Science.gov

Sample records for acidic dry deposition

  1. DRY DEPOSITION MODULE FOR REGIONAL ACID DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to compute surface dry deposition velocities for sulfur dioxide, sulfate, ozone, NO plus NO2, and nitric acid vapor over much of the North American continent have been developed for use with atmospheric numerical models of long-range transport and deposition. The resultin...

  2. STATUS OF RESEARCH TO DEVELOP ACIDIC DRY DEPOSITION MONITORING CAPABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry deposition is thought to be as important as wet deposition in acidifying ecosystems. However, at present acidic dry deposition of relevant particles and gases cannot be monitored directly in a quantitative manner. The U.S. EPA Workshop on Dry Deposition (Report No. EPA-600/9-...

  3. POLLUTANT SAMPLER FOR MEASUREMENTS OF ATMOSPHERIC ACIDIC DRY DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An acidic pollutant sampler for dry deposition monitoring has been designed and evaluated in laboratory and field studies. The system, which is modular and simple to operate, samples gaseous HNO3, NH3, SO2 and NO2 and particulate SO4(-2), NO3(1-) and NH4(1+) and is made of Teflon...

  4. PROTOTYPE CONCENTRATION MONITOR FOR ESTIMATING ACIDIC DRY DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry deposition contributes significantly to the acidification of the ecosystem. However, difficulties in measuring dry deposition of reactive gases and fine particles make routine direct monitoring impractical. An alternate approach is to use the 'concentration monitoring' method...

  5. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  6. FIELD COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF CONTRIBUTORS TO ACIDIC DRY DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was conducted to compare methods for sampling and analysis of atmospheric constituents that are important contributors to acidic dry deposition. hree multicomponent samplers were used: the Canadian filter pack (FP), the annular denuder system (ADS), and the transiti...

  7. Dry acid deposition on leaves of Ligustrum and a new surrogate leaf

    SciTech Connect

    Ondo, J.L.; John, W.; Wall, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    The dry deposition of acidic particles and gases on plants depends on micrometeorology in the canopy and on the surface structure of the leaves. The authors chose two methods to collect and analyze this deposition: washing sulfate and nitrate deposits from the leaves of two species of Ligustrum, an ornamental shrub, and using a surrogate leaf which would absorb acidic gases through pores into a reservoir. The plants are kept in 5-gallon pots in order to be transportable. The leaves are washed, then exposed for a given length of time. Then the leaves are harvested and extracted in distilled water. This extract is analyzed by ion chromatography for sulfate and nitrate. The surrogate leaf is constructed with a nuclepore filter membrane simulating the stomatal openings of a leaf. There is a moist filter in the interior leading to a reservoir. Sulfur dioxide and other acidic gases diffuse through the nuclepore pores and are absorbed in the moist filter. After exposure the exterior surfaces are washed to extract any dry particulate, and the interior filter is analyzed for dissolved acidic gases. The ''leaf'' is small enough to be placed in the canopy in field studies. This surrogate leaf has also been used as a passive monitor in indoor air pollution studies. The surrogate leaves and the ligustrum have been exposed side by side at sites in Berkeley and in the Los Angeles air basin. A comparison has been made between the deposition on natural leaves and the deposition on the artificial leaves.

  8. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  9. Dry deposition and heavy acid loading in the vicinity of Masaya Volcano, a major sulfur and chlorine source in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Delmelle, P; Stix, J; Bourque, C P; Baxter, P J; Garcia-Alvarez, J; Barquero, J

    2001-04-01

    Certain volcanoes constitute the world's largest sources of SO2, HCl, and HF emissions and contribute significantly to regional acid deposition. However, the impact of volcanic acid emissions to nearby ecosystems remain poorly documented. In this paper, the spatial pattern of acid dry depositions was monitored within 44 km of Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua, with a network of sulfation plates. Measured SO2 deposition rates were <2-791 mg m(-2) day(-1). The plates also collected the dry deposition of HCI at rates of <1-297 mg m(-2) day(-1). A similar deposition velocity Vd (gas transfer) of 1.6 +/- 0.8 cm/s was calculated for SO2 and HCl above the plate surfaces. Quantities of SO2 and HCI deposited daily within the area surveyed amounted to 1.5 x 10(8) g and 5.7 x 10(7) g, respectively, which correspond to about 10% of the total SO2 and HCl released by the volcano. These depositions may generate an equivalent hydrogen flux ranging from <1 to 30 mg m(-2) day(-1). Our results demonstrate that volcano emissions can dramatically affect acid deposition downwind and in turn cause extreme acid loading of the local ecosystems. This study opens exciting prospects for investigating the sensivity of volcanic ash soils to acid inputs. PMID:11348058

  10. Nitric acid dry deposition to conifer forests: Niwot Ridge spruce-fir-pine study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sievering, H.; Kelly, T.; McConville, G.; Seibold, C.; Turnipseed, A.

    2001-01-01

    The dry deposition velocity of nitric acid, Vd(HNO3), over a 12-m (mean height) spruce-fir forest at Niwot Ridge, Colorado was estimated during 13 daytime periods using the flux-gradient approach. Turbulence intensity at this site is high (mean u* of 0.65ms-1 with u of 2.9ms-1) and contributed to the large observed Vd(HNO3). The overriding contributor is identified to be the small aerodynamic needle width of the conifer trees. Two cases had inflated Vd(HNO3) due to height-differentiated nitric acid loss to soil-derived particle surfaces. Not considering these cases, the mean Vd(HNO3) was 7.6cms-1. The mean laminar boundary layer resistance (Rb) was found to be 7.8sm-1 (of similar magnitude to that of the aerodynamic resistance, 8.5sm-1). The data-determined Rb is bracketed by two theoretical estimates of the mean Rb, 5.9 and 8.6sm-1, that include consideration of the small canopy length scale (aerodynamic needle width), 1mm or less, at this conifer forest. However, the poor correlation of data-determined Rb values with both sets of theoretical estimates indicates that measurement error needs to be reduced and/or improved formulations of theoretical Rb values are in order. The large observed Vd(HNO3) at this conifer forest site is attributed to high turbulence intensity, and, especially, to small aerodynamic needle width. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. Dry deposition of ammonia, nitric acid, ammonium, and nitrate to alpine tundra at Niwot Ridge, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattray, G.; Sievering, H.

    2001-01-01

    Micrometeorological measurements and ambient air samples, analyzed for concentrations of NH3, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3-, were collected at an alpine tundra site on Niwot Ridge, Colorado. The measured concentrations were extremely low and ranged between 5 and 70ngNm-3. Dry deposition fluxes of these atmospheric species were calculated using the micrometeorological gradient method. The calculated mean flux for NH3 indicates a net deposition to the surface and indicates that NH3 contributed significantly to the total N deposition to the tundra during the August-September measurement period. Our pre-measurement estimate of the compensation point for NH3 in air above the tundra was 100-200ngNm-3; thus, a net emission of NH3 was expected given the low ambient concentrations of NH3 observed. Based on our results, however, the NH3 compensation point at this alpine tundra site appears to have been at or below about 20ngNm-3. Large deposition velocities (>2cms-1) were determined for nitrate and ammonium and may result from reactions with surface-derived aerosols. Copyright (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.Micrometeorological measurements and ambient air samples, analyzed for concentrations of NH3, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3-, were collected at an alpine tundra site on Niwot Ridge, Colorado. The measured concentrations were extremely low and ranged between 5 and 70 ng N m-3. Dry deposition fluxes of these atmospheric species were calculated using the micrometeorological gradient method. The calculated mean flux for NH3 indicates a net deposition to the surface and indicates that NH3 contributed significantly to the total N deposition to the tundra during the August-September measurement period. Our pre-measurement estimate of the compensation point for NH3 in air above the tundra was 100-200 ng N m-3; thus, a net emission of NH3 was expected given the low ambient concentrations of NH3 observed. Based on our results, however, the NH3 compensation point at this alpine tundra site appears to

  12. ROUTINE ESTIMATION AND REPORTING OF DRY DEPOSITION FOR THE U.S.A. DRY DEPOSITION NETWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A National Dry Deposition Network (NDDN) was established in the United States during 1986 to document the magnitude, spatial variability, and trends in dry deposition of ozone and acidic particles and gases. urrently, the network consists of 50 stations: 1 in the eastern United S...

  13. Acid dew and the role of chemistry in the dry deposition of reactive gases to wetted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, William L.

    1987-01-01

    A formalism is developed to describe the dry deposition of soluble reactive gases to wetted surfaces in terms of the relevant meteorological conditions, the surface roughness, the total amount of liquid water present on the surface, the rate of accumulation of this water, and the species' solubility and reactivity in the surface water. This formulation is then incorporated into a model designed to simulate the generation of acidic dew from the deposition of HNO3, SO2, S(IV) oxidants, H2O2, and O3. Similar to the observations of dew in the continental U.S., the model generates a dewdrop pH of about 4 by the end of the night; the pH can rapidly fall to toxic levels due to rapid evaporation after sunrise. Relatively low deposition velocities are predicted for the SO2 and O3 because of their lower solubilities and hence larger surface resistances than those of the other oxidants. Because the chemical lifetime of the SO2 in the dew is influenced by the atmospheric levels of H2O2, O3, and SO2, the SO2 deposition velocity is a strong function of these species' atmospheric abundances.

  14. Initial results from the Pawnee Eddy Correlation system for dry acid-deposition research. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, K.; Massman, W.; Stocker, D.; Fox, D.G.; Stedman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Pawnee Grassland Eddy Correlation Dry Deposition Project is described. Instrumentation, methods of analysis, and initial data and research findings are presented. Data from this eddy correlation system show agreement with: previously observations of deposition velocities for atmospheric ozone, NO/sub 2/ and NOx; micrometeorological theory; micrometeorological site characteristics.

  15. Castnet national dry deposition network 1990-1992 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgardner, R.

    1995-08-01

    The National Dry Deposition Network (NDDN) was established to provide long-term estimates of dry acidic deposition across the continental United States. Fifty routine sites were operational from 1990 to 1992, including 41 sites in the eastern United States and 9 sites in the western United States. Each site was equipped with sensors for continuous measurements of ozone and meteorological variables required for estimation of dry deposition rates. Weekly average atmospheric concentrations of particulate sulfate, particulate nitrate, particulate ammonium, sulfur dioxide, and nitric acid were measured at all sites and wet deposition of acidity and related species were measured at selected sites. Two methods development sites were installed during 1991 to evaluate: (1) comparability of United States and Canadian air quality measurements, and (2) effects of terrain on pollutant concentration and deposition. Routine application of an inferential model for calculation of deposition velocities and dry deposition fluxes was also begun.

  16. HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS: DRY-DEPOSITION PHENOMENA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry-deposition rates were evaluated for two hazardous organic air pollutants, nitrobenzene and perchloroethylene, to determine their potential for removal from the atmosphere to three building material surfaces, cement, tar paper, and vinyl asbestos tile. Dry-deposition experimen...

  17. NATIONAL DRY DEPOSITION NETWORK THIRD ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT (1989)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Dry Deposition Network is ultimately to provide long-term estimates of dry acidic deposition across the continental United States. ifty sites operated during 1989, 41 in the east and 9 in the west. eekly average atmospheric concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammoniu...

  18. CASTNET NATIONAL DRY DEPOSITION NETWORK - 1990-1992 STATUS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Dry Deposition Network (NDDN) was established to provide long-term estimates of dry acidic deposition across the continental United States. ifty routine sites were operational from 1990 to 1992, including 41 sites in the eastern United States and 9 sites in the weste...

  19. WRF/Chem study of dry and wet deposition of trifluoroacetic acid produced from the atmospheric degradation of a few short-lived HFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; McKeen, S. A.; Kim, S.; Ahmadov, R.; Grell, G. A.; Talukdar, R. K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) is the prevalent (used in >80% passenger cars and commercial vehicles worldwide) refrigerant in automobile air conditioning units (MACs). With an atmospheric lifetime of ~14 years and a global warming potential (GWP) of 1430 on a 100-year time horizon, HFC-134a does not meet current and expected requirements for MAC refrigerants in many parts of the world. Therefore, substitutes with lower GWP are being sought. One of the simplest way to achieve lower GWP is to use chemicals with shorter atmospheric lifetimes. In this work, we investigate the dry and wet deposition and the rainwater concentration of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) produced by the atmospheric oxidation of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (TFP) and 1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropene (PFP). The WRF/Chem model was used to calculate dry and wet TFA deposition over the contiguous USA during the May-September 2006 period that would result from replacing HFC-134a in MACs with a 1:1 molar ratio mixture of 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene (TFP) and 1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropene (PFP). The simulation is evaluated by comparing observations of precipitation and sulfate wet deposition at stations of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP). Simulated precipitation and sulfate wet deposition correlate well with the observations, but exhibit a positive bias for precipitation and a negative bias for sulfate wet deposition. Atmospheric lifetimes of TFP and PFP against oxidation by the hydroxyl radical OH, a prognostic species in WRF/Chem, are ~5 and ~4 days in the simulation, respectively. The model setup allows the attribution of dry and wet TFA deposition to individual source regions (California, Houston, Chicago, and the remaining contiguous USA in this work). TFA deposition is highest in the eastern USA because of numerous large sources and high precipitation in the region. West of the Continental Divide, TFA deposition is significantly lower, and its origin is dominated by emissions from

  20. Simple Approaches for Measuring Dry Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition to Watersheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the effects of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition on surface water quality requires accurate accounts of total N deposition (wet, dry, and cloud vapor); however, dry deposition is difficult to measure and is often spatially variable. Affordable passive sampling methods...

  1. Dry deposition of pan to grassland vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P.V.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Gao, W.

    1994-01-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate or PAN (CH{sub 3}C(O)OONO{sub 2}) is formed in the lower troposphere via photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). PAN has a lifetime in the free troposphere of about three months and is removed by photolysis or reaction with OH. Dry deposition will decrease its lifetime, although the few measurements that have been made indicate that this process is slow. Measurements of the uptake of PAN by alfalfa in growth chambers indicated that the dry deposition velocity (downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height) was 0.75 cm s{sup {minus}1}. Garland and Penkett measured a dry deposition velocity of 0.25 cm s{sup {minus}1} for PAN to grass and soil in a return-flow wind tunnel. Shepson et al. (1992) analyzed trends of PAN and O{sub 3} concentrations in the stable nocturnal boundary layer over mixed deciduous/coniferous forests at night, when leaf stomata were closed, and concluded that the deposition velocity for PAN was at least 0.5 cm s{sup {minus}1}. We measured the dry deposition velocity of PAN to a grassland site in the midwestern United States with a modified Bowen ratio technique. Experiments were conducted on selected days during September, October, and November of 1990. An energy balance Bowen ratio station was used to observe the differences in air temperature and water vapor content between heights of 3.0 and 0.92 m and to evaluate the surface energy balance. Air samples collected at the same two heights in Teflon {reg_sign} bags were analyzed for PAN by a gas chromatographic technique. We present an example of the variations of PAN concentrations and gradients observed during the day and compare measurements of the dry deposition velocity to expectations based on the physicochemical properties of PAN.

  2. DRY DEPOSITION OF POLLUTANTS TO FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on the results of an extensive field campaign to measure dry deposition of ozone and sulfur dioxide to a sample of forest types in the United States. Measurements were made for full growing seasons over a deciduous forest in Pennsylvania and a mixed deciduous-conifer...

  3. Acid deposition in east Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Phadnis, M.J.; Carmichael, G.R.; Ichikawa, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A comparison between transport models was done to study the acid deposition in east Asia. The two models in question were different in the way the treated the pollutant species and the way simulation was carried out. A single-layer, trajectory model with simple (developed by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Japan) was compared with a multi-layered, eulerian type model (Sulfur Transport Eulerian Model - II [STEM-II]) treating the chemical processes in detail. The acidic species used in the simulation were sulfur dioxide and sulfate. The comparison was done for two episodes: each a month long in winter (February) and summer (August) of 1989. The predicted results from STEM-II were compared with the predicted results from the CRIEPI model as well as the observed data at twenty-one stations in Japan. The predicted values from STEM-II were similar to the ones from the CRIEPI results and the observed values in regards to the transport features. The average monthly values of SO{sub 2} in air, sulfate in air and sulfate in precipitation were in good agreement. Sensitivity studies were carried out under different scenarios of emissions, dry depositions velocities and mixing heights. The predicted values in these sensitivity studies showed a strong dependence on the mixing heights. The predicted wet deposition of sulfur for the two months is 0.7 gS/m2.mon, while the observed deposition is around 1.1 gS/m2.mon. It was also observed that the wet deposition on the Japan sea side of the islands is more than those on the Pacific side and the Okhotsk sea, mainly because of the continental outflow of pollutant air masses from mainland China and Korea. The effects of emissions from Russia and volcanoes were also evaluated.

  4. Dynamics of sulfate and nitrate dry deposition associated with pollen

    SciTech Connect

    Khalili, E.K.

    1988-01-01

    A field study of pollen dispersion and deposition from a remote forested area in Northern Wisconsin has been undertaken. Although the experiments constitute a case study in Wisconsin, the experimental site was chosen, which represents much of the Eastern US and Europe where acid rain is considered an important environmental problem. Measurements of dry deposition of pollen were made during the pollination season (May and June, 1987). Deposited particles were weighted to determine mass fluxes, then washed and subjected to ion chromatographic analysis for sulfate and nitrate. Ambient concentration of pollen were measured by a coarse particle sampler (Noll Inertial Rotary Impact) during the same time period. The chemical analysis of pollen species collected around the sampling site as well as commercially available pollen demonstrated that sulfate and nitrate were present on all pollen samples. Many trace metals such as Fe, Al, Zn, Cu, Mn, Cd, Pb, Ca, and Si and organic acids were quantified. It was hypothesized that pollen accumulate extraneous amounts of non-essential, as well as essential elements from the soil supplying nutrient. Therefore, pollen can be used as a fingerprint for the availability and the level of contamination of a particular element in the forest soil environment. A model developed for measurement of coarse particle dry deposition was utilized to measure the pollen dry deposition velocity. It was shown that depositional velocity of pollen exceeds the settling velocity by a factor of 3 to 4, and both V{sub d} and fluxes of pollen grains increase with wind speed. Finally, the role of pollen dispersion and deposition has been discussed and emphasized for modeling of lake acidification in forested region.

  5. SOIL REACTION AND ACIDIC DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter discusses the major chemical processes by which acidic deposition interacts with soils. he focus is on forest soils, as the effects of acidic deposition on soils used for production of food and fiber are generally small compared to effects of agricultural practices s...

  6. BOREAS TGB-7 Dry Deposition Herbicide and Organochlorine Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air, rainwater, and dry deposition samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the dry deposition flux of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  7. Dual Nitrate Isotopes in Dry Deposition: Utility for Partitioning Nox Source Contributions to Landscape Nitrogen Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry deposition is a major component of total nitrogen deposition and thus an important source of bioavailable nitrogen to ecosystems. However, relative to wet deposition, less is known regarding the sources and spatial variability of dry deposition. This is in part due to diffi...

  8. Dry deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, H.L.; Lee, W.J.; Su, C.C.; Chao, H.R.; Fan, Y.C.

    1996-12-01

    Dry deposition and air sampling were undertaken, simultaneously, in the ambient air of an urban site and a petrochemical-industry (PCI) plant by using several dry deposition plates and PS-1 samplers from January to May 1994 in southern Taiwan. The dry deposition plate with a smooth surface was always pointed into the wind. Twenty-one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MSD). The dry deposition flux of total-PAHs in urban and PCI sites averaged 166 and 211 {micro}g/m{sup 2}{center_dot}d, respectively. In general, the PAH dry deposition flux increased with increases in the PAH concentration in the ambient air. The PAH pattern of dry deposition flux in both urban and PCI sites were similar to the pattern measured by the filter of the PS-1 sampler and completely different from the PAH pattern in the gas phase. The higher molecular weight PAHs have higher dry deposition velocities. This is due to the fact that higher molecular weight PAHs primarily associated with the particle phase are deposited mostly by gravitational settling, while the gas phase PAHs were between 0.001 and 0.010 cm/s, only the lower molecular-weight PAHs--Nap and AcPy--had a significant fraction of dry deposition flux contributed by the gas phase. All the remaining higher molecular-weight PAHs had more than 94.5% of their dry deposition flux resulting from the particle phase. This is due to the fact that higher molecular weight PAHs have a greater fraction in the particle phase and the dry deposition velocities of particulates are much higher than those of the gas phase.

  9. Litterfall mercury dry deposition in the eastern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risch, Martin R.; DeWild, John F.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Kolka, Randall K.; Zhang, Leiming

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) in autumn litterfall from predominately deciduous forests was measured in 3 years of samples from 23 Mercury Deposition Network sites in 15 states across the eastern USA. Annual litterfall Hg dry deposition was significantly higher (median 12.3 micrograms per square meter (μg/m2), range 3.5–23.4 μg/m2) than annual Hg wet deposition (median 9.6 μg/m2, range 4.4–19.7 μg/m2). The mean ratio of dry to wet Hg deposition was 1.3–1. The sum of dry and wet Hg deposition averaged 21 μg/m2 per year and 55% was litterfall dry deposition. Methylmercury was a median 0.8% of Hg in litterfall and ranged from 0.6 to 1.5%. Annual litterfall Hg and wet Hg deposition rates differed significantly and were weakly correlated. Litterfall Hg dry deposition differed among forest-cover types. This study demonstrated how annual litterfall Hg dry deposition rates approximate the lower bound of annual Hg dry fluxes.

  10. ACID DEPOSITION AND FOREST DECLINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The location, topography and other characteristics of the high-elevation forests of eastern North America cause them to be receptors of high levels of acid deposition and airborn trace metals. No other major forested areas in the U.S. are subjected to such intensely acid cloud mo...

  11. (Acidic deposition and the environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

    1990-10-24

    The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

  12. Sulfate dry deposition to red oak and tulip poplar leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenberg, J.J. ); Knoerr, K.R. )

    1988-01-01

    Measurement of rates of atmospheric sulfate dry deposition to vegetation is necessary to assess biophysical relationships. However, micrometeorological measurement techniques have stringent site and equipment requirements and direct estimation techniques have procedural and contamination difficulties. This paper describes the development and testing of a leaf washing technique to directly measure the rate of sulfate dry deposition to hardwood forest vegetation. The leaf washing technique was developed by comparing the rate of removal of sulfur dry deposited to leaf surfaces with the rate and extent of leaching from the internal sulfur pool.

  13. CASTNet mountain acid deposition monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Bowser, J.J.; Anderson, J.B.; Edgerton, E.S.; Mohnen, V.; Baumgardener, R.

    1994-12-31

    Concern over the influence of air pollution on forest decline has led the USEPA to establish the Mountain Acid Deposition Monitoring Program (MADMP) to quantify total deposition at high altitudes, i.e., above cloud base. Clouds can be a major source of atmospheric deposition to sensitive, mountain ecosystems. This program is a part of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), a national assessment of the effects of the 1990 Clean Air Act. The objectives of MADMP are to estimate total deposition, measure cloud chemistry, and characterize spacial and temporal trends at four selected high altitude sites in the Eastern US. Four MADMP sites have been established for the 1994 field season: Clingman`s Dome, Great Smoky Mountain Nat. Park, TN; Slide Mountain, Catskill State Park, NY; Whiteface Mountain, Adirondack State Park, NY; and Whitetop Mountain, Mt. Rogers Nat`l Recreational Area, VA. An automated cloud collection system will be utilized in combination with continuous measurements of cloud liquid water content in order to estimate cloudwater deposition. Other relevant data will include continuous meteorological measurements, ozone and sulfur dioxide concentrations, wet deposition from rainfall analysis, and dry deposition from filter pack analysis. Quality assurance and quality control measures will be employed to maximize accuracy and precision.

  14. An evaluation of ozone dry deposition simulations in East Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Park, R.; Hong, Seungkyu K.; Kwon, Hyoung-Ahn; Kim, Saewung; Guenther, Alex B.; Woo, Jung-Hun; Loughner, C. P.

    2014-08-11

    We used a 3-D regional atmospheric chemistry transport model (WRF-Chem) to examine processes that determine O3 in East Asia; in particular, we focused on O3 dry deposition, which is an uncertain research area due to insufficient observation and numerical studies in East Asia. Here, we compare two widely used dry deposition parameterization schemes, Wesely and M3DRY, which are used in the WRF-Chem and CMAQ models, respectively. The O3 dry deposition velocities simulated using the two aforementioned schemes under identical meteorological conditions show considerable differences (a factor of 2) due to surface resistance parameterization discrepancies. The O3 concentration differed by up to 10 ppbv for the monthly mean. The simulated and observed dry deposition velocities were compared, which showed that the Wesely scheme model is consistent with the observations and successfully reproduces the observed diurnal variation. We conduct several sensitivity simulations by changing the land use data, the surface resistance of the water and the model’s spatial resolution to examine the factors that affect O3 concentrations in East Asia. As shown, the model was considerably sensitive to the input parameters, which indicates a high uncertainty for such O3 dry deposition simulations. Observations are necessary to constrain the dry deposition parameterization and input data to improve the East Asia air quality models.

  15. Overall elemental dry deposition velocities measured around Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Seung-Muk; Shahin, Usama; Sivadechathep, Jakkris; Sofuoglu, Sait C.; Holsen, Thomas M.

    Overall dry deposition velocities of several elements were determined by dividing measured fluxes by measured airborne concentrations in different particle size ranges. The dry deposition measurements were made with a smooth surrogate surface on an automated dry deposition sampler (Eagle II) and the ambient particle concentrations were measured with a dichotomous sampler. These long-term measurements were made in Chicago, IL, South Haven, MI, and Sleeping Bear Dunes, MI, from December 1993 through October 1995 as part of the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study. In general, the dry deposition fluxes of elements were highly correlated with coarse particle concentrations, slightly less well correlated with total particle concentrations, and least well correlated with fine particle concentrations. The calculated overall dry deposition velocities obtained using coarse particle concentrations varied from approximately 12 cm s -1 for Mg in Chicago to 0.2 cm s -1 for some primarily anthropogenic metals at the more remote sites. The velocities calculated using total particle concentrations were slightly lower. The crustal elements (Mg, Al, and Mn) had higher deposition velocities than anthropogenic elements (V, Cr, Cu, Zn, Mo, Ba and Pb). For crustal elements, overall dry deposition velocities were higher in Chicago than at the other sites.

  16. PROCEDURES FOR ESTIMATING DRY WEATHER POLLUTANT DEPOSITION IN SEWERAGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A set of generalized procedures for estimating pollutant loadings associated with dry weather sewage solids deposition in combined sewer systems has been prepared to provide planners, engineers and municipal managers with technical information so that they can make intelligent in...

  17. (International conference on acidic deposition)

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B. Jr.

    1990-10-05

    The traveler took the opportunity to participate in a mini-sabbatical at the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE) in Edinburgh, Scotland, as a part of planned travel to Glasgow, Scotland, to attend the International Conference on Acidic Precipitation. The purpose of the sabbatical was to provide quality time for study and interchange of ideas with scientists at ITE working on physiological effects of acidic deposition and to allocate significant time for writing and synthesizing of results of physiological studies from the National Forest Response Program's Spruce/Fir Research Cooperative. The study focused on the very significant cytological and physiological effects of calcium deficiency in trees, a response that appears to be amplified in spruce by acidic deposition.

  18. AN EXAMINATION OF SOME MICROMETEOROLOGICAL METHODS FOR MEASURING DRY DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry deposition on natural surfaces is one of the major removal pathways for air pollutants. In order to develop mathematical descriptions for the numerical simulation of the transport, removal, and ecological impact of pollutant gases and aerosols, the dependence of dry depositio...

  19. Application of throughfall methods to estimate dry deposition of mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, S.E.; Owens, J.G.; Stratton, W.

    1992-12-31

    Several dry deposition methods for Mercury (Hg) are being developed and tested in our laboratory. These include big-leaf and multilayer resistance models, micrometeorological methods such as Bowen ratio gradient approaches, laboratory controlled plant chambers, and throughfall. We have previously described our initial results using modeling and gradient methods. Throughfall may be used to estimate Hg dry deposition if some simplifying assumptions are met. We describe here the application and initial results of throughfull studies at the Walker Branch Watershed forest, and discuss the influence of certain assumptions on interpretation of the data. Throughfall appears useful in that it can place a lower bound to dry deposition under field conditions. Our preliminary throughfall data indicate net dry deposition rates to a pine canopy which increase significantly from winter to summer, as previously predicted by our resistance model. Atmospheric data suggest that rainfall washoff of fine aerosol dry deposition at this site is not sufficient to account for all of the Hg in net throughfall. Potential additional sources include dry deposited gas-phase compounds, soil-derived coarse aerosols, and oxidation reactions at the leaf surface.

  20. The dry deposition of mercury into the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisonbee, Joel R.

    The Great Salt Lake (GSL) in the western United States has been identified as the most mercury laden body of water in the United States with a median water mercury concentration of 42 nanograms per liter. When Hg enters an aquatic ecosystem, it can be converted to the toxic organic mercury compound, methylmercury. Methylmercury bioaccumulates up the food chain and has been the cause of consumption advisories for game fish in many lakes and rivers in the historically pristine Intermountain West. In 2005, the Utah Department of Health and the Fish and Wildlife Service placed a similar consumption advisory on waterfowl on the GSL. The primary goal of this study is to identify the pathway of greatest influx of Hg pollution to the GSL to give insight toward the source and an eventual solution to the Hg pollution problem. Speciated atmospheric mercury measurements were collected at a field site on the eastern shore of the GSL for a 1-year period beginning on July 1, 2009. These atmospheric mercury concentrations, along with turbulence measurements, were used as input to a resistance-in-series dry deposition model (based on Wesley and Hicks 1977). The dry deposition flux of mercury was determined from the modeled dry deposition velocity and the measured concentrations. This dry deposition flux was compared to the wet deposition flux measured by the National Deposition Network and the riverine influx measured by the USGS. It was found that in the 1 year from July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2010, 10.7 nanograms per square meter of Hg was deposited into the GSL by dry deposition from the atmosphere. Dry deposition makes up 60% of the total Hg influx from all measured pathways. The flux from the dry deposition of the global background pool of Hg (1.5 +/- 0.2 nanograms per square meter) dominated the dry deposition flux, making up 82.5+/-8.5% of the dry deposition flux and 50% of the total Hg influx to the GSL. Lake sediment cores from the GSL suggest a much larger annual flux

  1. ON AERODYNAMIC AND BOUNDARY LAYER RESISTANCES WITHIN DRY DEPOSITION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There have been many empirical parameterizations for the aerodynamic and boundary layer resistances proposed in the literature, e.g. those of the Meyers Multi-Layer Deposition Model (MLM) used with the nation-wide dry deposition network. Many include arbitrary constants or par...

  2. Dry deposition modelling of air pollutants over urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherin, N.; Roustan, Y.; Seigneur, C.; Musson Genon, L.

    2012-04-01

    More than one-half of the world's inhabitants lives in urban areas. Consequently, the evolution of pollutants inside these urban areas are problems of great concern in air quality studies. Though the dry deposition fluxes of air pollutants, which are known to be significant in the neighborhood of sources of pollution, like urban areas, have not been modeled precisely until recently within urban areas. By reviewing the physics of the processes leading to the dry deposition of air pollutants, it is clear that atmosphere turbulence is crucial for dry deposition. Urban areas, and particularly buildings, are known to significantly impact flow fields and then by extension the dry deposition fluxes. Numerous urban schemes have been developed in the past decades to approximate the effect of the local scale urban elements on drag, heat flux and radiative budget. The most recent urban canopy models are based on quite simple geometries, but sufficiently close to represent the aerodynamic and thermal characteristics of cities. These canopy models are generally intended to parameterize aerodynamic and thermal fields, but not dry deposition. For dry deposition, the current classical "roughness" approach, uses only two representative parameters, z0 and d, namely the roughness length and the zero-plane displacement height to represent urban areas. In this work, an innovative dry deposition model based on the urban canyon concept, is proposed. It considers a single road, bordered by two facing buildings, which are treated separately. It accounts for sub-grid effects of cities, especially a better parameterization of the turbulence scheme, through the use of local mixing length and a more detailled description of the urban area and key parameters within the urban canopy. Three different flow regimes are distinguished in the urban canyon according to the height-to-width ratio: isolated roughness flow, wake interference flow and skimming flow regime. The magnitude of differences in

  3. CLEAR SKIES INITIATIVE: RGM DRY DEPOSITION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excessive levels of mercury in the nations waters are the most widespread cause of water quality impairment in the US. Atmospheric emissions and deposition processes drive mercury accumulation in soils and sediments, and are now recognized as the major route of mercury contamina...

  4. Phosphorus input through fog deposition in a dry tropical forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecar, Karen L.; Runyan, Christiane W.; D'Odorico, Paolo; Lawrence, Deborah; Schmook, Birgit; Das, Rishiraj

    2015-12-01

    In many tropical forests, where phosphorus (P) is considered a limiting nutrient, atmospheric deposition can contribute significantly to available P. Previous studies have shown that P inputs from atmospheric deposition are enhanced by plant canopies. This effect is explained as the result of increased deposition of P-rich aerosol particles (dry deposition) and fog droplets (fog or "occult" deposition) onto leaf surfaces. Here we studied the importance of fog as a source of P to a P-limited dry tropical forest. Throughout an 80 day period during the dry season when fog is most common, we sampled fog water and bulk precipitation in a clearing and measured leaf wetness and throughfall in an adjacent secondary and mature forest stand. During the study period, total P (PT) concentrations in fog water ranged from 0.15 to 6.40 mg/L, on average fourteenfold greater than PT concentrations in bulk precipitation (0.011 to 0.451 mg/L), and sixfold and sevenfold greater than throughfall PT concentrations in the secondary and mature forest stands, respectively (0.007 to 1.319 mg/L; 0.009 to 0.443 mg/L). Based on leaf area index, the frequency of fog deposition, and amount of water deposited per fog event, we estimate that fog delivers a maximum of 1.01 kg/ha/yr to secondary forest stands and 1.75 kg/ha/yr to mature forest stands, compared to 0.88 kg/ha/yr to secondary forest stands and 1.98 kg/ha/yr to mature forest stands via throughfall (wet + dry deposition) and stemflow. Thus, fog deposition may contribute substantially to available P in tropical dry forests.

  5. Dry deposition of large, airborne particles onto a surrogate surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Kalman, David; Larson, Timothy

    Simultaneous measurements of particle dry deposition flux and airborne number concentration in the open atmosphere were made using three different types of artificially generated particles in the size range 10-100 μm - perlite, diatomaceous earth and glass beads. A combination of gravimetric analysis, automated microscopy and sonic anemometry provided size-resolved estimates of both the inertial and gravitational components of the quasi-laminar layer particle deposition velocity, ( Vd) b, as a function of size. Eddy inertial deposition efficiency ( ηdI) was determined as a function of dimensionless eddy Stokes number (Stk e). In the range 3Dry Deposition Module. Ontario Ministry of Environment, Rexdale, Ontario). However the dry deposition model of Sehmel and Hodgson (1978, a model for predicting dry deposition of particles and gases to environmental surfaces. DOE Report PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA), used in several regulatory models, significantly under-predicted (up to seven times) ( Vd) b for large particles ( da>10 μm).

  6. Ring to Mountain Transition in Deposition Pattern of Drying Droplets.

    PubMed

    Man, Xingkun; Doi, Masao

    2016-02-12

    When a droplet containing a nonvolatile component is dried on a substrate, it leaves a ringlike deposit on the substrate. We propose a theory that predicts the deposit distribution based on a model of fluid flow and the contact line motion of the droplet. It is shown that the deposition pattern changes continuously from a coffee ring to volcanolike and to mountainlike depending on the mobility of the contact line and the evaporation rate. An analytical expression is given for the peak position of the distribution of the deposit left on the substrate. PMID:26918999

  7. Ring to Mountain Transition in Deposition Pattern of Drying Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Xingkun; Doi, Masao

    2016-02-01

    When a droplet containing a nonvolatile component is dried on a substrate, it leaves a ringlike deposit on the substrate. We propose a theory that predicts the deposit distribution based on a model of fluid flow and the contact line motion of the droplet. It is shown that the deposition pattern changes continuously from a coffee ring to volcanolike and to mountainlike depending on the mobility of the contact line and the evaporation rate. An analytical expression is given for the peak position of the distribution of the deposit left on the substrate.

  8. Rain water composition and influence of dry deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kulshreetha, U.C.; Jain, M.; Sarkar, A.K.; Parashar, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    This study reports the influence of dry deposition of pollutants on the chemical composition rain water at Delhi (India) by collecting the samples of wet-only, bulk and dry depositions. The wet-only samples were collected at a height of 30 m above the ground level using an automatic collector supplied by IMI, Stockholm. Simultaneously, bulk samples from two different heights, i.e., 30 m and 13 m were also collected. The samples of dry deposition were collected at 13 m height only. pH and conductance were measured immediately after collection of samples. The anions, F, Cl, NO{sub 3} and SO{sub 4} were analyzed by an ion chromatograph while cations viz, Na, K, Ca and Mg were analyzed by an AAS. The NH{sub 4} was estimated calorimetrically by the indo-phenol method.

  9. Hydrogen ions associated with the dry deposition of pollen

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, K.E.; Khalili, E.K. )

    1988-01-01

    The data provided in this paper demonstrates that pollen can generate significant amounts of hydrogen ions when added to water and that the deposition of tree pollen in forested areas represents a significant hydrogen ion source. Measurements of dry deposition of pollen were made during the months of May and June, 1987 in Northern Wisconsin, using a smooth surrogate surface. Rain samples were also collected. Deposited particles were weighed to determine mass fluxes, then washed and ion chromatographed for SO {sub 4} = and NO {sub 3} {minus} analysis. Species of pollen collected from different types of trees during the sampling period were analyzed for SO{sub 4} = NO {sub 3} and other trace constituents. The micrograms of hydrogen ions (protons) generated per gram for different types of pollen added to water, were measured. From 56 to 566 gm were generated per gram or pollen added. The amount generated varied with pollen type. Based on this information, the equivalent protons from the dry deposition of pollen were calculated and compared with the wet deposition proton data. The sulfate, nitrate, and protons associated with dry deposition were of a magnitude comparable with wet deposition.

  10. Accuracy of cuticular resistance parameterizations in ammonia dry deposition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Frederik; Brümmer, Christian; Richter, Undine; Fléchard, Chris; Wichink Kruit, Roy; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-04-01

    Accurate representation of total reactive nitrogen (Nr) exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere is a crucial part of modern air quality models. However, bi-directional exchange of ammonia (NH3), the dominant Nr species in agricultural landscapes, still poses a major source of uncertainty in these models, where especially the treatment of non-stomatal pathways (e.g. exchange with wet leaf surfaces or the ground layer) can be challenging. While complex dynamic leaf surface chemistry models have been shown to successfully reproduce measured ammonia fluxes on the field scale, computational restraints and the lack of necessary input data have so far limited their application in larger scale simulations. A variety of different approaches to modelling dry deposition to leaf surfaces with simplified steady-state parameterizations have therefore arisen in the recent literature. We present a performance assessment of selected cuticular resistance parameterizations by comparing them with ammonia deposition measurements by means of eddy covariance (EC) and the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM) at a number of semi-natural and grassland sites in Europe. First results indicate that using a state-of-the-art uni-directional approach tends to overestimate and using a bi-directional cuticular compensation point approach tends to underestimate cuticular resistance in some cases, consequently leading to systematic errors in the resulting flux estimates. Using the uni-directional model, situations where low ratios of total atmospheric acids to NH3 concentration occur lead to fairly high minimum cuticular resistances, limiting predicted downward fluxes in conditions usually favouring deposition. On the other hand, the bi-directional model used here features a seasonal cycle of external leaf surface emission potentials that can lead to comparably low effective resistance estimates under warm and wet conditions, when in practice an expected increase in the compensation point due to

  11. Organic sedimentary deposits in Titan's dry lakebeds: Probable evaporite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Bow, J.; Schwartz, J.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, J.M.; Hayes, A.G.; Vixie, G.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Soderblom, L.A.; Clark, R.N.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of organic sedimentary deposits at the bottom of dry lakebeds near Titan's north pole in observations from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). We show evidence that the deposits are evaporitic, making Titan just the third known planetary body with evaporitic processes after Earth and Mars, and is the first that uses a solvent other than water. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  12. Atmospheric dry and wet deposition of mercury in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Siddiqi, Zia; Song, Xinjie; Mandiwana, Khakhathi L.; Yousaf, Muhammad; Lu, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) speciation and deposition are critical in understanding the cycling of mercury in the environment. To estimate the dry and wet deposition of mercury in an urban environment, concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized inorganic mercury (GOIM), mercury associated with particles having size less than 2.5 μm (Hg(p) < 2.5) (December 2003-November 2004) and total particulate mercury (THg(p)) (June 2004-December 2004) in the atmosphere, as well as the concentrations of methyl mercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg) in atmospheric precipitation samples (June 2005-January 2006 and September 2007-March 2008), were measured in downtown Toronto, Canada.The dry deposition rates of GOIM, Hg(p) < 2.5 μm and THg(p) estimated between December 2003 and December 2004 were 0.17-2.33 μg m-2 month-1, 0.04-0.32 μg m-2 month-1 and 0.17-1.11 μg m-2 month-1, respectively, while the wet deposition rates of methyl mercury and total mercury between June 2005-January 2006 and September 2007-March 2008 were 0.01-0.08 μg m-2 month-1 and 0.32-8.48 μg m-2 month-1, respectively. The total dry deposition (7.66-26.06 μg m-2 a-1, calculated as the sum of GOIM and THg(p) deposition) and the total wet deposition (= the wet deposition of total mercury = 18.60 μg m-2 a-1) contributed proportionally to the total atmospheric Hg deposition in Toronto.

  13. COMPARISON OF SEVERAL TECHNIQUES FOR DETERMINING DRY DEPOSITION FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the period from 1/22/81 through 5/4/82, measurements were conducted to permit comparison of several techniques for determining dry deposition flux of nitrates and sulfates. Direct flux estimates were made by using actual leaf surfaces and foliar wash and by exposing and wash...

  14. Dry Deposition Estimates in Texas during Drought Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Kimura, Y.; McDonald-Buller, E.; McGaughey, G.; Allen, D.

    2014-12-01

    Severe drought has been a recurring phenomenon in the southwestern United States. Most climate models suggest that droughts will become more frequent in the future as climate changes in response to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiative forcing species in the atmosphere. Drought-induced changes in natural and anthropogenically managed and cultivated land cover systems have the potential to affect air quality. Dry deposition refers to the process by which trace gases and particulates in the atmosphere are transferred to the Earth's surface, including to soil, vegetation, and water, in the absence of precipitation. It is a primary physical removal mechanism for ozone during the warm spring through early fall seasons in Texas. As the state endeavors to achieve and maintain attainment with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone, it is important to understand the impacts of drought conditions on estimates of dry deposition. This research explores the interannual variations in predicted dry deposition velocities and component surface resistances of ozone in eastern Texas during 2006-2011, including years with severe to exceptional drought conditions (e.g. 2011) as well as years with average to above average precipitation patterns (e.g. 2007). Two widely used dry deposition algorithms that have been incorporated within the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx), the photochemical grid model used to support air quality planning efforts in Texas, are used in offline simulations.

  15. Recent bright gully deposits on Mars: Wet or dry flow?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pelletier, J.D.; Kolb, K.J.; McEwen, A.S.; Kirk, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Bright gully sediments attributed to liquid water flow have been deposited on Mars within the past several years. To test the liquid water flow hypothesis, we constructed a high-resolution (1 m/pixel) photogrammetric digital elevation model of a crater in the Centauri Montes region, where a bright gully deposit formed between 2001 and 2005. We conducted one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D numerical flow modeling to test whether the deposit morphology is most consistent with liquid water or dry granular How. Liquid water flow models that incorporate freezing can match the runout distance of the flow for certain freezing rates but fail to reconstruct the distributary lobe morphology of the distal end of the deposit. Dry granular flow models can match both the observed runout distance and the distal morphology. Wet debris flows with high sediment concentrations are also consistent with the observed morphology because their rheologies are often similar to that of dry granular flows. As such, the presence of liquid water in this flow event cannot be ruled out, but the available evidence is consistent with dry landsliding. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Evaluation of Data Replacement Strategies for CASTNET Dry Deposition Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET) and its predecessor, the National Dry Deposition Network (NDDN), as national air quality and meteorological monitoring networks. The purpose of CASTNET is to track the pr...

  17. MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF THE DRY DEPOSITION OF PEROXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of the dry deposition velocity (Vd) of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and total organic peroxides (ROOH) were made during four experiments at three forested sites. Details and uncertainties associated with the measurement of peroxide...

  18. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 1. MODEL FORMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multilayer biochemical dry deposition model has been developed based on the NOAA Multilayer Model (MLM) to study gaseous exchanges between the soil, plants, and the atmosphere. Most of the parameterizations and submodels have been updated or replaced. The numerical integration ...

  19. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 2. MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multilayer biochemical dry deposition model (MLBC) described in the accompanying paper was tested against half-hourly eddy correlation data from six field sites under a wide range of climate conditions with various plant types. Modeled CO2, O3, SO2<...

  20. NATIONAL DRY DEPOSITION NETWORK SECOND ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT (1988)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Progress in the National Dry Deposition Network during calendar year 1988 is presented. The network configuration and operating procedures for the field, laboratory, and data management center are described and data are summarized. Forty-three sites were operational at the close ...

  1. Laboratory exposure systems to simulate atmospheric degradation of building stone under dry and wet deposition conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. B.; Haneef, S. J.; Hepburn, B. J.; Hutchinson, A. J.; Thompson, G. E.; Wood, G. C.

    The design philosophy, construction and use of two exposure test systems are described, in which the objective is to simulate the degradation of stone samples under, respectively, the 'dry' and 'wet' deposition of atmospheric pollutants. Some element of realistic acceleration is possible in certain experiments. Particular emphasis is placed upon using known presentation rates of the pollutants, both in respect of typical depositions of pollutants and their oxidation products appropriate for an industrial atmosphere. In the dry deposition rig, SO 2, NO 2, NO, HCl and the oxidant O 3 are presented individually or together at realistic deposition rates. In the wet deposition apparatus, SO 2-4, NO -3 and Cl - at a pH of 3.5, simulating 'acid rain' but in a more concentrated form, are deposited. The dry deposition chamber can be operated at constant relative humidity (typically 84%) with pre-dried or precisely wetted stones to simulate episodic rain wetting, or using other methods of wet/dry cycling, which are also a feature of the wet deposition chamber. Heating and cooling of the samples is also possible, as is the use of shaped or coupled stones of different kinds such as are found in a building facade. The results are illustrated in terms of data on the weight change, the anion content of stone and run-off, the pH change of run-off and the total calcium reacted, using Portland stone, as a prelude to later papers in which behaviour of a whole matrix of stone types and environments is presented and discussed. Such an approach permits the eventual production of 'pollutant-material response' relationships and damage functions for comparison with and prediction of external exposure results.

  2. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A TRANSPORTABLE SYSTEM FOR DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF DRY DEPOSITION FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry deposition of air pollutants is expensive and difficult to measure. icks et al. (1985) proposed the dry deposition inferential model determines dry deposition fluxes as the product of a measured concentration and a modeled deposition velocity. eposition velocity is calculated...

  3. Atmospheric dry deposition of sulfur and nitrogen in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Mei; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Fenn, Mark E; Percy, Kevin E

    2016-10-15

    Due to the potential ecological effects on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems from atmospheric deposition in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR), Alberta, Canada, this study was implemented to estimate atmospheric nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) inputs. Passive samplers were used to measure ambient concentrations of ammonia (NH3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric acid/nitrous acid (HNO3/HONO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the AOSR. Concentrations of NO2 and SO2 in winter were higher than those in summer, while seasonal differences of NH3 and HNO3/HONO showed an opposite trend, with higher values in summer. Concentrations of NH3, NO2 and SO2 were high close to the emission sources (oil sands operations and urban areas). NH3 concentrations were also elevated in the southern portion of the domain indicating possible agricultural and urban emission sources to the southwest. HNO3, an oxidation endpoint, showed wider ranges of concentrations and a larger spatial extent. Concentrations of NH3, NO2, HNO3/HONO and SO2 from passive measurements and their monthly deposition velocities calculated by a multi-layer inference model (MLM) were used to calculate dry deposition of N and S. NH3 contributed the largest fraction of deposited N across the network, ranging between 0.70-1.25kgNha(-1)yr(-1), HNO3/HONO deposition ranged between 0.30-0.90kgNha(-1)yr(-1), and NO2 deposition between 0.03-0.70kgNha(-1)yr(-1). During the modeled period, average dry deposition of the inorganic gaseous N species ranged between 1.03 and 2.85kgNha(-1)yr(-1) and SO4-S deposition ranged between 0.26 and 2.04kgha(-1)yr(-1). Comparisons with co-measured ion exchange resin throughfall data (8.51kgSha(-1)yr(-1)) indicate that modeled dry deposition combined with measured wet deposition (1.37kgSha(-1)yr(-1)) underestimated S deposition. Gas phase NH3 (71%) and HNO3 plus NO2 (79%) dry deposition fluxes dominated the total deposition of NH4-N and NO3-N, respectively. PMID:27295600

  4. Development of a distributed air pollutant dry deposition modeling framework.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Satoshi; Kroll, Charles N; Nowak, David J

    2012-12-01

    A distributed air pollutant dry deposition modeling system was developed with a geographic information system (GIS) to enhance the functionality of i-Tree Eco (i-Tree, 2011). With the developed system, temperature, leaf area index (LAI) and air pollutant concentration in a spatially distributed form can be estimated, and based on these and other input variables, dry deposition of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), and particulate matter less than 10 microns (PM10) to trees can be spatially quantified. Employing nationally available road network, traffic volume, air pollutant emission/measurement and meteorological data, the developed system provides a framework for the U.S. city managers to identify spatial patterns of urban forest and locate potential areas for future urban forest planting and protection to improve air quality. To exhibit the usability of the framework, a case study was performed for July and August of 2005 in Baltimore, MD. PMID:22858662

  5. ADVANCES IN CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR ACID DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Causes and effects of acid deposition are the subject of widespread discussion both in the U.S. and Europe. Two major concerns are the acidification of lakes and streams, and forest damage. The proposed mechanism for acidification of lakes and streams is the deposition of acidic ...

  6. ACIDIC DEPOSITION AND CISTERN DRINKING WATER SUPPLIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water quality charecteristics, including the trace element Cd, cu, Pb, and Zn, in rainwater cistern supplies representing an area receiving acidic deposition were compared to cistern water chemistry in a control area that does not receive a significant input of acidic deposit...

  7. Mesoscale acid deposition modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Proctor, F. H.; Zack, John W.; Karyampudi, V. Mohan; Price, P. E.; Bousquet, M. D.; Coats, G. D.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed in support of the EPA/DOE MADS (Mesoscale Acid Deposition) Project included the development of meteorological data bases for the initialization of chemistry models, the testing and implementation of new planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes in the MASS model, the simulation of transport and precipitation for MADS case studies employing the MASS model, and the use of the TASS model in the simulation of cloud statistics and the complex transport of conservative tracers within simulated cumuloform clouds. The work performed in support of the NASA/FAA Wind Shear Program included the use of the TASS model in the simulation of the dynamical processes within convective cloud systems, the analyses of the sensitivity of microburst intensity and general characteristics as a function of the atmospheric environment within which they are formed, comparisons of TASS model microburst simulation results to observed data sets, and the generation of simulated wind shear data bases for use by the aviation meteorological community in the evaluation of flight hazards caused by microbursts.

  8. Atmospheric dry deposition in the vicinity of the Salton Sea, California - I: Air pollution and deposition in a desert environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alonso, R.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Boarman, W.I.

    2005-01-01

    Air pollutant concentrations and atmospheric dry deposition were monitored seasonally at the Salton Sea, southern California. Measurements of ozone (O 3), nitric acid vapor (HNO3), ammonia (NH3), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) were performed using passive samplers. Deposition rates of NO 3-, NH4+, Cl-, SO 42-, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ to creosote bush branches and nylon filters as surrogate surfaces were determined for one-week long exposure periods. Maximum O3 values were recorded in spring with 24-h average values of 108.8 ??g m-3. Concentrations of NO and NO2 were low and within ranges of the non-urban areas in California (0.4-5.6 and 3.3-16.2 ??g m-3 ranges, respectively). Concentrations of HNO3 (2.0-6.7 ??g m-3) and NH 3 (6.4-15.7 ??g m-3) were elevated and above the levels typical for remote locations in California. Deposition rates of Cl-, SO42-, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ were related to the influence of sea spray or to suspended soil particles, and no strong enrichments caused by ions originated by human activities were detected. Dry deposition rates of NO3- and NH4+ were similar to values registered in areas where symptoms of nitrogen saturation and changes in species composition have been described. Deposition of nitrogenous compounds might be contributing to eutrophication processes at the Salton Sea. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. TOTAL SULFUR DEPOSITION (WET+DRY) FROM THE ATMOSHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) is emitted primarily as a by-product of coal combustion from power plants. Sulfur Dioxide reacts in the atmosphere to form other chemical such as Sulfuric Acid and Amonium Sulfate. These compounds and their secondarily formed constituents deposit to the sur...

  10. TOTAL SULFUR DEPOSITION (WET+DRY) FROM THE ATMOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) is emitted primarily as a by-product of coal combustion from power plants. Sulfur Dioxide reacts in the atmosphere to form other chemical such as Sulfuric Acid and Amonium Sulfate. These compounds and their secondarily formed constituents deposit to the sur...

  11. Ozone dry deposition above a tropical forest in the dry season in northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Ichiro; Wingpud, Vitsanu; Theramongkol, Phunsak; Khummongkol, Pojanie; Wangwongwatana, Supat; Totsuka, Tsumugu

    In order to investigate the ozone dry deposition above a tropical forest in Southeast Asia, the field experiments were performed in a flat deciduous (teak) forest in Mea Moh located in northern Thailand, in the dry season, from January to April 2002. The experimental period included both the leafless period and transitional period between lush and leafless. Ozone fluxes were obtained by coupling a UV photometric ozone monitor with an ultrasonic anemometer on the basis of the gradient method. Ozone concentrations exceeded 60 ppb on average in the afternoons during the experimental period. The ozone fluxes peak around noon. The daytime level of the fluxes in this study is relatively high compared with the fluxes from previous experiments over a tropical forest or a leafless deciduous forest in other regions. This high daytime flux level is mainly caused by the high concentrations in the dry season in Mae Moh. Median deposition velocities of ozone were 0.32 cm s -1 in daytime (6:00-17:00) and 0.04 cm s -1 in nighttime (18:00-5:00), respectively. The deposition velocities as well as the fluxes peaks around noon. Observed surface resistances decreased in daytime. The surface resistances were found to be affected by aerodynamic process rather than stomatal process during the time from 10:00 to 2:00. Wesely's parameterization to infer surface resistance was examined to consider its applicability in the region. The observed surface resistance in the dry season is closer to the inferred surface resistance using the input resistances of transitional spring than that using the input resistances of leafless seasons. This indicates that the parameterization of non-stomatal resistances needs modification above the teak forest in the dry season taking into account the influence of aerodynamic process and the specific conditions in northern Thailand.

  12. Dry and wet deposition of inorganic nitrogen compounds to a tropical pasture site (Rondónia, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebs, I.; Lara, L. L.; Zeri, L. M. M.; Gatti, L. V.; Artaxo, P.; Dlugi, R.; Slanina, J.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.

    2005-05-01

    The input of nitrogen (N) to ecosystems has increased dramatically over the past decades. While total N deposition (wet + dry) has been extensively determined in temperate regions, only very few data sets exist about wet N deposition in tropical ecosystems, and moreover, experimental information about dry N deposition in tropical environments is lacking. In this study we estimate dry and wet deposition of inorganic N for a remote pasture site in the Amazon Basin based on in-situ measurements. The measurements covered the late dry (biomass burning) season, a transition period and the onset of the wet season (clean conditions) (12 September to 14 November 2002, LBA-SMOCC). Ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), ozone (O3), aerosol ammonium (NH4+) and aerosol nitrate (NO3-) were measured in real-time, accompanied by simultaneous (micro-)meteorological measurements. Dry deposition fluxes of NO2 and HNO3 are inferred using the ''big leaf multiple resistance approach'' and particle deposition fluxes are derived using an established empirical parameterization. Bi-directional surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of NH3 and HONO are estimated by applying a ''canopy compensation point model''. Dry and wet N deposition is dominated by NH3 and NH4+, which is largely the consequence of biomass burning during the dry season. The grass surface appeared to have a strong potential for daytime NH3 (re-)emission, owing to high canopy compensation points, which are related to high surface temperatures and to direct NH3 emissions from cattle excreta. NO2 also significantly accounted for dry N deposition, whereas HNO3, HONO and N-containing aerosol species were only minor contributors. We estimated a total (dry + wet) N deposition of 7.3-9.8 kgN ha-1 yr-1 to the tropical pasture site, whereof 2-4.5 kgN ha-1 yr-1 are attributed to dry N deposition and ~5.3 kgN ha-1 yr-1 to wet N deposition. Our estimate exceeds total (wet + dry) N

  13. Wet and dry deposition of mercury in Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gichuki, Susan W.; Mason, Robert P.

    2014-04-01

    Elevated concentrations of mercury (Hg) in fish from around Bermuda and fish consumers promoted a study of the atmospheric inputs of Hg to the ocean in the region. The average concentrations of total mercury in rain (THg; volume weighted mean 4.7 ng L-1) and in aerosols (particulate Hg; HgP; 9.5 pg m-3) were found to be comparable to other coastal locations removed from local sources at similar latitudes in North America. The estimated wet and dry deposition fluxes of Hg suggest that Bermuda is impacted by anthropogenic sources. A mass balance for Hg across the air-sea interface for the region around Bermuda also suggests that atmospheric wet plus dry deposition is less than estimated gas evasion of elemental Hg, indicating that the ocean is a net source in the region. This likely reflects historic elevated deposition of Hg to the North Atlantic, as has been suggested by historic water column data and from Hg biogeochemical modeling.

  14. Dry deposition of reduced and reactive nitrogen: A surrogate surfaces approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shahin, U.M.; Holsen, T.M. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Zhu, X. . Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering)

    1999-06-15

    Nitrogen dry deposition causes pH modification of ecosystems, promotes eutrophication in some water bodies, interferes with the nutrient geochemical cycle on land, and has a deteriorating effect on buildings. In this study, a water surface sampler (WSS) and knife-leading-edge surrogate surface (KSS) covered with both a Nylasorb filter and a greased disk were used to directly measure nitrate dry deposition in Chicago between May and October 1997. Concurrently, the KSS covered with both a citric acid-coated paper filter and a greased disk and the WSS were used to measure ammonia dry deposition. The average measured dry deposition flux for HNO[sub 3] was 3.78 [+-] 1.24 mg m[sup [minus]2] day[sup [minus]1]; for particulate nitrate, it was 1.46 [+-] 0.3 mg m[sup [minus]2] day[sup [minus]1]; and for ammonia gas, it was 2.64 [+-] 1.15 mg m[sup [minus]2] day[sup [minus]1]. Nitrate fluxes to the WSS and Nylasorb filter on the KSS were statistically equal, as were the total ammonia fluxes to the WSS and the citric acid-impregnated filter on the KSS. The experimental measurements indicated that HNO[sub 3] and particulate nitrate were the major species responsible for the nitrate flux to the WSS and that ammonia gas was the major source of deposited ammonia. The average mass transfer coefficients (MTCs) of HNO[sub 3] and NH[sub 3] to the WSS were 1.5 [+-] 0.22 and 2.46 [+-] 1 cm/s, respectively. SO[sub 2] and HNO[sub 3] MTCs were statistically the same. After adjusting for the differences in molecular weights, the HNO[sub 3] and NH[sub 3] mass transfer coefficients were statistically equal to the SO[sub 2] MTC.

  15. Atmospheric dry deposition of trace elements at a site on Asian-continent side of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Masahiro; Asakura, Kazuo

    2011-02-01

    The sources of dry-deposited trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb and V) and the factors controlling their dry deposition fluxes were investigated on the basis of two-year observations (April 2004-March 2006) at a site on the Asian-continent side of Japan, which has been strongly affected by air pollutants from the Asian continent. Dry deposition sampling was conducted using a water surface sampler connected to a wet-only precipitation sampler. The dry deposition of As, Cd, Pb and Sb showed a small contribution to atmospheric deposition (0.25-0.44 as ratios of annual dry/wet deposition fluxes). Moreover, the dry deposition fluxes of those elements increased negligibly during the period when their atmospheric particulate matter (PM) concentrations increased owing to transport from the Asian continent. Thus, the dry deposition of As, Cd, Pb and Sb from the Asian continent was not significant, because their overall dry deposition velocities are relatively low (mostly <1 cm s -1). Conversely, the annual dry deposition fluxes of Cr, Cu and Ni exceeded their annual wet deposition fluxes (2.5-12.4 as ratios of annual dry/wet deposition fluxes). Those overall dry deposition velocities were much higher (3.2-9.7 cm s -1), and the crustal enrichment factors (EFs) frequently exceeded ten. These results suggest that the dry deposition of Cr, Cu and Ni is dominated by considerably coarse particles from local anthropogenic sources. For Mn and V, the dry and wet depositions contributed almost equally to the annual deposition fluxes. Their monthly dry deposition fluxes correlated significantly with that of Al ( P < 0.001), and the EFs were close to unity, suggesting a large contribution of background soil to their dry deposition. The dry deposition fluxes of all the trace elements were dependent not on their atmospheric PM concentrations but on their overall dry deposition velocities. The particle size distributions of the elements in the atmosphere are likely the most

  16. Effects of acid deposition on agricultural production

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Oden, N.L.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Coveney, E.A.; Jacobson, J.S.; Rosenthal, R.E.; Evans, L.S.; Lewin, K.F.; Allen, F.L.

    1985-09-01

    A preliminary assessment, both qualitative and quantitative, was carried out on the effects of acid deposition on agriculture. An inventory was made of US crops exposed to different acid deposition levels in 1982. Most crops (valued at more than $50 billion) were exposed to annual average acid deposition levels greater than pH 4.6, but crops worth more than $220 billion were exposed to even lower pH levels. Published results of experiments on crop response to acid deposition have not identified any single crop as being consistently sensitive, and suggest that present levels of acidic precipitation in the US are not significantly affecting growth and yield of crops. Because relatively few experiments appropriate to a quantitative acid deposition assessment have been conducted, the quantitative section is necessarily based on a restricted data set. Corn, potatoes, and soybeans have been studied in experimental environments which simulate agronomic conditions and which have adequate statistical power for yield estimates; only some varieties of soybeans have demonstrated statistically significant sensitivity to acid deposition.

