Science.gov

Sample records for acidic eo water

  1. EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asrar, Ghassem; Dozier, Jeff

    Market: Students and researchers in geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics. This book reports on the timely Earth Observing System (EOS) Program's wide range of scientific investigations, observational capabilities, vast data and information system, and educational activities. Because its primary goal is to determine the extent, causes, and regional consequences of global climate change, this program provides the scientific knowledge needed by world leaders to formulate sound and equitable environmental policies.

  2. Model membranes prepared with ceramide EOS, cholesterol and free fatty acids form a unique lamellar phase.

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniel; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2010-03-16

    The lipid matrix present in the human stratum corneum (the thin, uppermost layer of the skin) is considered to play a crucial role in the skin barrier function. The lipid matrix consists of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. The 13 nm lamellar phase present in the lipid matrix of the stratum corneum is very characteristic and plays an important role in the skin barrier function. One subclass of ceramides with a linoleic acid linked to a very long acyl (referred to as EOS) plays a crucial role in the formation of the 13 nm lamellar phase. In this article, we focus on the lipid phase behavior of EOS mixed with cholesterol or with cholesterol and free fatty acids. Our studies reveal that an equimolar ratio of EOS, cholesterol, and free fatty acids forms a lamellar phase with a very long repeat distance of approximately 14.7 nm. This phase exhibits exceptional behavior in that in the thermotropic response the fatty acid chains and the ceramide chains undergo an order-disorder transition in different temperature ranges while part of the hydrocarbon chains of ceramides and fatty acids are mixing in the orthorhombic lattice. On the basis of these observations, a molecular model for the 14.7 nm phase has been proposed in which the lipids are organized in a lamellar phase with three different lipid layers in a symmetric unit cell.

  3. Behaviour of bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) and 4-nonylphenol ethoxylates (4-NP1EO, 4-NP2EO) in oxidative water treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Lenz, K; Beck, V; Fuerhacker, M

    2004-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as natural and synthetic hormones or industrial chemicals can adversely affect the endocrine system at very low concentrations. As such substances can be present in raw water used for drinking-water production, they potentially pose a health risk to humans. In this study laboratory tests were performed to determine removal efficiencies of selected oxidative drinking water treatment processes, namely ozonation (1.4 mg/l O3) and chlorination, using sodium hypochlorite (0.5 mg/l NaClO) and chlorine dioxide (0.4-0.6 mg/l ClO2) under conditions applied in technical plants. 500-300,000 ng/l of bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) and 4-nonylphenol-n-ethoxylates (NPnEO) were selected for investigations and measured by HPLC/FLD and HPLC/MS. To investigate possible oxidation by-products, adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) were determined and estrogenic activities were assessed with the help of an estrogen receptor binding assay (YES). Ozonation and chlorination with ClO2 removed both 4-NP and BPA below detection limits, corresponding with AOX and estrogenic activity. Concerning NPnEO ozonation removed NP1EO and NP2EO up to 28% and 30%, respectively, whereas ClO2 showed high removal efficiencies, eliminating >94% and 92%, respectively. NaCIO removed 4-NP and BPA below detection limits, but estrogenic activities increased and AOX could be measured. NP1EO and NP2EO were only marginally reduced corresponding to the slight decrease of estrogenic potential.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Dibutyric cAMP and Butyric Acid on the Differentiation of Human Eosinophilic Leukemia EoL-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, YunJae

    2015-12-01

    Purification of enough numbers of circulating eosinophils is difficult because eosinophils account for less than 5% peripheral blood leukocytes. Human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells have been considered an in vitro source of eosinophils as they can differentiate into mature eosinophil-like cells when incubated with dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) or butyric acid. In this study, the viability and phenotypic maturation of EoL-1 cells stimulated by either dbcAMP or butyric acid were comparatively analyzed. After treatment with 100 µM dbcAMP or 0.5 µM butyric acid, EoL-1 cells showed morphological signs of differentiation, although the number of nonviable EoL-1 cells was significantly increased following butyric acid treatment. Stimulation of EoL-1 cells with 0.5 µM butyric acid more effectively induced the expression of mature eosinophil markers than stimulation with dbcAMP. These results suggest that treatment of EoL-1 cells with 0.5 µM butyric acid for limited duration could be an effective strategy for inducing their differentiation. Considering that expression of CCR3 was not sufficient in EoL-1 cells stimulated with 0.5 µM butyric acid, treatment of the chemically stimulated EoL-1 cells with cytokines, which primarily support eosinophil maturation, would help to obtain differentiated EoL-1 cells with greater functional maturity.

  5. Apoptosis- and differentiation-inducing activities of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid isomer, on human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai-Nam; Leung, Kwok-Nam

    2014-11-01

    Conjugated linolenic acids (CLNAs) are a group of naturally occurring positional and geometrical isomers of the C18 polyunsaturated essential fatty acid, linolenic acid (LNA), with three conjugated double bonds (C18:3). Although previous research has demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effects of CLNA on a wide variety of cancer cell lines in vitro, their action mechanisms and therapeutic potential on human myeloid leukemia cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, we found that jacaric acid (8Z,10E,12Z-octadecatrienoic acid), a CLNA isomer which is present in jacaranda seed oil, inhibited the in vitro growth of human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Mechanistic studies showed that jacaric acid triggered cell cycle arrest of EoL-1 cells at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis of the EoL-1 cells, as measured by the Cell Death Detection ELISAPLUS kit, Annexin V assay and JC-1 dye staining. Notably, the jacaric acid-treated EoL-1 cells also underwent differentiation as revealed by morphological and phenotypic analysis. Collectively, our results demonstrated the capability of jacaric acid to inhibit the growth of EoL-1 cells in vitro through triggering cell cycle arrest and by inducing apoptosis and differentiation of the leukemia cells. Therefore, jacaric acid might be developed as a potential candidate for the treatment of certain forms of myeloid leukemia with minimal toxicity and few side effects.

  6. Development of EOS-aided procedures for the determination of the water balance of hydrologic budget of a large watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congalton, Russell G.; Thomas, Randall W.; Zinke, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Work focused on the acquisition of remotely sensed data for the 1985 to 1986 hydrogolic year; continuation of the field measurement program; continued acquisition and construction of passive microwave remote sensing instruments; a compilation of data necessary for an initial water balance computation; and participation with the EOS Simulataneity Team in reviewing the Feather River watershed as a possible site for a simultaneity experiment.

  7. Reduction of Salmonella enterica on alfalfa seeds with acidic electrolyzed oxidizing water and enhanced uptake of acidic electrolyzed oxidizing water into seeds by gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Stan, Silvia D; Daeschel, Mark A

    2003-11-01

    Alfalfa sprouts have been implicated in several salmonellosis outbreaks in recent years. The disinfectant effects of acidic electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water against Salmonella enterica both in an aqueous system and on artificially contaminated alfalfa seeds were determined. The optimum ratio of seeds to EO water was determined in order to maximize the antimicrobial effect of EO water. Seeds were combined with EO water at ratios (wt/vol) of 1:4, 1:10, 1:20, 1:40, and 1:100, and the characteristics of EO water (pH, oxidation reduction potential [ORP], and free chlorine concentration) were determined. When the ratio of seeds to EO water was increased from 1:4 to 1:100, the pH decreased from 3.82 to 2.63, while the ORP increased from +455 to +1,073 mV. EO water (with a pH of 2.54 to 2.38 and an ORP of +1,083 to +1,092 mV) exhibited strong potential for the inactivation of S. enterica in an aqueous system (producing a reduction of at least 6.6 log CFU/ml). Treatment of artificially contaminated alfalfa seeds with EO water at a seed-to-EO water ratio of 1:100 for 15 and 60 min significantly reduced Salmonella populations by 2.04 and 1.96 log CFU/g, respectively (P < 0.05), while a Butterfield's buffer wash decreased Salmonella populations by 0.18 and 0.23 log CFU/g, respectively. After treatment, EO water was Salmonella negative by enrichment with or without neutralization. Germination of seeds was not significantly affected (P > 0.05) by treatment for up to 60 min in electrolyzed water. The uptake of liquid into the seeds was influenced by the internal gas composition (air, N2, or O2) of seeds before the liquid was added.

  8. EOS standards

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, Carl W

    2011-01-12

    An approach to creating accurate EOS for pressure standards is described. Applications to Cu, Au, and Ta are shown. Extension of the method to high compressions using DFT is illustrated. Comparisons with modern functionals show promise.

  9. The EOS Aura Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Douglass, A. R.; Hilsenrath, E.; Luce, M.; Barnett, J.; Beer, R.; Waters, J.; Gille, J.; Levelt, P. F.; DeCola, P.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The EOS Aura Mission is designed to make comprehensive chemical measurements of the troposphere and stratosphere. In addition the mission will make measurements of important climate variables such as aerosols, and upper tropospheric water vapor and ozone. Aura will launch in late 2003 and will fly 15 minutes behind EOS Aqua in a polar sun synchronous ascending node orbit with a 1:30 pm equator crossing time.

  10. EOS Directory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This Earth Observing System (EOS) directory is divided into two main sections: white and yellow pages. The white pages list alphabetically the names and addresses -- including e-mail, phone, and fax when available -- of all individuals involved with EOS, from graduate students to panel members to program management and more. The yellow pages list the names, affiliation, and phone number of participants divided by project management, program management, individual project participants, interdisciplinary investigations (listed alphabetically by PI), the Science Executive Committee, various panels, platforms, working groups, fellowships, and contractors.

  11. EOS workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, Franz; Karspeck, Milan; Millot, Michel; Maurice, Kelly; Jackson, Matt

    1992-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work done from mid-1989 until January 1992 to develop a prototype set of tools for the analysis of EOS-type images. Such images are characterized by great multiplicity and quantity. A single 'snapshot' of EOS-type imagery may contain several hundred component images so that on a particular pixel, one finds multiple gray values. A prototype EOS-sensor, AVIRIS, has 224 gray values at each pixel. The work focused on the ability to utilize very large images and continuously roam through those images, zoom and be able to hold more than one black and white or color image, for example for stereo viewing or for image comparisons. A second focus was the utilization of so-called 'image cubes', where multiple images need to be co-registered and then jointly analyzed, viewed, and manipulated. The target computer platform that was selected was a high-performance graphics superworkstation, Stardent 3000. This particular platform offered many particular graphics tools such as the Application Visualization System (AVS) or Dore, but it missed availability of commercial third-party software for relational data bases, image processing, etc. The project was able to cope with these limitations and a phase-3 activity is currently being negotiated to port the software and enhance it for use with a novel graphics superworkstation to be introduced into the market in the Spring of 1993.

  12. Integrated Use Of MERIS And Other EO Data For Water Quality And Red Tide Monitoring Along United Arab Emirates Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceriola, G.; Avgikou, V.; Manunta, P.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal zones host a large percentage of global population and economical and productive activities and are in need of a constant monitoring. The C-wams project is focused at implementing a suite EO services targeting two growing sectors: Waste Water Treatment and Desalination plants. The coast of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) hosts some of the largest desalination plants in the world and their operation can affect and be affected by the status of the WQ near the coast: the local phenomenon known as Red Tide caused increasing damages in the last 4 years. Some actors are involved in this respect in the Persian gulf, among them the Environment Agency of Abu Dhabi (EAD). In UAE an historical study-case is being performed aimed at identifying Red Tide events using MERIS images, integrating them with other medium and higher resolution data. The present work describes its scenario and the preliminary results obtained.

  13. Water surface is acidic

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Victoria; Milet, Anne; Vácha, Robert; Jungwirth, Pavel; Devlin, J. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Water autoionization reaction 2H2O → H3O− + OH− is a textbook process of basic importance, resulting in pH = 7 for pure water. However, pH of pure water surface is shown to be significantly lower, the reduction being caused by proton stabilization at the surface. The evidence presented here includes ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations of water slabs with solvated H3O+ and OH− ions, density functional studies of (H2O)48H+ clusters, and spectroscopic isotopic-exchange data for D2O substitutional impurities at the surface and in the interior of ice nanocrystals. Because H3O+ does, but OH− does not, display preference for surface sites, the H2O surface is predicted to be acidic with pH < 4.8. For similar reasons, the strength of some weak acids, such as carbonic acid, is expected to increase at the surface. Enhanced surface acidity can have a significant impact on aqueous surface chemistry, e.g., in the atmosphere. PMID:17452650

  14. Characterisation of Danish Waters with EO and Modelling for Aquaculture Site Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Silvia; Hansen, Lars B.; Rasmussen, Mads O.; Kaas, Hanne

    2016-08-01

    The process of selecting a site for aquaculture is complex and many factors are feeding into it. Spatial information from satellites and models is highly valuable in this process. For instance, water temperature is crucial for the fish's health and feed management and chlorophyll-a concentration (chl-a) is used as a water quality indicator. Near-real time satellite information can be used for monitoring purposes and historic patterns of these variables can be included into the process of choosing a suitable site. Modelled data can be used as complementary source, for predictive purposes and during cloudy periods, when optical satellite data is unavailable. In this paper we present a concept of how information from satellites and models can feed into siting. Moreover, we compare temperature and chl-a both from satellites and models, to evaluate the quality as well as difference between these products in the Danish waters.

  15. Moisture Fluxes Derived from EOS Aqua Satellite Data for the North Water Polynya Over 2003-2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boisvert, Linette N.; Markus, Thorsten; Parkinson, Claire L.; Vihma, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Satellite data were applied to calculate the moisture flux from the North Water polynya during a series of events spanning 2003-2009. The fluxes were calculated using bulk aerodynamic formulas with the stability effects according to the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Input parameters were taken from three sources: air relative humidity, air temperature, and surface temperature from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite, sea ice concentration from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E, also onboard Aqua), and wind speed from the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis. Our results show the progression of the moisture fluxes from the polynya during each event, as well as their atmospheric effects after the polynya has closed up. These results were compared to results from studies on other polynyas, and fall within one standard deviation of the moisture flux estimates from these studies. Although the estimated moisture fluxes over the entire study region from AIRS are smaller in magnitude than ERA-Interim, they are more accurate due to improved temperature and relative humidity profiles and ice concentration estimates over the polynya. Error estimates were calculated to be 5.56 x10(exp -3) g/sq. m/ s, only 25% of the total moisture flux, thus suggesting that AIRS and AMSR-E can be used with confidence to study smaller scale features in the Arctic sea ice pack and can capture their atmospheric effects. These findings bode well for larger-scale studies of moisture fluxes over the entire Arctic Ocean and the thinning ice pack.

  16. FP7 project MyWater - Merging hydrologic models and EO data for reliable information on Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Antonio; Chambel, Pedro; Silva, Adélio; Velickov, Slavco; van Andel, Schalk; Toth, Gergely; Almeida, Waldenio; Mako, Andras; Alexandridis, Thomas; Cugala, Domigos

    2013-04-01

    21st century reality already sees 2.5 billion people without adequate access to water, whilst climate changes lead to dramatically changing water resources availability and needs. These changes will influence all citizens, and authorities will need more reliable information to adapt to the new situation. The MyWater project responds to these challenges, implementing a new information platform which integrates data from three scientific research areas - earth observation, catchment modelling and meteorology - to better access hydrological processes. This platform will allow a quasi-automatic service chains which output user tailored results like: drinking water needs (quantity and quality), agriculture water needs, water health related indicators, flood scenarios, etc. Overall, MyWater will provide reliable information on water quantity, quality and usage for appropriate water management, improving knowledge and creating the forecasting capabilities necessary to catchment managers, and at the same time optimizing the ratio cost/benefit of water resources monitoring. The work presented regards to the FP7-EU project "Merging hydrological models and Earth observation data for reliable information on water - MyWater".

  17. Mixed micelles of a PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer (P123) and a nonionic surfactant (C12EO6) in water. a dynamic and static light scattering study.

    PubMed

    Schillén, Karin; Jansson, Jörgen; Löf, David; Costa, Telma

    2008-05-08

    The present article reports on static and dynamic light scattering (SLS and DLS) studies of aqueous solutions of the nonionic surfactant C12EO6 and the poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer EO20PO68EO20 (P123) at temperatures between 25 and 45 degrees C. In water, P123 self-assembles into spherical micelles with a hydrodynamic radius of 10 nm, and at 40 degrees C, these micelles consist of 131 unimers. Addition of C12EO6 leads to an association of the surfactant molecules to the P123 micelles and mixed micelles are formed. The size and structure of the mixed micelles as well as interparticle interactions were studied by varying the surfactant-to-copolymer (C12EO6/P123) molar ratio. The novelty of this study consists of a composition-induced structural change of the mixed micelles at constant temperature. They gradually change from being spherical to polymer-like with increasing C12EO6 content. At low C12EO6/P123 molar ratios (below 12), the SLS measurements showed that the molar mass of the mixed micelles decreases with an increasing amount of C12EO6 in the micelles for all investigated temperatures. In this regime, the mixed micelles are spherical and the DLS measurements revealed a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of the mixed micelles. An exception was found for C12EO6/P123 molar ratios between 2 and 3, where the mixed micelles become rodlike at 40 degrees C. This was the subject of a previous study and has hence not been investigated here. At high molar ratios (48 and above), the polymer-like micelles present a concentration-induced growth, similar to that observed in the pure C12EO6/water system.

  18. The EOS polar platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald; Hobish, Mitchell K.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is presented. The EOS will be part of the Mission to Planet Earth that will include a series of flight and scientific experiments. The initial polar-orbiting platform, EOS-A, will carry a suite of instruments designed to examine earth system processes at and near the planet's surface, and the interactions between various subsystems. Some of the instruments that will provide specialized data for geologists, meteorologists, biochemists, biologists, and physicists are described. Thus, EOS will provide an opportunity for technologists and scientists to examine the earth to a level of detail not previously attainable.

