase gene chs4. After transformation, mutants exhibited a slow growth rate and shorter and more branched hyphae, which were distinct from those of the original strain. The results also showed that the conidiation efficiency of all transformants was reduced sharply and indicated that chs4 is essential in conidia development. The morphologies of all transformants and the original strain in penicillin production were investigated by light microscopy, which showed that changes in chs4 expression led to a completely different morphology during fermentation and eventually caused distinct penicillin yields, especially in the transformants PcRNAi1-17 and PcRNAi2-1 where penicillin production rose by 27 % and 41 %, respectively.

  9. Use of shape correspondence analysis to quantify skeletal changes associated with bone-anchored Class III correction

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tung; Cevidanes, Lucia; Paniagua, Beatriz; Zhu, Hongtu; Koerich, Leonardo; De Clerck, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the three-dimensional (3D) skeletal changes in the mandibles of Class III patients treated with bone-anchored maxillary protraction using shape correspondence analysis. Material and Method Twenty-five consecutive patients with skeletal Class III who were between the ages of 9 and 13 years (mean age, 11.10 ± 1.1 years) were treated using Class III intermaxillary elastics and bilateral miniplates (two in the infrazygomatic crests of the maxilla and two in the anterior mandible). Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed for each patient before initial loading (T1) and at 1 year out (T2). From the CBCT scans, 3D models were generated, registered on the anterior cranial base, and analyzed using 3D linear distances and vectors between corresponding point-based surfaces. Results Bone-anchored traction produced anteroposterior and vertical skeletal changes in the mandible. The novel application of Shape correspondence analysis showed vectors of mean (± standard deviation) distal displacement of the posterior ramus of 3.6 ± 1.4 mm, while the chin displaced backward by 0.5 ± 3.92 mm. The lower border of the mandible at the menton region was displaced downward by 2.6 ± 1.2 mm, and the lower border at the gonial region moved downward by 3.6 ± 1.4 mm. There was a downward and backward displacement around the gonial region with a mean closure of the gonial angle by 2.1°. The condyles were displaced distally by a mean of 2.6 ± 1.5 mm, and there were three distinct patterns for displacement: 44% backward, 40% backward and downward, and 16% backward and upward. Conclusion This treatment approach induces favorable control of the mandibular growth pattern and can be used to treat patients with components of mandibular prognathism. PMID:23886012

  10. Saliva versus plasma bioequivalence of rusovastatin in humans: validation of class III drugs of the salivary excretion classification system.

    PubMed

    Idkaidek, Nasir; Arafat, Tawfiq

    2015-03-01

    Bioequivalence of rusovastatin in healthy human volunteers was done using saliva and plasma matrices in order to investigate the robustness of using saliva instead of plasma as a surrogate for bioequivalence of class III drugs according to the salivary excretion classification system (SECS). Saliva and plasma samples were collected for 72 h after oral administration of rusovastatin 40 mg to 12 healthy humans. Saliva and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis. Analysis of variance, 90 % confidence intervals, and intra-subject and inter-subject variability values of pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using Kinetica program V5. Human effective intestinal permeability was also calculated by SimCYP program V13. Rusovastatin falls into class III (high permeability/low fraction unbound to plasma proteins) and hence was subjected to salivary excretion. A correlation coefficient of 0.99 between saliva and plasma concentrations, and a saliva/plasma concentration ratio of 0.175 were observed. The 90 % confidence limits of area under the curve (AUClast) and maximum concentration (C max) showed similar trends in both saliva and plasma. On the other hand, inter- and intra-subject variability values in saliva were higher than in plasma, leading to the need for a slightly higher number of subjects to be used in saliva studies. Non-invasive saliva sampling instead of the invasive plasma sampling method can be used as a surrogate for bioequivalence of SECS class III drugs when an adequate sample size is used.

  11. Complete amino acid sequence of the N-terminal extension of calf skin type III procollagen.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, A; Glanville, R W; Hörlein, D; Bruckner, P; Timpl, R; Fietzek, P P; Kühn, K

    1984-01-01

    The N-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen, isolated from foetal-calf skin, contains 130 amino acid residues. To determine its amino acid sequence, the peptide was reduced and carboxymethylated or aminoethylated and fragmented with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase and bacterial collagenase. Pyroglutamate aminopeptidase was used to deblock the N-terminal collagenase fragment to enable amino acid sequencing. The type III collagen extension peptide is homologous to that of the alpha 1 chain of type I procollagen with respect to a three-domain structure. The N-terminal 79 amino acids, which contain ten of the 12 cysteine residues, form a compact globular domain. The next 39 amino acids are in a collagenase triplet sequence (Gly- Xaa - Yaa )n with a high hydroxyproline content. Finally, another short non-collagenous domain of 12 amino acids ends at the cleavage site for procollagen aminopeptidase, which cleaves a proline-glutamine bond. In contrast with type I procollagen, the type III procollagen extension peptides contain interchain disulphide bridges located at the C-terminus of the triple-helical domain. PMID:6331392

  12. 40 CFR 144.28 - Requirements for Class I, II, and III wells authorized by rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., quarterly reports on: (i) The physical, chemical, and other relevant characteristics of the injection fluids... Director a qualitative analysis and ranges in concentrations of all constituents of injected fluids at... annular pressure; (iii) The results from ground-water monitoring wells prescribed in paragraph...

  13. Combined prosthodontic and orthodontic treatment of a patient with a Class III skeletal malocclusion: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Sakar, Olcay; Beyli, Mehmet; Marsan, Gulnaz

    2004-09-01

    This clinical report describes a multidisciplinary approach for the treatment of a patient with Angle Class III skeletal malocclusion and decreased occlusal vertical dimension. An overlay removable partial denture (ORPD) was used to reestablish the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD). After the trial and adjustment period, the reduced lower anterior dentofacial height was orthodontically increased and the negative horizontal overlap was corrected. A maxillary precision attachment RPD and a mandibular fixed partial denture and metal ceramic crowns were fabricated to satisfy esthetic and functional requirements.

  14. Amelogenesis imperfecta with multiple impacted teeth and skeletal class III malocclusion: complete mouth rehabilitation of a young adult.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Patil, Smita P

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is an autosomal dominant disorder. It is a group of hereditary diseases showing abnormal enamel density and crown malformation. This clinical report describes the oral rehabilitation of a young adult diagnosed with a variant of hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta with multiple impacted teeth and skeletal class III malocclusion. The treatment procedures of teeth extractions, endodontic treatment of remaining teeth followed by post and core restorations, esthetic and functional crown lengthening, and metal ceramic fixed dental prostheses were performed sequentially in the maxillary arch. The mandibular arch was restored with an overdenture. One-year follow-up revealed satisfactory results.

  15. Treatment Approach for Maxillary Hypoplasia in Cleft Patients: Class III Elastics with Skeletal Anchorage (Report of Two Cases)

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbin, Arezoo; Kazemian, Mozhgan; Saeedi-Pouya, Iman; Eslami, Neda; Shafaee, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Treatment of cleft lip and palate patients requires a multidisciplinary plan. These patients usually have a hypoplastic maxilla due to the prior surgical scars. Orthognathic surgery to advance the maxilla in these patients is not very efficient; therefore, orthopedic interventions during an appropriate age seems to be essential. Case Report: In this article, two cleft lip and palate patients have been treated with Class III elastics anchored to the maxillary posterior and mandibular anterior miniplates in order to induce maxillary advancement. Conclusion: Both cases showed a significant improvement in their profiles with minimal dentoalveolar compensations. A counterclockwise rotation of the mandible occurred. PMID:27602343

  16. Oxidation of Co(II) by ozone and reactions of Co(III) in solutions of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanov, A. V.; Isaikina, O. Ya.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Reactions of the oxidation of bivalent cobalt ions by ozone, of the spontaneous decomposition of trivalent cobalt, and of interactions between Co(III) and chloride ions in solutions of sulfuric acid are studied. The order and rate constant of the process of decomposition of Co(III) are determined. Information on the kinetics of the interaction between Co(III) and Cl- is obtained. Kinetic patterns of the accumulation of Co(III) during the ozonation of solutions of CoSO4 in sulfuric acid are explained. Molar absorption coefficients of Co(III) and Co2+ ions in the visible range of wavelengths are determined.

  17. Presynaptic (Type III) cells in mouse taste buds sense sour (acid) taste.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yijen A; Maruyama, Yutaka; Stimac, Robert; Roper, Stephen D

    2008-06-15

    Taste buds contain two types of cells that directly participate in taste transduction - receptor (Type II) cells and presynaptic (Type III) cells. Receptor cells respond to sweet, bitter and umami taste stimulation but until recently the identity of cells that respond directly to sour (acid) tastants has only been inferred from recordings in situ, from behavioural studies, and from immunostaining for putative sour transduction molecules. Using calcium imaging on single isolated taste cells and with biosensor cells to identify neurotransmitter release, we show that presynaptic (Type III) cells specifically respond to acid taste stimulation and release serotonin. By recording responses in cells isolated from taste buds and in taste cells in lingual slices to acetic acid titrated to different acid levels (pH), we also show that the active stimulus for acid taste is the membrane-permeant, uncharged acetic acid moiety (CH(3)COOH), not free protons (H(+)). That observation is consistent with the proximate stimulus for acid taste being intracellular acidification, not extracellular protons per se. These findings may also have implications for other sensory receptors that respond to acids, such as nociceptors.

  18. TGF-{beta}-stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via the ERK signaling pathway in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eun Jee; Chun, Ji Na; Jung, Sun-Ah; Cho, Jin Won; Lee, Joon H.

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} induces aberrant expression of {beta}III in RPE cells via the ERK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta} increases O-GlcNAc modification of {beta}III in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene by TGF-{beta}. -- Abstract: The class III {beta}-tubulin isotype ({beta}{sub III}) is expressed exclusively by neurons within the normal human retina and is not present in normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in situ or in the early phase of primary cultures. However, aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin has been observed in passaged RPE cells and RPE cells with dedifferentiated morphology in pathologic epiretinal membranes from idiopathic macular pucker, proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). Transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) has been implicated in dedifferentiation of RPE cells and has a critical role in the development of proliferative vitreoretinal diseases. Here, we investigated the potential effects of TGF-{beta} on the aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin and the intracellular signaling pathway mediating these changes. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression and O-linked-{beta}-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNac) modification of class III {beta}-tubulin in cultured RPE cells as determined using Western blotting, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. TGF-{beta} also stimulated phosphorylation of ERK. TGF-{beta}-induced aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with U0126, an inhibitor of ERK phosphorylation. Our findings indicate that TGF-{beta} stimulated aberrant expression of class III {beta}-tubulin via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. These data demonstrate that mature RPE cells have the capacity to express a neuron-associated gene in response to TGF-{beta} stimulation and provide useful information

  19. Human Retroviruses and AIDS. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences: I--II; III--V

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Wain-Hobson, S.; Smith, R.F.; Pavlakis, G.N.

    1993-12-31

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (I) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  20. Integrated Computational and Experimental Protocol for Understanding Rh(III) Speciation in Hydrochloric and Nitric Acid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, Alex C.; Boele, Cherilynn A.; Bennett, Kevin T.; Clark, Sue B.; Wall, Nathalie; Clark, Aurora E.

    2014-12-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical approach has investigated the complex speciation of Rh(III) in hydrochloric and nitric acid media, as a function of acid concentration. This has relevance to the separation and isolation of Rh(III) from dissolved spent nuclear fuel, which is an emergent and attractive alternative source of platinum group metals, relative to traditional mining efforts.

  1. Neodymium(III) Complexes of Dialkylphosphoric and Dialkylphosphonic Acids Relevant to Liquid-Liquid Extraction Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Krause, Jeanette A.; Sweet, Lucas E.

    2016-01-27

    The complexes formed during the extraction of neodymium(III) into hydrophobic solvents containing acidic organophosphorus extractants were probed by single-crystal X-ray diffractometry, visible spectrophotometry, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The crystal structure of the compound Nd(DMP)3 (1, DMP = dimethyl phosphate) revealed a polymeric arrangement in which each Nd(III) center is surrounded by six DMP oxygen atoms in a pseudo-octahedral environment. Adjacent Nd(III) ions are bridged by (MeO)2POO– anions, forming the polymeric network. The diffuse reflectance visible spectrum of 1 is nearly identical to that of the solid that is formed when an n-dodecane solution of di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HA) is saturated with Nd(III), indicating a similar coordination environment around the Nd center in the NdA3 solid. The visible spectrum of the HA solution fully loaded with Nd(III) is very similar to that of the NdA3 material, both displaying hypersensitive bands characteristic of an pseudo-octahedral coordination environment around Nd. These spectral characteristics persisted across a wide range of organic Nd concentrations, suggesting that the pseudo-octahedral coordination environment is maintained from dilute to saturated conditions.

  2. Potentiation of vasoconstriction and pressor response by low concentration of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)).

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyung-Min; Shin, Yoo-Sun; Kang, Seojin; Noh, Ji-Yoon; Kim, Keunyoung; Chung, Seung-Min; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2011-09-10

    A close link between arsenic exposure and hypertension has been well-established through many epidemiological reports, yet the mechanism underlying it remains unclear. Here we report that nanomolar concentrations of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a toxic trivalent methylated arsenic metabolite, can potentiate agonist-induced vasoconstriction and pressor responses. In freshly isolated rat aortic ring, exposure to nanomolar MMA(III) (100-500 nM) potentiated phenylephrine (PE)-induced vasoconstriction while at higher concentrations (≥2.5 μM), suppression of vasoconstriction and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle were observed. Potentiation of agonist-induced vasoconstriction was also observed with other contractile agonists and it was retained in endothelium-denuded aortic rings, suggesting that these events are agonist-independent and smooth muscle cell dependent. Interestingly, exposure to MMA(III) resulted in increased myosin light chain phosphorylation while PE-induced Ca2+ influx was not affected, reflecting that Ca2+ sensitization is involved. In line with this, MMA(III) enhanced agonist-induced activation of small GTPase RhoA, a key contributor to Ca2+ sensitization. Of note, treatment of MMA(III) to rats induced significantly higher pressor responses in vivo, demonstrating that this event can occur in vivo indeed. We believe that RhoA-mediated Ca2+ sensitization and the resultant potentiation of vasoconstriction by MMA(III) may shed light on arsenic-associated hypertension.