  17. ACIDIC DEPOSITION PHENOMENON AND ITS EFFECTS: CRITICAL ASSESSMENT DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acidic Deposition Phenomenon and Its Effects: Critical Assessment Document (CAD) is a summary, integration, and interpretation of the current scientific understanding of acidic deposition. It is firmly based upon The Acidic Deposition Phenomenon and Its Effects: Critical Asse...

  18. Numerical study on dry deposition processes in canopy layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xiaoen; Chang, Julius S.

    1992-12-01

    A coupling model between the canopy layer(CL) and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for the study of dry deposition velocity is developed. The model consists of six parts: chemical species conservation equation including absorptive factor; the species uptake action including detailed vertical variation of absorptive element in CL; momentum exchange in CL which is represented by a first-order closure momentum equation with an additional larger-scale diffusive term; momentum exchange in ABL which is described by a complete set of the ABL turbulent statistic parameters; absorptivity (or solubility or reflection) at the surface including effects of the physical and chemical characters of the species, land type, seasonal and diurnal variations of the meteorological variables; and deposition velocity derived by distributions of the species with height in CL. Variational rules of the concentration and deposition velocity with both height and time are simulated with the model for both corn and forest canopies. Results predicted with the bulk deposition velocity derived in the paper consist well with experimental data.

  19. ATMOSPHERIC ACID DEPOSITION DAMAGE TO PAINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Available data from laboratory and field studies of damage to paints by erosion have been analyzed to develop an atmospheric acid deposition damage function for exterior house paints containing calcium carbonate or silicate extenders. Regression analysis coefficients associated w...

  20. Florida acid deposition study - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, C.D.; Hendrickson, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Comprehensive literature searches were performed in the areas of source attribution and long-range transport and ecological and material effects. The literature searches were designed to determine the impacts of acid deposition that are specific to Florida. In January 1982 the results of Phase I programs were issued. These reports were: (1) Monitoring Program Phase I Summary Report; (2) Source Attribution Phase I Summary Report; and (3) A Literature Review of the Ecological and Materials Effects of Acid Deposition.

  1. Long-term elemental dry deposition fluxes measured around Lake Michigan with an automated dry deposition sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Shahin, U. Yi, S.M.; Paode, R.D.; Holsen, T.M.

    2000-05-15

    Long-term measurements of mass and elemental dry deposition (MG, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Ba, and Pb) were made with an automated dry deposition sampler (Eagle II) containing knife-edge surrogate surfaces during the Lake Michigan Mass Balance/Mass Budget Study. Measurements were made over a roughly 700-day period in Chicago, IL; in South Haven and Sleeping Bear Dunes, MI; and over Lake Michigan on the 68th Street drinking water intake cribs from December 1993 to October 1995. Average mass fluxes in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 65, 10, 3.6, and 12 mg m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Primarily crustal elemental fluxes were significantly smaller than the mass fluxes but higher than primarily anthropogenic elemental fluxes. For example, the average elemental flux of Al in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 1.0, 0.34, 0.074, and 0.34 mg m{sup {minus}2}day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The average Pb fluxes in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 0.038, 0.023, 0.035, and 0.032 mg m{sup {minus}2}day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The measured fluxes at the various sites were used to calculate the dry deposition loadings to the lake. These estimated fluxes were highest for Mg and lowest for Cd.

  2. Spotting of automotive finishes from the interactions between dry deposition of crustal material and wet deposition of sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, G.T.; Rodgers, W.R.; Wong, Curtis A.; Collins, D.C.; Verma, M.H.

    1990-12-01

    During the summer of 1988, General Motors Research Laboratories operated a mobile atmospheric research laboratory in Jacksonville, Florida to determine the cause of environmentally-related damage that occurs on automotive finishes in many parts of the US. The damage occurs as circular, elliptical, or irregular spots that appear as deposits or precipitates. The results of the present study show that a wetting event (rain or dew) is a prerequisite for damage to occur. Sulfuric acid contained in the rain or dew reacts on surfaces with dry-deposited calcium which is a common constituent of soil As the droplets evaporate, a calcium sulfate precipitate forms on horizontal surfaces around the perimeter of the droplet. Subsequent washing of the surface may remove the precipitate, but on clearcoats, where the calcium sulfate was present, scars remain.

  3. Field measurements of aerosol particle dry deposition on tropical foliage at an urban site.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ranjit; Kumari, K Maharaj; Srivastava, S S

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents dry deposition of major ions on tropical foliage (leaves of Ashok (Polyalthia longifolia) and Cassia (Cassia siamea)) at St. John's, Agra, an urban site of tropical India on nonrainy, nondewy, and nonfoggy days. The deposition flux was higher on Cassia leaf than Ashok leaf probably due to a rougher surface as shown by scanning electron microscopy. Dry deposition of cations varies from 0.46 to 12.16 mg m(-2) day(-1) while anions vary from 0.04 to 3.24 mg m(-2) day(-1). The percentage contribution of alkaline components is greater than that of acidic components, indicating the alkaline nature of dry deposition. Two-way analysis of variance results reveal significant seasonal variation only for K+, SO4(2-), and F-; however, values varied season to season for Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, NO3-, and NH4+ also. The large seasonal variation in deposition flux may be due to meteorological conditions, diameter of particles, and variation in atmospheric level. SO42- and NO3- show significant correlation, indicating their origin from similar sources while significant correlation between Ca2+ and Mg2+ implies their origin from soil. Poor correlation between Ca2+ and SO4(2-), Ca2+ and NO3-, and Mg2+ and SO4(2-) indicates that in addition to soil other sources also contribute to dry deposition. Low dry deposition fluxes of SO2- and NO3- compared to Ca2+ and Mg2+ may be due to low mass medium diameters of SO4(2-) and NO3- and may be due to uptake through the stomatal pores abundant on leaf surfaces. Factor analysis was employed to identify the sources. F-, Cl, SO4(2-), NO3-, and K+ are grouped together in the first factor, indicating their probable contribution from combustion, Ca2+, Mg2+, and NH4+ are grouped in factor II, which may be attributed to road dust and soil, and factor III includes mainly Na+ and F-, probably contributed from brick-kiln industries. Atmospheric concentrations of F-, Cl-, NOs-, SO4(2-), Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and NH4+ were found to be 0.38, 2

  4. Characterizing dry deposition of mercury in urban runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulkerson, M.; Nnadi, F.N.; Chasar, L.S.

    2007-01-01

    Stormwater runoff from urban surfaces often contains elevated levels of toxic metals. When discharged directly into water bodies, these pollutants degrade water quality and impact aquatic life and human health. In this study, the composition of impervious surface runoff and associated rainfall was investigated for several storm events at an urban site in Orlando, Florida. Total mercury in runoff consisted of 58% particulate and 42% filtered forms. Concentration comparisons at the start and end of runoff events indicate that about 85% of particulate total mercury and 93% of particulate methylmercury were removed from the surface before runoff ended. Filtered mercury concentrations showed less than 50% reduction of both total and methylmercury from first flush to final flush. Direct comparison between rainfall and runoff at this urban site indicates dry deposition accounted for 22% of total inorganic mercury in runoff. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  5. Comparison of snowpack and winter wet-deposition chemistry in the Rocky Mountains, USA: Implications for winter dry deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, D.W.; Ingersoll, G.P.; Mast, M.A.; Turk, J.T.; Campbell, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    Depth-integrated snowpack chemistry was measured just prior to maximum snowpack depth during the winters of 1992-1999 at 12 sites co-located with National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trend Network (NADP/NTN) sites in the central and southern Rocky Mountains, USA. Winter volume-weighted mean wet-deposition concentrations were calculated for the NADP/NTN sites, and the data were compared to snowpack concentrations using the paired t-test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. No statistically significant differences were indicated in concentrations of SO42- or NO3- (p>0.1). Small, but statistically significant differences (p???0.03) were indicated for all other solutes analyzed. Differences were largest for Ca2+ concentrations, which on average were 2.3??eql-1 (43%) higher in the snowpack than in winter NADP/NTN samples. Eolian carbonate dust appeared to influence snowpack chemistry through both wet and dry deposition, and the effect increased from north to south. Dry deposition of eolian carbonates was estimated to have neutralized an average of 6.9??eql-1 and a maximum of 12??eql-1 of snowpack acidity at the southernmost sites. The good agreement between snowpack and winter NADP/NTN SO42- and NO3- concentrations indicates that for those solutes the two data sets can be combined to increase data density in high-elevation areas, where few NADP/NTN sites exist. This combination of data sets will allow for better estimates of atmospheric deposition of SO42- and NO3- across the Rocky Mountain region.

  6. Modeling dry deposition of total particle mass in trafficked and rural sites of central Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, G.C.; Wu, Y.S.

    1999-07-01

    Dry deposition plates, PS-1, micro orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI), Noll rotary impactor (NRI), and Universal samplers were used to measure dry deposition fluxes and ambient air particle concentrations during day and night periods at a trafficked and a rural sampling site in central Taiwan. The results indicate that dry deposition fluxes of total particle mass at the trafficked site are about 100 times higher than at the rural sampling site. Statistical results also proved that there are no significant differences for the coarse particle concentrations in the trafficked and rural sampling sites. MOUDI, NRI, and Universal samplers were used to estimate the dry deposition flux. The ratios of estimated/measured dry deposition flux of total particle mass in the trafficked area are better than for the rural sampling site. This is because the NRI sampler was applied in the trafficked area. The Noll and Fang model-predicted dry deposition flux is more accurate than that predicted by the Sehmel and Hodgson model in both the traffic and rural sampling sites. The Universal sampler was applied in predicting dry deposition flux in the rural site. The results show that the Universal sampler is not a suitable device in predicting dry deposition because it can only collect particle sizes less than 10 {micro}m. However, this study indicates that NRI combined with the Universal sampler is useful in predicting particle mass dry deposition.

  7. A new sampler for collecting separate dry and wet atmospheric depositions of trace organic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, Don T.; Cessna, Allan J.; Gurprasad, Narine P.; Banner, James

    Studies conducted in Saskatchewan and elsewhere have demonstrated the atmospheric transport of agricultural pesticides and other organic contaminants and their deposition into aquatic ecosystems. To date these studies have focused on ambient concentrations in the atmosphere and in wet precipitation. To measure the dry deposition of organic chemicals, a new sampler was designed which uses a moving sheet of water to passively trap dry particles and gasses. The moving sheet of water drains into a reservoir and, during recirculation through the sampler, is passed through an XAD-2 resin column which adsorbs the trapped organic contaminants. All surfaces which contact the process water are stainless steel or Teflon. Chemicals collected can be related to airborne materials depositing into aquatic ecosystems. The sampler has received a United States patent (number 5,413,003 - 9 May 1996) with the Canadian patent pending. XAD-2 resin adsorption efficiencies for 10 or 50 μg fortifications of ten pesticides ranged from 76% for atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino- S-triazine) to 110% for triallate [ S-(2,3,3-trichloro-2-phenyl)bis(1-methylethyl)carbamothioate], dicamba (2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid) and toxaphene (chlorinated camphene mixture). Field testing using duplicate samplers showed good reproducibility and amounts trapped were consistent with those from high volume and bulk pan samplers located on the same site. Average atmospheric dry deposition rates of three chemicals, collected for 5 weeks in May and June, were: dicamba, 69 ng m -2 da -1; 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), 276 ng m -2 da -1: and, γ-HCH ( γ-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-hexachlorocyclohexane), 327 ng m -2 da -1.

  8. Acidic deposition and soil processes

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, R.M.; April, R.H.

    1985-08-01

    The results of the Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) show that the sensitivity of a watershed to surface water acidification is determined by the flow paths of water through the terrestrial system. If the water infiltrates through the soils into the groundwater system, acid neutralization occurs through weathering reactions involving minerals in the soils and till. Runoff and shallow interflow result in acid surface waters. Flow paths are determined in the ILWAS watersheds by the thickness of the glacial till. Complete neutralization can occur even in areas underlain by sensitive bedrock if the flow path through the mineral horizons is long enough. This appears to hold even in areas outside of the Adirondacks. 11 references, 5 figures.

  9. Impact of future land-cover changes on HNO3 and O3 surface dry deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, T.; Lathière, J.; Szopa, S.; de Noblet-Ducoudré, N.

    2015-12-01

    Dry deposition is a key component of surface-atmosphere exchange of compounds, acting as a sink for several chemical species. Meteorological factors, chemical properties of the trace gas considered and land surface properties are strong drivers of dry deposition efficiency and variability. Under both climatic and anthropogenic pressure, the vegetation distribution over the Earth has been changing a lot over the past centuries and could be significantly altered in the future. In this study, we perform a modeling investigation of the potential impact of land-cover changes between the present day (2006) and the future (2050) on dry deposition velocities at the surface, with special interest for ozone (O3) and nitric acid (HNO3), two compounds which are characterized by very different physicochemical properties. The 3-D chemistry-transport model LMDz-INCA is used, considering changes in vegetation distribution based on the three future projections, RCPs 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5, and present-day (2007) meteorology. The 2050 RCP 8.5 vegetation distribution leads to a rise of up to 7 % (+0.02 cm s-1) in the surface deposition velocity calculated for ozone (Vd,O3) and a decrease of -0.06 cm s-1 in the surface deposition velocity calculated for nitric acid (Vd,HNO3) relative to the present-day values in tropical Africa and up to +18 and -15 %, respectively, in Australia. When taking into account the RCP 4.5 scenario, which shows dramatic land-cover change in Eurasia, Vd,HNO3 increases by up to 20 % (annual-mean value) and reduces Vd,O3 by the same magnitude in this region. When analyzing the impact of surface dry deposition change on atmospheric chemical composition, our model calculates that the effect is lower than 1 ppb on annual-mean surface ozone concentration for both the RCP 8.5 and RCP 2.6 scenarios. The impact on HNO3 surface concentrations is more disparate between the two scenarios regarding the spatial repartition of effects. In the case of the RCP 4.5 scenario, a

  10. Monitoring dry deposition of gases and particles over a forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennen, M. G.; van Putten, E. M.; Uiterwijk, J. W.; Hogenkamp, J. E. M.; Wiese, C. J.; Draaijers, G.; Erisman, J. W.; Otjes, R. P.; Wyers, G. P.

    1996-12-01

    Dry deposition fluxes of acidifying and eutrophying compounds are continuously determined at Speulder forest, a Douglas fir site in the centre of the Netherlands. The monitoring equipment, installed on a 36-m high tower, consists of a sonic anemometer, a cup anemometer, a wind vane, a Bowen ratio system, three temperature/r.h. sensors, and gas analyzers to measure gradients of SO 2, NO x and NH 3 and concentrations of HCl, HNO 2 and HNO 3. Particles are sampled in two size ranges (<2.5 mm and 2.5-10 mm) on filters, which are analysed for acidifying components and basic cations. Fluxes of SO 2, NO x and NH 3 are determined with the gradient method, while fluxes of the other components are estimated with the inferential method. Parameterizations of the surface resistance ( Rc) for gases are derived from measurements obtained during periods that meet criteria with respect to homogeneous fetch, stationary flow, etc. Parameterized Rc values are used to estimate fluxes during periods that don't fulfil these demands. In this way, yearly average fluxes can be determined. In 1995, the total deposition fluxes of SO x(=SO 2+SO 42-), NO y(=NO x+NO 3-+HNO 2+HNO 3) and NH x, (=NH 3+NH 4+) were 450, 630 and 1620 eq. ha -1 a -1, respectively.

  11. Modeling studies of ammonia dispersion and dry deposition at some hog farms in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Kanwardeep S; Arya, S Pal; Aneja, Viney P

    2008-09-01

    A modeling study was conducted on dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia taking one hog farm as a unit. The ammonia emissions used in this study were measured under our OPEN (Odor, Pathogens, and Emissions of Nitrogen) project over a waste lagoon and from hog barns. Meteorological data were also collected at the farm site. The actual layout of barns and lagoons on the farms was used to simulate dry deposition downwind of the farm. Dry deposition velocity, dispersion, and dry deposition of ammonia were studied over different seasons and under different stability conditions using the short-range dispersion/air quality model, AERMOD. Dry deposition velocities were highest under near-neutral conditions and lowest under stable conditions. The highest deposition at short range occurred under nighttime stable conditions and the lowest occurred during daytime unstable conditions. Significant differences in deposition over crop and grass surfaces were observed under stable conditions. PMID:18817112

  12. Seasonal and annual variations and regional characteristics of wet and dry deposition amounts in East Asian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Tsuyoshi, O.; Endo, T.; Yagoh, H.; Matsuda, K.

    2011-12-01

    Emission of sulfur and nitrogen compounds in Asian region has been remarkably increased with recent rapid economical growth (Ohara et al., 2007). To appropriately assess the influence of air pollutants on the ecosystem, it is important to quantitatively determine the atmospheric deposition of air pollutants. Here, Seasonal and annual variations and regional characteristics of estimated wet and dry deposition amounts at 27 monitoring sites of Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET) from 2003 to 2009 are discussed. Wet deposition sample was collected every 24 hours or 1 week by a wet only sampler. Wet deposition amounts were calculated by the product of the volume-weighted concentrations of ionic species (SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+) in the precipitation and precipitation amount measured by a standard rain gauge at each site. Dry deposition amount was estimated by the inferential method which was originated the model developed by Wesely and Hicks (1977) and modified by Matsuda (2008). The components examined for dry deposition were sulfur compounds (gaseous SO2 and particulate SO42-) and nitrogen compounds (gaseous HNO3 and NH3, particulate NO3- and NH4+). Dry deposition was calculated by the product of the deposition velocity estimated by the inferential method for forest and grass surfaces and the monitored air concentration of each compound. The mean annual dry deposition amounts for sulfur and nitrogen compounds in Japanese sites were in the range of 5-37 and 7-50 mmol m-2 year-1, respectively. The regional characteristics of dry deposition amounts in Japan were similar between sulfur and nitrogen compounds, which showed higher deposition in the Sea of Japan side and the western Japan. The mean annual total (wet + dry) deposition amounts for sulfur and nitrogen compounds in Japanese sites were in the range of 28-77 and 22-130 mmol m-2 year-1, respectively. The contributions of dry deposition to the total deposition amounts were 10-55% and 13-56% for

  13. RESULTS FROM THE MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro) was initiated in 1993 as part of the research necessary to support the objectives of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), which was created to address the. requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The main ob...

  14. Dry and wet deposition of inorganic nitrogen compounds to a tropical pasture site (Rondônia, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebs, I.; Lara, L. L.; Zeri, L. M. M.; Gatti, L. V.; Artaxo, P.; Dlugi, R.; Slanina, J.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.

    2006-02-01

    The input of nitrogen (N) to ecosystems has increased dramatically over the past decades. While total (wet + dry) N deposition has been extensively determined in temperate regions, only very few data sets of N wet deposition exist for tropical ecosystems, and moreover, reliable experimental information about N dry deposition in tropical environments is lacking. In this study we estimate dry and wet deposition of inorganic N for a remote pasture site in the Amazon Basin based on in-situ measurements. The measurements covered the late dry (biomass burning) season, a transition period and the onset of the wet season (clean conditions) (12 September to 14 November 2002) and were a part of the LBA-SMOCC (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke, Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall, and Climate) 2002 campaign. Ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), ozone (O3), aerosol ammonium (NH4+) and aerosol nitrate (NO3-) were measured in real-time, accompanied by simultaneous meteorological measurements. Dry deposition fluxes of NO2 and HNO3 are inferred using the ''big leaf multiple resistance approach'' and particle deposition fluxes are derived using an established empirical parameterization. Bi-directional surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of NH3 and HONO are estimated by applying a ''canopy compensation point model''. N dry and wet deposition is dominated by NH3 and NH4+, which is largely the consequence of biomass burning during the dry season. The grass surface appeared to have a strong potential for daytime NH3 emission, owing to high canopy compensation points, which are related to high surface temperatures and to direct NH3 emissions from cattle excreta. NO2 also significantly accounted for N dry deposition, whereas HNO3, HONO and N-containing aerosol species were only minor contributors. Ignoring NH3 emission from the vegetation surface, the annual net N deposition rate is estimated to be about

  15. Acid deposition control benefits as problematic

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    The author argues that the government's mistaken beliefs downgrade the benefits of acid deposition control, and may misdirect research of the effects of acid rain upon natural and human systems. It can be argued as to whether or not the factors (generally existing prices and yield changes from current standing stocks of environmental goods) upon which the $5 billion estimate for control was built have a major or minor influence upon the true economic consequences of acid deposition. As the application of Bayes' rule demonstrates, any lessening in arbitrariness of numerical assignments to the factors could lead to a major revision in the estimate. Assessment stories probably contribute to the paralysis of political will even though their truth value is small.

  16. Differential soil acidity tolerance of dry bean genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil acidity is a major yield limiting factors for bean production in the tropical regions. Using soil acidity tolerant genotypes is an important strategy in improving bean yields and reducing cost of production. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with the objective of evaluating 20 dry bean geno...

  17. THE DRY DEPOSITION OF SPECIATED MERCURY TO THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES: MEASUREMENTS AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Florida Everglades Dry-Deposition Study (FEDDS) was designed to test the viability of using new and existing measurement techniques in the estimation of the dry-depositional loading of speciated mercury (elemental gaseous, reactive gaseous and particulate) to a mixed sawgrass...

  18. Dry deposition velocity of total suspended particles and meteorological influence in four locations in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leifu; Peng, Shaolin; Liu, Jingang; Hou, Qianqian

    2012-01-01

    Dry deposition velocity of total suspended particles (TSP) is an effective parameter that describes the speed of atmospheric particulate matter deposit to the natural surface. It is also an important indicator to the capacity of atmosphere self-depuration. However, the spatial and temporal variations in dry deposition velocity of TSP at different urban landscapes and the relationship between dry deposition velocity and the meteorological parameters are subject to large uncertainties. We concurrently investigated this relationship at four different landscapes of Guangzhou, from October to December of 2009. The result of the average dry deposition velocity is (1.49 +/- 0.77), (1.44 +/- 0.77), (1.13 +/- 0.53) and (1.82 +/- 0.82) cm/sec for urban commercial landscape, urban forest landscape, urban residential landscape and country landscape, respectively. This spatial variation can be explained by the difference of both particle size composition of TSP and meteorological parameters of sampling sites. Dry deposition velocity of TSP has a positive correlation with wind speed, and a negative correlation with temperature and relative humidity. Wind speed is the strongest factor that affects the magnitude of TSP dry deposition velocity, and the temperature is another considerable strong meteorological factor. We also find out that the relative humidity brings less impact, especially during the dry season. It is thus implied that the current global warming and urban heat island effect may lead to correlative changes in TSP dry deposition velocity, especially in the urban areas. PMID:22894097

  19. Acidic deposition and surface water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M. R.

    A pair of back-to-back (morning and afternoon) hydrology sessions, held December 10, 1987, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., covered “Predicting the Effects of Acidic Deposition on Surface Water Chemistry.” The combined sessions included four invited papers, 12 contributed papers, and a panel discussion at its conclusion. The gathering dealt with questions on a variety of aspects of modeling the effects of acidic deposition on surface water chemistry.Contributed papers included discussions on the representation of processes in models as well as limiting assumptions in model application (V. S. Tripathi et al., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., and E. C. Krug, Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign), along with problems in estimating depositional inputs to catchments and thus inputs to be used in the simulation of catchment response (M. M. Reddy et al., U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, Colo.; and E. A. McBean, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada). L. A. Baker et al. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) dealt with the problem of modeling seepage lake systems, an exceedingly important portion of the aquatic resources in Florida and parts of the upper U.S. Midwest. J. A. Hau and Y. Eckstein (Kent State University, Kent, Ohio) considered equilibrium modeling of two northern Ohio watersheds that receive very different loads of acidic deposition but are highly similar in other respects.

  20. Acid deposition in Maryland: Implications of the results of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowmann, M.; Ross, J.; Blundell, C.; Price, R.

    1991-07-01

    Acid deposition, commonly referred to as 'acid rain,' is a major global environmental concern. Acid deposition has reportedly resulted in damage to aquatic, terrestrial, and physical resources and has potentially adverse effects on human health. A component of the Maryland acid deposition program is the preparation of an annual report that summarizes yearly activities and costs of ongoing acid deposition research and monitoring programs.

  1. Impact of future land cover changes on HNO3 and O3 surface dry deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, T.; Lathière, J.; Szopa, S.; de Noblet-Ducoudré, N.

    2015-07-01

    Dry deposition is a key component of surface-atmosphere exchange of compounds, acting as a sink for several chemical species. Meteorological factors, chemical properties of the trace gas considered and land surface properties are strong drivers of dry deposition efficiency and variability. Under both climatic and anthropogenic pressure, the vegetation distribution over the Earth has been changing a lot over the past centuries, and could be significantly altered in the future. In this study, we perform a modeling investigation of the potential impact of land-cover changes between present-day (2006) and the future (2050) on dry deposition rates, with special interest for ozone (O3) and nitric acid vapor (HNO3), two compounds which are characterized by very different physico-chemical properties. The 3-D chemistry transport model LMDz-INCA is used, considering changes in vegetation distribution based on the three future projections RCPs 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5. The 2050 RCP 8.5 vegetation distribution leads to a rise up to 7 % (+0.02 cm s-1) in VdO3 and a decrease of -0.06 cm s-1 in VdHNO3 relative to the present day values in tropical Africa, and up to +18 and -15 % respectively in Australia. When taking into account the RCP 4.5 scenario, which shows dramatic land cover change in Eurasia, VdHNO3 increases by up to 20 % (annual-mean value) and reduces VdO3 by the same magnitude in this region. When analyzing the impact of dry deposition change on atmospheric chemical composition, our model calculates that the effect is lower than 1 ppb on annual mean surface ozone concentration, for both for the RCP8.5 and RCP2.6 scenarios. The impact on HNO3 surface concentrations is more disparate between the two scenarios, regarding the spatial repartition of effects. In the case of the RCP 4.5 scenario, a significant increase of the surface O3 concentration reaching locally up to 5 ppb (+5 %) is calculated on average during the June-August period. This scenario induces also an increase of

  2. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition in south-east Scotland: Quantification of the organic nitrogen fraction in wet, dry and bulk deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Benítez, Juan M.; Cape, J. Neil; Heal, Mathew R.; van Dijk, Netty; Díez, Alberto Vidal

    Water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) compounds are ubiquitous in precipitation and in the planetary boundary layer, and therefore are a potential source of bioavailable reactive nitrogen. This paper examines weekly rain data over a period of 22 months from June 2005 to March 2007 collected in 2 types of rain collector (bulk deposition and "dry + wet" deposition) located in a semi-rural area 15 km southwest of Edinburgh, UK (N55°51'44″, W3°12'19″). Bulk deposition collectors are denoted in this paper as "standard rain gauges", and they are the design used in the UK national network for monitoring precipitation composition. "Dry + wet" deposition collectors are flushing rain gauges and they are equipped with a rain detector (conductivity array), a spray nozzle, a 2-way valve and two independent bottles to collect funnel washings (dry deposition) and true wet deposition. On average, for the 27 weekly samples with 3 valid replicates for the 2 types of collectors, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) represented 23% of the total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) in bulk deposition. Dry deposition of particles and gas on the funnel surface, rather than rain, contributed over half of all N-containing species (inorganic and organic). Some discrepancies were found between bulk rain gauges and flushing rain gauges, for deposition of both TDN and DON, suggesting biological conversion and loss of inorganic N in the flushing samplers.

  3. (Acidic deposition: Its nature and impacts)

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.B.; Turner, R.S. ); Ryan, P.F. )

    1990-10-18

    The travelers presented papers on various aspects of modeling performed as part of the US National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition: Its Nature and Impacts. The meeting was sponsored by the Royal Society of Edinburgh and was attended by over 800 scientists, primarily from Europe and North America. The conference focused on nine aspects of the nature and impacts of atmospheric pollutants, including ozone: chemistry of atmospheric pollutants; processes controlling the deposition of pollutants; effects of pollutants on soils; physiology of plant responses to pollutants; effects of pollutants in agricultural and natural or seminatural ecosystems; atmospheric pollutants and forests; effects of pollutants on the chemistry of freshwater streams and lakes; effects of pollutants on freshwater plants and animals; and effects of pollutants, indoors and outdoors, on materials and buildings.

  4. Observational and modeling study of dry deposition on surrogate surfaces in a South China city: implication of removal of atmospheric crustal particles.

    PubMed

    Wai, Ka-Ming; Leung, Ka-Yee; Tanner, Peter A

    2010-05-01

    Dry deposition samples collected during 1999-2001 at a South China site using surrogate surfaces were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Collector surface properties played important roles to the dry deposition. The deposition velocities for various species ranged from 0.02 to 1.69 cm s(-1), in general agreement with literature values. More than 90% of Ca(2+) was deposited by sedimentation and its comparable values of dry or wet removal residence times imply that dry deposition is an important atmospheric removal process for the ubiquitous crustal species in South China, compared with precipitation scavenging. Relatively good agreement was found when the species deposition velocities were modeled based on up-to-date knowledge of particle dry deposition. The total depositions for anthropogenic and crustal species in northern China are likely to be much higher than those in the south, including our site where the fluxes of the acidic species SO(4)(2-) and NO(3)(-) were 4.4 and 2.2 g m(-2) year(-1), respectively. The sum of dry deposition for cations Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) contributes 44% of the total flux, which is equivalent to the value estimated in Europe. PMID:19357979

  5. The impact of drought on ozone dry deposition over eastern Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ling; McDonald-Buller, Elena C.; McGaughey, Gary; Kimura, Yosuke; Allen, David T.

    2016-02-01

    Dry deposition represents a critical pathway through which ground-level ozone is removed from the atmosphere. Understanding the effects of drought on ozone dry deposition is essential for air quality modeling and management in regions of the world with recurring droughts. This work applied the widely used Zhang dry deposition algorithm to examine seasonal and interannual changes in estimated ozone dry deposition velocities and component resistances/conductances over eastern Texas during years with drought (2006 and 2011) as well as a year with slightly cooler temperatures and above average rainfall (2007). Simulated area-averaged daytime ozone dry deposition velocities ranged between 0.26 and 0.47 cm/s. Seasonal patterns reflected the combined seasonal variations in non-stomatal and stomatal deposition pathways. Daytime ozone dry deposition velocities during the growing season were consistently larger during 2007 compared to 2006 and 2011. These differences were associated with differences in stomatal conductances and were most pronounced in forested areas. Reductions in stomatal conductances under drought conditions were highly sensitive to increases in vapor pressure deficit and warmer temperatures in Zhang's algorithm. Reductions in daytime ozone deposition velocities and deposition mass during drought years were associated with estimates of higher surface ozone concentrations.

  6. Acidic Depositions: Effects on Wildlife and Habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1993-01-01

    The phenomenon of 'acid rain' is not new; it was recognized in the mid-1800s in industrialized Europe. In the 1960s a synthesis of information about acidification began in Europe, along with predictions of ecological effects. In the U.S. studies of acidification began in the 1920s. By the late 1970s research efforts in the U.S. and Canada were better coordinated and in 1980 a 10-year research program was undertaken through the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Plan (NAPAP) to determine the causes and consequences of acidic depositions. Much of the bedrock in the northeastern U.S. and Canada contains total alkalinity of 20 kg/ha/yr of wet sulphate depositions and are vulnerable to acidifying processes. Acidic depositions contribute directly to acidifying processes of soil and soil water. Soils must have sufficient acid-neutralizing capacity or acidity of soil will increase. Natural soil-forming processes that lead to acidification can be accelerated by acidic depositions. Long-term effects of acidification are predicted, which will reduce soil productivity mainly through reduced availability of nutrients and mobilization of toxic metals. Severe effects may lead to major alteration of soil chemistry, soil biota, and even loss of vegetation. Several species of earthworms and several other taxa of soil-inhabiting invertebrates, which are important food of many vertebrate wildlife species, are affected by low pH in soil. Loss of canopy in declining sugar maples results in loss of insects fed on by certain neotropical migrant bird species. No definitive studies categorically link atmospheric acidic depositions with direct or indirect effects on wild mammals. Researchers have concentrated on vegetative and aquatic effects. Circumstantial evidence suggests that effects are probable for certain species of aquatic-dependent mammals (water shrew, mink, and otter) and that these species are at risk from the loss of foods or contamination of these foods by metals

  7. Regional variations in wet and dry deposition fluxes of trace elements in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Masahiro; Marumoto, Kohji; Narukawa, Masahiro; Asakura, Kazuo

    The annual wet and dry deposition fluxes of 12 trace elements (i.e., As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se and V) were measured on the basis of 1 year of observations (December 2003-November 2004) at 10 sites in Japan. Precipitation and dry deposition (gases and particles) samples were collected every half month using an automatic sampler, which is composed of a precipitation sampler and a water surface sampler for dry deposition. The wet deposition fluxes of Hg, Pb and Se exceeded their dry deposition fluxes at most sites. In contrast, the dry deposition fluxes of Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni and V were significantly higher than their wet deposition fluxes. The annual wet deposition fluxes of trace elements except for Cu, Mo and Ni were correlated with the annual precipitation amount ( P<0.05). In particular, about 70-80% of the variance of the wet deposition fluxes for Hg ( r2=0.80), Sb ( r2=0.68) and V ( r2=0.80) was explained using the precipitation amount. The wet deposition fluxes of As, Cd, Pb and Se at sites on the Japan Sea coast tended to be higher than those expected from the precipitation amount. This suggests a large contribution of their long-range transport from the Asian continent. On the other hand, the regional variations in the dry deposition fluxes of the trace elements were different from those in the wet deposition fluxes. A markedly higher dry deposition fluxes were observed at sites in industrial and urban areas. The relatively high dry deposition fluxes of Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb suggest that these elements are mainly from electric steel furnaces near the sites, because they are abundant in furnace emission particles. The results of lead isotope analyses indicate that the lead isotope ratios in the dry deposition samples at industrial and urban sites are different from those at other sites. This implies that lead dry deposition at such sites is dominated by emissions from peculiar sources, although whether those sources are the electric steel

  8. [Characteristics of Atmospheric Dry and Wet Deposition of Trace Metals in the Hinterland of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liu-yi; Liu, Yuan; Qiao, Bao-qing; Fu, Chuan; Wang, Huan-bo; Huang, Yi-min; Yang, Fu-mo

    2016-02-15

    In order to investigate the characteristics of atmospheric trace metals deposition in the hinterland of the Three Gorges Reservoir, the wet and dry deposition samples were collected at an urban area sampling site in Wanzhou during January to June 2014. Besides, the samples were collected at five other sampling sites in April 2014 for comparative analysis, including factory region, town suburb, nature reserve, county suburb, and rural area. pH, conductivity, and trace metals (Al, As, B, Ba, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Pb, Ni, Sb, Sr, Sn, Ti, Zn, V) were analyzed. In urban area, the acid rain frequency was 48.44% , and the acid rain occurred mainly in the period of January to April. The order of acid rain frequency in various functional areas was factory region > urban area > county suburb > town suburb > nature reserve > county rural area. All of the trace metals in wet deposition during the sampling period were lower than the National Environmental Quality Standard for Surface Water Standard of Class III. Cd, Cu, Ph and Zn were found exceeding the standard of class I , and the pollution in factory region was more serious compared to other functional areas. The extract pH of dry deposition in urban area was in the range of 4.91-6.74, with an average value of 5.79. The order of dry deposition in various functional areas was factory region > county suburb > urban area > county rural area > town suburb > nature reserve, which was exactly the same as that of the wet deposition, indicating the similar sources of dry and wet deposition. In urban area, the contents of Ba, Co, Cu, Cr, Li, Mn, Ni, Sr, Zn in dry deposition were greater than those in wet deposition, but the contents of Al, As, B, Bi, Cd, Fe, Ph, Sb, Sn, Ti, V showed the opposite trend. Analysis of the enrichment factors showed that Al was in moderate enrichment, while Bi and Cd were significantly enriched. PMID:27363132

  9. Assessing New Dry Deposition Parameterization Schemes for Incorporation into Global Atmospheric Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, T.; Perlinger, J. A.; Wu, S.; Fairall, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    Dry deposition is a key process in atmosphere-surface exchange and is an important transmission route for atmospheric gases and aerosols to enter terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Vertical transport of atmospheric aerosols to Earth's surface is governed by several processes including turbulent transfer, interception, inertial impaction, settling, diffusion, turbophoresis, thermophoresis, and electrostatic effects. In global transport models (GTMs), particle dry deposition velocity (vd) from the lowest model layer to the surface is often parameterized using an electrical resistance analogy. This resistance analogy is widely used in a modified form to compute vd for steady-state dry deposition flux. Recently, a mass conservative formulation of dry deposition applicable to smooth and rough surfaces was proposed. Here, we evaluate dry deposition velocities computed using five different schemes with measurement results from a variety of surfaces including bare soil, grass, and coniferous, broad-leaf, and deciduous forest canopies. Based on this assessment, we provide suggestions for optimal treatment of dry deposition processes in GTMs and evaluate implementation of new dry deposition schemes.

  10. Simulated seasonal variations in wet acid depositions over East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Cui; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Han, Xiao; Wang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    The air quality modeling system Regional Atmospheric Modeling System-Community Multi-scale Air Quality (RAMS-CMAQ) was applied to analyze temporospatial variations in wet acid deposition over East Asia in 2005, and model results obtained on a monthly basis were evaluated against extensive observations, including precipitation amounts at 704 stations and SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ concentrations in the atmosphere and rainwater at 18 EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) stations. The comparison shows that the modeling system can reasonably reproduce seasonal precipitation patterns, especially the extensive area of dry conditions in northeast China and north China and the major precipitation zones. For ambient concentrations and wet depositions, the simulated results are in reasonable agreement (within a factor of 2) with observations in most cases, and the major observed features are mostly well reproduced. The analysis of modeled wet deposition distributions indicates that East Asia experiences noticeable variations in its wet deposition patterns throughout the year. In winter, southern China and the coastal areas of the Japan Sea report higher S04(2-) and NO3- wet depositions. In spring, elevated SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found in northeastern China, southern China, and around the Yangtze River. In summer, a remarkable rise in precipitation in northeastern China, the valleys of the Huaihe and Yangtze rivers, Korea, and Japan leads to a noticeable increase in SO4(2-) and NO3- wet depositions, whereas in autumn, higher SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found around Sichuan Province. Meanwhile, due to the high emission of SO2, high wet depositions of SO4(2-) are found throughout the entire year in the area surrounding Sichuan Province. There is a tendency toward decreasing NO3- concentrations in rainwater from China through Korea to Japan in both observed and simulated results, which is a consequence of the influence of the continental

  11. Emerging acid deposition research and monitoring issues

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, R.

    1997-12-31

    The research baselines established for acid rain in the 1980s position scientists and policy makers to evaluate the environmental effectiveness of the acid rain control program and to test the variety of scientific hypotheses made regarding the chemical, transport and biological processes involved in acidic deposition. Several new research questions have evolved. How effective are the emissions reductions? What is the residual risk? How have ecological recovery rates been affected and what other environmental factors influence recovery? What are the critical requirements to measure ecological change including the extent and rate while also capturing the extent and severity of emerging ecological stressors (such as watershed nitrogen saturation)? These and other questions are currently being synthesized within and outside of EPA to develop a long-term strategy to provide guidance to emerging research and monitoring issues.

  12. Overall dry deposition velocities of trace elements measured at harbor and traffic site in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lin, Jum-Bo; Lin, Jhih-Guang

    2007-03-01

    For reasonable and convenient assessments of the characteristics of the dry deposition velocities between Taichung harbor site and Wuchi town site in central Taiwan, the overall dry deposition velocities of several metallic elements were calculated as the particulate diameter (D(p)) distributions of large particles (D(p) > 10 microm), coarse particles (10 microm < D(p) < 2.5 microm), and fine particles (D(p) < 2.5 microm) based on the ambient measurements during March-December of 2004. In this work, the dry deposition fluxes showed the higher correlation with coarse particle concentrations than large particle concentrations; however, the least well correlation was observed between the dry deposition fluxes and the fine particle concentrations. The calculated best-fit overall dry deposition velocities obtained using coarse particle concentrations varied from approximately 0.2 cm s(-1) for Cr to 1.5 cm s(-1) for Pb and 0.2 cm s(-1) for Fe to 2.6 cm s(-1) for Pb at Taichung harbor and Wuchi town site, respectively. In general, the crustal elements had higher deposition velocities than anthropogenic elements. In addition, overall dry deposition velocities for crustal elements were higher in Wuchi town site than in Taichung harbor site. The results identified the dry deposition flux was mainly contributed from large and coarse particles due to their high deposition velocities. The results also indicated that the best approach to estimate overall dry deposition was by depending on the characteristics of particles with diameters larger than 2.5 microm. PMID:17166552

  13. Nanoparticle preparation of Mefenamic acid by electrospray drying

    SciTech Connect

    Zolkepali, Nurul Karimah Bakar, Noor Fitrah Abu Anuar, Nornizar; Naim, M. Nazli; Bakar, Mohd Rushdi Abu

    2014-02-24

    Nanoparticles preparation of Mefenamic acid (MA) by using an electrospray drying method was conducted in this study. Electrospray drying is a process that uses electrostatic force to disperse a conductive liquid stream into fine charged droplets through the coulomb fission of charges in the liquid and finally dry into fine particles. Electrospray drying modes operation usually in Taylor cone jet, and it was formed by controlling applied voltage and liquid flow rate. A conductive liquid (2.77–8.55μScm{sup −1}) which is MA solution was prepared by using acetone with concentration 0.041 and 0.055 M before pumping at a flow rate of 3–6ml/h. By applying the applied voltage at 1.3–1.5 kV, Taylor cone jet mode was formed prior to the electrospray. During electrospray drying process, solvent evaporation from the droplet was occurring that leads to coulomb disruption and may generate to nanoparticles. The dried nanoparticles were collected on a grounded substrate that was placed at varying distance from the electrospray. MA particle with size range of 100–400 nm were produced by electrospray drying process. Characterization of particles by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that particles formed into polymorph I.

  14. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Keller, Fred A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2003-12-09

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  15. Atmospheric trace elements at Enewetak Atoll: 2. Transport to the ocean by wet and dry deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, R.; Duce, R. A.; Ray, B. J.; Unni, C. K.

    1985-02-01

    The concentrations of trace elements in precipitation and dry deposition are presented for samples collected at Enewetak Atoll (11°N, 162° E) during SEAREX experiments in 1979. The concentrations of Al, Sc, Mn, Fe, Co, and Th in rain are dominated by crustal material, and for these elements, wet deposition evidently exceeds dry deposition. For most of these elements the present rates of atmospheric deposition at Enewetak are similar to their mean rate of accumulation in sediments over the past 5-10,000 years, suggesting that the air-to-sea exchange of particles is closely tied to the sedimentary cycle of the mid-Pacific. Noncrustal sources govern the concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cu, Se, and Cd in wet and dry deposition samples. Analyses of dry deposition collected from a flat plastic plate indicate that the amount of material recycled from the sea surface varies markedly between samples, and even though these estimates do not necessarily reflect the dry deposition to the ocean surface, the results suggest that recycled sea spray often amounts to more than 50% of the total dry deposition of the enriched elements. Recycled sea spray also makes up a significant fraction of the total wet deposition of the enriched elements. The net deposition rates of elements such as Cu and Zn are greater than or equal to their inputs from vertical mixing, but the net deposition of Pb clearly exceeds the input from upwelling. The current net deposition rates of the enriched elements are also similar to their rates of removal to sediments. These results indicate that air-sea exchange processes may significantly affect the chemistry of trace metals in the open ocean.

  16. An Evaluation of Ozone Dry Deposition in Global Scale Chemistry Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardacre, C.; Wild, O.; Emberson, L.

    2014-12-01

    Dry deposition of atmospheric oxidants to the Earth's surface or vegetation is important as both a major removal pathway governing their atmospheric abundance and as a key input of oxidants and nutrients to sensitive vegetation surfaces. By linking the atmosphere and biosphere, dry deposition processes contribute to wider climate and Earth system feedbacks which need to be adequately quantified for a full understanding of Earth system responses. In addition, they have immediate policy-relevant implications for air quality, ecosystem health and crop productivity that need to be assessed on local, regional and global scales. In this study we use results from the recent Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP) model intercomparison to explore how dry deposition of ozone varies across 15 current atmospheric chemistry and transport models. While most models take a similar, resistances-based approach to parameterising dry deposition, there are substantial differences across the models in the magnitude and variability of the annual and monthly ozone deposition fluxes which contribute to the differences in modelled surface ozone and in the global tropospheric ozone budget. We find that the range in global ozone deposition flux over the HTAP model ensemble spans about 30% with deposition to ocean, grass land and tropical forests being particularly variable. Further, we compare modelled dry deposition of ozone to measurements made at a variety of locations in Europe and North America, noting differences of up to a factor of two but no clear systematic bias over the sites examined. We extend this analysis by running sensitivity studies to determine the importance of key parameters in the ozone dry deposition process, including soil moisture and leaf area index. This study provides an important first step towards quantifying the uncertainty in ozone dry deposition and permitting a more thorough, observation-based evaluation of this important process.

  17. Global inorganic nitrogen dry deposition inferred from ground- and space-based measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yanlong; Yu, Guirui; Gao, Yanni; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Jiao, Cuicui; Zuo, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) dry deposition is an important component in total N deposition. However, uncertainty exists in the assessment of global dry deposition. Here, we develop empirical models for estimating ground N concentrations using NO2 satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and ground measurements from 555 monitoring sites. Global patterns and trends in the fluxes of NO2, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3− were assessed for 2005–2014. Moreover, we estimated global NH3 dry deposition directly using data from 267 monitoring sites. Our results showed that East Asia, the United States, and Europe were important regions of N deposition, and the total annual amount of global inorganic N deposition was 34.26 Tg N. The dry deposition fluxes were low in Africa and South America, but because of their large area, the total amounts in these regions were comparable to those in Europe and North America. In the past decade, the western United States and Eurasia, particularly eastern China, experienced the largest increases in dry deposition, whereas the eastern United States, Western Europe, and Japan experienced clear decreases through control of NOx and NH3 emissions. These findings provide a scientific background for policy-makers and future research into global changes. PMID:26813440

  18. Global inorganic nitrogen dry deposition inferred from ground- and space-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yanlong; Yu, Guirui; Gao, Yanni; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Jiao, Cuicui; Zuo, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) dry deposition is an important component in total N deposition. However, uncertainty exists in the assessment of global dry deposition. Here, we develop empirical models for estimating ground N concentrations using NO2 satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and ground measurements from 555 monitoring sites. Global patterns and trends in the fluxes of NO2, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3- were assessed for 2005-2014. Moreover, we estimated global NH3 dry deposition directly using data from 267 monitoring sites. Our results showed that East Asia, the United States, and Europe were important regions of N deposition, and the total annual amount of global inorganic N deposition was 34.26 Tg N. The dry deposition fluxes were low in Africa and South America, but because of their large area, the total amounts in these regions were comparable to those in Europe and North America. In the past decade, the western United States and Eurasia, particularly eastern China, experienced the largest increases in dry deposition, whereas the eastern United States, Western Europe, and Japan experienced clear decreases through control of NOx and NH3 emissions. These findings provide a scientific background for policy-makers and future research into global changes.

  19. Global inorganic nitrogen dry deposition inferred from ground- and space-based measurements.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanlong; Yu, Guirui; Gao, Yanni; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Qiufeng; Jiao, Cuicui; Zuo, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) dry deposition is an important component in total N deposition. However, uncertainty exists in the assessment of global dry deposition. Here, we develop empirical models for estimating ground N concentrations using NO2 satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and ground measurements from 555 monitoring sites. Global patterns and trends in the fluxes of NO2, HNO3, NH4(+), and NO3(-) were assessed for 2005-2014. Moreover, we estimated global NH3 dry deposition directly using data from 267 monitoring sites. Our results showed that East Asia, the United States, and Europe were important regions of N deposition, and the total annual amount of global inorganic N deposition was 34.26 Tg N. The dry deposition fluxes were low in Africa and South America, but because of their large area, the total amounts in these regions were comparable to those in Europe and North America. In the past decade, the western United States and Eurasia, particularly eastern China, experienced the largest increases in dry deposition, whereas the eastern United States, Western Europe, and Japan experienced clear decreases through control of NOx and NH3 emissions. These findings provide a scientific background for policy-makers and future research into global changes. PMID:26813440

  20. PROCEDURES FOR ESTIMATING DRY WEATHER SEWAGE IN-LINE POLLUTANT DEPOSITION. PHASE 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Planners, engineers, and municipal managers are given generalized procedures/equations to estimate the amount of pollutants deposited in combined sewer systems during dry weather so they can make intelligent decisions about sewer flushing programs and other combined sewer managem...

  1. GUIDELINE FOR DESIGN, INSTALLATION, OPERATION, AND QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR DRY DEPOSITION MONITORING NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual provides basic, practical, field-tested guidance on the installation, operation, maintenance, calibration, and auditing of dry deposition measurement systems. The information provided is based primarily on EPA's experience in installing, operating, maintaining, and aud...

  2. Ancillary effects of selected acid deposition control policies

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, R.J.; Lyke, A.J.; Nesse, R.J.

    1986-08-01

    NAPAP is examining a number of potential ways to reduce the precursors (sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) to acid deposition. However, the policies to reduce acid deposition will have other physical, biological and economic effects unrelated to acid deposition. For example, control policies that reduce sulfur dioxide emissions may also increase visibility. The effects of an acid deposition policy that are unrelated to acid deposition are referred to as ''ancillary'' effects. This reserch identifies and characterizes the principle physical and economic ancillary effects associated with acid deposition control and mitigation policies. In this study the ancillary benefits associated with four specific acid deposition policy options were investigated. The four policy options investigated are: (1) flue gas desulfurization, (2) coal blending or switching, (3) reductions in automobile emissions of NO/sub x/, and (4) lake liming. Potential ancillary benefits of each option were identified and characterized. Particular attention was paid to the literature on economic valuation of potential ancillary effects.

  3. MOUNTAIN CLOUD CHEMISTRY PROJECT WET, DRY ANDCLOUD WATER DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is the second in a series of annual summaries of research on the deposition of airborne chemicals to forest canopies and the forest floor in eastern North America. The report is based on observations and model estimates of atmospheric deposition at high elevation site...

  4. Improved Formulations for Air-Surface Exchanges Related to National Security Needs: Dry Deposition Models

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, James G.

    2006-07-01

    The Department of Homeland Security and others rely on results from atmospheric dispersion models for threat evaluation, event management, and post-event analyses. The ability to simulate dry deposition rates is a crucial part of our emergency preparedness capabilities. Deposited materials pose potential hazards from radioactive shine, inhalation, and ingestion pathways. A reliable characterization of these potential exposures is critical for management and mitigation of these hazards. A review of the current status of dry deposition formulations used in these atmospheric dispersion models was conducted. The formulations for dry deposition of particulate materials from am event such as a radiological attack involving a Radiological Detonation Device (RDD) is considered. The results of this effort are applicable to current emergency preparedness capabilities such as are deployed in the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), other similar national/regional emergency response systems, and standalone emergency response models. The review concludes that dry deposition formulations need to consider the full range of particle sizes including: 1) the accumulation mode range (0.1 to 1 micron diameter) and its minimum in deposition velocity, 2) smaller particles (less than .01 micron diameter) deposited mainly by molecular diffusion, 3) 10 to 50 micron diameter particles deposited mainly by impaction and gravitational settling, and 4) larger particles (greater than 100 micron diameter) deposited mainly by gravitational settling. The effects of the local turbulence intensity, particle characteristics, and surface element properties must also be addressed in the formulations. Specific areas for improvements in the dry deposition formulations are 1) capability of simulating near-field dry deposition patterns, 2) capability of addressing the full range of potential particle properties, 3) incorporation of particle surface retention/rebound processes, and

  5. Modeling of dry deposition over regional scales with use of satellite data.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.

    1998-10-12

    Dry deposition, an essential component in the atmospheric budget of many trace chemicals, can deliver a major portion of the chemicals deposited at sensitive receptors at the surface of the Earth. Dry deposition in atmospheric numerical models is often described with modules that provide estimates of the deposition velocity V{sub d}, which is the downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height. A fairly common practice in dry deposition modules is to describe surface conditions that affect dry deposition in terms of broad land use and seasonal categories. This practice can lead to unrealistic values for V{sub d}, however, when vegetative conditions for one land use category vary considerably within the domain, when abrupt changes in surface conditions are imposed by a change in seasonal category, or when environmental conditions change vegetative properties within one season. To improve this situation, surface spectral reflectance sensed by environmental satellites can be used to provide more realistic depictions of the spatial and temporal variations in surface conditions. Such an approach is explored here, by extending of methods described by Gao (1995) and Gao and Wesely (1995), in conjunction with a previously developed dry deposition module (Wesely, 1989). In addition, because simulations of biogenic emissions usually rely on an adequate description of many of the surface conditions that affect dry deposition, we examine a method of using a single source of satellite data with modules for both biogenic emission rates and dry deposition velocities. The Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) version 2.2, which is a version similar to the model described by Geron et al. (1994), is used. Results are presented for ozone V{sub d}, isoprene emission rates, and emission rates of other monoterpenes in the eastern half of the US and nearby areas for selected periods during 1989.

  6. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of trace elements at ten sites in Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y. P.; Wang, Y. S.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric deposition is considered to be a major process that removes pollutants from the atmosphere and an important source of nutrients and contaminants for ecosystems. Trace elements (TEs), especially toxic metals deposited on plants and into soil and water, can cause substantial damage to the environment and human health due to their transfer and accumulation in food chains. Despite public concerns, quantitative knowledge of metal deposition from the atmosphere to ecosystems remains scarce. To advance our understanding of the spatio-temporal variations in the magnitudes, pathways, compositions and impacts of atmospherically deposited TEs, precipitation (rain and snow) and dry-deposited particles were collected simultaneously at ten sites in Northern China from December 2007 to November 2010. The measurements showed that the wet and dry depositions of TEs in the target areas were orders of magnitude higher than previous observations within and outside China, generating great concern over the potential risks. The spatial distribution of the total (wet plus dry) deposition flux was consistent with that of the dry deposition, with a significant decrease from industrial and urban areas to suburban, agricultural and rural sites. In contrast, the wet deposition exhibited less spatial variation. The seasonal variation of wet deposition was also different from that of dry deposition, although they were both governed by the precipitation and emission patterns. For the majority of TEs that exist as coarse particles, dry deposition dominated the total flux at each site. This was not the case for K, Ni, As, Pb, Zn, Cd, Se, Ag and Tl, for which the relative importance between wet and dry deposition fluxes varied by site. Whether wet deposition is the major atmospheric cleansing mechanism for the TEs depends on the size distribution and solubility of the particles. We found that atmospheric inputs of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, As and Se were of the same magnitude as their increases in

  7. Atmospheric wet and dry deposition of trace elements at 10 sites in Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y. P.; Wang, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is considered to be a major process that removes pollutants from the atmosphere and an important source of nutrients and contaminants for ecosystems. Trace elements (TEs), especially toxic metals deposited on plants and into soil or water, can cause substantial damage to the environment and human health due to their transfer and accumulation in food chains. Despite public concerns, quantitative knowledge of metal deposition from the atmosphere to ecosystems remains scarce. To advance our understanding of the spatiotemporal variations in the magnitudes, pathways, compositions and impacts of atmospherically deposited TEs, precipitation (rain and snow) and dry-deposited particles were collected simultaneously at 10 sites in Northern China from December 2007 to November 2010. The measurements showed that the wet and dry depositions of TEs in the target areas were orders of magnitude higher than previous observations within and outside China, generating great concern over the potential risks. The spatial distribution of the total (wet plus dry) deposition flux was consistent with that of the dry deposition, with a significant decrease from industrial and urban areas to suburban, agricultural and rural sites, while the wet deposition exhibited less spatial variation. In addition, the seasonal variation of wet deposition was also different from that of dry deposition, although they were both governed by the precipitation and emission patterns. For the majority of TEs that exist as coarse particles, dry deposition dominated the total flux at each site. This was not the case for potassium, nickel, arsenic, lead, zinc, cadmium, selenium, silver and thallium, for which the relative importance between wet and dry deposition fluxes varied by site. Whether wet deposition is the major atmospheric cleansing mechanism for the TEs depends on the size distribution of the particles. We found that atmospheric inputs of copper, lead, zinc, cadmium, arsenic and

  8. Deposition of salicylic acid into hamster sebaceous.

    PubMed

    Motwani, M R; Rhein, L D; Zatz, J L

    2004-01-01

    In an earlier paper, we identified vehicles that are miscible with sebum, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In this paper, the potential of these vehicles to deliver salicylic acid (SA) into the sebum-filled follicles of hamster ears is examined. The main objective of this study is to correlate the melting transitions of a model sebum with the follicular delivery of SA, using two different types of vehicles (fatty and polar). Generally, the fatty vehicles show higher deposition than the polar vehicles. Follicular delivery of salicylic acid correlates well with its solubility in the respective vehicles. This extent of deposition also shows a relationship with the effect of the vehicle on thermal behavior of the model sebum. The nature of the relationship depends on the vehicle (polar or fatty) tested. We conclude that DSC could be used to identify appropriate vehicles for drugs whose follicular delivery depends on solubility. The results also suggest that delivery into the sebaceous glands occurs by two different mechanisms, depending upon the polarity of the vehicle and the physicochemical properties of the drug. The results of these experiments are further extended to investigate follicular delivery of SA from two different types of oil-in-water emulsion formulations. From these studies we conclude that either increasing the volume of the oil phase or changing the emulsion to a water-in-oil emulsion would increase follicular deposition. Our research highlights the role of sebum, its compatibility with drug molecules, and vehicle selection in the transport of drugs into the follicles. The overall results of these experiments provide a reasonable understanding of the mechanisms underlying the transport of drugs to, and subsequently through, the sebaceous follicle. PMID:15645108

  9. Laboratory study of SO2 dry deposition on limestone and marble: Effects of humidity and surface variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hosker, R.P., Jr.; Weintraub, V.C.; Sherwood, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    The dry deposition of gaseous air pollutants on stone and other materials is influenced by atmospheric processes and the chemical characteristics of the deposited gas species and of the specific receptor material. Previous studies have shown that relative humidity, surface moisture, and acid buffering capability of the receptor surface are very important factors. To better quantify this behavior, a special recirculating wind tunnel/environmental chamber was constructed, in which wind speed, turbulence, air temperature, relative humidity, and concentrations of several pollutants (SO2, O3, nitrogen oxides) can be held constant. An airfoil sample holder holds up to eight stone samples (3.8 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick) in nearly identical exposure conditions. SO2 deposition on limestone was found to increase exponentially with increasing relative humidity (RH). Marble behaves similarly, but with a much lower deposition rate. Trends indicate there is little deposition below 20% RH on clean limestone and below 60% RH on clean marble. This large difference is due to the limestone's greater porosity, surface roughness, and effective surface area. These results indicate surface variables generally limit SO2 deposition below about 70% RH on limestone and below at least 95% RH on marble. Aerodynamic variables generally limit deposition at higher relative humidity or when the surface is wet.The dry deposition of gaseous air pollutants on stone and other materials is influenced by atmospheric processes and the chemical characteristics of the deposited gas species and of the specific receptor material. Previous studies have shown that relative humidity, surface moisture, and acid buffering capability of the receptor surface are very important factors. To better quantify this behavior, a special recirculating wind tunnel/environmental chamber was constructed, in which wind speed, turbulence, air temperature, relative humidity, and concentrations of several pollutants (SO2, O3

  10. Nitric Acid-Sea Salt Reactions: Implications for Nitrogen Deposition to Water Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Sørensen, L. L.

    2000-05-01

    Many previous studies have indicated the importance of nitric acid (HNO3) reactions on sea salt particles for flux divergence of HNO3 in the marine surface layer. The potential importance of this reaction in determining the spatial and temporal patterns of nitrogen dry deposition to marine ecosystems is investigated using models of sea spray generation and particle- and gas-phase dry deposition. Under horizontally homogeneous conditions with near-neutral stability and for wind speeds between 3.5 and 10 m s1, transfer of HNO3 to the particle phase to form sodium nitrate may decrease the deposition velocity of nitrogen by over 50%, leading to greater horizontal transport prior to deposition to the sea surface. Conversely, for wind speeds above 10 m s1, transfer of nitrogen to the particle phase would increase the deposition rate and hence decrease horizontal transport prior to surface removal.

  11. RARE Grant- Atmospheric Dry Deposition: Quantification of Mercury and Nutrients using Novel Surrogate Surface Collector Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will quantify the daily surrogate surface dry deposition of mercury and nutrient species, and evaluate its relative importance to wet deposition at two sites in Florida over a two-year period. It will identify the major sources contributing to the observed mercury and...

  12. The impact of changing nitrogen oxide emissions on wet and dry nitrogen deposition in the northeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Thomas J.; Likens, Gene E.; Vermeylen, Francoise M.; Stunder, Barbara J. B.

    This study is an attempt to quantify the relation between changes in NO x emissions and nitric acid (HNO 3) in the northeastern USA. From this relation, and previous work relating NO x emission changes and wet NO 3- deposition, we can estimate how changing NO x emissions may impact total (wet+dry) measured nitrogen (N) deposition. Electric utility emissions account for {1}/{4}, and vehicle emissions account for over {1}/{2} of the total NO x emissions in the eastern USA. Canadian NO x emissions from the seven easternmost provinces (Manitoba and east) represent less than 10% (1.2 teragrams (Tg) NO x) of the NO x emissions compared with those from the eastern USA. Emissions from eastern Canada are dominated by vehicle NO x emissions, which account for {2}/{3} of the total NO x emissions from eastern Canada. Data from the EPA National Emissions Inventory show, for the period 1991-2001, that nitrogen oxide (NO x) emissions in the eastern USA have declined by 17% to from 16.1 to 13.1 Tg. Large declines in vehicle emissions in 2001 may be questionable. If 2001 data are excluded the decline in total NO x is only 7%. A recent assessment of EPA's emissions estimates suggest that vehicle NO x emissions may be underestimated, and total NO x emissions reductions may be less than what is reported by the EPA. The CASTNet (Clean Air Status and Trends Network) measurements of N dry deposition include HNO 3, particulate NO 3- and NH 4+. The dominant N dry deposition product measured is HNO 3, which represents 80% of measured N dry deposition for the sites used in this study. Amounts of NH 3, NO 2, organic nitrate and PAN dry deposition are not measured by CASTNet. The NH 3 and NO 2 deposition are probably significant, and may be major N dry deposition components in some areas. Random coefficient models with total NO x emissions as the independent variable, and HNO 3 concentrations as the dependent variable, show that reducing total NO x emissions by 50% should reduce HNO 3

  13. Dry deposition of sulfate to Quercus rubra and Liriodendron tulipifera foliage

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenberg, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Estimates were made of the rate of dry deposition to red oak (Quercus rubra) and tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) foliage. In the laboratory, radioactive ammonium sulfate aerosols were generated in an exposure chamber. These aerosols were dry deposited onto leaves that were sequentially washed to examine the efficacy of washing procedures in removal of surface deposits. Over 90% of dry deposited sulfate was removed after a 30 second wash duration. Laboratory procedures also estimated the magnitude of foliar sulfur that leached into leaf wash solutions. The majority of laboratory leaves demonstrated no leaching of sulfur from the internal pool. However, some leaves showed significant sulfur leaching. It was concluded that leaching of internal sulfur was highly leaf specific. This indicated that each leaf used in field experiments needed to be individually examined for leaching.