  19. EOS mapping accuracy study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, R. B.; Eppes, T. A.; Ouellette, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Studies were performed to evaluate various image positioning methods for possible use in the earth observatory satellite (EOS) program and other earth resource imaging satellite programs. The primary goal is the generation of geometrically corrected and registered images, positioned with respect to the earth's surface. The EOS sensors which were considered were the thematic mapper, the return beam vidicon camera, and the high resolution pointable imager. The image positioning methods evaluated consisted of various combinations of satellite data and ground control points. It was concluded that EOS attitude control system design must be considered as a part of the image positioning problem for EOS, along with image sensor design and ground image processing system design. Study results show that, with suitable efficiency for ground control point selection and matching activities during data processing, extensive reliance should be placed on use of ground control points for positioning the images obtained from EOS and similar programs.

  20. Calculation of vapor-liquid equilibrium and PVTx properties of geological fluid system with SAFT-LJ EOS including multi-polar contribution. Part III. Extension to water-light hydrocarbons systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rui; Lai, Shaocong; Dubessy, Jean

    2014-01-01

    The SAFT-LJ EOS improved by Sun and Dubessy (2010, 2012) is extended to water-light hydrocarbon systems. Light hydrocarbons (including CH4, C2H6, C3H8 and nC4H10) are modeled as chain molecules without multi-polar moments. The contributions of the shape of molecules and main intermolecular interactions existing in water-light hydrocarbon systems (including repulsive and attractive forces between Lennard-Jones segments, the hydrogen-bonding force and the multi-polar interaction between water molecules) to the residual Helmholtz energy were accounted for by this EOS. The adjustable parameters for the interactions of H2O-CH4, H2O-C2H6, H2O-C3H8, and H2O-nC4H10 pairs were evaluated from mutual solubility data of binary water-hydrocarbon systems at vapor-liquid equilibria. Comparison with the experimental data shows this SAFT-LJ EOS can represent well vapor-liquid (and liquid-liquid) equilibria of binary water-light hydrocarbon systems over a wide P-T range. The accuracy of this EOS for mutual solubilities of methane, ethane, propane and water is within the experimental uncertainty generally. Moreover, the model is able to accurately predict the vapor-liquid equilibria and PVTx properties of multi-component systems composed of water, light hydrocarbon as well as CO2. As we know, this EOS is the first one allowing quantitative calculation of the mutual solubilities of water and light hydrocarbons over a wide P-T range among SAFT-type EOSs. This work indicates that the molecular-based EOS combined with conventional mixing rule can well describe the thermodynamic behavior of highly non-ideal systems such as water-light hydrocarbons mixtures except in the critical region for which long range density fluctuations cannot be taken into account by this analytical model.

  1. The significance of interaction potentials of water with other molecules in the EOS of high explosives products

    SciTech Connect

    van Thiel, M.; Ree, F.H.; Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    The chemical equilibrium and thermodynamic properties of detonated explosive mixtures at high temperature (T) and pressure (P) depend critically on all interactions between the major products. Improvements in the homomolecular interaction of nitrogen, carbon-dioxide, and condensed carbon have had significant effects on detonation properties of LX-14 (an HMX formulation). Extensive work on O, N, and C products also showed the importance of including high temperature unstable species in determining the potential-constant of the major products of detonation. That work also showed the need to improve the unlike pair interaction constants in our statistical mechanical chemical equilibrium theory (CHEQ). Thirdly, a recent comparison of experimental and theoretical detonation velocities (D) indicated that the original set of interaction potentials used contains canceling errors that limit the overall effectiveness of the code as a predictor of high P and T properties of reactive mixtures. This study proceeds from explosives with simple product mixtures, RX-23-AB, HNB, and PETN, to HMX-like mixtures. The present set of potential constants is compared to the experimental EOS used for a number of experimental systems that use LX-14.

  2. Use of EO-1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI) multispectral image data and real-time field sampling for water quality mapping in the Hirfanlı Dam Lake, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kavurmacı, Murat; Ekercin, Semih; Altaş, Levent; Kurmaç, Yakup

    2013-08-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of water quality variations in Hirfanlı Water Reservoir, which is one of the most important water resources in Turkey, through EO-1 (Earth Observing-1) Advanced Land Imager (ALI) multispectral data and real-time field sampling. The study was materialized in 20 different sampling points during the overpass of the EO-1 ALI sensor over the study area. A multi-linear regression technique was used to explore the relationships between radiometrically corrected EO-1 ALI image data and water quality parameters: chlorophyll a, turbidity, and suspended solids. The retrieved and verified results show that the measured and estimated values of water quality parameters are in good agreement (R (2) >0.93). The resulting thematic maps derived from EO-1 multispectral data for chlorophyll a, turbidity, and suspended solids show the spatial distribution of the water quality parameters. The results indicate that the reservoir has average nutrient values. Furthermore, chlorophyll a, turbidity, and suspended solids values increased at the upstream reservoir and shallow coast of the Hirfanlı Water Reservoir.

  3. Wonders of Eos Chasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 16 October 2003

    The slopes and floor of Eos Chasma, a portion of the vast Valles Marineris canyon complex, are located near an early landing site for the MER rovers. Sadly, this site was eliminated due to serious concerns about winds. Nevertheless, this site contains some marvelous geology. Layered rocks abound in the walls of the canyon as well as in the large streamlined material on the floor. The streamlined island appears to have been formed in a massive flood episode. Alluvial fans can also be seen at the base of the slopes. One fan has a deeply entrenched channel that was most likely carved out by water; however, it may be possible that dry avalanches created this channel.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -13.5, Longitude 317.8 East (42.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. EOS Aura Mission Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, William J.

    2015-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation will discuss EOS Aura mission and spacecraft subsystem summary, recent and planned activities, inclination adjust maneuvers, propellant usage lifetime estimate. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager-Technical (code 428) has reviewed and approved the slides on April 30, 2015.

  5. Eos visible imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the proposed Earth Observing System (Eos) optical imagers are examined. These imagers include: moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS); geoscience laser ranging system (GLRS); high resolution imaging spectrometer (HIRIS); the intermediate thermal infrared spectrometer (ITIR); multi-angle imaging spectrometer (MISR); earth observing scanning polarimeter (EOSP); and the lightening imaging sensor (LIS).

  6. The 1991 EOS reference handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dokken, David (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are covered: (1) The Global Change Research Program; (2) The Earth Observing System (EOS) goal and objectives; (3) primary EOS mission requirements; (4) EOS science; (5) EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) architecture; (6) data policy; (7) international cooperation; (8) plans and status; (9) the role of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; (10) The Global Fellowship Program; (11) management of EOS; (12) mission elements; (13) EOS instruments; (14) interdisciplinary science investigations; (15) points of contact; and (16) acronyms and abbreviations.

  7. EOS for critical slurry and solution systems

    SciTech Connect

    DiPeso, G; Peterson, P

    1998-10-27

    In a fire involving fissile material, the mixture of the fissile material ash with fire fighting water may lead to a criticality excursion if there are nearby sumps that permit a critical geometry. The severity of the resulting energy release and pressure pulse is dependent on the rate at which the mixing occurs. To calculate these excursions, a non-equilibrium equation of state for the water ash mixture or slurry is needed that accounts for the thermal non-equilibrium that occurs due to finite heat transfer rates. We are developing the slurry EOS as well as a lumped neutronic and hydrodynamic model to serve as a testing ground for the non-equilibrium EOS before its incorporation into more sophisticated neutronic-hydrodynamics codes. Though the model lacks spatial dependence, it provides estimates of energy release and pressure pulses for various mixture assembly rates. We are also developing a non-equilibrium EOS for critical solution systems in which the fissile material is dissolved in water, which accounts for chemical non-equilibrium due to finite mass transfer rates. In contrast to previously published solution EOS, our solution EOS specifically accounts for mass diffusion of dissolved radiolytic gas to bubble nucleation sites. This EOS was developed to check our overall modeling against published solution excursion experiments and to compare solution excursions with slurry excursions initiated under the same conditions. Preliminary results indicate a good match between solution EOS calculations and experiments involving premixed 60-80 g U/l solutions for both low rate and high rate reactivity insertions. Comparison between slurry and solution calculations for the same composition show comparable energy release and pressure peaks for both low and high rate reactivity insertions with the slurry releasing less energy but generating more pressure than the solution for the amount of energy released. Calculations more appropriate to actual fire fighting scenarios

  8. Physically-based Methods for the Estimation of Crop Water Requirements from E.O. Optical Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The estimation of evapotranspiration (ET) represent the basic information for the evaluation of crop water requirements. A widely used method to compute ET is based on the so-called "crop coefficient" (Kc), defined as the ratio of total evapotranspiration by reference evapotranspiration ET0. The val...

  9. Archiving tools for EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindrilaru, Elvin-Alin; Peters, Andreas-Joachim; Duellmann, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Archiving data to tape is a critical operation for any storage system, especially for the EOS system at CERN which holds production data for all major LHC experiments. Each collaboration has an allocated quota it can use at any given time therefore, a mechanism for archiving "stale" data is needed so that storage space is reclaimed for online analysis operations. The archiving tool that we propose for EOS aims to provide a robust client interface for moving data between EOS and CASTOR (tape backed storage system) while enforcing best practices when it comes to data integrity and verification. All data transfers are done using a third-party copy mechanism which ensures point-to- point communication between the source and destination, thus providing maximum aggregate throughput. Using ZMQ message-passing paradigm and a process-based approach enabled us to achieve optimal utilisation of the resources and a stateless architecture which can easily be tuned during operation. The modular design and the implementation done in a high-level language like Python, has enabled us to easily extended the code base to address new demands like offering full and incremental backup capabilities.

  10. EOS Terra Validation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David

    1999-01-01

    The EOS Terra mission will be launched in July 1999. This mission has great relevance to the atmospheric radiation community and global change issues. Terra instruments include ASTER, CERES, MISR, MODIS and MOPITT. In addition to the fundamental radiance data sets, numerous global science data products will be generated, including various Earth radiation budget, cloud and aerosol parameters, as well as land surface, terrestrial ecology, ocean color, and atmospheric chemistry parameters. Significant investments have been made in on-board calibration to ensure the quality of the radiance observations. A key component of the Terra mission is the validation of the science data products. This is essential for a mission focused on global change issues and the underlying processes. The Terra algorithms have been subject to extensive pre-launch testing with field data whenever possible. Intensive efforts will be made to validate the Terra data products after launch. These include validation of instrument calibration (vicarious calibration) experiments, instrument and cross-platform comparisons, routine collection of high quality correlative data from ground-based networks, such as AERONET, and intensive sites, such as the SGP ARM site, as well as a variety field experiments, cruises, etc. Airborne simulator instruments have been developed for the field experiment and underflight activities including the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS), AirMISR, MASTER (MODIS-ASTER), and MOPITT-A. All are integrated on the NASA ER-2, though low altitude platforms are more typically used for MASTER. MATR is an additional sensor used for MOPITT algorithm development and validation. The intensive validation activities planned for the first year of the Terra mission will be described with emphasis on derived geophysical parameters of most relevance to the atmospheric radiation community. Detailed information about the EOS Terra validation Program can be found on the EOS Validation program

  11. The EOS Aura Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoebert, Mark R.; Douglass, A. R.; Hilsenrath, E.; Bhartia, P. K.; Barnett, J.; Gille, J.; Beer, R.; Gunson, M.; Waters, J.; Levelt, P. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite is scheduled to launch in the second quarter of 2004. The Aura mission is designed to attack three science questions: (1) Is the ozone layer recovering as expected? (2) What are the sources and processes that control tropospheric pollutants? (3) What is the quantitative impact of constituents on climate change? Aura will answer these questions by globally measuring a comprehensive set of trace gases and aerosols at high vertical and horizontal resolution. Fig. 1 shows the Aura spacecraft and its four instruments.

  12. Porous carbon EOS: numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverdiev, A.; Batani, D.; Dezulian, R.; Vinci, T.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of direct simulation of laser-driven shock experiments aiming at determining the equation of state (EOS) of carbon using the "relative" impedance mismatch method. In particular, using tabulated carbon EOS (SESAME library, material number 7830), we have found some difficulties in reducing the initial density of the material in simulations with porous carbon. We have therefore calculated a new EOS for porous carbon with a reduced bulk modulus.

  13. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  14. Eos Chaos Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    11 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered rock outcrops in Eos Chaos, located near the east end of the Valles Marineris trough system. The outcrops occur in the form of a distinct, circular butte (upper half of image) and a high slope (lower half of image). The rocks might be sedimentary rocks, similar to those found elsewhere exposed in the Valles Marineris system and the chaotic terrain to the east of the region.

    Location near: 12.9oS, 49.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  15. Organic acids in naturally colored surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamar, William L.; Goerlitz, D.F.

    1966-01-01

    Most of the organic matter in naturally colored surface waters consists of a mixture of carboxylic acids or salts of these acids. Many of the acids color the water yellow to brown; however, not all of the acids are colored. These acids range from simple to complex, but predominantly they are nonvolatile polymeric carboxylic acids. The organic acids were recovered from the water by two techniques: continuous liquid-liquid extraction with n-butanol and vacuum evaporation at 50?C (centigrade). The isolated acids were studied by techniques of gas, paper, and column chromatography and infrared spectroscopy. About 10 percent of the acids recovered were volatile or could be made volatile for gas chromatographic analysis. Approximately 30 of these carboxylic acids were isolated, and 13 of them were individually identified. The predominant part of the total acids could not be made volatile for gas chromatographic analysis. Infrared examination of many column chromatographic fractions indicated that these nonvolatile substances are primarily polymeric hydroxy carboxylic acids having aromatic and olefinic unsaturation. The evidence suggests that some of these acids result from polymerization in aqueous solution. Elemental analysis of the sodium fusion products disclosed the absence of nitrogen, sulfur, and halogens.

  16. Robotic servicing of EOS instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaghi, Andrea I.; Juberts, Maris

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses robotic servicing of the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) instruments. The goals of implementing a robotic servicing system on EOS would be to maintain the instruments throughout the required mission life and minimize life-cycle costs. To address robot servicing, an initial design concept has been developed which will be applied to a representative EOS instrument. This instrument will be used as a model for determining the most practical level of servicing of its parts, and how to design these parts for robot servicing. Using this representative EOS instrument as a model, a generic design scheme will be developed that can be applied to all EOS instruments. The first task is to determine how to identify which parts must be designed for robot servicing. Next, the requirements imposed on the instruments and the servicing robot when designing for robot serviceability must be examined.

  17. Incorporation of stratospheric acids into water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Scott; Turco, Richard P.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids are absorbed within the water ice lattice at mole fractions maximizing below 0.00001 and 0.0001 in a variety of solid impurity studies. The absorption mechanism may be substitutional or interstitial, leading in either case to a weak permeation of stratospheric ices by the acids at equilibrium. Impurities could also inhabit grain boundaries, and the acid content of atmospheric ice crystals will then depend on details of their surface and internal microstructures. Limited evidence indicates similar properties for the absorption of HNO3. Water ice lattices saturated with acid cannot be a significant local reservoir for HCl in the polar stratosphere.

  18. Eos Chasma Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image shows several landslides within Eos Chasma. Many very large landslides have occurred within different portions of Valles Marineris. Note where the northern wall has failed in a upside-down bowl shape, releasing the material that formed the landslide deposit.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8, Longitude 318.6 East (41.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Observational constraints on EoS parameters of emergent universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Bikash Chandra; Thakur, Prasenjit

    2017-04-01

    We investigate emergent universe model using recent observational data of the background as well as the growth tests. The flat emergent universe model obtained by Mukherjee et al. is permitted with a non-linear equation of state (in short, EoS) (p=Aρ -B ρ^{1/2}), where A and B are constants (here in our analysis A=0 is considered). We carried out analysis considering the Wang-Steinhardt ansatz for growth index (γ ) and growth function (f defined as f=Ωm^{γ } (a)). The best-fit values of the EoS and growth parameters are determined making use of chi-square minimization technique. Here we specifically determined the best-fit value and the range of value of the present matter density (Ω m) and Hubble parameter (H0). The best-fit values of the EoS parameters are used to study the evolution of the growth function f, growth index γ , state parameter ω and deceleration parameter (q) for different red shift parameter z. The late accelerating phase of the universe in the EU model is accommodated satisfactorily.

  20. The Relative Acidities of Water and Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrash, Henry I.

    2001-11-01

    The experimental evidence for the relative acidities of water and methanol is reviewed. Because of solvent effects, a comparison of either autoprotolysis constants or dissociation constants measured in different media does not provide a reliable indication of these relative values. The most suitable measure of the relative acidities of water and methanol is the equilibrium constant for the proton transfer between water and methoxide ion (H2O + CH3O- OHO- + CH3OH) in various water-methanol mixtures. Experimental measurements of this thermodynamic equilibrium constant, in particular the contributions of Unmack, show considerable uncertainty owing to the difficulties in estimating activity coefficients, but they strongly indicate that methanol is about twice as acidic as water. This result shows that substitution of a methyl group for a hydrogen atom does not always destabilize a negative charge on a nearby oxygen atom. The question of whether to present acidities, particularly those of solvents, in terms of dissociation constants based on concentrations rather than activities is considered. In view of the slight consideration given to the relative acidities of water and alcohols in current organic chemistry tests and the discontinuity for students caused by use of concentration-based constants in organic chemistry only, thermodynamic constants remain the most suitable way to present acidities.