  3. Assessment of the changes in quality of life of patients with class II and III deformities during and after orthodontic-surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Baherimoghaddam, T; Tabrizi, R; Naseri, N; Pouzesh, A; Oshagh, M; Torkan, S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to assess and compare the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of patients with class II and III deformities during and after orthodontic-surgical treatment. Thirty class III and 28 class II patients were evaluated at baseline (T0), just prior to surgery (T1), at 6 months after surgery (T2), and at 12 months after debonding (T3). OHRQoL was assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Friedman two-way analysis of variance and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were performed to compare the relative changes in OHRQoL during treatment. Significant changes in the overall OHIP-14 scores were observed during and after orthodontic-surgical treatment in both groups. During the pre-surgical stage, psychological discomfort and psychological disability decreased in class III patients, and class II patients experienced a significant deterioration in psychological discomfort during the same period. Six months after surgery, patients in both groups showed improvements in psychological discomfort, social disability, and handicap. Physical disability and functional limitation showed further improvement at 12 months after debonding in class II patients. This study reaffirms that orthodontic-surgical treatment has a significant effect on the OHRQoL of class III and class II patients.

  4. Orthodontic decompensation in skeletal Class III malocclusion: redefining the amount of movement assessed by Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cappellozza, José Antonio Zuega; Guedes, Fabio Pinto; Nary, Hugo; Capelozza, Leopoldino; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is essential for tridimensional planning of orthognathic surgery, as it allows visualization and evaluation of bone structures and mineralized tissues. Tomographic slices allow evaluation of tooth inclination and individualization of movement performed during preoperative decompensation. The aim of this paper was to assess maxillary and mandibular incisors inclination pre and post orthodontic decompensation in skeletal Class III malocclusion. Methods: The study was conducted on six individuals with skeletal Class III malocclusion, surgically treated, who had Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic scans obtained before and after orthodontic decompensation. On multiplanar reconstruction view, tomographic slices (axial, coronal and sagittal) were obtained on the long axis of each incisor. The sagittal slice was used for measurement taking, whereas the references used to assess tooth inclination were the long axis of maxillary teeth in relation to the palatal plane and the long axis of mandibular teeth in relation to the mandibular plane. Results: There was significant variation in the inclination of incisors before and after orthodontic decompensation. This change was of greater magnitude in the mandibular arch, evidencing that natural compensation is more effective in this arch, thereby requiring more intensive decompensation. Conclusion: When routinely performed, the protocols of decompensation treatment in surgical individuals often result in intensive movements, which should be reevaluated, since the extent of movement predisposes to reduction in bone attachment levels and root length. PMID:26560818

  5. The evaluation of maximum bite force in the occlusal rehabilitation of patient with Angle Class III malocclusion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kaymak, Dilek; Dogan, Arife

    2013-01-01

    The case report describes the occlusal rehabilitation of a male patient with Angle Class III malocclusion and its effect on maximum bite force. The main complaints of patient were masticatory difficulty and poor esthetic. The patient's expectations from the treatment were a good esthetic and function with a less invasive and relatively promptly way. Therefore, increasing of the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) and then restoring the maxillary and mandibular teeth was chosen by the patient among the treatment options. At the beginning of treatment maximum bite force of patient was measured. Then an occlusal splint was provided to evaluate the adaptation of the patient to the altered OVD. Full mouth rehabilitation with metal ceramic restorations was made. After the completion of full mouth restoration, bite force measurement was repeated and patient exhibited increased maximum bite force. Full mouth restorative treatment in a patient with Class III malocclusion could be an effective treatment approach to resolve esthetic concern and to improve masticatory function related to maximum bite force. PMID:24049580

  6. Spectrophotometric determination of gold(iii) with p-dimethylaminobenzilidenerhodanine in hydrochloric acid-ethanol medium.

    PubMed

    Borissova, R

    The reaction between gold(III) and p-dimethylaminobenzilidenerhodanine in hydrochloric acid medium containing 20% v/v ethanol has been studied spectrophotometrically. It has been established that the process is very complicated: gold(III) is reduced to gold(I) which reacts with unchanged reagent. The value of the equilibrium constant is 2.56 +/- 0.45. Conditions are proposed for the determination of 2-8 mug of gold in 25 ml, with a standard deviation of 0.04 mug 25 ml .

  7. The interaction of phenolic acids with Fe(III) in the presence of citrate as studied by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Senpei; Bai, Guangling; Chen, Lingli; Shen, Qun; Diao, Xianmin; Zhao, Guanghua

    2014-08-15

    Under physiological conditions, exogenous chelators such as polyphenols might interact with non-protein bound ferric complexes, such as Fe(III)-citrate. Additionally, Fe(III) and citrate are widely distributed in various fruits and vegetables which are also rich in phenolic acids. In this study, we focus on the interaction between phenolic acids (gallic acid, methyl gallate and protocatechuic acid) and Fe(III) in the presence of excessive citrate by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) for thermodynamic studies, and stopped-flow absorption spectrometry for fast kinetic studies. Results reveal that all of these three phenolic acids can bind to the Fe(III) with the same stoichiometry (3:1). Moreover, the binding constants of these three compounds with Fe(III) are greatly dependent on ligand structure, and are much higher than that of Fe(III)-citrate. Based on their stoichiometry and superhigh binding constants, it is most likely that these three phenolic acids can displace the citrate to bind with one iron(III) ion to form a stable octahedral geometric structure, albeit at different rates. These findings shed light on the interaction between phenolic acids and Fe(III) in the presence of citrate under either physiological conditions or in a food system.

  8. Color Change of Sudan III against Concentrated Sulfuric Acid in Acetonitrile and Quantification for a Small Amount of Concentrated Sulfuric Acid.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takao; Kurata, Shoji; Ogino, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The color-changing phenomenon of hydrophobic bisazo dye, Sudan III in an acetonitrile solution against the addition of concentrated sulfuric acid has been discovered and the chromic properties investigated. Based on observations, a novel quantification method of concentrated sulfuric acid has been developed. Sudan III changes its color from orange to blue against a small volume of sulfuric acid, and the acetonitrile solution of Sudan III is the most suitable for observing the color-change phenomenon. (1)H-NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopic studies showed that the color-change mechanism of Sudan III against sulfuric acid is due to the protonation of the dye by sulfuric acid. This phenomenon is applicable to the quantification of concentrated sulfuric acid by introducing the Hammett acidity function. The proposed method requires only a small amount of the sample, 0.04 mL, and enables rapid quantification.

  9. Use of coal mining waste for the removal of acidity and metal ions Al (III), Fe (III) and Mn (II) in acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Geremias, R; Laus, R; Macan, J M; Pedrosa, R C; Laranjeira, M C M; Silvano, J; Fávere, F V

    2008-08-01

    The coal industry may generate acid mine drainage (AMD) and mining wastes, which may adversely affect the quality of the environment. In this study we propose the use of this waste in the removal of acidity and metal ions, as well as in the reduction of the toxicity of AMD. A physico-chemical analysis of the waste shows the presence of mainly SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 and a superficial area of 4.316 m2 g(-1). The treatment of AMD with the waste resulted in an increase in pH from 2.6 to 7.8 and removed 100% of the Al (III), 100% of the Fe (III) and 89% of the Mn (II). We also observed that the high toxicity of the AMD towards Daphnia magna (LC50 = 3.68%) and Artemia sp. (LC50 = 4.97%) was completely eliminated after treatment with the waste. The data obtained allow us to propose that the waste can be used in the treatment of AMD, providing an economic use for the waste.

  10. Characterization of new medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenases adds resolution to duplications of the class I/III and the sub-class I genes.

    PubMed

    Cederlund, Ella; Hedlund, Joel; Hjelmqvist, Lars; Jonsson, Andreas; Shafqat, Jawed; Norin, Annika; Keung, Wing-Ming; Persson, Bengt; Jörnvall, Hans

    2011-05-30

    Four additional variants of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases have been purified and functionally characterized, and their primary structures have been determined. The results allow conclusions about the structural and evolutionary relationships within the large family of MDR alcohol dehydrogenases from characterizations of the pigeon (Columba livia) and dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) major liver alcohol dehydrogenases. The pigeon enzyme turns out to be of class I type and the dogfish enzyme of class III type. This result gives a third type of evidence, based on purifications and enzyme characterization in lower vertebrates, that the classical liver alcohol dehydrogenase originated by a gene duplication early in the evolution of vertebrates. It is discernable as the major liver form at about the level in-between cartilaginous and osseous fish. The results also show early divergence within the avian orders. Structures were determined by Edman degradations, making it appropriate to acknowledge the methodological contributions of Pehr Edman during the 65 years since his thesis at Karolinska Institutet, where also the present analyses were performed.

  11. In Silico Prediction of Drug Dissolution and Absorption with variation in Intestinal pH for BCS Class II Weak Acid Drugs: Ibuprofen and Ketoprofen§

    PubMed Central

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Langguth, Peter; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2012-01-01

    The FDA Biopharmaceutical Classification System guidance allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I. Extensions of the in vivo biowaiver for a number of drugs in BCS Class III and BCS class II have been proposed, particularly, BCS class II weak acids. However, a discrepancy between the in vivo- BE results and in vitro- dissolution results for a BCS class II acids was recently observed. The objectives of this study were to determine the oral absorption of BCS class II weak acids via simulation software and to determine if the in vitro dissolution test with various dissolution media could be sufficient for in vitro bioequivalence studies of ibuprofen and ketoprofen as models of carboxylic acid drugs. The oral absorption of these BCS class II acids from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted by GastroPlus™. Ibuprofen did not satisfy the bioequivalence criteria at lower settings of intestinal pH=6.0. Further the experimental dissolution of ibuprofen tablets in the low concentration phosphate buffer at pH 6.0 (the average buffer capacity 2.2 mmol L-1/pH) was dramatically reduced compared to the dissolution in SIF (the average buffer capacity 12.6 mmol L -1/pH). Thus these predictions for oral absorption of BCS class II acids indicate that the absorption patterns largely depend on the intestinal pH and buffer strength and must be carefully considered for a bioequivalence test. Simulation software may be very useful tool to aid the selection of dissolution media that may be useful in setting an in vitro bioequivalence dissolution standard. PMID:22815122

  12. In silico prediction of drug dissolution and absorption with variation in intestinal pH for BCS class II weak acid drugs: ibuprofen and ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Langguth, Peter; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Amidon, Gordon L

    2012-10-01

    The FDA Biopharmaceutical Classification System guidance allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I. Extensions of the in vivo biowaiver for a number of drugs in BCS class III and BCS class II have been proposed, in particular, BCS class II weak acids. However, a discrepancy between the in vivo BE results and in vitro dissolution results for BCS class II acids was recently observed. The objectives of this study were to determine the oral absorption of BCS class II weak acids via simulation software and to determine if the in vitro dissolution test with various dissolution media could be sufficient for in vitro bioequivalence studies of ibuprofen and ketoprofen as models of carboxylic acid drugs. The oral absorption of these BCS class II acids from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted by GastroPlus™. Ibuprofen did not satisfy the bioequivalence criteria at lower settings of intestinal pH of 6.0. Further the experimental dissolution of ibuprofen tablets in a low concentration phosphate buffer at pH 6.0 (the average buffer capacity 2.2 mmol l (-1) /pH) was dramatically reduced compared with the dissolution in SIF (the average buffer capacity 12.6 mmol l (-1) /pH). Thus these predictions for the oral absorption of BCS class II acids indicate that the absorption patterns depend largely on the intestinal pH and buffer strength and must be considered carefully for a bioequivalence test. Simulation software may be a very useful tool to aid the selection of dissolution media that may be useful in setting an in vitro bioequivalence dissolution standard.

  13. Sample pretreatment for the capillary electrophoretic determination of organic acids in chromium(III) plating baths.

    PubMed

    Taraba, Lukáš; Křížek, Tomáš; Kubíčková, Anna; Coufal, Pavel

    2015-12-01

    This work deals with the development and optimization of the sample pretreatment and consequent electrophoretic analysis of two modern plating baths containing chromium(III) and either citric acid or oxalic acid. Some model mixtures containing known amounts of components of industrial baths have been prepared to simulate simplified bath matrices. Prior to analysis, a sample pretreatment consisting of the addition of some agents that could release acid from the stable chromium complex was tested. Determination of organic anions was accomplished by indirect UV detection. The best results were achieved by precipitation of chromium(III) hydroxide. The content of oxalate and citrate in real samples was calculated as 96.5% (SD 2.3%) and 97.3% (SD 0.8%), respectively, of the declared amount. Very good robustness of the method and satisfactory repeatability of migration time and peak area were obtained. This simple inexpensive method is suitable for routine determination of citric and oxalic acid in chromium(III)-based plating baths.

  14. Alterations in cytosol free calcium in horseradish roots simultaneously exposed to lanthanum(III) and acid rain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Anhua; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    The extensive use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased their environmental levels. REE pollution concomitant with acid rain in many agricultural regions can affect crop growth. Cytosol free calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play an important role in almost all cellular activities. However, no data have been reported regarding the role of cytosol free Ca(2+) in plant roots simultaneously exposed to REE and acid rain. In this study, the effects of exposures to lanthanum(III) and acid rain, independently and in combination, on cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, root activity, metal contents, biomass, cytosol pH and La contents in horseradish roots were investigated. The simultaneous exposures to La(III) and acid rain increased or decreased the cytosol free Ca(2+) levels, depending on the concentration of La(III), and these effects were more evident than independent exposure to La(III) or acid rain. In combined exposures, cytosol free Ca(2+) played an important role in the regulation of root activity, metal contents and biomass. These roles were closely related to La(III) dose, acid rain strength and treatment mode (independent exposure or simultaneous exposure). A low concentration of La(III) (20 mg L(-1)) could alleviate the adverse effects on the roots caused by acid rain, and the combined exposures at higher concentrations of La(III) and acid rain had synergic effects on the roots.

  15. On the Temperature Dependence of the Formation Constant of Thiocyanatopentaaquochromium (III) in Acidic Solution.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    constants for metal ion complexes Bflandamer’s method Chromium (III) complexes Heat capacity of activation Equilibrium and kinetics of reactions in solution...20 ABSTRACT (Continue on reveree aide if neceetary and Identify by block number) The equilibrium constants for the ionization of carboxylic acids in...water pass through a maximum as temperature changes. If the equilibrium constant repre- sents a one-step process, then the attendant thermodynamic

  16. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of iron (III) complex with a quinolone family member (pipemidic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, D.; Szymanska, B.; Kovala-Demertzi, Dimitra; Wiecek, Joanna; Talik, E.; Demertzis, Mavroudis A.