  14. Recent field studies of dry deposition to surfaces in plant canopies

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, S.E.; Lovett, G.M.; Bondietti, E.A.; Davidson, C.I.

    1984-01-01

    A variety of field techniques were used to assess the dry deposition of sulfur. In a deciduous forest canopy in eastern Tennessee, inert petri plates and adjacent chestnut oak leaves showed similar SO/sub 4//sup -2/ deposition velocities of about 0.1 cm s/sup -1/. In the same forest, statistical analysis of throughfall yielded a deposition velocity of 0.48 cm s/sup -1/ for total sulfur (SO/sub 4//sup -2/ plus SO/sub 2/). The throughfall technique appears useful for scaling individual surface measurements to larger spatial and temporal scales. On a grassy field in Illinois, flat Teflon plates, petri dishes, and dustfall buckets were exposed side by side. Measured sulfate deposition increased with increasing rim height on the collection surface, and deposition velocities ranged from 0.14 to 0.70 cm s/sup -1/. Much of the deposition to these surfaces can be attributed to large-particle SO/sub 4//sup -2/. Dry season (summer) deposition velocities of /sup 7/Be in California were found to be similar to dry deposition velocities of /sup 212/Pb in Tennessee, ranging from 0.18 to 0.35 cm s/sup -1/. These natural radionuclides attach to submicron aerosols in the atmosphere and may be useful tracers of submicron SO/sub 4//sup -2/ deposition. 9 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  15. Phenological controls on inter-annual variability in ozone dry deposition velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Olivia; Fiore, Arlene; Munger, J. William; Shevliakova, Elena; Horowitz, Larry; Malyshev, Sergey; Griffin, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of ozone removal by northern mid-latitude temperate deciduous forests is largely based on short-term observational studies, and thus year-to-year variations of this sink have received little attention. The specific pathways for ozone dry deposition include stomatal uptake and other non-stomatal processes that are poorly understood. Given the importance of ozone dry deposition to model accurately the tropospheric ozone budget and regional air quality, an improved mechanistic understanding of this ozone sink is needed. We investigate here the physical and biological controls on inter-annual variations in seasonal and diurnal cycles of ozone dry deposition velocity using nine years of hourly observations of eddy covariance ozone flux and concentration measurements at Harvard Forest, a northern mid-latitude temperate deciduous forest. We also use coincident eddy covariance water vapor flux and sensible heat flux and other micrometeorological measurements to infer stomatal conductance in order to separate the impacts of stomatal versus non-stomatal pathways on ozone deposition. There is a difference of approximately a factor of two between minimum and maximum monthly daytime mean ozone dry deposition velocities at Harvard Forest. The highest summertime mean ozone dry deposition velocities occur during 1998 and 1999 (0.72 cm/s), and similar seasonal and diurnal cycles occur in both years. The similar dry deposition velocities during these two years, however, may reflect compensation between different processes as mean daytime summertime stomatal conductance during 1998 is roughly 1.5 times higher than for 1999, suggesting large year-to-year variations in non-stomatal as well as stomatal uptake of ozone. We partition the onset and decline of the growing season each year into different periods using spring and fall phenology observations at Harvard Forest. Combining the dry deposition velocities across years during each phenological period, we find that

  16. Limited influence of dry deposition of semivolatile organic vapors on secondary organic aerosol formation in the urban plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Karl, T.; Camredon, M.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.

    2013-06-01

    The dry deposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its impact on secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are investigated in the Mexico City plume. Gas-phase chemistry and gas-particle partitioning of oxygenated VOCs are modeled with the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) from C3 to C25 alkanes, alkenes, and light aromatics. Results show that dry deposition of oxidized gases is not an efficient sink for SOA, as it removes <5% of SOA within the city's boundary layer and ~15% downwind. Dry deposition competes with the gas-particle uptake, and only gases with fewer than ~12 carbons dry deposit while longer species partition to SOA. Because dry deposition of submicron aerosols is slow, condensation onto particles protects organic gases from deposition, thus increasing their atmospheric burden and lifetime. In the absence of this condensation, ~50% of the regionally produced mass would have been dry deposited.

  17. Freeze drying for gas chromatography stationary phase deposition

    DOEpatents

    Sylwester, Alan P.

    2007-01-02

    The present disclosure relates to methods for deposition of gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases into chromatography columns, for example gas chromatography columns. A chromatographic medium is dissolved or suspended in a solvent to form a composition. The composition may be inserted into a chromatographic column. Alternatively, portions of the chromatographic column may be exposed or filled with the composition. The composition is permitted to solidify, and at least a portion of the solvent is removed by vacuum sublimation.

  18. Dry deposition of particulate matter at an urban forest, wetland and lake surface in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiakai; Zhu, Lijuan; Wang, Huihui; Yang, Yilian; Liu, Jiatong; Qiu, Dongdong; Ma, Wu; Zhang, Zhenming; Liu, Jinglan

    2016-01-01

    The dry deposition of particular matters from atmosphere to ecosystems is an undesirable consequence of this pollution while the deposition process is also influenced by different land use types. In current study, concentration of fine particles, coarse particles and meteorological data were collected during the daytime in an artificial forest, wetland and a water surface in the Beijing Olympic Park. Dry deposition velocity, fluxes and vegetation collection were calculated by different models and the results were compared. The results show: (1) the deposition velocity onto the forest canopy was higher than which onto the wetland and the water surface and the velocity varied in different seasons; (2) the fine particles deposited most in the winter while the coarse particles was in the spring; (3) the vegetation collection rates of fine particles were lower than coarse particles, and the forest collected more PMs than the wetland plants.

  19. Estimation of speciated and total mercury dry deposition at monitoring locations in eastern and central North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, L.; Blanchard, P.; Gay, D.A.; Prestbo, E.M.; Risch, M.R.; Johnson, D.; Narayan, J.; Zsolway, R.; Holsen, T.M.; Miller, E.K.; Castro, M.S.; Graydon, J.A.; St. Louis, V.L.; Dalziel, J.

    2012-01-01

    Dry deposition of speciated mercury, i.e., gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), particulate-bound mercury (PBM), and gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), was estimated for the year 2008–2009 at 19 monitoring locations in eastern and central North America. Dry deposition estimates were obtained by combining monitored two- to four-hourly speciated ambient concentrations with modeled hourly dry deposition velocities (Vd) calculated using forecasted meteorology. Annual dry deposition of GOM+PBM was estimated to be in the range of 0.4 to 8.1 μg m−2 at these locations with GOM deposition being mostly five to ten times higher than PBM deposition, due to their different modeled Vd values. Net annual GEM dry deposition was estimated to be in the range of 5 to 26 μg m−2 at 18 sites and 33 μg m−2 at one site. The estimated dry deposition agrees very well with limited surrogate-surface dry deposition measurements of GOM and PBM, and also agrees with litterfall mercury measurements conducted at multiple locations in eastern and central North America. This study suggests that GEM contributes much more than GOM+PBM to the total dry deposition at the majority of the sites considered here; the only exception is at locations close to significant point sources where GEM and GOM+PBM contribute equally to the total dry deposition. The relative magnitude of the speciated dry deposition and their good comparisons with litterfall deposition suggest that mercury in litterfall originates primarily from GEM, which is consistent with the limited number of previous field studies. The study also supports previous analyses suggesting that total dry deposition of mercury is equal to, if not more important than, wet deposition of mercury on a regional scale in eastern North America.

  20. REGIONAL PATTERNS AND LOCAL VARIABILITY OF DRY AND OCCULT DEPOSITION STRONGLY INFLUENCE SULFATE CONCENTRATIONS IN MAINE LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is great uncertainty and large cost in making dry deposition measurements. e present evidence based on wet deposition, evapotranspiration, S storage in lake sediments, and sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams in Nllaine that the dry deposition flux of sulfur to drain...

  1. Wet and Dry Atmospheric Mercury Deposition Accumulates in Watersheds of the Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, E. W.; Grant, C.; Grimm, J.; Drohan, P. J.; Bennett, J.; Lawler, D.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury emissions to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants and other sources such as waste incineration can be deposited to landscapes in precipitation and in dry fallout. Some mercury reaches watersheds and streams, where it can accumulate in sediments and biota. Human exposure to mercury occurs primarily through fish consumption, and currently mercury fish eating advisories are in place for many of the streams and lakes in the state. Here, we explored mercury in air, soils, water, and biota. To quantify atmospheric mercury deposition, we measured both wet and dry mercury deposition at over 10 locations in Pennsylvania, from which we present variation in mercury deposition and initial assessments of factors affecting the patterns. Further, we simulated mercury deposition at unmonitored locations in Pennsylvania and the northeastern United States over space and time with a high-resolution modeling technique that reflects storm tracks and air flow patterns. To consider mercury accumulation in watersheds, we collected data on soil mercury concentrations in a set of soil samples, and collected baseline data on mercury in streams draining 35 forested watersheds across Pennsylvania, spanning gradients of atmospheric deposition, climate and geology. Mercury concentrations were measured in stream water under base-flow conditions, in streambed sediments, aquatic mosses, and in fish tissues from brook trout. Results indicate that wet and dry atmospheric deposition is a primary source of mercury that is accumulating in watersheds of Pennsylvania and the northeastern United States.

  2. Organic micropollutants in wet and dry depositions in the Venice Lagoon.

    PubMed

    Gambaro, Andrea; Radaelli, Marta; Piazza, Rossano; Stortini, Angela Maria; Contini, Daniele; Belosi, Franco; Zangrando, Roberta; Cescon, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    Atmospheric transport is an important route by which pollutants are conveyed from the continents to both coastal and open sea. The role of aerosol deposition in the transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and polybromodiphenyls ethers (PBDEs) to water and soil systems has been evaluated by measuring their concentrations in wet and dry depositions to the Venice Lagoon. The organic micropollutant flux data indicate that they contribute to the total deposition flux in different ways through wet and dry deposition, showing that the prevalent contribution derives from wet deposition. The fluxes calculated for PBDEs, showed the prevalence of 47, 99, 100 and 183 congeners, both in dry and wet fluxes. With regard to PCBs, the flux of summation operatorPCB for wet deposition is in the same order of magnitude of the diffusive flux at the air-water interface. The PAH fluxes obtained in the present study are similar to those obtained in previous studies on the atmospheric bulk deposition to the Venice Lagoon. The ratios between Phe/Ant and Fl/Py indicate that the pollutants sources are pyrolytic, deriving from combustion fuels. PMID:19524283

  3. Dry deposition of PM2.5 sulfate above a hilly forest using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Ichiro; Mizukami, Kou; Ban, Satomi; Takahashi, Akira

    2015-04-01

    Sulfur compounds continue to be an important component of atmospheric deposition in East Asia. In order to better understand the dry deposition of PM2.5 sulfate, which is one of the most significant transboundary air pollutants in this region, we measured the dry deposition flux of PM2.5 sulfate above a hilly forest of the Field Museum Tamakyuryo (FM Tama) site in suburban Tokyo. We used the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method and took measurements during the summer, from 26 July to 2 August 2013, and the autumn, from 18 to 22 November 2013. We primarily focused on the evaluation of dry deposition above a forest on complex terrain. The total flux and 80% of the runs showed downward flux. The deposition velocities measured by the REA method during times when the wind direction was from a relatively uniform sloping surface over the forest were more reasonable than those measured when the wind direction was from a more complex surface. Using a resistance model that includes the effect of growth of hygroscopic aerosols, we inferred the deposition velocities during two experimental periods. When the fluxes were averaged for a long time (i.e., about 2 weeks) the inferred fluxes and deposition velocities were in reasonable agreement with the measurements. Although averages over long periods showed good agreement, the measured deposition velocities were distributed in a wider range than those inferred by the model. An increased range of deposition velocities was associated with flux footprints from complex terrain. It is possible that the agreements between measured and inferred fluxes or deposition velocities at the site are because the depositions of sulfate are largely controlled by surface factors rather than aerodynamic resistance.

  4. Formic and acetic acid over the central Amazon region, Brazil 1. Dry season

    SciTech Connect

    Andreae, M.O.; Talbot, R.W.; Andreae, T.W.; Harriss, R.C.

    1988-02-20

    We have determined the atmospheric concentrations of formic and acetic acid in the gas phase, in aerosols, and in rain during the dry season (July--August 1985) in the Amazonia region of Brazil. At ground level the average concentrations of gas phase formic and acetic acid were 1.6 +- 0.6 and 2.2 +- 1.0 ppb, respectively. The diurnal behavior of both acids at ground level and their vertical distribution in the forest canopy point to the existence of vegetative sources as well as to production by chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Dry deposition of the gaseous acids appears to be a major sink. The concentrations of formic and acetic acid in the gas phase were about 2 orders of magnitude higher than concentrations of the corresponding species in the atmospheric aerosol. About 50--60%/sub 0/ of the aerosol (total) formate and acetate were in the size fraction below 1.0 ..mu..m diameter.

  5. Acid deposition: Atmospheric processes in Eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This report examines scientific evidence on the relationship between emissions of acid-forming pollutants and damage to sensitive ecosystems from acid rain and other forms of acid deposition. The report's conclusions represent the most authoritative statement yet that reductions in emissions of these pollutants will result in proportional reductions in acid rain.

  6. Atmospheric dry deposition of persistent organic pollutants to the Atlantic and inferences for the global oceans.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Elena; Jaward, Foday M; Lohmann, Rainer; Jones, Kevin C; Simó, Rafel; Dachs, Jordi

    2004-11-01

    Atmospheric deposition to the oceans is a key process affecting the global dynamics and sinks of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). A new methodology that combines aerosol remote sensing measurements with measured POP aerosol-phase concentrations is presented to derive dry particulate depositional fluxes of POPs to the oceans. These fluxes are compared with those due to diffusive air-water exchange. For all polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and lower chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), air-water exchange dominates the dry deposition mechanism. However, this tendency reverses in some areas, such as in marine aerosol influenced areas and dust outflow regions, consistent with the important variability encountered for the depositional fluxes. Seasonal variability is mainly found in mid-high latitudes, due to the important influence of wind speed enhancing dry deposition fluxes and temperature as a driver of the gas-particle partitioning of POPs. The average dry aerosol deposition flux of sigmaPCBs and sigmaPCDD/Fs to the Atlantic Ocean is calculated to be in the order of 66 ng m(-2) yr(-1) and 9 ng m(-2)yr(-1) respectively. The total dry aerosol deposition of sigmaPCBs and sigmaPCDD/Fs to the Atlantic Ocean is estimated to be 2200 kg yr(-1) and 500 kg yr(-1), respectively, while the net air-water exchange is higher, 22000 kg sigmaPCBs yr(-1) for PCBs and 1300 kg sigmaPCDD/Fs yr(-1). Furthermore, it is suggested that marine aerosol plays an important role in scavenging atmospheric contaminants. PMID:15575265

  7. Acid deposition and the acidification of soils and waters

    SciTech Connect

    Reuss, J.O.; Johnson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual model of acid deposition is presented consistent with established physicochemical principles and the bulk of available information. The authors seek to provide insight into probable long-term effects of acid deposition; a testable hypotheses; plus design and interpretation of the research. (PSB)

  8. Projecting Ammonia Dry Deposition Using Passive Samplers and a Bi-Directional Exchange Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robarge, W. P.; Walker, J. T.; Austin, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Animal agriculture within the United States is known to be a source of ammonia (NH3) emissions. Dry deposition of NH3 to terrestrial ecosystems immediately surrounding large local sources of NH3 emissions (e.g. animal feeding operations) is difficult to measure, and is best estimated via models. Presented here are results for a semi-empirical modeling approach for estimating air-surface exchange fluxes of NH3 downwind of a large poultry facility (~ 3.5 million layers) using a bi-directional air-surface exchange model. The modeling domain is the western section of the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge in Tyrrell, Washington, and Hyde Counties of eastern North Carolina in the South Atlantic Coastal Plain physiographic region. Vegetation within the modeling domain is primarily pocosin wetlands, characterized by acid (pH 3.6) peat soils and a thick canopy of shrub vegetation (leatherwood (Cyrilla racemiflora), inkberry (Ilex glabra), wax myrtle (Morella cerifera)). Land surrounding the refuge is primarily used for crop production: ~ 28%, 24%, and 45% agricultural in Tyrell, Hyde, and Washington counties, respectively. Ammonia air-surface exchange (flux) was calculated using a two-layer canopy compensation point model developed by Nemitz et al. (2001. Quart. J. Roy. Met. Soc. 127, 815 - 833.) as implemented by Walker et al. (2008. Atmos. Environ., 42, 3407 - 3418.), in which the competing processes of emission and deposition within the foliage-soil system were taken into account by relating the net canopy-scale NH3 flux to the net emission potential of the canopy (i.e., foliage and soil). Ammonia air concentrations were measured using ALPHA passive samplers (Center for Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh) along transects to the north and northeast of the poultry facility at distances of 800, 2000 and 3200 m, respectively. Samplers were deployed in duplicate at each location at a height of 5.8 m from July 2008 to July 2010 weekly during warm months and bi-weekly curing

  9. A multilayer model for inferring dry deposition using standard meteorological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Tilden P.; Finkelstein, Peter; Clarke, John; Ellestad, Thomas G.; Sims, Pamela F.

    1998-09-01

    In this paper, we describe the latest version of the dry deposition inferential model, which is used to estimate the deposition velocities (Vd) for SO2, O3, HNO3, and particles with diameters less than 2 μm. The dry deposition networks operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) use this model to estimate dry deposition on a weekly basis. This model uses a multilayer approach, discretizing the vegetated canopy into 20 layers. The use of canopy radiative transfer and simple wind profile models allows for estimates of stomatal (rs) and leaf boundary layer (rb) resistances to be determined at each layer in the plant canopy for both sunlit and shaded leaves. The effect of temperature, water stress, and vapor pressure deficits on the stomatal resistance (rs) have been included. Comparisons of modeled deposition velocities are made with extensive direct measurements performed at three different locations with different crops. The field experiment is discussed in some detail. Overall, modeled O3 deposition velocities are in good agreement with measured values with the average mean bias for all surfaces of the order of 0.01 cm/s or less. For SO2, mean biases range from -0.05 for corn to 0.15 cm/s for soybeans, while for HNO3, they range from 0.09 for corn to 0.47 cm/s for pasture.

  10. ROCKY MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION MODEL ASSESSMENT: EVALUATION OF MESOSCALE ACID DEPOSITION MODELS FOR USE IN COMPLEX TERRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report includes an evaluation of candidate meteorological models and acid deposition models. The hybrid acid deposition/air quality modeling system for the Rocky Mountains makes use of a mesoscale meteorological model, which includes a new diagnostic wind model, as a driver f...

  11. Elemental carbon in snow at Changbai Mountain, northeastern China: concentrations, scavenging ratios, and dry deposition velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. W.; Gallet, J. C.; Pedersen, C. A.; Zhang, X. S.; Ström, J.; Ci, Z. J.

    2014-01-01

    Light-absorbing aerosol - particularly elemental carbon (EC) - while mixed with snow and ice is an important climate driver from the enhanced absorption of solar radiation. Currently, considerable efforts are being made to estimate its radiative forcing on a global scale, but several uncertainties remain, particularly those regarding its deposition processes. In this study, concurrent measurements of EC in air and snow are performed for three years (2009-2012) at Changbai station, northeastern China. The scavenging ratio and the wet- and dry-deposition fluxes of EC over the snow surface are estimated. The mean EC concentration in the surface snow is 1000 ± 1500 ng g-1, ranging from 7 to 7640 ng g-1. The mean value of the scavenging ratio of EC by snow is 140 ± 100, with a median value of 150, which is smaller than that reported in Arctic areas. A non-rimed snow process is a significant factor in interpreting differences with Arctic areas. Wet-deposition fluxes of EC are estimated to be 0.47 ± 0.37 μg cm-2 month-1 on average over the three snow seasons studied. Dry deposition is more than five times higher, with an average of 2.65 ± 1.93 μg cm-2 month-1; however, only winter period estimation is possible (December-February). During winter in Changbai, 87% of EC in snow is estimated to be due to dry deposition, with a mean dry deposition velocity of 6.44 × 10-3 m s-1 and median of 8.14 × 10-3 m s-1. Finally, the calculation of the radiative effect shows that 500 ng g-1 of dry-deposited EC to a snow surface absorbs three times more incoming solar energy than the same mass mixed in the snow through wet deposition. Deposition processes of an EC-containing snow surface are, therefore, crucial to estimate its radiative forcing better, particularly in northeastern China, where local emission strongly influences the level and gradient of EC in the snowpack, and snow-covered areas are cold and dry due to the atmospheric general circulation. Furthermore, this study

  12. Atmospheric Mercury Transfer to Peat Bogs Dominated by Gaseous Elemental Mercury Dry Deposition.

    PubMed

    Enrico, Maxime; Roux, Gaël Le; Marusczak, Nicolas; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Claustres, Adrien; Fu, Xuewu; Sun, Ruoyu; Sonke, Jeroen E

    2016-03-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is the dominant form of mercury in the atmosphere. Its conversion into oxidized gaseous and particulate forms is thought to drive atmospheric mercury wet deposition to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, where it can be subsequently transformed into toxic methylmercury. The contribution of mercury dry deposition is however largely unconstrained. Here we examine mercury mass balance and mercury stable isotope composition in a peat bog ecosystem. We find that isotope signatures of living sphagnum moss (Δ(199)Hg = -0.11 ± 0.09‰, Δ(200)Hg = 0.03 ± 0.02‰, 1σ) and recently accumulated peat (Δ(199)Hg = -0.22 ± 0.06‰, Δ(200)Hg = 0.00 ± 0.04‰, 1σ) are characteristic of GEM (Δ(199)Hg = -0.17 ± 0.07‰, Δ(200)Hg = -0.05 ± 0.02‰, 1σ), and differs from wet deposition (Δ(199)Hg = 0.73 ± 0.15‰, Δ(200)Hg = 0.21 ± 0.04‰, 1σ). Sphagnum covered during three years by transparent and opaque surfaces, which eliminate wet deposition, continue to accumulate Hg. Sphagnum Hg isotope signatures indicate accumulation to take place by GEM dry deposition, and indicate little photochemical re-emission. We estimate that atmospheric mercury deposition to the peat bog surface is dominated by GEM dry deposition (79%) rather than wet deposition (21%). Consequently, peat deposits are potential records of past atmospheric GEM concentrations and isotopic composition. PMID:26849121

  13. Regional patterns and local variability of dry and occult deposition strongly influence sulfate concentrations in Maine lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, S.A.; Kahl, J.S.; Brakke, D.F.; Brewer, G.F.; Haines, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    There is great uncertainty and large cost in making dry deposition measurements. The authors present evidence based on wet deposition, evapotranspiration, S storage in lake sediments, and sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams in Maine that the dry deposition flux of sulfur to drainage basins of lakes in Maine ranges from nearly 0% to more than 100% of wet deposition, even in small areas. The regional pattern of sulfate concentrations in Maine lakes is due to gradients in both wet and dry deposition and variation in evapotranspiration. Patterns are modified locally by lakes hydrologic type, elevation, vegetation, and terrestrial drainage basin aspect. (Copyright (c) 1988 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

  14. FIELD EXPERIMENT TO PARTITION THE EFFECTS OF DRY AND WET DEPOSITION ON METALLIC MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a material exposure site located at the Research Triangle Park, NC, the Environmental Protection Agency began in 1982 a study to partition the effects of dry and wet deposition on galvanized and weathering steel panels. At the site, air quality and meteorological parameters ar...

  15. Modeling of Ammonia Dry Deposition to a Pocosin Landscape Downwind of a Large Poultry Facility

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semi-empirical bi-directional flux modeling approach is used to estimate NH3 air concentrations and dry deposition fluxes to a portion of the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge (PLNWR) downwind of a large poultry facility. Meteorological patterns at PLNWR are such that som...

  16. DRY DEPOSITION OF REDUCED AND REACTIVE NITROGEN: A SURROGATE SURFACES APPROACH. (R826647)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen dry deposition causes pH modification of ecosystems, promotes
    eutrophication in some water bodies, interferes with the nutrient geochemical
    cycle on land, and has a deteriorating effect on buildings. In this study, a
    water surface sampler (WSS) and knife-l...

  17. AN AUTOMATED SYSTEM FOR PRODUCING UNIFORM SURFACE DEPOSITS OF DRY PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory system has been constructed that uniformly deposits dry particles onto any type of test surface. Devised as a quality assurance tool for the purpose of evaluating surface sampling methods for lead, it also may be used to generate test surfaces for any contaminant ...

  18. Effect of atmospheric electricity on dry deposition of airborne particles from atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Kimmel, V.; Israelsson, S.

    The electric mechanism of dry deposition is well known in the case of unattached radon daughter clusters that are unipolar charged and of high mobility. The problematic role of the electric forces in deposition of aerosol particles is theoretically examined by comparing the fluxes of particles carried by different deposition mechanisms in a model situation. The electric mechanism of deposition appears essential for particles of diameter 10-200 nm in conditions of low wind speed. The electric flux of fine particles can be dominant on the tips of leaves and needles even in a moderate atmospheric electric field of a few hundred V m -1 measured over the plane ground surface. The electric deposition is enhanced under thunderclouds and high voltage power lines. Strong wind suppresses the relative role of the electric deposition when compared with aerodynamic deposition. When compared with diffusion deposition the electric deposition appears less uniform: the precipitation particulate matter on the tips of leaves and especially on needles of top branches of conifer trees is much more intensive than on the ground surface and electrically shielded surfaces of plants. The knowledge of deposition geometry could improve our understanding of air pollution damage to plants.

  19. Soluble Nutrient and Trace Metal Fluxes from Aerosol Dry Deposition to Elkhorn Slough, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, E. T.; Paytan, A.; Haskins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition has been widely recognized as a source of pollutants and nutrients to coastal ecosystems. Specifically, deposition includes nitrogen compounds, sulfur compounds, mercury, pesticides, phosphate, trace metals and other toxic compounds that can travel great distances in aerosols. These components can come from both natural (volcanoes, mineral dust, forest fires) and anthropogenic (fossil fuels, chemical byproducts, incineration of waste) sources. These pollutants may affect ecosystem health and water quality with environmental impacts such as eutrophication, contaminated fish and harmful algal blooms. In this study we focus on dry deposition to Elkhorn Slough, California. Size fractionated aerosol samples (PM 2.5 and PM 10) collected continuously over a seven day period using a cascade impactor are used along with a deposition model to determine the soluble nutrient and trace metal fluxes on the Elkhorn Slough ecosystem. Atmospheric deposition inputs will be compared to other sources and their potential impact evaluated.

  20. Isotope studies to determine dry deposition of sulfate to deciduous and coniferous trees: Final draft

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted at two locations near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, with radioactive /sup 35/S (87 day half-life) to examine the cycling behavior of sulfur in yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera), red maple (Acer rubrum), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) trees. Some findings pertain to methods development for estimating dry deposition of sulfur to forest canopies and the magnitude of sulfur emissions from natural sources (Task II). We will determine through field studies, the internal cycling, storage, and biogenic emission of sulfur, as traced by /sup 35/SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, in environments impacted by atmospheric sulfate deposition; and will determine through isotope dilution studies, the contribution of foliar leaching and dry deposition to net throughfall (NTF) sulfate concentrations beneath deciduous and coniferous trees in such environments. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Formation of circular crack pattern in deposition self-assembled by drying nanoparticle suspension.

    PubMed

    Jing, Guangyin; Ma, Jun

    2012-05-31

    Curved cracks widely exist in nanoparticle (NP) deposition produced by drying colloidal suspension. Circular cracks, for example, initiate and propagate along a circular trajectory. One feasible theoretical explanation of a circular crack is the Xia-Hutchinson model, in which a preexisting track (flaw loop) in the film is necessary for initiating and propagating the crack on the circular path. Here, we report the first experimental evidence of dried deposition to support this model. Our results indicate that cracks along the circular trajectory can surprisingly "pass" across a 180 μm air gap. Moreover, two arc-path cracks originate in different areas and propagate to meet, forming a circular trajectory. These unexpected crack initiation and propagation indicate that the crack propagates alone the "preformed" track, experimentally confirming the hypothesis proposed by the Xia-Hutchinson model. The transition of the circular crack to a radial one indicates that the deposition microstructure is the dominant factor for the crack formation. PMID:22577983

  2. Sourcing dry N deposition in urban areas and implications for national N inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redling, K. M.; Elliott, E. M.; Hom, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Fossil fuel combustion from point (e.g. power plants) and mobile (e.g. automobiles) sources in urban areas is a key contributor to dry nitrogen deposition. However, relative to rural areas, atmospheric N deposition in urban areas is poorly characterized because monitoring of reactive N deposition by national networks is primarily conducted at remote locations. For example, the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNET), the dry deposition monitoring network in the U.S., intentionally locates sites in rural areas to capture regional background levels of deposition. This may potentially underestimate the amount of atmospheric N reaching the land surface, as it does not take into account hotspots of N deposition near area sources of pollution, such as roadways and urban locations. Furthermore, vegetation in urban environments represents a potentially important sink for atmospheric inputs of reactive N, and understanding the nutrient dynamics of vegetation in urban ecosystems is critical to understanding N budgets. However, little is known about how urban ecosystems compensate for higher local N loading received via depositional processes. This study couples passive sampling of dry N deposition and plant biomonitors to delineate the sources and magnitude of N deposition to urban and rural areas and associated influence on local vegetation. Research sites consisted of two urban to rural transects, one in Baltimore, MD and the other in Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Passive samplers were deployed at urban, suburban and rural sites for five months to collect dry N deposition (NO2, HNO3 and NH3) for analysis of both concentration and stable isotopes of nitrogen (δ15N). This method provides a straightforward and inexpensive approach for monitoring N deposition and sources across large spatial gradients for extended time periods. Additionally, we deployed grasses as biomonitors along the urban to rural gradients to assess the influence of excess dry N deposition on isotopic

  3. Quantification of Gaseous Elemental Mercury Dry Deposition to Environmental Surfaces using Mercury Stable Isotopes in a Controlled Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, A. P.; Schauer, J. J.; Shafer, M. M.; Olson, M.; Robinson, M.; Vanderveer, P.; Creswell, J. E.; Parman, A.; Mallek, J.; Gorski, P.

    2009-12-01

    Andrew P. Rutter (1) * *, James J, Schauer (1,2) *, Martin M. Shafer(1,2), Michael R. Olson (1), Michael Robinson (1), Peter Vanderveer (3), Joel Creswell (1), Justin L. Mallek (1), Andrew M. Parman (1) (1) Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, 660 N. Park St, Madison, WI 53705. (2) Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, 2601 Agriculture Drive, Madison, WI 53718. (3) Biotron, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2115 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706 * Correspond author(jjschauer@wisc.edu) * *Presenting author (aprutter@wisc.edu) Abstract Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is the predominant component of atmospheric mercury outside of arctic depletion events, and locations where anthropogenic point sources are not influencing atmospheric concentrations. GEM constitutes greater than 99% of the mercury mass in most rural and remote locations. While dry and wet deposition of atmospheric mercury is thought to be dominated by oxidized mercury (a.k.a. reactive mercury), only small GEM uptake to environmental surfaces could impact the input of mercury to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Dry deposition and subsequent re-emission of gaseous elemental mercury is a pathway from the atmosphere that remains only partially understood from a mechanistic perspective. In order to properly model GEM dry deposition and re-emission an understanding of its dependence on irradiance, temperature, and relative humidity must be measured and parameterized for a broad spectrum of environmental surfaces colocated with surrogate deposition surfaces used to make field based dry deposition measurements. Measurements of isotopically enriched GEM dry deposition were made with a variety of environmental surfaces in a controlled environment room at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. The experimental set up allowed dry deposition components which are not easily separated in the field to be decoupled. We were able to isolate surface transfer processes from variabilities caused by

  4. The Measurement of Dry Deposition and Surface Runoff to Quantify Urban Road Pollution in Taipei, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunn-Jinn; Chen, Chi-Feng; Lin, Jen-Yang

    2013-01-01

    Pollutants deposited on road surfaces and distributed in the environment are a source of nonpoint pollution. Field data are traditionally hard to collect from roads because of constant traffic. In this study, in cooperation with the traffic administration, the dry deposition on and road runoff from urban roads was measured in Taipei City and New Taipei City, Taiwan. The results showed that the dry deposition is 2.01–5.14 g/m2·day and 78–87% of these solids are in the 75–300 µm size range. The heavy metals in the dry deposited particles are mainly Fe, Zn, and Na, with average concentrations of 34,978, 1,519 and 1,502 ppm, respectively. Elevated express roads show the highest heavy metal concentrations. Not only the number of vehicles, but also the speed of the traffic should be considered as factors that influence road pollution, as high speeds may accelerate vehicle wear and deposit more heavy metals on road surfaces. In addition to dry deposition, the runoff and water quality was analyzed every five minutes during the first two hours of storm events to capture the properties of the first flush road runoff. The sample mean concentration (SMC) from three roads demonstrated that the first flush runoff had a high pollution content, notably for suspended solid (SS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), oil and grease, Pb, and Zn. Regular sweeping and onsite water treatment facilities are suggested to minimize the pollution from urban roads. PMID:24135820

  5. Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen over Czech forests: refinement of estimation of dry deposition for unmeasured nitrogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunova, Iva; Stoklasova, Petra; Kurfurst, Pavel; Vlcek, Ondrej; Schovankova, Jana

    2014-05-01

    The accurate quantification of atmospheric deposition is very important for assessment of ambient air pollution impacts on ecosystems. Our contribution presents an advanced approach to improved quantification of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen over Czech forests, merging available measured data and model results. The ambient air quality monitoring in the Czech Republic is paid an appreciable attention (Hůnová, 2001) due to the fact, that in the recent past its territory belonged to the most polluted parts of Europe (Moldan and Schnoor, 1992). The time trends and spatial patterns of atmospheric deposition were published (Hůnová et al. 2004, Hůnová et al. 2014). Nevertheless, it appears that the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, particularly the dry deposition, is likely to be underestimated due to unavailability of data of certain nitrogen species as HNO3(g) and NH3. It is known that HNO3(g) may contribute significantly to the dry deposition of nitrogen even in regions with relatively low concentrations (Flechard et al., 2011). We attempted to substitute unmeasured nitrogen species using an Eulerian photochemical dispersion model CAMx, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (ESSS, 2011), coupled with a high resolution regional numeric weather prediction model Aladin (Vlček, Corbet, 2011). Preliminary results for 2008 indicate that dry deposition of nitrogen, so far based on detailed monitoring of ambient NOx levels, is underestimated substantially. The dry deposition of N/NOx in 2008 reported by Ostatnická (2009) was about 0.5 g.m-2.year-1 over 99.5 % of the nation-wide area, while the contribution of unmeasured nitrogen species estimated by CAMx model were much higher. To be specific, the dry deposition of N/HNO3(g) accounted for 1.0 g.m-2.year-1, and N/NH3 for 1.6 g.m-2.year-1. In contrast, the deposition of N/HONO (g) with 0.001 g.m-2.year-1, N/PAN with 0.007 g.m-2.year-1, particulate N/NO3- with 0.002 g.m-2.year-1, and particulate N/NH4

  6. ROCKY MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION MODEL ASSESSMENT: ACID RAIN MOUNTAIN MESOSCALE MODEL (ARM3)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Rain Mountain Mesoscale Model (ARM3) is a mesoscale acid deposition/air quality model that was developed for calculating incremental acid deposition (sulfur and nitrogen species) and pollutant concentration impacts in complex terrain. The model was set up for operation w...

  7. Source-receptor relationship of wet and dry depositions of PAHs in Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Yayoi; Kajino, Mizuo; Sato, Keiichi; Kurokawa, Junichi; Tang, Ning; Ohara, Toshimasa; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Ueda, Hiromasa

    2016-04-01

    The spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) deposition by the source-receptor analysis over Northeast Asia was investigated by using an Eulerian regional-scale aerosol chemical model denoted as Regional Air Quality Model 2 for Persistent Organic Pollutants (RAQM2-POP version) at the year of 2005. We confirmed that the simulation was reproduced the PAH concentrations in precipitation based on comparison with observed and simulated concentrations. In this research, the domain was divided into six-source regions (Northern China, NCHN; Central China, CCHN; South China, SCHN; eastern Russia, ERUS; South Korea, SKOR; Japan, JPN) and three-receptor regions (Yellow Sea and East China Sea, ECS; the Sea of Japan, SOJ; northwestern Pacific Ocean, NWP). We focus on benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), which is the most carcinogenic species. The largest emission occurs on CCHN, following SCHN, NCHN, ERUS, SKOR, JPN. In the three Chinese domains and ERUS, the largest contribution to the dry and wet deposition is the domestic origin. In these domains, the wet deposition amount of BaP was 2-16 times larger than those of the dry deposition amount. The total deposition (wet+dry) amount was lower than those of the emission amount. In contrast, the total depositions are larger than the emissions from their own domains in the downwind region (SKOR, JPN), indicating a signature of long-range transport of PAH to the downwind regions. The relative contributions from the three Chinese domains and ERUS to the downwind region (KOR, JPN) are evaluated. For wet deposition in winter, the relative contribution from NCHN and CCHN (20-69%) are larger, whereas the relative contribution from CCHN, SCHN, RUS (13-57%) are larger in summer. These are controlled by the distribution of precipitation. For dry deposition, the relative contribution from NCHN and CCHN (28-49%) are large in winter season, whereas the relative contribution from the three Chinese domains and ERUS are decrease in summer

  8. Dry compliant seal for phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Granata, Jr., Samuel J.; Woodle, Boyd M.

    1990-01-01

    A dry compliant overlapping seal for a phosphoric acid fuel cell preformed f non-compliant Teflon to make an anode seal frame that encircles an anode assembly, a cathode seal frame that encircles a cathode assembly and a compliant seal frame made of expanded Teflon, generally encircling a matrix assembly. Each frame has a thickness selected to accommodate various tolerances of the fuel cell elements and are either bonded to one of the other frames or to a bipolar or end plate. One of the non-compliant frames is wider than the other frames forming an overlap of the matrix over the wider seal frame, which cooperates with electrolyte permeating the matrix to form a wet seal within the fuel cell that prevents process gases from intermixing at the periphery of the fuel cell and a dry seal surrounding the cell to keep electrolyte from the periphery thereof. The frames may be made in one piece, in L-shaped portions or in strips and have an outer perimeter which registers with the outer perimeter of bipolar or end plates to form surfaces upon which flanges of pan shaped, gas manifolds can be sealed.

  9. Estimation of SO{sub 2} dry deposition using turbulence parameters observed by sonic anemometer-thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chong Bum; Kim, Jeong, Sik; Kim, Yong Goog; Cho, Chang Rae; Byun, D.W.

    1996-12-31

    The dry deposition of pollutants can be calculated from the concentration of pollutants in the atmosphere and deposition velocity. To calculate deposition velocity, turbulence parameters such as friction velocity and Monin-Obukhov length are used. However, due to the difficulties in observation of turbulence parameters, usually mean values of wind speed and temperature observed using conventional meteorological instruments are used to estimate the dry deposition. The dry deposition velocity is the function of aerodynamic resistance (R{sub a}), sublayer resistance (R{sub b}), surface resistance (R{sub c}). R{sub a} and R{sub b} are calculated from turbulence parameters and R{sub c} is related to surface characteristics. The purpose of the present study is to compare the dry deposition obtained using the data sets of mean values and turbulence parameters measured by sonic anemometer-thermometer. The field observation was performed for 30 days from October 27 to November 25, 1995. The turbulence parameters were measured by 3 dimensional sonic anemometer-thermometer and mean meteorological variables are obtained at two heights, 2.5 m and 10 m. The results show that the dry deposition velocity is large, in daytime and small in nighttime. The major factor of diurnal variation is Ra. In the daytime the dry deposition velocity calculated using mean meteorological data show relatively similar to the dry deposition velocity calculated using the turbulence data, however there are big differences at night.

  10. Aerosol dynamics within and above forest in relation to turbulent transport and dry deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannik, Üllar; Zhou, Luxi; Zhou, Putian; Gierens, Rosa; Mammarella, Ivan; Sogachev, Andrey; Boy, Michael

    2016-03-01

    A 1-D atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model coupled with a detailed atmospheric chemistry and aerosol dynamical model, the model SOSAA, was used to predict the ABL and detailed aerosol population (characterized by the number size distribution) time evolution. The model was applied over a period of 10 days in May 2013 to a pine forest site in southern Finland. The period was characterized by frequent new particle formation events and simultaneous intensive aerosol transformation. The aim of the study was to analyze and quantify the role of aerosol and ABL dynamics in the vertical transport of aerosols. It was of particular interest to what extent the fluxes above the canopy deviate from the particle dry deposition on the canopy foliage due to the above-mentioned processes. The model simulations revealed that the particle concentration change due to aerosol dynamics frequently exceeded the effect of particle deposition by even an order of magnitude or more. The impact was, however, strongly dependent on particle size and time. In spite of the fact that the timescale of turbulent transfer inside the canopy is much smaller than the timescales of aerosol dynamics and dry deposition, leading us to assume well-mixed properties of air, the fluxes at the canopy top frequently deviated from deposition inside the forest. This was due to transformation of aerosol concentration throughout the ABL and resulting complicated pattern of vertical transport. Therefore we argue that the comparison of timescales of aerosol dynamics and deposition defined for the processes below the flux measurement level do not unambiguously describe the importance of aerosol dynamics for vertical transport above the canopy. We conclude that under dynamical conditions reported in the current study the micrometeorological particle flux measurements can significantly deviate from the dry deposition into the canopy. The deviation can be systematic for certain size ranges so that the time

  11. Dry deposition of gaseous radioiodine and particulate radiocaesium onto leafy vegetables.

    PubMed

    Tschiersch, Jochen; Shinonaga, Taeko; Heuberger, Heidi

    2009-10-15

    Radionuclides released to the atmosphere during dry weather (e.g. after a nuclear accident) may contaminate vegetable foods and cause exposure to humans via the food chain. To obtain experimental data for an appropriate assessment of this exposure path, dry deposition of radionuclides to leafy vegetables was studied under homogeneous and controlled greenhouse conditions. Gaseous (131)I-tracer in predominant elemental form and particulate (134)Cs-tracer at about 1 mum diameter were used to identify susceptible vegetable species with regard to contamination by these radionuclides. The persistence was examined by washing the harvested product with water. The vegetables tested were spinach (Spinacia oleracea), butterhead lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. capitata), endive (Cichorium endivia), leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa var. crispa), curly kale (Brassica oleracea convar. acephala) and white cabbage (Brassica oleracea convar. capitata). The variation of radionuclides deposited onto each vegetable was evaluated statistically using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis Test and the U-test of Mann-Whitney. Significant differences in deposited (131)I and (134)Cs activity concentration were found among the vegetable species. For (131)I, the deposition velocity to spinach normalized to the biomass of the vegetation was 0.5-0.9 cm(3) g(-1) s(-1) which was the highest among all species. The particulate (134)Cs deposition velocity of 0.09 cm(3) g(-1) s(-1) was the highest for curly kale, which has rough and structured leaves. The lowest deposition velocity was onto white cabbage: 0.02 cm(3) g(-1) s(-1) (iodine) and 0.003 cm(3) g(-1) s(-1) (caesium). For all species, the gaseous iodine deposition was significantly higher compared to the particulate caesium deposition. The deposition depends on the sensitive parameters leaf area, stomatal aperture, and plant morphology. Decontamination by washing with water was very limited for iodine but up to a factor of two for caesium. PMID:19640563

  12. Atmospheric dry deposition flux of metallic species to the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottley, C. J.; Harrison, Roy M.

    Air sampling on a series of 10 research cruises on the North Sea (south of 56°N) has yielded detailed spatial distributions of atmospheric metal concentrations, Al, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mg, Na, Pb and Zn which closely parallel the results of earlier published models. Air mass back trajectory analysis demonstrates the strong influence which source region may have upon the elemental composition of the North Sea atmosphere. A cascade impactor designed to collect efficiently large as well as small aerosol has produced detailed size distributions from which mass weighted deposition velocity estimates have been produced (Al, 0.33; Cd, 0.24; Cu, 0.44; Fe, 0.30; Pb, 0.13; Zn, 0.30 cm s -1) enabling estimates for the dry deposition flux to the study area to be made. Extrapolation of these data to the whole of the North Sea yields dry deposition flux estimates (Cd, 33; Cu, 350; Pb, 370; Zn, 2640 tonnes yr -1) which are in some instances substantially lower than those previously reported, but nevertheless represent a significant pathway for metallic species to enter this marine environment. The size distributions show the clear dominance that large aerosol has upon the overall dry deposition flux. Flux estimates are thus highly sensitive to the sampling of this large aerosol component, and to assumptions made regarding the sea surface as a source of giant trace metal-enriched particles which act only as a means of recycling marine metals.

  13. Wet and Dry Atmospheric Depositions of Inorganic Nitrogen during Plant Growing Season in the Coastal Zone of Yellow River Delta

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunzhao; Du, Siyao; Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Guangmei

    2014-01-01

    The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO42− and Na+ were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m−2, in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3−–N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4+–N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3−–N and NH4+–N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3−–N and NH4+–N in 0–10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD. PMID:24977238

  14. Wet and dry atmospheric depositions of inorganic nitrogen during plant growing season in the coastal zone of Yellow River Delta.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junbao; Ning, Kai; Li, Yunzhao; Du, Siyao; Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Guangmei; Gao, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO4 (2-) and Na(+) were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m(-2), in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3 (-)-N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4 (+)-N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N in 0-10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD. PMID:24977238

  15. Measurements of size-fractionated concentration and bulk dry deposition of atmospheric particulate bound mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, G. C.; Zhang, L.; Huang, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    Daily samples of size-fractionated (18, 10, 2.5 and 1.0 μm) particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) were collected using Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposition Impactors (MOUDI), on randomly selected days each month between November 2010 and July 2011, at a traffic site (Hungkuang), a wetland site (Gaomei), and an industrial site (Quanxing) in central Taiwan. Bulk dry deposition was also collected simultaneously using a surrogate surface. The nine-month average (±standard deviation) Hg(p) concentrations were 0.57 (±0.90), 0.17 (±0.27), and 0.94 (±0.92) ng m-3 at Hungkuang, Gaomei, and Quanxing, respectively. Concentrations in November and December were much higher than in the other months due to a combination of high local emissions and meteorological conditions. PM1.0 contributed more than 50% to the bulk concentration at the traffic and the industrial sites, but only contributed 25% at the wetland site. PM1.0-2.5 contributed 25%-50%, depending on location, to the bulk mass. Coarse fraction (PM2.5-18) contributed 7% at Hungkuang, 25% at Gaomei, and 19% at Quanxing. Samples with very high bulk concentrations had large fine fractions. Annual dry deposition estimated from the surrogate surface measurements was in the range of 30-85 μg m-2 yr-1 at the three sites. Coarse particulate Hg(p) were estimated to contribute 50-85% of the total Hg(p) dry deposition. Daily dry deposition velocities (Vd) ranged from 0.01 to 7.7 cm s-1. The annual Vd generated from the total measured fluxes was 0.34, 0.60 and 0.29 cm s-1 at Hungkuang, Gaomei, and Quanxing, respectively. These values can be reasonably reproduced using a size-resolved model and measured size fractions.

  16. On the spray-drying deposition of TiO 2 photocatalytic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova-Bujnova, M.; Todorovska, R.; Milanova, M.; Kralchevska, R.; Todorovsky, D.

    2009-11-01

    The photocatalytic activity of TiO 2 films deposited on different substrates by the spray-drying method using suspensions of commercially available TiO 2 (Degussa P25 or Tronox) as starting material was studied. The influence of the type of the initial TiO 2, preparation conditions (temperature of the substrate during the film deposition, temperature of the post-deposition annealing), substrate material (glass, fused silica, stainless steel and graphite), the presence of additives in the spraying suspension (polyethylene glycol, ethylene glycol and acetylacetone) and its sonication before spraying on the morphology, size of crystallites and phase composition (rutile/anatase ratio) was studied. Optimal conditions for spray deposition of the films are suggested.

  17. Estimated range of black carbon dry deposition and the related snow albedo reduction over Himalayan glaciers during dry pre-monsoon periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Tan, Qian; Lau, K.-M.; Bonasoni, Paolo; Marinoni, Angela; Laj, Paolo; Ménégoz, Martin; Takemura, Toshihiko; Chin, Mian

    2013-10-01

    One of the major factors attributed to the accelerated melting of Himalayan glaciers is the snow darkening effect of atmospheric black carbon (BC). The BC is the result of incomplete fossil fuel combustion from sources such as open biomass burning and wood burning cooking stoves. One of the key challenges in determining the darkening effect is the estimation uncertainty of BC deposition (BCD) rate on surface snow cover. Here we analyze the variation of BC dry deposition in seven different estimates based on different dry deposition methods which include different atmospheric forcings (observations and global model outputs) and different spatial resolutions. The seven simulations are used to estimate the uncertainty range of BC dry deposition over the southern Himalayas during pre-monsoon period (March-May) in 2006. Our results show BC dry deposition rates in a wide range of 270-4700 μg m-2 during the period. Two global models generate higher BC dry deposition rates due to modeled stronger surface wind and simplification of complicated sub-grid surface conditions in this region. Using ice surface roughness and observation-based meteorological data, we estimate a better range of BC dry deposition rate of 900-1300 μg m-2. Under dry and highly polluted conditions, aged snow and sulfate-coated BC are expected to possibly reduce visible albedo by 4.2-5.1%. Our results suggest that for estimating aerosol-induced snow darkening effects of Himalaya snowpacks using global and regional models, realistic physical representation of ice or snow surface roughness and surface wind speed are critical in reducing uncertainties on the estimate of BC deposition over snow surface.

  18. Particle Deposition in Drying Drops of Colloidal Suspensions Containing Different Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, Tim; Yunker, Peter J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2012-02-01

    When a drop of water containing small solid particles dries, most of the solid material is deposited in a ring-shape stain after evaporation (the so-called coffee ring), driven by initial contact line pinning and a subsequent outward-flow. The fluid dynamics and, hence, the deposition mechanism in such suspensions can be dramatically changed when surfactants are introduced into the system. In a colloidal model-system, the ionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) produces a concentration-driven Marangoni flow counteracting the outward-flow of the coffee ring effect. SDS locally concentrates at the air/water interface next to the contact line, leading to a reduced local surface tension. Thus, a circulating flow (`Marangoni eddy') is introduced that prevents particles from deposition. This flow is visualized by the movements of the dragged particles using video microscopy. Other surfactants can influence this highly non-equilibrium systems in completely other ways. E.g., the non-ionic Polaxamer block-copolymer surfactants lead to a uniform particle deposition, which we explain by hydrophilization of the colloidal particles. Controlling the solid deposition in drying drops is of major importance for many technical applications.

  19. ESTIMATES OF CLOUD WATER DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM SITES IN THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY, Whitetop Mountain, VA, and Clingrnan's Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). ...

  20. Factors affecting response of surface waters to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.; Johnson, D.W.; Elwood, J.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Clapp, R.B.; Reuss, J.O.

    1986-04-01

    Knowledge of watershed hydrology and of the biogeochemical reactions and elemental pools and fluxes occurring in watersheds can be used to classify the response of watersheds and surface waters to acidic deposition. A conceptual mosel is presented for classifying watersheds into those for which (1) surface water chemistry will change rapidly with deposition quality (direct response) (2) surface water chemistry will change only slowly over time (delayed response), and (3) surface water chemistry will not change significantly, even with continued acidic deposition (capacity-protected). Techniques and data available for classification of all watersheds in a region into these categories are discussed.

  1. Atmospheric dry deposition of trace elements measured around the urban and industrially impacted NY-NJ harbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Seung-Muk; Totten, Lisa A.; Thota, Sathyapriya; Yan, Shu; Offenberg, John H.; Eisenreich, Steven J.; Graney, Joseph; Holsen, Thomas M.

    Long-term direct trace metal dry deposition measurements were made during 2001 and 2002 at two sites near the NY/NJ Harbor Estuary in New Jersey: Jersey City (JC) and New Brunswick (NB). In addition intensive dry deposition and atmospheric size distribution (ASD) measurements were made between September 2001 and June 2002. Dry deposition samples were obtained using modified MIC-B wet deposition samplers which deployed knife-edge surrogate surfaces during dry periods. ASDs were measured with micro-orifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDI) and coarse particle rotary impactors (CPRI). The fluxes of trace metals were found to be highest at the JC site and lowest at the NB site. The dry deposition fluxes ranged from 0.030 (Cd) to 3800 (Al) μg m -2 d -1 and 0.14 (Cd) to 8100 (Al) μg m -2 d -1at NB and JC sites, respectively. Metals of crustal origin were found mostly in the coarse particle fraction and anthropogenic metals were found mostly in the fine particle fraction. For the intensive experiments, overall dry deposition velocities of several trace metals were determined by dividing measured fluxes by measured concentrations in different particle size ranges. For most of the elements, the flux was highly correlated with PM 10 and coarse particle concentrations. The overall dry deposition velocities of crustal elements (Al and Mg) varied from 3.7 to 8.7 cm s -1 with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.50 to 0.84. The best-fit dry deposition velocities for anthropogenic elements (Cr, Mn, Zn, and Pb; Cu, Mo, and Ba; V and Ni) varied more than those for crustal elements (0.52-25 vs. 3.7-8.7 cm s -1). The dry deposition velocities for most elements obtained using three size ranges were statistically significant with R2 values ranging from 0.37 to 0.84 except for V and Ni (0.12).

  2. Miocene Flood Deposits in the Dry Valleys, Antarctica Dated Using Cosmogenic 3He Isotopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margerison, H.; Phillips, W.; Stuart, F.; Sugden, D.

    2004-12-01

    In situ produced cosmogenic 3He measurements on deposits in the Dry Valleys, East Antarctica, provides information on Neogene climatic variation and East Antarctic ice sheet evolution. Ferrar dolerite cobble-size boulders located in the Coombs Hills form a series of mega-ripples (wavelength approximately 50 meters) associated with scabland features and stripped, corrugated bedrock surfaces. These features, together with topographic position, indicate the boulders were deposited by subglacial floodwaters. Such outburst flooding occurred during over-riding of the northern Dry Valleys by a greatly expanded East Antarctic ice sheet. Timing of the over-riding episode has been previously assigned to between 13.6 and 14.8 Ma by correlation with volcanic ash deposits dated in the Asgard Range of the Dry Valleys. Cosmogenic 3He concentrations in clinopyroxene from Ferrar dolerite boulder samples imply a minimum of 8.6 to 10.4 Ma exposure, calculated using scaling factors appropriate to Antarctica and assuming zero erosion. These are among the oldest surface exposure dates yet measured on Earth, but are however younger than the 40Ar/39Ar defined chronology. Erosion is an important influence on measured concentrations of cosmogenic isotopes and unconstrained erosion of samples can significantly influence the accuracy of stable cosmogenic isotope dating techniques in East Antarctica. Nearby Ferrar dolerite bedrock surfaces are used to yield an average cosmogenic 3He derived steady-state erosion rate of 0.24 m Ma-1. Applying a conservative erosion correction, (based on < 25% of this rate) to the oldest flood deposit causes apparent exposure ages to rise to over 14 Ma. These results provide independent support for the model of a stable, hyper-arid polar climate persisting in East Antarctica throughout the Neogene period and provide quantitative constraints on long term rates of erosion within the Dry Valleys.

  3. Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Particulate Matter and Dry Deposition Flux in the Cuihu Wetland of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lijuan; Liu, Jiakai; Cong, Ling; Ma, Wenmei; Ma, Wu; Zhang, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the rapid development of industrialization and urbanization has caused serious environmental pollution, especially particulate pollution. As the "Earth's kidneys," wetland plays a significant role in improving the environmental quality and adjusting the climate. To study how wetlands work in this aspect, from the early autumn of 2014 to 2015, we implemented a study to measure the PM concentration and chemical composition at three heights (1.5, 6, and 10 m) during different periods (dry, normal water, and wet periods) in the Cuihu wetland park in Beijing for analyzing the dry deposition flux and the effect of meteorological factors on the concentration. Results indicated that (1) the diurnal variations of the PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations at the three heights were similar in that the highest concentration occurred at night and the lowest occurred at noon, and the daytime concentration was lower than that at night; (2) the PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations also varied between different periods that wet period > normal water period > wet period, and the concentration at different heights during different periods varied. In general, the lowest concentration occurred at 10 m during the dry and normal water periods, and the highest concentration occurred at 1.5 m during the wet period. (3) SO42-, NO3-, and Cl- are the dominant constituents of PM2.5, accounting for 42.22, 12.6, and 21.56%, respectively; (4) the dry depositions of PM2.5 and PM10 at 10 m were higher than those at 6 m, and the deposition during the dry period was higher than those during the wet and normal water periods. In addition, the deposition during the night-time was higher than that during the daytime. Moreover, meteorological factors affected the deposition, the temperature and wind speed being negatively correlated with the deposition flux and the humidity being positively correlated. (5) The PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were influenced by meteorological factors. The PM2.5 and PM10

  4. Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Particulate Matter and Dry Deposition Flux in the Cuihu Wetland of Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Ling; Ma, Wenmei; Ma, Wu; Zhang, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the rapid development of industrialization and urbanization has caused serious environmental pollution, especially particulate pollution. As the “Earth’s kidneys,” wetland plays a significant role in improving the environmental quality and adjusting the climate. To study how wetlands work in this aspect, from the early autumn of 2014 to 2015, we implemented a study to measure the PM concentration and chemical composition at three heights (1.5, 6, and 10 m) during different periods (dry, normal water, and wet periods) in the Cuihu wetland park in Beijing for analyzing the dry deposition flux and the effect of meteorological factors on the concentration. Results indicated that (1) the diurnal variations of the PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations at the three heights were similar in that the highest concentration occurred at night and the lowest occurred at noon, and the daytime concentration was lower than that at night; (2) the PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations also varied between different periods that wet period > normal water period > wet period, and the concentration at different heights during different periods varied. In general, the lowest concentration occurred at 10 m during the dry and normal water periods, and the highest concentration occurred at 1.5 m during the wet period. (3) SO42−, NO3−, and Cl− are the dominant constituents of PM2.5, accounting for 42.22, 12.6, and 21.56%, respectively; (4) the dry depositions of PM2.5 and PM10 at 10 m were higher than those at 6 m, and the deposition during the dry period was higher than those during the wet and normal water periods. In addition, the deposition during the night-time was higher than that during the daytime. Moreover, meteorological factors affected the deposition, the temperature and wind speed being negatively correlated with the deposition flux and the humidity being positively correlated. (5) The PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations were influenced by meteorological factors. The PM2

  5. EMISSION INVENTORY APPLICATIONS TO REGIONAL ACID DEPOSITION MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) is being developed and a simpler fast-turn-around 'engineering' model(s) (EM) is being designed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). This paper ...

  6. ANTHROPOGENIC EMISSIONS INVOLVED IN ACIDIC DEPOSITION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the methodology that was used to develop the 1985 National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) Emissions Inventory, including quality control procedures. and summarizes the inventory contents. evelopment of the 1985 inventory required detailed invest...

  7. Aspects of lead/acid battery technology 5. Dry charging of formed negative plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prout, L.

    The objective in the dry charging of formed negative plates in lead/acid batteries is to preserve the highly active sponge lead material from attack by atmospheric oxygen until the dry and unfilled charged battery is put into service. This review discusses the following methods that are commonly used for dry charging: (i) drying in a vacuum; (ii) drying by direct application of superheated steam; (iii) drying in an inert-gas atmosphere; (iv) removal of water by hot kerosene and subsequent drying in a closed kerosene vapour chamber and (v) drying in the presence of anti-oxidants. The protection of dry-charge characteristics, rapid evaluation of dry-charge quality and testing for excess wax or oil inhibitors are also described.

  8. Drying, phase separation, and deposition in droplets of sunset yellow chromonic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Adam; Davidson, Zoey S.; Huang, Yongyang; Still, Tim; Zhou, Chao; Yodh, A. G.

    We investigate the drying process and the final deposition patterns of multi-phase sessile droplets containing aqueous lyotropic chromonic liquid crystal (LC). The experiments employ a variety of optical techniques including profilometry, polarization optical microscopy and optical coherence microscopy. An unusual hierarchical LC assembly is observed during drying; in particular, LC mesogens are first formed at the start of drying and then compartments of isotropic, nematic and columnar phases arise. Nonuniform evaporation creates concentration gradients in droplets such that LC phases emerge from the outer edge of the drop and advance to the center over the course of drying. Distinct outward flows associated with the ``coffee-ring effect'' are seen initially, but the assembly of the mesogens creates viscosity, density, and surface tension gradients that effectively introduce new convective flows and complex LC phase boundaries within the drop. Finally, we show that the final deposit shape of chromonic materials changes with rate of evaporation. We gratefully acknowledge financial support through NSF DMR12-05463, MRSEC DMR11-20901, NASA NNX08AO0G, and NSF DBI-1455613.