  1. EOS Terra Validation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David

    2000-01-01

    The EOS Terra mission will be launched in July 1999. This mission has great relevance to the atmospheric radiation community and global change issues. Terra instruments include Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-Angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT). In addition to the fundamental radiance data sets, numerous global science data products will be generated, including various Earth radiation budget, cloud and aerosol parameters, as well as land surface, terrestrial ecology, ocean color, and atmospheric chemistry parameters. Significant investments have been made in on-board calibration to ensure the quality of the radiance observations. A key component of the Terra mission is the validation of the science data products. This is essential for a mission focused on global change issues and the underlying processes. The Terra algorithms have been subject to extensive pre-launch testing with field data whenever possible. Intensive efforts will be made to validate the Terra data products after launch. These include validation of instrument calibration (vicarious calibration) experiments, instrument and cross-platform comparisons, routine collection of high quality correlative data from ground-based networks, such as AERONET, and intensive sites, such as the SGP ARM site, as well as a variety field experiments, cruises, etc. Airborne simulator instruments have been developed for the field experiment and underflight activities including the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) AirMISR, MASTER (MODIS-ASTER), and MOPITT-A. All are integrated on the NASA ER-2 though low altitude platforms are more typically used for MASTER. MATR is an additional sensor used for MOPITT algorithm development and validation. The intensive validation activities planned for the first year of the Terra

  2. EoE (Eosinophilic Esophagitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus (the tube connecting the mouth to the stomach). It occurs when ... such as rhinitis, asthma, and/or eczema. Certain families may have an inherited tendency to develop EoE. ...

  3. Complete EOS for PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph S

    2009-10-08

    PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic-bonded explosive based on triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB). A complete equation of state (EOS) is constructed for unreacted PBX 9502 suitable for reactive burn models, i.e., high pressure regime in which material strength is unimportant. The PBX EOS is composed of two parts: a complete EOS for TATB and a porosity model which allows for variations in the initial PBX density. The TATB EOS is based on a cold curve and a thermal model for lattice vibrations. The heat capacity, and hence thermal model, is determined by the vibrational spectrum from Raman scattering. The cold curve is calibrated to diamond anvil cell data for isothermal compression using a two-piece Keane fitting form. Hugoniot data for PBX 9502 is used as a consistency check.

  4. Esterification by the Plasma Acidic Water: Novel Application of Plasma Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling

    2014-03-01

    This work explores the possibility of plasma acid as acid catalyst in organic reactions. Plasma acidic water was prepared by dielectric barrier discharge and used to catalyze esterification of n-heptanioc acid with ethanol. It is found that the plasma acidic water has a stable and better performance than sulfuric acid, meaning that it is an excellent acid catalyst. The plasma acidic water would be a promising alternative for classic mineral acid as a more environment friendly acid.

  5. Bacterial Cyanuric Acid Hydrolase for Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Sujin; Mutlu, Baris R.; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-01-01

    Di- and trichloroisocyanuric acids are widely used as water disinfection agents, but cyanuric acid accumulates with repeated additions and must be removed to maintain free hypochlorite for disinfection. This study describes the development of methods for using a cyanuric acid-degrading enzyme contained within nonliving cells that were encapsulated within a porous silica matrix. Initially, three different bacterial cyanuric acid hydrolases were compared: TrzD from Acidovorax citrulli strain 12227, AtzD from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP, and CAH from Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 39073. Each enzyme was expressed recombinantly in Escherichia coli and tested for cyanuric acid hydrolase activity using freely suspended or encapsulated cell formats. Cyanuric acid hydrolase activities differed by only a 2-fold range when comparing across the different enzymes with a given format. A practical water filtration system is most likely to be used with nonviable cells, and all cells were rendered nonviable by heat treatment at 70°C for 1 h. Only the CAH enzyme from the thermophile M. thermoacetica retained significant activity under those conditions, and so it was tested in a flowthrough system simulating a bioreactive pool filter. Starting with a cyanuric acid concentration of 10,000 μM, more than 70% of the cyanuric acid was degraded in 24 h, it was completely removed in 72 h, and a respike of 10,000 μM cyanuric acid a week later showed identical biodegradation kinetics. An experiment conducted with water obtained from municipal swimming pools showed the efficacy of the process, although cyanuric acid degradation rates decreased by 50% in the presence of 4.5 ppm hypochlorite. In total, these experiments demonstrated significant robustness of cyanuric acid hydrolase and the silica bead materials in remediation. PMID:26187963

  6. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  7. Binary nucleation in acid-water systems. II. Sulfuric acid-water and a comparison with methanesulfonic acid-water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyslouzil, B. E.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Okuyama, K.

    1991-05-01

    This work presents a systematic investigation of binary nucleation rates for sulfuric acid and water and the effect of temperature on these rates at isothermal, subsaturated conditions. The results from nucleation rate measurements for the sulfuric acid (H2SO4) -water system are discussed and compared to those previously presented for methanesulfonic acid (MSA)-water [B. E. Wyslouzil, J. H. Seinfeld, R. C. Flagan, and K. Okuyama, J. Chem. Phys. (submitted)]. Experiments were conducted at relative humidities (Rh) ranging from 0.006acidities (Ra) in the range of 0.04water experiments, but particle size distribution measurements confirm that most of the particles formed are being observed. The ratio of experimental to theoretical nucleation rates, Jexpt/Jtheor, was found to be a strong function of the predicted number of acid molecules in the critical nucleus for both the H2SO4 -water and MSA-water systems.

  8. HDF-EOS Web Server

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Bane, Bob; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    A shell script has been written as a means of automatically making HDF-EOS-formatted data sets available via the World Wide Web. ("HDF-EOS" and variants thereof are defined in the first of the two immediately preceding articles.) The shell script chains together some software tools developed by the Data Usability Group at Goddard Space Flight Center to perform the following actions: Extract metadata in Object Definition Language (ODL) from an HDF-EOS file, Convert the metadata from ODL to Extensible Markup Language (XML), Reformat the XML metadata into human-readable Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Publish the HTML metadata and the original HDF-EOS file to a Web server and an Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol (OPeN-DAP) server computer, and Reformat the XML metadata and submit the resulting file to the EOS Clearinghouse, which is a Web-based metadata clearinghouse that facilitates searching for, and exchange of, Earth-Science data.

  9. HDF-EOS 5 Validator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Bane, Bob; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    A computer program partly automates the task of determining whether an HDF-EOS 5 file is valid in that it conforms to specifications for such characteristics as attribute names, dimensionality of data products, and ranges of legal data values. ["HDF-EOS" and variants thereof are defined in "Converting EOS Data From HDF-EOS to netCDF" (GSC-15007-1), which is the first of several preceding articles in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs.] Previously, validity of a file was determined in a tedious and error-prone process in which a person examined human-readable dumps of data-file-format information. The present software helps a user to encode the specifications for an HDFEOS 5 file, and then inspects the file for conformity with the specifications: First, the user writes the specifications in Extensible Markup Language (XML) by use of a document type definition (DTD) that is part of the program. Next, the portion of the program (denoted the validator) that performs the inspection is executed, using, as inputs, the specifications in XML and the HDF-EOS 5 file to be validated. Finally, the user examines the output of the validator.

  10. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Ackman, Terry E.; Place, John M.

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  11. Epidemic Outbreak Surveillance (EOS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    protocol using the nucleic acid extraction protocol on normal nasal wash samples spiked with titered Influenza A vin~s from Virapur, LLC. FluMist Vaccine...determine specificity between FluMist and wild type influenza . The testing concluded that FluMist was undistinguishable from wild type influenza on the...wild type influenza in patients exhibiting influenza symptoms that had received the FluMist Vaccine. Gene Expression Automated Processing Training was

  12. EOS7R: Radionuclide transport for TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K.

    1995-11-01

    EOS7R provides radionuclide transport capability for TOUGH2. EOS7R extends the EOS7 module (water, brine, and optional air) to model water, brine, parent component, daughter component, and optional air and heat. The radionuclide components follow a first-order decay law, and may adsorb onto the solid grains. Volatilization of the decaying components is modeled by Henry`s Law. The decaying components are normally referred to as radionuclides, but they may in fact by any trace components that decay, adsorb, and volatilize. The decay process need not be radioactive decay, but could be any process that follows a first-order decay law, such as biodegradation. EOS7R includes molecular diffusion for all components in gaseous and aqueous phases using a simplified binary diffusion model. When EOS7R is used with standard TOUGH2, transport occurs by advection and molecular diffusion in all phases. When EOS7R is coupled with the dispersion module T2DM, one obtains T2DMR, the radionuclide transport version of T2DM. T2DMR models advection, diffusion, and hydrodynamic dispersion in rectangular two-dimensional regions. Modeling of radionuclide transport requires input parameters specifying the half-life for first-order decay, distribution coefficients for each rock type for adsorption, and inverse Henry`s constants for volatilization. Options can be specified in the input file to model decay in inactive grid blocks and to read from standard EOS7 INCON files. The authors present a number of example problems to demonstrate application and accuracy of TOUGH2/EOS7R. One-dimensional simulation results agree well with analytical solutions. For a two-dimensional salt-dome flow problem, the final distribution of daughter radionuclide component is complicated by the presence of weak recirculation caused by density effects due to salinity.

  13. Compact star matter: EoS with new scaling law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungmin; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Lee, Jaehyun

    In this paper, we present a simple discussion on the properties of compact stars using an EoS obtained in effective field theory anchored on scale and hidden-local symmetric Lagrangian endowed with topology change and a unequivocal prediction on the deformation of the compact star, that could be measured in gravitational waves. The objective is not to offer a superior or improved EoS for compact stars but to confront with a forthcoming astrophysical observable, the given model formulated in what is considered to be consistent with the premise of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The model so obtained is found to satisfactorily describe the observation of a two-solar mass neutron star [P. B. Demorest et al., Nature 467 (2010) 1081, J. Antoniadis et al., Science 340 (2013) 1233232] with a minimum number of parameters. Specifically, the observable we are considering in this paper is the tidal deformability parameter λ (equivalently the Love number k2), which affects gravitational wave forms at the late period of inspiral stage. The forthcoming aLIGO and aVirgo observations of gravitational waves from binary neutron star system will provide a valuable guidance for arriving at a better understanding of highly compressed baryonic matter.

  14. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1996-10-08

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer is described made from monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  15. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, Patrick V.; Coleman, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  16. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, Patrick V.; Coleman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  17. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer were selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide where the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  18. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1990-06-26

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylane glycols (PVB 6/22/90), propylene and and polypropylene (PVB 6/22/90) glycols, P-dioxanone, 1, 5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  19. The EducEO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Steffen; Dias, Eduardo; Zeug, Guenther; Vescovi, Fabio; See, Linda; Sturn, Tobias; McCallum, Ian; Stammes, Piet; Snik, Frans; Hendriks, Elise

    2015-04-01

    The ESA funded EducEO project is aimed at demonstrating the potential of citizen science and crowdsourcing for Earth Observation (EO), where citizen science and crowdsourcing refer to the involvement of citizens in tasks such as data collection. The potential for using citizens in the calibration and validation of satellite imagery through in-situ measurements and image recognition is largely untapped. The EducEO project will aim to achieve good integration with networks such as GLOBE (primary and secondary education) and COST (higher education) to involve students in four different applications that will be piloted as part of the EducEO project. The presentation will provide a brief overview and initial results of these applications, which include: the iSpex tool for measuring air pollution using an iPhone; a game to classify cropland and deforested areas from high resolution satellite imagery; an application to monitor areas of forest change using radar data from Sentinel-1; and the collection of in-situ yield and production data from both farmers (using high-tech farming equipment) and students. In particular initial results and future potential of the serious game on land cover and forest change monitoring will be discussed.

  20. Acidic deposition and surface water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M. R.

    A pair of back-to-back (morning and afternoon) hydrology sessions, held December 10, 1987, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., covered “Predicting the Effects of Acidic Deposition on Surface Water Chemistry.” The combined sessions included four invited papers, 12 contributed papers, and a panel discussion at its conclusion. The gathering dealt with questions on a variety of aspects of modeling the effects of acidic deposition on surface water chemistry.Contributed papers included discussions on the representation of processes in models as well as limiting assumptions in model application (V. S. Tripathi et al., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., and E. C. Krug, Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign), along with problems in estimating depositional inputs to catchments and thus inputs to be used in the simulation of catchment response (M. M. Reddy et al., U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, Colo.; and E. A. McBean, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada). L. A. Baker et al. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) dealt with the problem of modeling seepage lake systems, an exceedingly important portion of the aquatic resources in Florida and parts of the upper U.S. Midwest. J. A. Hau and Y. Eckstein (Kent State University, Kent, Ohio) considered equilibrium modeling of two northern Ohio watersheds that receive very different loads of acidic deposition but are highly similar in other respects.

  1. Investigation of EO transition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, G. G.; Schreckenbach, K.

    1985-01-01

    Basic ideas on the nature of electric monopole transitions and their experimental realisation are presented. Some feeling for the sensitivity obtainable for X=B(EO)/B(E2) ratios are discussed. Examples of measurements performed using the electron spectrometer BILL are described to demonstrate their relevance in testing nuclei models. These include even-even and odd-even nuclei such as nuclei close to Z=50, rare-earth nuclei, Pt-Os isotopes and the actinides.

  2. HDF-EOS 2 and HDF-EOS 5 Compatibility Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Bane, Bob; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    The HDF-EOS 2 and HDF-EOS 5 Compatibility Library contains C-language functions that provide uniform access to HDF-EOS 2 and HDF-EOS 5 files through one set of application programming interface (API) calls. ("HDFEOS 2" and "HDF-EOS 5" are defined in the immediately preceding article.) Without this library, differences between the APIs of HDF-EOS 2 and HDF-EOS 5 would necessitate writing of different programs to cover HDF-EOS 2 and HDF-EOS 5. The API associated with this library is denoted "he25." For nearly every HDF-EOS 5 API call, there is a corresponding he25 API call. If a file in question is in the HDF-EOS 5 format, the code reverts to the corresponding HDF-EOS 5 call; if the file is in the HDF-EOS 2 format, the code translates the arguments to HDF-EOS 2 equivalents (if necessary), calls the HDFEOS 2 call, and retranslates the results back to HDF-EOS 5 (if necessary).

  3. Acid mine water treatment using engineered wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinmann, Robert L. P.

    1990-03-01

    During the last two decades, the United States mining industry has greatly increased the amount it spends on pollution control. The application of biotechnology to mine water can reduce the industry's water treatment costs (estimated at over a million dollars a day) and improve water quality in streams and rivers adversely affected by acidic mine water draining from abandoned mines. Biological treatment of mine waste water is typically conducted in a series of small excavated ponds that resemble, in a superficial way, a small marsh area. The ponds are engineered to first facilitate bacterial oxidation of iron; ideally, the water then flows through a composted organic substrate that supports a population of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The latter process raises the pH. During the past four years, over 400 wetland water treatment systems have been built on mined lands as a result of research by the U.S. Bureau of Mines. In general, mine operators find that the wetlands reduce chemical treatment costs enough to repay the cost of wetland construction in less than a year. Actual rates of iron removal at field sites have been used to develop empirical sizing criteria based on iron loading and pH. If the pH is 6 or above, the wetland area (m2) required is equivalent to the iron load (grams/day) divided by 10. Theis requirement doubles at a pH of 4 to 5. At a pH below 4, the iron load (grams/day) should be divided by 2 to estimate the area required (m2).