    2006-12-01

    The interaction of iron (III) with pipemidic acid, Hpipem, afforded the complex [Fe (pipem) (HO)2 (H2O)]2. The new complex has been characterised by elemental analyses, infra-red, EPR and XPS spectroscopies. The monoanion, pipem, exhibits O, O ligation through the carbonyl and carboxylato oxygen atoms. Six coordinate dimer distorted octahedral configuration has been proposed for [Fe (pipem) (HO)2 (H2O)]2.

  17. A structural transition in class II major histocompatibility complex proteins at mildly acidic pH

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Peptide binding by class II major histocompatibility complex proteins is generally enhanced at low pH in the range of hydrogen ion concentrations found in the endosomal compartments of antigen- presenting cells. We and others have proposed that class II molecules undergo a reversible conformational change at low pH that is associated with enhanced peptide loading. However, no one has previously provided direct evidence for a structural change in class II proteins in the mildly acidic pH conditions in which enhanced peptide binding is observed. In this study, susceptibility to denaturation induced by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) detergent or heat was used to probe the conformation of class II at different hydrogen ion concentrations. Class II molecules became sensitive to denaturation at pH 5.5-6.5 depending on the allele and experimental conditions. The observed structural transition was fully reversible if acidic pH was neutralized before exposure to SDS or heat. Experiments with the environment- sensitive fluorescent probe ANS (8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid) provided further evidence for a reversible structural transition at mildly acidic pH associated with an increase in exposed hydrophobicity in class II molecules. IAd conformation was found to change at a higher pH than IEd, IEk, or IAk, which correlates with the different pH optimal for peptide binding by these molecules. We conclude that pH regulates peptide binding by influencing the structure of class II molecules. PMID:8551215

  18. Decolorization of orange II by catalytic oxidation using iron (III) phthalocyanine-tetrasulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Rismayani, Sinta; Fukushima, Masami; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji

    2004-10-18

    Orange II, C.I. Acid Orange 7 (AO7), is oxidatively decolorized via catalytic oxidation by iron(III) phthalocyanine-tetrasulfonic acid (Fe(III)-PcTS) as a biomimetic catalyst and KHSO(5) as an oxygen donor. The nature of the decolorization of AO7 was investigated in the catalyst concentration range of 10-50 microM, in which the initial concentration of AO7 was 417 mg l(-1). A 99.6% decolorization was observed at [KHSO(5)] = 2.5 mM and [Fe(III)-PcTS] = 20 microM after a 3-h reaction period. However, the fact that only 4.9% of the TOC was removed indicated that the conversion to CO(2) was incomplete. The results of a total organic nitrogen analysis of the reaction mixture showed that the nitrogen in the azo chain was mainly converted to N(2) gas. In addition, 38.6% of the AO7 was converted to 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene, and 21.4% to p-phenolsulfonic acid. These results indicate that the degradation via this catalytic system involves the conversion of AO7 to phenolic compounds, followed by N(2) production. In addition, a Microtox test showed that toxicity of the solution increased as a result of AO7 oxidation using this catalytic system.

  19. LIPID CLASS DISTRIBUTION OF HIGHLY UNSATURATED LONG CHAIN FATTY ACIDS IN MARINE DINOFLAGELLATES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The very long chain highly unsaturated C28 fatty acids, octacosaheptaenoic [28:7(n-6)] and octacosaoctaenoic acid [28:8(n-3)], were found to be associated with phospholipids, obtained by fractionation of total lipid extracts into distinct lipid classes, in 4 and 6, respectively, ...

  20. Surgery-first approach using a three-dimensional virtual setup and surgical simulation for skeletal Class III correction

    PubMed Central

    Im, Joon; Kang, Sang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yeon; Kim, Moon Key

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old woman presented to our dental clinic with anterior crossbite and mandibular prognathism. She had a concave profile, long face, and Angle Class III molar relationship. She showed disharmony in the crowding of the maxillomandibular dentition and midline deviation. The diagnosis and treatment plan were established by a three-dimensional (3D) virtual setup and 3D surgical simulation, and a surgical wafer was produced using the stereolithography technique. No presurgical orthodontic treatment was performed. Using the surgery-first approach, Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy and mandibular bilateral intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy setback were carried out. Treatment was completed with postorthodontic treatment. Thus, symmetrical and balanced facial soft tissue and facial form as well as stabilized and well-balanced occlusion were achieved. PMID:25473649

  1. Combined Orthodontic-surgical Treatment for Skeletal Class III Malocclusion with Multiple Impacted Permanent and Supernumerary Teeth: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dai Juan and Feng

    2014-01-01

    In this report we describe a combined orthodontic and surgical treatment for a 14-year-old boy with severe skeletal class III deformity and dental problem. His upper posterior primary teeth in the left side were over-retained and 6 maxillary teeth (bilateral central incisors and canines, left first and second premolars) were impacted, together with 5 supernumerary teeth in both arches. The treatment protocol involved extraction of all the supernumerary and deciduous teeth, surgical exposure and orthodontic traction of the impacted teeth, a bimaxillary orthognathic approach including Lefort I osteotomy. Bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO) and genioplasty was performed to correct skeletal problem. After treatment, all of the impacted teeth were brought to proper alignment in the maxillary arch. A satisfied profile and good posterior occlusion was achieved. Treatment mechanics and consideration during different stages are discussed. PMID:24893948

  2. Menthone aryl acid hydrazones: a new class of anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Jain, Jainendra; Kumar, Y; Sinha, Reema; Kumar, Rajeev; Stables, James

    2011-01-01

    A series of ten compounds (Compounds J(1)-J(10)) of (±) 3-menthone aryl acid hydrazone was synthesized and characterized by thin layer chromatography and spectral analysis. Synthesized compounds were evaluated for anticonvulsant activity after intraperitoneal (i.p) administration to mice by maximal electroshock (MES) and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) induced seizure method and minimal clonic seizure test. Minimal motor impairment was also determined for these compounds. Results obtained showed that four compounds out of ten afforded significant protection in the minimal clonic seizure screen at 6 Hz. Compound J(6), 4-Chloro-N-(2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexylidene) benzohydrazide was found to be the most active compound with MES ED(50) of 16.1 mg/kg and protective index (pI) of greater than 20, indicating that (±) 3-menthone aryl acid hydrazone possesses better and safer anticonvulsant properties than other reported menthone derivatives viz. menthone Schiff bases, menthone semicarbazides and thiosemicarbazides.

  3. Impact of the Motor and Tail Domains of Class III Myosins on Regulating the Formation and Elongation of Actin Protrusions.

    PubMed

    Raval, Manmeet H; Quintero, Omar A; Weck, Meredith L; Unrath, William C; Gallagher, James W; Cui, Runjia; Kachar, Bechara; Tyska, Matthew J; Yengo, Christopher M

    2016-10-21

    Class III myosins (MYO3A and MYO3B) are proposed to function as transporters as well as length and ultrastructure regulators within stable actin-based protrusions such as stereocilia and calycal processes. MYO3A differs from MYO3B in that it contains an extended tail domain with an additional actin-binding motif. We examined how the properties of the motor and tail domains of human class III myosins impact their ability to enhance the formation and elongation of actin protrusions. Direct examination of the motor and enzymatic properties of human MYO3A and MYO3B revealed that MYO3A is a 2-fold faster motor with enhanced ATPase activity and actin affinity. A chimera in which the MYO3A tail was fused to the MYO3B motor demonstrated that motor activity correlates with formation and elongation of actin protrusions. We demonstrate that removal of individual exons (30-34) in the MYO3A tail does not prevent filopodia tip localization but abolishes the ability to enhance actin protrusion formation and elongation in COS7 cells. Interestingly, our results demonstrate that MYO3A slows filopodia dynamics and enhances filopodia lifetime in COS7 cells. We also demonstrate that MYO3A is more efficient than MYO3B at increasing formation and elongation of stable microvilli on the surface of cultured epithelial cells. We propose that the unique features of MYO3A, enhanced motor activity, and an extended tail with tail actin-binding motif, allow it to play an important role in stable actin protrusion length and ultrastructure maintenance.

  4. Apriori feasibility testing of randomized clinical trial design in patients with cleft deformities and Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    McIlvaine, Elizabeth; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Lane, Christianne J.; Azen, Stanley P.; Yen, Stephen L.-K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of randomizing treatment (surgical vs. non-surgical) for correction of a Class III malocclusion (underbite) resulting from an earlier repair of cleft lip and palate. Materials and methods Surveys about willingness to accept randomized treatment during adolescence were mailed to the parents of cleft lip and palate patients under the care of Children's Hospital Los Angeles between 2005 and 2010. The inclusion criteria were patients with cleft lip and palate, Class III malocclusion due to maxillary deficiency, and absence of medical and cognitive contraindications to treatment. Results Out of 287 surveys, 82 (28%) were completed and returned; 47% of the subjects held a strong treatment preference (95% CI, 35–58%), while 30% were willing to accept randomization (95% CI, 20– 41%). Seventy-eight percent would drop out of a randomized trial if dissatisfied with the assigned treatment (95% CI, 67–86%). The three most commonly cited reasons for being unwilling to accept random treatment assignment were 1) the desire for doctors to choose the best treatment, 2) the desire for parents to have input on treatment, and 3) the desire to correct the underbite as early as possible. Conclusion Based on this study, parents and patients would be unwilling to accept a randomly assigned treatment and would not remain in an assigned group if treatment did not meet expectations. This highlight the limitations associated with randomization trials involving surgical modalities and provide justification for other research models (e.g., cohort studies) to compare two treatment options when randomization is not feasible. PMID:24630053

  5. Novel three-dimensional position analysis of the mandibular foramen in patients with skeletal class III mandibular prognathism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon-Ho; Won, Yu-Jin; Kim, Moon-Key

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the relative position of the mandibular foramina (MnFs) in patients diagnosed with skeletal class III malocclusion. Materials and Methods Computed tomography (CT) images were collected from 85 patients. The vertical lengths of each anatomic point from the five horizontal planes passing through the MnF were measured at the coronoid process, sigmoid notch, condyle, and the gonion. The distance from the anterior ramus point to the posterior ramus point on the five horizontal planes was designated the anteroposterior horizontal distance of the ramus for each plane. The perpendicular distance from each anterior ramus point to each vertical plane through the MnF was designated the horizontal distance from the anterior ramus to the MnF. The horizontal and vertical positions were examined by regression analysis. Results Regression analysis showed the heights of the coronoid process, sigmoid notch, and condyle for the five horizontal planes were significantly related to the height of the MnF, with the highest significance associated with the MnF-mandibular plane (coefficients of determination (R2): 0.424, 0.597, and 0.604, respectively). The horizontal anteroposterior length of the ramus and the distance from the anterior ramus point to the MnF were significant by regression analysis. Conclusion The relative position of the MnF was significantly related to the vertical heights of the sigmoid notch, coronoid process, and condyle as well as to the horizontal anteroposterior length of the ascending ramus. These findings should be clinically useful for patients with skeletal class III mandibular prognathism. PMID:27358814

  6. Diruthenium(II,III) tetramidates as a new class of oxygenation catalysts.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Leslie; Cao, Zhi; Fanwick, Phillip E; Ren, Tong

    2012-01-14

    Two new diruthenium(II,III) tetramidate compounds, Ru(2)(NHOCC(CH(3))(2))(4)Cl (1) and Ru(2)(NHOCCH(2)CH(3))(4)Cl (2) have been prepared and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. The activity of promoting sulfide oxygenation using simple oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) was studied. A UV-kinetics study indicated that the initial rates of 1 and 2 are comparable to the previously studied diruthenium tetracarboxylates in promoting TBHP oxygenation of methyl phenyl sulfide (MPS). Using excess oxidant and CH(3)CN as the solvent, organic sulfides MPS and diphenyl sulfide (PPS) were oxidized using 1 mol% of the catalytic species. Compound 1 is more effective than 2 in converting sulfides to sulfoxide under the same conditions. Fast conversion was achieved when the reactions were carried out in the solvent-free conditions, and the major oxidation product was the sulfoxide. The electronic structure of the title compounds was studied with DFT calculations to gain an understanding of the activation of peroxy reagents.

  7. Conserved 33-kb haplotype in the MHC class III region regulates chronic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Houtman, Miranda; Padyukov, Leonid; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed many genetic loci associated with complex autoimmune diseases. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the MHC gene HLA-DRB1 is the strongest candidate predicting disease development. It has been suggested that other immune-regulating genes in the MHC contribute to the disease risk, but this contribution has been difficult to show because of the strong linkage disequilibrium within the MHC. We isolated genomic regions in the form of congenic fragments in rats to test whether there are additional susceptibility loci in the MHC. By both congenic mapping in inbred strains and SNP typing in wild rats, we identified a conserved, 33-kb large haplotype Ltab-Ncr3 in the MHC-III region, which regulates the onset, severity, and chronicity of arthritis. The Ltab-Ncr3 haplotype consists of five polymorphic immunoregulatory genes: Lta (lymphotoxin-α), Tnf, Ltb (lymphotoxin-β), Lst1 (leukocyte-specific transcript 1), and Ncr3 (natural cytotoxicity-triggering receptor 3). Significant correlation in the expression of the Ltab-Ncr3 genes suggests that interaction of these genes may be important in keeping these genes clustered together as a conserved haplotype. We studied the arthritis association and the spliceo-transcriptome of four different Ltab-Ncr3 haplotypes and showed that higher Ltb and Ncr3 expression, lower Lst1 expression, and the expression of a shorter splice variant of Lst1 correlate with reduced arthritis severity in rats. Interestingly, patients with mild RA also showed higher NCR3 expression and lower LST1 expression than patients with severe RA. These data demonstrate the importance of a conserved haplotype in the regulation of complex diseases such as arthritis. PMID:27303036

  8. Class III PI3K-mediated prolonged activation of autophagy plays a critical role in the transition of cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; Zhang, Yangyang; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua; Jiang, Surong; Zhang, Xiaojin; Ding, Zhengnian; Tu, Fei; Wu, Jun; Gao, Xiang; Li, Liu

    2015-07-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy often leads to heart failure. Activation of autophagy has been shown in pathological hypertrophic hearts. Autophagy is regulated positively by Class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). However, it is unknown whether Class III PI3K plays a role in the transition of cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure. To address this question, we employed a previously established cardiac hypertrophy model in heat shock protein 27 transgenic mice which shares common features with several types of human cardiomyopathy. Age-matched wild-type mice served as control. Firstly, a prolonged activation of autophagy, as reflected by autophagosome accumulation, increased LC3 conversion and decreased p62 protein levels, was detected in hypertrophic hearts from adaptive stage to maladaptive stage. Moreover, morphological abnormalities in myofilaments and mitochondria were presented in the areas accumulated with autophagosomes. Secondly, activation of Class III PI3K Vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34), as demonstrated by upregulation of Vps34 expression, increased interaction of Vps34 with Beclin-1, and deceased Bcl-2 expression, was demonstrated in hypertrophic hearts from adaptive stage to maladaptive stage. Finally, administration with Wortmaninn, a widely used autophagy inhibitor by suppressing Class III PI3K activity, significantly decreased autophagy activity, improved morphologies of intracellular apartments, and most importantly, prevented progressive cardiac dysfunction in hypertrophic hearts. Collectively, we demonstrated that Class III PI3K plays a central role in the transition of cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure via a prolonged activation of autophagy in current study. Class III PI3K may serve as a potential target for the treatment and management of maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy.