  9. Surface roughness induced cracks of the deposition film from drying colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Luo, Hao; Ma, Jun; Xie, Weiguang; Wang, Yan; Jing, Guangyin

    2016-02-01

    We investigate crack formation in deposition films from drying colloidal suspension drops, by varying the roughness and texture of the substrate. The experimental results indicate that the crack number or crack spacing presents a general dependence on the substrate roughness, despite the orientation of the substrate textures. Interestingly, the crack spacing decreases with the increase of the roughness. Two possible mechanisms are proposed to understand the dependence of the cracks on roughness. Firstly, the concentration reduction of the drying suspension due to collecting colloidal particles from the substrate textures decreases the crack spacing. Secondly, stress concentration resulting from the defects (the notches in textures) in the dried deposition enhances crack formation. However, a quantitative estimation by the calculation of the stress concentrating factors reveals that the notch of the substrate textures dominates crack variation. The results here bring forth a practical method for controlling the crack orientation and suppression, and a potential application to crack-free coatings, films and paintings during the drying of complex fluids. PMID:26920527

  10. Integration of Succinic Acid Production in a Dry Mill Ethanol Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2006-08-01

    This project seeks to address both issues for a dry mill ethanol biorefinery by lowering the cost of sugars with the development of an advanced pretreatment process, improving the economics of succinic acid (SA), and developing a model of an ethanol dry mill to evaluate the impact of adding different products and processes to a dry mill.

  11. Simple model for estimating dry deposition velocity of ozone and its destruction in a polluted nocturnal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Ho; Lai, Chin-Hsing; Wu, Yee-Lin; Chen, Ming-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Determining the destructions of both ozone and odd oxygen, O x, in the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) is important to evaluate the regional ozone budget and overnight ozone accumulation. This work develops a simple method to determine the dry deposition velocity of ozone and its destruction at a polluted nocturnal boundary layer. The destruction of O x can also be determined simultaneously. The method is based on O 3 and NO 2 profiles and their surface measurements. Linkages between the dry deposition velocities of O 3 and NO 2 and between the dry deposition loss of O x and its chemical loss are constructed and used. Field measurements are made at an agricultural site to demonstrate the application of the model. The model estimated nocturnal O 3 dry deposition velocities from 0.13 to 0.19 cm s -1, very close to those previously obtained for similar land types. Additionally, dry deposition and chemical reactions account for 60 and 40% of the overall nocturnal ozone loss, respectively; ozone dry deposition accounts for 50% of the overall nocturnal loss of O x, dry deposition of NO 2 accounts for another 20%, and chemical reactions account for the remaining 30%. The proposed method enables the use of measurements made in typical ozone field studies to evaluate various nocturnal destructions of O 3 and O x in a polluted environment.

  12. Neutral and ionic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in atmospheric and dry deposition samples over a source region (Tianjin, China).

    PubMed

    Yao, Yiming; Chang, Shuai; Sun, Hongwen; Gan, Zhiwei; Hu, Hongwei; Zhao, Yangyang; Zhang, Yufen

    2016-05-01

    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were detected in the atmosphere of a source region in Tianjin, China. Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) were the dominant neutral PFASs in the atmosphere with total concentrations of 93.6-131 pg/m(3) and 8:2 FTOH contributing the most, whereas perfluorooctane sulfonamide derivatives (PFOSAs) were two magnitudes lower or undetected. In comparison, ionic PFASs (perfluoroalkyl carboxyl acids (PFCAs)) in the atmosphere were detected at similar or even higher levels. At wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), the air over influent was found with higher levels of FTOHs than over aeration tank and effluent; whereas in the air over the aeration tank, the concentrations of PFOSAs and nonvolatile ionic PFASs substantially increased, suggesting a possible direct release of ionic PFASs to the atmosphere besides the atmospheric conversion from volatile precursors. In the air phase, a low proportion (1-5%) of PFCAs was subjected to dry deposition in the source region. Interestingly, the dry-deposition-to-bulk-air ratios of PFCA analogues were the lowest at medium chain lengths (C8 and C9) and increased with either shorter or longer chain length. The extraordinary affinity of shorter-chain PFCAs (C6-C7) to particles was presumed to be due to their smaller molecular size favoring the interactions between the carboxyl head groups and specific sorption sites on particulate matter. PMID:26952273

  13. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1984 ANNUAL DATA SUMMARY FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a summary of 1984 wet deposition precipitation chemistry data collected in North America and available in the Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base. North American wet deposition monitoring networks with data in ADS are NADP/NTN, CANSAP, APN, UAPSP, MAP3S/PCN, W...

  14. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1983 ANNUAL DATA SUMMARY FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a summary of 1983 wet deposition precipitation chemistry data collected in North America and available in the Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base. North American wet deposition monitoring networks with data in ADS are NADP/NTN, CANSAP, APN, UAPSP, MAP3S/PCN, W...

  15. Dry Lung as a Physical Model in Studies of Aerosol Deposition.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Victor N; Kanev, Igor L

    2015-10-01

    A new physical model was developed to evaluate the deposition of micro- and nanoaerosol particles (NAPs) into the lungs as a function of size and charges. The model was manufactured of a dry, inflated swine lung produced by Nasco company (Fort Atkinson, WI). The dry lung was cut into two lobes and a conductive tube was glued into the bronchial tube. The upper 1-2-mm-thick layer of the lung lobe was removed with a razor blade to expose the alveoli. The lobe was further enclosed into a plastic bag and placed within a metalized plastic box. The probability of aerosol deposition was calculated by comparing the size distribution of NAPs passed through the lung with that of control, where aerosol passed through a box bypassing the lung. Using this new lung model, it was demonstrated that charged NAPs are deposited inside the lung substantially more efficiently than neutral ones. It was also demonstrated that deposition of neutral NAPs well fits prediction of the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry (MPPD) model developed by the Applied Research Associates, Inc. (ARA). PMID:26267596

  16. Enhanced acid rain and atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, sulfur and heavy metals in Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is known to be important mechanism reducing air pollution. In response to the growing concern on the potential effects of the deposited material entering terrestrial and aquatic environments as well as their subsequent health effects, since 2007 we have established a 10-site monitoring network in Northern China, where particularly susceptible to severe air pollution. Wet and dry deposition was collected using an automatic wet-dry sampler. The presentation will focus on the new results of atmospheric deposition flux for a number of chemical species, such as nutrients (e.g. nitrogen and phosphorus), acidic matters (e.g. sulfur and proton), heavy metals and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, etc. This is to our knowledge the first detailed element budget study in the atmosphere across Northern China. We find that: (1) Over the 3 year period, 26% of precipitation events in the target area were more acid than pH 5.60 and these acidic events occurred in summer and autumn. The annual volume-weighted mean (VWM) pH value of precipitation was lower than 5.60 at most sites, which indicated the acidification of precipitation was not optimistic. The primary ions in precipitation were NH4+, Ca2+, SO42- and NO3-, with 10-sites-average concentrations of 221, 216, 216 and 80 μeq L-1, respectively. The ratio of SO42- to NO3- was 2.7; suggesting SO42- was the dominant acid component. (2) The deposited particles were neutral in general and the pH value increased from rural area to industrial and coastal sites. It is not surprising to note that the annual VWM pH value of precipitation was higher than 5.60 at three urban sites (Beijing and Tianjin mega cities) and one coastal site near the Bohai Bay, considering the fact that high buffer capacity of alkaline component, gas NH3 and mineral aerosols, at these sites compared to other places. (3) The 10-sites annual total deposition amounts for sulfur and nitrogen compounds were 60 and 65 kg N/S ha-1 yr-1

  17. Possible origin of the crack pattern in deposition films formed from a drying colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Jing, Guangyin

    2012-12-01

    The fracture mechanics was usually employed to explain the crack propagation in the deposition produced by drying colloidal suspension. However, more complex than conventional fracture, those cracks periodically distribute and make up a unique pattern. Inspired by the concept of spinodal decomposition, here we develop the theory to illustrate the possible mechanism of the spatial arrangement of the cracks. It indicates that before the cracks develop and propagate in the deposition under the law of fracture mechanics, the periodically distributed flaws are generated by the phase separation of colloidal clusters and solvent. Then the cracks originate at the sites of those flaws in terms of fracture mechanics. It concludes that the crack spacing results from the wavelength of the concentration fluctuation during the phase separation, linearly growing with the increase of the deposition thickness and initial particle concentration, which is consistent with experimental results. PMID:23367949

  18. Dry deposition and concentration of marine aerosols in a coastal area, SW Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Mats E. R.; Franzén, Lars G.

    The present paper introduces a model for the dry deposition of marine aerosols in a coastal area of SW Sweden. The model, incorporating wind speed and distance from shore, is based on repeated measurements of salt impingement on specially designed salt traps in dense profiles from the shore and inland. The measurements show that the deposited salts include two significantly different components, one dynamic containing large droplets, with short residence time in the air, deposited close to the shore, the other one being microscopic droplets, with long residence time in the air and with a low deposition velocity (principally, the system is similar to that of mineral particles, i.e. saltating dune sand vs loess). The deposition of marine aerosols has various effects on the terrestrial environments. Aside from those associated to human activities, i.e. technical effects on outdoor electrical installations, increased corrosion of cars, etc. there are others associated to natural ecosystems. Hence, salts are important contributors to major and trace elements for plant growth. On the other hand, the deposition of windborne salt spray is believed to form an important stress factor on forests and especially to exposed stands of Norway spruce ( Picea abies L.). In this latter sense it is the authors' opinion that the rising number of westerly gales reported on the Swedish west coast during the last two decades might give an important contribution to the increasing amounts of damage observed from coniferous forests in SW Sweden.

  19. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part II: A new modelling approach and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Alexandre; Mailliat, Alain; Amielh, Muriel; Anselmet, Fabien

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the modelling of aerosol dry deposition on vegetation. It follows a companion article, in which a review of the current knowledge highlights the need for a better description of the aerosol behaviour within the canopy [Petroff, A., Mailliat, A., Amielh, M., Anselmet, F., 2008. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part I: Review of present knowledge. Atmospheric Environment, in press, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.09.043]. Concepts from multi-phase flow studies are used for describing the canopy medium and deriving a time and space-averaged aerosol balance equation and the associated deposition terms. The closure of the deposition terms follows an up-scaling procedure based on the statistical distribution of the collecting elements. This aerosol transport model is then applied in a stationary and mono-dimensional configuration and takes into account the properties of the vegetation, the aerosol and the turbulent flow. Deposition mechanisms are Brownian diffusion, interception, inertial and turbulent impactions, and gravitational settling. For each of them, a parameterisation of the particle collection is derived and the quality of their predictions is assessed by comparison with wind-tunnel deposition measurements on coniferous twigs [Belot, Y., Gauthier, D., 1975. Transport of micronic particles from atmosphere to foliar surfaces. In: De Vries, D.A., Afgan, N.H. (Eds.), Heat and Mass Transfer in the Biosphere. Scripta Book, Washington, DC, pp. 583-591; Belot, Y., 1977. Etude de la captation des polluants atmosphériques par les végétaux. CEA, R-4786, Fontenay-aux-Roses; Belot, Y., Camus, H., Gauthier, D., Caput, C., 1994. Uptake of small particles by canopies. The Science of the Total Environment 157, 1-6]. Under a real canopy configuration, the predictions of the aerosol transport model compare reasonably well with detailed on-site deposition measurements of Aitken mode particles [Buzorius, G., Rannik, Ü., M

  20. The sensitivity of global ozone predictions to dry deposition schemes and their response to climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centoni, Federico; Stevenson, David; Fowler, David; Nemitz, Eiko; Coyle, Mhairi

    2015-04-01

    Concentrations of ozone at the surface are strongly affected by deposition to the surface. Deposition processes are very sensitive to temperature and relative humidity at the surface and are expected to respond to global change, with implications for both air quality and ecosystem services. Many studies have shown that ozone stomatal uptake by vegetation typically accounts for 40-60% of total deposition on average and the other part which occurs through non-stomatal pathways is not constant. Flux measurements show that non-stomatal removal increases with temperature and under wet conditions. There are large uncertainties in parameterising the non-stomatal ozone deposition term in climate chemistry models and model predictions vary greatly. In addition, different model treatments of dry deposition constitute a source of inter-model variability in surface ozone predictions. The main features of the original Unified Model-UK Chemistry and Aerosols (UM-UKCA) dry deposition scheme and the Zhang et al. 2003 scheme, which introduces in UM-UKCA a more developed non-stomatal deposition approach, are presented. This study also estimates the relative contributions of ozone flux via stomatal and non-stomatal uptakes at the global scale, and explores the sensitivity of simulated surface ozone and ozone deposition flux by implementing different non-stomatal parameterization terms. With a view to exploring the potential influence of future climate, we present results showing the effects of variations in some meteorological parameters on present day (2000) global ozone predictions. In particular, this study revealed that the implementation of a more mechanistic representation of the non-stomatal deposition in UM-UKCA model along with a decreased stomatal uptake due to the effect of blocking under wet conditions, accounted for a substantial reduction of ozone fluxes to broadleaf trees in the tropics with an increase of annual mean surface ozone. On the contrary, a large increase of

  1. Acidic deposition in the northeastern United States: Sources and inputs, ecosystem effects, and management strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, C.T.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bulger, A.J.; Butler, T.J.; Cronan, C.S.; Eagar, C.; Lambert, K.F.; Likens, G.E.; Stoddard, J.L.; Weathers, K.C.

    2001-01-01

    North America and Europe are in the midst of a large-scale experiment. Sulfuric and nitric acids have acidified soils, lakes, and streams, thereby stressing or killing terrestrial and aquatic biota. It is therefore critical to measure and to understand the recovery of complex ecosystems in response to decreases in acidic deposition. Fortunately, the NADP, CASTNet, and AIRMoN-dry networks are in place to measure anticipated improvements in air quality and in atmospheric deposition. Unfortunately, networks to measure changes in water quality are sparse, and networks to monitor soil, vegetation, and fish responses are even more limited. There is an acute need to assess the response of these resources to decreases in acid loading. It would be particularly valuable to assess the recovery of aquatic biota - which respond directly to acid stress - to changes in surface water chemistry (Gunn and Mills 1998). We used long-term research from the HBEF and other sites across the northeastern United States to synthesize data on the effects of acidic deposition and to assess ecosystem responses to reductions in emissions. On the basis of existing data, it is clear that in the northeastern United States ??? reductions of SO2 emissions since 1970 have resulted in statistically significant decreases in SO42- in wet and bulk deposition and in surface waters ??? emissions of NOX and concentrations of NO3- in wet and bulk deposition and in surface waters have shown no increase or decrease since the 1980s ??? estimates of NH3 emissions are uncertain, although atmospheric deposition of NH4+ remains important for forest management and stream NO3- loss ??? acidic deposition has accelerated the leaching of base cations from soils, thus delaying the recovery of ANC in lakes and streams from decreased emissions of SO2 (at the HBEF the available soil Ca pool appears to have declined 50% over the past 50 years) ???sulfur and N from atmospheric deposition have accumulated in forest soils across

  2. Characteristics Of Atmospheric Dry Deposition Of Metals To The Region Of Lake Asan And Sapgyo, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J.; Shin, H.; Lee, M.; Lim, Y.; Seo, M.; Jung, I.

    2008-12-01

    Environment includes a multi-media such as air, surface water, soil, underground water and ecosystem. Some pollutants transfer among a multi-media, posing serious threat to humans, animals and plants. Pollutants released into the environment remain for long times and transport long distances while going through physical and chemical interactions such as transports between multi-media ; air, water and soil, deposition, and absorption and release from organisms. This study assessed the amount of heavy metals transferred from air to water and soil using dry deposition plate and water surface sampler during spring (June 13 ~ 21, 2007) and winter (October 23 ~ 30 in 2007) at 9 locations including Dangjin, Pyeongtaek and Asan. Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, MOUDI was used to confirm the size distribution. The measured heavy metal deposition flux was compared with the expectation obtained with deposition model. In addition, amount of heavy metal deposition at Asan and Sapgyo lakes were evaluated to verify the water pollution state driven by atmospheric deposition. Atmospheric dry deposition flux of metals are 133.92 microgram m-2 day-1, 44.01 microgram m-2 day-1, 0.915 microgram m-2 day-1, and 0.175 microgram m-2 day-1 during spring, and 72.86 microgram m-2 day- 1, 88.14 microgram m-2 day-1, 0.991 microgram m-2 day-1, and 0.189 microgram m-2 day-1 during fall, for lead, nickel, arsenic, and cadmium, respectively. It is required to re- calculation the dry deposition flux by land use type due to possibility of underestimating the flux in case of using grease surrogate surface having low surface roughness. The cadmium, lead, and arsenic size distribution was mono-modal with the peaks in the 0.65 ~ 1.1 micrometer size range in the fine mode showing sharp peak in the condensation submode especially for cadmium and lead because of effect of primary emission. The nickel size distribution was bimodal, a typical size distribution for an urban atmosphere, showing sharp

  3. Concentration and dry deposition of mercury species in arid south central New Mexico (2001-2002)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caldwell, Colleen A.; Swartzendruber, Philip; Prestbo, Eric

    2006-01-01

    This research was initiated to characterize atmospheric deposition of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM), particulate mercury (HgP; <2.5 μm), and gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) in the arid lands of south central New Mexico. Two methods were field-tested to estimate dry deposition of three mercury species. A manual speciation sampling train consisting of a KCl-coated denuder, 2.5 μm quartz fiber filters, and gold-coated quartz traps and an ion-exchange membrane (as a passive surrogate surface) were deployed concurrently over 24-h intervals for an entire year. The mean 24-h atmospheric concentration for RGM was 6.8 pg m-3 with an estimated deposition of 0.10 ng m-2h-1. The estimated deposition of mercury to the passive surrogate surface was much greater (4.0 ng m-2h-1) but demonstrated a diurnal pattern with elevated deposition from late afternoon to late evening (1400−2200; 8.0 ng m-2h-1) and lowest deposition during the night just prior to sunrise (2200−0600; 1.7 ng m-2h-1). The mean 24-h atmospheric concentrations for HgP and Hg0 were 1.52 pg m-3 and 1.59 ng m-3, respectively. Diurnal patterns were observed for RGM with atmospheric levels lowest during the night prior to sunrise (3.8 pg m-3) and greater during the afternoon and early evening (8.9 pg m-3). Discernible diurnal patterns were not observed for either HgP or Hg0. The total dry deposition of Hg was 5.9 μg m-2 year-1 with the contribution from the three species as follows:  RGM (0.88 μg m-2 year-1), HgP (0.025 μg m-2 year-1), and Hg0 (5.0 μg m-2 year-1). The annual wet deposition for total mercury throughout the same collection duration was 4.2 μg m-2 year-1, resulting in an estimated total deposition of 10.1 μg m-2 year-1 for Hg. On one sampling date, enhanced HgP (12 pg m-3) was observed due to emissions from a wildfire approximately 250 km to the east.

  4. Quantitation of 5-Methyltetrahydrofolic Acid in Dried Blood Spots and Dried Plasma Spots by Stable Isotope Dilution Assays

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Markus; Rychlik, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Because of minimal data available on folate analysis in dried matrix spots (DMSs), we combined the advantages of stable isotope dilution assays followed by LC-MS/MS analysis with DMS sampling to develop a reliable method for the quantitation of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried plasma spots (DPSs) as well as for the quantitation of whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs. We focused on two diagnostically conclusive parameters exhibited by the plasma and whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid levels that reflect both temporary and long-term folate status. The method is performed using the [2H4]-labeled isotopologue of the vitamin as the internal standard, and three steps are required for the extraction procedure. Elution of the punched out matrix spots was performed using stabilization buffer including Triton X-100 in a standardized ultrasonication treatment followed by enzymatic digestion (whole blood only) and solid-phase extraction with SAX cartridges. This method is sensitive enough to quantify 27 nmol/L whole blood 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and 6.3 and 4.4 nmol/L plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs and DPSs, respectively. The unprecedented accurate quantification of plasma 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid in DBSs was achieved by thermal treatment prior to ultrasonication, inhibiting plasma conjugase activity. Mass screenings are more feasible and easier to facilitate for this method in terms of sample collection and storage compared with conventional clinical sampling for the assessment of folate status. PMID:26605791

  5. A mechanistic study of phosphinocarboxylic acid for boiler deposit control

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.Y.; Patel, S.

    1995-11-01

    A laboratory study has been carried out to identify the key properties of phosphinocarboxylic acid polymers to control boiler water deposits. These multifunctional properties are its ability to: transport iron, disperse boiler water sludge that contains iron oxide, silica and calcium phosphate and dissolution of deposits. The thermal and hydrolytic stability of the phosphinocarboxylic acid polymers was investigated in autoclave studies up to 1,500 psig. The post-autoclave samples were analyzed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Aqueous Gel Permeation Chromatography to ascertain the polymer integrity. In addition performance tests were carried out for pre- and post-autoclave polymer samples. The performance testing clearly shows that phosphinocarboxylic acid polymers are effective in maintaining deposit control in a boiler due to their inherent thermal stability.

  6. Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in Southwestern USA: Comparison between texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012.The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characteriza...

  7. A Corrected Formulation of the Multilayer Model (MLM) for Inferring Gaseous Dry Deposition to Vegetated Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saylor, Rick D.; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Meyers, Tilden P.; Hicks, Bruce B.

    2014-01-01

    The Multilayer Model (MLM) has been used for many years to infer dry deposition fluxes from measured trace species concentrations and standard meteorological measurements for national networks in the U.S., including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet). MLM utilizes a resistance analogy to calculate deposition velocities appropriate for whole vegetative canopies, while employing a multilayer integration to account for vertically varying meteorology, canopy morphology and radiative transfer within the canopy. However, the MLM formulation, as it was originally presented and as it has been subsequently employed, contains a non-physical representation related to the leaf-level quasi-laminar boundary layer resistance that affects the calculation of the total canopy resistance. In this note, the non-physical representation of the canopy resistance as originally formulated in MLM is discussed and a revised, physically consistent, formulation is suggested as a replacement. The revised canopy resistance formulation reduces estimates of HNO3 deposition velocities by as much as 38% during mid-day as compared to values generated by the original formulation. Inferred deposition velocities for SO2 and O3 are not significantly altered by the change in formulation (less than 3%). Inferred deposition loadings of oxidized and total nitrogen from CASTNet data may be reduced by 10-20% and 5-10%, respectively, for the Eastern U. S. when employing the revised formulation of MLM as compared to the original formulation.

  8. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  9. Cloud acidity and acidic deposition in the lower troposphere and ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere: Modeling and data analysis regarding the role of atmospheric aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Nenghuei.

    1991-01-01

    This study focused on the role of atmospheric aerosols in determining the cloud acidity and acidic deposition in the lower troposphere and the ozone depletion in the Antarctic stratosphere. For the former, a cloud chemistry model is developed to study the in-cloud chemistry and acidity in cloud droplets. The cloud chemistry model includes the absorption of trace gases, the oxidation of aqueous phase SO{sub 2}, and the scavenging of atmospheric aerosols. A new scheme is developed to differentiate the acidity and chemical composition distributing in individual cloud droplets. The above cloud chemistry model is incorporated into a two-layer flow model in order to investigate the effects of mountain waves on the cloud acidity. Using the three-year database acquired at Mt. Mitchell site, the in-cloud chemistry and acidic deposition through dry, wet and cloud deposition pathways are investigated. The in-cloud scavenging of submicron aerosols such as sulfates and nitrates is parameterized as a function of cloud deposition rate. The deposition fluxes of sulfur (S) compounds are found primarily contributed by cloud capture mechanism followed by incident precipitation and dry deposition. A comparison of deposition estimates at Mt. Mitchell with those at other sites shows that the sulfate deposition at sites exceeding 1,200 m MSL in elevation in Bavaria (Germany) and eastern USA is almost identical within error limits. The features of the Antarctic stratospheric aerosols during the ozone depletion episode of October 1987 are investigated based on the SAGE 2 (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2) data. The study focuses on (1) inferring the aerosol size spectrum using a modified randomized minimization-search-technique (RMST), and (2) investigating the vertical, zonal and columnar averages of aerosol properties, together with the ozone concentration.

  10. Dry Deposition of Fine Aerosol Nitrogen to an Agricultural Field Measured by Eddy-Correlation Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, D. A.; Allen, J. O.; Smith, K. A.; Hope, D.

    2004-12-01

    In urban areas high emissions of reactive nitrogen species cause an increase in atmospheric aerosol nitrogen formation and deposition. This nitrogen is eventually removed from the atmosphere by wet or dry deposition, with dry deposition often accounting for more than half of the total deposition of particulate nitrate (Lovett, 1994). Total N deposition is not adequately characterized, in part because dry deposition is difficult to measure or model. For example measured fine particle deposition to a forest canopy differs from predicted values by an order of magnitude (Gallagher et al., 1997). The eddy-correlation technique is a micrometeorological method used to directly measure fluxes from measurements made above the surface (Wesely and Hicks, 2000). Eddy-correlation mass spectrometry (ECMS) has been developed to directly measure aerosol particle deposition velocities from fast response aerosol concentration and wind velocity measurements. Using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) (Jayne et al., 2000), the size and composition of ambient aerosols is measured at a high frequency. The AMS signal is proportional to non-refractory PM1.0 mass. Aerosol deposition fluxes for a given averaging period are then calculated directly as the covariance of the vertical wind velocity with the AMS signal (F = -/line{w'S'}). A field study was conducted to measure aerosol nitrogen dry deposition to an agricultural field immediately downwind of the Phoenix metropolitan area using eddy-correlation mass spectrometry. The study was supplemented with aerosol composition measurements including bulk deposition collectors and filter bank samplers. Bulk deposition samples and 24-hour filter samples were analyzed for ammonia and nitrogen. Here we compare the results of the flux estimates from bulk collection with inferential measurements (filter samples and modeled deposition velocities) and direct micrometeorological measurements (ECMS) in order to improve N deposition estimates.

  11. Oil sands thickened froth treatment tailings exhibit acid rock drainage potential during evaporative drying.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2015-02-01

    Bitumen extraction from oil sands ores after surface mining produces different tailings waste streams: 'froth treatment tailings' are enriched in pyrite relative to other streams. Tailings treatment can include addition of organic polymers to produce thickened tailings (TT). TT may be further de-watered by deposition into geotechnical cells for evaporative drying to increase shear strength prior to reclamation. To examine the acid rock drainage (ARD) potential of TT, we performed predictive analyses and laboratory experiments on material from field trials of two types of thickened froth treatment tailings (TT1 and TT2). Acid-base accounting (ABA) of initial samples showed that both TT1 and TT2 initially had net acid-producing potential, with ABA values of -141 and -230 t CaCO₃ equiv. 1000 t(-1) of TT, respectively. In long-term kinetic experiments, duplicate ~2-kg samples of TT were incubated in shallow trays and intermittently irrigated under air flow for 459 days to simulate evaporative field drying. Leachates collected from both TT samples initially had pH~6.8 that began decreasing after ~50 days (TT2) or ~250 days (TT1), stabilizing at pH~2. Correspondingly, the redox potential of leachates increased from 100-200 mV to 500-580 mV and electrical conductivity increased from 2-5 dS m(-1) to 26 dS m(-1), indicating dissolution of minerals during ARD. The rapid onset and prolonged ARD observed with TT2 is attributed to its greater pyrite (13.4%) and lower carbonate (1.4%) contents versus the slower onset of ARD in TT1 (initially 6.0% pyrite and 2.5% carbonates). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis revealed rapid shift in microbial community when conditions became strongly acidic (pH~2) favoring the enrichment of Acidithiobacillus and Sulfobacillus bacteria in TT. This is the first report showing ARD potential of TT and the results have significant implications for effective management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams/deposits. PMID:25306090

  12. Acidic deposition and its effects on forest productivity: a review of the present state of knowledge, research activities, and information needs

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkerton, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The present state of knowledge with regard to acid deposition is reviewed. Sources include the literature and direct contact with persons responsible for carrying out all completed, ongoing, and planned research activities, national and international, related to acidic deposition and its effects, with emphasis on forest productivity. In addition, a list of information needs in seven areas was developed, these include: a characterization of forest soils to define their sensitivity to acidic deposition; effects on forest soil chemical and biological processes; development of improved dry deposition measurement methods; changes in precipitation composition due to forest canopies; more extensive monitoring of acidic deposition in industry owned forest lands; expansion of long-term greenhouse and controlled field experiments; and the relationship of acidic deposition and intensive forestry management practices. 85 references. (MDF)

  13. Measurements and modeling of emissions, dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia from swine facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Kanwardeep Singh

    Ammonia has recently gained importance for its increasing atmospheric concentrations and its role in the formation of aerosols. Studies have shown increasing atmospheric concentration levels of NH3 and NH 4+, especially in the regions of concentrated animal feeding operations. Atmospheric inputs of reduced nitrogen as ammonia and ammonium by dry and wet deposition may represent a substantial contribution to the acidification of semi natural ecosystems and could also affect sensitive coastal ecosystems and estuaries. The anaerobic lagoon and spray method, commonly used for waste storage and disposal in confined animal feeding operations (CAFO), is a significant source of ammonia emissions. An accurate emission model for ammonia from aqueous surfaces can help in the development of emission factors. Study of dispersion and dry deposition patterns of ammonia downwind of a hog farm will help us to understand how much ammonia gets dry deposited near the farm, and how remaining ammonia gets transported farther away. An experimental and modeling study is conducted of emissions, dispersion and dry deposition of ammonia taking one swine farm as a unit. Measurements of ammonia flux were made at 11 swine facilities in North Carolina using dynamic flow-through chamber system over the anaerobic waste treatment lagoons. Continuous measurements of ammonia flux, meteorological and lagoon parameters were made for 8-10 days at each farm during each of the warm and cold seasons. Ammonia concentrations were continuously measured in the chamber placed over the lagoon using a Thermo Environmental Instrument Incorporated (TECO) Model 17c chemiluminescnce ammonia analyzer. A similar ammonia analyzer was used to measure ammonia concentrations at selected locations on the farm. Barn emissions were measured using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. A 10 m meteorological tower was erected at each site to measure wind speed and direction, temperature, relative humidity

  14. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation.

    PubMed

    Djurdjević, L; Mitrović, M; Pavlović, P; Gajić, G; Kostić, O

    2006-05-01

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges (ranging from 1-80%). Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids (38.07-185.16 microg/g of total phenolics and 4.12-27.28 microg/g of phenolic acids) in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. Ash samples contained high amounts of ferulic, vanillic, and p-coumaric acid, while the content of both p-hydroxybenzoic and syringic acid was relatively low. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits. PMID:16418890

  15. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation

    SciTech Connect

    L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic

    2006-05-15

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  16. Dry Deposition of Fine Aerosol Nitrogen to an Agricultural Field Measured by Eddy-Correlation Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, D. A.; Allen, J. O.

    2005-12-01

    In urban areas high emissions of reactive nitrogen species cause an increase in atmospheric aerosol nitrogen formation and deposition. This nitrogen is eventually removed from the atmosphere by wet or dry deposition, with dry deposition often accounting for more than half of the total deposition of particulate nitrate. Total N deposition is not adequately characterized, in part because dry deposition is difficult to measure or model. For example measured fine particle deposition to a forest canopy differs from predicted values by an order of magnitude. The eddy-correlation technique is a micrometeorological method used to directly measure fluxes from measurements made above the surface. Eddy-correlation mass spectrometry (ECMS) has been developed to directly measure aerosol particle deposition velocities from fast response aerosol concentration and wind velocity measurements. Using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), the size and composition of ambient aerosols were measured at 10~Hz. The AMS signal is proportional to non-refractory PM1.0 mass. Aerosol deposition fluxes for a given averaging period are then calculated directly as the covariance of the vertical wind velocity with the AMS signal (F = -\\overline{w'S'}). A field study was conducted to measure aerosol nitrogen dry deposition to an agricultural field immediately downwind of the Phoenix metropolitan area using eddy-correlation mass spectrometry. The study was supplemented with aerosol composition measurements including bulk deposition collectors and filter bank samplers. Here we compare the results of the flux estimates from bulk collection with inferential measurements (filter samples and modeled deposition velocities) and direct micrometeorological measurements (ECMS) in order to improve nitrogen deposition estimates.

  17. Eddy Correlation Measurements of the Dry Deposition of Particles in Wintertime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, B.; Fairall, C. W.; Thomson, D. W.

    1988-05-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of the vertical fluxes of particles, momentum, heat and water vapor, were conducted over a partially snow covered field in central Pennsylvania during December 1985. The PMS ASASP-300 and CSASP-100-HV optical counters were used as sensors to measure particle-number fluxes. Overall, average dry deposition velocities for 28 half-hour runs were found to be 0.034 ± 0.014 and 0.021 ± 0.005 cm s1 for particles in two size ranges, 0.15-30 and 0.5-1.0 m, respectively. The average deposition velocity was close to results from prior wind-tunnel and theoretical investigations. These results were also comparable with those reported by other authors over grass. Relatively large sampling rates reduced the effects of counting noise on deposition measurements of 0.5-;1.0 m particles. Small correlation coefficients between vertical velocity and the particle concentration were found even after corrections for the effects of counting noise. The normalized average surface deposition velocity vds/u( for particles in diameter of 0.15-0.30 and 0.5-1.0 m appeared to be 0.006 and 0.002, respectively, in nearly neutral and stable conditions.

  18. PARAMETRIC METHODOLOGIES OF CLOUD VERTICAL TRANSPORT FOR ACID DEPOSITION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A CUmulus VENTing (CUVENT) cloud module has been developed that calculates the vertical flux of mass from the boundary layer to the cloud layer by an ensemble of nonprecipitating subgrid-scale air mass clouds. This model will be integrated into the Regional Acid Deposition Model ...

  19. Gaseous dry deposition of atmospheric mercury: A comparison of two surface resistance models for deposition to semiarid vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Heather A. Holmes; Eric R. Pardyjak; Kevin D. Perry; Michael L. Abbott

    2011-07-01

    In the United States, atmospheric mercury (Hg) deposition, from regional and international sources, is the largest contributor to increased Hg concentrations in bodies of water leading to bioaccumulation of methyl mercury in fish. In this work, modeled dry deposition velocities (vd) for gaseous Hg are calculated using two surface resistance parameterizations found in the literature. The flux is then estimated as the product of the species concentration and modeled vd. The calculations utilize speciated atmospheric mercury concentrations measured during an annual monitoring campaign in southern Idaho. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were monitored with Tekran models 2537A and 1130, respectively. Two anemometers collected meteorological data, including one fast-response three-dimensional sonic anemometer to measure turbulence parameters. For the flux calculation, three resistances are required to model the mechanisms that transport gaseous Hg from the atmosphere to the surface, with the surface resistance being the largest source of error. Results from two surface resistance models are presented. In particular, the downward flux is sensitive to the choice of model and input parameters such as seasonal category and mesophyll resistance. A comparison of annual GEM and RGM fluxes calculated using the two models shows good agreement for RGM (3.2% difference for annual deposition); however, for the low-solubility species of GEM, the models show a 64% difference in annual fluxes, with a range of 32% to 200% in seasonal fluxes. Results indicate the importance of understanding the diurnal variation of the physical processes modeled in the surface resistance parameterization for vd.

  20. Acidity, nutrients, and minerals in atmospheric precipitation over Florida: deposition patterns, mechanisms and ecological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Brezonik, P.L.; Hendry, C.D. Jr.; Edgerton, E.S.; Schulze, R.L.; Crisman, T.L.

    1983-06-01

    A monitoring network of 21 bulk and 4 wet/dry collectors located throughout Florida measured spatial and temporal trends during a one-year period from May 1978 to April 1979. The project summary notes that statewide deposition rates of nitrogen and phosphorus were below the loading rates associated with eutrophication, although nutrient concentrations were higher during the summer. Overall, pH appears to have relatively small effects (in the range 4.7-6.8) on community structure in soft-water Florida lakes. More dramatic effects could occur under more acidic conditions in the future. 4 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  1. Quantifying particulate matter deposition in Niwot Ridge, Colorado: Collection of dry deposition using marble inserts and particle imaging using the FlowCAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Natasha R.; Mladenov, Natalie; Seibold, Christine M.; Chowanski, Kurt; Seitz, Leslie; Wellemeyer, T. Barret; Williams, Mark W.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric wet and dry deposition are important sources of carbon for remote alpine lakes and soils. The carbon inputs from dry deposition in alpine National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) collectors, including aeolian dust and biological material, are not well constrained due to difficulties in retaining particulate matter in the collectors. Here, we developed and tested a marble insert for dry deposition collection at the Niwot Ridge Long Term Ecological Research Station (NWT LTER) Soddie site (3345 m) between 24 May and 8 November 2011. We conducted laboratory tests of the insert's effect on particulate matter (PM) mass and non-purgeable organic carbon (DOC) and found that the insert did not significantly change either measurement. Thus, the insert may enable dry deposition collection of PM and DOC at NADP sites. We then developed a method for enumerating the collected wet and dry deposition with the Flow Cytometer and Microscope (FlowCAM), a dynamic-image particle analysis tool. The FlowCAM has the potential to establish morphology, which affects particle settling and retention, through particle diameter and aspect ratio. Particle images were used to track the abundance of pollen grains over time. Qualitative image examination revealed that most particles were biological in nature, such as intact algal cells and pollen. Dry deposition loading to the Soddie site as determined by FlowCAM measurements was highly variable, ranging from 100 to >230 g ha-1 d-1 in June-August 2011 and peaking in late June. No significant difference in diameter or aspect ratio was found between wet and dry deposition, suggesting fundamental similarities between those deposition types. Although FlowCAM statistics and identification of particle types proved insightful, our total-particle enumeration method had a high variance and underestimated the total number of particles when compared to imaging of relatively large volumes (60-125 mL) from a single sample. We recommend use of

  2. 32Si in Wet and Dry Deposition as an Input to the Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einloth, S. L.; Ekwurzel, B.; Eastoe, C.; Lal, D.

    2002-12-01

    Silicon-32 (32Si) is a cosmogenic isotope produced in the atmosphere by spallation of argon with a global production rate of 5x10-4 atoms cm-2 sec-1 (Kharkar et al., 1966). This isotope is valuable for examining century-scale processes due to its half-life of 140 +/- 10 yr, which is particularly relevant for recharge processes in semi-arid regions. 32Si is ideal for this purpose because, unlike other tracers, there are no subsurface or {\\in-situ} contributions. In order to characterize the potential recharge input of 32Si to the vadose zone in the southwestern United States, precipitation samples were collected that represent monsoon, winter, and snow conditions. These are the first measurements of 32Si in composite wet and dry deposition. Previous studies have considered only precipitation, and preliminary results suggest the dry deposition can be significant, particularly in a semi-arid region. Capturing the entire input function is critical to accurately model the 32Si system in the vadose zone. Kharkar, D.P., V.N. Nijumpurkar, and D. Lal. The global fallout of Si32 produced by cosmic rays. Geochim. Et Cosmochim. Acta, 1966, v30, 621-631.

  3. Emissions involved in acidic deposition processes: Methodology and results

    SciTech Connect

    Placet, M.

    1990-01-01

    Data on the emissions involved in atmospheric acid-base chemistry are crucial to the assessment of acidic deposition and its effects. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the primary chemical compounds involved in acidic deposition processes. In addition, other emission species -- e.g., ammonia, alkaline dust particles, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride -- are involved in atmospheric acid-base chemistry, either by contributing acidic constituents or by neutralizing acidic species. Several emissions data bases have been developed under the auspices of the National Acid Precipitation Program (NAPAP). In addition to those developed by NAPAP, emissions data bases and emissions trends estimates also have been developed by organizations such as the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper briefly describes and compares the methods used in developing these emissions data bases and presents an overview of their emissions estimates. A more detailed discussion of these topics can be found in the State-of-Science Report on emissions recently released by NAPAP and in the references cited in that report. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. [Effect of drying methods on monoterpenes, phenolic acids and flavonoids in Mentha haplocalyx].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shao-qing; Zhu, Zhen-hua; Guo, Sheng; Zhao, Yu-yang; Lu, Xue-jun; Sha, Xiu-xiu; Qian, Da-wei; Duan, Jin-ao

    2015-12-01

    To provide a scientific basis for the selection of the appropriate drying method for Mentha Haplocalyx Herba (MHH), determine 2 monoterpenes, 4 phenolic acids and 5 flavonoids in MHH by GC-MS and UPLC-TQ-MS methods, and investigate the effects of the drying methods on the changes in contents of these analytes. The qualities of products obtained with different drying methods were evaluated by the multivariate statistical method of Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS). Results showed that the drying methods had the greatest impact on menthol, caffeic acid, and rosemary acid, which were followed by chlorogenic acid and diosmetin-7-O-glucoside. The contents in these analytes processed with hot-air-drying method were higher than those with microwave-drying and infrared-drying methods at the same temperatures. The contents in these analytes processed under low temperature (40-45 °C) were higher than those under higher temperature (60-70 °C). Above all, the contents in phenolic acids processed with microwave fixation (exposed under microwave at 100 °C for several minutes) were obviously higher than those of not being processed, showing an inhibition of some enzymes in samples after fixation. The TOPSIS evaluation showed that the variable temperature drying method of 'Hot-Air 45-60 °C' was the most suitable approach for the primary drying processing of MHH. The results could provide the scientific basis for the selection of appropriate drying method for MHH, and helpful reference for the primary drying proces of herbs containing volatile chemical components. PMID:27245035

  5. Electrophoretic deposition of tannic acid-polypyrrolidone films and composites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Zhang, Tianshi; Zhitomirsky, Igor

    2016-05-01

    Thin films of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-tannic acid (TA) complexes were prepared by a conceptually new strategy, based on electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Proof of concept investigations involved the analysis of the deposition yield, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy of the deposited material, and electron microscopy studies. The analysis of the deposition mechanism indicated that the limitations of the EPD in the deposition of small phenolic molecules, such as TA, and electrically neutral polymers, similar to PVP, containing hydrogen-accepting carbonyl groups, can be avoided. The remarkable adsorption properties of TA and film forming properties of the PVP-TA complexes allowed for the EPD of materials of different types, such as huntite mineral platelets and hydrotalcite clay particles, TiO2 and MnO2 oxide nanoparticles, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, TiN and Pd nanoparticles. Moreover, PVP-TA complexes were used for the co-deposition of different materials and formation of composite films. In another approach, TA was used as a capping agent for the hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanorods, which were then deposited by EPD using PVP-TA complexes. The fundamental adsorption and interaction mechanisms of TA involved chelation of metal atoms on particle surfaces with galloyl groups, π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding. The films prepared by EPD can be used for various applications, utilizing functional properties of TA, PVP, inorganic and organic materials of different types and their composites. PMID:26878711

  6. Effects of acidic deposition on the erosion of carbonate stone - experimental results from the U.S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Reimann, K.J.; Sciammarella, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the goals of NAPAP-sponsored research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone has been to quantify the incremental effects of wet and dry deposition of hydrogen ion, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides on stone erosion. Test briquettes and slabs of freshly quarried Indiana limestone and Vermont marble have been exposed to ambient environmental conditions in a long-term exposure program. Physical measurements of the recession of test stones exposed to ambient conditions at an angle of 30?? to horizontal at the five NAPAP materials exposure sites range from ~15 to ~30?? ??m yr-1 for marble, and from ~25 to ~45 ??m yr -1 for limestone, and are approximately double the recession estimates based on the observed calcium content of run-off solutions from test slabs. The difference between the physical and chemical recession measurements is attributed to the loss of mineral grains from the stone surfaces that are not measured in the run-off experiments. The erosion due to grain loss does not appear to be influenced by rainfall acidity, however, preliminary evidence suggests that grain loss may be influenced by dry deposition of sulfur dioxide between rainfall events. Chemical analyses of the run-off solutions and associated rainfall blanks suggest that ~30% of erosion by dissolution can be attributed to the wet deposition of hydrogen ion and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid between rain events. The remaining ~70% of erosion by dissolution is accounted for by the solubility of carbonate stone in rain that is in equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide ('clean rain'). These results are for marble and limestone slabs exposed at an angle of 30?? from horizontal. The relative contribution of sulfur dioxide to chemical erosion is significantly enhanced for stone slabs having an inclination of 60?? or 85??. The dry deposition of alkaline particulate material has a mitigating effect at the two urban field exposure sites at Washington, DC

  7. Dry atmospheric deposition rates of metals along a coastal transect in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, Lisa D.; Schiff, Kenneth C.

    While recent studies indicate atmospheric deposition is a significant source of metals to the Santa Monica Bay and coastal river systems of the Los Angeles area, the spatial extent of the atmospheric source along the entire southern California coast has not been measured in 30 years. This study provides measurements of dry atmospheric deposition of chromium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc at eight sites located along the coast between Santa Barbara and San Diego, and compares these data to historic measurements from the 1970s. Median dry deposition fluxes across sites ranged between 0.23 and 3.6 (chromium), 0.21 and 5.4 (nickel), 0.52 and 14 (lead), 0.89 and 29 (copper), and 4.8 and 160 (zinc) μg m -2 day -1. Differences in metal dry deposition rates observed between sites were dominated by proximity to urban areas and/or other nearby sources, with the highest metal fluxes observed near the Los Angeles Harbor (LAH) and San Diego Bay (SDB) sites. Compared with data from the 1970s, lead fluxes were typically one to two orders of magnitude lower in the present study (2006), indicating atmospheric sources of this metal have decreased over the past three decades in southern California. Chromium fluxes were also lower in 2006 compared with the 1970s, although to a lesser extent than for lead. In contrast, copper and zinc fluxes were typically within the same order of magnitude between the two time periods, with some higher measurements observed in 2006 compared with the 1970s at the LAH and SDB sites. This result indicates atmospheric sources of copper and zinc have not decreased over the past three decades in southern California, and have increased near our harbor/urban sites. Differences in sampling conditions (e.g., Santa Ana winds) and measurement techniques may also explain, in part, the differences observed in metal flux rates for these time periods. However, these limitations were most important for those metals with the smallest difference in flux rates measured

  8. Measurements of Dry Deposition of S and N Compounds on Natural Surfaces (leaves)and Their Parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, A.; Kumari, K. M.; Srivastava, S. S.

    2001-12-01

    "Measurement of Dry Deposition of S and N Compounds on Natural Surfaces (leaves) and Their Parameterization" Ranjit Kumar, Abha Rani, K. Maharaj Kumari and S.S. Srivasta* Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Daylabgh, Agra-282005 (INDIA), E-mail: sssdei@yahoo.com ABSTRACT Promotion of rapid economic growth and urbanization have led to the increasing emissions of acidifying sulphur and nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere which are most potent for injury to vegetation, deterioration of monuments and acidifications of lakes, soils. Dry deposition appears to be an important process by which, air pollutants can be delivered to sensitive surfaces in the form of gases or particulates from the atmosphere as dry conditions prevail for maximum period in this geographical region. The studies reported for deposition of acidifying sulphur and nitrogen compounds on natural surfaces are limited and none from India. Direct measurement of dry deposition on natural surfaces is lacking. This paper deals with measurements of rate of dry deposition of S as sulphate and N as nitrate on natural surfaces (Ashok and Cassia leaves) at Dayalbagh, Agra in India and estimate the total input of S and N compounds. The mean annual dry deposition rate of SO4 and NO3 on Ashok leaf was found to be 1.07± 0.64 mg m-2 d-1 and 0.76± 0.58 mg m-2 d-1 while on Cassia leaf values were found to be 1.11 ±0.75 and 0.81 ± 0.56 mg m-2 d-1. The deposition of SO4 includes both the deposition due to gaseous SO2 and particulate SO42- while deposition of NO3 include deposition contributed by HNO3 vapor and particulate NO3-. The high deposition rates on Cassia leaf may be due to large number of leaf hairs and stomatal pores on leaf surface as compared to Ashok leaf as observed by Scanning Electron Microscopic photographs. The dry deposition rates for SO4 and NO3 were highest during the monsoon followed by winter and summer. The annual input of S was found to be 3.89 kg

  9. MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM (MADPRO): CLOUD DEPOSITION TO THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS, 1994 THROUGH 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro) was initiated in 1993 as part of the research necessary to support the objectives of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), which was created to address the requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The two ma...

  10. Chemistry of Dry Deposition on Building Materials at an Urban Site on Indo Gangetic Plain in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Srivastava, S. S.; Kumari, K. M.

    2008-05-01

    Dry deposition is an important pathway for removal of pollutants from the atmosphere to earth surfaces. Agra is famous for historical monuments and cultural heritage worldwide. Increase in atmospheric contamination has caused extinction threats to building materials. The main pollutants of concern are S and N species. This paper deals with deposition of F-, Cl-, SO42-, NO3-, SO2, HNO3, NH3, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and NH4+ on marbles and red stones at Agra a site in Indo-Gangetic Plain. Dry deposition was higher on white marble than red stone. X-ray study reveals that higher deposition on marble is probably due to chemical characteristics of surfaces. Direct measurements study are cumbersome and tedious so an alternate method of parameterization based on meteorological parameters for calculation of dry deposition of S and N compounds to building materials are simulated and computer programme was developed to make it more convenient, fast and useful. The deposition velocity of SO2, HNO3, SO42- and NO3- obtained by current parameterization method are in the reported range. Dry deposition fluxes obtained by the current parameterization method and direct measurements are in the range.

  11. A modified micrometeorological gradient method for estimating O3 dry depositions over a forest canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. Y.; Zhang, L.; Wang, X. M.; Munger, J. W.

    2015-07-01

    Small pollutant concentration gradients between levels above a plant canopy result in large uncertainties in estimated air-surface exchange fluxes when using existing micrometeorological gradient methods, including the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM) and the modified Bowen ratio method (MBR). A modified micrometeorological gradient method (MGM) is proposed in this study for estimating O3 dry deposition fluxes over a forest canopy using concentration gradients between a level above and a level below the canopy top, taking advantage of relatively large gradients between these levels due to significant pollutant uptake in the top layers of the canopy. The new method is compared with the AGM and MBR methods and is also evaluated using eddy-covariance (EC) flux measurements collected at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site, Massachusetts, during 1993-2000. All three gradient methods (AGM, MBR, and MGM) produced similar diurnal cycles of O3 dry deposition velocity (Vd(O3)) to the EC measurements, with the MGM method being the closest in magnitude to the EC measurements. The multi-year average Vd(O3) differed significantly between these methods, with the AGM, MBR, and MGM method being 2.28, 1.45, and 1.18 times that of the EC, respectively. Sensitivity experiments identified several input parameters for the MGM method as first-order parameters that affect the estimated Vd(O3). A 10% uncertainty in the wind speed attenuation coefficient or canopy displacement height can cause about 10% uncertainty in the estimated Vd(O3). An unrealistic leaf area density vertical profile can cause an uncertainty of a factor of 2.0 in the estimated Vd(O3). Other input parameters or formulas for stability functions only caused an uncertainly of a few percent. The new method provides an alternative approach to monitoring/estimating long-term deposition fluxes of similar pollutants over tall canopies.

  12. A modified micrometeorological gradient method for estimating O3 dry deposition over a forest canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. Y.; Zhang, L.; Wang, X. M.; Munger, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Small pollutant concentration gradients between levels above a plant canopy result in large uncertainties in estimated air-surface exchange fluxes when using existing micrometeorological gradient methods, including the aerodynamic gradient method (AGM) and the modified Bowen-Ratio method (MBR). A modified micrometeorological gradient method (MGM) is proposed in this study for estimating O3 dry deposition fluxes over a forest canopy using concentration gradients between a level above and a level below the canopy top, taking advantage of relatively large gradients between these levels due to significant pollutant uptake at top layers of the canopy. The new method is compared with the AGM and MBR methods and is also evaluated using eddy-covariance (EC) flux measurements collected at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site, Massachusetts during 1993-2000. All the three gradient methods (AGM, MBR and MGM) produced similar diurnal cycles of O3 dry deposition velocity (Vd(O3)) to the EC measurements, with the MGM method being the closest in magnitude to the EC measurements. The multi-year average Vd(O3) differed significantly between these methods, with the AGM, MBR and MGM method being 2.28, 1.45 and 1.18 times of that of the EC. Sensitivity experiments identified several input parameters for the MGM method as first-order parameters that affect the estimated Vd(O3). A 10% uncertainty in the wind speed attenuation coefficient or canopy displacement height can cause about 10% uncertainty in the estimated Vd(O3). An unrealistic leaf area density vertical profile can cause an uncertainty of a factor of 2.0 in the estimated Vd(O3). Other input parameters or formulas for stability functions only caused an uncertainly of a few percent. The new method provides an alternative approach in monitoring/estimating long-term deposition fluxes of similar pollutants over tall canopies.

  13. Role of acid rain in atmospheric deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Winchester, J.W.

    1990-12-31

    A study was conducted to assess the potential importance of atmospheric nitrate deposition for a north Florida estuary. A comparison, based on statistical analysis of fluxes of ten dissolved constituents of rain water and river water, has been carried out for the watershed of the Apalachicola River, utilizing weekly rain water chemical data from the National Acid Deposition Program (NADP) for five sites within the watershed area, monitored from 1978-84 until late 1989, and less frequent river water chemical data from the U.S. Geological Survey for one site at Chattahoochee, Florida, monitored from 1965 until late 1989. Similar statistical analysis was performed on monitoring data for the Sopchoppy and Ochlockonee Rivers of north Florida. Atmospheric deposition to the watershed appears to be sufficient to account for essentially all the dissolved nitrate and ammonium and total organic nitrogen flow in the three rivers. However, after deposition most of the nitrate may be transformed to other chemical forms during the flow of the rivers toward their estuaries. In an additional statistical analysis of rain water monitoring data from the eight state southeastern USA region, it was found that both meteorological conditions and transport from pollution sources appear to control deposition fluxes of nitrate and sulfate acid air pollutants.

  14. Wet and dry deposition of mineral dust particles in Japan: factors related to temporal variation and spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, K.; Ura, S.; Kagawa, M.; Mikami, M.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Matoba, S.; Aoki, K.; Shinoda, M.; Kurosaki, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Shimizu, A.; Uematsu, M.

    2013-08-01

    Data of temporal variations and spatial distributions of mineral dust deposition fluxes are very limited in terms of duration, location, and processes of deposition. To ascertain temporal variations and spatial distributions of mineral dust deposition by wet and dry processes, weekly deposition samples were obtained at Sapporo, Toyama, Nagoya, Tottori, Fukuoka, and Cape Hedo (Okinawa) in Japan during October 2008-December 2010 using automatic wet and dry separating samplers. Mineral dust weights in water-insoluble residue were estimated from Fe contents measured using an X-ray fluorescence analyzer. For wet deposition, highest and lowest annual dust fluxes were found at Toyama (9.6 g m-2 yr-1) and at Cape Hedo (1.7 g m-2 yr-1) as average values in 2009 and 2010. Higher wet deposition fluxes were observed at Toyama and Tottori, where frequent precipitation (>60% days per month) was observed during dusty seasons. For dry deposition among Toyama, Tottori, Fukuoka, and Cape Hedo, the highest and lowest annual dust fluxes were found respectively at Fukuoka (5.2 g m-2 yr-1) and at Cape Hedo (2.0 g m-2 yr-1) as average values in 2009 and 2010. Although the seasonal tendency of the monthly dry deposition amount roughly resembled that of monthly days of Kosa dust events, the monthly amount of dry deposition was not proportional to monthly days of the events. Comparison of dry deposition fluxes with vertical distribution of dust particles deduced from Lidar data and coarse particle concentrations suggested that the maximum dust layer height or thickness is an important factor for controlling the dry deposition amount after long-range transport of dust particles. Size distributions of refractory dust particles were obtained using four-stage filtration: >20, >10, >5, and >1 μm diameter. Weight fractions of the sum of >20 μm and 10-20 μm (giant fraction) were higher than 50% for most of the event samples. Irrespective of the deposition type, the giant dust fractions were

  15. Room-Temperature Fabrication of a Flexible Thermoelectric Generator Using a Dry-Spray Deposition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dae-Seob; Choi, Jung-Oh; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    We present a flexible thermoelectric (TE) generator with titanium dioxide (TiO2), antimony (Sb), and tellurium (Te) powders fabricated by a nanoparticle deposition system (NPDS). NPDS is a novel low-energy consumption dry-spray method that enables the deposition of inorganic materials on substrates at room temperature and under low vacuum. TiO2 nanopowders were dispersed on a TE powder for improved adhesion between TE films and the substrate. Film morphologies were investigated using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and the phase structure was analyzed by x-ray diffraction. A TE leg, deposited with 3 wt.% TiO2 content, had the largest Seebeck coefficient of approximately 160 μV/K. The prototype TE generator consisted of 16 TE legs linked by silver interconnects over an area of 20 mm × 60 mm. The prototype produced a voltage of 48.91 mV and a maximum power output of 0.18 μW from a temperature gradient of 20 K. The values are comparable to that of conventional methods. These results suggest that flexible TE generators can be fabricated by energy efficient methods, although internal and contact resistances must be decreased.

  16. Sensitivity of continental United States atmospheric budgets of oxidized and reduced nitrogen to dry deposition parametrizations

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Robin L.; Schwede, Donna B.; Bash, Jesse O.; Pleim, Jon E.; Walker, John T.; Foley, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) is removed by surface fluxes (air–surface exchange) and wet deposition. The chemistry and physics of the atmosphere result in a complicated system in which competing chemical sources and sinks exist and impact that removal. Therefore, uncertainties are best examined with complete regional chemical transport models that simulate these feedbacks. We analysed several uncertainties in regional air quality model resistance analogue representations of air–surface exchange for unidirectional and bi-directional fluxes and their effect on the continental Nr budget. Model sensitivity tests of key parameters in dry deposition formulations showed that uncertainty estimates of continental total nitrogen deposition are surprisingly small, 5 per cent or less, owing to feedbacks in the chemistry and rebalancing among removal pathways. The largest uncertainties (5%) occur with the change from a unidirectional to a bi-directional NH3 formulation followed by uncertainties in bi-directional compensation points (1–4%) and unidirectional aerodynamic resistance (2%). Uncertainties have a greater effect at the local scale. Between unidirectional and bi-directional formulations, single grid cell changes can be up to 50 per cent, whereas 84 per cent of the cells have changes less than 30 per cent. For uncertainties within either formulation, single grid cell change can be up to 20 per cent, but for 90 per cent of the cells changes are less than 10 per cent. PMID:23713122

  17. Estimates of cloud water deposition at Mountain Acid Deposition Program sites in the Appalachian Mountains.

    PubMed

    Baumgardner, Ralph E; Isil, Selma S; Lavery, Thomas F; Rogers, Christopher M; Mohnen, Volker A

    2003-03-01

    Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high-elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY; Whitetop Mountain, VA; and Clingman's Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). This paper provides a summary of cloud water chemistry, cloud liquid water content, cloud frequency, estimates of cloud water deposition of sulfur and nitrogen species, and estimates of total deposition of sulfur and nitrogen at these sites. Other cloud studies in the Appalachians and their comparison to MADPro are also summarized. Whiteface Mountain exhibited the lowest mean and median concentrations of sulfur and nitrogen ions in cloud water, while Clingman's Dome exhibited the highest mean and median concentrations. This geographic gradient is partly an effect of the different meteorological conditions experienced at northern versus southern sites in addition to the difference in pollution content of air masses reaching the sites. All sites measured seasonal cloud water deposition rates of SO4(2-) greater than 50 kg/ha and NO3(-) rates of greater than 25 kg/ha. These high-elevation sites experienced additional deposition loading of SO4(2-) and NO3(-) on the order of 6-20 times greater compared with lower elevation Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) sites. Approximately 80-90% of this extra loading is from cloud deposition. PMID:12661689

  18. Influence of alkaline suspended particles on the chemical composition of acid deposition in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C.S.; Lin, Z.J.; Wu, M.Y.; Liu, J.I.; Yuan, C.

    1998-12-31

    This study investigated the influence of alkaline suspended particles on the chemical composition of acid deposition both temporally and spatially in Kaohsiung metropolitan area in Taiwan. During the period of January--December, 1996, both wet and dry deposition samples were collected by automatic acid precipitation samplers at six sampling sites which covered the entire metropolitan area. Major cations (NH{sub 4}{sup +}, K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup +2}, and Mg{sup +2}) and anions (F{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}) of acid deposition samples were analyzed in a central laboratory, while the pH value and conductivity of rainwater samples were measured in situ. Results from chemical analysis indicated that Ca{sup +2} was the most abundant cation in acid deposition samples. Major cations were Ca{sup +2} and NH{sub 4}{sup +}, while major anions were SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. This study also revealed that the pH value, suspended solids, Ca{sup +2}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} of rainwater decreased with rainy time in a sequential rainwater sampling process. It was estimated that approximately 80% of suspended particles could be washed out by rain droplets in the first hour of raining process. Therefore, alkaline suspended particles in the atmosphere played an very important role on the chemical composition of acid precipitation in Kaohsiung metropolitan area in Taiwan.

  19. Revisiting the dry depositional sink of oxidized organic vapors to vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Thomas; Harley, Peter; Emmons, Luisa; Thornton, Brenda; Guenther, Alex; Basu, Chhandak; Turnipseed, Andrew; Jardine, Kolby

    2010-05-01

    Large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOC) enter the atmosphere. The annual production of VOC (600 -2000 TgC/a) likely exceeds that of methane and CO (~500 TgC/a each). Together these gases fuel tropospheric chemistry. Oxidation of VOC leads to the formation of aerosol (Hallquist et al., 2009) via complex organic chemistry (e.g. Atkinson and Arey, 2003; Paulot et al., 2009) in the gas and aerosol phase thereby modulating the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere (Lelieveld et al., 2008). Currently one of the biggest uncertainties in constraining budgets of VOC is the amount of dry and wet deposition to vegetation, which acts as a major source and sink for organic trace gases on a global scale. This has consequences for constraining secondary species produced in the gasphase, which will either oxidize to CO and CO2, condense on or form organic aerosol (OA) and be rained out, or directly deposit to the surface via dry and wet deposition. Two recent bottom-up assessments of the tropospheric OA budget (Hallquist et al., 2009, Goldstein and Galbally, 2007) were based on varying assumptions for wet and dry deposition of organic vapors (e.g. 130-200 TgC/a vs 800 TgC/a) and consequently derived significantly different global production rates for secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We present a synthesis of ecosystem scale flux measurements showing that the removal of oxygenated VOC (OVOC) via dry deposition is significantly larger than currently assumed for deciduous ecosystems. Laboratory experiments indicate that exposure to ozone, MVK or mechanical wounding can enhance the uptake of OVOCs. Since the general route of atmospheric photo-oxidation of VOCs goes through the formation of carbonyls and hydroxycarbonyls these findings have consequences for understanding the atmospheric evolution of organic carbon. A revised VOC uptake scheme was incorporated into a chemistry-transport model to investigate the impact on a global scale. References: Atkinson R. and J. Arey

  20. Transport and solubility of Hetero-disperse dry deposition particulate matter subject to urban source area rainfall-runoff processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, G.; Sansalone, J.