  4. Water Resource Monitoring Based n EO Data: Gained Experience After 10 Years of Dragon Programme over the Yangtze River Reaches: From ERS 1 to Sentinel 1 and from MERIS to HJ1 and Pleiades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesou, Herve; Huber, Claire; Huang, Shifeng; Studer, Mathias; Lai, Xijun; Chen, Xiaoling; Daillet, Sylviane

    2014-11-01

    Water resources monitoring from space is an application of remote sensing under full development, with arriving satellite such as the Sentinels, and of course the development of inland applications of altimetry and the future mission as SWOT. Since 10 years within the framework of the DRAGON ESA MOST programme, a monitoring of Chines major fresh water lakes, Poyang and Dongting lakes on Yangtze reaches, is realized exploiting large source of EO data. Thanks to EO data archive exploitation, the covered period starts in 2000 up to 2014, over these two core lakes, whereas, since a 2012, a similar approach is carried over the small lakes of Anhui Province. A key question is how to access to convenient satellite data with sufficient resource to insure a high temporal frequency, ie ideally with about 10 days of revisit. An opportunistic approach was followed in order to insure this data access thanks to a large ESA support, accessing Envisat and ESA TPM, as well Chinese data. From 2004 to April 2012, ENVISAT Medium resolution products, MERIS and ASAR WSM data, were the core of the monitoring system. Since the lost of Envisat, the data exploited moved from MR to HR (20-30 m), thanks to the access to large volume of HJ1 images in 2012 and 2014, as well as coverage CSK data (30m) thanks agreement with ASI. The assimilation of these data is a fine preparation for the future exploitation of Sentinel1 and 2 dataset. Furthermore a first Sentinel data have been exploited, less than 45 after satellite launch. In addition on most sensitive areas, such as the Poyang Lake natural Reserve (Jiangxi Pr) and Shenjing Lake (Anhui Prov.) a unique set of VHR data, Pleiades, Kompsat, have been exploited. The expect strategy for the coming months and years will be in a first period, the jointly exploitation of Sentinel 1 data if the Chinese areas are rapidly integrated within the Sentinel 1 acquisition scheme, jointly with the Chinese HJ1AB data. In a second time HJ1AB data would be

  5. Water Resource Monitoring Based on EO Data: Gained Experience After 10 Years of Dragon Programme over the Yangtze Middle Reaches: From ERS 1 to Sentinel 1 and from MERIS to HJ1 and Pleiades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesou, Herve; Huber, Claire; Huang, Shifeng; Studer, Mathais; Lai, Xijun; Chen, Xiaoling; Daillet, Sylviane

    2014-11-01

    Water resources monitoring from space is an application of remote sensing under full development, with arriving satellite such as the Sentinels, and of course the development of inland applications of altimetry and the future mission as SWOT. Since 10 years within the framework of the DRAGON ESA MOST programme, a monitoring of Chines major fresh water lakes, Poyang and Dongting lakes on Yangtze reaches, is realized exploiting large source of EO data. Thanks to EO data archive exploitation, the covered period starts in 2000 up to 2014, over these two core lakes, whereas, since a 2012, a similar approach is carried over the small lakes of Anhui Province. A key question is how to access to convenient satellite data with sufficient resource to insure a high temporal frequency, ie ideally with about 10 days of revisit. An opportunistic approach was followed in order to insure this data access thanks to a large ESA support, accessing Envisat and ESA TPM, as well Chinese data. From 2004 to April 2012, ENVISAT Medium resolution products, MERIS and ASAR WSM data, were the core of the monitoring system. Since the lost of Envisat, the data exploited moved from MR to HR (20-30 m), thanks to the access to large volume of HJ1 images in 2012 and 2014, as well as coverage CSK data (30m) thanks agreement with ASI. The assimilation of these data is a fine preparation for the future exploitation of Sentinel1 and 2 dataset. Furthermore a first Sentinel data have been exploited, less than 45 after satellite launch. In addition on most sensitive areas, such as the Poyang Lake natural Reserve (Jiangxi Pr) and Shenjing Lake (Anhui Prov.) a unique set of VHR data, Pleiades, Kompsat, have been exploited. The expect strategy for the coming months and years will be in a first period, the jointly exploitation of Sentinel 1 data if the Chinese areas are rapidly integrated within the Sentinel 1 acquisition scheme, jointly with the Chinese HJ1AB data. In a second time HJ1AB data would be

  6. Seasonal spectral dynamics and carbon fluxes at core EOS sites using EO-1 Hyperion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomasino, D.; Campbell, P.; Price, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fluxes of water and carbon into the atmosphere are critical components in order to monitor and predict climate change. Spatial heterogeneity and seasonal changes in vegetation contribute to ambiguities in regional and global CO2 and water cycle dynamics. Satellite remote sensing is essential for monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of various vegetation types for the purposes of determining carbon and water fluxes. Satellite data from the EO-1 Hyperion sensor was acquired for five Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) sites, Mongu (Zambia, Africa), Konza Prairie (Kansas, USA), Duke Forest (North Carolina, USA), Barrow (Alaska, USA) and Sevilleta (New Mexico, USA). Each EOS site represented a distinct vegetative ecosystem type; hardwood forest, grassland, evergreen forest, lichens, and shrubland/grassland respectively. Satellite data was atmospherically corrected using the Atmosphere CORrection Now (ACORN) model and subsequently, the spectral reflectance data was extracted in the vicinity of existing flux towers. The EO-1 Hyperion sensor proved advantageous because of its high and continuous spectral resolution (10 nm intervals from 355 to 2578 nm wavelengths). The high spectral resolution allowed us calculate biophysical indices based on specific wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum that are associated with alterations in foliar chemistry and plant membrane structure (i.e., vegetation stress) brought upon by many environmental factors. Previous studies have focused on relationships within a specific site or vegetation community. This study however, incorporated many sites with different vegetation types and various geographic locations throughout the world. Monitoring the fluctuations in vegetation stress with contemporaneous environmental conditions and carbon flux measurements from each site will provide better insight into water and carbon flux dynamics in many different biomes. Noticeable spectral signatures were identified based on site specific

  7. Comparison of EO1 Landsat-7 ETM+ and EO-1 ALI images over Rochester, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedelty, Jeffrey A.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Smith, James A.

    2002-08-01

    We present a comparison of images from the ETM+ sensor on Landsat-7 and the ALI instrument on EO-1 over a test site in Rochester, NY. The site contains a variety of features, ranging from water of varying depths, deciduous/coniferous forest, grass fields, to urban areas. The nearly coincident cloud-free images were collected just one minute apart on 25 August, 2001. We atmospherically corrected each image with the 6S atmosphere model, using aerosol optical thickness and water vapor column density measured by a Cimel sun photometer within the Aerosol Robotic Network (Aeronet), along with ozone density derived from NCEP data. We present three-color composites from each instrument that show excellent qualitative agreement. We present ETM+ and ALI reflectance spectra for water, grass, and urban targets. We make a more detailed comparison for our forest site, where we use measured geometric and optical properties as input to the SAIL canopy reflectance model, which we compare to the ETM+, ALI, and EO-1 Hyperion reflectance spectra.

  8. Wormlike micelles in Tween-80/CmEO3 mixed nonionic surfactant systems in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Varade, Dharmesh; Ushiyama, Kousuke; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Aramaki, Kenji

    2007-08-15

    Formation and rheological behaviour of viscoelastic wormlike micellar solution in aqueous mixed system of nonionic surfactants, polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween-80) and trioxyethylene alkyl ether (C(m)EO(3), m=12, 14, and 16) was studied. The semi-dilute aqueous solution of Tween-80, in presence of C(m)EO(3) shows a sharp increase in viscosity leading to the formation of a gel-like highly viscoelastic solution reaching a maximum, but decreases beyond an intermediate concentration and finally phase separates. When C(12)EO(3) is replaced by C(14)EO(3) the micellar growth occurs more effectively. However, with further increase in alkyl chain length, i.e. with C(16)EO(3), phase separation occurs before a viscoelastic solution is formed. The effect of temperature on the water/Tween-80/C(14)EO(3) mixed surfactant system was also studied. With increase in temperature, viscosity increases more promptly and the viscosity maximum is attained at relatively lower concentration of C(14)EO(3). Enhanced one dimensional micellar growth with increase in the temperature is mainly attributed to the decrease in the spontaneous curvature of the aggregates. Structural investigation by means of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique of micelles in aqueous solution of Tween-80 and mixed water/Tween-80/C(m)EO(3) systems confirmed the one dimensional micellar growth in the above system.

  9. Does predation risk influence habitat use by northern redbelly dace Phoxinus eos at different spatial scales?

    PubMed

    Dupuch, A; Magnan, P; Bertolo, A; Dill, L M; Proulx, M

    2009-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between spatial variations in predation risk and abundance of northern redbelly dace Phoxinus eos at both macroscale (littoral v. pelagic zones) and microscale (structured v. open water habitats in the littoral zone) of Canadian Shield lakes. Minnow traps were placed in both structured and open water habitats in the littoral zone of 13 Canadian Shield lakes, and estimates of the relative predation risk of P. eos in both the pelagic and the littoral zones were obtained from tethering experiments. Results showed that (1) the mean abundance of P. eos in the littoral zone was positively correlated with the relative predation risk in the pelagic zone, (2) P. eos preferentially used structured over open water habitats in the littoral zone and (3) this preference was not related to the relative predation risk in the littoral zone but decreased as the relative predation risk increased in the pelagic zone. At the lake level, these results support the hypothesis that P. eos enter the littoral zone to avoid pelagic piscivores. At the littoral zone level, the results do not necessarily contradict the widely accepted view that P. eos preferentially use structured over open habitats to reduce their predation risk, but suggest that flexibility in antipredator tactics (e.g. shelter use v. shoaling) could explain the spatial distribution of P. eos between structured and open water habitats.

  10. Removal of acidic or basic α-amino acids in water by poorly water soluble scandium complexes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Jin, Shigeki; Ujihara, Tomomi

    2012-11-02

    To recognize α-amino acids with highly polar side chains in water, poorly water soluble scandium complexes with both Lewis acidic and basic portions were synthesized as artificial receptors. A suspension of some of these receptor molecules in an α-amino acid solution could remove acidic and basic α-amino acids from the solution. The compound most efficient at preferentially removing basic α-amino acids (arginine, histidine, and lysine) was the receptor with 7,7'-[1,3-phenylenebis(carbonylimino)]bis(2-naphthalenesulfonate) as the ligand. The neutral α-amino acids were barely removed by these receptors. Removal experiments using a mixed amino acid solution generally gave results similar to those obtained using solutions containing a single amino acid. The results demonstrated that the scandium complex receptors were useful for binding acidic and basic α-amino acids.

  11. Converting from XML to HDF-EOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Bane, Bob; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    A computer program recreates an HDF-EOS file from an Extensible Markup Language (XML) representation of the contents of that file. This program is one of two programs written to enable testing of the schemas described in the immediately preceding article to determine whether the schemas capture all details of HDF-EOS files.

  12. Using EO-1 Hyperion to Simulate HyspIRI Products for a Coniferous Forest: The Fraction of PAR Absorbed by Chlorophyll (fAPAR(sub chl)) and Leaf Water Content (LWC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Qingyuan; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Cheng, Yen-Ben

    2011-01-01

    This study presents development of prototype products for terrestrial ecosystems in preparation for the future imaging spectrometer planned for the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission. We present a successful demonstration example in a coniferous forest of two product prototypes: fraction of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) absorbed by chlorophyll of a canopy (fAPAR(sub chl)) and leaf water content (LWC), for future HyspIRI implementation at 60 m spatial resolution. For this, we used existing 30 m resolution imaging spectrometer data available from the Earth Observing One (EO-1) Hyperion satellite to simulate and prototype the level one radiometrically corrected radiance (L1R) images expected from the HyspIRI visible through shortwave infrared spectrometer. The HyspIRI-like images were atmospherically corrected to obtain surface reflectance, and spectrally resampled to produce 60 m reflectance images for wavelength regions that were comparable to all seven of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land bands. Thus, we developed MODIS-like surface reflectance in seven spectral bands at the HyspIRI-like spatial scale, which was utilized to derive fAPARchl and LWC with a coupled canopy-leaf radiative transfer model (PROSAIL2) for the coniferous forest[1]. With this study, we provide additional evidence that the fAPARchl product is more realistic for describing the physiologically active canopy than the traditional fAPAR parameter for the whole canopy (fAPAR(sub canopy)), and thus should replace it in ecosystem process models to reduce uncertainties in terrestrial carbon cycle studies and ecosystem studies.

  13. Using EO-1 Hyperion to Simulate HyspIRI Products for a Coniferous Forest: The Fraction of PAR Absorbed by Chlorophyll (fAPAR(sub chl)) and Leaf Water Content(LWC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Qingyuan; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Cheng, Yen-Ben

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents development of prototype products for terrestrial ecosystems in preparation for the future imaging spectrometer planned for the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission. We present a successful demonstration example in a coniferous forest of two product prototypes: fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by chlorophyll of a canopy (fAPARchl) and leaf water content (LWC), for future HyspIRI implementation at 60-m spatial resolution. For this, we used existing 30-m resolution imaging spectrometer data available from the Earth Observing One (EO-1) Hyperion satellite to simulate and prototype the level one radiometrically corrected radiance (L1R) images expected from the HyspIRI visible through shortwave infrared spectrometer. The HyspIRIlike images were atmospherically corrected to obtain surface reflectance and spectrally resampled to produce 60-m reflectance images for wavelength regions that were comparable to all seven of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land bands. Thus, we developed MODIS-like surface reflectance in seven spectral bands at the HyspIRI-like spatial scale, which was utilized to derive fAPARchl and LWC with a coupled canopy-leaf radiative transfer model (PROSAIL2) for the coniferous forest. With this paper, we provide additional evidence that the fAPARchl product is more realistic in describing the physiologically active canopy than the traditional fAPAR parameter for the whole canopy (fAPARcanopy), and thus, it should replace it in ecosystem process models to reduce uncertainties in terrestrial carbon cycle and ecosystem studies.

  14. New entries to water-compatible Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shu; Ogawa, Chikako

    2006-08-07

    Lewis acid catalysis has attracted much attention in organic synthesis as it often affords access to unique reactivity and selectivity under mild conditions. Although various kinds of Lewis acids have been developed and applied in industry, these Lewis acids must be generally used under strictly anhydrous conditions, as the presence of even a small amount of water interferes with the reactions due to preferential reaction of the Lewis acids with water rather than the substrates. In contrast to this, rare earth and other metal complexes have been found to be water-compatible. Furthermore, Bi(OTf)(3)- and Ga(OTf)(3)-basic ligand complexes have also been found to be stable in water, and have been used as water-compatible Lewis acids. This application is particularly significant, as Bi(OTf)(3) and Ga(OTf)(3) themselves are unstable in the presence of water, but are stabilized by the basic ligands. This observation has led to the development of a new approach to Lewis acid catalysis in which Lewis acids that are generally unstable in the presence of water are rendered amenable to aqueous systems when combined with basic ligands. In particular, the use of chiral basic ligands leading to new types of water-compatible chiral Lewis acids may enable a wide range of asymmetric catalysis in aqueous media.

  15. Peracetic acid: A new biocide for industrial water applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.F.

    1997-12-01

    Peracetic acid is rapidly cidal at low concentrations against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, molds, and algae under a wide variety of conditions. It is also effective against anaerobic and spore forming bacteria. Peracetic acid is effective at killing biofilm microorganisms at low concentrations and short contact times. Unlike a number of other biocides, the biocidal activity of peracetic acid is not affected by pH or water hardness and biocidal activity is retained even in the presence of organic matter. For these reasons, peracetic acid is well suited as a biocide in industrial cooling water and papermaking systems. Peracetic acid is compatible with additives commonly used in these systems. Although peracetic acid is a potent biocide, it is unique in that it does not produce toxic byproducts and its decomposition products, acetic acid, water and oxygen, are innocuous and environmentally acceptable.

  16. EOS calculations for hydrothermal diamond anvil cell operation.

    PubMed

    Presser, Volker; Heiss, Martin; Nickel, Klaus G

    2008-08-01

    The hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) is an excellent tool for high-temperature, high-pressure (hydrothermal) experiments. For an accurate determination of pressure induced by a certain temperature in an isochoric sample chamber volume, an equation of state (EOS) of water can be used instead of direct measurement. This paper reviews the theoretic background and provides all needed equations for the application of EOS of water to HDAC experiments summarizing state-of-the-art knowledge and incorporating up-to-date thermodynamic data. The p-T conditions determined using the IAPWS-95 formulation for the thermodynamic properties of ordinary water are in agreement with values obtained from direct methods or other established EOS formulations. In particular, (1) the calculation of density through the (a) melting point or (b) homogenization method along with determining (2) pressure as a function of density and temperature or (3) density as a function of pressure and temperature is explained. As a new aspect in the context of HDAC operations, the critical influence of nucleation and a strategy to overcome this problem are discussed. Furthermore, we have derived new polynomial equations, which allow the direct calculation of the fluid phase's density from the melting temperature. These are implemented in a spreadsheet program, which is freely available for interested users.

  17. Vector Data Model: A New Model of HDF-EOS to Support GIS Applications in EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, E.; Edmonds, R d

    2001-05-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data Information System (ESDIS) project has an active program of research and development of systems for the storage and management of Earth science data for Earth Observation System (EOS) mission, a key program of NASA Earth Science Enterprise. EOS has adopted an extension of the Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) as the format of choice for standard product distribution. Three new EOS specific datatypes - point, swath and grid - have been defined within the HDF framework. The enhanced data format is named HDF-EOS. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used by Earth scientists in EOS data product generation, visualization, and analysis. There are two major data types in GIS applications, raster and vector. The current HDF-EOS handles only raster type in the swath data model. The vector data model is identified and developed as a new HDFEOS format to meet the requirements of scientists working with EOS data products in vector format. The vector model is designed using a topological data structure, which defines the spatial relationships among points, lines, and polygons. The three major topological concepts that the vector model adopts are: a) lines connect to each other at nodes (connectivity), b) lines that connect to surround an area define a polygon (area definition), and c) lines have direction and left and right sides (contiguity). The vector model is implemented in HDF by mapping the conceptual model to HDF internal data models and structures, viz. Vdata, Vgroup, and their associated attribute structures. The point, line, and polygon geometry and attribute data are stored in similar tables. Further, the vector model utilizes the structure and product metadata, which characterize the HDF-EOS. Both types of metadata are stored as attributes in HDF-EOS files, and are encoded in text format by using Object Description Language (ODL) and stored as global attributes in HDF-EOS files. EOS has developed a series of routines for storing

  18. Evaluation of bactericidal activity of weakly acidic electrolyzed water (WAEW) against Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yaru; Choi, Kyoo-Duck; Chung, Donghwa; Shin, Il-Shik

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibriovulnificus cause severe foodborne illness in humans; thus, to reduce outbreaks of disease, it is clearly important to reduce food contamination by these pathogens. Although electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water has been reported to exhibit strong bactericidal activities against many pathogens, it has never been tested against V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal activity of weakly acidic electrolyzed water (WAEW), a type of EO water, against V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus. Cell suspensions and cell cultures of both pathogens were treated for 30s with sodium hypochlorite solution containing 35mg/L available chlorine concentration (ACC) or WAEW containing 35mg/L ACC. After an initial inoculum of 5.7logCFU/mL, the number of viable V. vulnificus cells was reduced by 2.2 logs after treatment for 60s with sodium hypochlorite solution containing 35mg/L ACC, while no cells survived treatment with WAEW for 30s. Similar results were obtained for V. parahaemolyticus. Under open storage conditions, WAEW maintained bactericidal activities against cell suspensions of both strains after 5weeks but disappeared against cell cultures of the two strains after 5weeks. Under closed storage conditions, however, WAEW maintained bactericidal activities against both cell suspensions and cell cultures of each strain after 5weeks. No cells were detected in the cell suspensions and cultures when the ACC of WAEW was more than 20mg/L and treatment time was greater than 15s. Bactericidal activity of WAEW against V. vulnificus cell culture was reduced when the ACC of WAEW was less than 15mg/L but was maintained in the V. vulnificus cell suspension when the ACC of WAEW was 0.5mg/L. Thus, the bactericidal activity of WAEW was primarily affected by ACC rather than treatment time. Similar results were obtained for V. parahaemolyticus, indicating that WAEW kills these microorganisms more quickly than a

  19. Peracetic acid: A new biocide for industrial water applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    Peracetic acid is rapidly cidal at low concentrations against a broad spectrum of microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, molds, and algae under a wide variety of conditions. It is also effective against anaerobic and spore-forming bacteria. Peracetic acid is effective at killing biofilm microorganisms at low concentrations and short contact times. Unlike a number of other biocides, the biocidal activity of peracetic acid is not affected by pH or water hardness and is retained even in the presence of organic matter. For these reasons, peracetic acid is well-suited as a biocide in industrial cooling water and paper-making systems. It is also compatible with additives commonly used in these systems. Although peracetic acid is a potent biocide, it is unique in that it does not produce toxic byproducts and its decomposition products (acetic acid, water, and oxygen) are innocuous and environmentally acceptable.