  9. Facial and occlusal esthetic improvements of an adult skeletal Class III malocclusion using surgical, orthodontic, and implant treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Cardoso, Mauricio; de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; Guedes, Fabio Pinto; Battilani Filho, Valter Antonio Ban; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Correa, Marcio Aurelio; Nary Filho, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this clinical report is to describe the complex treatment of an adult Class III malocclusion patient who was disappointed with the outcome of a previous oral rehabilitation. Interdisciplinary treatment planning was performed with a primary indication for implant removal because of marginal bone loss and gingival recession, followed by orthodontic and surgical procedures to correct the esthetics and skeletal malocclusion. The comprehensive treatment approach included: (1) implant removal in the area of the central incisors; (2) combined orthodontic decompensation with mesial displacement and forced extrusion of the lateral incisors; (3) extraction of the lateral incisors and placement of new implants corresponding to the central incisors, which received provisional crowns; (4) orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement to improve occlusal and facial relationships; and finally, (5) orthodontic refinement followed by definitive prosthetic rehabilitation of the maxillary central incisors and reshaping of the adjacent teeth. At the three-year follow-up, clinical and radiographic examinations showed successful replacement of the central incisors and improved skeletal and esthetic appearances. Moreover, a Class II molar relationship was obtained with an ideal overbite, overjet, and intercuspation. In conclusion, we report the successful esthetic anterior rehabilitation of a complex case in which interdisciplinary treatment planning improved facial harmony, provided gingival architecture with sufficient width and thickness, and improved smile esthetics, resulting in enhanced patient comfort and satisfaction. This clinical case report might be useful to improve facial esthetics and occlusion in patients with dentoalveolar and skeletal defects. PMID:26877982

  10. A stable Fe{sup III}-Fe{sup IV} replacement of tyrosyl radical in a class I ribonucleotide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Voevodskaya, N.; Lendzian, F.; Graeslund, A. . E-mail: astrid@dbb.su.se

    2005-05-20

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) of Chlamydia trachomatis is a class I RNR enzyme composed of two homodimeric components, proteins R1 and R2. In class I RNR, R1 has the substrate binding site, whereas R2 has a diferric site and normally in its active form a stable tyrosyl free radical. C. trachomatis RNR is unusual, because its R2 component has a phenylalanine in the place of the radical carrier tyrosine. Replacing the tyrosyl radical, a paramagnetic Fe{sup III}-Fe{sup IV} species (species X, normally a transient intermediate in the process leading to radical formation) may provide the oxidation equivalent needed to start the catalytic process via long range electron transfer from the active site in R1. Here EPR spectroscopy shows that in C. trachomatis RNR, species X can become essentially stable when formed in a complete RNR (R1/R2/substrate) complex, adding further weight to the possible role of this species X in the catalytic reaction.

  11. Facial and occlusal esthetic improvements of an adult skeletal Class III malocclusion using surgical, orthodontic, and implant treatment.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Cardoso, Mauricio; de Molon, Rafael Scaf; de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; Guedes, Fabio Pinto; Battilani Filho, Valter Antonio Ban; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Correa, Marcio Aurelio; Nary Filho, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this clinical report is to describe the complex treatment of an adult Class III malocclusion patient who was disappointed with the outcome of a previous oral rehabilitation. Interdisciplinary treatment planning was performed with a primary indication for implant removal because of marginal bone loss and gingival recession, followed by orthodontic and surgical procedures to correct the esthetics and skeletal malocclusion. The comprehensive treatment approach included: (1) implant removal in the area of the central incisors; (2) combined orthodontic decompensation with mesial displacement and forced extrusion of the lateral incisors; (3) extraction of the lateral incisors and placement of new implants corresponding to the central incisors, which received provisional crowns; (4) orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement to improve occlusal and facial relationships; and finally, (5) orthodontic refinement followed by definitive prosthetic rehabilitation of the maxillary central incisors and reshaping of the adjacent teeth. At the three-year follow-up, clinical and radiographic examinations showed successful replacement of the central incisors and improved skeletal and esthetic appearances. Moreover, a Class II molar relationship was obtained with an ideal overbite, overjet, and intercuspation. In conclusion, we report the successful esthetic anterior rehabilitation of a complex case in which interdisciplinary treatment planning improved facial harmony, provided gingival architecture with sufficient width and thickness, and improved smile esthetics, resulting in enhanced patient comfort and satisfaction. This clinical case report might be useful to improve facial esthetics and occlusion in patients with dentoalveolar and skeletal defects.

  12. Flow injection potentiometric determination of bismuth(III) in anti-acid formulations.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, M F; Fatibello-Filho, O

    2001-06-19

    A flow injection potentiometric procedure is proposed for determining bismuth(III) in anti-acid formulations. In this work, a tubular electrode coated with an ion-pair formed between [Bi(EDTA)](-) and tricaprylylmethylammonium cation (Aliquat 336) in a poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) was constructed and used in a single channel flow injection system. The effect of membrane composition, pH and flow injection parameter over the Bi(III) tubular electrode response (slope (mV/decade)) was initially evaluated in quintuplicate in 0.5 mol l(-1) EDTA solution as carrier. The best response (-59.6+/-0.9 mV/decade) was attained with the 5% m/m ion-pair; 65% m/m o-nitrophenyl octyl ether (o-NPOE) and 30% m/m PVC in pH 6-9. The electrode showed a linear response to E (mV) versus log [Bi(EDTA)](-) in the bismuth(III) concentration range from 2.0x10(-5) to 1.0x10(-2) mol l(-1) and a useful lifetime of at least 5 months (more than 1000 determinations for each polymeric membrane). The detection limit was 1.2x10(-5) mol l(-1) and the R.S.D. was less than 2.0% for a solution containing 5.0x10(-4) mol l(-1) bismuth(III) (n=10). Several species such as Cd(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Mg(II), Cr(III) and Al(III) at 1.0x10(-3) mol l(-1) concentration in 0.5 mol l(-1) EDTA solution did not cause any interference. The frequency rate was 90 determinations per hour and the results obtained for bismuth(III) in anti-acid formulations using this flow procedure and those obtained using a spectrophotometric procedure are in agreement at the 95% confidence level.

  13. Microbial reduction of Fe(III)-bearing clay minerals in the presence of humic acids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangfei; Qiu, Shuang; Liu, Baiqing; Pu, Yiying; Gao, Zhanming; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-01-01

    Both Fe(III)-bearing clay minerals and humic acids (HAs) are abundant in the soils and sediments. Previous studies have shown that bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals could be accelerated by adding anthraquinone compound as a redox-active surrogate of HAs. However, a quinoid analogue could not reflect the adsorption and complexation properties of HA, and little is known about the effects of real HAs at environmental concentration on bioreduction of clay minerals. Here, it was shown that 10–200 mg l−1 of natural or artificially synthesized HAs could effectively stimulate the bioreduction rate and extent of Fe(III) in both iron-rich nontronite NAu-2 and iron-deficient montmorillonite SWy-2. After adsorption to NAu-2, electron-transfer activities of different HA fractions were compared. Additionally, Fe(II) complexation by HAs also contributed to improvement of clay-Fe(III) bioreduction. Spectrosopic and morphological analyses suggested that HA addition accelerated the transformation of NAu-2 to illite, silica and siderite after reductive dissolution. PMID:28358048

  14. Management of the Class III malocclusion treated with maxillary expansion, facemask therapy and corrective orthodontic. A 15-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; ALESSIO, Luiz Eduardo; de ALMEIDA-PEDRIN, Renata Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; PINZAN, Arnaldo; VIEIRA, Luiz Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    The facial growth of Class III malocclusion worsens with age, in this case, the early orthopedic treatment, providing facial balance, modifying the maxillofacial growth and development. A 7.6-year old boy presented with Class III malocclusion associated with anterior crossbite; the mandible was shifted to the right and the maxilla had a transversal deficiency. Rapid maxillary expansion followed by facemask therapy was performed, to correct the anteroposterior relationship and improve the facial profile. The patient was followed for a 15-year period, after completion of the treatment, and stability was observed. Growing patients should be monitored following their treatment, so as to prevent malocclusion relapse. PMID:25760273

  15. Management of the Class III malocclusion treated with maxillary expansion, facemask therapy and corrective orthodontic. A 15-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Renato Rodrigues de; Alessio, Luiz Eduardo; Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues de; Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues de; Pinzan, Arnaldo; Vieira, Luiz Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    The facial growth of Class III malocclusion worsens with age, in this case, the early orthopedic treatment, providing facial balance, modifying the maxillofacial growth and development. A 7.6-year old boy presented with Class III malocclusion associated with anterior crossbite; the mandible was shifted to the right and the maxilla had a transversal deficiency. Rapid maxillary expansion followed by facemask therapy was performed, to correct the anteroposterior relationship and improve the facial profile. The patient was followed for a 15-year period, after completion of the treatment, and stability was observed. Growing patients should be monitored following their treatment, so as to prevent malocclusion relapse.

  16. Elution behavior of metal ions with mixed glycine-nitric acid eluents in Dowex 50W-X8 column: separation of Th(IV), Ce(IV), Bi(III), Fe(III), and Al(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Eusebius, L.; Ghose, A.; Dey, A.

    1982-01-01

    Distribution coefficients (K) determined by the batch technique in acidic glycine media using Dowex 50W-X8 cation exchanger (H/sup +/-form, 100-200 mesh size) revealed that this medium can effectively be employed to separate a number of tetravalent and trivalent metal ions from bivalent metal ions. In fixed glycine (0.40 M) and varying concentration of nitric acid (0.10 to 1.0 M), a number of mixtures containing two or three metal ions were resolved on columns using about 8 g of exchanger. In 0.40 M glycine-1.0 M HNO/sub 3/ medium, Th(IV)/Ce(IV) were separated from Al(III)/Fe(III)/Bi(III)/Co(II)/Ni(II)/Cu(II)/Zn(II)/Cd(II)/Hg(II)/Pb(II)/Ag(I) and also Al(III)/Bi(III) from a number of divalent metal ions. In 0.40 M glycine-0.50 M HNO/sub 3/ medium, the resolution of following ternary mixtures were also achieved: Th(IV)/Ce(IV)-Al(III)/Bi(III)-Fe(III)/Co(II)/Ni(II)/Cu(II)/Zn(II)/Cd(II)/Hg(II)/Pb(II)/Ag(I). Th(IV)/Al(III)/Fe(III)/Bi(III) were also separated from other divalent metal ions in 1.60 M glycine-0.50 M HNO/sub 3/ medium. The values of K, elution characteristics of metal ions, elution curves, and the results of the resolution of a number of mixtures of metal ions along with standard deviations are reported.

  17. Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III: effect of single amino acid substitutions and relationship with functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, V; Leone, G; Mastrangelo, S; Lane, D A; Girolami, A; de Moerloose, P; Sas, G; Abildgaard, U; Blajchman, M; Rodeghiero, F

    1994-02-01

    Microheterogeneity of antithrombin III (AT-III) was investigated by crossed immunoelectrofocusing (CIEF) on eleven molecular variants. A normal pattern was found in five variants while two different abnormal CIEF patterns were found in the other four and two variants, respectively. Point mutations causing a major pI change (exceeding 4.0) of the amino acid substituted lead to alterations in the overall microheterogeneity. The variants thus substituted share a first type of abnormal CIEF pattern with alterations throughout the pH range, regardless of the location of the mutation (reactive site and adjacent regions or heparin binding region). Minor amino acid pI changes in these regions do not alter the AT-III overall microheterogeneity, whatever the resulting functional defect. However, if the mutation is placed in the region around positions 404 or 429, then even minor changes of the amino acid pI seem able to alter the overall charge, leading to a second type of abnormal CIEF pattern with the main alteration at pH 4.8-4.6. Neuraminidase treatment leads to disappearance of microheterogeneity except for the variants with the Arg393 to Cys substitution. Addition of thrombin induces CIEF modifications specifically related to the functional defect. A normal formation of thrombin-antithrombin complexes induces a shift towards the more acid pH range, whereas in the variants substituted at the reactive site the CIEF pattern is substantially unaffected by thrombin; variants substituted at positions 382-384 show a maximal thrombin-induced increase of the isoforms at pI 4.8-4.6. Therefore mutant antithrombins with different functional abnormalities but sharing a common CIEF pattern were well distinguished.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Type III polyketide synthase is involved in the biosynthesis of protocatechuic acid in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yangyong; Xiao, Jing; Pan, Li

    2014-11-01

    Genomic studies have shown that not only plants but also filamentous fungi contain type III polyketide synthases. To study the function of type III polyketide synthase (AnPKSIII) in Aspergillus niger, a deletion strain (delAnPKSIII) and an overexpression strain (oeAnPKSIII) were constructed in A. niger MA169.4, a derivative of the wild-type (WT) A. niger ATCC 9029 that produces large quantities of gluconic acid. Alterations in the metabolites were analyzed by HPLC when the extract of the overexpression strain was compared with extracts of the WT and deletion strains. Protocatechuic acid (PCA; 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3.2 mg/l) was isolated and identified as the main product of AnPKSIII when inductively expressed in A. niger MA169.4. The molecular weight of PCA was 154.1 (m/z 153.1 [M-H](-)), was detected by ESI-MS in the negative ionization mode, and (1)H and (13)C NMR data confirmed its structure.