    2010-03-01

    SummaryWith respect to hydrologic processes, the impervious pavement interface significantly alters relationships between rainfall and runoff. Commensurate with alteration of hydrologic processes the pavement also facilitates transport and solubility of dry deposition particulate matter (PM) in runoff. This study examines dry depositional flux rates, granulometric modification by runoff transport, as well as generation of total dissolved solids (TDS), alkalinity and conductivity in source area runoff resulting from PM solubility. PM is collected from a paved source area transportation corridor (I-10) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana encompassing 17 dry deposition and 8 runoff events. The mass-based granulometric particle size distribution (PSD) is measured and modeled through a cumulative gamma function, while PM surface area distributions across the PSD follow a log-normal distribution. Dry deposition flux rates are modeled as separate first-order exponential functions of previous dry hours (PDH) for PM and suspended, settleable and sediment fractions. When trans-located from dry deposition into runoff, PSDs are modified, with a d50m decreasing from 331 to 14 μm after transport and 60 min of settling. Solubility experiments as a function of pH, contact time and particle size using source area rainfall generate constitutive models to reproduce pH, alkalinity, TDS and alkalinity for historical events. Equilibrium pH, alkalinity and TDS are strongly influenced by particle size and contact times. The constitutive leaching models are combined with measured PSDs from a series of rainfall-runoff events to demonstrate that the model results replicate alkalinity and TDS in runoff from the subject watershed. Results illustrate the granulometry of dry deposition PM, modification of PSDs along the drainage pathway, and the role of PM solubility for generation of TDS, alkalinity and conductivity in urban source area rainfall-runoff.

  1. A measurement of summertime dry deposition of ambient air particulates and associated metallic pollutants in Central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Chiang, Hung-Che; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Xiao, You-Fu; Wu, Chia-Ming; Kuo, Yu-Chen

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize metallic elements associated with atmospheric particulate matter in the dry deposition plate, total suspended particulate, fine particles, and coarse particles at Taichung Harbor and Gong Ming Junior High School (airport) in central Taiwan at a sampling site from June 2013 to August 2013. The results indicated that: (1) the average concentrations of the metallic elements Cr and Cd were highest at the Gong Ming Junior High School (airport), and the average concentrations of the metallic elements Ni, Cu, and Pb were highest at the Taichung Harbor sampling site. (2) The high smelting industry density and export/import rate of heavily loaded cargos were the main reasons leading to these findings. (3) The average metallic element dry deposition and metallic element PM(2.5-10) all followed the order of Pb > Cr > Cu > Ni > Cd at the two sampling sites. However, the average metallic elements Cu and Pb were found to have the highest dry deposition velocities and concentrations in PM(2.5) for the two sampling sites in this study. (4) The correlation coefficients of ambient air particle dry deposition and concentration with wind speed at the airport were higher than those from the harbor sampling site. The wind and broad open spaces at Taichung Airport were the possible reasons for the increasing correlation coefficients for ambient air particle concentration and dry deposition with wind speed at the Taichung Airport sampling site. PMID:25185928

  2. Amino acid preservation in saline halite core samples: Analogs for Martian dry evaporitic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, J.; Aubrey, A.; Lowenstein, T.; Timofeeff, M.

    2008-12-01

    in the deepest core section. This may indicate some recent amino acid contribution to the pool of certain amino acids. Racemization rates can be calculated from the equation: ln[(1+D/L)/(1-D/L)] - ln [(1+D/L)/(1-D/L)]t=0 = 2ki(time) where ki is the first-order rate constant for the interconversion of the enantiomers. Using the D/L ratios at the top of the core for the t = 0 term gives kasp = 3.5x10exp-5 y-1 and 1.3x10exp-5 y-1 for the 18 and 70 ka samples, respectively. For valine, the values are kval = 5.6x10exp-6 y-1 and 7.3x10exp-6 y-1. Extrapolating these values to the average surface temperatures on Mars indicates that the chirality of these amino acids would be preserved for billions of years. Thus, closed basin lacustrine and dry desert valley regions with evaporite-rich deposits are suitable environments in the search for preserved biosignatures on Mars. References [1] Bibring, J.P., et al., Science 307, 1576 (2005) [2] Klinghofer, G., et al., Science 306, 1740 (2004) [3] Osterloo, M.M., et al., Science 319, 1651 (2008) [4] Squyres, S.W., et al., Nature 443, E1 (2006) [5] Lowenstein, T.K., et al., Geology 27, 3 (1999) [6] Glavin, D., et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 185,1 (2001) [7] Aubrey, A. D., et al., in preparation, Nature Geo. Sci.

  3. Stabilisation of proteins via mixtures of amino acids during spray drying.

    PubMed

    Ajmera, Ankur; Scherließ, Regina

    2014-03-10

    Biologicals are often formulated as solids in an effort to preserve stability which generally requires stabilising excipients for proper drying. The purpose of this study was to screen amino acids and their combinations for their stabilising effect on proteins during spray drying. Catalase, as model protein, was spray dried in 1+1 or 1+2 ratios with amino acids. Some amino acids namely arginine, glycine and histidine showed good retention of catalase functionality after spray drying and subsequent storage stress. A 1+1 combination of arginine and glycine in a 1+2 ratio with catalase resulted in a tremendously good stabilising effect. Storage at high temperature/humidity also showed beneficial effects of this combination. To evaluate whether this was a general principle, these findings were transferred to an antigenic protein of comparable size and supramolecular structure (haemagglutinin) as well as to a smaller enzyme (lysozyme). Upon spray drying with the combination of amino acids it could be shown that both proteins remain more stable especially after storage compared to the unprotected protein. The combination of arginine and glycine is tailored to the needs of protein stabilisation during spray drying and may hence be utilised in dry powder formulation of biomolecules with superior stability characteristics. PMID:24412336

  4. Caffeic Acid Derivatives in Dried Lamiaceae and Echinacea purpurea Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentrations of caffeic acid derivatives within Lamiaceae and Echinacea (herb, spice, tea, and dietary supplement forms) readily available in the U.S. marketplace (n=72) were determined. After the first identification of chicoric acid in Ocimum basilicum (basil), the extent to which chicoric a...

  5. Fracture of colloidal single-crystal films fabricated by controlled vertical drying deposition.

    PubMed

    Cao, He; Lan, Ding; Wang, Yuren; Volinsky, Alex A; Duan, Li; Jiang, Heng

    2010-09-01

    Controlled vertical drying deposition method was used to make high-quality single crystal close-packed colloidal films formed of different radii polystyrene latex spheres on glass substrates coming from a low concentration water suspension (0.1% volume fraction). Regardless of the spheres radii the film thickness was about 6.3 microns. However, cracks destroyed the crystalline film structure during the colloidal film growth. The effect of particle radius (85-215 nm range) on film cracking was systematically studied using in situ optical fracture monitoring. Primary parallel cracks run along the vertical growth direction, later followed by secondary branched cracks in-between the primary cracks due to residual water evaporation. Quantitative theoretical relationship between the cracks spacing and particles radius was derived and shows good agreement with experimental observations. Normalized cracks spacing is related to a reciprocal ratio of the dimensionless particle radius. PMID:21230081

  6. Dry Deposition Velocity Estimation for the Savannah River Site: Part 1 – Parametric Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-01-16

    Values for the dry deposition velocity of airborne particles were estimated with the GENII Version 2.10 computer code for the Savannah River site using assumptions about surface roughness parameters and particle size and density. Use of the GENII code is recommended by the U.S. Department of Energy for this purpose. Meteorological conditions evaluated include atmospheric stability classes D, E, and F and wind speeds of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 m/s. Local surface roughness values ranging from 0.03 to 2 meters were evaluated. Particles with mass mean diameters of 1, 5, and 10 microns and densities of 1, 3, and 5 g/cm3 were evaluated.

  7. Atmospheric inorganic nitrogen in dry deposition to a typical red soil agro-ecosystem in southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Hao

    2010-06-01

    Atmospheric dry deposition is an important pathway of nitrogen (N) sources input to agro-ecosystems. With the knowledge of increasing agricultural effects by dry N deposition, researchers have paid great attention to this topic. Characteristics of dry N deposition were estimated by a big-leaf resistance analogy model and the Auto-Meteorological Experiment Station (AMES) in a typical red soil agro-ecosystem in southeastern China for two years (2005-2006). Monthly dry deposition velocities (V(d)) were in the range of 0.16-0.36, 0.07-0.17 and 0.07-0.24 cm s(-1) for NH(3), NO(2) and aerosol particles (aerosol NH(4)(+) or NO(3)(-)), respectively, and the V(d) were higher in spring and winter than in summer and autumn. Monthly dry N deposition concentration (C(a)) and inferred deposition flux (F(d)) were in the range of 63.38-261.10, 47.21-278.92, 1.56-7.15, 47.21-278.92 microg N m(-3) and of 1.31-8.60, 0.38-3.67, 0-0.08, 0.01-0.23 kg N ha(-2) for NH(3), NO(2), aerosol NH(4)(+) and aerosol NO(3)(-), respectively. During the study period (2005-2006), the total dry N deposition was 70.55 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) which equivalent to 1.53.8 kg (urea) ha(-1) yr(-1) or 415.0 kg (ammonium bicarbonate) ha(-1) yr(-1) applied in the red soil agro-ecosystems. In addition, the annual mean N depositions, mean sum of the monthly N depositions were 69.44, 1.12, 53.95 and 16.60 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) for gaseous N, aerosol N, ammonia N and oxidized N, making up 98.42%, 1.58%, 53.95% and 16.60% of the total dry deposition N (70.50 kg ha(-1) yr(-1)). PMID:20532381

  8. ACIDIC DEPOSITION IN THE NORTHEASTERN U.S.: SOURCES AND INPUTS, ECOSYSTEM EFFECTS, AND MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic deposition results from the emissions of air pollutants. Effects of acidic deposition in the northeastern US include the acidification of soil and water, causing stresses to terrestrial and aquatic biota.

  9. Atmospheric dry deposition in the vicinity of the Salton Sea, California - II: Measurement and effects of an enhanced evaporation system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alonso, R.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Yee, J.L.; Boarman, W.I.

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of salt spray drift from pilot technologies employed by the US Bureau of Reclamation on deposition rates of various air-born ions. An enhanced evaporation system (EES) was tested in the field at the Salton Sea, California. Dry deposition of NO3-, NH4+, SO42-, Cl-, Ca2+, Na+, K+ and Se was assessed by using nylon filters and branches of natural vegetation exposed for one-week long periods. The simultaneous exposure of both lyophilized branches and branches of live plants offered important information highlighting the dynamics of deposited ions on vegetation. The EES significantly increased the deposition rates of Cl-, SO42- and Na+ in an area of about 639-1062 m surrounding the sprayers. Similarly, higher deposition of Ca 2+ and K+ caused by the EES was detected only when deposition was assessed using nylon filters or lyophilized branches. Deposition fluxes of NO3-, NH4+ and Se were not affected by the spraying system. Techniques for measuring dry deposition and calculating landscape-level depositional loads in non-forested systems need further development. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dry deposition velocity of atmospheric nitrogen in a typical red soil agro-ecosystem in Southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Cui, Jian; Fan, Jian-ling; Liang, Jia-ni; Wang, Ti-jian

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric dry deposition is an important nitrogen (N) input to farmland ecosystems. The main nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere include gaseous N (NH3, NO2, HNO3) and aerosol N (NH4+/NO3-). With the knowledge of increasing agricultural effects by dry deposition of nitrogen, researchers have paid great attention to this topic. Based on the big-leaf resistance dry deposition model, dry N deposition velocities (Vd) in a typical red soil agro-ecosystem, Yingtan, Jiangxi, Southeastern China, were estimated with the data from an Auto-Meteorological Experiment Station during 2004-2007. The results show that hourly deposition velocities (Vdh) were in the range of 0.17-0.34, 0.05-0.24, 0.57-1.27, and 0.05-0.41 cm/s for NH3, NO2, HNO3, and aerosol N, respectively, and the Vdh were much higher in daytime than in nighttime and had a peak value around noon. Monthly dry deposition velocities (Vdm) were in the range of 0.14-0.36, 0.06-0.18, and 0.07-0.25 cm/s for NH3, NO2, and aerosol N, respectively. Their minimum values appeared from June to August, while their maximum values occurred from February to March each year. The maximum value for HNO3 deposition velocities appeared in July each year, and Vdm(HNO3) ranged from 0.58 to 1.31 cm/s during the 4 years. As for seasonal deposition velocities (Vds), Vds(NH3), Vds(NO2), and Vds(aerosol N) in winter or spring were significantly higher than those in summer or autumn, while Vds(HNO3) in summer were higher than that in winter. In addition, there is no significant difference among all the annual means for deposition velocities (Vda). The average values for NH3, NO2, HNO3, and aerosol N deposition velocities in the 4 years were 0.26, 0.12, 0.81, and 0.16 cm/s, respectively. The model is convenient and feasible to estimate dry deposition velocity of atmospheric nitrogen in the typical red soil agro-ecosystem. PMID:19557535

  11. Is dry deposition of semi-volatile organic gases a significant loss of secondary organic aerosols (SOA)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.; Knote, C. J.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Madronich, S.

    2013-12-01

    Dry deposition removal of semi-volatile organic compounds from the atmosphere and its impact on organic aerosol mass is currently under-explored and not well represented in chemistry-climate models, especially for the many complex partly oxidized organics involved in particle formation. The main reason for this omission is that current models use simplified SOA mechanisms that lump precursors and their products into volatility bins, therefore losing information on important properties of individual molecules (or groups) that are needed to calculate dry deposition. In this study, we apply the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to simulate SOA formation and estimate the influence of dry deposition of gas-phase organics on SOA concentrations downwind of an urban area (Mexico City), as well as over a pine forest. SOA precursors considered here include short- and long-chain alkanes (C3-25), alkenes, light aromatics, isoprene and monoterpenes. We show that dry deposition of oxidized gases is not an efficient sink for anthropogenic SOA, as it removes <5% of SOA within the city's boundary layer and ~15% downwind. The effect on biogenic SOA is however significantly larger. We discuss reasons for these differences, and investigate separately the impacts on short and long-chain species. We show that the dry deposition is competing with the uptake of gases to the aerosol phase. In the absence of this condensation, ~50% of the regionally produced mass downwind of Mexico City would have been dry-deposited. However, because dry deposition of submicron aerosols is slow, condensation onto particles protects organic gases from deposition and therefore increases their atmospheric burden and lifetime. We use the explicit GECKO-A model to build an empirical parameterization for use in 3D models. Removal (dry and wet) of organic vapors depends on their solubility, and required Henry's law solubility coefficients were estimated for

  12. Ozone in the Mongolian Gobi desert: Large-scale concentrations and dry deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, Franz X.; Behrendt, Thomas; Ermel, Michael; Hempelmann, Nils; Jöckel, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    For the first time, measurements of surface ozone mixing ratio have been performed from semi-arid steppe to arid/hyper-arid Mongolian Gobi desert. During 12-29 August 2009, ozone mixing ratio was continuously measured from a mobile platform (4x4 Furgon SUV). The survey (3060 km / 229171km2) started at the Mongolian capital Ulaan-Baatar (47.9582°N, 107.0190°E ), heading to south-west (Echin Gol, 43.2586°N, 99.0255°E), eastward to Dalanzadgad (43.6061°N, 104.4445°E), and finally back to Ulaan-Baatar. Ambient air was sampled (approx. 1 L/min) through a 4 m long PTFE-intake line along a forward facing boom mounted on the roof of a 4x4 Furgon SUV. Ozone mixing ratio has been measured by UV-spectroscopy using a mobile dual-cell ozone analyzer (model 205, 2BTechnologies, Boulder, U.S.A.). While ozone signals were measured every 5 seconds, 1 minute averages and standard deviations have been calculated on-line and stored into the data logger. The latter are used to identify and to discriminate against unrealistic low or high ozone mixing ratios which have been due to occasionally passing plumes of vehicle exhaust and/or biomass burning gases, as well as gasoline (at gas filling stations). Even under desert conditions, the temporal behaviour of ozone mixing ratio was characterized by considerable and regular diel variations. Minimum mixing ratios (15-25 ppb) occurred early in the morning (approx. 06:00 local), when surface depletion of ozone (by dry deposition) can not be compensated by supply from the free troposphere due to thermodynamic stability of the nocturnal boundary layer. Late in the afternoon (approx. 17:00 local), under conditions of a turbulently well mixed convective boundary layer, maximum ozone mixing ratios (45-55 ppb) were reached. Daily amplitudes of the diel cycle of ozone mixing ratio were in the order of 30 ppb (steppe), 20 ppb (arid desert), to approx. 5 ppb (hyper-arid Gobi desert (Shargyn Gobi)). Ozone surface measurements were compared to

  13. Development of the aerosol generation system for simulating the dry deposition behavior of radioaerosol emitted by the accident of FDNPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A large amount of radioactivity was discharged by the accident of FDNPP. The long half-life radionuclide, 137Cs was transported through the atmosphere mainly as the aerosol form and deposited to the forests in Fukushima prefecture. After the dry deposition of the 137Cs, the foliar uptake process would occur. To evaluate environmental transfer of radionuclides, the dry deposition and following foliar uptake is very important. There are some pioneering studies for radionuclide foliar uptake with attaching the solution containing stable target element on the leaf, however, cesium oxide aerosols were used for these deposition study [1]. In the FDNPP case, 137Cs was transported in sulfate aerosol form [2], so the oxide aerosol behaviors could not represent the actual deposition behavior in this accident. For evaluation of whole behavior of 137Cs in vegetation system, fundamental data for deposition and uptake process of sulfate aerosol was desired. In this study, we developed aerosol generation system for simulating the dry deposition and the foliar uptake behaviors of aerosol in the different chemical constitutions. In this system, the method of aerosol generation based on the spray drying. Solution contained 137Cs was send to a nozzle by a syringe pump and spraying with a high speed air flow. The sprayed mist was generated in a chamber in the relatively high temperature. The solution in the mist was dried quickly, and micro size solid aerosols consisting 137Cs were generated. The aerosols were suctioned by an ejector and transported inside a tube by the dry air flow, then were directly blown onto the leaves. The experimental condition, such as the size of chamber, chamber temperature, solution flow rate, air flow rate and so on, were optimized. In the deposition experiment, the aerosols on leaves were observed by a SEM/EDX system and the deposition amount was evaluated by measuring the stable Cs remaining on leaf. In the presentation, we will discuss the detail

  14. Studies of acid deposition and its effects in two small catchments in Hunan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Nandong; Seip, Hans Martin; Liao, Bohan; Vogt, Rolf D.

    Acid deposition and its effects were studied by analysing the chemistry in precipitation, stream water, soil water and soils in two catchments in Hunan. One site, Linkesuo (denoted LKS), is on the outskirts of Changsha, the provincial capital of Hunan, the other (Bailutang, denoted BLT) on the outskirts of Chenzhou in southern Hunan. Volume-weighted average pH values and sulphate concentrations in wet deposition were 4.58 (BLT) and 4.90 (LKS) and 174 μmolc L-1 and 152 μmolc L-1, respectively. Wet deposition of sulphate has been estimated as 4.3 gS m-2yr-1 and 3.4 gS m-2yr-1 at BLT and LKS, respectively. Estimates of the corresponding total depositions (dry + wet) are 6.1 gS m-2yr-1 and 5.3 gS m-2yr-1. In precipitation and throughfall, sulphate was the major anion and calcium the major cation. In stream and soil water, nitrate was slightly higher than sulphate on an equivalent basis and magnesium (Mg) not much lower than calcium (Ca). Important soil properties, such as soil pH, soil organic matter (SOM) content, exchangeable acidic cations, exchangeable base cations, effective cation exchange capacity (CECe), base saturation (BS), and aluminium (Al) and iron (Fe) pools, were determined for five forest soil profiles (consisting of four horizons) in each of the two catchments. The soils in BLT are generally more acid, have lower BS and higher Al and Fe pools than the LKS soils. The Al- and Fe-pools were generally higher in the topsoils (i.e. the O and A horizons) than in deeper soils (i.e. E and B horizons) especially at the most acidic site (BLT). There are significant correlations between Fe-pools and the corresponding Al-pools in both catchments except between the amorphous Feox and Alox. Considering the long-term high deposition of sulphate, there is a risk of future ecological damage due to acidification, especially in the BLT catchment, although vegetation damage has yet to be observed in the catchments. This condition appears to be representative of a large

  15. Atmospheric deposition and canopy exchange of anions and cations in two plantation forests under acid rain influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weijun; Ren, Huili; Darrel Jenerette, G.; Hui, Dafeng; Ren, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition as a widely concerned environmental problem in China has been less studied in plantation forests compared to urban and secondary forests, albeit they constitute 1/3 of the total forested areas of the country. We measured the rainwater amount and chemistry outside and beneath the canopies of two widely distributed plantations (Acacia mangium and Dimocarpus longan) in the severe acid rain influenced Pearl River Delta region of southeastern China for two years. Our results showed that the frequency of acid rain was 96% on the basis of pH value <5.6. The volume-weighted mean (vwm) pH was 4.62 and higher in the dry (Oct.-Mar.) than in the wet (Apr.-Sep.) seasons. The major acidic anion was sulfate with vwm concentration of 140 μeq l-1 and annual deposition flux of 110.3 kg ha-1 yr-1. The major neutralizing cations were calcium (94.8 μeq l-1 and 28 kg ha-1 yr-1) and ammonium (41.2 μeq l-1 and 11.7 kg ha-1 yr-1). Over 95% of these major acidic anions and neutralizing cations were derived from anthropogenic and terrestrial sources as a result of industrial, agricultural and forestry activities. Plantation canopy had marked impacts on rainwater chemistry, with the measured anion and cation concentrations being significantly enriched in throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) rainwater by 1.4 (for NO) to 20-fold (for K+) compared to those in bulk precipitation (BP). Dry deposition generally contributed about 13-22% of the total deposition while canopy leaching mainly occurred for K+ (>88%) and NH (10-38%). The two tree species showed distinct impacts on rainfall redistribution and rainwater chemistry due to their differences in canopy architecture and leaf/bark texture, suggesting that species-specific effects should not be overlooked while assessing the acid deposition in forested areas.

  16. ATMOSPHERIC DRY PARTICLE DEPOSITION OF POPS AND TRACE METALS IN AN URBAN- AND INDUSTRIALLY-IMPACTED MID-ATLANTIC ESTUARY (AEOLOS B MID-ATLANTIC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of hazardous air pollutants into the coastal urban-industrial atmosphere increase atmospheric depositional fluxes to proximate water bodies. Dry deposition of large particles containing persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and trace metals were a major contribu...

  17. Mathematical modeling of acid deposition due to radiation fog

    SciTech Connect

    Pandis, S.N.; Seinfeld, J.H. )

    1989-09-20

    A Lagrangian model has been developed to study acidic deposition due to radiation fog. The model couples submodels describing the development and dissipation of radiation fog, the gas-phase chemistry and transfer, and the aqueous-phase chemistry. The model is applied to a radiation fog episode in Bakersfield in the San Joaquin Valley of California over the period January 4--5 1985. Model predictions for temperature profile, fog development, liquid water content, gas-phase concentrations of SO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, and NH{sub 3}, {ital p}H, aqueous-phase concentrations of OS{sup 2{minus}}{sub 4}, NH{sup +}{sub 4}, and NO{sup {minus}}{sub 3}, and finally deposition rates of the above ions are compared with the observed values. The deposition rates of the major ions are predicted to increase significantly during the fog episode, the most notable being the increase of sulfate deposition. Pathways for sulfate production that are of secondary importance in a cloud environment may become signficant in a fog. Expressing the mean droplet settling velocity as a function of liquid water content is found to be quite influential in the model's predictions. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  18. Acid Deposition From Stratospheric Geoengineering With Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, B.; Robock, A.; Oman, L.; Stenchikov, G.

    2008-12-01

    We used a general circulation model of the Earth's climate to conduct geoengineering experiments involving stratospheric injection of sulfur dioxide [Robock et al., 2008] and analyzed the resulting deposition of sulfate. When sulfur is injected into the tropical or Arctic stratosphere, the main additional surface deposition occurs in midlatitude bands, because of strong cross-tropopause flux in the jet stream regions, and there are some larger local increases, specifically in Northern Canada and the Western Pacific Ocean. We used critical load studies to determine the effects of this increase in acid deposition on terrestrial ecosystems. For annual injection of 5 Tg of SO2 into the tropical stratosphere or 3 Tg of SO2 into the Arctic stratosphere, the additional surface sulfate deposition is not enough to negatively impact most ecosystems. Robock, Alan, Luke Oman, and Georgiy Stenchikov (2008), Regional climate responses to geoengineering with tropical and Arctic SO2 injections. J. Geophys. Res., 113, D16101, doi:10.1029/2008JD010050.

  19. A theoretical estimate of O 3 and H 2O 2 dry deposition over the northeast United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walcek, C. J.

    Estimates of short-term, regional-scale spatial distributions of ozone (O 3) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) dry deposition over the northeast U.S. are presented. Dry deposition fluxes to surfaces are computed using a regional tropospheric chemistry model with deposition velocities which vary with local meteorology, land type, insolation, seasonal factors and surface wetness. A compilation of O 3 surface resistances is presented based on a survey of O 3 dry deposition measurements. The surface resistance for H 2O 2 is assumed to be small under most conditions, causing H 2O 2 to dry deposit at a rate which is frequently limited by surface-layer turbulence. Regional patterns of dry deposition velocities for these oxidants over the northeast U.S. are computed using landuse data and meteorological information predicted using a mesoscale meteorology model. Domain-averaged O 3 deposition velocities during a spring period reach a mid-day peak of 0.7-0.8 cm s -1 and drop to 0.1-0.2 cm s -1 at night. Domain-averaged H 2O 2 deposition velocities at a height of approximately 80 m are predicted to reach a mid-day peak of 1.6-2.0cm s -1, and fall to 0.6-0.9 cm s -1 at night. Time-averaged surface-layer H 2O 2 concentrations show a latitude dependence, with higher concentrations in the south. H 2O 2 concentrations are significantly reduced due to efficient wet removal and chemical destruction during the passage of a cyclonic frontal system. In contrast, O 3 concentrations are predicted to rise during the passage of a frontal system due to efficient vertical exchange of midtropospheric air into the boundary layer during convective conditions, followed by synoptic-scale subsidence occurring in the high pressure airmass following a cyclone. Maximum O 3 deposition during this 3-day springtime period occurs in polluted agricultural areas. In contrast, H 2O 2 dry deposition exhibits a latitude dependence with maximum 3-day accumulations occurring in the south. Domain-averaged mid

  20. Saccharification and Fermentation of Dilute-Acid-Pretreated Freeze-Dried Switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioethanol production potential of three oven-dried switchgrass germplasms (St6-1, St6-3 3E and St6-3F) containing 26.65 to 29.28% glucan, 17.92 to 19.37% xylan, and 17.74 to 19.23% lignin (dry matter basis) was investigated. Evaluation of the effect of three acid concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% w...

  1. Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Oven-dried Switchgrass Germplasms for Bioethanol Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioethanol production potential of three oven-dried switchgrass germplasms (St6-1, St6- 3E and St6-3F) containing 26.65 to 29.28% glucan, 17.92 to 19.37% xylan, and 17.74 to 19.23% lignin (dry matter basis) was investigated. Evaluation of the effect of three acid concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% w/...

  2. Mitigation of acid deposition: Liming of surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoshesky, J.; Price, R.; DeMuro, J.

    1989-05-01

    In recent years acid deposition has become a serious concern internationally. Scientific literature has documented the acidification of numerous lakes and streams in North America and Scandinavia resulting in the depletion or total loss of fisheries and other aquatic biota. Liming represents the only common corrective practice aimed specifically at remediating an affected acid receptor. This report reviews a range of liming technologies and liming materials, as well as the effect of surface-water liming on water quality and aquatic biota. As background to the liming discussion, the hydrologic cycle and the factors that make surface waters sensitive to acid deposition are also discussed. Finally, a brief review of some of the liming projects that have been conducted, or are currently in operation is presented, giving special emphasis to mitigation efforts in Maryland. Liming has been effectively used to counteract surface-water acidification in parts of Scandinavia, Canada, and the U.S. To date, liming has generally been shown to improve physical and chemical conditions and enhance the biological recovery of aquatic ecosystems affected by acidification.

  3. Assessment of nitrogen and phosphorus loading by atmospheric dry deposition to the Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olayinka, Kehinde O; Oladosu, Najeem O; Abayomi, Akeem A; Alo, Babajide I

    2016-07-01

    Surface water pollution has been found to be considerably driven by the contributions of airborne particles, open-air waste burning and fossil fuel combustion, ammonia volatilization from excreta, fertilizer and derivatives from explosive factories. Atmospheric deposition into the Lagos Lagoon is suspected to be a major contributor to the nutrient levels of the lagoon. Atmospheric dry nutrient deposition was monitored at six stations around the Lagos Lagoon from January to June 2012 in order to estimate the contribution of atmospheric deposits into the lagoon's nutrient cycles. Species of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in the lagoon water were analyzed by colorimetric methods. Mean [NO(-) 3 + NO(-) 2]-N was 3.08 ± 2.10 mg m(-2) day(-1) (0.55-8.73 mg m(-2) day(-1)). The (NO(-) 3 + NO(-) 2)-N was only about 2 % of total N but [NH(+) 4 + organic]-N was approximately 38 % of total N. Particulate N was about 60 % of total N. Average total N was 144 ± 94.9 mg m(-2) day(-1) (48.0-285 mg m(-2) day(-1)). Average soluble reactive P was significantly lower than [NO(-) 3 + NO(-) 2]-N averaging about 0.12 ± 0.12 mg m(-2) day(-1). Soluble reactive P (SRP) was less than 2 % of total P but soluble organic P was about 86 % of total P. Particulate P accounted for about 12 % of total P. Average total P was 4.56 ± 10.1 mg m(-2) day(-1) (0.48-31.6 mg m(-2) day(-1)). This study shows that atmospheric deposition of nutrients into the Lagos Lagoon is taking place and this may represent a considerable proportion of the total nutrient loading of the lagoon. PMID:27325250

  4. Polyglycolic acid microneedles modified with inkjet-deposited antifungal coatings.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Ryan D; Daniels, Justin; Stafslien, Shane; Nasir, Adnan; Lefebvre, Joe; Narayan, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined use of piezoelectric inkjet printing to apply an antifungal agent, voriconazole, to the surfaces of biodegradable polyglycolic acid microneedles. Polyglycolic acid microneedles with sharp tips (average tip radius = 25 ± 3 μm) were prepared using a combination of injection molding and drawing lithography. The elastic modulus (9.9 ± 0.3 GPa) and hardness (588.2 ± 33.8 MPa) values of the polyglycolic acid material were determined using nanoindentation and were found to be suitable for use in transdermal drug delivery devices. Voriconazole was deposited onto the polyglycolic acid microneedles by means of piezoelectric inkjet printing. It should be noted that voriconazole has poor solubility in water; however, it is readily soluble in many organic solvents. Optical imaging, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to examine the microneedle geometries and inkjet-deposited surface coatings. Furthermore, an in vitro agar plating study was performed on the unmodified, vehicle-modified, and voriconazole-modified microneedles. Unlike the unmodified and vehicle-modified microneedles, the voriconazole-modified microneedles showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The unmodified, vehicle-modified, and voriconazole-modified microneedles did not show activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Staphylococcus aureus. The results indicate that piezoelectric inkjet printing may be useful for loading transdermal drug delivery devices such as polyglycolic acid microneedles with antifungal pharmacologic agents and other pharmacologic agents with poor solubility in aqueous solutions. PMID:25732934

  5. Helically agitated mixing in dry dilute acid pretreatment enhances the bioconversion of corn stover into ethanol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dry dilute acid pretreatment at extremely high solids loading of lignocellulose materials demonstrated promising advantages of no waste water generation, less sugar loss, and low steam consumption while maintaining high hydrolysis yield. However, the routine pretreatment reactor without mixing apparatus was found not suitable for dry pretreatment operation because of poor mixing and mass transfer. In this study, helically agitated mixing was introduced into the dry dilute acid pretreatment of corn stover and its effect on pretreatment efficiency, inhibitor generation, sugar production, and bioconversion efficiency through simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentation (SSF) were evaluated. Results The overall cellulose conversion taking account of cellulose loss in pretreatment was used to evaluate the efficiency of pretreatment. The two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model on dry pretreatment was established and applied to analyze the mixing mechanism. The results showed that the pretreatment efficiency was significantly improved and the inhibitor generation was reduced by the helically agitated mixing, compared to the dry pretreatment without mixing: the ethanol titer and yield from cellulose in the SSF reached 56.20 g/L and 69.43% at the 30% solids loading and 15 FPU/DM cellulase dosage, respectively, corresponding to a 26.5% increase in ethanol titer and 17.2% increase in ethanol yield at the same fermentation conditions. Conclusions The advantage of helically agitated mixing may provide a prototype of dry dilute acid pretreatment processing for future commercial-scale production of cellulosic ethanol. PMID:24387051

  6. STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF DRY AND WET DEPOSITION ON GALVANIZED STEEL AND WEATHERING STEEL: A THREE YEAR FIELD EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    At an exposure site located at the Research Triangle Park, NC, an automatic covering device was installed to partition the effects of dry and wet deposition on the corrosion of galvanized steel and weathering steel samples. Weight loss was used as the measure of corrosion of both...

  7. Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the FourCorners Area and Eastern Oklahoma, U.S.A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma from August, 2009–August, 2011. Using data from a six site area network, a characterization of the magnitude and spatia...

  8. Acid deposition in aquatic ecosystems: Setting limits empirically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcombe, Charles P.

    1985-07-01

    The problem of acid deposition and its harmful effects on aquatic ecosystems has created a new branch of science that is called upon to provide the knowledge on which legislative controls can be based. However, because of the nature of existing legislation, which requires evidence of cause and effect between industrial emissions and pollution, and because of science's inability to provide this information over the short term, considerable controversy has arisen about whether sufficient information exists to warrant control measures at this time. Among those who advocate controls, there is genuine divergence of opinion about how stringent the controls must be to achieve any desired level of protection. The controversy has led to an impasse between the scientific and political participants, which is reflected in the slow pace of progress toward an effective management strategy. Resolution of the impasse, at least in the short term, may demand that science and politics rely on empirical models rather than explanatory ones. The empirical model, which is the major proposal in this article, integrates all of the major variables and many of the minor ones, and constructs a three-dimensionally curved surface capable of representing the status of any waterbody subjected to the effects of acid deposition. When suitably calibrated—a process involving the integration of knowledge and data from aquatic biology, geochemistry, meteorology, and limnology—it can be used to depict limits to the rate of acid deposition required for any level of environmental protection. Because it can generate a pictorial display of the effects of management decisions and legislative controls, the model might serve as a basis for enhancing the quality of communication among all the scientific and political participants and help to resolve many of their controversies.

  9. Long-Term Wet and Dry Deposition of Total and Methyl Mercury in the Remote Boreal Ecoregion of Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Graydon, Jennifer A; Louis, Vincent; Hintelmann, Holger; Lindberg, Steven Eric

    2008-11-01

    Although a positive relationship between atmospheric loadings of inorganic mercury (Hg(II)) to watersheds and concentrations of methyl mercury (MeHg) in fish has now been established, net wet and dry deposition of Hg(II) and MeHg to watersheds remains challenging to quantify. In this study, concentrations and loadings of total mercury (THg; all forms of Hg in a sample) and MeHg in open area wet deposition, throughfall, and litterfall were quantified at the remote Experimental Lakes Area in the boreal ecoregion, NW Ontario, Canada. Between 1992 and 2006, mean annual THg and MeHg loadings in the open were 36 17 and 0.5 0.2 mg ha 1, respectively. Throughfall THg and MeHg loadings were generally 2 4 times and 0.8 2 times higher, respectively, than loadings in the open. Loadings of both THg and MeHg were highest under an old growth spruce/fir canopy and lowest under a deciduous maple canopy, whereas loadings under young jack pine and wetland spruce/pine/alder canopies were intermediate. Litterfall generally represented the largest input of THg (86 105 mg ha 1) and MeHg (0.7 0.8 mg ha 1) to the landscape on an annual basis. Using the direct method of estimating dry deposition (thoughfall + litterfall open loadings), we calculated that annual dry deposition of THg and MeHg under forest canopies ranged from 105 to 201 mg ha 1, whereas dry deposition of MeHg ranged from 0.7 to 1.2 mg ha 1. Photoreduction and emission of wet-deposited Hg(II) from canopy foliage were accounted for, resulting in 3 5% (5 6 mg ha 1) higher annual estimates of dry deposition than via the direct method alone. Net THg and MeHg loadings to this remote landscape were lower than at any other previously studied forested site globally. This study shows that THg and MeHg loading can be extremely variable within a heterogeneous boreal landscape and that processes such as Hg photoreduction and emission from foliage should be considered when estimating dry deposition of Hg.

  10. Importance of dry and wet deposition of condensable organic vapors on the budget of secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madronich, S.; Knote, C. J.; Hodzic, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the lifecycle of organic aerosols, removal processes must balance formation but have received considerably less attention. An important loss process, that has not yet been fully characterized, is the removal by wet and dry deposition of the gas phase organics that partition dynamically with the particle phase of the aerosol. Approaches like the volatility basis set (VBS) assume that these intermediate-volatility organic compounds exist in a dynamic equilibrium between gas and particle phases, and make up a considerable fraction of observed SOA. Parameterizing their deposition velocities is challenging, but recent studies with detailed chemical models have allowed the estimation of the required Henry's law solubility coefficients, with high values confirming the susceptibility to dry and wet deposition. We included these removal processes into the respective modules of the regional chemistry transport model WRF-chem and conducted month-long simulations covering the continental United States in different seasons. Sets of simulations without any deposition of organic vapors, with only dry or wet deposition, or with both turned on allow us to evaluate the effects of these removal processes on the continental SOA budget, and to assess their relative importance.

  11. Biotoxicity of Mars soils: 1. Dry deposition of analog soils on microbial colonies and survival under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Doug W.

    2012-11-01

    Six Mars analog soils were created to simulate a range of potentially biotoxic geochemistries relevant to the survival of terrestrial microorganisms on Mars, and included basalt-only (non-toxic control), salt, acidic, alkaline, aeolian, and perchlorate rich geochemistries. Experiments were designed to simulate the dry-deposition of Mars soils onto spacecraft surfaces during an active descent landing scenario with propellant engines. Six eubacteria were initially tested for tolerance to desiccation, and the spore-former Bacillus subtilis HA101 and non-spore former Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 were identified to be strongly resistant (HA101) and moderately resistant (29212) to desiccation at 24 °C. Furthermore, tests with B. subtilis and E. faecalis demonstrated that at least 1 mm of Mars analog soil was required to fully attenuate the biocidal effects of a simulated Mars-normal equatorial UV flux. Biotoxicity experiments were conducted under simulated Martian conditions of 6.9 mbar, -10 °C, CO2-enriched anoxic atmosphere, and a simulated equatorial solar spectrum (200-1100 nm) with an optical depth of 0.1. For B. subtilis, the six analog soils were found, in general, to be of low biotoxicity with only the high salt and acidic soils exhibiting the capacity to inactivate a moderate number of spores (<1 log reductions) exposed 7 days to the soils under simulated Martian conditions. In contrast, the overall response of E. faecalis to the analog soils was more dramatic with between two and three orders of magnitude reductions in viable cells for most soils, and between six and seven orders of magnitude reductions observed for the high-salt soil. Results suggest that Mars soils are likely not to be overtly biotoxic to terrestrial microorganisms, and suggest that the soil geochemistries on Mars will not preclude the habitability of the Martian surface.

  12. Impact of Dry Solids and Bile Acid Concentrations on Bile Acid Binding Capacity of Extruded Oat Cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extruded breakfast cereals (EBC), processed from two oat lines, N979-5-2-4 (N979) and ‘Jim’, with beta-glucan concentrations of 8.7 and 4.9%, respectively, were used to determine the impact of dry solids (DS) and bile acid (BA) concentrations on in vitro BA binding efficiency. A full fractional fact...

  13. Wet and dry deposition of mineral dust particles in Japan: factors related to temporal variation and spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, K.; Ura, S.; Kagawa, M.; Mikami, M.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Matoba, S.; Aoki, K.; Shinoda, M.; Kurosaki, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Shimizu, A.; Uematsu, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent ground networks and satellite remote-sensing observations have provided useful data related to spatial and vertical distributions of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere. However, measurements of temporal variations and spatial distributions of mineral dust deposition fluxes are limited in terms of their duration, location, and processes of deposition. To ascertain temporal variations and spatial distributions of mineral dust deposition using wet and dry processes, weekly deposition samples were obtained at Sapporo, Toyama, Nagoya, Tottori, Fukuoka, and Cape Hedo (Okinawa) in Japan during October 2008-December 2010 using automatic wet and dry separating samplers. Mineral dust weights in water-insoluble residue were estimated from Fe contents measured using an X-ray fluorescence analyser. Wet and dry deposition fluxes of mineral dusts were both high in spring and low in summer, showing similar seasonal variations to frequency of aeolian dust events (Kosa) in Japan. For wet deposition, highest and lowest annual dust fluxes were found at Toyama (9.6 g m-2 yr-1) and at Cape Hedo (1.7 g m-2 yr-1) as average values in 2009 and 2010. Higher wet deposition fluxes were observed at Toyama and Tottori, where frequent precipitation (> 60% days per month) was observed during dusty seasons. For dry deposition among Toyama, Tottori, Fukuoka, and Cape Hedo, the highest and lowest annual dust fluxes were found respectively at Fukuoka (5.2 g m-2 yr-1) and at Cape Hedo (2.0 g m-2 yr-1) as average values in 2009 and 2010. The average ratio of wet and dry deposition fluxes was the highest at Toyama (3.3) and the lowest at Hedo (0.82), showing a larger contribution of the dry process at western sites, probably because of the distance from desert source regions and because of the effectiveness of the wet process in the dusty season. Size distributions of refractory dust particles were obtained using four-stage filtration: > 20, > 10, > 5, and > 1 μm diameter. Weight fractions

  14. Controlling particle deposit morphologies in drying nano-particle laden sessile droplets using substrate oscillations.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Apratim; Basu, Saptarshi; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo

    2016-06-01

    Sessile water droplets containing nano-silica particles are allowed to evaporate in the presence of driven substrate oscillations at chosen frequencies. Different mode shapes are observed at different oscillation frequencies. As reference, the evaporation of the same droplets is also observed under stationary conditions i.e. in the absence of any oscillations. For all cases, the deposit structures formed by the agglomeration of the nano-silica particles have been imaged. It has been observed that for the stationary droplets and for droplets whose oscillations are initiated close to the resonance of the lowest allowable oscillation mode, the structures are similar having larger spread over height, while for higher frequencies the structures are dome-like with more uniform outer dimensions. The possible reasons behind these structures are investigated using experimental techniques such as high-speed imaging of droplet oscillations, internal flow visualization and SEM imaging. Understanding of the underlying mechanisms behind the formation of these striking features is required for these methods to be applicable in larger scale drying operations or micro-device applications. Altogether a novel methodology has been presented and investigated for manipulating the morphological features in evaporating nano-particle laden sessile droplets. PMID:27181754

  15. Dry deposition of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in three Plantago species

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, M.I.; Vorenhout, M.; Sijm, D.T.H.M.; Kolloeffel, C.

    1999-10-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the leaf wax of three Plantago species were determined weekly for 3 weeks. The almost glabrous, free-standing leaves of Plantago major and the sparsely hairy Plantago lanceolata leaves were more heavily contaminated with low molecular weight (MW) PAHs (MW {lt} 228) than the densely hairy, partly overlapping Plantago media leaves. This may be caused by the lower canopy roughness (higher aerodynamic resistance), the higher amount of leaf hairs, and/or the higher leaf overlap of P. media. On the other hand, PAHs with MW {ge} 252 tended to show higher concentrations in P. media than in the other two species. This is likely caused by the dense layer of hairs on P. media leaves, which can efficiently intercept the largely particle-bound high MW PAHs. When the PAH concentrations were normalized to projected leaf surface area, the differences between P. media and the other two species became significant for the high MW PAHs, while the differences for the low MW PAHs decreased. Although the differences in PAH concentrations between species are relatively small, this study clearly shows that plant architecture and leaf hairs influence the dry deposition of PAHs.

  16. Distribution and effects of acidic deposition on wildlife and ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; Longcore, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Acidic deposition occurs over most of the United States and the deposition patterns and theoretical vulnerabilities of aquatic ecosystems to chemical changes can be delineated, but few data exist on concomitant biological effects. Hypothetical direct effects are limited primarily to toxicity of various heavy metals mobilized at reduced pH. Results of studies in Scandinavia suggest that aluminum interferes with avian reproduction near acidified lakes. Some amphibian populations located on acid-vulnerable substrates may be adversely affected by reduced pH in the vernal pools used for egg laying and larval growth. Indirect effects on populations are difficult to detect because few historical data exist for wildlife populations and trophic relationships in vulnerable areas. Current research in the U.S.A. focuses on measuring habitat characteristics, food availability, and avian use of vulnerable wetland habitats. Results of Scandinavian studies suggest that some species of waterfowl may prefer acidified, I fish-free habitats because invertebrates essential for meeting nutritional requirements are more easily obtained in the absence of competition from fish. However, avian species dependent on fish would be absent from these habitats. Alteration of either the vegetative structure or primary productivity of wetlands might indirectly affect avian populations by causing decreased invertebrate productivity and consequent food limitations for birds.

  17. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the gas phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the WRF-Chem regional chemistry transport model, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48 and 63% respectively over the continental US. Dry deposition of gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (-40 vs. -8% for anthropogenics, and -52 vs. -11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas phase (61% for anthropogenics and 76% for biogenics). Results are sensitive to assumptions made in the dry deposition scheme, but gas-phase deposition of SVOCs remains crucial even under conservative estimates. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm-1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in

  18. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-01-06

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the gas phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the WRF-Chem regional chemistry transport model, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48 and 63% respectively over the continental US. Dry deposition ofmore » gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (−40 vs. −8% for anthropogenics, and −52 vs. −11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas phase (61% for anthropogenics and 76% for biogenics). Results are sensitive to assumptions made in the dry deposition scheme, but gas-phase deposition of SVOCs remains crucial even under conservative estimates. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm−1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility

  19. A COUPLED LAND-SURFACE AND DRY DEPOSITION MODEL AND COMPARISON TO FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF SURFACE HEAT, MOISTURE, AND OZONE FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed a coupled land-surface and dry deposition model for realistic treatment of surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and chemical dry deposition within a comprehensive air quality modeling system. A new land-surface model (LSM) with explicit treatment of soil moisture...

  20. Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in the Southwestern USA: A Comparison between Texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area

    PubMed Central

    Sather, Mark E.; Allen, Kara L.; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/m2h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2 ng/m2h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

  1. Gaseous oxidized mercury dry deposition measurements in the southwestern USA: a comparison between Texas, eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners area.

    PubMed

    Sather, Mark E; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Allen, Kara L; Smith, Luther; Mathew, Johnson; Jackson, Clarence; Callison, Ryan; Scrapper, Larry; Hathcoat, April; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Ketcher, Philip; Brunette, Robert; Karlstrom, Jason; Van der Jagt, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012. The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characterization of the magnitude and spatial extent of ambient GOM dry deposition in central and eastern Texas for a 12-month period which contained statistically average annual results for precipitation totals, temperature, and wind speed. The research objective was to investigate GOM dry deposition in areas of Texas impacted by emissions from coal-fired utility boilers and compare it with GOM dry deposition measurements previously observed in eastern Oklahoma and the Four Corners area. Annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were relatively low in Texas, ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 ng/m(2)h at the four Texas monitoring sites, similar to the 0.2 ng/m(2)h annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate recorded at the eastern Oklahoma monitoring site. The Texas and eastern Oklahoma annual GOM dry deposition rate estimates were at least four times lower than the highest annual GOM dry deposition rate estimate previously measured in the more arid bordering western states of New Mexico and Colorado in the Four Corners area. PMID:24955412

  2. Encapsulation of folic acid in food hydrocolloids through nanospray drying and electrospraying for nutraceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Masiá, Rocío; López-Nicolás, Rubén; Periago, Maria Jesús; Ros, Gaspar; Lagaron, Jose M; López-Rubio, Amparo

    2015-02-01

    In this work, two different technologies (electrospraying and nanospray drying) were evaluated for the encapsulation of folic acid using both a whey protein concentrate (WPC) matrix and a commercial resistant starch. The morphology of the capsules, molecular organization of the matrices upon encapsulation, encapsulation efficiency, and stability of the folic acid within the capsules under different storage conditions and upon thermal exposure were studied. Results showed that spherical nano-, submicro- and microcapsules were obtained through both techniques, although electrospraying led to smaller capsule sizes and to an enhanced control over their size distribution. Greater encapsulation efficiency was observed using WPC as encapsulating matrix, probably related to interactions between the protein and folic acid which favoured the incorporation of the bioactive. The best results in terms of bioactive stabilization in the different conditions assayed were also obtained for the WPC capsules, although both materials and encapsulation techniques led to improved folic acid stability, especially under dry conditions. PMID:25172691

  3. Investigation of acyl migration in mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acids under aqueous basic, aqueous acidic, and dry roasting conditions.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sagar; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Matei, Marius Febi; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2014-09-17

    Acyl migration in chlorogenic acids describes the process of migration of cinnamoyl moieties from one quinic acid alcohol group to another, thus interconverting chlorogenic acid regioisomers. It therefore constitutes a special case of transesterification reaction. Acyl migration constitutes an important reaction pathway in both coffee roasting and brewing, altering the structure of chlorogenic acid initially present in the green coffee bean. In this contribution we describe detailed and comprehensive mechanistic studies comparing inter- and intramolecular acyl migration involving the seven most common chlorogenic acids in coffee. We employe aqueous acidic and basic conditions mimicking the brewing of coffee along with dry roasting conditions. We show that under aqueous basic conditions intramolecular acyl migration is fully reversible with basic hydrolysis competing with acyl migration. 3-Caffeoylquinic acid was shown to be most labile to basic hydrolysis. We additionally show that the acyl migration process is strongly pH dependent with increased transesterification taking place at basic pH. Under dry roasting conditions acyl migration competes with dehydration to form lactones. We argue that acyl migration precedes lactonization, with 3-caffeoylquinic acid lactone being the predominant product. PMID:25116442

  4. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  5. Use of satellite data to improve parameterization of spatial and temporal variations of gaseous dry deposition in regional-scale models

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Weigang; Wesely, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The removal of gaseous substances from the atmosphere by dry deposition represents an important sink in the atmospheric budget for many trace gases. The surface removal rate, therefore, needs be described quantitatively in modeling atmospheric transport and chemistry with regional- and global-scale models. Because the uptake capability of a terrestrial surface is strongly influenced by the type and condition of its vegetation, the seasonal and spatial changes in vegetation should be described in considerable detail in large-scale models. The objective of the present study is to develop a model that links remote sensing data from satellites with the RADM dry deposition module to provide a parameterization of dry deposition over large scales with improved temporal and spatial coverage. This paper briefly discusses the modeling methods and initial results obtained by applying the improved dry deposition module to a tallgrass prairie, for which measurements of O{sub 3} dry deposition and simultaneously obtained satellite remote sensing data are available.

  6. Impact of rolling and phosphorous acid on root rot of dry peas in the Pacific Northwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rolling soil after planting is standard in dry pea production areas in the Pacific Northwest but can increase compaction resulting in increase of root rot by oomycetes and other pathogens. Phosphorous acid has been used to manage oomycete pathogens, therefore, the impact of not rolling soil after s...

  7. Phenolic acids and antioxidant capacity of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) as compared with corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three sets of ground corn and the corresponding distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) were collected from three commercial plants and analyzed for individual phenolic acids by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array and/or mass spectrometry and for antioxidant capacity...

  8. Phenolic acids and antioxidant activity of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) as compared with corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sample sets of ground corn and the corresponding distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) were collected from three commercial plants in Iowa. Phenolic acids were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array and/or mass spectrometry. The antioxidant activity was ...

  9. Dry matter production and nutrient content of longan grown on an acid Ultisol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the adaptability of longan (Dimocarpus longan) to acidic soils high in aluminum (Al). A 2-year field study was conducted to determine the effects of various levels of soil Al on dry matter production, plant growth, and nutrient content in shoots of four cultivars of longan. S...

  10. Extraction of fatty acids from dried freshwater algae using accelerated solvent extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high temperature/pressure extraction method (accelerated solvent extraction)(ASE) and a manual extraction method (modified Folch extraction) were compared with regard to their ability to extract total fat from three samples of air-dried filamentous algae and determine the fatty acid (FA) profile o...

  11. Dry Matter Production and Leaf Elemental Concentrations of Rambutan Grown on an Acid Ultisol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the adaptability of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) to highly acidic soils rich in aluminum (Al). A 2-yr field study was conducted to determine the effects of various levels of soil Al on dry matter production, plant growth, and nutrient concentration in the leaves of four cult...

  12. Evaluation and improvements of two community models in simulating dry deposition velocities for peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) over a coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyong; Wang, Xuemei; Turnipseed, Andrew A.; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Leiming; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas; Huey, L. G.; Niyogi, Dev; Xia, Beicheng; Alapaty, Kiran

    2012-02-01

    Dry deposition velocities (Vd) for peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) calculated using two community dry deposition models with different treatments of both stomatal and nonstomatal uptakes were evaluated using measurements of PAN eddy covariance fluxes over a Loblolly pine forest in July 2003. The observed daytime maximum of Vd(PAN) was ˜1.0 cm s-1on average, while the estimates by the WRF-Chem dry deposition module (WDDM) and the Noah land surface model coupled with a photosynthesis-based Gas Exchange Model (Noah-GEM) were only 0.2 cm s-1 and 0.6 cm s-1, respectively. The observations also showed considerable PAN deposition at night with typical Vd values of 0.2-0.6 cm s-1, while the estimated values from both models were less than 0.1 cm s-1. Noah-GEM modeled more realistic stomatal resistance (Rs) than WDDM, as compared with observations of water vapor exchange fluxes. The poor performance of WDDM for stomatal uptake is mainly due to its lack of dependence on leaf area index. Thermal decomposition was found to be relatively unimportant for measured PAN fluxes as shown by the lack of a relationship between measured total surface conductance and temperature. Thus, a large part of the underprediction in Vd from both models should be caused by the underestimation of nonstomatal uptake, in particular, the cuticle uptake. Sensitivity tests on both stomatal and nonstomatal resistances terms were conducted and some recommendations were provided.

  13. Applications of DuPont photopolymer Cromalin(R) for dry deposition of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, Michielle Helene

    2006-04-01

    A dry deposition method for patterning particles for specific applications of emissive display screens, photocatalysts and nanoparticles, using DuPont Tacky DotRTM photopolymer, was developed. This tacky photopolymer, CromalinRTM, may be adhered to various substrates and patterned through the polymerization of the adhesive when exposed to UV light. It was found that CromalinRTM is activated at a wavelength of 340--370 nm and has a patterning resolution as measured by the USAF 1951 resolution target to be ˜20 mum. Phosphor, alumina, titania, toner and various types of nanometer-sized materials, including carbon nanotubes, mesoporous silica nanoparticles, silver nanowires and magnetic magnetite nanoparticles were adhered to Positive CromalinRTM. These particles were shown to become adhered and embedded within the tacky photopolymer layer. Patterning of these nanomaterials was also found to be successful. Particle loading evaluations showed a monolayer of particles was adhered to the surface with an increase in deposit density and coverage when a layer of large diameter particles was followed by a layer of small diameter particles. A tape test showed the adhesion of particles to the surface is adequate (˜50 N) for the investigated applications and is dependent on particle shape. The decomposition properties of this adhesive material were evaluated to be suitable for emissive display screens and photocatalysis processes. The thermal degradation of the polymer in argon at 450°C was ˜83-86 wt.%. Adhesion increased with limited UV exposure and the solubility in water and acetone of Positive Cromalin RTM decreased. Multiple adhesion mechanisms may contribute to the adhesion of various particle shapes and materials to Positive CromalinRTM. The elastic behavior of CromalinRTM allows particles to become completely or partially embedded into the photopolymer layer. This intimate contact allows surface forces, such as van der Waals, to act at the interface of the polymer

  14. Modeling dry and wet deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ions in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China using a source-oriented CMAQ model: Part I. Base case model results.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Tang, Ya; Hu, Jianlin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jingyi; Kota, Sri Harsha; Wu, Li; Gao, Huilin; Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi

    2015-11-01

    A source-oriented Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model driven by the meteorological fields generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to study the dry and wet deposition of nitrate (NO3(-)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), and ammonium (NH4(+)) ions in the Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve (JNNR), China from June to August 2010 and to identify the contributions of different emission sectors and source regions that were responsible for the deposition fluxes. The model performance is evaluated in this paper and the source contribution analyses are presented in a companion paper. The results show that WRF is capable of reproducing the observed precipitation rates with a Mean Normalized Gross Error (MNGE) of 8.1%. Predicted wet deposition fluxes of SO4(2-) and NO3(-) at the Long Lake (LL) site (3100 m a.s.l.) during the three-month episode are 2.75 and 0.34 kg S(N) ha(-1), which agree well with the observed wet deposition fluxes of 2.42 and 0.39 kg S(N) ha(-1), respectively. Temporal variations in the weekly deposition fluxes at LL are also well predicted. Wet deposition flux of NH4(+) at LL is over-predicted by approximately a factor of 3 (1.60 kg N ha(-1)vs. 0.56 kg N ha(-1)), likely due to missing alkaline earth cations such as Ca(2+) in the current CMAQ simulations. Predicted wet deposition fluxes are also in general agreement with observations at four Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET) sites in western China. Predicted dry deposition fluxes of SO4(2-) (including gas deposition of SO2) and NO3(-) (including gas deposition of HNO3) are 0.12 and 0.12 kg S(N) h a(-1) at LL and 0.07 and 0.08 kg S(N) ha(-1) at Jiuzhaigou Bureau (JB) in JNNR, respectively, which are much lower than the corresponding wet deposition fluxes. Dry deposition flux of NH4(+) (including gas deposition of NH3) is 0.21 kg N ha(-1) at LL, and is also much lower than the predicted wet deposition flux. For both dry and wet deposition fluxes, predictions

  15. COMPREHENSIVE EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN PLAN TO RELATE POLLUTANT SOURCES TO ACIDIC DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because verifiable numerical models that incorporate all processes determining the dispersion, transformations, and deposition of emitted pollutants associated with acidic deposition from the atmosphere are only now under development, it was deemed worthwhile to determine whether...

  16. High titer gluconic acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger from dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover without detoxification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongsen; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    This study reported a high titer gluconic acid fermentation using dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover (DDAP) hydrolysate without detoxification. The selected fermenting strain Aspergillus niger SIIM M276 was capable of inhibitor degradation thus no detoxification on pretreated corn stover was required. Parameters of gluconic acid fermentation in corn stover hydrolysate were optimized in flasks and in fermentors to achieve 76.67 g/L gluconic acid with overall yield of 94.91%. The sodium gluconate obtained from corn stover was used as additive for extending setting time of cement mortar and similar function was obtained with starch based sodium gluconate. This study provided the first high titer gluconic acid production from lignocellulosic feedstock with potential of industrial applications. PMID:26724553

  17. USING THE REGIONAL ACID DEPOSITION MODEL TO DETERMINE THE NITROGEN DEPOSITION AIRSHED OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Regional Acid Deposition Model, RADM, an advanced Eulerian model, is used to develop an estimate of the primary airshed of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions that is contributing nitrogen deposition to the Chesapeake Bay watershed. rief description of RADM together with a summary...

  18. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1985 ANNUAL AND SEASONAL DATA SUMMARIES FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives a summary of 1985 wet deposition precipitation chemistry data collected in North America and available in the Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base. North American wet deposition monitoring networks with data in ADS are NADP/NTN, CANSAP, APN, UAPSP, MAP3S/PCN, W...