  20. EOS ASTER thermal infrared band vicarious calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palluconi, F.; Tonooka, H.; Hook, S.; Abtahi, A.; Alley, R.; Thompson, T.; Hoover, G.; Zadourian, S.

    2001-01-01

    Calibration of the 5 EOS ASTER instrument emission bands (90 m pixels at surface) is being checked during the operational life of the mission using field measurements simultaneous with the image acquisition.

  1. EOS Terra: Mission Status Constellation MOWG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantziaras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    This EOS Terra Mission Status Constellation MOWG will discuss mission summary; spacecraft subsystems summary, recent and planned activities; inclination adjust maneuvers, conjunction history, propellant usage and lifetime estimate; and end of mission plan.

  2. Efficacy of electrolyzed water in the prevention and removal of fecal material attachment and its microbicidal effectiveness during simulated industrial poultry processing.

    PubMed

    Kim, C; Hung, Y C; Russell, S M

    2005-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of alkaline and acidic electrolyzed (EO) water in preventing and removing fecal contaminants and killing Campylobacter jejuni on poultry carcasses under simulated industrial processing conditions. New York dressed and defeathered chicken carcasses spot-inoculated with cecal material or C. jejuni were subjected to spraying treatment with alkaline EO or 10% trisodium phosphate (TSP) water or combinations of spraying and immersion treatments with acidic EO and chlorinated water, respectively. Prespraying chicken carcasses with alkaline EO water significantly lowered cecal material attachment scores (3.77) than tap water (4.07) and 10% TSP (4.08) upon treatment of the dorsal area. Combinations of pre- and postspraying were significantly more effective than postspraying only, especially when using alkaline EO water in removing fecal materials on the surface of chicken carcasses. Although treatment by immersion only in EO and chlorinated water significantly reduced the initial population (4.92 log10 cfu/g) of C. jejuni by 2.33 and 2.05 log10 cfu/g, respectively, combinations of spraying and immersion treatment did not improve the bactericidal effect of sanitizers. The results indicated that alkaline EO water might provide an alternative to TSP in preventing attachment and removal of feces on the surface of chicken carcasses. The results also suggested that chicken carcasses containing pathogenic microorganisms may contribute to the cross-contamination of whole batches of chickens during processing in the chiller tank and afterward.

  3. Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids from Atacama Desert Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Pelletier, Christine C.; Kirby, James P.; Grunthaner, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    Amino acids are considered organic molecular indicators in the search for extant and extinct life in the Solar System. Extraction of these molecules from a particulate solid matrix, such as Martian regolith, will be critical to their in situ detection and analysis. The goals of this study were to optimize a laboratory amino acid extraction protocol by quantitatively measuring the yields of extracted amino acids as a function of liquid water temperature and sample extraction time and to compare the results to the standard HCl vapor- phase hydrolysis yields for the same soil samples. Soil samples from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert ( Martian regolith analog) were collected during a field study in the summer of 2005. The amino acids ( alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycine, serine, and valine) chosen for analysis were present in the samples at concentrations of 1 - 70 parts- per- billion. Subcritical water extraction efficiency was examined over the temperature range of 30 - 325 degrees C, at pressures of 17.2 or 20.0 MPa, and for water- sample contact equilibration times of 0 - 30 min. None of the amino acids were extracted in detectable amounts at 30 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), suggesting that amino acids are too strongly bound by the soil matrix to be extracted at such a low temperature. Between 150 degrees C and 250 degrees C ( at 17.2 MPa), the extraction efficiencies of glycine, alanine, and valine were observed to increase with increasing water temperature, consistent with higher solubility at higher temperatures, perhaps due to the decreasing dielectric constant of water. Amino acids were not detected in extracts collected at 325 degrees C ( at 20.0 MPa), probably due to amino acid decomposition at this temperature. The optimal subcritical water extraction conditions for these amino acids from Atacama Desert soils were achieved at 200 degrees C, 17.2 MPa, and a water- sample contact equilibration time of 10 min.

  4. New class of hybrid EoS and Bayesian M - R data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Castillo, D.; Ayriyan, A.; Benic, S.; Blaschke, D.; Grigorian, H.; Typel, S.

    2016-03-01

    We explore systematically a new class of two-phase equations of state (EoS) for hybrid stars that is characterized by three main features: 1) stiffening of the nuclear EoS at supersaturation densities due to quark exchange effects (Pauli blocking) between hadrons, modelled by an excluded volume correction; 2) stiffening of the quark matter EoS at high densities due to multiquark interactions; and 3) possibility for a strong first-order phase transition with an early onset and large density jump. The third feature results from a Maxwell construction for the possible transition from the nuclear to a quark matter phase and its properties depend on the two parameters used for 1) and 2), respectively. Varying these two parameters, one obtains a class of hybrid EoS that yields solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equations for sequences of hadronic and hybrid stars in the mass-radius diagram which cover the full range of patterns according to the Alford-Han-Prakash classification following which a hybrid star branch can be either absent, connected or disconnected with the hadronic one. The latter case often includes a tiny connected branch. The disconnected hybrid star branch, also called "third family", corresponds to high-mass twin stars characterized by the same gravitational mass but different radii. We perform a Bayesian analysis and demonstrate that the observation of such a pair of high-mass twin stars would have a sufficient discriminating power to favor hybrid EoS with a strong first-order phase transition over alternative EoS.

  5. Building EOS capability for Malaysia - the options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subari, M. D.; Hassan, A.

    2014-06-01

    Earth observation satellite (EOS) is currently a major tool to monitor earth dynamics and increase human understanding of earth surface process. Since the early 80s, Malaysia has been using EOS images for various applications, such as weather forecasting, land use mapping, agriculture, environment monitoring and others. Until now, all EOS images were obtained from foreign satellite systems. Realising on the strategic need of having its own capability, Malaysia embarked into EOS development programs in the early 90s. Starting with TiungSAT-1, a micro-satellite carrying small camera, then followed by RazakSAT, a small satellite carrying 2.5 m panchromatic (PAN) medium-aperture-camera, the current satellite program development, the RazakSAT-2, designed to carry a 1.0 m high resolution PAN and 4.0m multi-spectral camera, would become a strategic initiative of the government in developing and accelerating the nation's capability in the area of satellite technology and its application. Would this effort continue until all needs of the remote sensing community being fulfilled by its own EOS? This paper will analyze the intention of the Malaysian government through its National Space Policy and other related policy documents, and proposes some policy options on this. Key factors to be considered are specific data need of the EOS community, data availability and the more subjective political motivations such as national pride.

  6. Adsorption of humic acids and trace metals in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies concerning the interactions between suspended hydrous iron oxide and dissolved humic acids and trace metals are reported. As a major component of dissolved organic matters and its readiness for adsorption at the solid/water interface, humic acids may play a very important role in the organometallic geochemistry of suspended sediments and in determining the fate and distribution of trace metals, pesticides and anions in natural water systems. Most of the solid phases in natural waters contain oxides and hydroxides. The most simple promising theory to describe the interactions of hydrous iron oxide interface is the surface complex formation model. In this model, the adsorptions of humic acids on hydrous iron oxide may be interpreted as complex formation of the organic bases (humic acid oxyanions) with surface Fe ions. Measurements on adsorptions were made in both fresh water and seawater. Attempts have been made to fit our data to Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption equilibrium constants were determined.

  7. Astrobionibbler: In Situ Microfluidic Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, A. C.; Fisher, A. M.; Takano, N.; Fors-Francis, K.; Sherrit, S.; Grunthaner, F.

    2016-10-01

    A fluidic-chip based instrument for subcritical water extraction (SCWE) of amino acids and other organics from powder samples has been developed. A variety of soil analog extractions have been performed to better understand SCWE capabilities.

  8. Benzoic Acid and Chlorobenzoic Acids: Thermodynamic Study of the Pure Compounds and Binary Mixtures With Water.

    PubMed

    Reschke, Thomas; Zherikova, Kseniya V; Verevkin, Sergey P; Held, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Benzoic acid is a model compound for drug substances in pharmaceutical research. Process design requires information about thermodynamic phase behavior of benzoic acid and its mixtures with water and organic solvents. This work addresses phase equilibria that determine stability and solubility. In this work, Perturbed-Chain Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (PC-SAFT) was used to model the phase behavior of aqueous and organic solutions containing benzoic acid and chlorobenzoic acids. Absolute vapor pressures of benzoic acid and 2-, 3-, and 4-chlorobenzoic acid from literature and from our own measurements were used to determine pure-component PC-SAFT parameters. Two binary interaction parameters between water and/or benzoic acid were used to model vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibria of water and/or benzoic acid between 280 and 413 K. The PC-SAFT parameters and 1 binary interaction parameter were used to model aqueous solubility of the chlorobenzoic acids. Additionally, solubility of benzoic acid in organic solvents was predicted without using binary parameters. All results showed that pure-component parameters for benzoic acid and for the chlorobenzoic acids allowed for satisfying modeling phase equilibria. The modeling approach established in this work is a further step to screen solubility and to predict the whole phase region of mixtures containing pharmaceuticals.

  9. Effects of slightly acidic electrolysed drinking water on mice.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshiko; Obata, Takahiro; Kawagoe, Masami; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Sato, Masayoshi; Toida, Kazumi; Kushima, Hidemi; Matsuda, Yukihisa

    2011-10-01

    Slightly acidic electrolysed (SAE) water is a sanitizer with strong bactericidal activity due to hypochlorous acid. We assessed the safety of SAE water as drinking water for mice at a 5 ppm total residual chlorine (TRC) concentration to examine the possibility of SAE water as a labour- and energy-saving alternative to sterile water. We provided SAE water or sterile water to mice for 12 weeks, during which time we recorded changes in body weight and weekly water and food intakes. At the end of the experiment, all of the subject animals were sacrificed to assess serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and creatinine levels and to examine the main organs histopathologically under a light microscope. In addition, we investigated the bacteria levels of both types of water. We found no difference in functional and morphological health condition indices between the groups. Compared with sterile water, SAE water had a relatively higher ability to suppress bacterial growth. We suggest that SAE water at 5 ppm TRC is a safe and useful alternative to sterile water for use as drinking water in laboratory animal facilities.

  10. Acid Base Equilibrium in a Lipid/Water Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streb, Kristina K.; Ilich, Predrag-Peter

    2003-12-01

    A new and original experiment in which partition of bromophenol blue dye between water and lipid/water gel causes a shift in the acid base equilibrium of the dye is described. The dye-absorbing material is a monoglyceride food additive of plant origin that mixes freely with water to form a stable cubic phase gel; the nascent gel absorbs the dye from aqueous solution and converts it to the acidic form. There are three concurrent processes taking place in the experiment: (a) formation of the lipid/water gel, (b) absorption of the dye by the gel, and (c) protonation of the dye in the lipid/water gel environment. As the aqueous solution of the dye is a deep purple-blue color at neutral pH and yellow at acidic pH the result of these processes is visually striking: the strongly green-yellow particles of lipid/water gel are suspended in purple-blue aqueous solution. The local acidity of the lipid/water gel is estimated by UV vis spectrophotometry. This experiment is an example of host-guest (lipid/water gel dye) interaction and is suitable for project-type biophysics, physical chemistry, or biochemistry labs. The experiment requires three, 3-hour lab sessions, two of which must not be separated by more than two days.

  11. Occurrence of perfluoroalkyl acids in environmental waters in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Duong, Hanh Thi; Kadokami, Kiwao; Shirasaka, Hanako; Hidaka, Rento; Chau, Hong Thi Cam; Kong, Lingxiao; Nguyen, Trung Quang; Nguyen, Thao Thanh

    2015-03-01

    This is the first nationwide study of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in environmental waters in Vietnam. Twenty-eight river water and 22 groundwater samples collected in four major cities and 14 river water samples from the Red River were screened to investigate the occurrence and sources of 16 PFAAs. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were the most prevalent of 11 detected PFAAs with maximum concentrations in urban river water of 5.3, 18 and 0.93ngL(-1), respectively, and in groundwater of 8.2, 4.5 and 0.45ngL(-1), respectively. PFAAs in the Red River water were detected at low levels. PFAA concentrations in river water were higher in the rainy season than in the dry season, possibly due to storm water runoff, a common phenomenon in Southeast Asian countries. The highest concentrations of PFAAs in river water were observed in samples from highly populated and industrialized areas, perhaps sourced from sewage. The PFAA concentrations observed were similar to those in other Southeast Asian countries, but lower than in developed nations. From the composition profiles of PFAAs, industrial products containing PFAAs imported from China and Japan might be one of the major sources of PFAAs in the Vietnamese aquatic environment. According to the health-based values and advisory issued by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the concentrations of detected PFAAs in this study do not pose an immediate health risk to humans and aquatic organisms.

  12. NEUROXOTOXICITY PRODUCED BY DIBROMOACETIC ACID IN DRINKING WATER OF RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Drinking Water Act requires that EPA consider noncancer endpoints for the assessment of adverse human health effects of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Dibromoacetic acid (DBA) is one of many DBPs produced by the chlorination of drinking water. Its chlorinated analog, ...

  13. Homogeneous vs. heterogeneous nucleation in water-dicarboxylic acid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hienola, A. I.; Vehkamäki, H.; Riipinen, I.; Kulmala, M.

    2009-03-01

    Binary heterogeneous nucleation of water-succinic/glutaric/malonic/adipic acid on nanometer-sized particles is investigated within the frame of classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. Homogeneous nucleation is also included for comparison. It is found that the nucleation probabilities depend on the contact angle and on the size of the seed particles. New thermodynamical properties, such as saturation vapor pressure, density and surface tension for all the dicarboxylic acid aqueous solutions are included in the calculations. While the new surface tension and density formulations do not bring any significant difference in the computed nucleation rate for homogeneous nucleation for succinic and glutaric acids, the use of the newly derived equations for the vapor pressure decrease the acid concentrations in gas phase by 3 orders of magnitude. According to our calculations, the binary heterogeneous nucleation of succinic acid-water and glutaric acid-water - although it requires a 3-4 orders of magnitude lower vapor concentrations than the homogeneous nucleation - cannot take place under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand binary homogeneous nucleation of adipic acid-water systems might be possible under conditions occuring in upper boundary layer. However, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between the surface and the molecules of the nucleating vapor should be considered in the future.

  14. The EOS data and information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is proposed as a 1991 new initiative by NASA as part of the Mission to Planet Earth. One of the key components of the EOS program is the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Two independent Phase B studies of EOSDIS were conducted from January 1989 through April 1990. Some of the key challenges faced by EOSDIS are: satisfying the data and information needs of a diverse multidisciplinary scientific community integrating product generation algorithms for over two dozen instruments, keeping up with an orbital average data rate of over 50 Mb/sec and assuring prompt generation of standard products, reprocessing data as product generation algorithms change, and storing, and managing information about tens of Petabytes of data over the 15-year life of the mission.

  15. EO-1 Prototyping for Environmental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P. K.; Middleton, E.; Ungar, S.; Zhang, Q.; Ong, L.; Huemmrich, K. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth Observing One (EO-1) Mission, launched in November, 2000 as part of NASA’s New Millennium Program, is in it’s eight year of operation. From the start it was recognized that a key criteria for evaluating the EO-1 technology and outlining future Earth science mission needs is the ability of the technology to characterize terrestrial surface state and processes. EO-1 is participating in a broad range of investigations, demonstrating the utility of imaging spectroscopy in applications relating to forestry, agriculture, species discrimination, invasive species, desertification, land-use, vulcanization, fire management, homeland security, natural and anthropogenic hazards and disaster assessments and has provided characterization for a variety of instruments on EOS platforms. By generating a high spectral and spatial resolution data set for the corral reefs and islands, it is contributing for realizing the goals of the National Decadal survey and providing an excellent platform for testing strategies to be employed in the HyspIRI mission. The EO1 Mission Science Office (MSO) is developing tools and prototypes for new science products, addressing the HyspIRI goals to assess vegetation status and health and provide vegetation spectral bio-indicators and biophysical parameters such as LAI and fAPAR at <100 m spatial resolution. These are being used to resolve variability in heterogeneous areas (e.g. agriculture, narrow shapes, urban and developed lands) and for managed ecosystems less than 10 km2. A set of invariable reference targets (e.g. sun, moon, deserts, Antarctica) are being characterised to allow cross-calibration of current and future EO sensors, comparison of land products generated by multiple sensors and retroactive processing of time series data. Such products are needed to develop Science Requirements for the next generation of hyperspectral satellite sensors and to address global societal needs.