  19. Determination of Cr(III) in chromic acid. Comparison of spectrophotometric and ion chromatographic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Smith, C.H.

    1986-04-01

    Two methods have been developed for determining Cr(III) in chromic acid solutions. Both methods are based on the formation of a Cr-EDTA complex. The ion chromatographic method detects the Cr-EDTA as an anion using chemically suppressed conductivity. The spectrophotometric method detects the Cr-EDTA as a colored complex by measuring the absorbance at 540 nm. The conditions necessary for forming the Cr-EDTA complex are described. The results obtained by the spectrophotometric and ion chromatographic methods are compared. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Comparative biochemical characterization of peroxidases (class III) tightly bound to the maize root cell walls and modulation of the enzyme properties as a result of covalent binding.

    PubMed

    Hadži-Tašković Šukalović, Vesna; Vuletić, Mirjana; Marković, Ksenija; Cvetić Antić, Tijana; Vučinić, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Comparative biochemical characterization of class III peroxidase activity tightly bound to the cell walls of maize roots was performed. Ionically bound proteins were solubilized from isolated walls by salt washing, and the remaining covalently bound peroxidases were released, either by enzymatic digestion or by a novel alkaline extraction procedure that released covalently bound alkali-resistant peroxidase enzyme. Solubilized fractions, as well as the salt-washed cell wall fragments containing covalently bound proteins, were analyzed for peroxidase activity. Peroxidative and oxidative activities indicated that peroxidase enzymes were predominately associated with walls by ionic interactions, and this fraction differs from the covalently bound one according to molecular weight, isozyme patterns, and biochemical parameters. The effect of covalent binding was evaluated by comparison of the catalytic properties of the enzyme bound to the salt-washed cell wall fragments with the corresponding solubilized and released enzyme. Higher thermal stability, improved resistance to KCN, increased susceptibility to H2O2, stimulated capacity of wall-bound enzyme to oxidize indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as well as the difference in kinetic parameters between free and bound enzymes point to conformational changes due to covalent binding. Differences in biochemical properties of ionically and covalently bound peroxidases, as well as the modulation of the enzyme properties as a result of covalent binding to the walls, indicate that these two fractions of apoplastic peroxidases play different roles.

  1. Dance-based exercise program in rheumatoid arthritis. Feasibility in individuals with American College of Rheumatology functional class III disease.

    PubMed

    Noreau, L; Moffet, H; Drolet, M; Parent, E

    1997-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that aerobic exercise training is beneficial to prevent physical deconditioning in persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) without inducing adverse effects on individual's joints and general health. After significant results in individuals with RA (Functional Class I and II), the present study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of a modified dance-based exercise program to improve the physical fitness and psychological state of persons with RA (Class III). Ten (10) female subjects (mean age, 54 +/- 10 years) participated in an eight-week exercise program (twice weekly). Health status, use of medication, joint pain and swelling, cardiorespiratory fitness, activity of daily living, and psychological state were assessed before and after the training program. A high level of participation has been maintained by the participants (mean = 14.8/16 sessions). Most of them were able to perform a maximal exercise test on treadmill and reached 90% of the predicted heart rate at maximal exercise. No significant gain in aerobic power was observed for the group as a whole, but four subjects showed improvements of between 10% and 20% of their cardiorespiratory fitness. Positive changes in depression, anxiety, fatigue, and tension were observed after the eight-week exercise program. No deleterious effect on the health status was observed. These findings provide some evidences as to the feasibility of submitting individuals with RA to a modified dance-exercise program. Further studies, however, are required to determine the long-term effect of weight-bearing exercise on the health status of individuals with RA.

  2. Multiple nucleic acid cleavage modes in divergent type III CRISPR systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Graham, Shirley; Tello, Agnes; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea from invading nucleic acids. Type III systems (Cmr, Csm) have been shown to cleave RNA targets in vitro and some are capable of transcription-dependent DNA targeting. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has two divergent subtypes of the type III system (Sso-IIID and a Cmr7-containing variant of Sso-IIIB). Here, we report that both the Sso-IIID and Sso-IIIB complexes cleave cognate RNA targets with a ruler mechanism and 6 or 12 nt spacing that relates to the organization of the Cas7 backbone. This backbone-mediated cleavage activity thus appears universal for the type III systems. The Sso-IIIB complex is also known to possess a distinct ‘UA’ cleavage mode. The predominant activity observed in vitro depends on the relative molar concentration of protein and target RNA. The Sso-IIID complex can cleave plasmid DNA targets in vitro, generating linear DNA products with an activity that is dependent on both the cyclase and HD nuclease domains of the Cas10 subunit, suggesting a role for both nuclease active sites in the degradation of double-stranded DNA targets. PMID:26801642

  3. Synthesis, luminescence properties of Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes with a novel aromatic carboxylic acid and their interactions with bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Liqun; Yang, Zhengfa; Tang, Ruiren

    2012-12-01

    A novel aromatic carboxylic acid ligand (L) was synthesized and its corresponding Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes, Na3EuLCl3·2H2O (EuL) and Na3TbLCl3·3H2O (TbL), were successfully prepared. L and its corresponding complexes were characterized by means of MS, elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR and TG. The luminescence spectra of Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes were investigated and the results showed that L was an efficient sensitizer for Eu(III) and Tb(III) luminescence. The interactions of L, EuL and TbL with bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been investigated through fluorescence spectroscopy under physiological conditions. The Stern-Volmer analysis indicated that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by L, EuL and TbL was resulted from static mechanism, and the binding constants (Ka) were 2.22 × 104, 1.33 × 105 and 4.27 × 105 at 300 K, respectively. The binding sites (n) and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG were calculated at different temperatures. According to the theoretical and experimental results, van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds were found to play major roles in the binding reaction. Furthermore, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectra indicated that the conformation of BSA was changed. The results obtained in the work can help understand the action mode between L and its corresponding Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes with BSA, and they are also expected to provide important information of designs of new inspired drugs based on Eu and Tb.

  4. Assessment of Microleakage of a Composite Resin Restoration in Primary Teeth Following Class III Cavity Preparation Using Er, Cr: YSGG laser: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Priya; Pandey, Annu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Marginal seal integrity is important for a successful adhesive dental restoration. Alterations caused by laser irradiation in the enamel and dentin surface can affect the marginal integrity of adhesive restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of a composite resin restoration in primary teeth following laser irradiation of enamel and dentin. Methods: Forty freshly extracted sound human primary maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth were used in this study. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups (I and II), with 20 teeth in each. In group I, proximal cavities (Class III) were prepared using an airotor hand –piece and diamond bur. The cavities were etched for 15 seconds with 35% phosphoric acid gel, rinsed with water for 15 seconds, air dried and a bonding agent was applied onto the cavity surfaces and light cured for 20 seconds. The cavities were restored with composite resin and light cured for 40 seconds. In group II, proximal (Class III) cavities were prepared using Erbium, Chromium: Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) (Er,Cr:YSGG) (Biolaseiplus, wave length 2.78 μm). The cavity was then rinsed, air dried and without etching, a bonding agent was applied and light cured for 20 seconds. The cavities were restored in the same manner as that of group I. The treated teeth were mounted on acrylic resin blocks and were subjected to a thermocycling regimen. Following, the teeth were immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 hours. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally in a bucco-lingual direction using a diamond disc at slow speed. The sections of all the groups were examined under a stereomicroscope for micro-leakage. Results: The mean scores for microleakage in group I was 1.95 ± 1.31 and in group II it was 1.4 ± 1.27. There was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.882). Conclusion: No significant difference in microleakage was noticed between the composite resin bonded to lased enamel and

  5. Electrochemical oxidation of 243Am(III) in nitric acid by a terpyridyl-derivatized electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Dares, C. J.; Lapides, A. M.; Mincher, B. J.; Meyer, T. J.

    2015-11-05

    A high surface area, tin-doped indium oxide electrode surface-derivatized with a terpyridine ligand has been applied to the oxidation of trivalent americium to Am(V) and Am(VI) in nitric acid. Potentials as low as 1.8 V vs. the saturated calomel electrode are used, 0.7 V lower than the 2.6 V potential for one-electron oxidation of Am(III) to Am(IV) in 1 M acid. This simple electrochemical procedure provides, for the first time, a method for accessing the higher oxidation states of Am in non-complexing media for developing the coordination chemistries of Am(V) and Am(VI) and, more importantly, for separation of americium from nuclear waste streams.

  6. Inhibition of the β-class carbonic anhydrases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Alfonso; Vullo, Daniela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Manole, Gheorghe; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-04-01

    The growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is strongly inhibited by weak acids although the mechanism by which these compounds act is not completely understood. A series of substituted benzoic acids, nipecotic acid, ortho- and para-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid were investigated as inhibitors of three β-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) from this pathogen, mtCA 1 (Rv1284), mtCA 2 (Rv3588c) and mtCA 3 (Rv3273). All three enzymes were inhibited with efficacies between the submicromolar to the micromolar one, depending on the scaffold present in the carboxylic acid. mtCA 3 was the isoform mostly inhibited by these compounds (K(I)s in the range of 0.11-0.97 µM); followed by mtCA 2 (K(I)s in the range of 0.59-8.10 µM), whereas against mtCA 1, these carboxylic acids showed inhibition constants in the range of 2.25-7.13 µM. This class of relatively underexplored β-CA inhibitors warrant further in vivo studies, as they may have the potential for developing antimycobacterial agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to the clinically used drugs for which many strains exhibit multi-drug or extensive multi-drug resistance.

  7. A Survey of Nucleotide Cyclases in Actinobacteria: Unique Domain Organization and Expansion of the Class III Cyclase Family in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, K.; Krupa, A.; Srinivasan, N.

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are well-known second messengers involved in the regulation of important metabolic pathways or virulence factors. There are six different classes of nucleotide cyclases that can accomplish the task of generating cAMP, and four of these are restricted to the prokaryotes. The role of cAMP has been implicated in the virulence and regulation of secondary metabolites in the phylum Actinobacteria, which contains important pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. leprae, M. bovis and Corynebacterium, and industrial organisms from the genus Streptomyces. We have analysed the actinobacterial genome sequences found in current databases for the presence of different classes of nucleotide cyclases, and find that only class III cyclases are present in these organisms. Importantly, prominent members such as M. tuberculosis and M. leprae have 17 and 4 class III cyclases, respectively, encoded in their genomes, some of which display interesting domain fusions seen for the first time. In addition, a pseudogene corresponding to a cyclase from M. avium has been identified as the only cyclase pseudogene in M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. The Corynebacterium and Streptomyces genomes encode only a single adenylyl cyclase each, both of which have corresponding orthologues in M. tuberculosis. A clustering of the cyclase domains in Actinobacteria reveals the presence of typical eukaryote-like, fungi-like and other bacteria-like class III cyclase sequences within this phylum, suggesting that these proteins may have significant roles to play in this important group of organisms. PMID:18629044

  8. Class III Restoration of Anterior Primary Teeth: In Vitro Retention Comparison of Conventional, Modified and Air-abrasion Treated Preparations.

    PubMed

    Asl Aminabadi, Naser; Najafpour, Ebrahim; Erfanparast, Leila; Samiei, Mohammad; Haghifar, Monireh; Sighari Deljavan, Alireza; Jamali, Zahra; Pournaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Shokravi, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Anterior esthetic restoration is challenging in pediatric dentistry, due to limited durability and poor retention of the restoration.This study assessed the effect of air abrasion on tensile failure load of composite class III restorations using different preparation techniques. Materials and methods. 100 extracted human anterior primary teeth were divided, based on the preparation methods, into four groups each consisting of 25 subjects : conventional (A), labial surface bevel (B), conventional + air abrasion (C), and labial surface bevel + air abrasion (D). After restoring cavities, tensile failure load of samples was measured in Newton by Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm per minute. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests using SPSS software. Results. There were statistically significant differences between groups A and C (P = 0.003), groups A and B (P & 0.001), groups A and D (P & 0.001), groups B and C (P = 0.028), groups B and D (P = 0.027), and also groups C and D (P& 0.001). Group D demonstrated the highest mean tensile failure load. Conclusion. Labial surface bevel treated by air abrasion showed significantly more retention of composite restoration.

  9. Structural, Evolutionary, and Functional Analysis of the Class III Peroxidase Gene Family in Chinese Pear (Pyrus bretschneideri)

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yunpeng; Han, Yahui; Meng, Dandan; Li, Dahui; Jin, Qing; Lin, Yi; Cai, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Peroxidases (PRXs) are widely existed in various organisms and could be divided into different types according to their structures and functions. Specifically, the Class III Peroxidase, a plant-specific multi-gene family, involves in many physiological processes, such as the metabolism of auxin, the extension and thickening of cell wall, as well as the formation of lignin. By searching the pear genome database, 94 non-redundant PRXs from Pyrus bretschneideri (PbPRXs) were identified. Subsequently, analysis of phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, conserved motifs, and microsynteny was performed. These PbPRXs were unevenly distributed among 17 chromosomes of pear. In addition, 26 segmental duplication events but only one tandem duplication were occurred in these PbPRXs, implying segmental duplication was the main contributor to the expansion of the PbPRX family. By the Ka/Ks analysis, 26 out of 27 duplicated PbPRXs has experienced purifying selection. Twenty motifs were identified in PbPRXs based on the MEME analysis, 11 of which were enriched in pear. A total of 41 expressed genes were identified from ESTs of pear fruit. According to qRT-PCR, the expression trends of five PbPRXs in subgroup C were consistent with the change of lignin content during pear fruit development. So we inferred that the five PbPRXs were candidate genes involved in the lignin synthesis pathway. These results provided useful information for further researches of PRX genes in pear. PMID:28018406

  10. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant plant class III chitinase from the pitcher of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata.