  19. Assessing the atmospheric deposition of mercury to Lake Michigan: The importance of the Chicago/Gary urban area on wet and dry deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Matthew Scott

    1998-12-01

    Mercury is a toxic bioaccumulative substance found in aquatic ecosystems. The results of the first study of atmospheric mercury deposition into Lake Michigan and the relative importance of the Chicago/Gary urban area were investigated as part of the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study (LMMBS) and the Atmospheric Exchange Over Lakes and Oceans Study (AEOLOS). Event wet-only precipitation, total aerosol, and vapor phase samples were collected for mercury and trace element determinations from five sites around Lake Michigan from July 1994 through October 1995 as part of the LMMBS. In addition, intensive over-water measurements were conducted aboard the EPA research vessel Lake Guardian during the summer of 1994 and the winter of 1995 as part of the AEOLOS. Atmospheric mercury concentrations were from two to ten times higher in the Chicago/Gary urban area. Wet and dry Hg deposition (including reactive gaseous Hg) were calculated to Lake Michigan using a hybrid receptor modeling framework. The model utilized mercury monitoring data collected during the LMMBS and AEOLOS together with high resolution over-water meteorological data provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Atmospheric deposition was found to be the primary pathway for mercury input to Lake Michigan, contributing approximately 84% of the estimated 1419 Kg annual flux. Wet deposition (10.6 μg m-2) and dry deposition (10.0 μg m-2) contributed almost equally to the annual atmospheric Hg deposition of 20.6 μg m-2 (1189 Kg). A strong urban influence was observed in the over-water mercury deposition estimates in the southern portion of the lake. An independent meteorological transport analysis determined that local sources in the Chicago/Gary urban area significantly impacted the LMMBS sites around Lake Michigan. The Chicago/Gary urban area was found to contribute about 20% (127 Kg) of the annual atmospheric mercury deposition to Lake Michigan. Multivariate statistical analysis of

  20. Vitamins, fatty acids, and antioxidant capacity stability during storage of freeze-dried human milk.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Blanca; Castellote, Ana Isabel; Montes, Rosa; López-Sabater, M Carmen

    2014-09-01

    Although freezing is the most common method used to preserve human milk, nutritional and immunological components may be lost during storage. Freeze-drying could increase the shelf life of human milk, while preserving its original characteristics. Seventy-two samples of freeze-dried human milk were stored for different periods of time, up to a maximum of 3 months, at 4 °C or 40 °C. Vitamin C, tocopherols, antioxidant capacity, and fatty acids composition were analyzed. A new HILIC-UHPLC method improving vitamin C determination was also validated. Ascorbic acid and total vitamin C concentrations significantly decreased at both temperatures, while antioxidant capacity only decreased at 40 °C. Fatty acids composition and both γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol contents remained unaltered. The stability after storage of freeze-dried milk was higher than that reported for frozen or fresh milk indicating that freeze-drying is a promising option to improve the preservation of human milk in banks. PMID:24840090

  1. Preparation and characterization of dry method esterified starch/polylactic acid composite materials.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yingfeng; Gu, Jiyou; Yang, Long; Qiao, Zhibang; Tan, Haiyan; Zhang, Yanhua

    2014-03-01

    Corn starch and maleic anhydride were synthesized from a maleic anhydride esterified starch by dry method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used for the qualitative analysis of the esterified starches. The reaction efficiency of dry method esterified starch reached 92.34%. The dry method esterified starch was blended with polylactic acid (PLA), and the mixture was melted and extruded to produce the esterified starch/polylactic acid (ES/PLA) composites. The degree of crystallinity of the ES/PLA was lower than that of the NS/PLA, indicating that the relative dependence between these two components of starch and polylactic acid was enhanced. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the dry method esterified starch increased the two-phase interface compatibility of the composites, thereby improving the tensile strength, bending strength, and elongation at break of the ES/PLA composite. The introduction of a hydrophobic ester bond and increase in interface compatibility led to an increase in ES/PLA water resistance. Melt index determination results showed that starch esterification modification had improved the melt flow properties of starch/PLA composite material. Strain scanning also showed that the compatibility of ES/PLA was increased. While frequency scanning showed that the storage modulus and complex viscosity of ES/PLA was less than that of NS/PLA. PMID:24315947

  2. Packaging performance of organic acid incorporated chitosan films on dried anchovy (Stolephorus indicus).

    PubMed

    Vimaladevi, S; Panda, Satyen Kumar; Xavier, K A Martin; Bindu, J

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial chitosan films were prepared with acetic acid and propionic acid with glycerol as plasticizer and its efficiency was compared with polyester-polyethylene laminate (PEST/LDPE). The tensile strength of acetic acid/chitosan (ACS) films were higher than propionic acid/chitosan (PCS) films. The elongation percentage (6.43-11.3) and water vapour permeability (0.015-0.03 g/m(2)/day) were significantly lower (p<0.05) for chitosan films when compared to control. Oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of control and propionic acid/chitosan (PCS) films were significantly higher (p<0.05) than acetic acid/chitosan (ACS) films. Dried anchovy (Stolephorus indicus) wrapped in these films were stored at ambient temperature for three months. Quality indices like peroxide value (PV), thiobarbituric acid value (TBA) and microbiological parameters such as aerobic plate count (APC) and total fungal count (TFC) were periodically determined. In terms of microbial and chemical indices, anchovies wrapped in ACS and PCS films were superior to those wrapped with PEST/LDPE films during storage. Study revealed the suitability of chitosan film as wraps for increasing storage stability of dried fish. PMID:25965473

  3. Comparison of Aerodynamic Resistance Parameterizations and Implications for Dry Deposition Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen deposition data used to support the secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards and critical loads research derives from both measurements and modeling. Data sets with spatial coverage sufficient for regional scale deposition assessments are currently generated fro...

  4. A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vet, Robert; Artz, Richard S.; Carou, Silvina; Shaw, Mike; Ro, Chul-Un; Aas, Wenche; Baker, Alex; Bowersox, Van C.; Dentener, Frank; Galy-Lacaux, Corinne; Hou, Amy; Pienaar, Jacobus J.; Gillett, Robert; Forti, M. Cristina; Gromov, Sergey; Hara, Hiroshi; Khodzher, Tamara; Mahowald, Natalie M.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Rao, P. S. P.; Reid, Neville W.

    2014-08-01

    A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition has been carried out under the direction of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Scientific Advisory Group for Precipitation Chemistry (SAG-PC). The assessment addressed three questions: (1) what do measurements and model estimates of precipitation chemistry and wet, dry and total deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity, and phosphorus show globally and regionally? (2) has the wet deposition of major ions changed since 2000 (and, where information and data are available, since 1990) and (3) what are the major gaps and uncertainties in our knowledge? To that end, regionally-representative measurements for two 3-year-averaging periods, 2000-2002 and 2005-2007, were compiled worldwide. Data from the 2000-2002 averaging period were combined with 2001 ensemble-mean modeling results from 21 global chemical transport models produced in Phase 1 of the Coordinated Model Studies Activities of the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP). The measurement data and modeling results were used to generate global and regional maps of major ion concentrations in precipitation and deposition. A major product of the assessment is a database of quality assured ion concentration and wet deposition data gathered from regional and national monitoring networks. The database is available for download from the World Data Centre for Precipitation Chemistry (http://wdcpc.org/)

  5. OZONE AND SULFUR DIOXIDE DRY DEPOSITION TO FORESTS: OBSERVATIONS AND MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluxes and deposition velocities of O3 and SO2 were measured over both a deciduous and a mixed coniferous-deciduous forest for full growing seasons. Fluxes and deposition velocities of O3 were measured over a coniferous forest for a month. Mean deposition velocities of 0.35 t...

  6. Initial results from the Pawnee eddy correlation system for acid deposition research

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, K.; Massman, W.; Stocker, D.; Fox, D.G.; Stellman, D.; Hazlett, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Pawnee grassland eddy correlation dry deposition project is described. Instrumentation, methods of analysis, and initial data and research findings are presented. Data from this eddy correlation system show agreement with previous observations of deposition velocities for atmospheric ozone, NO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}; micrometeorological theory; and micrometeorological site characteristics.

  7. Do the paleolimnological reconstructions reflect the influence of acid deposition?

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, D.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The using possibility of paleolimnological analyses was considered with the documentation aim of acid-forming substances distant transfer on territory of Northern Fennoscandia. The Holocene and ancient interglacial lakes pH-and alkalinity trends, reconstructed by means of bottom sediments diatomic analyses, were studied. It has been made evident that the tendency to sharp changes of these data is revealed on final stages of interglacial periods. At that time the high amplitude of climatic changes with low periodicity is resulting in catastrophic changes of landscapes in the frames of water-catchments bodies. During the last millennium the climatic situation in the Northern Fennoscandia was changing repeatedly (Medieval Warm Epoch, Little Ice Age, the rise in temperature in 20-40`s of XXth century). In the Little Ice Age (XVI-XIX centuries) the decrease of average annual temperature and intensification of winds velocity have caused a rapid retreat of latitudinal and high-altitude forest boundaries, accompanied by sharp reconstruction of tundra-,forest-tundra-and northern taiga landscapes. These processes have accelerated due to the enforcement of economic activity which caused the destruction of vegetation cover (salt-working, and ship-building since the XIXth century, pasture of reindeer herds since the end of XIXth century). Acidifying of ground and surface waters in the current century could be caused by the increased entry of organic acids, as a result of plant residues decomposition. The decomposition process was activated in the end of XIXth - beginning of XXth century in connection with the rise of temperature and increase of precipitation. Thus, the trends in pH and alkalinity changes in this region can not be used as indicators of acid-forming substances atmospheric deposition increase.

  8. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in the gas-phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the regional chemistry transport model WRF-Chem, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48% and 63% respectively over the continental US Dry deposition of gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (-40% vs. -8% for anthropogenics, -52% vs. -11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas-phase (61% for anthropogenics, 76% for biogenics). A number of sensitivity studies shows that this is a robust feature of the modeling system. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = 105 M atm-1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 25% / 10% compared to our best estimate. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm-1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower

  9. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-05-26

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in the gas-phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the regional chemistry transport model WRF-Chem, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48% and 63% respectively over the continental US Dry deposition of gas-phasemore » SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (−40% vs. −8% for anthropogenics, −52% vs. −11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas-phase (61% for anthropogenics, 76% for biogenics). A number of sensitivity studies shows that this is a robust feature of the modeling system. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = 105 M atm−1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 25% / 10% compared to our best estimate. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm−1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We

  10. Photosynthetic and growth responses of Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric and nitric acid depositions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fang-Fang; Ding, Hui-Ming; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Jing-Jing; Yang, Song-Yu; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A continuing rise in acid deposition can cause forest degradation. In China, acid deposition has converted gradually from sulfuric acid deposition (SAD) to nitric acid deposition (NAD). However, the differing responses of photosynthesis and growth to depositions of sulfuric vs. nitric acid have not been well studied. In this study, 1-year-old seedlings of Schima superba, a dominant species in subtropical forests, were treated with two types of acid deposition SO4 (2-)/NO3 (-) ratios (8:1 and 0.7:1) with two applications (foliar spraying and soil drenching) at two pH levels (pH 3.5 and pH 2.5) over a period of 18 months. The results showed that the intensity, acid deposition type, and spraying method had significant effects on the physiological characteristics and growth performance of seedlings. Acid deposition at pH 2.5 via foliar application reduced photosynthesis and growth of S. superba, especially in the first year. Unlike SAD, NAD with high acidity potentially alleviated the negative effects of acidity on physiological properties and growth, probably due to a fertilization effect that improved foliar nitrogen and chlorophyll contents. Our results suggest that trees were damaged mainly by direct acid stress in the short term, whereas in the long term, soil acidification was also likely to be a major risk to forest ecosystems. Our data suggest that the shift in acid deposition type may complicate the ongoing challenge of anthropogenic acid deposition to ecosystem stability. PMID:26797956

  11. DRYING AFFECTS ARTEMISININ, DIHYDROARTEMISINIC ACID, ARTEMISINIC ACID, AND THE ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY OF ARTEMISIA ANNUA L. LEAVES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The anti-parasitic, anti-cancer, and anti-viral sesquiterpene lactone artemisinin, commercially extracted from Artemisia annua, is in high demand worldwide. However, limited information is available on how post-harvest drying procedures affect plant biochemistry leading to the biosynthesis of artem...

  12. Development of an assay to simultaneously measure orotic acid, amino acids, and acylcarnitines in dried blood spots

    PubMed Central

    Held, Patrice K.; Haynes, Christopher A.; De Jesús, Víctor R.; Baker, Mei W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Orotic aciduria in the presence of hyperammonemia is a key indicator for a defect in the urea cycle, specifically ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency. Current newborn screening (NBS) protocols can detect several defects of the urea cycle, but screening for OTC deficiency remains a challenge due to the lack of a suitable assay. The purpose of this study was to develop a high-throughput assay to measure orotic acid in dried blood spot (DBS) specimens as an indicator for urea cycle dysfunction, which can be readily incorporated into routine NBS. Methods Orotic acid was extracted from DBS punches and analyzed using flow-injection analysis tandem mass spectrometry (FIA–MS/MS) with negative-mode ionization, requiring <2 min/sample run time. This method was then multiplexed into a conventional newborn screening assay for analysis of amino acids, acylcarnitines, and orotic acid. Results We describe 2 assays which can quantify orotic acid in DBS: a stand-alone method and a combined method for analysis of orotic acid, amino acids, and acylcarnitines. Both methods demonstrated orotic acid recovery of 75–85% at multiple levels of enrichment. Precision was also comparable to traditional FIA–MS/MS methods. Analysis of residual presumptively normal NBS specimens demonstrated a 5:1 signal to noise ratio and the average concentration of orotic acid was approximately 1.2 μmol/l. The concentration of amino acids and acylcarnitines as measured by the combined method showed no significant differences when compared to the conventional newborn screening assay. In addition, retrospective analysis of confirmed patients and presumptively normal newborn screening specimens suggests potential for the methods to identify patients with OTC deficiency, as well as other urea cycle defects. Conclusion The assays described here quantify orotic acid in DBS using a simple extraction and FIA–MS/MS analysis procedures that can be implemented into current NBS protocols. PMID

  13. Deposition and rainwater concentrations of trifluoroacetic acid in the United States from the use of HFO-1234yf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; McKeen, S.; Kim, S.-W.; Ahmadov, R.; Grell, G. A.; Talukdar, R. K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Currently, HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) is the most common refrigerant in automobile air conditioners. This high global warming potential substance (100 year GWP of 1370) will likely be phased out and replaced with HFO-1234yf (2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene) that has a 100 year GWP of 4. HFO-1234yf will be oxidized to produce trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in clouds. TFA, a mildly toxic substance with detrimental effects on some aquatic organisms at high concentrations (≥100μgL-1), would be transported by rain to the surface and enter bodies of water. We investigated the dry and wet deposition of TFA from HFO-1234yf over the contiguous USA using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting model (ARW) with interactive chemical, aerosol, and cloud processes (WRF/Chem) model. Special focus was placed on emissions from three continental USA regions with different meteorological characteristics. WRF/Chem simulated meteorology, cloud processes, gas and aqueous phase chemistry, and dry and wet deposition between May and September 2006. The model reproduced well the multimonth total sulfate wet deposition (4% bias) and its spatial variability (r = 0.86) observed by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. HFO-1234yf emissions were obtained by assuming the number of automobile air conditioners to remain unchanged, and substituting HFO-1234yf, mole-per-mole for HFC-134a. Our estimates of current HFC-134a emissions were in agreement with field data. Average TFA rainwater concentration was 0.89μgL-1, with peak values of 7.8μgL-1, for the May-September 2006 period over the contiguous USA. TFA rainwater concentrations over the dry western USA were often significantly higher, but wet-deposited TFA amounts remained relatively low at such locations.

  14. Design of spray dried insulin microparticles to bypass deposition in the extrathoracic region and maximize total lung dose.

    PubMed

    Ung, Keith T; Rao, Nagaraja; Weers, Jeffry G; Huang, Daniel; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-09-25

    Inhaled drugs all too often deliver only a fraction of the emitted dose to the target lung site due to deposition in the extrathoracic region (i.e., mouth and throat), which can lead to increased variation in lung exposure, and in some instances increases in local and systemic side effects. For aerosol medications, improved targeting to the lungs may be achieved by tailoring the micromeritic properties of the particles (e.g., size, density, rugosity) to minimize deposition in the mouth-throat and maximize the total lung dose. This study evaluated a co-solvent spray drying approach to modulate particle morphology and dose delivery characteristics of engineered powder formulations of insulin microparticles. The binary co-solvent system studied included water as the primary solvent mixed with an organic co-solvent, e.g., ethanol. Factors such as the relative rate of evaporation of each component of a binary co-solvent mixture, and insulin solubility in each component were considered in selecting feedstock compositions. A water-ethanol co-solvent mixture with a composition range considered suitable for modulating particle shell formation during drying was selected for experimental investigation. An Alberta Idealized Throat model was used to evaluate the in vitro total lung dose of a series of spray dried insulin formulations engineered with different bulk powder properties and delivered with two prototype inhalers that fluidize and disperse powder using different principles. The in vitro total lung dose of insulin microparticles was improved and favored for powders with low bulk density and small primary particle size, with reduction of deposition in the extrathoracic region. The results demonstrated that a total lung dose >95% of the delivered dose can be achieved with engineered particles, indicating a high degree of lung targeting, almost completely bypassing deposition in the mouth-throat. PMID:27480399

  15. Dry deposition washoff and dew on the surfaces of pine foliage on the urban- and mountain-facing sides of Mt. Gokurakuji, western Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiwa, M.; Oshiro, N.; Miyake, T.; Nakatani, N.; Kimura, N.; Yuhara, T.; Hashimoto, N.; Sakugawa, H.

    Dry deposition and dew components on pine foliage were measured from 1998 to 2000 on the urban- and mountain-facing sides of Mt. Gokurakuji in order to estimate the effect of anthropogenic activities to dry deposition and dew concentration on the surfaces of pine foliage. A leaf wash experiment was employed to determine the dry deposition rates on the pine foliage. The NO 3- and SO 42- dry deposition rates per unit surface area of pine foliage were 1.47 and 0.28 μmol m -2 h -1 respectively on the urban-facing side and 0.32 and 0.09 μmol m -2 h -1 on the mountain-facing side. Dry deposition fluxes of N (NO 3-+NH 4+) and S (SO 42-) to the forest floors were 8.4 kg N ha -1 yr -1 and 2.8 kg S ha -1 yr -1 on the urban-facing, and 3.3 kg N ha -1 yr -1 and 1.8 kg S ha -1 yr -1 on the mountain-facing side, respectively. The higher dry deposition fluxes of N and S on the urban-facing side could be attributed to its proximity to traffic roads and the urban area. The concentrations of most ions in the dew were higher on the urban-facing side (U130) than on the mountain-facing side (M430). NO 3- and SO 42- concentrations in dew at U130 were 802 and 428 μeq l -1, respectively, while at M430 they were 199 and 222 μeq l -1, respectively, suggesting that higher dry deposition rates on the urban-facing side enhanced their concentrations in the dew on this side. The role of dry deposits and subsequently dissolved ones in dew on the needle surfaces is discussed in terms of pine tree damage by atmospheric depositions.

  16. The influence of a small amount of maleic acid on crystal deposition phenomena of methacrylic acid in melt crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Tomomichi; Kato, Shinpei; Takiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Crystal deposition phenomena were investigated in the suspension melt crystallization of an organic acid. Methacrylic acid was used as the target substance, a certain amount of methanol was used as the solvent, and the effect of a small amount of maleic acid by-produced in methacrylic acid synthesis was focused on. Batch crystallizations were carried out on a laboratory scale using various concentrations of maleic acid. In the presence of maleic acid, a certain deviation from equilibrium of the pure binary system was observed in the final composition of mother liquor. Moreover, nevertheless the final temperature in the crystallizer was same, the amount of crystal deposition in the presence of maleic acid was smaller than in the absence of maleic acid. It was suggested that the final amount of crystal deposition decreased in the presence of maleic acid. Additionally, it was observed that the obtained crystal size was smaller in the presence of maleic acid. Hence, a simplified kinetic analysis of crystal deposition rates was carried out to make the effect of maleic acid clear. Consequently, it was suggested that the cause of the above-mentioned phenomena was the existence of the maleic acid concentration dependent pseudo-liquidus line.

  17. U.S. EPA WORKSHOP TO DEVELOP A SIMPLE MODEL FOR ACID DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Deposition Planning Staff in the Office of Acid Deposition/EPA requested that the Atmospheric Sciences Research Laboratory undertake the development of a low-computational-demanding model suitable for educational use in understanding the linear or non-linear nature of th...

  18. Dry-spray deposition of TiO2 for a flexible dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) using a nanoparticle deposition system (NPDS).

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Saeng; Chun, Doo-Man; Choi, Jung-Oh; Lee, Jong-Cheon; Kim, Yang Hee; Kim, Kwang-Su; Lee, Caroline Sunyong; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2012-04-01

    TiO2 powders were deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates for application to the photoelectrode of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). In the conventional DSSC manufacturing process, a semiconductor oxide such as TiO2 powder requires a sintering process at higher temperature than the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of polymers, and thus utilization of flexible polymer substrates in DSSC research has been constrained. To overcome this restriction related to sintering, we used a nanoparticle deposition system (NPDS) that could produce a thin coating layer through a dry-spray method under atmospheric pressure at room temperature. The powder was sprayed through a slit-type nozzle having a 0.4 x 10 mm2 rectangular outlet. In order to determine the deposited TiO2 thickness, five kinds of TiO2 layered specimens were prepared, where the specimens have single and double layer structures. Deposited powders on the ITO coated PET substrates were observed using FE-SEM and a scan profiler The thicker TiO2 photoelectrode with a DSSC having a double layer structure showed higher energy efficiency than the single layer case. The highest fabricated flexible DSSC displayed a short circuit current density J(sc) = 1.99 mA cm(-2), open circuit voltage V(oc) = 0.71 V, and energy efficiency eta = 0.94%. These results demonstrate the possibility of utilizing the dry-spray method to fabricate a TiO2 layer on flexible polymer substrates at room temperature under atmospheric pressure. PMID:22849129

  19. Variation of Atmospheric Deposition of Acid Species and Yellow Sand Particles From 1987 to 1999 Through Modeling Studies and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Uno, I.; Zhang, M.; Akimoto, H.

    2002-05-01

    Acid deposition is of serious environmental concern in East Asia. Wet and dry deposition monitoring datasets have been collected for long enough to understand the deposition distribution and its variation in time and space in this region Field observations indicate that acid precipitation often occurs in the southern part of China, even though emissions of the precursors are stronger in the north, where such high levels of strong acids in precipitation have not been widely. The acidity of rainwater is heavily influenced and modified by natural soil dust from desert and semi-arid areas. This soil aerosol, or _gKOSA", is lifted from Asian deserts and the Loess plateau, and then carried by the prevailing wind over East Asia. A comprehensive Air Quality Prediction Modeling System (AQPMS) is used to perform year-long, quantitative simulation of rainwater pH in East Asia for 1987 and 1999, respectively with emissions of Akimoto et al.(1987) and Street et al.(2000), to discuss the variation of deposition of acid species and yellow sand particles due to the emission change in the past dozen years. Monitoring data at 17 sites of EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) in addition to the field observation data of SEPA(State Environmental Protection Agency) of China are used to evaluate the model, and a reasonable agreement is obtained. Emission in Sichuan province has decreased and emission in central China including Hubei province and Hunan province has increased. Model simulation shows the change of emission pattern caused the serious acid-rain-hit area moving southeastward as observed. In the west part of Sichuan province, the pH value increased, this is partly due to the success of countermeasures against acid rain in China since 1996, which reduce the emission in Sichuan area much more than expected. The variations of annual distribution of rain pH, sulfate, nitrite and yellow sand particles deposition are also discussed in detail, so do the

  20. Error estimations of dry deposition velocities of air pollutants using bulk sea surface temperature under common assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Yao; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Keenlyside, Noel; Wang, Shu-Lun; Arthur Chen, Chen-Tung; Wang, Bin-Jye; Liu, Tsun-Hsien

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that skin sea surface temperature (SSST) is different from bulk sea surface temperature (BSST) by a few tenths of a degree Celsius. However, the extent of the error associated with dry deposition (or uptake) estimation by using BSST is not well known. This study tries to conduct such an evaluation using the on-board observation data over the South China Sea in the summers of 2004 and 2006. It was found that when a warm layer occurred, the deposition velocities using BSST were underestimated within the range of 0.8-4.3%, and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was overestimated by 21 W m -2. In contrast, under cool skin only conditions, the deposition velocities using BSST were overestimated within the range of 0.5-2.0%, varying with pollutants and the absorbed sea surface heat flux was underestimated also by 21 W m -2. Scale analysis shows that for a slightly soluble gas (e.g., NO 2, NO and CO), the error in the solubility estimation using BSST is the major source of the error in dry deposition estimation. For a highly soluble gas (e.g., SO 2), the error in the estimation of turbulent heat fluxes and, consequently, aerodynamic resistance and gas-phase film resistance using BSST is the major source of the total error. In contrast, for a medium soluble gas (e.g., O 3 and CO 2) both the errors from the estimations of the solubility and aerodynamic resistance are important. In addition, deposition estimations using various assumptions are discussed. The largest uncertainty is from the parameterizations for chemical enhancement factors. Other important areas of uncertainty include: (1) various parameterizations for gas-transfer velocity; (2) neutral-atmosphere assumption; (3) using BSST as SST, and (4) constant pH value assumption.

  1. Field measurements of dry deposition to spruce foliage and petri dishes in the Black Forest, F.R.G.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Dry deposition fluxes Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Mn2+, Pb2+ and SO42- to spruce foliage and petri dishes were measured in two high-elevation sites (>900 m) in the southern Black Forest, F.R.G., during 12 periods (2-7 days, each) from mid-September to mid-November, 1983, In situ extraction of deposited material from small spruce branches allowed repeated use of the same foliar collecting surfaces for a direct comparison of deposition between periods. Fluxes were corrected for leaching of internally cycled constituents using factors determined from serial extraction experiments. The ratio of flux to petri dishes vs foliage (P/F) was >1.0 for Ca2+, Pb2+ and SO42-, and somewhat 900 m) in the southern Black Forest, F.R.G., during 12 periods (2-7 days, each) from mid-September to mid-November, 1983. The ratio of flux to petri dishes vs foliage (P/F) was >1.0 for Ca2+, Pb2+, and SO42-, and somewhat <1.0 but more constant for Mg2+. Temporal variations in dry deposition fluxes at an exposed site near the industrialized Rhine Valley correlated with variations in total air particulate concentrations at a nearby air quality station. Deposition rates were comparable in magnitude but different in temporal pattern at a remote site in the Black Forest interior. Fluxes at each site reached a minimum during the period of 4-9 November when a regional air inversion confined pollutants to the Rhine Valley below the study sites. High fluxes accompanied the inversion break-up.

  2. Acid deposition and air quality related values in north central Colorado wilderness areas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hidy, G.M.

    1995-05-01

    Terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem response to atmospheric acid, sulfur, and nitrate deposition has been studied only in a very limited way in Colorado wilderness areas. However, the observed deposition rates in north central Colorado remain low relative to affected areas in the eastern United States and well within a range where no adverse ecological effects are expected. This report presents a survey of scientific information describing acid deposition and air quality related values, which may have implications for utility plant operations.

  3. Phase-Partitioning and Dry Deposition of Atmospheric Nitrogen at the Mid-Atlantic U.S. Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, K. M.; Keene, W. C.; Maben, J. R.; Galloway, J. N.

    2001-12-01

    Dry deposition of gaseous NH3 and HNO3 and particulate NH4+ and NO3- from the atmosphere is a potentially important but poorly constrained source of nutrient N for coastal ecosystems. Reliable multiphase measurements are essential to elucidate major controls on phase-partitioning and removal processes in chemically evolving air masses transported through coastal regions. During July and August 2000 at Lewes, Delaware, we sampled ambient NH3, HNO3, and HCl over 2-hour intervals with mist chambers and particulate NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, and Na+ over 12-hour (day/night) intervals with cascade impactors. Based on these measurements, aerosol liquid water content as a function of size was estimated with hygroscopicity models, corresponding pH's were inferred from the thermodynamic properties of NH3, HNO3, and HCl, and dry deposition fluxes of gaseous and particulate N were modeled. Major controls on phase partitioning and deposition fluxes (relative humidity, wind velocity, transport regime, and relative mix of sea-salt and continental emissions) were evaluated in the context of regional N budgets.

  4. Lead isotopes combined with a sequential extraction procedure for source apportionment in the dry deposition of Asian dust and non-Asian dust.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pyeong-Koo; Yu, Soonyoung

    2016-03-01

    Lead isotopic compositions were determined in leachates that were generated using sequential extractions of dry deposition samples of Asian dust (AD) and non-Asian dust (NAD) and Chinese desert soils, and used to apportion Pb sources. Results showed significant differences in (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(204)Pb isotopic compositions in non-residual fractions between the dry deposition samples and the Chinese desert soils while (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(204)Pb isotopic compositions in residual fraction of the dry deposition of AD and NAD were similar to the mean (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(204)Pb in residual fraction of the Alashan Plateau soil. These results indicate that the geogenic materials of the dry deposition of AD and NAD were largely influenced by the Alashan Plateau soil, while the secondary sources of the dry deposition were different from those of the Chinese desert soils. In particular, the lead isotopic compositions in non-residual fractions of the dry deposition were homogenous, which implies that the non-residual four fractions (F1 to F4) shared the primary anthropogenic origin. (206)Pb/(207)Pb values and the predominant wind directions in the study area suggested that airborne particulates of heavily industrialized Chinese cities were one of the main Pb sources. Source apportionment calculations showed that the average proportion of anthropogenic Pb in the dry deposition of AD and NAD was 87% and 95% respectively in total Pb extraction, 92% and 97% in non-residual fractions, 15% and 49% in residual fraction. Approximately 81% and 80% of the anthropogenic Pb was contributed by coal combustion in China in the dry deposition of AD and NAD respectively while the remainder was derived from industrial Pb contamination. The research result proposes that sequential extractions with Pb isotope analysis are a useful tool for the discrimination of anthropogenic and geogenic origins in highly contaminated AD and NAD. PMID:26708760

  5. Estimation and mapping of wet and dry mercury deposition across northeastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, E.K.; Vanarsdale, A.; Keeler, G.J.; Chalmers, A.; Poissant, L.; Kamman, N.C.; Brulotte, R.

    2005-01-01

    Whereas many ecosystem characteristics and processes influence mercury accumulation in higher trophic-level organisms, the mercury flux from the atmosphere to a lake and its watershed is a likely factor in potential risk to biota. Atmospheric deposition clearly affects mercury accumulation in soils and lake sediments. Thus, knowledge of spatial patterns in atmospheric deposition may provide information for assessing the relative risk for ecosystems to exhibit excessive biotic mercury contamination. Atmospheric mercury concentrations in aerosol, vapor, and liquid phases from four observation networks were used to estimate regional surface concentration fields. Statistical models were developed to relate sparsely measured mercury vapor and aerosol concentrations to the more commonly measured mercury concentration in precipitation. High spatial resolution deposition velocities for different phases (precipitation, cloud droplets, aerosols, and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM)) were computed using inferential models. An empirical model was developed to estimate gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) deposition. Spatial patterns of estimated total mercury deposition were complex. Generally, deposition was higher in the southwest and lower in the northeast. Elevation, land cover, and proximity to urban areas modified the general pattern. The estimated net GEM and RGM fluxes were each greater than or equal to wet deposition in many areas. Mercury assimilation by plant foliage may provide a substantial input of methyl-mercury (MeHg) to ecosystems. ?? 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  6. Ozone and sulfur dioxide dry deposition to forests: Observations and model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Peter L.; Ellestad, Thomas G.; Clarke, John F.; Meyers, Tilden P.; Schwede, Donna B.; Hebert, Eric O.; Neal, Julie A.

    2000-06-01

    Fluxes and deposition velocities of O3 and SO2 were measured over both a deciduous and a mixed coniferous-deciduous forest for full growing seasons. Fluxes and deposition velocities of O3 were measured over a coniferous forest for a month. Mean deposition velocities of 0.35 to 0.48 cm/s for O3 and 0.6 to 0.72 cm/s for SO2 were observed during the growing seasons of 1997 and 1998. Weekly averages of O3 deposition velocity ranged from 0.25 cm/s at the beginning and end of the season to 1.25 cm/s in late June. SO2 had a smaller seasonal variation, from 0.75 to 1.5 cm/s between the beginning and peak of the season. Because O3 concentrations are higher, the flux of O3 to forests is considerably greater than the flux of SO2. Daytime deposition velocities are very similar at each site, from 0.75 to 0.79 cm/s for O3, and from 1.01 to 1.04 cm/s for SO2. Diurnal cycles for both gases are discussed, as are the impact of some weather events. The peak time for O3 deposition velocity is in midmorning, while it is near midday for SO2. Surface wetness is usually associated with a small increase in deposition velocity, but for some rain events a major increase was noted. Minimum deposition velocities usually occur at night and increase slowly in the predawn hours before light. Comparisons are made between observations of deposition velocity and predictions made with the Meyers multilayer deposition velocity model. While the model is, on average, unbiased for O3, it tends to underpredict the higher deposition velocity values. The model is slightly biased low (underpredicts) for SO2 deposition velocity. The strengths of the model are noted, as are opportunities for improvement.

  7. Fluxes, variability and sources of cadmium, lead, arsenic and mercury in dry atmospheric depositions in urban, suburban and rural areas

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, G.; Chen, Z.; Teng, J.; Bi, C.; Zhou, D.; Sun, C.; Li, Y.; Xu, S.

    2012-02-15

    In China's largest city, Shanghai, dry deposition fluxes of Cd, Pb, As and Hg were 137, 19 354, 2897 and 9.4 {mu}g m{sup -2} a{sup -1}, respectively in an urban area, intermediate in a suburban area, and 51.7, 5311, 1703 and 7.3 {mu}g m{sup -2} a{sup -1}, respectively in a rural area. Enrichment factors were Cd>Pb>As>Hg. Seasonal variations of metals differed: Pb and As were dominated by fossil fuel combustion, Cd was related to industrial pollution, and natural source controlled Hg levels.

  8. Fluxes, variability and sources of cadmium, lead, arsenic and mercury in dry atmospheric depositions in urban, suburban and rural areas.

    PubMed

    Shi, G; Chen, Z; Teng, J; Bi, C; Zhou, D; Sun, C; Li, Y; Xu, S

    2012-02-01

    In China's largest city, Shanghai, dry deposition fluxes of Cd, Pb, As and Hg were 137, 19354, 2897 and 9.4 μgm(-2)a(-1), respectively in an urban area, intermediate in a suburban area, and 51.7, 5311, 1703 and 7.3 μgm(-2)a(-1), respectively in a rural area. Enrichment factors were Cd>Pb>As>Hg. Seasonal variations of metals differed: Pb and As were dominated by fossil fuel combustion, Cd was related to industrial pollution, and natural source controlled Hg levels. PMID:22280823

  9. Effects of acid deposition on terrestrial ecosystems and their rehabilitation strategies in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zong-wei; Miao, Hong; Zhang, Fu-zhu; Huang, Yi-zong

    2002-04-01

    South China has become the third largest region associated with acid deposition following Europe and North America, the area subject to damage by acid deposition increased from 1.75 million km2 in 1985 to 2.8 million km2 in 1993. Acid deposition has caused serious damage to ecosystem. Combined pollution of acid rain and SO2 showed the obvious multiple effects on crops. Vegetable was more sensitive to acid deposition than foodstuff crops. Annual economic loss of crops due to acid deposition damage in eleven provinces of south China was 4.26 billion RMB Yuan. Acid deposition caused serious damage to forest. Annual economic loss of wood volume was about 1.8 billion RMB Yuan and forest ecological benefit loss 16.2 billion in eleven provinces of south China. Acid deposition in south China was typical "sulfuric acid type". According to the thoughts of sustainable development, some strategies were brought forward as follows: (1) enhancing environmental management, specifying acid-controlling region, controlling and abating the total emission amount of SO2; (2) selecting practical energy technologies of clean coal, for example, cleansing and selecting coal, sulfur-fixed-type industrial briqutting, abating sulfur from waste gas and so on; (3) developing other energy sources to replace coal, including water electricity, atomic energy and the new energy such as solar energy, wind energy and so on; (4) in acid deposition region of south China, selecting acid-resistant type of crop and tree to decrease agricultural losses, planting more green fertilizer crops, using organic fertilizers and liming, in order to improve buffer capacities of soil. PMID:12046292

  10. FACTORS AFFECTING DRY DEPOSITION OF SO2 ON FORESTS AND GRASSLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Deposition velocities for SO2 over forests and grasslands are derived through a mass conservation approach using established empirical relations descriptive of the atmospheric transport of a gaseous contaminant above and within a vegetational canopy. Of particular interest are si...

  11. ESTIMATING GASEOUS EXCHANGES BETWEEN THE ATMOSPHERE AND PLANTS USING A COUPLED BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To study gaseous exchanges between the soil, biosphere and atmosphere, a biochemical model was coupled with the latest version of Meyers Multi-Layer Deposition Model. The biochemical model describes photosynthesis and respiration and their coupling with stomatal resistance for...

  12. Growth, yield and yield components of dry bean as influenced by phosphorus in a tropical acid soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus deficiency is one of the most yield limiting factors for dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production in tropical acid soils. Dry beans are invariably grown as mono crops or as inter crops under the perennial tropical crops. Information is limited regarding the influence of phosphorus fertili...

  13. Dry Deposition Velocity Estimation for the Savannah River Site: Part 2 -- Parametric and Site-Specific Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Cook, Kary M.

    2013-09-12

    Values for the dry deposition velocity of airborne particles were estimated with the GENII Version 2.10.1 computer code for the Savannah River site using assumptions about surface roughness parameters and particle size and density. Use of the GENII code is recommended by the U.S. Department of Energy for this purpose. Meteorological conditions evaluated include atmospheric stability classes D, E, and F and wind speeds of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m/s. Local surface roughness values ranging from 0.03 to 2 meters were evaluated. Particles with mass mean diameters of 1, 5, and 10 microns and densities of 1, 3, 4, and 5 g/cm3 were evaluated. Site specific meteorology was used to predict deposition velocity for Savannah River conditions for a range of distances from 670 to 11,500 meters.

  14. Enhanced Dry Reforming of Methane on Ni and Ni-Pt Catalysts Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Troy D.; Montemore, Matthew M.; Lubers, Alia M.; Ellis, Lucas D.; Weimer, Alan; Falconer, John L.; Medlin, James W.

    2015-02-25

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to deposit Ni and Pt on alumina supports to form monometallic and bimetallic catalysts with initial particle sizes of 1–2.4 nm. The ALD catalysts were more active (per mass of metal) than catalysts prepared by incipient wetness (IW) for dry reforming of methane (DRM), and they did not form carbon whiskers during reaction due to their sufficiently small size. Catalysts modified by Pt ALD had higher rates of reaction per mass of metal and inhibited coking, whereas NiPt catalysts synthesized by IW still formed carbon whiskers. Temperature-programmed reduction of Ni catalysts modified by Pt ALD indicated the presence of bimetallic interaction. Density functional theory calculations suggested that under reaction conditions, the NiPt surfaces form Ni-terminated surfaces that are associated with higher DRM rates (due to their C and O adsorption energies, as well as the CO formation and CH4 dissociation energies).

  15. Effect of acid adaptation on inactivation of Salmonella during drying and storage of beef jerky treated with marinades.

    PubMed

    Calicioglu, Mehmet; Sofos, John N; Samelis, John; Kendall, Patricia A; Smith, Gary C

    2003-12-15

    This study evaluated the influence of pre-drying marinade treatments on inactivation of acid-adapted or nonadapted Salmonella on beef jerky during preparation, drying and storage. The inoculated (five-strain composite, 6.0 log CFU/cm2) slices were subjected to the following marinades (24 h, 4 degrees C) prior to drying at 60 degrees C for 10 h and aerobic storage at 25 degrees C for 60 days: (1) no marinade, control (C), (2) traditional marinade (TM), (3) double amount of TM modified with added 1.2% sodium lactate, 9% acetic acid, and 68% soy sauce with 5% ethanol (MM), (4) dipping into 5% acetic acid and then TM (AATM), and (5) dipping into 1% Tween 20 and then into 5% acetic acid, followed by TM (TWTM). Bacterial survivors were determined on tryptic soy agar with 0.1% pyruvate and xylose-lysine-tergitol 4 (XLT4) agar. Results indicated that drying reduced bacterial populations in the order of pre-drying treatments TWTM (4.8-6.0 log CFU/cm2)> or =AATM> or =MM>TM> or =C (2.6-5.0 log CFU/cm2). Nonadapted Salmonella were significantly (P<0.05) more resistant to inactivation during drying than acid-adapted Salmonella in all treatments. Bacterial populations decreased below the detection limit (-0.4 log CFU/cm2) as early as 7 h during drying or remained detectable even after 60 days of storage, depending on acid adaptation, pre-drying treatment, and agar media. The results indicated that acid adaptation may not cause increased resistance of Salmonella to the microbial hurdles involved in jerky processing and that use of modified marinades in manufacturing jerky may improve the effectiveness of drying in inactivating Salmonella. PMID:14580973

  16. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1987 ANNUAL AND SEASONAL DATA SUMMARIES FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the 1987 wet deposition precipitation chemistry data collected in North America and available in the Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base. nterpretative statistical analyses are not a focus of this report; however, users of the report will learn about maj...

  17. ACID PRECIPITATION IN NORTH AMERICA: 1980, 1981 AND 1982 ANNUAL DATA SUMMARIES FROM ACID DEPOSITION SYSTEM DATA BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Deposition System (ADS) data base for North American wet deposition data is used to provide an overview of the major North American monitoring networks: NADP, CANSAP, APN, MAP3S/PCN, EPRI/SURE, UAPSP and APIOS daily and cumulative. Individual site annual statistical summ...

  18. Influence of dry deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC) on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the Mexico City plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, Alma; Madronich, Sasha; Aumont, Bernard; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Karl, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The dry deposition removal of organic compounds from the atmosphere and its impact on organic aerosol mass is currently unexplored and unaccounted for in chemistry-climate models. The main reason for this omission is that current models use simplified SOA mechanisms that lump precursors and their products into volatility bins, therefore losing information on other important properties of individual molecules (or groups) that are needed to calculate dry deposition. In this study, we apply the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to simulate SOA formation and estimate the influence of dry deposition of VOCs on SOA concentrations downwind of Mexico City. SOA precursors considered here include short- and long-chain alkanes (C3-25), alkenes, and light aromatics. The results suggest that 90% of SOA produced in Mexico City originates from the oxidation and partitioning of long-chain (C>12) alkanes, while the regionally exported SOA is almost equally produced from long-chain alkanes and from shorter alkanes and light aromatics. We show that dry deposition of oxidized gases is not an efficient sink for SOA, as it removes <5% of SOA within the city's boundary layer and ~15% downwind. We discuss reasons for this limited influence, and investigate separately the impacts on short and long-chain species. We show that the dry deposition is competing with the uptake of gases to the aerosol phase, and because dry deposition of submicron aerosols is slow, condensation onto particles protects organic gases from deposition and therefore increases their atmospheric burden and lifetime. In the absence of this condensation, ~50% of the regionally produced mass would have been dry-deposited.

  19. Wet and dry deposition of particles associated metals (Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni, Hg) in a rural wetland site, Marais Vernier, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connan, O.; Maro, D.; Hébert, D.; Roupsard, P.; Goujon, R.; Letellier, B.; Le Cavelier, S.

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric transport plays an important role in the transfer of pollutants to ecosystems. During such transport, the atmospheric aerosol is one of the key factors in terms of deposition. Over 18 months, we studied the concentrations of Zn, Pb, Ni, Cd, Hg in air and precipitations in a wetland site in the north west of France. The objective of this study was to characterise the quantities transferred by dry and wet deposition. An eddy correlation technique was used to measure dry deposition velocities and determine the dry deposition fluxes from atmospheric concentration. In this site, wet deposition is almost always preponderant, except for Pb and Cd over several months. Measurements in the air and in rainwater are low and show that the site is protected from important anthropogenic influences, with levels that can be considered as background levels. In terms of deposition fluxes, the configuration of the site and the meteorological conditions (low wind speeds, low thermal fluxes) lead to low dry depositions. Wet depositions, although more important are also relatively low compared to the literature, directly linked to the pluviometry during the study period.

  20. Antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria isolated from dry-fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Fraqueza, Maria João

    2015-11-01

    Dry-fermented sausages are meat products highly valued by many consumers. Manufacturing process involves fermentation driven by natural microbiota or intentionally added starter cultures and further drying. The most relevant fermentative microbiota is lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Lactobacillus, Pediococcus and Enterococcus, producing mainly lactate and contributing to product preservation. The great diversity of LAB in dry-fermented sausages is linked to manufacturing practices. Indigenous starters development is considered to be a very promising field, because it allows for high sanitary and sensorial quality of sausage production. LAB have a long history of safe use in fermented food, however, since they are present in human gastrointestinal tract, and are also intentionally added to the diet, concerns have been raised about the antimicrobial resistance in these beneficial bacteria. In fact, the food chain has been recognized as one of the key routes of antimicrobial resistance transmission from animal to human bacterial populations. The World Health Organization 2014 report on global surveillance of antimicrobial resistance reveals that this issue is no longer a future prediction, since evidences establish a link between the antimicrobial drugs use in food-producing animals and the emergence of resistance among common pathogens. This poses a risk to the treatment of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. This review describes the possible sources and transmission routes of antibiotic resistant LAB of dry-fermented sausages, presenting LAB antibiotic resistance profile and related genetic determinants. Whenever LAB are used as starters in dry-fermented sausages processing, safety concerns regarding antimicrobial resistance should be addressed since antibiotic resistant genes could be mobilized and transferred to other bacteria. PMID:26002560

  1. Three-dimensional patterns from the thin-film drying of amino acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehua; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show the dried-in patterns from amino acid solutions which can be in the form of dots or networks. The three-dimensional lattice-gas Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model is applied to simulate the formation of dot-like and network-like particle structures from the evaporating thin films of solutions. A sigmoidal jump in the chemical potential value is implemented to obtain dual-scale structures with the grain size distribution peaking at two distinctive values. The simulated and experimental results are qualitatively comparable. PMID:26039636

  2. Three-dimensional patterns from the thin-film drying of amino acid solutions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuehua; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show the dried-in patterns from amino acid solutions which can be in the form of dots or networks. The three-dimensional lattice-gas Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model is applied to simulate the formation of dot-like and network-like particle structures from the evaporating thin films of solutions. A sigmoidal jump in the chemical potential value is implemented to obtain dual-scale structures with the grain size distribution peaking at two distinctive values. The simulated and experimental results are qualitatively comparable. PMID:26039636

  3. Dry transfer of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown graphene onto liquid-sensitive surfaces for tunnel junction applications.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ying; Chen, Ke

    2015-01-21

    We report a dry transfer method that can tranfer chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene onto liquid-sensitive surfaces. The graphene grown on copper (Cu) foil substrate was first transferred onto a freestanding 4 μm thick sputtered Cu film using the conventional wet transfer process, followed by a dry transfer process onto the target surface using a polydimethylsiloxane stamp. The dry-transferred graphene has similar properties to traditional wet-transferred graphene, characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. It has a sheet resistance of 1.6 ∼ 3.4 kΩ/□, hole density of (4.1 ∼ 5.3) × 10(12) cm(-2), and hole mobility of 460 ∼ 760 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) without doping at room temperature. The results suggest that large-scale CVD-grown graphene can be transferred with good quality and without contaminating the target surface by any liquid. Mg/MgO/graphene tunnel junctions were fabricated using this transfer method. The junctions show good tunneling characteristics, which demonstrates the transfer technique can also be used to fabricate graphene devices on liquid-sensitive surfaces. PMID:25549272

  4. Dry transfer of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown graphene onto liquid-sensitive surfaces for tunnel junction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ying; Chen, Ke

    2015-01-01

    We report a dry transfer method that can tranfer chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene onto liquid-sensitive surfaces. The graphene grown on copper (Cu) foil substrate was first transferred onto a freestanding 4 μm thick sputtered Cu film using the conventional wet transfer process, followed by a dry transfer process onto the target surface using a polydimethylsiloxane stamp. The dry-transferred graphene has similar properties to traditional wet-transferred graphene, characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. It has a sheet resistance of 1.6 ˜ 3.4 kΩ/□, hole density of (4.1 ˜ 5.3) × 1012 cm-2, and hole mobility of 460 ˜ 760 cm2 V-1 s-1 without doping at room temperature. The results suggest that large-scale CVD-grown graphene can be transferred with good quality and without contaminating the target surface by any liquid. Mg/MgO/graphene tunnel junctions were fabricated using this transfer method. The junctions show good tunneling characteristics, which demonstrates the transfer technique can also be used to fabricate graphene devices on liquid-sensitive surfaces.

  5. Three air quality studies: Great Lakes ozone formation and nitrogen dry deposition; and Tucson aerosol chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Theresa

    (arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, and nickel) in the southern Tucson metropolitan area. A Tucson company that uses beryllium oxide to manufacture thermally conductive ceramics has prompted strong citizen concern. This study found that the study area has good air quality with respect to PM10 and metals, with ambient concentrations meeting US Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization standards. Beryllium was detected only once (during a dust storm) and was ascribed to naturally-occurring beryllium in the suspended soil. The third paper (to be submitted to the Journal of Great Lakes Research) studies nitrogen dry deposition over Lake Michigan and Lake Superior. Numerous studies have shown that wet and dry deposition of nitrogen has contributed to the eutrophication of coastal waters and declining productivity of marine fisheries. Nitrogen dry deposition over the Great Lakes themselves, as opposed to the shorelines, has not been documented in the peer-reviewed literature. This paper calculates nitrogen dry deposition over Lake Michigan and Lake Superior, using aircraft measurements from the LADCO Aircraft Study, and finds that over-water, nitrogen dry deposition is a significant source of nitrogen to Lake Michigan and Lake Superior.

  6. The emerging role of NO{sub x} in acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.A.; Birnbaum, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    The oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) have long been recognized as a principal precursor to acid deposition. Until recently, however, scientific knowledge about the nature and extent of NO{sub x}`s contribution to acidity in the atmosphere and to acid deposition damages on earth has been nascent; the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) and related research during the 1980s focused primarily on the linkage between sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions with acid deposition. This paper summarizes an integrative assessment on the science of NO{sub x} and acid deposition and the multiple environmental benefits associated with decreases in NO{sub x} emissions from coal-fired power plants. The Acid Rain Program performed this staff assessment to support the Phase II Acid Rain NO{sub x} Emission Reduction Rule, proposed on January 19, 1996 (61 FR 1442), and the Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) Integrated NO{sub x} Strategy. Model projections from EPA`s Acid Deposition Standard Feasibility Study (October 1995) provided the initial indication of the important role of NO{sub x} in the future chronic acidification of certain sensitive watershed ecosystems. Corroborative findings from the Bear Brook Watershed Manipulation Experiment and other recent field studies are discussed. This paper also presents an overview discussion of the current state-of-knowledge with respect to NO{sub x}`s role in the acidification of forests, soils, and vegetation as well as acidic-related damage to materials and structures. Basic terms and processes such as {open_quotes}atmospheric nitrogen deposition,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}nitrogen saturation,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}chronic vs. episodic acidification,{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}direct vs. soil-mediated acidification effects{close_quotes} are defined in context so as to facilitate understanding of the emerging role of NO{sub x} in acid deposition.

  7. Vacuolar deposition of ascorbate-derived oxalic acid in barley

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.J.

    1981-03-01

    L-(1-/sup 14/C)Ascorbic acid was supplied to detached barley seedlings to determine the subcellular location of oxalic acid, one of its metabolic products. Intact vacuoles isolated from protoplasts of labeled leaves contained (/sup 14/C)oxalic acid which accounted for about 70% of the intraprotoplast soluble oxalic acid. Tracer-labeled oxalate accounted for 36 and 72% of the /sup 14/C associated with leaf vacuoles of seedlings labeled for 22 and 96 hours, respectively.

  8. Coalescence of fog droplets: Differential fog water deposition on wet and dry forest canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobón, C.; Barrero, J.

    2010-07-01

    The Páramo ecosystem is a high-altitude (2800 - 4500 masl), natural ecosystems which comprises approximately 42000 km2, extending across the Andes from north of Peru, Ecuador, Colombia and western part of Venezuela. Andean páramos are widely considered to be prime suppliers of large volumes of high-quality water for large cities and for hydropower production. As páramos tend to be subjected to persistent fog incidence, fog interception by the vegetation is a common process in these ecosystems, representing not only an extra input of water to the ecosystem but also to suppress evaporation. In this process, small drops of water, transported by the wind, are captured by the surfaces of the vegetation, acting as physical obstacles to the flow of fog. These drops condense in the exposed surfaces and drip towards the ground or evaporate from the surfaces. The quantification of the magnitude of these processes is important for the quantification of the water balance of river basins where these types of ecosystems exist. Although the great hydrological importance of fog in montane tropical ecosystems little is known about its physical principles related to the interception of fog by physical barriers as vegetation, notably the differential behaviour of a wet and dry vegetation in the efficiency of capturing water from the fog. To characterize and quantify this efficiency of páramo vegetation in capturing water from the fog, during wet and dry canopy conditions, an experimental design was set up at the Páramo de Chingaza (Colombia) where paired samples of espeletia branches (dry and wet) were exposed to different fog events, and at the same time Juvik cylinders were exposed by the side of the experimental site, to measured fog inputs. Cylinders were also paired (wet and dry) at the beginning of the experiments. Results indicated that exposed wet and dry samples have a significant difference on the magnitude of water intercepted from the fog, being, in average, the wet

  9. Geochemical investigations of selected Eastern United States watersheds affected by acid deposition.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, O.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of acid deposition on surface waters in eastern USA watersheds of similar size, physiography, climate and land-use are related to the composition of the underlying bedrock. Watersheds developed on greenstone, calcareous shale, sandstone, granite and schist differ in their ability to neutralize acid rain; consequently, stream acidity is similar to that of precipitation. Watersheds developed on granite and schist are intermediate in their capacity to neutralize acid deposition. Bedrock composition appears to be the major property controlling surface-water chemistry in these systems; hydrological flowpaths and the nature of surficial materials and vegetation also influence chemical responses to acid deposition in watersheds. 453This and the following 10 abstracts are for papers forming a thematic set on geochemical aspects of acid rain. -P.Br.

  10. Development and validation of a size-resolved particle dry deposition scheme for application in aerosol transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A.; Zhang, L.

    2010-12-01

    A size-resolved particle dry deposition scheme is developed for inclusion in large-scale air quality and climate models where the size distribution and fate of atmospheric aerosols is of concern. The "resistance" structure is similar to what is proposed by Zhang et al. (2001), while a new "surface" deposition velocity (or surface resistance) is derived by simplification of a one-dimensional aerosol transport model (Petroff et al., 2008b, 2009). Compared to Zhang et al.'s model, the present model accounts for the leaf size, shape and area index as well as the height of the vegetation canopy. Consequently, it is more sensitive to the change of land covers, particularly in the accumulation mode (0.1-1 micron). A drift velocity is included to account for the phoretic effects related to temperature and humidity gradients close to liquid and solid water surfaces. An extended comparison of this model with experimental evidence is performed over typical land covers such as bare ground, grass, coniferous forest, liquid and solid water surfaces and highlights its adequate prediction. The predictions of the present model differ from Zhang et al.'s model in the fine mode, where the latter tends to over-estimate in a significant way the particle deposition, as measured by various investigators or predicted by the present model. The present development is thought to be useful to modellers of the atmospheric aerosol who need an adequate parameterization of aerosol dry removal to the earth surface, described here by 26 land covers. An open source code is available in Fortran90.

  11. The solubility of aluminum in acidic forest soils: Long-term changes due to acid deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Jan; Stein, Alfred

    1994-01-01

    Despite the ecological and pedogenic importance of Al, its solubility control in acidic forest soils is poorly understood. Here we discuss the solubility of Al and its development with time in three acid brown forest soils in The Netherlands, which are under extreme acidification from atmospheric deposition. All soil solutions (to a 60 cm depth) were undersaturated with respect to synthetic gibbsite (Al(OH) 3; log K = 9.12 at 8°C), with the highest degree of undersaturation occurring in the surface soil. In about one third of the individual soil layers a significant positive correlation existed between the activity of Al 3+ and H +, but this relationship was far less than cubic. Kinetically constrained dissolution of Al is unlikely to explain the disequilibrium with respect to gibbsite, because undersaturation was highest through summer when water residence times were longest and temperatures greatest. Time series analysis of six year data sets for several soil layers revealed a significant annual decline in soil solution pH and Al solubility (defined as log Al + 3 pH) despite a constant concentration of strong acid anions. The annual decline of both pH and Al solubility was greatest in the surface soil and was positively correlated with the relative depletion of reactive organically bound soil Al. The results support our earlier hypothesis that in strongly acidified forest soils complexation by solid phase organics controls the solubility of Al even in mineral soil layers, relatively low in organic C. The data lend no support to the current widespread and often uncritical use of gibbsite as a model for the Al solubility in highly acidic forest soils (pH < 4.5) of the temperate zone.

  12. A Calculation of Spatial Range of Colloidal Silicic Acid Deposited Downstream from the Alkali Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niibori, Yuichi; Iijima, Kazuki; Tamura, Naoyuki; Mimura, Hitoshi

    A high alkali domain spreads out due to the use of cement materials for the construction of the repository of radioactive wastes. Sudden change of pH at this alkali front produces colloidal silicic acid (polymeric silicic acid) in addition to the deposition of supersaturated monomeric silicic acid onto the fracture surface of flow-pathway. The colloidal silicic acid also deposits with relatively small rate-constant in the co-presence of solid phase. Once the flow-path surface is covered with the amorphous silica, the surface seriously degrades the sorption behavior of radionuclides (RNs). Therefore, so far, the authors have examined the deposition rates of supersaturated silicic acid. This study summarized the deposition rate-constants defined by the first-order reaction equation under various conditions of co-presence of amorphous silica powder. Then, using the smallest rate-constant (1.0×10-12 m/s in the co-presence of calcium ions of 1 mM) and a simulation code, COLFRAC-MRL, the spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front was estimated. The results suggested the clogging caused by the deposition of colloidal silicic acid in flow-path. The altered spatial range in the flow-path was limited to around 30 m in fracture and to several centimeters in rock matrix.

  13. Acidic Deposition along the Appalachian Trail Corridor and its Effects on Acid-Sensitive Terrestrial and Aquatic Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. B.; Sullivan, T. J.; Burns, D. A.; Bailey, S. W.; Cosby, B. J., Jr.; Dovciak, M.; Ewing, H. A.; McDonnell, T. C.; Riemann, R.; Quant, J.; Rice, K. C.; Siemion, J.; Weathers, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Appalachian National Scenic Trail (AT) spans 3,500 km from Georgia to Maine. Over its length, the trail passes through a corridor with wide variations in climate, bedrock type, soils, and stream water quality. These factors create a diverse range of ecosystems. The health of these ecosystems is a cause for concern because the AT passes through the heavily populated eastern U.S. with its many sources of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions that produce acidic deposition. To address concerns about the health of the AT, a study was designed to evaluate the condition and sensitivity of the AT corridor with respect to acidic deposition. Collections of stream water (265 sites), soil (60 sites), tree cores (15 sites) and atmospheric deposition samples (4 sites) were made along with understory and overstory vegetation measurements (30 sites) over the full trail length within a 40 km-wide corridor. Existing data on atmospheric deposition, geology, vegetation, stream chemistry, and soil chemistry were also used in the analysis. Mean acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) was lowest in the streams in the North section, intermediate in the Central section and highest the South section, despite the South having the highest acid rain levels. At least 40% of the study streams exhibited pH and/or Ali measurements that indicated potential harm to biota. Approximately 70% of the soil sites had values of base saturation under 20%, the threshold below which acidic deposition can mobilize inorganic aluminum (Ali), the form harmful to terrestrial and aquatic life. Compositional similarity of understory and canopy species was positively correlated with acidic deposition, suggesting that during past decades, species poorly adapted to acidic deposition were replaced with tolerant species. Target loads modeling indicated that exceedance of sulfur target loads to achieve stream ANC = 50 μeq/L by the year 2100occurred throughout the trail corridor.

  14. DEPOSITION OF SULFATE ACID AEROSOLS IN THE DEVELOPING HUMAN LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computations of aerosol deposition as affected by (i) aerosol hygroscopicity, (ii) human age, and (iii) respiratory intensity are accomplished using a validated mathematical model. he interactive effects are very complicated but systematic. ew general observations can be made; ra...