  16. EOS Laser Atmosphere Wind Sounder (LAWS) investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmitt, George D.

    1991-01-01

    The related activities of the contract are outlined for the first year. These include: (1) attend team member meetings; (2) support EOS Project with science related activities; (3) prepare and Execution Phase plan; and (4) support LAWS and EOSDIS related work. Attached to the report is an appendix, 'LAWS Algorithm Development and Evaluation Laboratory (LADEL)'. Also attached is a copy of a proposal to the NASA EOS for 'LAWS Sampling Strategies and Wind Computation Algorithms -- Storm-Top Divergence Studies. Volume I: Investigation and Technical Plan, Data Plan, Computer Facilities Plan, Management Plan.'

  17. Early-EOS data and information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, George H.; Hunolt, Gregory W.

    1991-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS), an integral part of the U.S. Global Change Research Program, will provide simultaneous observations from a suite of instruments in low-earth orbit. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) will handle the data from those instruments, as well as provide access to observations and related information from other earth science missions. The Early-EOSDIS Program will provide initial improved support for global change research by building upon present capabilities and data, and will establish a working prototype EOSDIS for selected archiving, distribution, and information management functions by mid-1994.

  18. Amino acid synthesis in a supercritical carbon dioxide - water system.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-06-15

    Mars is a CO(2)-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO(2)-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO(2)/liquid H(2)O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life's origin.

  19. Amino Acid Synthesis in a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide - Water System

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Shiohara, Tomoo; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Manome, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Mars is a CO2-abundant planet, whereas early Earth is thought to be also CO2-abundant. In addition, water was also discovered on Mars in 2008. From the facts and theory, we assumed that soda fountains were present on both planets, and this affected amino acid synthesis. Here, using a supercritical CO2/liquid H2O (10:1) system which mimicked crust soda fountains, we demonstrate production of amino acids from hydroxylamine (nitrogen source) and keto acids (oxylic acid sources). In this research, several amino acids were detected with an amino acid analyzer. Moreover, alanine polymers were detected with LC-MS. Our research lights up a new pathway in the study of life’s origin. PMID:19582225

  20. Humic acid adsorption and surface charge effects on schwertmannite and goethite in acid sulphate waters.

    PubMed

    Kumpulainen, Sirpa; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2008-04-01

    In acid conditions, as in acid mine drainage waters, iron oxide particles are positively charged, attracting negatively charged organic particles present in surrounding natural waters. Schwertmannite (Fe8O8(OH)6SO4) and goethite (alpha-FeOOH) are the most typical iron oxide minerals found in mine effluents. We studied schwertmannite formation in the presence of humic acid. Further, surface charge and adsorption of humic acid on synthetic schwertmannite and goethite surfaces in pH 2-9 and in humic acid concentrations of 0.1-100 mg/L C were examined. Schwertmannite did precipitate despite the presence of humic acid, although it contained more sulphate and had higher specific surface area than ordinary schwertmannite. Specific surface area weighted results showed that schwertmannite and goethite had similar humic acid adsorption capacities. Sulphate was released from schwertmannite surfaces with increasing pH, resulting in an increase in specific surface area. Presence of sulphate in solution decreased the surface charge of schwertmannite and goethite similarly, causing coagulation. In acid conditions (pH 2-3.5), according to the zeta potential, schwertmannite is expected to coagulate even in the presence of high concentrations of humic acid (< or = 100 mg/L C). However, at high humic acid concentrations (10-100 mg/L C) with moderate acid conditions (pH>3.5), both schwertmannite and goethite surfaces are strongly negatively charged (zeta potential < -30 mV) thus posing a risk for colloid stabilization and colloidal transport.

  1. Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, C T

    1985-01-01

    Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes. PMID:3935428

  2. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is the centerpiece of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth initiative. It is a pivotal part of the U.S. Global Change Research Program and hence of the international effort to understand global change and the increasing demands of human activity. EOS consists of a space-based observing system, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and a scientific research program. The space component consists of two series of polar-orbiting spacecraft, the first scheduled for launch in 1998, that will collect data for 15 years. EOS is completing its conceptual design phase and is preparing to enter the design phase with the selection and construction of the instruments for the first platform. EOSDIS will allow researchers to quickly and easily access data about the Earth system. Development of EOSDIS has already begun; it will support research and analysis with existing data. Geophysical and biological products will be created from the satellite data to be used to a broad range of the scientific community. NASA has also committed to providing smaller missions - called Earth Probes - dedicated to near-term observations of specific Earth processes. The scientific research program was initiated in 1990, with funding for 28 interdisciplinary teams, to begin development of models that will use EOS data and define the data requirements from the instruments, nine facility instruments and their science teams, 23 instrument investigations and definition studies for a synthetic-aperture radar.

  3. Data links for the EOS TPC

    SciTech Connect

    Bieser, F.; Jones, R.; McParland, C.

    1990-10-01

    We report on the design and performance of high speed data links and slower configuration control links used between the EOS TPC detector and the data processing electronics. Data rates of 5MBytes/s/link are maintained over 30m with optical isolation. Pedestal subtraction, hit detection, and data reordering are performed online. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  4. EOS Data Products Handbook. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L. (Editor); Greenstone, Reynold (Editor); Closs, James (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The EOS Data Products Handbook provides brief descriptions of the data products that will be produced from a range of missions of the Earth Observing System (EOS) and associated projects. Volume 1, originally published in 1997, covers the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the Terra mission (formerly named EOS AM-1), and the Data Assimilation System, while this volume, Volume 2, covers the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor Satellite (ACRIMSAT), Aqua, Jason-1, Landsat 7, Meteor 3M/Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III). the Quick Scatterometer (QuikScat), the Quick Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (Quik-TOMS), and the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) missions. Volume 2 follows closely the format of Volume 1, providing a list of products and an introduction and overview descriptions of the instruments and data processing, all introductory to the core of the book, which presents the individual data product descriptions, organized into 11 topical chapters. The product descriptions are followed by five appendices, which provide contact information for the EOS data centers that will be archiving and distributing the data sets, contact information for the science points of contact for the data products, references, acronyms and abbreviations, and a data products index.

  5. MISR EOS Validation Site Data Ordering

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-02

    ... EOS Validation data files are orderable through the  MISR Order Tool . Log in to the MISR Order Tool Select product(s) ... be subset for the chosen site. You can further customize your files by following instructions in the interface. ...

  6. Reduced Acid Dissociation of Amino-Acids at the Surface of Water

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We use surface-specific intensity vibrational sum-frequency generation and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy to probe the ionization state of the amino-acids l-alanine and l-proline at the air/water surface and in the bulk. The ionization state is determined by probing the vibrational signatures of the carboxylic acid group, representing the nondissociated acid form, and the carboxylate anion group, representing the dissociated form, over a wide range of pH values. We find that the carboxylic acid group deprotonates at a significantly higher pH at the surface than in the bulk. PMID:28177623

  7. Reduced Acid Dissociation of Amino-Acids at the Surface of Water.

    PubMed

    Strazdaite, Simona; Meister, Konrad; Bakker, Huib J

    2017-03-15

    We use surface-specific intensity vibrational sum-frequency generation and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy to probe the ionization state of the amino-acids l-alanine and l-proline at the air/water surface and in the bulk. The ionization state is determined by probing the vibrational signatures of the carboxylic acid group, representing the nondissociated acid form, and the carboxylate anion group, representing the dissociated form, over a wide range of pH values. We find that the carboxylic acid group deprotonates at a significantly higher pH at the surface than in the bulk.

  8. NEUTRALIZATION OF ACIDIC GROUND WATER NEAR GLOBE, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychaner, James H.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; ,

    1985-01-01

    Highly acidic contaminated water is moving through a shallow aquifer and interacting with streams near Globe, Arizona. Dissolved concentrations reach 3,000 mg/L iron, 150 mg/L copper, and 16,400 mg/L total dissloved solids; pH is as low as 3. 6. Samples from 16 PVC-cased observation wells include uncontaminated, contaminated, transition, and neutralized waters. Chemical reaction with sediments and mixing with uncontaminated water neutralizes the acidic water. The reactions form a transition zone where gypsum replaces calcite and most metals precipitate. Ferric hydroxide also precipitates if sufficient oxygen is available. Abundant gypsum crystals and ferric hydroxide coatings have been recovered from well cuttings. Large sulfate concentrations produce sulfate complexes with many metals that inhibit removal of metals from solution.

  9. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  10. Calcium extraction from brine water and seawater using oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natasha, Nadia Chrisayu; Lalasari, Latifa Hanum

    2017-01-01

    Calcium can be extracted not only from rocks but also from natural liquor such as seawater and brine water. In order to extract the calcium from seawater and brine water, oxalic acid was used in this research. Effect of variations of the volume of the oxalic acid at a constant concentration in seawater and brine water to produce calcium was investigated. The concentration of oxalic acid was 100 g/l and the variations of its volume were 2 ml, 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml, 10 ml, 20 ml, 30 ml, 40 ml, and 50 ml. The used seawater and brine water were firstly evaporated from 100 ml into 50 ml and then the oxalic acid was added into them with mixing to produce the calcium precipitates. The precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The SEM analysis showed that the precipitates from brine water were consisted of only calcium compound while from seawater sodium one was also found along with calcium compound. The XRD analysis showed that the calcium was present in the form of calcium oxalate for both seawater and brine water. The ICP-OES analysis of the filtrate from seawater precipitation showed that the its calcium content was decreased from 826.20 ppm to 0.04 ppm while from brine water, it decreased from 170.06 ppm to 1.96 ppm. These results showed that both seawater and brine water have the potential to be a raw material for calcium production.

  11. Diaromatic sulphur-containing 'naphthenic' acids in process waters.

    PubMed

    West, Charles E; Scarlett, Alan G; Tonkin, Andrew; O'Carroll-Fitzpatrick, Devon; Pureveen, Jos; Tegelaar, Erik; Gieleciak, Rafal; Hager, Darcy; Petersen, Karina; Tollefsen, Knut-Erik; Rowland, Steven J

    2014-03-15

    Polar organic compounds found in industrial process waters, particularly those originating from biodegraded petroleum residues, include 'naphthenic acids' (NA). Some NA have been shown to have acute toxicity to fish and also to produce sub-lethal effects. Whilst some of these toxic effects are produced by identifiable carboxylic acids, acids such as sulphur-containing acids, which have been detected, but not yet identified, may produce others. Therefore, in the present study, the sulphur-containing acids in oil sands process water were studied. A fraction (ca 12% by weight of the total NA containing ca 1.5% weight sulphur) was obtained by elution of methylated NA through an argentation solid phase extraction column with diethyl ether. This was examined by multidimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) in both nominal and high resolution mass accuracy modes and by GCxGC-sulphur chemiluminescence detection (GCxGC-SCD). Interpretation of the mass spectra and retention behaviour of methyl esters of several synthesised sulphur acids and the unknowns allowed delimitation of the structures, but not complete identification. Diaromatic sulphur-containing alkanoic acids were suggested. Computer modelling of the toxicities of some of the possible acids suggested they would have similar toxicities to one another and to dehydroabietic acid. However, the sulphur-rich fraction was not toxic or estrogenic to trout hepatocytes, suggesting the concentrations of sulphur acids in this sample were too low to produce any such effects in vitro. Further samples should probably be examined for these compounds.

  12. 2016 Mission Operations Working Group: Earth Observing-1 (EO-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    EO-1 Mission Status for the Constellation Mission Operations Working Group to discuss the EO-1 flight systems, mission enhancements, debris avoidance maneuver, orbital information, 5-year outlook, and new ground stations.

  13. Extremely acid Permian lakes and ground waters in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benison, K.C.; Goldstein, R.H.; Wopenka, B.; Burruss, R.C.; Pasteris, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Evaporites hosted by red beds (red shales and sandstones), some 275-265 million years old, extend over a large area of the North American mid- continent. They were deposited in non-marine saline lakes, pans and mud- flats, settings that are typically assumed to have been alkaline. Here we use laser Raman microprobe analyses of fluid inclusions trapped in halites from these Permian deposits to argue for the existence of highly acidic (pH < 1) lakes and ground waters. These extremely acidic systems may have extended over an area of 200,000 km2. Modern analogues of such systems may be natural acid lake and groundwater systems (pH ~2-4) in southern Australia. Both the ancient and modern acid systems are characterized by closed drainage, arid climate, low acid-neutralizing capacity, and the oxidation of minerals such as pyrite to generate acidity. The discovery of widespread ancient acid lake and groundwater systems demands a re-evaluation of reconstructions of surface conditions of the past, and further investigations of the geochemistry and ecology of acid systems in general.

  14. Evaporation kinetics of acetic acid-water solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, K.; Wong, N.; Saykally, R.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The transport of water molecules across vapor-liquid interfaces in the atmosphere is a crucial step in the formation and evolution of cloud droplets. Despite decades of study, the effects of solutes on the mechanism and rate of evaporation and condensation remain poorly characterized. The present work aims to determine the effect of atmospherically-relevant solutes on the evaporation rate of water. In our experiments, we create a train of micron-sized droplets and measure their temperature via Raman thermometry as they undergo evaporation without condensation. Analysis of the cooling rate yields the evaporation coefficient (γ). Previous work has shown that inorganic salts have little effect on γ, with surface-adsorbing anions causing a slight reduction in the coefficient from that measured for pure water. Organic acids are ubiquitous in aqueous aerosol and have been shown to disrupt the surface structure of water. Here we describe measurements of the evaporation rate of acetic acid solutions, showing that acetic acid reduces γ to a larger extent than inorganic ions, and that γ decreases with increasing acetic acid concentration.

  15. Disinfection of water in recirculating aquaculture systems with peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peracetic acid (PAA) has become a favoured alternative to chlorination in the disinfection of municipal waste water in recent years. It is also commonly used in the food industry as a disinfectant. Based on PAA concentration, the disulfide linkage in enzymes and proteins of microorganisms can be bro...

  16. NEUROTOXICITY PRODUCED BY DIBROMOACETIC ACID IN DRINKING WATER OF RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript examines the neurotoxic potential of a commonly found disinfection by-product (DBP), dibromoacetic acid (DBA). While the Safe Drinking Water Act requires evaluation of DBPs for noncancer health effects, surprisingly few have been tested for neurotoxicity. Rats e...

  17. 76 FR 31892 - Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Chapter III Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Request for information. SUMMARY: In accordance with Executive Order (E.O.) 13563, ``Improving... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On January 18, 2011, the President issued E.O. 13563, ``Improving Regulation...

  18. The UARS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Lau, G. K.; Pickett, H. M.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.; Boyles, M. A.; Burke, J. R.; Lay, R. R.; Loo, M. S.; Livesey, N. J.; Lungu, T. A.; Manney, G. L.; Nakamura, L. L.;  Perun, V. S.;  Ridenoure, B. P.;  Shippony, Z.;  Siegel, P. H.;  Thurstans, R. P.;  Harwood, R. S.;  Pumphrey, H. C.;  Filipiak, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) experiments obtain measurements of atmospheric composition, temperature, and pressure by observations of millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength thermal emission as the instrument field of view is scanned through the atmospheric limb. Features of the measurement technique include the ability to measure many atmospheric gases as well as temperature and pressure, to obtain measurements even in the presence of dense aerosol and cirrus, and to provide near-global coverage on a daily basis at all times of day and night from an orbiting platform. The composition measurements are relatively insensitive to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature. An accurate spectroscopic database is available, and the instrument calibration is also very accurate and stable. The first MLS experiment in space, launched on the (NASA) Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in September 1991, was designed primarily to measure stratospheric profiles of ClO, O3, H2O, and atmospheric pressure as a vertical reference. Global measurement of ClO, the predominant radical in chlorine destruction of ozone, was an especially important objective of UARS MLS. All objectives of UARS MLS have been accomplished and additional geophysical products beyond those for which the experiment was designed have been obtained, including measurement of upper-tropospheric water vapor, which is important for climate change studies. A follow-on MLS experiment is being developed for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) and is scheduled to be launched on the EOS CHEMISTRY platform in late 2002. EOS MLS is designed for many stratospheric measurements, including HOx radicals, which could not be measured by UARS because adequate technology was not available, and better and more extensive upper-tropospheric and lower-stratospheric measurements.

  19. Inhibition of Ileal Water Absorption by Intraluminal Fatty Acids INFLUENCE OF CHAIN LENGTH, HYDROXYLATION, AND CONJUGATION OF FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Ammon, Helmut V.; Phillips, Sidney F.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of fatty acids on ileal absorption of water, electrolytes, glucose, and taurocholate was examined in Thirty-Vella fistulas in five mongrel dogs. Fatty acid absorption also was measured. Segments of terminal ileum were perfused at steady state with isotonic electrolyte solutions containing 11.2 mM glucose, 4.5 mM taurocholate, and 0.1-5.0 mM fatty acid. Three C18 fatty acids, oleic acid, 10(9)-hydroxystearic acid, and ricinoleic acid, completely inhibited water absorption at 5 mM. Sodium, chloride, and potassium absorptions were inhibited in parallel with absorption of water. Differences between the potencies of C18 fatty acids were apparent when lesser concentrations were perfused. Dodecanoic and decanoic acids were as effective as C18 fatty acids at 5 mM but octanoic and hexanoic acids were ineffective. The polar group of C18 fatty acids was modified by conjugating oleic and ricinoleic acids with taurine. When these compounds and a substituted C18 fatty acid, p-n-decylbenzenesulfonate, were perfused, water absorption was also inhibited. Short-chain fatty acids (C3 and C4) and their hydroxylated derivatives were ineffective at 5 mM. When water absorption was inhibited, absorption of glucose and taurocholate was decreased. We speculate that the phenomenon of inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption by fatty acids may be relevant to steatorrhea and diarrhea in man. Images PMID:4808636

  20. Autonomous Science on the EO-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, S.; Sherwood, R.; Tran, D.; Castano, R.; Cichy, B.; Davies, A.; Rabideau, G.; Tang, N.; Burl, M.; Mandl, D.; Frye, S.; Hengemihle, J.; Agostino, J. D.; Bote, R.; Trout, B.; Shulman, S.; Ungar, S.; Gaasbeck, J. Van; Boyer, D.; Griffin, M.; Burke, H.; Greeley, R.; Doggett, T.; Williams, K.; Baker, V.