    PubMed

    Ishisaki, Kana; Arai, Sachiko; Hamada, Tatsuro; Honda, Yuji

    2012-11-01

    A class III chitinase belonging to the GH18 family from Nepenthes alata (NaCHIT3) was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme exhibited hydrolytic activity toward colloidal chitin, ethylene glycol chitin, and (GlcNAc)(n) (n=5 and 6). The enzyme hydrolyzed the fourth glycosidic linkage from the non-reducing end of (GlcNAc)(6). The anomeric form of the products indicated it was a retaining enzyme. The colloidal chitin hydrolytic reaction displayed high activity between pH 3.9 and 6.9, but the pH optimum of the (GlcNAc)(6) hydrolytic reaction was 3.9 at 37 °C. The optimal temperature for activity was 65 °C in 50 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH 3.9). The pH optima of NaCHIT3 and NaCHIT1 might be related to their roles in chitin degradation in the pitcher fluid.

  11. Should class III drugs be initiated in hospital to prevent drug-induced torsade de pointes arrhythmias?

    PubMed Central

    Verduyn, S.C.; Winckels, S.K.G.; Gorgels, A.P.M.; Doevendans, P.A.; Vos, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives In the US, the FDA requires in-hospital institution of class III drugs. This study retrospectively assessed whether these criteria, which differ markedly from the Dutch exclusion criteria, could predict sotalol-induced torsade de pointes arrhythmias (TdP). Method Oral sotalol effect in a control group (50 patients, 62±12 years, 23 men, 27 women) was compared with five patients developing TdP (75±5years, all women), using known and new (JTU area measured in lead V2) risk parameters. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation was the most common indication for sotalol treatment. Results At baseline the strict US regulations would have identified four of five TdP patients on the basis of individual K+ levels, creatinine clearance and QTc. However, 7 of 49 controls would also have been excluded, although they did not develop documented TdP in the >2 years follow-up. Sotalol slightly increased QTc (361±34 to 387±33ms) in controls, due to heart rate reduction. In the TdP group, sotalol dramatically increased QTc (467±33 to 626±52 ms, +35%, p<0.05) accompanied by deep negative TU waves and an increased JTU area and all could be identified as risk patients. Conclusion Patients developing TdP on oral sotalol can be identified using the FDA risk criteria and hospitalisation may therefore be appropriate. A European prospective study is required to investigate the costs, sensitivity and specificity of this strategy. PMID:25696183

  12. Positive and negative functional interactions between promoter elements from different classes of RNA polymerase III-transcribed genes.

    PubMed Central

    Parry, H D; Mattaj, I W

    1990-01-01

    Consensus tRNA gene promoter elements, A and B boxes, were introduced into the coding sequence of a Xenopus U6 gene. Combinations in which A and B boxes were coupled to wild-type or mutant U6 promoters were made. In this way information about both the functions of individual promoter elements and functional relationships between different classes of RNA polymerase III promoter element were obtained. Mutants in which the U6 PSE was non-functional were rescued by the presence of a B box, indicating a degree of functional relationship between these two elements. Moreover, the B box acted to increase the transcriptional activity and competitive strength of the wild-type U6 promoter. In contrast, no evidence was obtained to suggest that a tRNA A box can interact productively with U6 promoter elements in the absence of a B box. Data obtained suggest that the U6 PSE functions as an 'adaptor', being necessary to enable the basal U6 promoter to respond to upstream enhancement. Certain combinations of U6 and tRNA promoter elements are shown to be mutually antagonistic by a mechanism which is likely to involve blockage of transcription initiation. In summary, the U6 and tRNA promoters are shown to consist of functionally related, but distinct, promoter elements whose interactions shed new light on their normal roles in transcription. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2323333

  13. An EXES Search for Formaldehyde Gas in the Class I/II Young Stellar Object IRAS 04278+2253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin

    2013-10-01

    We propose to obtain high-resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy at 5.65915 microns wavelength of the Class I/II Young Stellar Object (YSO) IRAS 04278+2253 using EXES on SOFIA to search for absorption from formaldehyde (H2CO) gas. Low spectral resolution (R~90) Spitzer-IRS spectra of this YSO and a number of T Tauri stars (TTSs) show an unresolved band of absorption of full width half maximum (FWHM) of ~0.6 microns centered around 5.7 microns wavelength. Modeling of the Spitzer-IRS spectrum of IRAS 04278+2253 and the other TTSs indicates this band may be due to formaldehyde. Detection of individual absorption lines in high spectral resolution mid-infrared spectra of YSOs would be a significant finding, as the relatively recent mid-infrared spectral studies of TTSs that have found evidence for circumstellar gas in protoplanetary disks have found emission lines from gases such as H2O, OH, CO, CO2, HCN, and C2H2 (e.g., Carr & Najita 2008; Salyk et al 2008; Salyk et al 2009; Carr & Najita 2011; Pontoppidan et al 2011), but they do not find absorption lines, and they do not find H2CO.

  14. Structural, Evolutionary, and Functional Analysis of the Class III Peroxidase Gene Family in Chinese Pear (Pyrus bretschneideri).

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunpeng; Han, Yahui; Meng, Dandan; Li, Dahui; Jin, Qing; Lin, Yi; Cai, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Peroxidases (PRXs) are widely existed in various organisms and could be divided into different types according to their structures and functions. Specifically, the Class III Peroxidase, a plant-specific multi-gene family, involves in many physiological processes, such as the metabolism of auxin, the extension and thickening of cell wall, as well as the formation of lignin. By searching the pear genome database, 94 non-redundant PRXs from Pyrus bretschneideri (PbPRXs) were identified. Subsequently, analysis of phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, conserved motifs, and microsynteny was performed. These PbPRXs were unevenly distributed among 17 chromosomes of pear. In addition, 26 segmental duplication events but only one tandem duplication were occurred in these PbPRXs, implying segmental duplication was the main contributor to the expansion of the PbPRX family. By the Ka/Ks analysis, 26 out of 27 duplicated PbPRXs has experienced purifying selection. Twenty motifs were identified in PbPRXs based on the MEME analysis, 11 of which were enriched in pear. A total of 41 expressed genes were identified from ESTs of pear fruit. According to qRT-PCR, the expression trends of five PbPRXs in subgroup C were consistent with the change of lignin content during pear fruit development. So we inferred that the five PbPRXs were candidate genes involved in the lignin synthesis pathway. These results provided useful information for further researches of PRX genes in pear.

  15. Pharyngeal airway changes after mono- and bimaxillary surgery in skeletal class III patients: Cone-beam computed tomography evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hatab, N A; Konstantinović, V S; Mudrak, J K H

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) changes in the pharyngeal airway space (PAS) in 20 class III patients who underwent mono- or bimaxillary surgery using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT examination was obtained before surgery (T1) and at least 3 months after surgery (T2). The pharyngeal airway of each patient was studied at three levels: the level of the posterior nasal spine, the level of the most inferior point of the soft palate, and the level of the top of the epiglottis. At each of these levels, the anteroposterior and lateral dimension as well as cross-sectional area were measured. The volume of the whole PAS and volume between each cross section were also measured. The area and anteroposterior dimensions at the level of the most inferior point of the soft palate significantly decreased in patients who underwent monomaxillary surgery. The volume of the PAS decreased in both groups, but decreased significantly only in the monomaxillary group. The upper volume decreased in the mono- and increased in the bimaxillary group. The lower volume significantly decreased in the monomaxillary group. However, results showed that PAS decreased more after mono-than after bimaxillary surgery.

  16. PCSK1 rs6232 Is Associated with Childhood and Adult Class III Obesity in the Mexican Population

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos-Comparán, Marisela; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Larrieta-Carrasco, Elena; León-Mimila, Paola; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Liceaga-Fuentes, Adriana E.; Campos-Pérez, Francisco J.; López-Contreras, Blanca E.; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; del Río-Navarro, Blanca E.; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Background Common variants rs6232 and rs6235 in the PCSK1 gene have been associated with obesity in European populations. We aimed to evaluate the contribution of these variants to obesity and related traits in Mexican children and adults. Methodology/Principal Findings Rs6232 and rs6235 were genotyped in 2382 individuals, 1206 children and 1176 adults. Minor allele frequencies were 0.78% for rs6232 and 19.99% for rs6235. Rs6232 was significantly associated with childhood obesity and adult class III obesity (OR = 3.01 95%CI 1.64–5.53; P = 4×10−4 in the combined analysis). In addition, this SNP was significantly associated with lower fasting glucose levels (P = 0.01) and with increased insulin levels and HOMA-B (P = 0.05 and 0.01, respectively) only in non-obese children. In contrast, rs6235 showed no significant association with obesity or with glucose homeostasis parameters in any group. Conclusion/Significance Although rs6232 is rare in the Mexican population, it should be considered as an important risk factor for extreme forms of obesity. PMID:22737226

  17. Effects of surgical correction of class III malocclusion on the pharyngeal airway and its influence on sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Canellas, J V Dos S; Barros, H L M; Medeiros, P J D; Ritto, F G

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate, through cone beam computed tomography, the immediate changes in pharyngeal airway space (PAS) after orthognathic surgery in class III patients, and to determine the influence of surgery on the development of obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). A prospective study was conducted; 33 patients were divided into three groups: mandibular setback surgery (nine patients), bimaxillary surgery (18 patients), and maxillary advancement surgery (six patients). PAS measurements obtained pre- and postoperatively were compared using the t-test. All patients were assessed clinically for OSAHS before surgery and at 6 months postoperative using the Berlin questionnaire and a combined clinical assessment, which included the assessment of OSAHS symptoms, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, and body mass index. Patients undergoing isolated mandibular setback surgery demonstrated a decrease in total PAS volume, in hypopharynx volume, and in minimum cross-sectional area of the pharynx immediately after surgery (P<0.05). The clinical analysis did not reveal signs or symptoms of OSAHS in any of the 33 patients. Although patients who underwent mandibular setback surgery alone demonstrated a volume reduction in the PAS and a decrease in minimum cross-sectional area, these reductions were not accompanied by signs or symptoms of OSAHS.

  18. Linking Microbial Dynamics and Physicochemical Processes in High-temperature Acidic Fe(III)- Mineralizing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial activity is responsible for the mineralization of Fe(III)-oxides in high-temperature chemotrophic communities that flourish within oxygenated zones of low pH (2.5 - 4) geothermal outflow channels (Yellowstone National Park, WY). High-temperature Fe(II)-oxidizing communities contain several lineages of Archaea, and are excellent model systems for studying microbial interactions and spatiotemporal dynamics across geochemical gradients. We hypothesize that acidic Fe(III)-oxide mats form as a result of constant interaction among primary colonizers including Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales) and Metallosphaera spp. (Sulfolobales), and subsequent colonization by archaeal heterotrophs, which vary in abundance as a function of oxygen, pH and temperature. We are integrating a complementary suite of geochemical, stable isotope, genomic, proteomic and modeling analyses to study the role of microorganisms in Fe(III)-oxide mat development, and to elucidate the primary microbial interactions that are coupled with key abiotic events. Curated de novo assemblies of major phylotypes are being used to analyze additional -omics datasets from these microbial mats. Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales) are the dominant bacterial population(s) present, and predominate during early mat development (< 30 d). Other Sulfolobales populations known to oxidize Fe(II) and fix carbon dioxide (e.g., Metallosphaera spp.) represent a secondary stage of mat development (e.g., 14 - 30 d). Hydrogenobaculum filaments appear to promote the nucleation and subsequent mineralization of Fe(III)-oxides, which likely affect the growth and turnover rates of these organisms. Other heterotrophs colonize Fe(III)-oxide mats during succession (> 30 d), including novel lineages of Archaea and representatives within the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Nanoarchaeota. In situ oxygen consumption rates show that steep gradients occur within the top 1 mm of mat surface, and which correlate with

  19. Bacterial Formation of As(V) and As(III) Ferric Oxyhydroxides in Acid Mine Drainage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, G.; Juillot, F.; Lebrun, S.; Casiot, C.; Elbaz-Poulichet, F.; Bruneel, O.; Personne, J.; Leblanc, M.; Ildefonse, P.; Calas, G.

    2002-12-01

    The oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) which is often promoted by acidophilic bacteria in acid mine drainage (AMD) and some hot springs, leads to the precipitation of Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides which incorporate toxic elements within their structure or adsorb them at their surface, thus limiting their mobility. In such complex natural systems, synchrotron-based techniques as X-ray absorption spectroscopy offer the opportunity to monitor surface/solution interactions as well as redox changes affecting the mobility and toxicity of trace elements as arsenic. Spatial and seasonal variations of the (bio-) oxidation of Fe(II) and As(III), and the subsequent precipitation of As-Fe gels, were followed by XANES, XRD, and SEM along the CarnoulŠs AMD (Gard, France). Chemical and mineralogical data collected on sediments, stromatolite, and bioassay samples showed that some indigenous bacteria living in the As-rich CarnoulŠs water ([As] = up to 350 mg.l-1) play an important role in the nature and composition of the solid phases that sequester arsenic at the site. The formation of nano-crystalline and amorphous As(III) ferric oxy-hydroxides has been related to the presence of bacteria able to oxidize Fe(II) but not As(III), which are only present in winter in the upstream area. A rare ferric arsenite sulfate oxy-hydroxide mineral was discovered in this context. Other types of bacteria, occurring in the downstream area whatever the season, are able to catalyze As(III) to As(V) oxidation and, provided that enough Fe(II) oxidizes, promote the formation of amorphous As(V) rich ferric oxy-hydroxides. These bacterially mediated reactions significantly reduce the concentration of dissolved As(III), which is more toxic and mobile than As(V), and might thus be helpful for designing As-removal processes. This work was supported by the French PEVS and ACI Ecologie Quantitative Programs and the PIRAMID EC program. ?Deceased, 26 October 1999 Juillot F., Ildefonse Ph., Morin G., Calas G., De

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibits Deficient Biofilm Formation in the Absence of Class II and III Ribonucleotide Reductases Due to Hindered Anaerobic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Anna; Pedraz, Lucas; Astola, Josep; Torrents, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung infections by the ubiquitous and extremely adaptable opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa correlate with the formation of a biofilm, where bacteria grow in association with an extracellular matrix and display a wide range of changes in gene expression and metabolism. This leads to increased resistance to physical stress and antibiotic therapies, while enhancing cell-to-cell communication. Oxygen diffusion through the complex biofilm structure generates an oxygen concentration gradient, leading to the appearance of anaerobic microenvironments. Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a family of highly sophisticated enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the deoxyribonucleotides, and they constitute the only de novo pathway for the formation of the building blocks needed for DNA synthesis and repair. P. aeruginosa is one of the few bacteria encoding all three known RNR classes (Ia, II, and III). Class Ia RNRs are oxygen dependent, class II are oxygen independent, and class III are oxygen sensitive. A tight control of RNR activity is essential for anaerobic growth and therefore for biofilm development. In this work we explored the role of the different RNR classes in biofilm formation under aerobic and anaerobic initial conditions and using static and continuous-flow biofilm models. We demonstrated the importance of class II and III RNR for proper cell division in biofilm development and maturation. We also determined that these classes are transcriptionally induced during biofilm formation and under anaerobic conditions. The molecular mechanism of their anaerobic regulation was also studied, finding that the Anr/Dnr system is responsible for class II RNR induction. These data can be integrated with previous knowledge about biofilms in a model where these structures are understood as a set of layers determined by oxygen concentration and contain cells with different RNR expression profiles, bringing us a step closer to the understanding of this