  15. A randomized controlled trial of omega-3 fatty acids in dry eye syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Rahul; Kumar, Prachi; Kumar, Manjushrii; Mehra, Namrata; Mishra, Anurag

    2013-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids in dry eye syndrome. METHODS A prospective, interventional, placebo controlled, double blind randomized trial was done at two referral eye centers. Two hundred and sixty-four eyes of patients with dry eye were randomized to receive one capsule (500mg) two times a day containing 325mg EPA and 175mg DHA for 3 months (omega-3 group). The omega-3 group was compared to a group of patients (n=254) who received a placebo (placebo group). There were 4 patient visits (at baseline, 1 month, 2 months and 3 months). On each visit, recording of corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), slit lamp examination and questionnaire based symptom evaluation and scoring was done. A symptomatic score of 0-6 was mild, 6.1-12 moderate and 12.1-18 severe dry eye. Response to intervention was monitored by routine tear function tests like Schirmer I test, tear film break-up time (TBUT), Rose Bengal staining and most notably, conjunctival impression cytology. RESULTS Sixty-five percent of patients in the omega-3 group and 33% of patients in placebo group had significant improvement in symptoms at 3 months (P=0.005). There was a significant change in both Schirmer's test value and TBUT values in the omega-3 group (P<0.001), both comparisons. However, there was a larger drift in TBUT values in omega-3 than the placebo group, in comparison to Schirmer's test values. The mean TBUT score was 2.54±2.34 in the omega-3 group and 0.13±0.16 in placebo group, respectively. The mean reduction in symptom score in omega-3 group was 2.02±0.96 as compared to 0.48±0.22 in placebo group (P<0.001). Despite a slight increase mean score, the Schirmer scores did not correlate well with symptomatic improvement. CONCLUSION Omega-3 fatty acids have a definite role for dry eye syndrome. The benefit seems to be more marked in conditions such as blepharitis and meibomian gland disease. The role of omega fatty acids in tear production and

  16. Plant hydraulic responses to long-term dry season nitrogen deposition alter drought tolerance in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Pivovaroff, Alexandria L; Santiago, Louis S; Vourlitis, George L; Grantz, David A; Allen, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition represents a significant N input for many terrestrial ecosystems. N deposition can affect plants on scales ranging from photosynthesis to community composition, yet few studies have investigated how changes in N availability affect plant water relations. We tested the effects of N addition on plant water relations, hydraulic traits, functional traits, gas exchange, and leaf chemistry in a semi-arid ecosystem in Southern California using long-term experimental plots fertilized with N for over a decade. The dominant species were Artemisia california and Salvia mellifera at Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve and Adenostoma fasciculatum and Ceanothus greggii at Sky Oaks Field Station. All species, except Ceanothus, showed increased leaf N concentration, decreased foliar carbon to N ratio, and increased foliar N isotopic composition with fertilization, indicating that added N was taken up by study species, yet each species had a differing physiological response to long-term N addition. Dry season predawn water potentials were less negative with N addition for all species except Adenostoma, but there were no differences in midday water potentials, or wet season water potentials. Artemisia was particularly responsive, as N addition increased stem hydraulic conductivity, stomatal conductance, and leaf carbon isotopic composition, and decreased wood density. The alteration of water relations and drought resistance parameters with N addition in Artemisia, as well as Adenostoma, Ceanothus, and Salvia, indicate that N deposition can affect the ability of native Southern California shrubs to respond to drought. PMID:27017604

  17. Suitability of methylmalonic acid and total homocysteine analysis in dried bloodspots.

    PubMed

    de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G M; van der Ham, Maria; Jans, Judith J; Visser, Gepke; van Hasselt, Peter M; Prinsen, Hubertus C M T; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic acid (MMA) and total homocysteine (tHCYS) concentrations are used to detect acquired and inborn errors of cobalamin (vitamin B12, Cbl) metabolism and to evaluate the effect of therapeutic interventions. Dried blood spot sampling offers a patient-friendly and easy alternative to plasma sampling. However, dried blood spot concentrations are not necessarily equal to plasma concentrations. Therefore, the objective of this work was to establish the relationship between MMA and tHYS dried blood spot and plasma concentrations to facilitate clinical implementation of dried blood spot sampling. MMA and tHCYS in both plasma and DBS were validated on ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). While position of the punch (in DBS) did affect tHCYS concentration, no influence of hematocrit (Ht) and blood volume on both MMA and tHCYS concentrations was observed. The plasma assay performed better than the DBS assay by most criteria. However, the DBS matrix was superior for tHCYS stability. Paired plasma and DBS samples were obtained from patients suspected for Cbl deficiency and from patients with a known inborn error of metabolism affecting MMA or tHCYS concentration. Based on the strong correlation of tHCYS in both matrices (y=0.46±1.12 (r(2)=0.91)), determination of tHCYS in plasma can be replaced by tHCYS in DBS. However, for MMA, a correlation in the higher (pathological) range of MMA exist, but no correlation was observed in the lower ranges. Therefore the added value of MMA concentrations in DBS is currently unknown and should be further investigated. PMID:25467488

  18. Extended release of hyaluronic acid from hydrogel contact lenses for dry eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maulvi, Furqan A; Soni, Tejal G; Shah, Dinesh O

    2015-01-01

    Current dry eye treatment includes delivering comfort enhancing agents to the eye via eye drops, but low residence time of eye drops leads to low bioavailability. Frequent administration leads to incompliance in patients, so there is a great need for medical device such as contact lenses to treat dry eye. Studies in the past have demonstrated the efficacy of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the treatment of dry eyes using eye drops. In this paper, we present two methods to load HA in hydrogel contact lenses, soaking method and direct entrapment. The contact lenses were characterized by studying their optical and physical properties to determine their suitability as extended wear contact lenses. HA-laden hydrogel contact lenses prepared by soaking method showed release up to 48 h with acceptable physical and optical properties. Hydrogel contact lenses prepared by direct entrapment method showed significant sustained release in comparison to soaking method. HA entrapped in hydrogels resulted in reduction in % transmittance, sodium ion permeability and surface contact angle, while increase in % swelling. The impact on each of these properties was proportional to HA loading. The batch with 200-μg HA loading showed all acceptable values (parameters) for contact lens use. Results of cytotoxicity study indicated the safety of hydrogel contact lenses. In vivo pharmacokinetics studies in rabbit tear fluid showed dramatic increase in HA mean residence time and area under the curve with lenses in comparison to eye drop treatment. The study demonstrates the promising potential of delivering HA through contact lenses for the treatment of dry eye syndrome. PMID:26176811

  19. Efficacy of the Mineral Oil and Hyaluronic Acid Mixture Eye Drops in Murine Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Han; Kim, Jung Han; Li, Zhengri; Oh, Han Jin; Ahn, Kyu Youn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the therapeutic effects of mineral oil (MO) and hyaluronic acid (HA) mixture eye drops on the tear film and ocular surface in a mouse model of experimental dry eye (EDE). Methods Eye drops consisting of 0.1% HA alone or mixed with 0.1%, 0.5%, or 5.0% MO were applied to desiccating stress-induced murine dry eyes. Tear volume, corneal irregularity score, tear film break-up time (TBUT), and corneal fluorescein staining scores were measured at 5 and 10 days after treatment. Ten days after treatment, goblet cells in the conjunctiva were counted after Periodic acid-Schiff staining. Results There was no significant difference in the tear volume between desiccating stress-induced groups. The corneal irregularity score was lower in the 0.5% MO group compared with the EDE and HA groups. The 0.5% and 5.0% MO groups showed a significant improvement in TBUT compared with the EDE group. Mice treated with 0.1% and 0.5% MO mixture eye drops showed a significant improvement in fluorescein staining scores compared with the EDE group and the HA group. The conjunctival goblet cell count was higher in the 0.5% MO group compared with the EDE group and HA group. Conclusions The MO and HA mixture eye drops had a beneficial effect on the tear films and ocular surface of murine dry eye. The application of 0.5% MO and 0.1% HA mixture eye drops could improve corneal irregularity, the corneal fluorescein staining score, and conjunctival goblet cell count compared with 0.1% HA eye drops in the treatment of EDE. PMID:25829831

  20. Student Knowledge of Scientific and Natural Resource Concepts Concerning Acidic Deposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed is the level of scientific and natural resource knowledge possessed by fourth-, eighth- and eleventh-grade students. Misconceptions are noted. Discussed are implications for teaching about acidic deposition. (CW)

  1. LABORATORY AND FIELD EVALUATIONS OF EXTRANSENSITIVE SULFUR DIXOIDE AND NITROGEN DIOXIDE ANALYZERS FOR ACID DEPOSITION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of environmental acid deposition require monitoring of very low levels of several atmospheric pollutants. arious passive and active samplers have been used to collect integrated atmospheric samples for such studies. ontinuous analyzers offer an advantage because of their ...

  2. Development of Budesonide Loaded Biopolymer Based Dry Powder Inhaler: Optimization, In Vitro Deposition, and Cytotoxicity Study

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Ashwin J.; Pawar, Atmaram P.; Purohit, Ravindra N.

    2014-01-01

    The progress in the development of DPI technology has boosted the use of sensitive drug molecules for lung diseases. However, delivery of these molecules from conventional DPI to the active site still poses a challenge with respect to deposition efficiency in the lung. At same time, serious systemic side effects of drugs have become a cause for concern. The developed budesonide loaded biopolymer based controlled release DPI had shown maximum in vitro lung deposition with least toxicity. The subject of present study, lactose-free budesonide loaded biopolymer based DPI, further corroborates the great potential of antiasthmatic drugs. This technology is expected to revolutionize the approaches towards enhanced therapeutic delivery of prospective drugs. PMID:26556201

  3. Dry deposition velocity of sulfur dioxide over rice paddy in the tropical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitto, P.; Vinitnantarat, S.; Khummongkol, P.

    2007-07-01

    The SO 2 deposition velocity over a canopy of irrigated rice paddy in a tropical area was evaluated using the Bowen ratio and Fick's equations. The experimental facilities were set up in Chachoengsao province in the central region of Thailand and data was collected for a period of one year. The results showed that the deposition velocity of SO 2 varies with the time of day, and it was highest around noon time and lowest at night. Furthermore, the value for the seasonal average of Vd was the highest in winter and the lowest in the rainy season. The obtained seasonal average values of Vd were 0.67, 1.25, and 1.51 cm/s in the winter, summer, and rainy seasons, respectively.

  4. Drying rate and dehydrin synthesis associated with abscisic acid-induced dehydration tolerance in Spathoglottis plicata orchidaceae protocorms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Jun; Loh, Chiang-Shiong; Yeoh, Hock-Hin; Sun, Wendell Q

    2002-03-01

    Dehydration tolerance of in vitro orchid protocorms was investigated under controlled drying conditions and after abscisic acid (ABA) pretreatment. Protocorms were obtained by germinating seeds on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 10% (v/v) coconut water, 2% (w/v) sucrose and 0.8% (w/v) agar, and were dehydrated in relative humidities (RH) ranging from 7% to 93% at 25 degrees C. The critical water content of dehydration tolerance was determined, using the electrolyte leakage method. Drying rate affected the critical water content. Slow drying under high RH conditions achieved the greatest tolerance to dehydration. ABA pretreatment decreased the drying rate of protocorms, and increased dehydration tolerance. Improved tolerance to dehydration after ABA treatment was correlated with the effect of ABA on drying rate of protocorms. When critical water content of protocorms dried under different RH was plotted as a function of actual drying rate, no significant difference in tolerance to dehydration was observed between ABA-treated and control protocorms. ABA pretreatment and dehydration of orchid protocorms induced the synthesis of dehydrin, especially under the slow drying conditions. ABA pretreatment also promoted dry matter accumulation such as carbohydrates and soluble proteins and increased the concentration of K(+) and Na(+) ions in protocorms. The ABA-induced decrease in drying rate was correlated with lower osmotic potential, the enhanced maturity of protocorms and the accumulation of dehydrin in protocorms during pretreatment. PMID:11847254

  5. A multipoint (49 points) study of dry deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Erzurum, Turkey by using surrogated snow surface samplers.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Hanefi; Paloluoğlu, Cihan; Turalioğlu, Fatma S; Gaga, Eftade O

    2016-06-01

    Dry deposition of atmospheric 18 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components was investigated in the scope of the study by using surrogate snow samplers at 49 different sampling points in and around the city center of Erzurum, Turkey. Snow was sampled twice, the first of which was taken immediately after the first fresh snow cover and placed into aluminum trays to obtain dry deposition surface while the second sample was taken from the snow cover (accumulated snow) exposed to an 8-day dry deposition period and then analyzed and extracted. All the samples taken from the samplers were extracted using solid and liquid phase extraction and analyzed through GC-MS. It was observed that at the end of an 8-day dry period, snow samples enriched 5.5 times more in PAH components than the baseline. PAH deposition was determined to be influenced mainly by coal, mixed source, traffic, diesel fuel, and petrol fuel at 43, 27, 20, 8, and 2 % of sampling points, respectively. Local polluting sources were found to be effective on the spatial distribution of dry deposition of PAH components in urban area. PMID:26983812

  6. ANTIFUNGAL AND SPROUT REGULATORY BIOACTIVITIES OF PHENYLACETIC ACID, INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID, AND TYROSOL ISOLATED FROM THE POTATO DRY ROT SUPPRESSIVE BACTERIUM ENTEROBACTER CLOACAE S11:T:07

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterobacter cloacae S11:T:07 (NRRL B-21050) is a promising biological control agent which has significantly reduced both fungal dry rot disease and sprouting in lab and pilot potato storages. The metabolites phenylacetic acid (PAA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and tyrosol (TSL) were isolated from ...

  7. Comparison between knife-edge and frisbee-shaped surrogate surfaces for making dry deposition measurements: Wind tunnel experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiaoyan; Liu, Ying; Holsen, Thomas M.

    2011-08-01

    Dry deposition is a major pathway for atmospheric contaminant movement from the atmosphere to the earth surface. Despite its importance, there is no generally accepted direct method to measure dry deposition. Recently, the interest in using surrogate surfaces to measure dry deposition is growing, primarily because of their ease of use. However, a problem with these surfaces is extrapolating the results obtained to natural surfaces. There are two popular surrogate plates used to measure dry deposition. One had a sharp leading edge (knife-edge) (KSS), and the other has a smooth-edge (frisbee-shaped) (FSS). In this study, the performances of these two surrogate surfaces to directly measure gas dry deposition were explored using wind tunnel experiments and two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models. Although the fluid fields above these two plates were different, both created laminar boundary layers (distance above the surface where the velocity gradient is constant) with a constant thickness after approximately five cm. In the wind tunnel, gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) deposition to gold-coated filters was used to measure deposition velocities ( Vd) in part because for this combination deposition is air-side controlled. The GEM Vd to both surfaces increased with increasing wind speeds. Based on both measurements and CFD simulations, the Vds to the FSS were approximately 30% higher and more variable than to the KSS when the wind flow was parallel to the surfaces. However, when the angle between the surfaces and the wind was varied the Vds to the FSS were less dependent on the incident angle than to the KSS.

  8. The propagation and deposition process of a finite dry granular mass down a rough incline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geng Lin; Yang, Fu-Ling

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a theoretical analysis on the propagation and arresting process of a 2 D finite granular mass in shallow configuration down a rough incline. The coherence-length constitutive model proposed by Ertas and Halsey (2002) is used to solve the bulk motion and local coherence length scale, l (x , t) , that characterizes internal granular clusters. Flow depth profile, h (x , t) , governed by an advection-diffusion equation is solved by the matched asymptotic method under shallowness and used to determine a flow front trajectory, xf (t) . The solutions reveal l (x , t) < h (x , t) in the front indicating the clusters can move freely and transport momentum flux in a flowing bulk. The trend of l (x , t) shows monotonic growing and becomes comparable to h (x , t) upstream, indicating clusters transmit basal decelerating impulse to decelerate the flow, giving rise to rear deposit. The critical location where l (x , t) = h (x , t) is solved to the leading order to determine a deposition front trajectory, xd (t) . Under the constraint of conserved total mass, finite run-out distance, Ld, and arrested time, Td, are estimated and used to construct a modified front propagation model, xfm (t) , which compares well to the experimental data reported in Pouliquen and Forterre (2002).

  9. Ammonia Emission from a Beef Cattle Feedlot and Its Local Dry Deposition and Re-Emission.

    PubMed

    McGinn, S M; Janzen, H H; Coates, T W; Beauchemin, K A; Flesch, T K

    2016-07-01

    Ammonia (NH) volatized from livestock manure is affiliated with ecosystem and human health concerns and decreased fertilizer value of manure and can also be an indirect source of greenhouse gas. Beef cattle feedlots, where thousands of cattle are grouped together to enable greater control of feed management and production, are hot spots in the agricultural landscape for NH emissions. Quantifying the feedlot NH emissions is a difficult task, partly due to the reactive nature of NH within and surrounding the feedlot. Our study used a dispersion model coupled to field measurements to derive NH emissions from a feedlot in southern Alberta, Canada. The average feedlot NH emission was 50 μg m s (85 g animal d), which coincides with a low dietary crude protein content. At a location 165 m east of the feedlot, a flux gradient (FG) technique measured an average NH deposition of 12.0 μg m s (west wind) and 5.3 μg m s (east wind). Ammonia FG emission averaged 1 μg m s with east winds, whereas no NH emission was found for west wind. Using soil-captured NH, there was a decrease in deposition with distance from the feedlot (50% over 200 m). Collectively, the results of this study provide insight into the dynamics of NH in the agricultural landscape and illustrate the need for NH mitigation to improve the environmental and economic sustainability of cattle feedlots. PMID:27380065

  10. Lecithin/TPGS-based spray-dried self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems: In vitro pulmonary deposition and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Rania A H; Osman, Rihab

    2015-05-15

    The aim of the present work was to develop a new solid self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) for the pulmonary delivery of the poorly water-soluble anti-cancer drug atorvastatin (AVT). Microemulsion (ME) was first developed using isopropyl myristate (IPM), a combination of 2 biocompatible surfactants: lecithin/d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS) and ethanol as co-surfactant. Two types of lecithin with different phosphatidylcholine (PC) contents were compared. Phase diagram, physico-chemical characterization and stability studies were used to investigate ME region. Solid SMEDDS were then prepared by spray-drying the selected ME using a combination of carriers composed of sugars, leucine as dispersibility enhancer with or without polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000. Yield, flow properties, particle size and in vitro pulmonary deposition were used to characterize the spray-dried powders. Reconstituted MEs were characterized in terms of morphology, particle size and size distribution. In vitro cytotoxicity study was undertaken on lung cancer cell line for the selected MEs and SD-SMEDDS formulae. Results showed that the most satisfactory MEs properties were obtained with 1:3 lecithin/TPGS, 1:1 lecithin/oil and 1:1 surfactant/co-surfactant ratios. A larger ME area was obtained with lecithin containing 100% PC compared to the less expensive lecithin containing 20% PC. By manipulating spray drying parameters, carrier composition and ratio of ME lipids to carrier, microparticles with more than 70% of respirable fraction could be prepared. The ME was efficiently recovered in simulated lung fluid even after removal of alcohol. The concurrent delivery of AVT with TPGS in solid SMEDDS greatly enhanced the cytotoxic activity on lung cancer cells. PMID:25772421

  11. A new look at liming as an approach to accelerate recovery from acidic deposition effects.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Burns, Douglas A; Riva-Murray, Karen

    2016-08-15

    Acidic deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion has degraded aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in North America for over four decades. The only management option other than emissions reductions for combating the effects of acidic deposition has been the application of lime to neutralize acidity after it has been deposited on the landscape. For this reason, liming has been a part of acid rain science from the beginning. However, continued declines in acidic deposition have led to partial recovery of surface water chemistry, and the start of soil recovery. Liming is therefore no longer needed to prevent further damage, so the question becomes whether liming would be useful for accelerating recovery of systems where improvement has lagged. As more is learned about recovering ecosystems, it has become clear that recovery rates vary with watershed characteristics and among ecosystem components. Lakes appear to show the strongest recovery, but recovery in streams is sluggish and recovery of soils appears to be in the early stages. The method in which lime is applied is therefore critical in achieving the goal of accelerated recovery. Application of lime to a watershed provides the advantage of increasing Ca availability and reducing or preventing mobilization of toxic Al, an outcome that is beneficial to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the goal should not be complete neutralization of soil acidity, which is naturally produced. Liming of naturally acidic areas such as wetlands should also be avoided to prevent damage to indigenous species that rely on an acidic environment. PMID:27092419

  12. PROJECTION OF RESPONSE OF TREES AND FORESTS TO ACIDIC DEPOSITION AND ASSOCIATED POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1986 the National, Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) established the Forest Response Program (FRP) to assess the effects of acidic deposition and associated pollutants on forests. Modeling studies were developed in parallel with both field studies on the pattern an...

  13. A new look at liming as an approach to accelerate recovery from acidic deposition effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Burns, Douglas A.; Murray, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Acidic deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion has degraded aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in North America for over four decades. The only management option other than emissions reductions for combating the effects of acidic deposition has been the application of lime to neutralize acidity after it has been deposited on the landscape. For this reason, liming has been a part of acid rain science from the beginning. However, continued declines in acidic deposition have led to partial recovery of surface water chemistry, and the start of soil recovery. Liming is therefore no longer needed to prevent further damage, so the question becomes whether liming would be useful for accelerating recovery of systems where improvement has lagged. As more is learned about recovering ecosystems, it has become clear that recovery rates vary with watershed characteristics and among ecosystem components. Lakes appear to show the strongest recovery, but recovery in streams is sluggish and recovery of soils appears to be in the early stages. The method in which lime is applied is therefore critical in achieving the goal of accelerated recovery. Application of lime to a watershed provides the advantage of increasing Ca availability and reducing or preventing mobilization of toxic Al, an outcome that is beneficial to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the goal should not be complete neutralization of soil acidity, which is naturally produced. Liming of naturally acidic areas such as wetlands should also be avoided to prevent damage to indigenous species that rely on an acidic environment.

  14. Deposition of nanostructured YSZ coating from spray-dried particles with no heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Gao, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Ytrria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanoparticle agglomerates were fabricated by a spray dry method and were directly sprayed using atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) with a current of 300 A and 500 A. A commercially supplied nanostructured YSZ powder (sintered) was also sprayed under the same conditions for comparison. A scanning electron microscope (SEM), an optical microscope (OM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were utilized to characterize the feedstock powder and coatings. Weibull plots were used to analyze the performance of the nanostructured coatings. The lower 300 A operating current resulted in a higher portion of nanostructure retention at the expense of coating quality. An approximate 10% increase in porosity and a noticeable decrease in grain size (∼104 nm) were obtained by spraying non-heat treated agglomerates with a 500 A current. The thermal conductivity (400-600 °C) was evaluated using the one-dimensional, steady state Fourier's law of heat conduction. Next, lower thermal conductivity (∼1.3 W m-1 K-1 at 600 °C) was identified in coatings engineered at 500 A from agglomerated powder with no heat treatment.

  15. Dietary conjugated linoleic acids increase intramuscular fat deposition and decrease subcutaneous fat deposition in Yellow Breed × Simmental cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibo; Dong, Xianwen; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhou, Aiming; Peng, Quanhui; Zou, Huawei; Xue, Bai; Wang, Lizhi

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) on intramuscular and subcutaneous fat deposition in Yellow Breed × Simmental cattle. The experiment was conducted for 60 days. The results showed that the average backfat thickness, (testicles + kidney + pelvic) fat percentage and subcutaneous fat percentage in dietary CLA were significantly lower than in the control group, while intramuscular the fat percentage was significantly higher. Compared to the control group, the Longissimus muscle enzyme activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) in dietary CLA and the subcutaneous fat enzyme activities of LPL, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) were significantly increased. Similarly, compared to the control group, the Longissimus muscle sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), FAS, stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD), ACC, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), heart fatty-acid binding protein (H-FABP) and LPL gene expression in dietary CLA were significant increased, as were the subcutaneous fat of PPARγ, H-FABP, LPL, CPT-1 and HSL in dietary CLA. These results indicated that dietary CLA increases IMF deposition mainly by the up-regulation of lipogenic gene expression, while decreasing subcutaneous fat deposition mainly by the up-regulation of lipolytic gene expression. PMID:26582037

  16. Technological and safety properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Spanish dry-cured sausages.

    PubMed

    Landeta, G; Curiel, J A; Carrascosa, A V; Muñoz, R; de las Rivas, B

    2013-10-01

    Technological and safety-related properties were analyzed in lactic acid bacteria isolated from Spanish dry-cured sausages in order to select them as starter cultures. In relation to technological properties, all the strains showed significative nitrate reductase activity; Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paracasei and 52% of the Enterococcus faecium strains showed lipolytic activity and only Lactobacillus sakei strains (43%) were able to form biofilms. Related to safety aspects, E. faecium strains were the most resistant to antibiotics, whereas, L. sakei strains were the most sensitive. In relation to virulence factors, in the E. faecium strains analyzed, only the presence of efaA gene was detected. The analysis of biogenic amine production showed that most E. faecium strains and L. sakei Al-142 produced tyramine. In conclusion, L. paracasei Al-128 and L. sakei Al-143 strains possess the best properties to be selected as adequate and safe meat starter cultures. PMID:23743032

  17. Deposition velocity of O 3 and SO 2 in the dry and wet season above a tropical forest in northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Ichiro; Wingpud, Vitsanu; Theramongkol, Phunsak; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi

    In order to investigate ozone (O 3) and sulfur dioxide (SO 2) dry deposition above a forest in a tropical savanna climate in Southeast Asia, field experiments were performed in a teak deciduous forest in Mea Moh, Lampang Province, located in northern Thailand. O 3 and SO 2 fluxes were observed on the basis of the aerodynamic gradient method. The experimental period from January to August in 2004 covered the dry (Jan-Apr) and wet (May-Aug) seasons. Both gas concentrations increased in the dry season and decreased in the wet season. Interval estimation of average with a confidence interval of 95% on the deposition velocity data between 25 and 75 percentiles was performed. The intervals of average O 3 deposition velocity were estimated to be 0.37-0.39 cm s -1 (daytime) and 0.12-0.13 cm s -1 (nighttime) in the dry season; and 0.62-0.65 cm s -1 (daytime) and 0.25-0.27 cm s -1 (nighttime) in the wet season. The intervals of average SO 2 deposition velocity were estimated to be 0.10-0.31 cm s -1 (daytime) and 0.08-0.11 cm s -1 (nighttime) in the dry season; and 0.95-1.39 cm s -1 (daytime) and 0.26-0.42 cm s -1 (nighttime) in the wet season. SO 2 deposition velocity in the rain period was significantly higher than that in the no-rain period. Higher deposition velocities in the wet season were mainly caused by non-stomatal uptake of wet canopy due to a lot of wet days, especially in the case of SO 2. Much higher daytime deposition velocities in the wet season were additionally caused by stomatal uptake of leafy trees. The applicability of Wesely's parameterization of deposition velocity to a tropical savanna climate was examined. In both gases, the input resistance of transitional spring to the dry season and that of midsummer to the wet season could be applied as a first approximation, although strictly the parameterization of O 3 non-stomatal resistance needs modification in the dry-season daytime. The applicability of some other parameterizations was also considered

  18. Effect of dry deposition of pollutants on the degradation of lime mortars with sepiolite

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ramirez, S.; Thompson, G.E.; Puertas, F.; Blanco-Varela, M.T.

    1998-01-01

    The behavior of lime mortars containing sepiolite or sepiolite plus pentaclorophenol in atmospheric simulation chambers has been studied. The pollutant gases used in this study have been NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2}. The studies have been done in wet and dry conditions as well as with and without ozone. In the case of NO and NO{sub 2}, the aggressive agent would be HNO{sub 3}, which reacts with lime mortar binder CaCO{sub 3}, producing Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} formation. On this process, the influence of the presence of an oxidant as well as water has been studied. The catalyst effect of the oxidation is known to be accelerated by water presence, so mortars exposed to NO + O{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O and NO{sub 2} + O{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O environments undergo a greater salts formation than those exposed to the rest of he aggressive media. The three mortars` behaviors are similar and independent of their composition, producing small amount of salts in every case. When SO{sub 2} is the gas used, the aggressive agent of mortar will be H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} that reacts with mortar binder, CaCO{sub 3} to produce calcium sulfate in the form of gypsum. Oxidant and/or water influence has been studied, and the (SO{sub 2} + O{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O) chamber was found to be the one with greater aggressivity to mortars. However, in these conditions, sepiolite presence within the mortars delayed gypsum formation.

  19. Quartz dissolution and silica deposition in hot-dry-rock geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.

    1982-07-01

    The kinetics of quartz dissolution control the produced fluid dissolved silica concentration in geothermal systems in which the downhole residence time is finite. The produced fluid of the Phase I, Run Segment 5 experimental Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal system at Fenton Hill, NM, was undersaturated with respect to quartz in one pass through the reservoir, suggesting that the rate of granite dissolution governed the outlet dissolved silica concentration in this system. The literature data for the rate of quartz dissolution in water from 65 to 625/sup 0/C is correlated using an empirical rate law which is first order in quartz surface area and degree of undersaturation of the fluid. The Arrhenius plot (ln k vs T/sup -1/) is linear over eight orders of magnitude of the rate constant, verifying the validity of the proposed rate expression. Carefully performed quartz dissolution experiments in the present study duplicated the literature data and completed the data base in the temperature range from 150 to 250/sup 0/C. Identical experiments using crushed granite indicate that the rate of quartz dissolution in the presence of granite could be as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude faster than the rates observed in the pure quartz experiments. A temperature dependent HDR reservoir model incorporates the quartz dissolution rate law to simulate the dissolved silica behavior during the Fenton Hill Run Segment 5 experiment. For this low-permeability, fracture-dominated reservoir, the assumptions of one-dimensional plug flow through a vertically-inclined rectangular fracture and one-dimensional rock heat conduction perpendicular to the direction of flow are employed. These simplifications lead to an analytical solution for the temperature field in the reservoir.

  20. Effects of texture on salt precipitation dynamics and deposition patterns in drying porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi Rad, Mansoureh; Shokri, Nima

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, CO2 sequestration and water quality. Also excess of salt accumulation in soil may result in soil salinization which is a global problem adversely affecting vegetation, plant growth and crop production. Thus it is important to understand the parameters affecting salt transport and precipitation in porous media. We applied X-ray micro-tomography to investigate the dynamics of salt precipitation during evaporation from porous media as influenced by the particle and pore sizes. The packed beds were saturated with NaCl solution of 3 Molal and the time-lapse X-ray imaging was continued for one day. The results show that the presence of preferential evaporation sites (associated with fine pores) on the surface of the sand columns influences significantly the patterns and dynamics of NaCl precipitation (Norouzi Rad et al., 2013; Norouzi Rad and Shokri, 2014). They confirm the formation of an increasingly thick and discrete salt crust with increasing grain size in the sand column due to the presence of fewer fine pores (preferential precipitation sites) at the surface compared to the sand packs with finer grains. Fewer fine pores on the surface also results in shorter stage-1 precipitation for the columns with larger grain sizes. A simple model for the evolution of salt crust thickness based on this principle shows a good agreement with our experiments. Our results provide new insights regarding the physics of salt precipitation and its complex dynamics in porous media during evaporation. References Norouzi Rad, M., Shokri, N., Sahimi, M. (2013), Pore-Scale Dynamics of Salt Precipitation in Drying Porous Media, Phys. Rev. E, 88, 032404. Norouzi Rad, M., Shokri, N. (2014), Effects of grain angularity on NaCl precipitation in porous media during evaporation, Water Resour. Res

  1. Determination of digestibility, tissue deposition, and metabolism of the omega-3 fatty acid content of krill protein concentrate in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Kayla M; Gigliotti, Joseph C; Altman, Stephanie; Jaczynski, Jacek; Tou, Janet C

    2010-03-10

    Krill protein concentrate (KPC) consists of high-quality protein (77.7% dry basis) and lipids (8.1% dry basis) that are rich (27% of total fatty acids) in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs). The objective of the study was to determine digestibility, tissue deposition, metabolism, and tissue oxidative stability of the omega-3 PUFAs provided by KPC. Young female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10/group) were fed ad libitum isocaloric diets for 4 weeks with either 10% freeze-dried KPC or 10% casein. The casein diet contained 5.3% added corn oil (CO), whereas the KPC contained 5.3% total lipids from 0.9% krill oil (KO) provided by KPC and 4.4% added corn oil (KO + CO). Fatty acid compositions of various tissues were analyzed by gas chromatography. Lipid peroxidation was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Total antioxidant capacity and urinary eicosanoid metabolites were determined by enzyme immunoassay. The omega-3 PUFAs provided in KO from KPC increased (P = 0.003) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) concentration in the brain. DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) content in fat pads and liver were increased (P < 0.01), whereas the omega-6 PUFA, arachidonic acid (AA), was decreased (P < 0.01) in rats fed the KPC diet containing the KO + CO mixture compared to rats fed the casein diet containing pure CO. Feeding the KPC diet decreased pro-inflammatory 2-series prostaglandin and thromboxane metabolites. There was no significant difference in TBARS or total antioxidant capacity in the tissues of rats fed the different diets. On the basis of the study results, the low amount of omega-3 PUFAs provided by the KO content of KPC provides beneficial effects of increasing tissue EPA and DHA deposition and reduced AA-derived 2-series eicosanoid metabolites without increasing lipid peroxidation. Therefore, consumption of KPC has the potential to provide a healthy and sustainable source of omega-3 PUFAs. PMID:20131797

  2. Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation of dry diluted acid pretreated corn stover at high dry matter loading: Overcoming the inhibitors by non-tolerant yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Qing; Qin, Lei; Li, Wen-Chao; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie; Huang, Yao-Dong; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Dry dilute acid pretreatment (DDAP) is a promising method for lignocellulose bioconversion, although inhibitors generated during the pretreatment impede the fermentation severely. We developed the simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SScF) of DDAP pretreated biomass at high solid loading using xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SyBE005. Effect of temperature on SScF showed that ethanol yield at 34°C was 10.2% higher than that at 38°C. Ethanol concentration reached 29.5 g/L at 15% (w/w) dry matter loading, while SScF almost ceased at the beginning at 25% (w/w) dry matter loading of DDAP pretreated corn stover. According to the effect of the diluted hydrolysate on the fermentation of strain SyBE005, a fed-batch mode was developed for the SScF of DDAP pretreated corn stover with 25% dry matter loading without detoxification, and 40.0 g/L ethanol was achieved. In addition, high yeast inoculation improved xylose utilization and the final ethanol concentration reached 47.2 g/L. PMID:26363500

  3. Dry powders based on PLGA nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery of antibiotics: modulation of encapsulation efficiency, release rate and lung deposition pattern by hydrophilic polymers.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Francesca; d'Angelo, Ivana; Coletta, Ciro; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Perfetto, Brunella; Tufano, Maria Antonietta; Miro, Agnese; La Rotonda, Maria Immacolata; Quaglia, Fabiana

    2012-01-10

    Although few experimental studies have been handled so far to exploit the potential of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) in the production of dry powders for antibiotic inhalation, there has been no comprehensive study on the role played by NP composition. In this work, we try to shed light on this aspect by designing and developing a pulmonary delivery system for antibiotics, such as tobramycin (Tb), based on PLGA NPs embedded in an inert microcarrier made of lactose, referred to as nano-embedded micro-particles (NEM). At nanosize level, helper hydrophilic polymers were used to impart the desired surface, bulk and release properties to PLGA NPs prepared by a modified emulsion-solvent diffusion technique. Results showed that poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and chitosan (CS) are essential to optimise the size and modulate the surface properties of Tb-loaded PLGA NPs, whereas the use of alginate (Alg) allows efficient Tb entrapment within NPs and its release up to one month. Optimized formulations display good in vitro antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa planktonic cells. Furthermore, spray-drying of the NPs with lactose yielded NEM with peculiar but promising flow and aerosolization properties, while preserving the peculiar NP features. Nonetheless, in vivo biodistribution studies showed that PVA-modified Alg/PLGA NPs reached the deep lung, while CS-modified NPs were found in great amounts in the upper airways, lining lung epithelial surfaces. In conclusion, PLGA NP composition appears to play a crucial role in determining not only the technological features of NPs but, once processed in the form of NEM, also their in vitro/in vivo deposition pattern. PMID:21864595

  4. SPODOSOL VARIABILITY AND ASSESSMENT OF RESPONSE TO ACIDIC DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variability in forest soils makes it difficult to observe short-term changes in chemical properties under field conditions. uried soil-bag technique was developed to examine the chemical response of a Maine forest soil to loadings of strong acids (HNO3 and H2SO4). cids were added...

  5. EFFECTS OF ACID DEPOSITION ON PAINTED WOOD SUBSTRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the progress that has been made within the Coatings Effect Research Program that EPA conducts for Task Group VII within the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The major objective of this phase of the research program is to identify early...

  6. Effects of different biomass drying and lipid extraction methods on algal lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and biodiesel quality.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Javid; Liu, Yan; Lopes, Wilson A; Druzian, Janice I; Souza, Carolina O; Carvalho, Gilson C; Nascimento, Iracema A; Liao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Three lipid extraction methods of hexane Soxhlet (Sox-Hex), Halim (HIP), and Bligh and Dyer (BD) were applied on freeze-dried (FD) and oven-dried (OD) Chlorella vulgaris biomass to evaluate their effects on lipid yield, fatty acid profile, and algal biodiesel quality. Among these three methods, HIP was the preferred one for C. vulgaris lipid recovery considering both extraction efficiency and solvent toxicity. It had the highest lipid yields of 20.0 and 22.0% on FD and OD biomass, respectively, with corresponding neutral lipid yields of 14.8 and 12.7%. The lipid profiling analysis showed that palmitic, oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids were the major fatty acids in the algal lipids, and there were no significant differences on the amount of these acids between different drying and extraction methods. Correlative models applied to the fatty acid profiles concluded that high contents of palmitic and oleic acids in algal lipids contributed to balancing the ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and led to a high-quality algal biodiesel. PMID:25588528

  7. Authentication of dried distilled grain with solubles (DDGS) by fatty acid and volatile profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tres, Alba; Heenan, Samuel P.; van Ruth, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Demand for ethanol substituted fuels from the utilisation of cereal based biofuel has resulted in an over production of dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) that are now readily available on the animal feed market. With this rapid emerging availability comes potential variability in the nutritional value of DDGS and possible risks of feed contaminants. Subsequently, the authentication and traceability of alternative animal feed sources is of high priority. In this study and as part of the EU research project “Quality and Safety of Feeds and Food for Europe (QSAFFE FP7-KBBE-2010-4) an attempt was made to classify the geographical origin of cereal grains used in the production of DDGS material. DDGS material of wheat and corn origin were obtained from Europe, China, and the USA. Fatty acid profiles and volatile fingerprints were assessed by gas chromatography flame ionisation (GC-FID) and rapid proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) respectively. Chemometric analysis of fatty acid profiles and volatile fingerprints allowed for promising classifications of cereals used in DDGS material by geographical and botanical origin and enabled visual representation of the data. This objective analytical approach could be adapted for routine verification of cereal grains used in the production of DDGS material. PMID:25368433

  8. Fatty acid content and profile of the aerial microalga Coccomyxa sp. isolated from dry environments.

    PubMed

    Abe, Katsuya; Ishiwatari, Takehiro; Wakamatsu, Michihiro; Aburai, Nobuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Aerial algae are considered to be highly tolerant of and adaptable to severe conditions including radiation, desiccation, high temperatures, and nutrient deficiency, compared with those from aquatic habitats. There are considerable variations in the fatty acid (FA) composition of aerial microalgae from dry environments. A new species with a high lipid level was found on concrete surfaces and was identified as Coccomyxa sp. KGU-D001 (Trebouxiophyceae). This study characterized its FA content and profile in a bath culture. The alga showed a constant specific growth rate (0.26 day(-1)) ranging in light intensity from 20 to 80 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1). The algal cells started to form oil bodies in the early stationary phase of growth, and oil bodies occupied most of the cells during the late stationary phase when the cells accumulated 27 % total fatty acids (TFA). The process of lipid body formation accumulating large amounts of triacylglycerols (TAG) appeared to be very unusual in response to stress conditions persisting for a relatively long culture time (50 days). This study could indicate that aerial microalgae will be a candidate for biodiesel production when a new cultivation method is developed using extreme stresses such as nutritional deficiency and/or desiccation. PMID:25146196

  9. Amino acid geochemistry of fossil bones from the Rancho La Brea asphalt deposit, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMenamin, M.A.S.; Blunt, D.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Miller, S.E.; Marcus, L.F.; Pardi, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Low aspartic acid d:l ratios and modern collagenlike concentration values indicate that amino acids in bones from the Rancho La Brea asphalt deposit, Los Angeles, California are better preserved than amino acids in bones of equivalent age that have not been preserved in asphalt. Amino acids were recovered from 10 Rancho La Brea bone samples which range in age from less than 200 to greater than 36,000 yr. The calibrated rates of aspartic acid racemization range from 2.1 to 5.0 ?? 10-6yr-1. Although this wide range of rate constants decreases the level of confidence for age estimates, use of the larger rate constant of 5.0 ?? 10-6yr-1 provides minimum age estimates which fit the known stratigraphic and chronologic records of the Rancho La Brea deposits. ?? 1982.

  10. Growth of and mineral deposition in young rats fed saturated and unsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, A.; D'Souza, D. John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Male weanling rats were used in 4 week experiments to study effects of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids on growth and mineral deposition in several organs (bone, kidneys, liver, spleen, testes). Minerals evaluated were calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and zinc, and levels of these minerals in tests diets were appropriate for growing rats. Two levels of dietary fat were used, and fatty acids included in the study were butyric/capronic, palmitic/stearic, oleic, and linoleic/linolenic acids. Decreased weight gains were observed in rats fed saturated fatty acids or 10% fat, while increases in weight gains were associated with increases in polyunsaturated/saturated (P/S) ratios. Copper, iron, or zinc levels tended to be higher in organs of rats fed saturated fatty acids. P/S ratios had no effect on copper or zinc deposition, but decreases in liver iron and increases in spleen iron were observed in rats fed the higher P/S ratios. Manganese levels were generally unaffected by fatty acid types, fat level, or P/S ratio, although liver manganese levels were higher in rats fed unsaturated fatty acids. Dietary fatty acids, fat level, or P/S ratios had no apparent effects on calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, or zinc deposition in femurs and tibias of rats.

  11. Chronic hyperuricemia, uric acid deposit and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Ferri, Livia; Desideri, Giovambattista; Di Giosia, Paolo; Cheli, Paola; Del Pinto, Rita; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is commonly associated with traditional risk factors such as dysglicemia, dyslipidemia, central obesity and abnormal blood pressure, i.e. the metabolic syndrome. Concordantly, recent studies have revived the controversy over the role of circulating uric acid, hyperuricemia, and gout as an independent prognostic factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this regard, different studies also evaluated the possible role of xanthine inhibitors in inducing blood pressure reduction, increment in flow-mediated dilation, and improved cardiovascular prognosis in various patient settings. The vast majority of these studies have been conducted with either allopurinol or its active metabolite oxypurinol, i.e. two purine-like non-selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. More recently, the role of uric acid as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the possible protective role exerted by reduction of hyperuricemia to normal level have been evaluated by the use of febuxostat, a selective, non purine-like xanthine oxidase inhibitor. In this review, we will report current evidence on hyperuricemia in cardiovascular disease. The value of uric acid as a biomarker and as a potential therapeutic target for tailored old and novel "cardiometabolic" treatments will be also discussed. PMID:23173592

  12. Chronic Hyperuricemia, Uric Acid Deposit and Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Davide; Ferri, Livia; Desideri, Giovambattista; Giosia, Paolo Di; Cheli, Paola; Pinto, Rita Del; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is commonly associated with traditional risk factors such as dysglicemia, dyslipidemia, central obesity and abnormal blood pressure, i.e. the metabolic syndrome. Concordantly, recent studies have revived the controversy over the role of circulating uric acid, hyperuricemia, and gout as an independent prognostic factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this regard, different studies also evaluated the possible role of xanthine inhibitors in inducing blood pressure reduction, increment in flow-mediated dilation, and improved cardiovascular prognosis in various patient settings. The vast majority of these studies have been conducted with either allopurinol or its active metabolite oxypurinol, i.e. two purine-like non-selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. More recently, the role of uric acid as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the possible protective role exerted by reduction of hyperuricemia to normal level have been evaluated by the use of febuxostat, a selective, non purine-like xanthine oxidase inhibitor. In this review, we will report current evidence on hyperuricemia in cardiovascular disease. The value of uric acid as a biomarker and as a potential therapeutic target for tailored old and novel “cardiometabolic” treatments will be also discussed. PMID:23173592

  13. Modeling of air pollutant removal by dry deposition to urban trees using a WRF/CMAQ/i-Tree Eco coupled system.

    PubMed

    Cabaraban, Maria Theresa I; Kroll, Charles N; Hirabayashi, Satoshi; Nowak, David J

    2013-05-01

    A distributed adaptation of i-Tree Eco was used to simulate dry deposition in an urban area. This investigation focused on the effects of varying temperature, LAI, and NO2 concentration inputs on estimated NO2 dry deposition to trees in Baltimore, MD. A coupled modeling system is described, wherein WRF provided temperature and LAI fields, and CMAQ provided NO2 concentrations. A base case simulation was conducted using built-in distributed i-Tree Eco tools, and simulations using different inputs were compared against this base case. Differences in land cover classification and tree cover between the distributed i-Tree Eco and WRF resulted in changes in estimated LAI, which in turn resulted in variations in simulated NO2 dry deposition. Estimated NO2 removal decreased when CMAQ-derived concentration was applied to the distributed i-Tree Eco simulation. Discrepancies in temperature inputs did little to affect estimates of NO2 removal by dry deposition to trees in Baltimore. PMID:23419770

  14. CONTROLLED FIELD STUDY TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF DRY AND WET DEPOSITION OF AIR POLLUTANTS ON THE CORROSION RATE OF GALVANIZED STEEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the study galvanized steel panels were exposed for 6 months using an automatic covering device at a materials exposure site located at RTP, NC. Galvanized steel panels were boldly exposed to wet and dry deposition. Another set of panels was mounted on a motor-driven rack that ...

  15. DIVALENT INORGANIC REACTIVE GASEOUS MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A MERCURY CELL CHLOR-ALKALI PLANT AND ITS IMPACT ON NEAR FIELD ATMOSPHERIC DRY DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emission of inorganic divalent reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) from a mercury cell chlor-alkali plant (MCCAP) cell building and the impact on near field (100 km) dry deposition was investigated as part of a larger collaborative study between EPA, University of Michigan, Oak ...

  16. Effects of acidic deposition on paint: A chamber study

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, J.W.; Lemmons, T.J.; Hou, Y.; Schadt, R.J.; Fornes, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    Exterior acrylic latex and alkyd architectural coatings were exposed to different conditions in a chamber exposure system involving simulated sunlight, dew, and photochemical smog-containing sulfur dioxide (SO2). A simulated sunlight exposure of the coating films in the presence of clean air was also incorporated into the experimental design. Changes in surface features after 1,370 hours of exposure were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of x-rays (EDAX). Gaseous species that deposited to the films were determined by ion chromatography of the dew collections. Color-change measurements of the exposed films were recorded as Delta E values. Latex and alkyd films that were formulated with calcium carbonate (CACO3) as an extender pigment were found to undergo the most change in surface features, composition, and color.

  17. A new Pharmaceutical Aerosol Deposition Device on Cell Cultures (PADDOCC) to evaluate pulmonary drug absorption for metered dose dry powder formulations.

    PubMed

    Hein, Stephanie; Bur, Michael; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2011-01-01

    Absorption studies with aerosol formulation delivered by metered dose inhalers across cell- and tissue-based in vitro models of the pulmonary epithelia are not trivial due to the complexity of the processes involved: (i) aerosol generation and deposition, (ii) drug release from the carrier, and (iii) absorption across the epithelial air-blood barrier. In contrast to the intestinal mucosa, pulmonary epithelia are only covered by a thin film of lining fluid. Submersed cell culture systems would not allow to studying the deposition of aerosol particles and their effects on this delicate epithelial tissue. We developed a new Pharmaceutical Aerosol Deposition Device on Cell Cultures (PADDOCC) to mimic the inhalation of a single metered aerosol dose and its subsequent deposition on filter-grown pulmonary epithelial cell monolayers exposed to an air-liquid interface. The reproducibility of deposition of these dry powder aerosols and subsequent drug transport across Calu-3 monolayers with commercially available dry powder inhalers containing salbutamol sulphate or budesonide could be demonstrated. In the context of developing new dry powder aerosol formulations, PADDOCC appears as a useful tool, allowing reducing animal testing and faster translation into clinical trials. PMID:20951200

  18. Effects of sun and freeze-drying techniques on molecular, fatty acid and therapeutic properties of fermented goat milk product.

    PubMed

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Al-Rabadi, Ghaid J; Althnaibat, Rami M; Ereifej, Khalil; Alhamad, Mohammad N; Al-Ismail, Khaild; Brewer, Susan

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of sun drying (Sd) and freeze drying (Fd) on the chemical, nutritional and biological properties of either unsalted (Us) or salted (Sa) Jameed produced from goat milk. The products were characterized by measuring the chemical, physical and biological properties. SDS-PAGE was used to characterize the effect of processing conditions on protein subunits. Major new bands were found in SDS-PAGE of Jameed prepared by SdUs and FdUs from goat milk but not from that prepared by SdSa and FdSa. Preparation of Jameed by with or without salt treatments of Jameed by sun drying enhances the contents of short chain fatty acids. Result showed that the preparation of Jameed by SdUs decreased the content of caprylic acid. That prepared by sun drying and with or without salt increased the stability, shelf life and inhibitory activities of ACE and α-amylase. The optimum color values were found in Jameed prepared by FdSa. Different processing treatments influenced content of all fatty acids except for margaric and oleic acid. PMID:26345018

  19. Formulation of pH responsive peptides as inhalable dry powders for pulmonary delivery of nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wanling; Kwok, Philip C.L.; Chow, Michael Y.T.; Tang, Patricia; Mason, A. James; Chan, Hak-Kim; Lam, Jenny. K.W.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids have the potential to be used as therapies or vaccines for many different types of disease but delivery remains the most significant challenge to their clinical adoption. pH responsive peptides containing either histidine or derivatives of 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap) can mediate effective DNA transfection in lung epithelial cells with the latter remaining effective even in the presence of lung surfactant containing bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF), making this class of peptides attractive candidates for delivering nucleic acids to lung tissues. To further assess the suitability of pH responsive peptides for pulmonary delivery by inhalation, dry powder formulations of pH responsive peptides and plasmid DNA, with mannitol as carrier, were produced by either spray drying (SD) or spray freeze drying (SFD). The properties of the two types of powders were characterised and compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), next generation impaction (NGI), gel retardation and in vitro transfection via a twin-stage impinger (TSI) following aerosolisation by a dry powder inhaler (Osmohaler™). Although the aerodynamic performance and transfection efficacy of both powders were good, the overall performance revealed SD powders to have a number of advantages over SFD powders and are the more effective formulation with potential for efficient nucleic acid delivery through inhalation. PMID:23702276

  20. Comparison of bronchodilator responses and deposition patterns of salbutamol inhaled from a pressurised metered dose inhaler, as a dry powder, and as a nebulised solution.

    PubMed Central

    Zainudin, B M; Biddiscombe, M; Tolfree, S E; Short, M; Spiro, S G

    1990-01-01

    The lung dose and deposition patterns of drug delivered by dry powder inhaler are not known. The effects of inhaling 400 micrograms salbutamol delivered by dry powder inhaler (two 200 micrograms salbutamol Rotacaps), by pressurised metered dose inhaler, and by Acorn nebuliser were studied in nine subjects with chronic stable asthma. Technetium-99m labelled Teflon particles were mixed with micronised salbutamol in the pressurised metered dose inhaler and in the capsules; technetium-99m labelled human serum albumin was mixed with the salbutamol solution for the nebuliser study. The pressurised metered dose inhaler deposited 11.2% (SEM 0.8%) of the dose within the lungs; this was significantly more than the dose deposited by the dry powder inhaler (9.1% (0.6%], but did not differ significantly from the dose delivered by the nebuliser (9.9% (0.7%]. Distribution within the peripheral third of the lung was significantly greater with the nebuliser than with the other two systems; FEV1 improved to a significantly greater extent after inhalation of 400 micrograms salbutamol from the pressurised metered dose inhaler (35.6% from baseline) than from the nebuliser (25.8%) or dry powder inhaler (25.2%). Thus after inhalation of similar doses of salbutamol a larger proportion of drug was deposited within the lungs when it was inhaled from a metered dose inhaler than from a dry powder system; the nebuliser achieved the greatest peripheral deposition. The bronchodilator response seems to depend on the amount of drug within the lungs rather than its pattern of distribution. Images PMID:2392793

  1. Electrophoretic deposition of hyaluronic acid and composite films for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-06-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HYH) is a natural biopolymer, which has tremendous potential for various biomedical applications. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) methods have been developed for the fabrication of HYH films and composites. New methods for the immobilization of drugs and proteins have been utilized for the fabrication of organic composites. Electrophoretic deposition enabled the fabrication of organic-inorganic composites containing bioceramics and bioglass in the HYH matrix. It was shown that the deposition yield, microstructure, and composition of the films can be controlled. Potential applications of EPD for the surface modification of biomedical implants and fabrication of biosensors are highlighted.

  2. Changes in soil pH across England and Wales in response to decreased acid deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, G. J. D.; Bellamy, P. H.

    2009-04-01

    In our recent analysis of data from the National Soil Inventory of England and Wales, we found widespread changes in soil pH across both countries between the two samplings of the Inventory. In general, soil pH increased - i.e. soils became less acid - under all land uses. The Inventory was first sampled in 1978-83 on a 5-km grid over the whole area. This yielded about 6,000 sites of which 5,662 could be sampled for soil. Roughly 40% of the sites were re-sampled at intervals from 12 to 25 years after the original sampling - in 1994/96 for agricultural land and in 2002/03 for non-agricultural. Exactly the same sampling and analytical protocols were used in the two samplings. In arable soils, the increase in pH was right across the range, whereas in grassland soils the main increase was at the acid end of the scale (pH < 5.5) with a small increase above pH 7. Some part of the change is likely to have been due to changes in land management. This includes better targeting of agricultural lime on acid soils; changes in nitrogen fertilizer use; deeper ploughing bringing up more calcareous subsoil on soils on calcareous materials; and so forth. However a major driver appears to have been decreased acid deposition to land. The total amounts of nitrogen compounds deposited were relatively unchanged over the survey period, but the amounts of acidifying sulphur compounds decreased by approximately 50%. We constructed a linear regression model to assess the relation between the rate of change in pH (normalised to an annual basis) and the rate of change in acid deposition, as modified by soil properties (pH, clay content, organic matter content), rainfall and past acid deposition. We used data on rainfall and acid deposition over the survey period on the same 5-km grid as the NSI data. We fitted the model separately for each land use category. The results for arable land showed a significant effect of the change in rate of acid deposition, though a significant part of the

  3. Descriptive risk assessment of the effects of acidic deposition on Rocky Mountain amphibians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, Paul Stephen; Vertucci, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the risk of habitat acidification to the six species of amphibians that occur in the mountains of Colorado and Wyoming. Our evaluation included extrinsic environmental factors (habitat sensitivity and amount of acidic atmospheric deposition) and species-specific intrinsic factors (sensitivity to acid conditions, habitat preferences, and timing of breeding). Only one of 57 surveyed localities had both acid neutralizing capacity μeq/L and sulfate deposition >10 kg/ha/yr, extrinsic conditions with a possible risk of acidification. Amphibian breeding habitats in the Rocky Mountains do not appear to be sufficiently acidic to kill amphibian embryos. Some species breed in high-elevation vernal pools during snowmelt, and an acidic pulse during snowmelt may pose a risk to embryos of these species. However, the acidic pulse, if present, probably occurs before open water appears and before breeding begins. Although inherent variability of amphibian population size may make detection of declines from anthropogenic effects difficult, acidic deposition is unlikely to have caused the observed declines of Bufo boreas and Rana pipiens in Colorado and Wyoming. Amphibians in the Rocky Mountains are not likely to be at risk with acidification inputs at present levels.

  4. Influence of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on the Transport and Deposition Behaviors of Bacteria in Quartz Sand.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2016-03-01

    The significance of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on the transport and deposition behaviors of bacteria (Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis) in quartz sand is examined in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions at pH 5.6 by comparing both breakthrough curves and retained profiles with PFOA in solutions versus those without PFOA. All test conditions are found to be highly unfavorable for cell deposition regardless of the presence of PFOA; however, 7%-46% cell deposition is observed depending on the conditions. The cell deposition may be attributed to micro- or nanoscale roughness and/or to chemical heterogeneity of the sand surface. The results show that, under all examined conditions, PFOA in suspensions increases cell transport and decreases cell deposition in porous media regardless of cell type, presence or absence of extracellular polymeric substances, ionic strength, and ion valence. We find that the additional repulsion between bacteria and quartz sand caused by both acid-base interaction and steric repulsion as well as the competition for deposition sites on quartz sand surfaces by PFOA are responsible for the enhanced transport and decreased deposition of bacteria with PFOA in solutions. PMID:26866280

  5. Projection of response of trees and forests to acidic deposition and associated pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kiester, A.R.; Ford, E.D.; Avery, A.; Gay, C.; Droessler, T.

    1990-09-01

    In 1986 the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) established the Forest Response Program (FRP) to assess the effects of acidic deposition and associated pollutants on forests. Modeling studies were developed in parallel with both field studies on the pattern and trends of forest condition and physiological studies of seedlings, saplings, and branches of mature trees. The goals of the modeling effort were to simulate the dynamics of the processes by which acidic deposition and ozone affect tree physiological processes and therefore lead to changes in growth. Results from models of the physiological function of leaves, branches, roots, xylem, and canopies are presented here. These models illustrate three aspects of the dynamics of these processes. First, growth and the effects of pollutants are stochastic processes; that is, they vary randomly over time. The models help to account for the large amount of variability seen in normal field conditions. Second, some physiological processes can compensate for the effects of acidic deposition or ozone. Third, pollutants may have more than one effect on tree growth, and these effects may be synergistic. The potential nonlinearities and the variabilities demonstrated by these models lead to the conclusions that forest health effects may be developing that are not yet apparent; and for regulation of acidic deposition and associated pollutants to have a detectable effect, regulatory changes will probably have to be of substantial magnitude.

  6. Comparison of Mercury Mass Loading in Streams to Wet and Dry Atmospheric Deposition in Watersheds of the Western US: Evidence for Non-Atmospheric Mercury Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagalski, J. L.; Majewski, M. S.; Alpers, C. N.; Eckley, C.

    2015-12-01

    Many streams in the western United States (US) are listed as impaired by mercury (Hg), and it is important to understand the magnitudes of the various sources in order to implement management strategies. Atmospheric deposition of Hg and can be a major source of aquatic contamination, along with mine wastes, and other sources. Prior studies in the eastern US have shown that streams deliver less than 50% of the atmospherically deposited Hg on an annual basis. In this study, we compared annual stream Hg loads for 20 watersheds in the western US to measured wet and modeled dry deposition. Land use varies from undisturbed to mixed (agricultural, urban, forested, mining). Data from the Mercury Deposition Network was used to estimate Hg input from precipitation. Dry deposition was not directly measured, but can be modeled using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality model. At an undeveloped watershed in the Rocky Mountains, the ratio of stream Hg load to atmospheric deposition was 0.2 during a year of average precipitation. In contrast, at the Carson River in Nevada, with known Hg contamination from historical silver mining with Hg amalgamation, stream export exceeded atmospheric deposition by a factor of 60, and at a small Sierran watershed with gold mining, the ratio was 70. Larger watersheds with mixed land uses, tend to have lower ratios of stream export relative to atmospheric deposition suggesting storage of Hg. The Sacramento River was the largest watershed for which Hg riverine loads were available with an average ratio of stream Hg export to atmospheric deposition of 0.10. Although Hg was used in upstream historical mining operations, the downstream river Hg load is partially mitigated by reservoirs, which trap sediment. This study represents the first compilation of riverine Hg loads in comparison to atmospheric deposition on a regional scale; the approach may be useful in assessing the relative importance of atmospheric and non-atmospheric Hg sources.

  7. Dry deposition of pollutant and marker particles onto live mouse airway surfaces enhances monitoring of individual particle mucociliary transit behaviour.

    PubMed

    Donnelley, Martin; Morgan, Kaye S; Siu, Karen K W; Parsons, David W

    2012-07-01

    Particles suspended in the air are inhaled during normal respiration and unless cleared by airway defences, such as the mucociliary transit (MCT) system, they can remain and affect lung and airway health. Synchrotron phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCXI) methods have been developed to non-invasively monitor the behaviour of individual particles in live mouse airways and in previous studies the MCT behaviour of particles and fibres in the airways of live mice after deposition in a saline carrier fluid have been examined. In this study a range of common respirable pollutant particles (lead dust, quarry dust and fibreglass fibres) as well as marker particles (hollow glass micro-spheres) were delivered into the trachea of live mice using a dry powder insufflator to more accurately mimic normal environmental particulate exposure and deposition via inhalation. The behaviour of the particles once delivered onto the airway surface was tracked over a five minute period via PCXI. All particles were visible after deposition. Fibreglass fibres remained stationary throughout while all other particle types transited the tracheal surface throughout the imaging period. In all cases the majority of the particle deposition and any airway surface activity was located close to the dorsal tracheal wall. Both the individual and bulk motions of the glass bead marker particles were visible and their behaviour enabled otherwise hidden MCT patterns to be revealed. This study verified the value of PCXI for examining the post-deposition particulate MCT behaviour in the mouse trachea and highlighted that MCT is not a uniform process as suggested by radiolabel studies. It also directly revealed the advantages of dry particle delivery for establishing adequate particulate presence for visualizing MCT behaviour. The MCT behaviour and rate seen after dry particle delivery was different from that in previous carrier-fluid studies. It is proposed that dry particle delivery is essential for producing

  8. Effects of Dried Algae Schizochytrium Sp., A Rich Source of Docosahexaenoic Acid, on Growth, Fatty Acid Composition, and Sensory Quality of Channel Catfish Ictalurus Punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the effect of supplementation of dried algae Schizochytrium sp., a rich source of 22:6 n-3, on growth, fatty acid composition, and sensory quality of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Five isonitrogenous (28% crude protein) and isocaloric (2.78 kcal...

  9. Fundamental Study on Temperature Dependence of Deposition Rate of Silicic Acid - 13270

    SciTech Connect

    Shinmura, Hayata; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of the silicic acid is one of the key factors to estimate the condition of the repository system after the backfill. This study experimentally examined the temperature dependence of dynamic behavior of supersaturated silicic acid in the co-presence of solid phase, considering Na ions around the repository, and evaluated the deposition rate constant, k, of silicic acid by using the first-order reaction equation considering the specific surface area. The values of k were in the range of 1.0x10{sup -11} to 1.0x10{sup -9} m/s in the temperature range of 288 K to 323 K. The deposition rate became larger with increments of temperature under the Na ion free condition. Besides, in the case of Na ions 0.6 M, colloidal silicic acid decreased dramatically at a certain time. This means that the diameter of the colloidal silicic acid became larger than the pore size of filter (0.45 μm) due to bridging of colloidal silicic acid. Furthermore, this study estimated the range of altering area and the aperture of flow-path in various value of k corresponding to temperature by using advection-dispersion model. The concentration in the flow-path became lower with increments of temperature, and when the value of k is larger than 1.0x10{sup -11} m/s, the deposition range of supersaturated silicic acid was estimated to be less than 20 m around the repository. In addition, the deposition of supersaturated silicic acid led the decrement of flow-path aperture, which was remarkable under the condition of relatively high temperature. Such a clogging in flow paths is expected as a retardation effect of radionuclides. (authors)

  10. An overview of a 5-year research program on acid deposition in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; He, K.; Xu, X.; Zhang, P.; Bai, Y.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, X.; Duan, L.; Li, W.; Chai, F.

    2011-12-01

    Despite concerted research and regulative control of sulfur dioxide in China, acid rain remained a serious environmental issue, due to a sharp increase in the combustion of fossil fuel in the 2000s. In 2005, the Ministry of Science and Technology of China funded a five-year comprehensive research program on acid deposition. This talk will give an overview of the activities and the key findings from this study, covering emission, atmospheric processes, and deposition, effects on soil and stream waters, and impact on typical trees/plants in China. The main results include (1) China still experiences acidic rainfalls in southern and eastern regions, although the situation has stabilized after 2006 due to stringent control of SO2 by the Chinese Government; (2) Sulfate is the dominant acidic compound, but the contribution of nitrate has increased; (3) cloud-water composition in eastern China is strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions; (4) the persistent fall of acid rain in the 30 years has lead to acidification of some streams/rivers and soils in southern China; (5) the studied plants have shown varying response to acid rain; (6) some new insights have been obtained on atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric transport, soil chemistry, and ecological impacts, some of which will be discussed in this talk. Compared to the situation in North America and Europe, China's acid deposition is still serious, and continued control of sulfur and nitrogen emission is required. There is an urgent need to establish a long-term observation network/program to monitor the impact of acid deposition on soil, streams/rivers/lakes, and forests.

  11. Unusual specific heat of almost dry L-cysteine and L-cystine amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, M S; Lima, T A; Ferreira, F F; Martinho, H S

    2015-03-01

    A detailed quantitative analysis of the specific heat in the 0.5- to 200-K temperature range for almost dry L-cysteine and its dimer, L-cystine, amino acids is presented. We report the occurrence of a sharp first-order transition at ∼76 K for L-cysteine associated with the thiol group ordering which was successfully modeled with the two-dimensional Ising model. We demonstrated that quantum rotors, two-level systems (TLS), Einstein oscillators, and acoustic phonons (the Debye model) are essential ingredients to correctly describe the overall experimental data. Our analysis pointed out the absence of the TLS contribution to the low temperature specific heat of L-cysteine. This result was similar to that found in other noncrystalline amorphous materials, e.g., amorphous silicon, low density amorphous water, and ultrastable glasses. L-cystine presented an unusual nonlinear acoustic dispersion relation ω(q)=vq0.95 and a Maxwell-Boltzmann-type distribution of tunneling barriers. The presence of Einstein oscillators with ΘE∼70 K was common in both systems and adequately modeled the boson peak contributions. PMID:25871146

  12. Unusual specific heat of almost dry L-cysteine and L-cystine amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, M. S.; Lima, T. A.; Ferreira, F. F.; Martinho, H. S.