    2003-01-01

    In mid-2003, we will fly software to detect science events that will drive autonomous scene selectionon board the New Millennium Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) spacecraft. This software will demonstrate the potential for future space missions to use onboard decision-making to detect science events and respond autonomously to capture short-lived science events and to downlink only the highest value science data.

  1. The EOS CERES Global Cloud Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berendes, T. A.; Welch, R. M.; Trepte, Q.; Schaaf, C.; Baum, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    To detect long-term climate trends, it is essential to produce long-term and consistent data sets from a variety of different satellite platforms. With current global cloud climatology data sets, such as the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Experiment (ISCCP) or CLAVR (Clouds from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), one of the first processing steps is to determine whether an imager pixel is obstructed between the satellite and the surface, i.e., determine a cloud 'mask.' A cloud mask is essential to studies monitoring changes over ocean, land, or snow-covered surfaces. As part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program, a series of platforms will be flown beginning in 1997 with the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) and subsequently the EOS-AM and EOS-PM platforms in following years. The cloud imager on TRMM is the Visible/Infrared Sensor (VIRS), while the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is the imager on the EOS platforms. To be useful for long term studies, a cloud masking algorithm should produce consistent results between existing (AVHRR) data, and future VIRS and MODIS data. The present work outlines both existing and proposed approaches to detecting cloud using multispectral narrowband radiance data. Clouds generally are characterized by higher albedos and lower temperatures than the underlying surface. However, there are numerous conditions when this characterization is inappropriate, most notably over snow and ice of the cloud types, cirrus, stratocumulus and cumulus are the most difficult to detect. Other problems arise when analyzing data from sun-glint areas over oceans or lakes over deserts or over regions containing numerous fires and smoke. The cloud mask effort builds upon operational experience of several groups that will now be discussed.

  2. EOS situational data shared service mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, L.; Xu, Q.; Lan, C. Z.; Shi, Q. S.; Lu, W. J.; Wu, W. Q.

    2016-11-01

    With the rapid development of aerospace and remote sensing technology, various high-resolution Earth Observation Systems (EOS) are widely used in economic, social, military and other fields and playing an increasingly prominent role in the construction of Digital Earth and national strategic planning. The normal operation of the system is the premise of high quality data acquisition. Compared with the ground observation mode, EOS itself and the surrounding environment are more complex, and its operation control mainly depends on all kinds of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) data acquisition and analysis. SSA data has more extensive sources, larger volume, stronger time-effectiveness and more complicated structure than traditional geographical spatial data. For effective data sharing and utilization, combined with the analysis of data types and structures, a SSA data sharing identity language SSDSML is designed based on the extensible mark-up language XML, which realizes a comprehensive description of satellites and their attributes, space environment, ground stations, etc. Then EOS situational data shared service mechanism is established and provides a powerful data support for the normal operation of the system.

  3. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Stream water pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southwast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site. 10 references, 2 tables.

  4. EOS ODL Metadata On-line Viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Rabi, M.; Bane, B.; Ullman, R.

    2002-12-01

    We have recently developed and deployed an EOS ODL metadata on-line viewer. The EOS ODL metadata viewer is a web server that takes: 1) an EOS metadata file in Object Description Language (ODL), 2) parameters, such as which metadata to view and what style of display to use, and returns an HTML or XML document displaying the requested metadata in the requested style. This tool is developed to address widespread complaints by science community that the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) metadata files in ODL are difficult to read by allowing users to upload and view an ODL metadata file in different styles using a web browser. Users have the selection to view all the metadata or part of the metadata, such as Collection metadata, Granule metadata, or Unsupported Metadata. Choices of display styles include 1) Web: a mouseable display with tabs and turn-down menus, 2) Outline: Formatted and colored text, suitable for printing, 3) Generic: Simple indented text, a direct representation of the underlying ODL metadata, and 4) None: No stylesheet is applied and the XML generated by the converter is returned directly. Not all display styles are implemented for all the metadata choices. For example, Web style is only implemented for Collection and Granule metadata groups with known attribute fields, but not for Unsupported, Other, and All metadata. The overall strategy of the ODL viewer is to transform an ODL metadata file to a viewable HTML in two steps. The first step is to convert the ODL metadata file to an XML using a Java-based parser/translator called ODL2XML. The second step is to transform the XML to an HTML using stylesheets. Both operations are done on the server side. This allows a lot of flexibility in the final result, and is very portable cross-platform. Perl CGI behind the Apache web server is used to run the Java ODL2XML, and then run the results through an XSLT processor. The EOS ODL viewer can be accessed from either a PC or a Mac using Internet

  5. Bridging EO Research, Operations and Collaborative Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarth, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Building flexible and responsive processing and delivery systems is key to getting EO information used by researchers, policy agents and the public. There are typically three distinct processes we tackle to get product uptake: undertake research, operationalise the validated research, and deliver information and garner feedback in an appropriate way. In many cases however, the gaps between these process elements are large and lead to poor outcomes. Good research may be "lost" and not adopted, there may be resistance to uptake by government or NGOs of significantly better operational products based on EO data, and lack of accessibility means that there is no use of interactive science outputs to improve cross disciplinary science or to start a dialog with citizens. So one of the the most important tasks, if we wish to have broad uptake of EO information and accelerate further research, is to link these processes together in a formal but flexible way. One of the ways to operationalize research output is by building a platform that can take research code and scale it across much larger areas. In remote sensing, this is typically a system that has access to current and historical corrected imagery with a processing pipeline built over the top. To reduce the demand on high level scientific programmers and allowing cross disciplinary researchers to hack and play and refine, this pipeline needs to be easy to use, collaborative and link to existing tools to encourage code experimentation and reuse. It is also critical to have efficient, tight integration with information delivery and extension components so that the science relevant to your user is available quickly and efficiently. The rapid expansion of open data licensing has helped this process, but building top-down web portals and tools without flexibility and regard for end user needs has limited the use of EO information in many areas. This research reports on the operalization of a scale independent time series

  6. Mitigation of acid deposition: Liming of surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoshesky, J.; Price, R.; DeMuro, J.

    1989-05-01

    In recent years acid deposition has become a serious concern internationally. Scientific literature has documented the acidification of numerous lakes and streams in North America and Scandinavia resulting in the depletion or total loss of fisheries and other aquatic biota. Liming represents the only common corrective practice aimed specifically at remediating an affected acid receptor. This report reviews a range of liming technologies and liming materials, as well as the effect of surface-water liming on water quality and aquatic biota. As background to the liming discussion, the hydrologic cycle and the factors that make surface waters sensitive to acid deposition are also discussed. Finally, a brief review of some of the liming projects that have been conducted, or are currently in operation is presented, giving special emphasis to mitigation efforts in Maryland. Liming has been effectively used to counteract surface-water acidification in parts of Scandinavia, Canada, and the U.S. To date, liming has generally been shown to improve physical and chemical conditions and enhance the biological recovery of aquatic ecosystems affected by acidification.

  7. Characterization of haloacetic acid precursors in source water.

    PubMed

    Kanokkantapong, Vorapot; Marhaba, Taha F; Pavasant, Prasert; Panyapinyophol, Bunyarit

    2006-08-01

    Raw water from the Bangkok (Thailand) main municipal water supply canal was examined for its natural organic composition by fractionation with adsorption resins. DAX-8 resin was the first resin employed to fractionate the hydrophobic fractions. Fractionation at neutral pH resulted in the separation of the hydrophobic neutral components; at a high pH level (approx. 10) separation of the hydrophobic base components occurred; and at a low pH level (approx. 2) the hydrophobic acid components were separated. AG-MP-50 cationic resin was then used to separate the hydrophilic base components, and WA-10, a weak anionic resin, was applied finally to fractionate the hydrophilic acid and neutral components. Subsequently, each fraction was tested for its chlorine disinfection by-product (DBP) formation potential. The HAA formation tests demonstrated that the various organic fractions had different reactivity levels for the formation of haloacetic acids (HAAs). For this source water, the hydrophilic neutral fraction dominated over the other five fractions in being the main organic component and the most significant precursor of HAAs formation. On the other hand, in terms of specific HAA formation potential (FP), the hydrophobic and hydrophilic base fractions were the most reactive precursors to the formation of HAAs. In all cases, the quantity of HAAs formed depended linearly upon the amount of organic constituents in the water sample.

  8. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park: IV Acid-sulfate waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirk, Nordstrom D.; Blaine, McCleskey R.; Ball, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Many waters sampled in Yellowstone National Park, both high-temperature (30-94 ??C) and low-temperature (0-30 ??C), are acid-sulfate type with pH values of 1-5. Sulfuric acid is the dominant component, especially as pH values decrease below 3, and it forms from the oxidation of elemental S whose origin is H2S in hot gases derived from boiling of hydrothermal waters at depth. Four determinations of pH were obtained: (1) field pH at field temperature, (2) laboratory pH at laboratory temperature, (3) pH based on acidity titration, and (4) pH based on charge imbalance (at both laboratory and field temperatures). Laboratory pH, charge imbalance pH (at laboratory temperature), and acidity pH were in close agreement for pH ??10%, a selection process was used to compare acidity, laboratory, and charge balance pH to arrive at the best estimate. Differences between laboratory and field pH can be explained based on Fe oxidation, H2S or S2O3 oxidation, CO2 degassing, and the temperature-dependence of pK2 for H2SO4. Charge imbalances are shown to be dependent on a speciation model for pH values 350 mg/L Cl) decrease as the Cl- concentration increases from boiling which appears inconsistent with the hypothesis of H2S oxidation as a source of hydrothermal SO4. This trend is consistent with the alternate hypothesis of anhydrite solubility equilibrium. Acid-sulfate water analyses are occasionally high in As, Hg, and NH3 concentrations but in contrast to acid mine waters they are low to below detection in Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb concentrations. Even concentrations of SO4, Fe, and Al are much lower in thermal waters than acid mine waters of the same pH. This difference in water chemistry may explain why certain species of fly larvae live comfortably in Yellowstone's acid waters but have not been observed in acid rock drainage of the same pH.

  9. Leveraging abscisic acid receptors for efficient water use in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jinghui; Tischer, Stefanie V.; Christmann, Alexander; Windisch, Wilhelm; Schnyder, Hans; Grill, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth requires the influx of atmospheric CO2 through stomatal pores, and this carbon uptake for photosynthesis is inherently associated with a large efflux of water vapor. Under water deficit, plants reduce transpiration and are able to improve carbon for water exchange leading to higher water use efficiency (WUE). Whether increased WUE can be achieved without trade-offs in plant growth is debated. The signals mediating the WUE response under water deficit are not fully elucidated but involve the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is perceived by a family of related receptors known to mediate acclimation responses and to reduce transpiration. We now show that enhanced stimulation of ABA signaling via distinct ABA receptors can result in plants constitutively growing at high WUE in the model species Arabidopsis. WUE was assessed by three independent approaches involving gravimetric analyses, 13C discrimination studies of shoots and derived cellulose fractions, and by gas exchange measurements of whole plants and individual leaves. Plants expressing the ABA receptors RCAR6/PYL12 combined up to 40% increased WUE with high growth rates, i.e., are water productive. Water productivity was associated with maintenance of net carbon assimilation by compensatory increases of leaf CO2 gradients, thereby sustaining biomass acquisition. Leaf surface temperatures and growth potentials of plants growing under well-watered conditions were found to be reliable indicators for water productivity. The study shows that ABA receptors can be explored to generate more plant biomass per water transpired, which is a prime goal for a more sustainable water use in agriculture. PMID:27247417

  10. Advances in the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology of acid mine waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2000-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a plethora of research related to the hydrogeochemistry and microbiology of acid mine waters and associated tailings and waste-rock waters. Numerous books, reviews, technical papers, and proceedings have been published that examine the complex bio-geochemical process of sulfide mineral oxidation, develop and apply geochemical models to site characterization, and characterize the microbial ecology of these environments. This review summarizes many of these recent works, and provides references for those investigating this field. Comparisons of measured versus calculated Eh and measured versus calculated pH for water samples from several field sites demonstrate the reliability of some current geochemical models for aqueous speciation and mass balances. Geochemical models are not, however, used to predict accurately time-dependent processes but to improve our understanding of these systems and to constrain possible processes that contribute to actual or potential water quality issues. Microbiological studies are demonstrating that there is much we have yet to learn about the types of different microorganisms and their function and ecology in mine-waste environments. A broad diversity of green algae, bacteria, archaea, yeasts, and fungi are encountered in acid mine waters, and a better understanding of their ecology and function may potentially enhance remediation possibilities as well as our understanding of the evolution of life.

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of sulfuric acid/water aerosols: Freezing characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, M. L.; Niedziela, R. F.; Richwine, L. J.; Dransfield, T.; Miller, R. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    1997-04-01

    A low-temperature flow cell has been used in conjunction with a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer to study sulfuric acid/water aerosols. The aerosols were generated with a wide range of composition (28 to 85 wt%), including those characteristic of stratospheric sulfate aerosols, and studied over the temperature range from 240 K to 160 K. The particles exhibited deep supercooling, by as much as 100 K below the freezing point in some cases. Freezing of water ice was observed in the more dilute (<40 wt% sulfuric acid) particles, in agreement with the predictions of Jensen et al. and recent observations by Bertram et al. In contrast with theoretical predictions, however, the entire particle often does not immediately freeze, at least on the timescale of the present experiments (seconds to minutes). Freezing of the entire particle is observed at lower temperatures, well below that characteristic of the polar stratosphere.

  12. Natural acidity of waters in podzolized soils and potential impacts from acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stednick, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nutrient movements through sites in southeast Alaska and Washington were documented to determine net changes in chemical composition of precipitation water as it passed through a forest soil and became stream-flow. These sites were not subject to acid precipitation (rainfall pH 5.8 to 7.2), yet soil water was acidified to 4.2 by natural organic acid-forming processes in the podzol soils. Organic acids precipitated in the subsoils, allowing a pH increase. Streamwater pH ranged from 6.5 to 7.2 indicating a natural buffering capacity that may exceed any additional acid input from acid rain. Precipitation composition was dominated by calcium, magnesium, sodium, and chloride due to the proximity of the ocean at the southeast Alaska site. Anionic constituents of the precipitation were dominated by bicarbonate at the Washington site. Soil podzolization processes concurrently increased solution color and iron concentrations in the litter and surface horizons leachates. The anion flux through the soil profile was dominated by chloride and sulfate at the southeast Alaska site, whereas at the Washington site anion flux appeared to be dominated by organic acids. Electroneutrality calculations indicated a cation deficit for the southeast Alaska site.

  13. Efficacy of ozonated and electrolyzed oxidative waters to decontaminate hides of cattle before slaughter.

    PubMed

    Bosilevac, Joseph M; Shackelford, Steven D; Brichta, Dayna M; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2005-07-01

    The hides of cattle are the primary source of pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 that contaminate preevisceration carcasses during commercial beef processing. A number of interventions that reduce hide contamination and subsequent carcass contamination are currently being developed. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of ozonated and electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) waters to decontaminate beef hides and to compare these treatments with similar washing in water without the active antimicrobial compounds. Cattle hides draped over barrels were used as the model system. Ozonated water (2 ppm) was applied at 4,800 kPa (700 lb in2) and 15 degrees C for 10 s. Alkaline EO water and acidic EO water were sequentially applied at 60 degrees C for 10 s at 4,800 and 1,700 kPa (250 lb in2), respectively. Treatment using ozonated water reduced hide aerobic plate counts by 2.1 log CFU/100 cm2 and reduced Enterobacteriaceae counts by 3.4 log CFU/100 cm2. EO water treatment reduced aerobic plate counts by 3.5 log CFU/100 cm2 and reduced Enterobacteriaceae counts by 4.3 log CFU/100 cm2. Water controls that matched the wash conditions of the ozonated and EO treatments reduced aerobic plate counts by only 0.5 and 1.0 log CFU/100 cm2, respectively, and each reduced Enterobacteriaceae counts by 0.9 log CFU/100 cm2. The prevalence of E. coli O157 on hides was reduced from 89 to 31% following treatment with ozonated water and from 82 to 35% following EO water treatment. Control wash treatments had no significant effect on the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7. These results demonstrate that ozonated and EO waters can be used to decontaminate hides during processing and may be viable treatments for significantly reducing pathogen loads on beef hides, thereby reducing pathogens on beef carcasses.

  14. MEASUREMENT AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work was to develop an analytical method to quantify these five iodo-acids (iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, (Z)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, and (E)-2-iodo-3-methylbutenedioic acid) in drinking water, measure their oc...

  15. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DBPS IN U. S. CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodo-acids were recently identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, (Z)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, and (E)-2-iodo-3...