  1. A method for establishing class III medical device equivalence: sodium hyaluronate (GenVisc 850) for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Doros, Gheorghe; Lavin, Philip T; Daley, Michael; Miller, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    Although the concept of equivalence for drugs (generics) and biologics (biosimilars) has been readily adopted, the concept of equivalence or indistinguishable characteristics for class III medical devices has yet to be specifically addressed regarding a defined regulatory approval process in the US. In September 2015, GenVisc 850® (sodium hyaluronate), a hyaluronic acid approved for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) based upon indistinguishable characteristics in comparison to an approved branded hyaluronic acid (Supartz®/Supartz FX™). The purpose of this paper is to review the methodology and report the main outcomes used to demonstrate clinical comparability of GenVisc 850 with Supartz/Supartz FX. The FDA approval was collectively attained using prospectively defined methods for preclinical, physical, and chemical testing, as well as noninferiority in clinical performance comparisons. Evidence from five randomized controlled studies of Supartz/Supartz FX vs saline control injections (used for Supartz approval), two randomized controlled trials of GenVisc 850 vs saline control injections, and one randomized controlled study of GenVisc 850 vs Supartz/Supartz FX provided evidence of safety for GenVisc 850. Efficacy was further assessed based on assessment of the same Supartz studies and three prospectively identified GenVisc 850 studies. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was used to demonstrate that the clinical efficacy of GenVisc 850 was noninferior to Supartz/Supartz FX and superior to saline control. Overall, safety of GenVisc 850 was similar to that of Supartz/Supartz FX and saline control injections, while efficacy of GenVisc 850 was noninferior to that of Supartz/Supartz FX and superior to saline control injections. PMID:27471412

  2. A method for establishing class III medical device equivalence: sodium hyaluronate (GenVisc 850) for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Doros, Gheorghe; Lavin, Philip T; Daley, Michael; Miller, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    Although the concept of equivalence for drugs (generics) and biologics (biosimilars) has been readily adopted, the concept of equivalence or indistinguishable characteristics for class III medical devices has yet to be specifically addressed regarding a defined regulatory approval process in the US. In September 2015, GenVisc 850® (sodium hyaluronate), a hyaluronic acid approved for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) based upon indistinguishable characteristics in comparison to an approved branded hyaluronic acid (Supartz®/Supartz FX™). The purpose of this paper is to review the methodology and report the main outcomes used to demonstrate clinical comparability of GenVisc 850 with Supartz/Supartz FX. The FDA approval was collectively attained using prospectively defined methods for preclinical, physical, and chemical testing, as well as noninferiority in clinical performance comparisons. Evidence from five randomized controlled studies of Supartz/Supartz FX vs saline control injections (used for Supartz approval), two randomized controlled trials of GenVisc 850 vs saline control injections, and one randomized controlled study of GenVisc 850 vs Supartz/Supartz FX provided evidence of safety for GenVisc 850. Efficacy was further assessed based on assessment of the same Supartz studies and three prospectively identified GenVisc 850 studies. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was used to demonstrate that the clinical efficacy of GenVisc 850 was noninferior to Supartz/Supartz FX and superior to saline control. Overall, safety of GenVisc 850 was similar to that of Supartz/Supartz FX and saline control injections, while efficacy of GenVisc 850 was noninferior to that of Supartz/Supartz FX and superior to saline control injections.

  3. Thermodynamics of axial substitution and kinetics of reactions with amino acids for the paddlewheel complex tetrakis(acetato)chloridodiruthenium(II,III).

    PubMed

    Santos, Rodrigo L S R; van Eldik, Rudi; de Oliveira Silva, Denise

    2012-06-18

    The known paddlewheel, tetrakis(acetato)chloridodiruthenium(II,III), offers a versatile synthetic route to a novel class of antitumor diruthenium(II,III) metallo drugs, where the equatorial ligands are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory carboxylates. This complex was studied here as a soluble starting prototype model for antitumor analogues to elucidate the reactivity of the [Ru(2)(CH(3)COO)(4)](+) framework. Thermodynamic studies on equilibration reactions for axial substitution of water by chloride and kinetic studies on reactions of the diaqua complexes with the amino acids glycine, cysteine, histidine, and tryptophan were performed. The standard thermodynamic reaction parameters ΔH°, ΔS°, and ΔV° were determined and showed that both of the sequential axial substitution reactions are enthalpy driven. Kinetic rate laws and rate constants were determined for the axial substitution reactions of coordinated water by the amino acids that gave the corresponding aqua(amino acid)-Ru(2) substituted species. The results revealed that the [Ru(2)(CH(3)COO)(4)](+) paddlewheel framework remained stable during the axial ligand substitution reactions and was also mostly preserved in the presence of the amino acids.

  4. Inactivation of a class A and a class C β-lactamase by 6β-(hydroxymethyl)penicillanic acid sulfone

    PubMed Central

    Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Bethel, Christopher R.; Gootz, Thomas D.; Shang, Wenchi; Stroh, Justin; Lau, William; McLeod, Dale; Price, Loren; Marfat, Anthony; Distler, Anne; Drawz, Sarah M.; Chen, Hansong; Harry, Emily; Nottingham, Micheal; Carey, Paul R.; Buynak, John D.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    β-Lactamase inhibitors (clavulanic acid, sulbactam, and tazobactam) contribute significantly to the longevity of the β-lactam antibiotics used to treat serious infections. In the quest to design more potent compounds and to understand the mechanism of action of known inhibitors, 6β-(hydroxymethyl)penicillanic acid sulfone (6β-HM-sulfone) was tested against isolates expressing the class A TEM-1 β-lactamase and a clinically important variant of the AmpC cephalosporinase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PDC-3. The addition of the 6β-HM-sulfone inhibitor to ampicillin was highly effective. 6β-HM-sulfone inhibited TEM-1 with an IC50 of 12 ± 2 nM and PDC-3 with an IC50 of 180 ± 36 nM, and displayed lower partition ratios than commercial inhibitors, with partition ratios (kcat/kinact) equal to 174 for TEM-1 and 4 for PDC-3. Measured for 20 h, 6β-HM-sulfone demonstrated rapid, first-order inactivation kinetics with the extent of inactivation being related to the concentration of inhibitor for both TEM-1 and PDC-3. Using mass spectrometry to gain insight into the intermediates of inactivation of this inhibitor, 6β-HM-sulfone was found to form a major adduct of +247 ± 5 Da with TEM-1 and +245 ± 5 Da with PDC-3, suggesting that the covalently bound, hydrolytically stabilized acyl-enzyme has lost a molecule of water (H–O–H). Minor adducts of +88 ± 5 Da with TEM-1 and +85 ± 5 Da with PDC-3 revealed that fragmentation of the covalent adduct can result but appeared to occur slowly with both enzymes. 6β-HM-sulfone is an effective and versatile β-lactamase inhibitor of representative class A and C enzymes. PMID:22155308

  5. Theoretical study of metal-ligand interaction in Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) complexes of coumarin-3-carboxylic acid in the gas phase and solution.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Ivelina; Trendafilova, Natasha; Aquino, Adélia J A; Lischka, Hans

    2007-12-10

    The interaction of lanthanide(III) cations (Ln(III) = Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III)) with the deprotonated form of the coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (cca-) has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) and confirmed by reference MP2 and CCSD(T) computations. Solvent effects on the geometries and stabilities of the Ln(III) complexes were computed using a combination of water clusters and a continuum solvation model. The following two series of systems were considered: (i) Ln(cca)2+, Ln(cca)2+, Ln(cca)3 and (ii) Ln(cca)(H2O)2Cl2, Ln(cca)2(H2O)2Cl, Ln(cca)3. The strength and character of the Ln(III)-cca- bidentate bonding were characterized by calculated Ln-O bond lengths, binding energies, ligand deformation energies, energy partitioning analysis, sigma-donation contributions, and natural population analyses. The energy decomposition calculations predicted predominant electrostatic interaction terms to the Ln-cca bonding (ionic character) and showed variations of the orbital interaction term (covalent contributions) for the Ln-cca complexes studied. Electron distribution analysis suggested that the covalent contribution comes mainly from the interaction with the carboxylate moiety of cca-.

  6. Purification, enzymatic properties, and active site environment of a novel manganese(III)-containing acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Y; Kawabe, H; Tanaka, H; Fujimoto, S; Ohara, A

    1981-10-25

    A new manganese-containing acid phosphatase has been isolated and crystallized from sweet potato tubers. The pure enzyme contains one atom of manganese per Mr = 110,000 polypeptide and shows phosphatase activity toward various phosphate substrates. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 5.8 and the enzyme activity was inhibited by Cu2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, AsO43-, and MoO42-. This stable metalloenzyme is red-violet in color with an intense absorption band at 515 nm (epsilon - 2460). Our electronic, circular dichroism, and electron spin resonance findings strongly indicate that the Mn-valence state of the native enzyme is trivalent. When the Mn-enzyme is excited by the 5145 A line of Ar+ laser, prominent Raman lines at 1230, 1298, 1508, and 1620 cm-1 were detected. This Raman spectrum can probably be interpreted in terms of internal vibration of a coordinated tyrosine phenolate anion. The tryptophan-modified enzyme showed a positive Raman band at 370 cm-1, which is preferentially assigned to a Mn(III)-S streching mode. The modification of the Mn-enzyme by N-bromosuccinimide led to a large decrease in the fluorescence intensity of 335 nm which was dominated by its tryptophan residues within a considerable hydrophobic environment. The acid phosphatase activity was significantly decreased by the tryptophan modification. With respect to the active site donor sets, the Mn(III)-containing acid phosphatase is distinctly different from the Zn(II)-containing alkaline phosphatase. Of interest is also the appreciable similarity of some enzymatic and spectroscopic properties between the present enzyme and uteroferrin.

  7. Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and arsenite: LD(50) in hamsters and in vitro inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Petrick, J S; Jagadish, B; Mash, E A; Aposhian, H V

    2001-06-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a metabolite of inorganic arsenic, has received very little attention from investigators of arsenic metabolism in humans. MMA(III), like sodium arsenite, contains arsenic in the +3 oxidation state. Although we have previously demonstrated that it is more toxic than arsenite in cultured Chang human hepatocytes, there are no data showing in vivo toxicity of MMA(III). When MMA(III) or sodium arsenite was administered intraperitoneally to hamsters, the LD(50)s were 29.3 and 112.0 micromol/kg of body wt, respectively. In addition, inhibition of hamster kidney or purified porcine heart pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity by MMA(III) or arsenite was determined. To inhibit hamster kidney PDH activity by 50%, the concentrations (mean +/- SE) of MMA(III) as methylarsine oxide, MMA(III) as diiodomethylarsine, and arsenite were 59.9 +/- 6.5, 62.0 +/- 1.8, and 115.7 +/- 2.3 microM, respectively. To inhibit activity of purified porcine heart PDH activity by 50%, the concentrations (mean +/- SE) of MMA(III) as methylarsine oxide and arsenite were 17.6 +/- 4.1 and 106.1 +/- 19.8 microM, respectively. These data demonstrate that MMA(III) is more toxic than inorganic arsenite, both in vivo and in vitro, and call into question the hypothesis that methylation of inorganic arsenic is a detoxication process.

  8. Uptake and catabolism of modified LDL in scavenger-receptor class A type I/II knock-out mice.

    PubMed Central

    Van Berkel, T J; Van Velzen, A; Kruijt, J K; Suzuki, H; Kodama, T

    1998-01-01

    The liver is the major organ responsible for the uptake of modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from the blood circulation, with endothelial and Kupffer cells as major cellular uptake sites. Scavenger-receptors, which include various classes, are held responsible for this uptake. Mice deficient in scavenger-receptor class A types I and II were created and the fate of acetylated LDL (Ac-LDL) in vivo and its interaction with liver endothelial, Kupffer and peritoneal macrophages was characterized. Surprisingly, the decay in vivo (t12 < 2 min), tissue distribution and liver uptake (at 5 min it was 77.4 +/- 4.6% of the injected dose) of Ac-LDL in the knock-out mice were not significantly different from control mice (t12 < 2 min and liver uptake 79.1 +/- 4.6% of the injected dose). A separation of mice liver cells into parenchymal, endothelial and Kupffer cells 10 min after injection of Ac-LDL indicated that in both control and knock-out mice the liver endothelial cells were responsible for more than 70% of the liver uptake. Both in control and knock-out mice, preinjection of polyinosinic acid (poly I, 200 microg) completely blocked the liver uptake, indicating that both in control and knock-out mice the scavenger-receptors are sensitive to poly I. Preinjection of suboptimal poly I concentrations (20 and 50 microg) provided evidence that the serum decay and liver uptake of Ac-LDL is more readily inhibited in the knock-out mice as compared with the control mice, indicating less efficient removal of Ac-LDL in vivo in the knock-out mice under these conditions. Studies in vitro with isolated liver endothelial and Kupffer cells from knock-out mice indicate that the cell association of Ac-LDL during 2 h at 37 degrees C is 50 and 53% of the control, respectively, whereas the degradation reaches values of 58 and 63%. For peritoneal macrophages from knock-out mice the cell association of Ac-LDL was identical to the control mice whereas the Ac-LDL degradation in cells from the

  9. Genetic Variation on the BAT1-NFKBIL1-LTA Region of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class III Associates with Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Marchesani, Marja; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Mäntylä, Päivi; Paju, Susanna; Buhlin, Kåre; Suominen, Anna L.; Contreras, Johanna; Knuuttila, Matti; Hernandez, Marcela; Huumonen, Sisko; Nieminen, Markku S.; Perola, Markus; Sinisalo, Juha; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Pussinen, Pirkko J.