    2015-03-01

    A detailed quantitative analysis of the specific heat in the 0.5- to 200-K temperature range for almost dry L-cysteine and its dimer, L-cystine, amino acids is presented. We report the occurrence of a sharp first-order transition at ˜76 K for L-cysteine associated with the thiol group ordering which was successfully modeled with the two-dimensional Ising model. We demonstrated that quantum rotors, two-level systems (TLS), Einstein oscillators, and acoustic phonons (the Debye model) are essential ingredients to correctly describe the overall experimental data. Our analysis pointed out the absence of the TLS contribution to the low temperature specific heat of L-cysteine. This result was similar to that found in other noncrystalline amorphous materials, e.g., amorphous silicon, low density amorphous water, and ultrastable glasses. L-cystine presented an unusual nonlinear acoustic dispersion relation ω (q ) =v q0.95 and a Maxwell-Boltzmann-type distribution of tunneling barriers. The presence of Einstein oscillators with ΘE˜70 K was common in both systems and adequately modeled the boson peak contributions.

  13. Simple Limbal Epithelial Transplantation in Acid Injury and Severe Dry Eye.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sudesh Kumar; Bhatti, Anubha; Raj, Amit; Bamotra, Ravi Kant

    2016-06-01

    The epithelial cells of cornea constantly undergo renewal and regeneration and the stem cells responsible for renewal resides within basal epithelium at the limbus in palisades of Vogt. Simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) is a simplified technique for limbal stem cell deficiency and it combines the benefits of both conjunctival limbal autografting and cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation by being single-stage and utilizing minimal donor tissue. We will be discussing two cases of ocular surface disorder which were managed successfully by new technique simple limbal epithelial transplantation. Two patients one with unilateral Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD) following acid injury and other with bilateral LSCD due to severe dry eye underwent limbal epithelial transplantation using the SLET method after taking prior consent for the procedure. Success was termed complete when a completely epithelialized, avascular and stable corneal surface was seen. The follow up examinations were done on first day, at 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks and at 3 months after the surgery. A completely epithelialised, avascular and stable corneal surface was achieved by 4 weeks in both patients. Simple limbal epithelial transplantation is a new technique which is simple, cheap and easily affordable and it has decreased the dependence on stem cell laboratory. PMID:27504323

  14. Simple Limbal Epithelial Transplantation in Acid Injury and Severe Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Sudesh Kumar; Raj, Amit; Bamotra, Ravi Kant

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cells of cornea constantly undergo renewal and regeneration and the stem cells responsible for renewal resides within basal epithelium at the limbus in palisades of Vogt. Simple limbal epithelial transplantation (SLET) is a simplified technique for limbal stem cell deficiency and it combines the benefits of both conjunctival limbal autografting and cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation by being single-stage and utilizing minimal donor tissue. We will be discussing two cases of ocular surface disorder which were managed successfully by new technique simple limbal epithelial transplantation. Two patients one with unilateral Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD) following acid injury and other with bilateral LSCD due to severe dry eye underwent limbal epithelial transplantation using the SLET method after taking prior consent for the procedure. Success was termed complete when a completely epithelialized, avascular and stable corneal surface was seen. The follow up examinations were done on first day, at 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks and at 3 months after the surgery. A completely epithelialised, avascular and stable corneal surface was achieved by 4 weeks in both patients. Simple limbal epithelial transplantation is a new technique which is simple, cheap and easily affordable and it has decreased the dependence on stem cell laboratory. PMID:27504323

  15. Integrated assessment of acid deposition impacts using reduced-form modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, R.; Small, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    Emissions of sulfates and other acidic pollutants from anthropogenic sources result in the deposition of these acidic pollutants on the earth`s surface, downwind of the source. These pollutants reach surface waters, including streams and lakes, and acidify them, resulting in a change in the chemical composition of the surface water. Sometimes the water chemistry is sufficiently altered so that the lake can no longer support aquatic life. This document traces the efforts by many researchers to understand and quantify the effect of acid deposition on the water chemistry of populations of lakes, in particular the improvements to the MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) modeling effort, and describes its reduced-form representation in a decision and uncertainty analysis tool. Previous reduced-form approximations to the MAGIC model are discussed in detail, and their drawbacks are highlighted. An improved reduced-form model for acid neutralizing capacity is presented, which incorporates long-term depletion of the watershed acid neutralization fraction. In addition, improved fish biota models are incorporated in the integrated assessment model, which includes reduced-form models for other physical and chemical processes of acid deposition, as well as the resulting socio-economic and health related effects. The new reduced-form lake chemistry and fish biota models are applied to the Adirondacks region of New York.

  16. Global impacts of sulfate deposition from acid rain on methane emissions from natural wetlands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, V.

    2003-04-01

    Natural wetlands form the largest methane (CH_4) source to the atmosphere. A collection of recent field and laboratory studies point to an anthropogenic control on CH_4 emissions from these systems: acid rain sulfate (SO_42-) deposition. These studies ranging from the UK, USA, Canada, Sweden and Czech Republic demonstrate that low rates of SO_42- deposition, within the range commonly experienced in acid rain impacted regions, can suppress CH_4 emissions by as much as 40% and that the response of CH_4 emissions to increasing rates of SO_42- deposition closely mirrors changes in sulfate reduction rates with SO_42- deposition. This indicates that the suppression in CH_4 flux is the result of acid rain stimulating a competitive exclusion of methanogenesis by sulfate reducing bacteria, resulting in reduced methane production. These findings were extrapolated to the global scale by combining modelled, spatially explicit data sets of CH_4 emission from wetlands across the globe with modelled S deposition. Results indicate that this interaction may be important at the global scale, suppressing CH_4 emissions from wetlands in 2030 by as much as 20--28Tg, and, in the process, offsetting predicted climate induced growth in the wetland CH_4 source.

  17. Dry Acid Deposition and Accumulation on the Surface of Mars and in the Atacama Desert, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. C.; Zent, A. P.; Ehrenfruend, P.; Taylor, C. L.; McKay, C. P.; Garry, J. R. C.

    2005-01-01

    It has been discovered recently that soils from certain regions of the Chilean Atacama Desert have some characteristics that are similar to the surface materials tested by the Viking Landers. Navarro-Gonzalez et al. demonstrated that the quantity and diversity of heterotrophic bacteria increase as a function of local water availability in the Atacama, and that for some soil samples collected in the driest regions, no culturable bacteria could be isolated. Additionally, Navarro-Gonzalez et al. reported that pyrolysis-GCMS analysis of soils collected from these regions revealed extremely low levels of organic matter. Although the mechanism resulting in the low level of organics in these regions was not established by Navarro-Gonzalez, the condition of organic-depleted, near-sterile soil offers an interesting Earth analog of the martian surface material, as the Viking Gas Exchange (GEx) experiment and Labeled Release (LR) experiment were unable to demonstrate the presence of culturable bacteria, and the Viking pyrolysis- GCMS was unable to detect organic compounds.

  18. Preparation of waxes and humic acids from brown coal from the Sergeevskoe deposit

    SciTech Connect

    L.P. Noskova; A.V. Rokhin; A.P. Sorokin

    2007-06-15

    The comparative extraction of coal with organic solvents was performed. Humic acids were separated from solid residues. The yields, particle-size distributions, and chemical compositions of the resulting products were analyzed. It was demonstrated that brown-coal wax and humic fertilizers can potentially be obtained using coal from the Sergeevskoe deposit.

  19. EFFECT OF SOIL PROCESSES ON THE ACIDIFICATION OF WATER BY ACID DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanism whereby acid deposition can cause acidification of surface waters via equilibrium processes in soil solution was investigated using chemical equilibrium models. These models show that for soils with low to moderately low exchangeable bases the soil solution pH is on...

  20. Do Uric Acid Deposits in Zooxanthellae Function as Eye-Spots?

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kobiyama, Atsushi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    The symbiosis between zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium) and corals is a fundamental basis of tropical marine ecosystems. However the physiological interactions of the hosts and symbionts are poorly understood. Recently, intracellular crystalline deposits in Symbiodinium were revealed to be uric acid functioning for nutrient storage. This is the first exploration of these enigmatic crystalline materials that had previously been misidentified as oxalic acid, providing new insights into the nutritional strategies of Symbiodinium in oligotrophic tropical waters. However, we believe these deposits also function as eye-spots on the basis of light and electron microscopic observations of motile cells of cultured Symbiodinium. The cells possessed crystalline deposit clusters in rows with each row 100–150 nm thick corresponding to 1/4 the wavelength of light and making them suitable for maximum wave interference and reflection of light. Crystalline clusters in cells observed with a light microscope strongly refracted and polarized light, and reflected or absorbed short wavelength light. The facts that purines, including uric acid, have been identified as the main constituents of light reflectors in many organisms, and that the photoreceptor protein, opsin, was detected in our Symbiodinium strain, support the idea that uric acid deposits in Symbiodinium motile cells may function as a component of an eye-spot. PMID:19609449

  1. DISCOVERING THE CAUSES, CONSEQUENCES, AND IMPLICATIONS OF ACID RAIN AND ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much has been learned in recent years about air pollution, acid precipitation and atmospheric deposition and their effects on public welfare. There are still unanswered questions about certain aspects of these problems and possible strategies for their solution. Public concern ab...

  2. EFFECTS OF ACIDIC DEPOSITION ON NORTH AMERICAN LAKES: PALAEOLIMNOLOGICAL EVIDENCE FORM DIATOMS AND CHRYSOPHYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of sediment diatom and chrysophyte assemblages is the best technique currently available for inferring past lakewater pH trends, and use of the approach for assessing the ecological effects of acidic deposition is increasing rapidly. s of August 1989, sediment core infer...

  3. ACIDIFICATION AND RECOVERY OF A SPODOSOL BS HORIZON FROM ACIDIC DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine acidification and recovery of a Spodosol Bs horizon from acidic deposition in the Bear Brook Watershed (BBW) in central Maine. echanical vacuum extractor was used to draw solutions through a soil column at three treatments containing 40...

  4. Response of DOC in acid-sensitive Maine lakes to decreasing sulfur deposition (1993 - 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, sulfur deposition has decreased across the northeastern United States. As a result, sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams have also decreased and many surface waters have become less acidic. Over the same time period, th...

  5. EVALUATING CHANGES IN FOREST CONDITION POTENTIALLY RELATED TO ACIDIC DEPOSITION: AN EXAMPLE USING RED SPRUCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a result of concern about forest decline in Europe and the USA, research has been conducted to investigate changes in forest condition that might be associated with acidic deposition and related pollutants (principally ozone). ymptoms of tree decline observed in the field typi...

  6. ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING THE EFFECTS OF ACID DEPOSITION ON COATINGS ON WOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preliminary experiments have been carried out to characterize the potential deleterious effects of acidic deposition on three representative paints: an oil alkyd paint and two acrylic latex formulations. The base polymer latex common to both latex paints was also studied individu...

  7. Precipitation-chemistry measurements from the California Acid Deposition Monitoring Program, 1985-1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Charles L.; Tonnessen, Kathy A.

    1993-01-01

    The configuration of the California Acid Deposition Monitoring Program (CADMP) precipitation network is described and quality assurance results summarized. Comparison of CADMP and the National Acid Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) data at four parallel sites indicated that mean depth-weighted differences were less than 3 μeq ℓ−1 for all ions, being statistically significant for ammonium, sulfate and hydrogen ion. These apparently small differences were 15–30% of the mean concentrations of ammonium, sulfate and hydrogen ion. Mean depth-weighted concentrations and mass deposition rates for the period 1985–1990 are summarized; the latter were highest either where concentrations or precipitation depths were relatively high.

  8. Electrophoretic deposition and electrochemical behavior of novel graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Qian; Jia, Zhaojun; Xu, Xuchen; Shi, Yuying; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng; Xi, Tingfei; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-11-01

    Novel ternary graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite (GO-HY-HA) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Ti substrate using anodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Hyaluronic acid was employed as charging additive and dispersion agent during EPD. The kinetics and mechanism of the deposition, and the microstructure of the coated samples were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and microscopic Fourier transform infrared analysis. The results showed that the addition of GO sheets into the HY-HA suspensions could increase the deposition rate and inhibit cracks creation and propagation in the coatings. The corrosion resistant of the resulting samples were evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization method in simulated body fluid, and the GO-HY-HA coatings could effectively improve the anti-corrosion property of the Ti substrate.

  9. Contributions of dry and wet depositions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans to a contaminated site resulting from a penetachlorophenol manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hwang J; Wang, Shizoom; Wang, Ya F; Li, Hsing W; Wang, Lin C

    2011-04-01

    The soils at a factory for manufacturing pentachlorophenol were heavily contaminated by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). In order to verify the contributions of dry and wet deposition of PCDD/Fs from the ambient air, the concentration of PCDD/Fs in ambient air and soil were measured, the partition of particle- and gas-phases of atmospheric PCDD/Fs was calculated, and the annual fluxes of total dry and wet PCDD/F depositions were modeled. Average atmospheric PCDD/F concentration was 1.24 ng Nm(-3) (or 0.0397 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)). Moreover, over 92.8% of total PCDD/Fs were in the particle phase, and the dominant species were high chlorinated congeners. The total PCDD/F fluxes of dry and wet deposition were 119.5 ng m(-2) year(-1) (1.34 ng I-TEQ m(-2) year(-1)) and 82.0 ng m(-2) year(-1) (1.07 ng I-TEQ m(-2) year(-1)), respectively. By scenario simulation, the total fluxes of dry and wet PCDD/F depositions were 87.1 and 68.6 ng I-TEQ, respectively. However, the estimated PCDD/F contents in the contaminated soil were 839.9 μ g I-TEQ. Hence, the contributions of total depositions of atmospheric PCDD/F were only 0.02%. The results indicated that the major sources of PCDD/F for the contaminated soil could be attributed to the pentachlorophenol manufacturing process. PMID:20559715

  10. Folic acid content in thermostabilized and freeze-dried space shuttle foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Nillen, J. L.; Kloeris, V. L.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether freeze-dried and thermostabilized foods on a space shuttle contain adequate folate and to investigate any effects of freeze-drying on folacin. Frozen vegetables were analyzed after three states of processing: thawed; cooked; and rehydrated. Thermostabilized items were analyzed as supplied with no further processing. Measurable folate decreased in some freeze-dried vegetables and increased in others. Folacin content of thermostabilized food items was comparable with published values. We concluded that although the folacin content of some freeze-dried foods was low, adequate folate is available from the shuttle menu to meet RDA guidelines.

  11. [Determination of trace metals in atmospheric dry deposition with a heavy matrix of PUF by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy after microwave digestion].

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue-peng; Wang, Yue-si; Yang, Yong-jie; Wu, Dan; Xin, Jin-yuan; Fan, Wen-yan

    2010-03-01

    Interest in atmospheric dry deposition results mostly from concerns about the effects of the deposited trace elements entering waterbody, soil and vegetation as well as their subsequent health effects. A microwave assisted digestion method followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (MAD-ICP/MS) analysis was developed to determine the concentrations of a large number of trace metals in atmospheric dry deposition samples with a heavy matrix of polyurethane foam (PUF). A combination of HNO3-H2O2-HF was used for digestion. The experimental protocol for the microwave assisted digestion was established using two different SRMs (GBW 07401, Soil and GBW 08401, Coal fly ash). Subsequently, blanks and limits of detection for total trace metal concentrations were determined for PUF filter which was used for dry deposition sampling. Finally, the optimized digestion method was applied to real world atmospheric dry deposition samples collected at 10 sites in Jingjinji area in winter from Dec. 2007 to Feb. 2008. The results showed that the area-averaged total mass fluxes ranged between 85 and 912 mg x (m2 x d)(-1), and fluxes of most elements were highest at Baoding and lowest at Xinglong. In addition, the elemental fluxes in urban areas of Beijing, Tianjin and Tangshan were measured to be higher than that in suburb and rural sites. The average fluxes of crust elements (A1, Fe, Mn, K, Na, Ca and Mg) were one to three orders of magnitude higher than anthropogenic elements (Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, V, Zn and Ba), varying from 151 to 16034 microg x (m2 x d)(-1) versus 14 to 243 microg x (m2 x d)(-1). Zinc was the most abundant heavy metal and calcium the highest of the crust elements while the elements Mo, Co, Cd, As and Be deposited less or even could not be detected. The anthropogenic and crustal contributions were estimated by employing enrichment factors (EF) calculated relative to the average crustal composition. The EF values of all elements except Pb and Zn were below

  12. Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauci, Vincent; Dise, Nancy B.; Howell, Graham; Jenkins, Meaghan E.

    2008-09-01

    Sulfate in acid rain is known to suppress methane (CH4) emissions from natural freshwater wetlands. Here we examine the possibility that CH4 emissions from rice agriculture may be similarly affected by acid rain, a major and increasing pollution problem in Asia. Our findings suggest that acid rain rates of SO42- deposition may help to reduce CH4 emissions from rice agriculture. Emissions from rice plants treated with simulated acid rain at levels of SO42- consistent with the range of deposition in Asia were reduced by 24% during the grain filling and ripening stage of the rice season which accounts for 50% of the overall CH4 that is normally emitted in a rice season. A single application of SO42- at a comparable level reduced CH4 emission by 43%. We hypothesize that the reduction in CH4 emission may be due to a combination of effects. The first mechanism is that the low rates of SO42- may be sufficient to boost yields of rice and, in so doing, may cause a reduction in root exudates to the rhizosphere, a key substrate source for methanogenesis. Decreasing a major substrate source for methanogens is also likely to intensify competition with sulfate-reducing microorganisms for whom prior SO42- limitation had been lifted by the simulated acid rain S deposition.

  13. Effects of smoking and sun-drying on proximate, fatty and amino acids compositions of Southern pink shrimp (Penaeus notialis).

    PubMed

    Akintola, Shehu Latunji

    2015-05-01

    Traditional techniques of smoking and sun drying were investigated to understand their effects on nutritional qualities of Southern pink shrimp against present human dietary needs. Shrimps subjected to hot smoking at 71 °C and sun drying at ambient temperature of 31 °C treatments were compared to fresh samples. Proximate composition dry weight basis showed that smoked product were highest in protein and carbohydrate (P < 0.05) while fat was raised in sundried products (P < 0.05). The monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFAs) were highest ranging from 35.87 to 40.35 % in all products. Oleic acid (18:1) had highest value of 24.26 % in the smoked. Eicosapentanoic acid (C20:5 n-3) was highest in the sundried while Docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3) predominated in the fresh. The shrimp protein had Glutamate as the most abundant amino acid in the three forms. Both preservation methods significantly (P < 0.01) raised the values of tyrosine, histidine and leucine. The Ω-3/Ω-6 ratios showed that prawn is rich in omega 3. The highest arginine/lysine ratio (1.54) was obtained in sundried. The EAA/NEAA ratios ranged from 0.72 to 0.80 while index of atherogenicity (IA) and index of thrombogenicity (IT) ranged from 0.71 to 0.82 and 0.21 to 0.30 respectively in all forms. All products forms showed different advantages with respect to quality and nutrition, smoked samples however, offered the best benefits. Information provided is the first detailed study on the impacts of smoking and sun-drying on the nutritional qualities of a shrimp with tremendous economic and nutritional importance. PMID:25892762

  14. Amino-acid racemizarion in Quaternary shell deposits at Willapa Bay, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.; Clifton, H.E.

    1979-01-01

    Extents of racemization ( d l ratios) of amino acids in fossil Saxidomus giganteus (Deshayes) and Ostrea lurida Carpenter were measured on shell deposits exposed at 21 sites on the east side of Willapa Bay, Washington. Amino acids from Saxidomus show less variability in d Spl ratios and, therefore, are of greater use in correlation and age estimation than are amino acids from Ostrea. Shells of two different ages, about 120,000 ?? 40,000 yr old and about 190,000 ?? 40,000 yr old, are present. These ages correspond to Stages 5 and 7 of the marine isotope record defined by Shackleton and Opdyke in 1973 and hence the shell deposits likely formed during two different high stands of sea level. The stratigraphic record at Willapa Bay is consistent with this interpretation. ?? 1979.

  15. SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE METHOD TO MEASURE ACID DEPOSITION EFFECTS ON BUILDING STONE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kingston, Marguerite J.; Ager, Cathy M.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), the U. S. Geological Survey is cooperating with other agencies to test the effects of acid deposition on building stone. A 10-year test-site study has been organized for the purpose of correlating possible stone deterioration with environmental factors. In Summer 1984, slabs of building stone, 3 by 2 by 2 inches, were exposed to the atmosphere at four test sites where the pH of precipitation and other meteorological variables are continuously monitored. This paper examines the development of one experimental technique used in this study - the application of diffuse spectral reflectance methods for laboratory and in situ measurement of those properties of stone which may be affected by acid deposition.

  16. Effects of Folic Acid on Secretases Involved in Aβ Deposition in APP/PS1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Bai, Dong; Li, Wen; Huang, Guo-Wei; Liu, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia. Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is identified as the core protein of neuritic plaques. Aβ is generated by the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via the APP cleaving enzyme (α-secretase, or β-secretase) and γ-secretase. Previous studies indicated that folate deficiency elevated Aβ deposition in APP/PS1 mice, and this rise was prevented by folic acid. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether folic acid could influence the generation of Aβ by regulating α-, β-, and γ-secretase. Herein, we demonstrated that folic acid reduced the deposition of Aβ42 in APP/PS1 mice brain by decreasing the mRNA and protein expressions of β-secretase [beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1)] and γ-secretase complex catalytic component-presenilin 1 (PS1)-in APP/PS1 mice brain. Meanwhile, folic acid increased the levels of ADAM9 and ADAM10, which are important α-secretases in ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. However, folic acid has no impact on the protein expression of nicastrin (Nct), another component of γ-secretase complex. Moreover, folic acid regulated the expression of miR-126-3p and miR-339-5p, which target ADAM9 and BACE1, respectively. Taken together, the effect of folic acid on Aβ deposition may relate to making APP metabolism through non-amyloidogenic pathway by decreasing β-secretase and increasing α-secretase. MicroRNA (miRNA) may involve in the regulation mechanism of folic acid on secretase expression. PMID:27618097

  17. Contemporaneous deposition of phyllosilicates and sulfates: Using Australian acidic saline lake deposits to describe geochemical variability on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldridge, A.M.; Hook, S.J.; Crowley, J.K.; Marion, G.M.; Kargel, J.S.; Michalski, J.L.; Thomson, B.J.; de Souza, Filho C.R.; Bridges, N.T.; Brown, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the origin of the Martian sulfate and phyllosilicate deposits have led to the hypothesis that there was a marked, global-scale change in the Mars environment from circum-neutral pH aqueous alteration in the Noachian to an acidic evaporitic system in the late Noachian to Hesperian. However, terrestrial studies suggest that two different geochemical systems need not be invoked to explain such geochemical variation.Western Australian acidic playa lakes have large pH differences separated vertically and laterally by only a few tens of meters, demonstrating how highly variable chemistries can coexist over short distances in natural environments. We suggest diverse and variable Martian aqueous environments where the coetaneous formation of phyllosilicates and sulfates at the Australian sites are analogs for regions where phyllosilicates and sulfates coexist on Mars. In these systems, Fe and alkali earth phyllosilicates represent deep facies associated with upwelling neutral to alkaline groundwater, whereas aluminous phyllosilicates and sulfates represent near-surface evaporitic facies formed from more acidic brines. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Preparation and body distribution of freeze-dried powder of ursolic acid phospholipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao Ju; Hu, Xian Ming; Yi, Yi Mu; Wan, Jing

    2009-03-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is a poor soluble natural triterpenoid. It has a wide variety of antitumor activities. We extracted it from Crataegus pinnatifida for the first time. To achieve a high bioavailability, targeting effect, stability, and an intravenous (i.v.) administration, the UA phospholipid nanopowders (UA-PL-NP) were prepared, characterized, and evaluated. With soybean phospholipid as the carrier and poloxamer 188 as emulsifier, the UA nanoparticle suspension was prepared by solvent emulsification-evaporation and ultrasonic dispersion. The UA-PL-NP was obtained by freeze drying. The body distribution in mice was studied after i.v. administration of UA-PL-NP and an UA control solution (UA-Sol). The entrapment efficiency (EE) and UA concentration in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the UA-PL-NP had an average diameter of 273.8 nm with a zeta potential of -23.2 mV. The EE was up to 86.0%, and the drug loading (DL) was 12.8%. After i.v. administration of UA-PL-NP with low, middle and high doses, UA concentration in the livers of mice obviously increased during tested period and was highest in tested organs at 4 h. The AUC(0-12) ratio of UA-PL-NP in liver to that in plasma was much higher than that of UA-Sol, and the liver AUC(0-12) ratio of UA-PL-NP to UA-Sol was 8.6. These results indicate the UA-PL-NP have a good targeting to the liver after i.v. administration. Therefore, the UA-PL-NP is demonstrated to be available as an i.v. and liver targeting system for lipophilic antitumor triterpenoids. PMID:18798089

  19. Amino acid digestibility of heat damaged distillers dried grains with solubles fed to pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this experiment was to determine the effects of heat treatment on the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids (AA) in corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) fed to growing pigs. The second objective was to develop regression equations that may be used to predict the concentration of SID AA in corn DDGS. A source of corn DDGS was divided into 4 batches that were either not autoclaved or autoclaved at 130°C for 10, 20, or 30 min. Four diets containing DDGS from each of the 4 batches were formulated with DDGS being the only source of AA and CP in the diets. A N-free diet also was formulated and used to determine the basal endogenous losses of CP and AA. Ten growing pigs (initial BW: 53.5 ± 3.9 kg) were surgically equipped with a T-cannula in the distal ileum and allotted to a replicated 5 × 4 Youden square design with 5 diets and 4 periods in each square. The SID of CP decreased linearly (P < 0.05) from 77.9% in non-autoclaved DDGS to 72.1, 66.1, and 68.5% in the DDGS samples that were autoclaved for 10, 20, or 30 min, respectively. The SID of lysine was quadratically reduced (P < 0.05) from 66.8% in the non-autoclaved DDGS to 54.9, 55.3, and 51.9% in the DDGS autoclaved for 10, 20, or 30 min, respectively. The concentrations of SID Arginine, Histidine, Leucine, Lysine, Methionine, Phenylalanine, or Threonine may be best predicted by equations that include the concentration of acid detergent insoluble N in the model (r2 = 0.76, 0.68, 0.67, 0.84, 0.76, 0.73, or 0.54, respectively). The concentrations of SID Isoleucine and Valine were predicted (r2 = 0.58 and 0.54, respectively) by the Lysine:CP ratio, whereas the concentration of SID Tryptophan was predicted (r2 = 0.70) by the analyzed concentration of Tryptophan in DDGS. In conclusion, the SID of AA is decreased as a result of heat damage and the concentration of SID AA in heat-damaged DDGS may be predicted by regression equations

  20. Use of stream chemistry for monitoring acidic deposition effects in the Adirondack region of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Momen, B.; Roy, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) and pH were measured weekly from October 1991 through September 2001 in three streams in the western Adirondack Mountain region of New York to identify trends in stream chemistry that might be related to changes in acidic deposition. A decreasing trend in atmospheric deposition of SO42- was observed within the region over the 10-yr period, although most of the decrease occurred between 1991 and 1995. Both ANC and pH were inversely related to flow in all streams; therefore, a trend analysis was conducted on (i) the measured values of ANC and pH and (ii) the residuals of the concentration-discharge relations. In Buck Creek, ANC increased significantly (p 0.10). In Bald Mountain Brook, ANC and residuals of ANC increased significantly (p < 0.01), although the trend was diatonic-a distinct decrease from 1991 to 1996 was followed by a distinct increase from 1996 to 2001. In Fly Pond outlet, ANC and residuals of ANC increased over the study period (p < 0.01), although the trend of the residuals resulted largely from an abrupt increase in 1997. In general, the trends observed in the three streams are similar to results presented for Adirondack lakes in a previous study, and are consistent with the declining trend in atmospheric deposition for this region, although the observed trends in ANC and pH in streams could not be directly attributed to the trends in acidic deposition.

  1. The Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF): A tool for the integrated assessment of acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, C.N.; Henrion, M.; Marnicio, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    A major challenge that has faced policy makers concerned with acid deposition is obtaining an integrated view of the underlying science related to acid deposition. In response to this challenge, the US Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of an integrated Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF) which links together the key acid deposition components of emissions, air transport, atmospheric deposition, and aquatic effects in a single modeling structure. The goal of TAF is to integrate credible models of the scientific and technical issues into an assessment framework that can directly address key policy issues, and in doing so act as a bridge between science and policy. Key objectives of TAF are to support coordination and communication among scientific researchers; to support communications with policy makers, and to provide rapid response for analyzing newly emerging policy issues; and to provide guidance for prioritizing research programs. This paper briefly describes how TAF was formulated to meet those objectives and the underlying principals which form the basis for its development.

  2. Effects of acid deposition on calcium nutrition and health of Southern Appalachian spruce fir forests

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Wullschleger, S.; Stone, A.; Wimmer, R.; Joslin, J.D.

    1995-02-01

    The role of acid deposition in the health of spruce fir forests in the Southern Appalachian Mountains has been investigated by a wide variety of experimental approaches during the past 10 years. These studies have proceeded from initial dendroecological documentation of altered growth patterns of mature trees to increasingly more focused ecophysiological research on the causes and characteristics of changes in system function associated with increased acidic deposition. Field studies across gradients in deposition and soil chemistry have been located on four mountains spanning 85 km of latitude within the Southern Appalachians. The conclusion that calcium nutrition is an important component regulating health of red spruce in the Southern Appalachians and that acid deposition significantly reduces calcium availability in several ways has emerged as a consistent result from multiple lines or research. These have included analysis of trends in wood chemistry, soil solution chemistry, foliar nutrition, gas exchange physiology, root histochemistry, and controlled laboratory and field studies in which acid deposition and/or calcium nutrition has been manipulated and growth and nutritional status of saplings or mature red spruce trees measured. This earlier research has led us to investigate the broader implications and consequences of calcium deficiency for changing resistance of spruce-fir forests to natural stresses. Current research is exploring possible relationships between altered calcium nutrition and shifts in response of Fraser fir to insect attack by the balsam wooly adelgid. In addition, changes in wood ultrastructural properties in relation to altered wood chemistry is being examined to evaluate its possible role in canopy deterioration, under wind and ice stresses typical of high elevation forests.

  3. Acid deposition sensitivity map of the Southern Appalachian Assessment area; Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pepper, John D.; Grosz, Andrew E.; Kress, Thomas H.; Collins, Thomas K.; Kappesser, Gary B.; Huber, Cindy M.; Webb, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Project Summary: The following digital product represents the Acid Deposition Sensitivity of the Southern Appalachian Assessment Area. Areas having various susceptibilities to acid deposition from air pollution are designated on a three tier ranking in the region of the Southern Appalachian Assessment (SAA). The assessment is being conducted by Federal agencies that are members of the Southern Appalachian Man and Biosphere (SAMAB) Cooperative. Sensitivities to acid deposition, ranked high, medium, and low are assigned on the basis of bedrock compositions and their associated soils, and their capacities to neutralize acid precipitation.

  4. Giant uranium deposits formed from exceptionally uranium-rich acidic brines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Antonin; Rozsypal, Christophe; Mercadier, Julien; Banks, David A.; Cuney, Michel; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Cathelineau, Michel

    2012-02-01

    Giant uranium deposits were formed during the Mesoproterozoic era, 1.6-1.0 Gyr ago, in both Canada and Australia. The deposits are thought to have formed from large-scale circulation of brines at temperatures of 120-200 °C that percolated between sedimentary basins and underlying crystalline basement rocks. However, the precise conditions for transport of the uranium in these brines are poorly understood. Here we use mass spectrometry to analyse the uranium content of brines preserved in naturally occurring fluid inclusions in ore deposits from the Athabasca Basin, Canada. We measure concentrations of uranium in the range 1.0×10-6-2.8×10-3moll-1. These concentrations are three orders of magnitude above any other common crustal fluids. Experimentally, we measure the solubility of uranium as a function of NaCl content and pH, in mixtures that are analogous to ore-forming brines at 155°C. To account for the high uranium content observed in the Athabasca deposits, we find that the brines must have been acidic, with a pH between 2.5 and 4.5. Our results strongly suggest that the world's richest uranium deposits formed from highly concentrated uranium-bearing acidic brines. We conclude that these conditions are a necessary requirement for the formation of giant uranium deposits in relatively short periods of time of about 0.1-1 Myr, similar to other world-class deposits of lead-zinc and gold.

  5. A Study of Effects of Acid Deposition on Pine Forest Ecosystem in Southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Li, F.; Lv, Z.; Song, W.; Yang, S.

    2013-12-01

    We used a long-term soil acidification model (LTSAM) and a terrestrial biogeochemical model (CENTURY) coupled to simulate the effects of acid deposition on pine forest ecosystem in southwestern China, based on indoor experiment results of aluminum toxicity to individual plant growth. The results of indoor aluminum experiments show that high aluminum concentration may restrict the plant growth and the acidic condition may aggravate it. The behavior of restriction of plant growth includes decreases of pine seedling biomass, root elongation and the sorption of soil cations (e.g. Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+). The model simulation results about soil chemistry show that, as acid deposition increases more, the pH value decreases faster, the soil aluminum ion concentration increase more rapidly, and the nutrition ions in soil solution decrease more quickly. The increased acid deposition also has negative impacts on the forest ecosystem according to the biogeochemical model simulation, for example, decreases of vegetation biomass, net primary productivity (NPP) and net CO2 uptake. Furthermore, the decrease of plant biomass will result in the decrease of the soil organic carbon content for the limited decomposition material supply.

  6. Dry deposition of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN): Determination of its deposition velocity at night from measurements of the atmospheric PAN and 222Radon concentration gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrimpf, Wolfram; Lienaerts, Karlheinz; Müller, Klaus Peter; Rudolph, Jochen; Neubert, Rolf; Schüßler, Wolfram; Levin, Ingeborg

    During the field campaign POPCORN (Photooxidant Formation by Plant Emitted Compounds and OH-Radicals in North-Eastern Germany) in August 1994 we measured the nighttime deposition velocities of PAN above a corn field. These are the first absolute measurements of PAN deposition velocities in the field. The deposition velocities were derived using a novel method, which uses measurements of the gradients of PAN and 222Rn and of the emission rates of 222Rn from the soil. A unique data set of about 250 field measurements of the PAN deposition velocity at night was thus obtained. The deposition velocity at night proved to be highly variable with an average of 0.54 cm/s and a standard deviation of 0.94 cm/s. Recent presumptions by Shepson et al. [1992] that the PAN deposition velocity is strongly reduced with increasing relative humidity could not be confirmed by our measurements.

  7. Soil calcium status and the response of stream chemistry to changing acidic deposition rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.; Lovett, Gary M.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Burns, Douglas A.; Stoddard, J.L.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Porter, J.H.; Thompson, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    Despite a decreasing trend in acidic deposition rates over the past two to three decades, acidified surface waters in the northeastern United States have shown minimal changes. Depletion of soil Ca pools has been suggested as a cause, although changes in soil Ca pools have not been directly related to long-term records of stream chemistry. To investigate this problem, a comprehensive watershed study was conducted in the Neversink River Basin, in the Catskill Mountains of New York, during 1991-1996. Spatial variations of atmospheric deposition, soil chemistry, and stream chemistry were evaluated over an elevation range of 817-1234 m to determine whether these factors exhibited elevational patterns. An increase in atmospheric deposition of SO4 with increasing elevation corresponded with upslope decreases of exchangeable soil base concentrations and acid-neutralizing capacity of stream water. Exchangeable base concentrations in homogeneous soil incubated within the soil profile for one year also decreased with increasing elevation. An elevational gradient in precipitation was not observed, and effects of a temperature gradient on soil properties were not detected. Laboratory leaching experiments with soils from this watershed showed that (1) concentrations of Ca in leachate increased as the concentrations of acid anions in added solution increased, and (2) the slope of this relationship was positively correlated with base saturation. Field and laboratory soil analyses are consistent with the interpretation that decreasing trends in acid-neutralizing capacity in stream water in the Neversink Basin, dating back to 1984, are the result of decreases in soil base saturation caused by acidic deposition.

  8. Amino acid and nucleotide contents and sensory traits of dry-cured products from pigs with different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Reina, Raquel; Sánchez del Pulgar, José; López-Buesa, Pascual; García, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The free amino acid and nucleotide contents of dry-cured ham, shoulder and loin from two genetic lines selected from pigs according to the paternal allele (homozygous AA and heterozygous AG) of the insulin-like growth factor-II gene were studied by HPLC. Their influence on the flavor and taste characteristics was also studied. The increase of lean content caused by the IGF-II mutation could affect proteolysis during the ripening process and therefore the sensory characteristics. The lower intramuscular fat content in the AA ham batch had a positive effect on the free amino acid content. However, similar flavor traits between ham batches were found, but the AG loin batch showed greater value. The enhancing effect of the IMP on the overall flavor intensity was limited by the amino acid and the IMF contents in dry-cured ham and loin, while in dry-cured shoulder, the IMP could be the reason for the significant differences in after taste and cured flavor scores. PMID:23916958

  9. Deposition kinetics and characterization of stable ionomers from hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urstöger, Georg; Resel, Roland; Koller, Georg; Coclite, Anna Maria

    2016-04-01

    A novel ionomer of hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid was synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PECVD process, being solventless, allows mixing of monomers with very different solubilities, and for polymers formed at high deposition rates and with high structural stability (due to the high number of cross-links and covalent bonding to the substrate) to be obtained. A kinetic study over a large set of parameters was run with the aim of determining the optimal conditions for high stability and proton conductivity of the polymer layer. Copolymers with good stability over 6 months' time in air and water were obtained, as demonstrated by ellipsometry, X-Ray reflectivity, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Stable coatings showed also proton conductivity as high as 1.1 ± 0.1 mS cm-1. Chemical analysis showed that due to the high molecular weight of the chosen precursors, it was possible to keep the plasma energy-input-per-mass low. This allowed limited precursor fragmentation and the functional groups of both monomers to be retained during the plasma polymerization.

  10. Anthropogenic Oxidation of Seafloor Massive Sulfide (SMS) deposits: Implications for Localized Seafloor Acid Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenker, L.; Romano, G. Y.; Mckibben, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    A rapid increase in the price of transition metals in recent years has piqued interest in deep sea in situ mining of seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits. There are important unanswered questions about the potential environmental effects of seafloor mining, particularly localized sulfuric acid generation. Currently there is a paucity of data on the oxidation kinetics of sulfide minerals in seawater. Seafloor massive sulfides oxidize rapidly via irreversible, acid-producing reactions. The oxidation kinetics of these minerals need to be quantified to estimate the significance of acid production. Laboratory experiments have been performed to evaluate the effects of pH, temperature, oxidant concentration, and mineral surface area on the rate of oxidation of chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) and pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS) in seawater. Temperature controlled circulation baths, Teflon reaction vessels, synthetic seawater, and pure, hand sorted natural sulfide mineral crystals are used in experiments. Both batch and flow-through reactor methods are employed. Reaction products are analyzed using ICP-MS. The rate law is expressed as follows: R = k (MO2,aq)a(MH+)b where R is the specific mineral oxidation rate (moles/m2/sec), k is the rate constant (a function of temperature), and a and b are reaction orders for molar aqueous species' concentrations (M). The initial rate method is used to determine the reaction order of each variable. Chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite are being studied because as the slowest- and fastest-oxidizing of the common sulfide minerals found in SMS deposits, they bound the range of rates seen in seafloor settings and can be used to place lower and upper limits on abiotic rates of metal release and sulfuric acid production. Experiments to date indicate an oxidation rate of pyrrhotite several times faster than that of chalcopyrite. The rate laws, when incorporated into reactive-transport computer codes, will enable the prediction of localized anthropogenic sulfuric acid

  11. New model for the sulfation of marble by dry deposition Sheltered marble—the indicator of air pollution by sulfur dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Nguyen, Thi Phuong Thoa; Nishimura, R.; Tsujino, Y.; Yokoi, M.; Maeda, Y.

    This paper was concerned with evaluating the effect of dry deposition on deterioration of marble. Two types of marble were exposed to atmospheric environment with a rain shelter at four exposure sites in the south of Vietnam for 3-month, 1-year and 2-year periods from July 2001 to September 2003. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescent (XRF) methods were applied to study the products of marble deterioration. Ion chromatography was used to analyze dry depositions on marble. The main product of marble deterioration was gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O). The amount of sulfate ions deposited on marble was found to be proportional to SO 2 concentration in the air, relative humidity and duration of the exposure. In addition, sulfation of marble caused by SO 2 at a relative humidity lower than 70% is almost half of that at relative humidity higher than 70%. Moreover, marble consisting of calcite (CaCO 3) was more sensitive to SO 2 than marble consisting of dolomite (CaCO 3 and MgCO 3). A good relation between the amount of sulfate ions deposited on marble and SO 2 concentration in the air suggested that marble could serve as an indicator for atmospheric pollution by SO 2.

  12. Regional relationships between geomorphic/hydrologic parameters and surface water chemistry relative to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, B.P.; Liff, C.I.; Campbell, W.G.; Cassell, D.L.; Church, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors determined geomorphic and hydrologic parameters for 144 forested, lake watersheds in the Northeast (NE) of the United States based primarily on measurements from topographic maps. These parameters were used to test for relationships with selected surface water chemistry relevant to acidic deposition. Analyses were conducted on regional and subregional scales delineated based on soils, land use, physiography, total sulfur deposition and statistical clustering of selected geomorphic/hydrologic parameters. Significant relationships were found among the geomorphic/hydrologic parameters and the surface water chemistry for the NE. Elevation had the most significant relationship with surface water chemistry, particularly in the mountainous areas of the NE. Other factors occurring consistently as significant predictors of surface water chemistry were maximum relief, relief ratio, runoff, and estimates of basin elongation. Results suggest that elevational parameters might be surrogates for other watershed characteristics, such as soils or spatial deposition patterns.

  13. Inkjet deposition of itraconazole onto poly(glycolic acid) microneedle arrays.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Ryan D; Jaipan, Panupong; Skoog, Shelby A; Stafslien, Shane; VanderWal, Lyndsi; Narayan, Roger J

    2016-03-01

    Poly(glycolic acid) microneedle arrays were fabricated using a drawing lithography process; these arrays were modified with a drug release agent and an antifungal agent by piezoelectric inkjet printing. Coatings containing poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride), a water-soluble drug release layer, and itraconazole (an antifungal agent), were applied to the microneedles by piezoelectric inkjet printing. Microscopic evaluation of the microneedles indicated that the modified microneedles contained the piezoelectric inkjet printing-deposited agents and that the surface coatings were released in porcine skin. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry aided in confirmation that the piezoelectric inkjet printing-deposited agents were successfully applied to the desired target areas of the microneedle surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of the component materials in the piezoelectric inkjet printing-deposited material. Itraconazole-modified microneedle arrays incubated with agar plates containing Candida albicans cultures showed zones of growth inhibition. PMID:26869165

  14. Modeling wet deposition of acid substances over the PRD region in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xingcheng; Fung, Jimmy Chi Hung; Wu, Dongwei

    2015-12-01

    The Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in southern China has suffered heavily from acid rain in the last 10 years due to the anthropogenic emission of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. Several measurement-based studies about this issue have been conducted to analyze the chemical composition of precipitation in this area. However, no detailed, high resolution numerical simulation regarding this topic has ever been done in this region. In this study, the WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ system was applied to simulate the wet deposition of acid substances (SO42- and NO3-) in the PRD region from 2009 to 2011 with a resolution of 3 km. The simulation output agreed well with the observation data. Our results showed that Guangzhou was the city most affected by acid rain in this region. The ratio of non-sea-salt sulfate to nitrate indicated that the acid rain in this region belonged to the sulfate-nitrate mixed type. The source apportionment result suggests that point source and super regional source are the ones that contribute the pollutants most in the rain water over PRD Region. The sulfate and nitrate input to some reservoirs via wet deposition was also estimated based on the model simulation. Our results suggest that further cross-city cooperation and emission reduction are needed to further curb acid rain in this region.

  15. The effects of climate change on the nitrogen cycle and acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Walton, J.J. ); Graboske, B.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Increases in greenhouse gases are expected to lead to a number of changes to the atmosphere which may impact regional and global chemical cycles. With the increasing awareness of climate change and the possibility of global chemical changes to the atmosphere, it becomes important to ask whether these changes to global climate and chemical cycles might benefit or hinder control programs aimed at reducing acid deposition. In the following, we review several possible changes to climate that may be expected to impact the global cycle of reactive nitrogen. We then use our global model of the reactive nitrogen cycle to estimate the effects of several of the more important changes on the continental-scale deposition of nitric acid. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Modeling the contribution of soil fauna to litter decomposition influenced by acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, B.; Loucks, O.L; Kuperman, R. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1993-06-01

    The effect of acidic deposition on soil pH and therefore on soil invertebrates and litter decomposition is being investigated in oak-hickory forests across a three-state, midwest, pollution gradient. The role of soil invertebrates has been assessed previously through the use of feeding, assimilation and respiratory rates. These energetic parameters depend strongly on the form of the allometric equations which have been improved here by incorporating uncertainties in body and population size. Results show that changes in reproduction and turnover dynamics of soil invertebrates (particularly of earthworms) due to acid-induced changes in soil pH explains observed patterns in litter depth.

  17. Valuation of damages to recreational trout fishing in the Upper Northeast due to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J.E.; Cameron, T.A.; Mendelsohn, R.E.; Parsons, G.A.; Shankle, S.A.

    1991-04-01

    This report documents methods used to estimate economic models of changes in recreational fishing due to the acidic deposition. The analysis was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and its subcontractors for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) in support of the National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The primary data needed to estimate these models were collected in the 1989 Aquatic Based Recreation Survey (ABRS), which was jointly funded by the DOE and the EPA's Office of Policy Planning and Evaluation. 11 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

  18. Parallel measurements of organic and elemental carbon dry (PM1, PM2.5) and wet (rain, snow, mixed) deposition into the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Lewandowska, Anita; Falkowska, Lucyna M

    2016-03-15

    Parallel studies on organic and elemental carbon in PM1 and PM2.5 aerosols and in wet deposition in various forms of its occurrence were conducted in the urbanised coastal zone of the Baltic Sea. The carbon load introduced into the sea water was mainly affected by the form of precipitation. Dry deposition load of carbon was on average a few orders of magnitude smaller than wet deposition. The suspended organic carbon was more effectively removed from the air with rain than snow, while an inverse relationship was found for elemental carbon. However the highest flux of water insoluble organic carbon was recorded in precipitation of a mixed nature. The atmospheric cleaning of highly dissolved organic carbon was observed to be the most effective on the first day of precipitation, while the hydrophobic elemental carbon was removed more efficiently when the precipitation lasted longer than a day. PMID:26778500

  19. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This project had three major objectives. The first objective was to develop a fossil fuel combustion source inventory (NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and hydrocarbon emissions) that would be relatively easy to use and update for analyzing the impact of combustion emissions on acid deposition in the eastern United States. The second objective of the project was to use the inventory data as a basis for selection of a number of areas that, by virtue of their importance in the acid rain issue, could be further studied to assess the impact of local and intraregional combustion sources. The third objective was to conduct an analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in the areas under study, along with pertinent physical characteristics, meteorological conditions, and emission patterns of these areas, to investigate probable relationships between local and intraregional combustion sources and the deposition of acidic material. The combustion source emissions inventory has been developed for the eastern United States. It characterizes all important area sources and point sources on a county-by-county basis. Its design provides flexibility and simplicity and makes it uniquely useful in overall analysis of emission patterns in the eastern United States. Three regions with basically different emission patterns have been identified and characterized. The statistical analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in conjunction with emission patterns, wind direction, and topography has produced consistent results for each study area and has demonstrated that the wet deposition in each area reflects the characteristics of the localized area around the monitoring sites (typically 50 to 150 miles). 8 references, 28 figures, 39 tables.

  20. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation improves dry eye symptoms in patients with glaucoma: results of a prospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Vazquez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of a dietary supplement with a combination of omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants on dry eye symptoms caused by chronic instillation of antihypertensive eye drops in patients with glaucoma. Patients and methods A total of 1,255 patients with glaucoma and dry eye symptoms related to antiglaucoma topical medication participated in an open-label, uncontrolled, prospective, and multicenter study and were instructed to take three capsules a day of the nutraceutical formulation (Brudypio® 1.5 g) for 12 weeks. Dry eye symptoms (graded as 0–3 [none to severe, respectively]), conjunctival hyperemia, tear breakup time, Schirmer I test, Oxford grading scheme, and intraocular pressure were assessed. Results After 12 weeks of administration of the dietary supplement, all dry eye symptoms improved significantly (P<0.001) (mean 1.3 vs 0.6 for scratching, 1.4 vs 0.7 for stinging sensation, 1.6 vs 0.7 for grittiness, 1.0 vs 0.4 for tired eyes, 1.1 vs 0.5 for grating sensation, and 0.8 vs 0.3 for blurry vision). The Schirmer test scores and the tear breakup time also increased significantly. There was an increase in the percentage of patients grading 0–I in the Oxford scale and a decrease in those grading IV–V. Compliance was recorded in 62.5% of patients. In compliant patients, the mean differences at 12 weeks vs baseline of dry eye symptoms were statistically significant as compared to noncompliant patients. Conclusion Dietary supplementation with Brudypio® may be a clinically valuable additional option for the treatment of dry eye syndrome in patients with glaucoma using antiglaucoma eye drops. These results require confirmation with an appropriately designed randomized controlled study. PMID:27103781

  1. A 120-year record of the spatial and temporal distribution of gravestone decay and acid deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooers, Howard D.; Cota-Guertin, Avery R.; Regal, Ronald R.; Sames, Anthony R.; Dekan, Amanda J.; Henkels, Linnea M.

    2016-02-01

    This investigation examines the spatial and temporal variability of marble gravestone decay throughout West Midlands County and adjacent portions of Warwickshire, Staffordshire, and Worcestershire. Gravestone decay has been used effectively as a quantitative measure of acid deposition. Numerous techniques have been used to assess gravestone decay and each is subject to different sources of error. To minimize error we focus only on marble gravestones that use the flush lead lettering technique. Decay of the marble leaves the lead lettering raised above the surface, and the distance can be measured with the use of a digital micrometer. Gravestone decay can be used to quantify the spatial and temporal distribution of acid deposition. Our gravestone decay database consists of 1417 individual measurements on 591 tombstones in 33 cemeteries and covers the period from 1860 to 2010. Sites range from industrial and residential areas to rural settings. These data allow us to establish the natural background rates of decay, the effects of urban/residential expansion, and the efficacy of environmental regulations. Decay rates vary from a minimum of 0.2 mm/century in remote rural areas to nearly 3.0 mm/century in the Birmingham City Center. The data are corrected for environmental variables, converted to acid deposition rates, and plotted at 10-year intervals from 1890 to 2010.

  2. Climate dependency of tree growth suppressed by acid deposition effects on soils in Northwest Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Lapenis, A.G.; Berggren, D.; Aparin, B.F.; Smith, K.T.; Shortle, W.C.; Bailey, S.W.; Varlyguin, D.L.; Babikov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Increased tree growth in temperate and boreal forests has been proposed as a direct consequence of a warming climate. Acid deposition effects on nutrient availability may influence the climate dependency of tree growth, however. This study presents an analysis of archived soil samples that has enabled changes in soil chemistry to be tracked with patterns of tree growth through the 20th century. Soil samples collected in 1926, 1964, and 2001, near St. Petersburg, Russia, showed that acid deposition was likely to have decreased root-available concentrations of Ca (an essential element) and increased root-available concentrations of Al (an inhibitor of Ca uptake). These soil changes coincided with decreased diameter growth and a suppression of climate-tree growth relationships in Norway spruce. Expected increases in tree growth from climate warming may be limited by decreased soil fertility in regions of northern and eastern Europe, and eastern North America, where Ca availability has been reduced by acidic deposition. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  3. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL STATUS OF LAKES AND STREAMS IN THE UPPER MIDWEST: ASSESSMENT OF ACIDIC DEPOSITION EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many lakes in three areas in the Upper Midwest--northeastern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan--have low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and may be susceptible to change by acidic deposition. These acidic lakes are precipitation-dominated, clearw...

  4. Influence of sub-lethal stresses on the survival of lactic acid bacteria after spray-drying in orange juice.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J; Borges, S; Teixeira, P

    2015-12-01

    The demand for new functional non-dairy based products makes the production of a probiotic orange juice powder an encouraging challenge. However, during drying process and storage, loss of viability of the dried probiotic cultures can occur, since the cells are exposed to various stresses. The influence of sub-lethal conditions of temperature, acidic pH and hydrogen peroxide on the viability of Pediococcus acidilactici HA-6111-2 and Lactobacillus plantarum 299v during spray drying in orange juice and subsequent storage under different conditions was investigated. At the end of storage, the survival of both microorganisms through simulated gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) conditions was also determined. The viability of cells previously exposed to each stress was not affected by the drying process. However, during 180 days of storage at room temperature, unlike P. acidilactici HA-6111-2, survival of L. plantarum 299v was enhanced by prior exposure to sub-lethal conditions. Previous exposure to sub-lethal stresses of each microorganism did not improve their viability after passage through simulated GIT. Nevertheless, as cellular inactivation during 180 days of storage was low, both microorganisms were present in numbers of ca. 10(7) cfu/mL at the end of GIT. This is an indication that both bacteria are good candidates for use in the development of an orange juice powder with functional characteristics. PMID:26338119

  5. Development of New Formulation Dry Powder for Pulmonary Delivery Using Amino Acids to Improve Stability.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yumiko; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Okamoto, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Cationic polymers are being studied as non-viral gene delivery vectors. Poly{N-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-aminoethyl]aspartamide} (PAsp(DET)) and their block copolymers with poly(ethylene glycol), PEG-PAsp(DET), have been reported as efficient biodegradable non-viral vectors which form a polyplex with plasmid DNA (pDNA). However, the polyplexes are not stable because PAsp(DET) and PEG-PAsp(DET) are easily subjected to hydrolysis; therefore, they need to be prepared on site. In this study, using the biodegradable polycations as non-viral vectors, PAsp(DET) and PEG-PAsp(DET), we investigated the effects of L-leucine (Leu) on the polyplex. We prepared solutions and dry powders with and without Leu. Both dry powders had large and porous particles and Leu acted as a dispersing agent. The transfection activity of the sample solutions decreased within a month. However, the decrease in the transfection activity was partially suppressed by the dry powder with Leu at 5 and 25°C at 3 months. Furthermore, transfection experiments revealed that Leu exhibited a pDNA-stabilizing effect in the solution and dry powder. Similar results were observed for pDNA integrity, where a polyplex was formed in the dry powder. The results suggest that Leu is a candidate stabilizer to protect pDNA from degradation. PMID:26725531

  6. Microbial ecology of á-Proteobacteria ammonia-oxidizers along a concentration gradient of dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the San Bernadino Mountain Range.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, F. L.; Fenn, M. E.; Stein, L. Y.

    2002-12-01

    The fate of atmospherically-deposited nitrogen from industrial pollution is of major concern in the montane ecosystems bordering the South Coast California Air Basin. Nitrogen deposition rates in the more exposed regions of the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM) are among the highest in North America often exceeding 40 kg ha-1 year-1 in throughfall deposition of nitrate and ammonium (Fenn and Poth, 1999). Forest ecosystems with elevated N deposition generally exhibit elevated accumulation of soil nitrate, leaching and runoff, elevated emissions of nitrogenous gases, increased nitrification, and decreased litter decomposition rates. The role of nitrifying microbial populations, especially those taxonomically associated with the beta-Proteobacteria ammonia-oxidizers (AOB), will provide insight into nitrogen-cycling in these extremely N-saturated environments. Using 16S ribosomal DNA-based molecular techniques (16S rDNA clone library construction and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism), we are comparing AOB community diversity at 3 different locations along a natural atmospheric N-deposition concentration gradient in the SBM: from high at Camp Paviaka (CP), medium at Strawberry Peak (SP) to low at Dogwood (DW). As observed for wet N-deposition systems on the east coast, we hypothesized a negative correlation between AOB community diversity, abundance and function with nitrogen loading in the dry N deposition system of SBM. Nitrification potentials determined for the 3 sites along the N-deposition gradient were in the order of CP less than SP less than DW. Preliminary results indicate no correlation between diversity of AOB and increased nitrogen loading. Shannon-Weiner diversity indices calculated for ammonia-oxidizer RFLP group units were 2.22, 2.66 and 1.80 for CP, SP and DW, respectively.

  7. Assessment of lake sensitivity to acidic deposition in national parks of the Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nanus, L.; Williams, M.W.; Campbell, D.H.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Blett, T.; Clow, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    The sensitivity of high-elevation lakes to acidic deposition was evaluated in five national parks of the Rocky Mountains based on statistical relations between lake acid-neutralizing capacity concentrations and basin characteristics. Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 151 lakes sampled during synoptic surveys and basin-characteristic information derived from geographic information system (GIS) data sets were used to calibrate the statistical models. The explanatory basin variables that were considered included topographic parameters, bedrock type, and vegetation type. A logistic regression model was developed, and modeling results were cross-validated through lake sampling during fall 2004 at 58 lakes. The model was applied to lake basins greater than 1 ha in area in Glacier National Park (n = 244 lakes), Grand Teton National Park (n = 106 lakes), Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (n = 11 lakes), Rocky Mountain National Park (n = 114 lakes), and Yellowstone National Park (n = 294 lakes). Lakes that had a high probability of having an ANC concentration 3000 m, with 80% of the catchment bedrock having low buffering capacity. The modeling results indicate that the most sensitive lakes are located in Rocky Mountain National Park and Grand Teton National Park. This technique for evaluating the lake sensitivity to acidic deposition is useful for designing long-term monitoring plans and is potentially transferable to other remote mountain areas of the United States and the world.

  8. Development of maintenance-free dry calcium (MFDC) lead-acid battery for automotive use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Tsunenori; Yasuda, Hiroshi

    A maintenance-free, dry calcium (MFDC) developed by the Panasonic Battery (Thailand) Co. Ltd. The battery is designed for automotive applications and is ready for use upon injection of the electrolyte. The MFDC battery employs grids made from a lead-calcium-based alloy. This feature suppresses undesirable loss of electrolyte and enables good recovery of capacity after a long time of storage or a long cycle-life. Moreover, the batteries is a dry-charged type and requires only a low frequency of recharging due to its suppressed self-discharge during storage. Transportation costs are reduced as the battery contains only a small amount of electrolyte during storage.

  9. RAINS-ASIA: An assessment model for acid deposition in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.J.; Ramankutty, R.; Shah, J.J.

    1997-08-31

    Asia`s rapid economic growth has fueled a growing appetite for commercial energy, which is satisfied by fossil fuels that emit pollutants. These pollutants are oxidized and transported into the atmosphere, creating acidic depositions known as acid rain that can damage foliage, soils, and surface waters. At current energy consumption growth rates, by the year 2000 sulfur dioxide emissions from Asia will surpass the emissions of North America and Europe combined. RAINS-ASIA is an assessment tool developed by the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and donors to study the implications of alternative energy development strategies for air pollution and acid rain and to help identify cost-effective abatement methods. This report provides an overview of the model and some results of analyses that have been conducted as part of the RAINS-ASIA program.

  10. Acid rain: a primer on what, where, and how much

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.

    1985-04-01

    Acid rain is introduced by defining its components: wet and dry deposition. Data bases on precipitation chemistry from several monitoring networks are used to show where acid rain occurs. Precipitation chemistry and air quality data are used to discuss what is in acid rain. Maps of the deposition of the major constituents of wet deposition are presented to contrast the amount of material deposited (deposition) in acid rain with its composition (concentration). The interactions of acid rain with the surfaces on which it falls are used to trace the paths by which acid rain reaches surface and soil waters. Implications of acid rain effects are introduced but not discussed in detail.

  11. Chemical and biological recovery from acid deposition within the Honnedaga Lake watershed, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Daniel C; Robinson, Jason M; Chiotti, Justin; Jirka, Kurt J; Kraft, Clifford E

    2014-07-01

    Honnedaga Lake in the Adirondack region of New York has sustained a heritage brook trout population despite decades of atmospheric acid deposition. Detrimental impacts from acid deposition were observed from 1920 to 1960 with the sequential loss of acid-sensitive fishes, leaving only brook trout extant in the lake. Open-lake trap net catches of brook trout declined for two decades into the late 1970s, when brook trout were considered extirpated from the lake but persisted in tributary refuges. Amendments to the Clean Air Act in 1990 mandated reductions in sulfate and nitrogen oxide emissions. By 2000, brook trout had re-colonized the lake coincident with reductions in surface-water sulfate, nitrate, and inorganic monomeric aluminum. No changes have been observed in surface-water acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) or calcium concentration. Observed increases in chlorophyll a and decreases in water clarity reflect an increase in phytoplankton abundance. The zooplankton community exhibits low species richness, with a scarcity of acid-sensitive Daphnia and dominance by acid-tolerant copepods. Trap net surveys indicate that relative abundance of adult brook trout population has significantly increased since the 1970s. Brook trout are absent in 65 % of tributaries that are chronically acidified with ANC of <0 μeq/L and toxic aluminum levels (>2 μmol/L). Given the current conditions, a slow recovery of chemistry and biota is expected in Honnedaga Lake and its tributaries. We are exploring the potential to accelerate the recovery of brook trout abundance in Honnedaga Lake through lime applications to chronically and episodically acidified tributaries. PMID:24671614

  12. Effects of spray-drying on w/o/w multiple emulsions prepared from a stearic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Mlalila, Nichrous; Swai, Hulda; Kalombo, Lonji; Hilonga, Askwar

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of spray-drying on w/o/w double emulsions of methyltestosterone (MT) loaded in a stearic acid matrix. MT-loaded nanoparticles were formulated by a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion technique using 50, 75, and 100 mg of stearic acid, 2% and 3% w/v polyvinyl alcohol, 5% w/v lactose, and 0.2% w/v chitosan. The emulsions were immediately spray-dried based on an optimized model of inlet temperature and pump rate, and characterized for optimized responses with regard to particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential, for both emulsion and powder samples. Dynamic light scattering analysis shown that the nanoparticles increased in size with increasing concentrations of polyvinyl alcohol and stearic acid. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the MT-loaded nanoparticles were spherical in shape, had a smooth surface, and were in an amorphous state, which was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry. These MT-loaded nanoparticles are a promising candidate carrier for the delivery of MT; however,