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a multifactorial etiology. We investigated whether human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphisms (6p21.3) are associated with periodontal parameters. Parogene 1 population samples (n = 169) were analyzed with 13,245 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the MHC region. Eighteen selected SNPs (P ≤ 0.001) were replicated in Parogene 2 population samples (n = 339) and the Health 2000 Survey (n = 1,420). All subjects had a detailed clinical and radiographic oral health examination. Serum lymphotoxin-α (LTA) concentrations were measured in the Parogene populations, and the protein was detected in inflamed periodontal tissue. In the Parogene 1 population, 10 SNPs were associated with periodontal parameters. The strongest associations emerged from the parameters bleeding on probing (BOP) and a probing pocket depth (PPD) of ≥6 mm with the genes BAT1, NFKBIL1, and LTA. Six SNPs, rs11796, rs3130059, rs2239527, rs2071591, rs909253, and rs1041981 (r2, ≥0.92), constituted a risk haplotype. In the Parogene 1 population, the haplotype had the strongest association with the parameter BOP, a PPD of ≥6 mm, and severe periodontitis with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 2.63 (2.21 to 3.20), 2.90 (2.37 to 3.52), and 3.10 (1.63 to 5.98), respectively. These results were replicated in the other two populations. High serum LTA concentrations in the Parogene population were associated with the periodontitis risk alleles of the LTA SNPs (rs909253 and rs1041981) of the haplotype. In addition, the protein was expressed in inflamed gingival connective tissue. We identified a novel BAT1-NFKBIL1-LTA haplotype as a significant contributor to the risk of periodontitis. The genetic polymorphisms in the MHC class III region may be functionally important in periodontitis susceptibility. PMID:24566624

  10. The ERECTA, CLAVATA and class III HD-ZIP Pathways Display Synergistic Interactions in Regulating Floral Meristem Activities

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Udi; Asis, Lior; Eshed Williams, Leor

    2015-01-01

    In angiosperms, the production of flowers marks the beginning of the reproductive phase. At the emergence of flower primordia on the flanks of the inflorescence meristem, the WUSCHEL (WUS) gene, which encodes a homeodomain transcription factor starts to be expressed and establishes de novo stem cell population, founder of the floral meristem (FM). Similarly to the shoot apical meristem a precise spatial and temporal expression pattern of WUS is required and maintained through strict regulation by multiple regulatory inputs to maintain stem cell homeostasis. However, following the formation of a genetically determined fixed number of floral organs, this homeostasis is shifted towards organogenesis and the FM is terminated. In here we performed a genetic study to test how a reduction in ERECTA, CLAVATA and class III HD-ZIP pathways affects floral meristem activity and flower development. We revealed strong synergistic phenotypes of extra flower number, supernumerary whorls, total loss of determinacy and extreme enlargement of the meristem as compared to any double mutant combination indicating that the three pathways, CLV3, ER and HD-ZIPIII distinctively regulate meristem activity and that they act in parallel. Our findings yield several new insights into stem cell-driven development. We demonstrate the crucial requirement for coupling floral meristem termination with carpel formation to ensure successful reproduction in plants. We also show how regulation of meristem size and alternation in spatial structure of the meristem serve as a mechanism to determine flower organogenesis. We propose that the loss of FM determinacy due to the reduction in CLV3, ER and HD-ZIPIII activity is genetically separable from the AGAMOUS core mechanism of meristem termination. PMID:25946150

  11. Differential regulation of meristem size, morphology and organization by the ERECTA, CLAVATA and class III HD-ZIP pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Tali; Candela, Héctor; Landau, Udi; Asis, Lior; Zelinger, Einat; Carles, Cristel C.; Williams, Leor Eshed

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The shoot apical meristem (SAM) of angiosperm plants is a small, highly organized structure that gives rise to all above-ground organs. The SAM is divided into three functional domains: the central zone (CZ) at the SAM tip harbors the self-renewing pluripotent stem cells and the organizing center, providing daughter cells that are continuously displaced into the interior rib zone (RZ) or the surrounding peripheral zone (PZ), from which organ primordia are initiated. Despite the constant flow of cells from the CZ into the RZ or PZ, and cell recruitment for primordium formation, a stable balance is maintained between the distinct cell populations in the SAM. Here we combined an in-depth phenotypic analysis with a comparative RNA-Seq approach to characterize meristems from selected combinations of clavata3 (clv3), jabba-1D (jba-1D) and erecta (er) mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that CLV3 restricts meristem expansion along the apical-basal axis, whereas class III HD-ZIP and ER pathways restrict meristem expansion laterally, but in distinct and possibly perpendicular orientations. Our k-means analysis reveals that clv3, jba-1D/+ and er lead to meristem enlargement by affecting different aspects of meristem function; for example, clv3 displays an increase in the stem cell population, whereas jba-1D/+ er exhibits an increase in mitotic activity and in the meristematic cell population. Our analyses demonstrate that a combined genetic and mRNA-Seq comparative approach provides a precise and sensitive method to identify cell type-specific transcriptomes in a small structure, such as the SAM. PMID:26989178

  12. Reductions in knee joint forces with weight loss are attenuated by gait adaptations in class III obesity.

    PubMed

    DeVita, Paul; Rider, Patrick; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-03-01

    A consensus exists that high knee joint forces are a precursor to knee osteoarthritis and weight loss reduces these forces. Because large weight loss also leads to increased step length and walking velocity, knee contact forces may be reduced less than predicted by the magnitude of weight loss. The purpose was to determine the effects of weight loss on knee muscle and joint loads during walking in Class III obese adults. We determined through motion capture, force platform measures and biomechanical modeling the effects of weight loss produced by gastric bypass surgery over one year on knee muscle and joint loads during walking at a standard, controlled velocity and at self-selected walking velocities. Weight loss equaling 412 N or 34% of initial body weight reduced maximum knee compressive force by 824 N or 67% of initial body weight when walking at the controlled velocity. These changes represent a 2:1 reduction in knee force relative to weight loss when walking velocity is constrained to the baseline value. However, behavioral adaptations including increased stride length and walking velocity in the self-selected velocity condition attenuated this effect by ∼50% leading to a 392 N or 32% initial body weight reduction in compressive force in the knee joint. Thus, unconstrained walking elicited approximately 1:1 ratio of reduction in knee force relative to weight loss and is more indicative of walking behavior than the standard velocity condition. In conclusion, massive weight loss produces dramatic reductions in knee forces during walking but when patients stride out and walk faster, these favorable reductions become substantially attenuated.

  13. Differential regulation of meristem size, morphology and organization by the ERECTA, CLAVATA and class III HD-ZIP pathways.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Tali; Candela, Héctor; Landau, Udi; Asis, Lior; Zelinger, Einat; Carles, Cristel C; Williams, Leor Eshed

    2016-05-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) of angiosperm plants is a small, highly organized structure that gives rise to all above-ground organs. The SAM is divided into three functional domains: the central zone (CZ) at the SAM tip harbors the self-renewing pluripotent stem cells and the organizing center, providing daughter cells that are continuously displaced into the interior rib zone (RZ) or the surrounding peripheral zone (PZ), from which organ primordia are initiated. Despite the constant flow of cells from the CZ into the RZ or PZ, and cell recruitment for primordium formation, a stable balance is maintained between the distinct cell populations in the SAM. Here we combined an in-depth phenotypic analysis with a comparative RNA-Seq approach to characterize meristems from selected combinations of clavata3 (clv3), jabba-1D (jba-1D) and erecta (er) mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana We demonstrate that CLV3 restricts meristem expansion along the apical-basal axis, whereas class III HD-ZIP and ER pathways restrict meristem expansion laterally, but in distinct and possibly perpendicular orientations. Our k-means analysis reveals that clv3, jba-1D/+ and er lead to meristem enlargement by affecting different aspects of meristem function; for example, clv3 displays an increase in the stem cell population, whereas jba-1D/+ er exhibits an increase in mitotic activity and in the meristematic cell population. Our analyses demonstrate that a combined genetic and mRNA-Seq comparative approach provides a precise and sensitive method to identify cell type-specific transcriptomes in a small structure, such as the SAM.

  14. Rh(III)-catalyzed decarboxylative ortho-heteroarylation of aromatic carboxylic acids by using the carboxylic acid as a traceless directing group.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xurong; Sun, Denan; You, Qiulin; Cheng, Yangyang; Lan, Jingbo; You, Jingsong

    2015-04-03

    Highly selective decarboxylative ortho-heteroarylation of aromatic carboxylic acids with various heteroarenes has been developed through Rh(III)-catalyzed two-fold C-H activation, which exhibits a wide substrate scope of both aromatic carboxylic acids and heteroarenes. The use of naturally occurring carboxylic acid as the directing group avoids troublesome extra steps for installation and removal of an external directing group.

  15. Amino acid sequence of neurotoxin III of the scorpion Androctonus austrialis Hector.

    PubMed

    Kopeyan, C; Martinez, G; Rochat, H

    1979-03-01

    The amino acid sequence of neurotoxin III, purified from the venom of the North African scorpion Androctonus australis Hector, has been determined by Edman degradation using a liquid-phase sequencer. Carboxypeptidase A hydrolyses confirmed not only the sequence of the five last residues but also the presence of a free alpha-carboxylic group at the C-terminus. Edman degradation was conducted on one hand with the Quadrol [N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)ethylene diamine] program and S-alkylated protein before or after coupling with sulfophenylisothiocynate (the first 34 residues were thus identified), on the other hand on tryptic and chymotryptic peptides with a dimethylbenzylamine program (residues 1--23 and 31--34 were confirmed, the positions of residues 35-64 were established). Neurotoxin III was found to belong to the same group of scorpion toxins active on mammals as neurotoxin I purified from the same venom (50 homologous positions exist in the two proteins).

  16. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  17. Preparation and research of nano-scale europium (III)-pyromellitic acid powder luminescent material.

    PubMed

    Zhenfeng, Cui; Huijuan, Ren; Chun, Zheng; Fenghua, Chen; Guangyan, Hong

    2010-03-01

    The nanoscale luminescent complex of europium (III)-pyromellitic acid was synthesized successfully in the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) matrix by a co-precipitation method. The chemical formula of the synthesized complex was speculated to be PVP/Eu4/3L x 3H2O by elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of PVP/Eu4/3L x 3H2O indicated that it was a new crystalline complex since the diffraction angle, diffraction intensity, and distance of the crystal plane were all different from those of the ligand. It is proved by the thermogravimetric curve that the synthesized nanoscale luminescent complex was stable, ranging from ambient temperature to 479 degrees C in air. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image showed that the complex was nanoparticles. The synthesized complex emitted the characteristic red fluorescence of Eu(III) ions under ultraviolet excitation by the photoluminescence analyses. For example, the emission peaks of PVP/Eu4/3L x 3H2O at 578, 591, 612, and 694 nm using 322 nm as exciting wavelength are assigned to the 5D0 --> 7F0, 5D0 --> 7F1, 5D0 --> F2, and 5D0 --> 7F4 electron transitions of the Eu3+ ions, respectively.

  18. Chemiluminescence determination of gemifloxacin based on diperiodatoargentate (III)-sulphuric acid reaction in a micellar medium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Zhao, Wen-hui; Xiong, Wei

    2013-01-01

    A novel flow-injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) analysis method for the determination of gemifloxacin in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant micelles is described. Strong CL signal was generated during the reaction of gemifloxacin with diperiodatoargentate (III) in a sulfuric acid medium sensitized by CTAB. Under optimum experimental conditions, the CL intensity was linearly related to the concentration of gemifloxacin from 1.0 × 10(-9) to 3.0 × 10(-7) g/mL and the detection limit was 7.3 × 10(-10) g/mL (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.7 % for a 3.0 × 10(-8) g/mL gemifloxacin solution (11 repeated measurements). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of gemifloxacin in pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids. The possible mechanism of the CL reaction is also discussed briefly.

  19. The endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for trivalent dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup III})-induced cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Naranmandura, Hua; Xu, Shi; Koike, Shota; Pan, Li Qiang; Chen, Bin; Wang, Yan Wei; Rehman, Kanwal; Wu, Bin; Chen, Zhe; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of present study was to characterize the endoplasmic reticulum stress and generation of ROS in rat liver RLC-16 cells by exposing to trivalent dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) and compared with that of trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}). Protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) phosphorylation was significantly induced in cells exposed to DMA{sup III}, while there was no change in phosphorylated PERK (P-PERK) detected in cells after exposure to iAs{sup III} or MMA{sup III}. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after DMA{sup III} exposure was found to take place specifically in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), while previous reports showed that ROS was generated in mitochondria following exposure to MMA{sup III}. Meanwhile, cycloheximide (CHX) which is an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis strongly inhibited the DMA{sup III}-induced intracellular ROS generation in the ER and the phosphorylation of PERK, suggesting the induction of ER stress probably occurs through the inhibition of the protein folding process. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) mRNA were induced by all three arsenic species, however, evidence suggested that they might be induced by different pathways in the case of iAs{sup III} and MMA{sup III}. In addition, ER resident molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein78 (GRP78) was not affected by trivalent arsenicals, while it was induced in positive control only at high concentration (Thapsigargin;Tg), suggesting the GRP78 is less sensitive to low levels of ER stress. In summary, our findings demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum is a target organelle for DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. Highlights: ►ER is a target organelle for trivalent DMA{sup III}-induced cytotoxicity. ►Generation of ROS in ER can be induced specially by trivalent DMA{sup III}. ►ER-stress and generation of ROS are caused by the increase in

  20. Features of separation on polymeric reversed phase for two classes of higher saturated fatty acids esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deineka, V. I.; Lapshova, M. S.; Zakharenko, E. V.; Deineka, L. A.

    2013-11-01

    The principles of sorption on polymeric reversed phase (PRP) YMS C30 for members of the two classes of esters formed by higher saturated fatty acids, i.e., lutein diesters ( I) and triacylglycerols ( II), are investigated. It is shown that the logarithm of the retention factor increases nonlinearly with an increase of the length of the acid radical, although the retention on PRP is higher in the case of I and lower in the case of II, compared to their retention on traditional monomeric reversed phase (MRP) Kromasil-100 5C18; however, the equivalence of the contributions to the retention of I that correspond to an identical change in acids, does not depend on the length of the hydrocarbon radical of the second acid. It is noted that the Van't Hoff plot for PRP contains a curve break, indicating a change in the retention mechanism upon a rise in temperature.