  16. Removal of coagulant aluminum from water treatment residuals by acid.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Sugimoto, Mayo; Saka, Naoyuki; Nakai, Satoshi; Tanabe, Kazuyasu; Ito, Junki; Takenaka, Kenji; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2014-09-01

    Sediment sludge during coagulation and sedimentation in drinking water treatment is called "water treatment residuals (WTR)". Polyaluminum chloride (PAC) is mainly used as a coagulant in Japan. The recycling of WTR has been desired; one method for its reuse is as plowed soil. However, WTR reuse in this way is inhibited by the aluminum from the added PAC, because of its high adsorption capacity for phosphate and other fertilizer components. The removal of such aluminum from WTR would therefore be advantageous for its reuse as plowed soil; this research clarified the effect of acid washing on aluminum removal from WTR and on plant growth in the treated soil. The percentage of aluminum removal from raw WTR by sulphuric acid solution was around 90% at pH 3, the percentage decreasing to 40% in the case of a sun-dried sample. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity was decreased and the available phosphorus was increased by acid washing, with 90% of aluminum removal. The enhancement of Japanese mustard spinach growth and the increased in plant uptake of phosphates following acid washing were observed.

  17. Ice-like encapsulated water by two cholic acid moieties.

    PubMed

    Soto, Victor H; Alvarez, Mercedes; Meijide, Francisco; Trillo, Juan V; Antelo, Alvaro; Jover, Aida; Galantini, L; Tato, José Vázquez

    2012-10-01

    Starting from the structure of ice (in which each water molecule is surrounded by other four water molecules forming a tetrahedron with a value of 4.51Å for the edge O-O distance), and the knowledge that this value also corresponds to the O7-O12 distance of the skeleton of cholic acid, it is hypothesized that two steroid cholic acid moieties, with an appropriate steroid-steroid distance and a belly-to-belly orientation, could encapsulate a single water molecule between them. To check this hypothesis two succinyl derivatives of cholic acid (a monomer and the related head-head dimer in which the succinyl group is the linking bridge) were designed. The expected "ice-like" structure is found in the crystal of the dimer. There is a hydrogen bond synergy between those participating in the "ice-like" structure, and those in which the bridge is involved with the O7-H hydroxy group and the side chain of the steroid.

  18. Experimental and kinetic modelling studies on the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of the water hyacinth plant to levulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Girisuta, B; Danon, B; Manurung, R; Janssen, L P B M; Heeres, H J

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive experimental and modelling study on the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of the water hyacinth plant (Eichhornia crassipes) to optimise the yield of levulinic acid (LA) is reported (T=150-175 degrees CH2SO4 = 0.1-1M, water hyacinth intake=1-5wt%). At high acid concentrations (>0.5M), LA was the major organic acid whereas at low acid concentrations (<0.1M) and high initial intakes of water hyacinth, the formation of propionic acid instead of LA was favoured. The highest yield of LA was 53mol% (35wt%) based on the amount of C6-sugars in the water hyacinth (T=175 degrees CH2SO4 =1M , water hyacinth intake=1wt%). The LA yield as a function of the process conditions was modelled using a kinetic model originally developed for the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of cellulose and good agreement between the experimental and modelled data was obtained.

  19. Bigplate: an oblique angle explosive EOS test

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S; Avara, R; Fried, L; Janzen, J; McGuire, E; Souers, P C; Wu, B

    1998-04-16

    Bigplate is an advanced explosive equation of state (EOS) test. It consists of a point detonator driving a large disc (100 mm radius) of explosive, which pushes a 0.5 mm thick copper or tantalum plate. The plate is observed by a five-beam Fabry-Perot interferometer, which has beams at 0, 10, 20,40 and 80 mm on the plate. A short Fabry gives the jump-off to high accuracy; a long Fabry runs out to I0-15 microsec. A detailed error analysis is given, with the final velocity measurements considered good to ±0.066 mm/microsec. Jump-offs are measured to 0.01-0.02 microsec. Spall is seen in all shots, which creates a time delay on both the first and second velocity plateaus. A 0.1 microsec delay in jump-off of unknown origin is also seen at 80 mm. In order of decreasing explosive ideality, the explosives tired have been LX-14, LX-04 and LX-17. To partially negate the time delays, the data and code runs are overlaid at each radial position between the first and second plateaus. Traditional JWL's model LX-14 and LX-04 within accuracy, but not so for LX-17. The spall may be partly modeled using the pmin model but high resolution zoning is required. At longer times, spall does not appear to affect the explosive energetics. Because it includes diagonal zone crossing, Bigplate occupies a location between simple plate and cylinder tests and truly complex geometries. Hence, an EOS that fails Bigplate is not likely to move on to more complex issues. Bigplate is an excellent test bed for radically new EOS's, and the initial LX-17 runs done with Equilibrium and KINETIC CHEETAH are promising.

  20. Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An executive summary of a study on the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) was presented. It was concluded that the overall costs of space systems could be reduced significantly by the development of a modular shuttle compatible standard spacecraft, and the use of that spacecraft with the Shuttle Transportation System. It was also demonstrated that the development of the standard spacecraft is feasible, desirable, and cost effective if applied to a series of missions. The ability to initially retrieve, refurbish, and reuse the spacecraft and its payload, and ultimately to perform in-orbit servicing, would result in significant cost savings. A number of specific conclusions and recommendations were also suggested.

  1. EOS image data processing system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, J.; Honikman, T.; Mcmahon, E.; Miller, E.; Pietrzak, L.; Yorsz, W.

    1973-01-01

    The Image Processing System (IPS) requirements and configuration are defined for NASA-sponsored advanced technology Earth Observatory System (EOS). The scope included investigation and definition of IPS operational, functional, and product requirements considering overall system constraints and interfaces (sensor, etc.) The scope also included investigation of the technical feasibility and definition of a point design reflecting system requirements. The design phase required a survey of present and projected technology related to general and special-purpose processors, high-density digital tape recorders, and image recorders.

  2. Share Your Opinion With Other Eos Readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    2006-11-01

    Earlier this year, Robert Kitchen (Eos, 87(24), 235, 2006) drew attention to declining interest in Earth science education in public schools. The reason for a lack of interest in teaching Earth sciences in public schools may involve more than just the attitudes of parents who may wish for their children a better preparation for advanced placement courses later on. Part of the problem may lie with our present mind-set that technology can solve all the world's problems, from poverty, to better health, and to prosperity.

  3. Perfluorooctane sulphonate and perfluorooctanoic acid in drinking and environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Rumsby, Paul C; McLaughlin, Clare L; Hall, Tom

    2009-10-13

    Perfluorooctane sulphonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are chemicals that have been used for many years as surfactants in a variety of industrial and consumer products. Owing to their persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) characteristics, PFOS has been phased out by its principal producer and the use of PFOA has been reduced. This PBT potential and a number of pollution incidents have led in recent years to an increase in studies surveying the concentrations of PFOS and PFOA in environmental waters worldwide. This paper reviews the results of these studies, as well as the monitoring that was conducted after the pollution incidents. The results of surveys suggest that PFOS and PFOA are found in environmental waters worldwide at low levels. In general, these levels are below health-based values set by international authoritative bodies for drinking water. There have been limited measurements of these chemicals in drinking water, but again these are below health-based values, except in some cases following pollution incidents. Monitoring studies suggested that where PFOS and PFOA were detected, they were at similar levels in both source and drinking water, suggesting that drinking water treatment does not remove these chemicals. However, new data show that PFOS and PFOA are effectively removed by granular activated carbon absorbers in practice. Further research is required on the newer perfluorinated chemicals that appear to be safer, but their degradation products have not as yet been fully studied.

  4. The Role of Oxalic Acid in New Particle Formation from Methanesulfonic Acid, Methylamine, and Water.

    PubMed

    Arquero, Kristine D; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2017-02-21

    Atmospheric particles are notorious for their effects on human health and visibility and are known to influence climate. Though sulfuric acid and ammonia/amines are recognized as main contributors to new particle formation (NPF), models and observations have indicated that other species may be involved. It has been shown that nucleation from methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and amines, which is enhanced with added water, can also contribute to NPF. While organics are ubiquitous in air and likely to be involved in NPF by stabilizing small clusters for further growth, their effects on the MSA-amine system are not known. This work investigates the effect of oxalic acid (OxA) on NPF from the reaction of MSA and methylamine (MA) at 1 atm and 294 K in the presence and absence of water vapor using an aerosol flow reactor. OxA and MA do not efficiently form particles even in the presence of water, but NPF is enhanced when adding MSA to OxA-MA with and without water. The addition of OxA to MSA-MA mixtures yields a modest NPF enhancement, whereas the addition of OxA to MSA-MA-H2O has no effect. Possible reasons for these effects are discussed.

  5. P(DMS-co-EO)/P(EPI-co-EO) blend as a polymeric electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polo Fonseca, C.; Cezare, T. T.; Neves, S.

    A new polymer electrolyte comprising the blend of poly(dimethylsiloxane-co-ethylene oxide) (P(DMS-co-EO)), and poly(epichlorohydrin-co-ethylene oxide) (P(EPI-co-EO)), with different concentrations of LiClO 4 is described. The polymer electrolyte was prepared by a solution-cast technique. The electrochemical properties were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry techniques. The maximum ionic conductivity ( σ=1.2×10 -4 S cm -1) was obtained for the P(DMS-co-EO)/P(EPI-co-EO) 15/85 and 20/80 blends with 6 wt.% LiClO 4. These same films had a wide electrochemical stability, higher than 5 V at room temperature. A stable passive layer at the interface between the polymer electrolyte and lithium metal was formed within the first few days and maintained during the follow storage period. UV-Vis absorption spectra of the blends showed a transparent polymer electrolyte in the visible region.

  6. 78 FR 48845 - Hydrofluorosilicic Acid in Drinking Water; TSCA Section 21 Petition; Reasons for Agency Response

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Chapter I Hydrofluorosilicic Acid in Drinking Water; TSCA Section 21 Petition; Reasons for... to prohibit the use of hydrofluorosilicic acid (HFSA) as a water fluoridation agent. After careful... Regarding the Hydrofluorosilicic Acid (HFSA) in Drinking Water.'' May 9, 2013. 2. Hirzy, J.W.; Carton,...

  7. Determinants of cyanuric acid and melamine assembly in water.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mingming; Bong, Dennis

    2011-07-19

    While the recognition of cyanuric acid (CA) by melamine (M) and their derivatives has been known to occur in both water and organic solvents for some time, analysis of CA/M assembly in water has not been reported (Ranganathan, A.; Pedireddi, V. R.; Rao, C. N. R. J. Am. Chem. Soc.1999, 121, 1752-1753; Mathias, J. P.; Simanek, E. E.; Seto, C. T.; Whitesides, G. M. Macromol. Symp.1994, 77, 157-166; Zerkowski, J. A.; MacDonald, J. C.; Seto, C. T.; Wierda, D. A.; Whitesides, G. M. J. Am. Chem. Soc.1994, 116, 2382-2391; Mathias, J. P.; Seto, C. T.; Whitesides, G. M. Polym. Prepr.1993, 34, 92-93; Seto, C. T.; Whitesides, G. M. J. Am. Chem. Soc.1993, 115, 905-916; Zerkowski, J. A.; Seto, C. T.; Whitesides, G. M. J. Am. Chem. Soc.1992, 114, 5473-5475; Seto, C. T.; Whitesides, G. M. J. Am. Chem. Soc.1990, 112, 6409-6411; Wang, Y.; Wei, B.; Wang, Q. J. Chem. Cryst.1990, 20, 79-84; ten Cate, M. G. J.; Huskens, J.; Crego-Calama, M.; Reinhoudt, D. N. Chem.-Eur. J.2004, 10, 3632-3639). We have examined assembly of CA/M, as well as assembly of soluble trivalent CA and M derivatives (TCA/TM), in aqueous solvent, using a combination of solution phase NMR, isothermal titration and differential scanning calorimetry (ITC/DSC), cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and synthetic chemistry. While the parent heterocycles coprecipitate in water, the trivalent system displays more controlled and cooperative assembly that occurs at lower concentrations than the parent and yields a stable nanoparticle suspension. The assembly of both parent and trivalent systems is rigorously 1:1 and proceeds as an exothermic, proton-transfer coupled process in neutral pH water. Though CA and M are considered canonical hydrogen-bonding motifs in organic solvents, we find that their assembly in water is driven in large part by enthalpically favorable surface-area burial, similar to what is observed with nucleic acid recognition. There are currently few synthetic systems capable of robust molecular

  8. Metabolic regulation of amino acid uptake in marine waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchman, D.L.; Hodson, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    To determine the relationships among the processes of uptake, intracellular pool formation, and incorporation of amino acids into protein, the authors measured the uptake of dipeptides and free amino acids by bacterial assemblages in estuarine and coastal waters of the southeast US. The dipeptide phenylalanyl-phenylalanine (phe-phe) lowered V/sub max/ of phenylalanine uptake when the turnover rate of phenylalanine was relatively high. When the turnover rate was relatively low, phe-phe either had no effect or increased V/sub max/ of phenylalanine uptake. An analytical model was developed and tested to measure the turnover time of the intracellular pool of phenylalanine. The results suggested that the size of the intracellular pool is regulated, which precludes high assimilation rates of both phenylalanine and phe-phe. In waters with relatively low phenylalanine turnover rates, bacterial assemblages appear to have a greater capacity to assimilate phenylalanine and phe-phe simultaneously. Marine bacterial assemblages do not substantially increase the apparent respiration of amino acids when concentrations increase. The authors conclude that sustained increases in uptake rates and mineralization by marine bacterial assemblages in response to an increase in the concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen is determined by the rate of protein synthesis.

  9. Slow reactant-water exchange and high catalytic performance of water-tolerant Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Koito, Yusuke; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Hasegawa, Ryota; Kitano, Masaaki; Hara, Michikazu

    2014-06-23

    (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic measurement with trimethylphosphine oxide (TMPO) was applied to evaluate the Lewis acid catalysis of various metal triflates in water. The original (31)P NMR chemical shift and line width of TMPO is changed by the direct interaction of TMPO molecules with the Lewis acid sites of metal triflates. [Sc(OTf)3] and [In(OTf)3] had larger changes in (31)P chemical shift and line width by formation of the Lewis acid-TMPO complex than other metal triflates. It originates from the strong interaction between the Lewis acid and TMPO, which results in higher stability of [Sc(OTf)3TMPO] and [In(OTf)3TMPO] complexes than other metal triflate-TMPO complexes. The catalytic activities of [Sc(OTf)3] and [In(OTf)3] for Lewis acid-catalyzed reactions with carbonyl compounds in water were far superior to the other metal triflates, which indicates that the high stability of metal triflate-carbonyl compound complexes cause high catalytic performance for these reactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation suggests that low LUMO levels of [Sc(OTf)3] and [In(OTf)3] would be responsible for the formation of stable coordination intermediate with nucleophilic reactant in water.

  10. Realtime Decision Making on EO-1 Using Onboard Science Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Robert; Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stu

    2004-01-01

    Recent autonomy experiments conducted on Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) using the Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) flight software has been used to classify key features in hyperspectral images captured by EO-1. Furthermore, analysis is performed by this software onboard EO-1 and then used to modify the operational plan without interaction from the ground. This paper will outline the overall operations concept and provide some details and examples of the onboard science processing, science analysis, and replanning.

  11. Mammalian Cell Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of the Haloacetic Acids, A Major Class of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are formed during the disinfection of drinking water, wastewaters and recreational pool waters. Currently, five HAAs [bromoacetic acid (BAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), dichloroacetic ac...

  12. Thermal properties of phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membranes in water and methanol-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nores-Pondal, Federico J.; Buera, M. Pilar; Corti, Horacio R.

    The thermal properties of phosphoric acid-doped poly[2-2‧-(m-phenylene)-5-5‧ bi-benzimidazole] (PBI) and poly[2,5-benzimidazole] (ABPBI) membranes, ionomeric materials with promising properties to be used as electrolytes in direct methanol and in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique in the temperature range from -145 °C to 200 °C. The DSC scans of samples equilibrated in water at different relative humidities (RH) and in liquid water-methanol mixtures were analyzed in relation to glass transition, water crystallization/melting and solvent desorption in different temperature regions. The thermal relaxation observed in the very low temperature region could be ascribed to the glass transition of the H 3PO 4-H 2O mixture confined in the polymeric matrix. After cooling the samples up to -145 °C, frozen water was detected in PBI and ABPBI at different RH, although at 100% RH less amount of water had crystallized than that observed in Nafion membranes under the same conditions. Even more important is the fact that the freezing degree of water is much lower in ABPBI membranes equilibrated in liquid water-methanol mixtures than that observed for PBI and, in a previous study, for Nafion. Thus, apart from other well known properties, acid-doped ABPBI emerges as an excellent ionomer for applications in direct methanol fuel cells working in cold environments.

  13. DC diaphragm discharge in water solutions of selected organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhnankova, Edita J.; Hammer, Malte U.; Reuter, Stephan; Krcma, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Effect of four simple organic acids water solution on a DC diaphragm discharge was studied. Efficiency of the discharge was quantified by the hydrogen peroxide production determined by UV-VIS spectrometry of a H2O2 complex formed with specific titanium reagent. Automatic titration was used to study the pH behaviour after the plasma treatment. Optical emission spectroscopy overview spectra were recorded and detailed spectra of OH band and Hβ line were used to calculate the rotational temperature and comparison of the line profile (reflecting electron concentration) in the acid solutions. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  14. Disposal of acid gases with oilfield produced water

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, G.L.; Kopperson, D.; Horne, S.; Kohn, G.; Romansky, D.; Chan, C.

    1998-12-31

    With tightening environmental policies, many companies are investigating alternatives to atmospheric sulfur and greenhouse gas emissions. The oil and gas industry of Alberta, Canada typically recovers a high percentage of sulfur in large sour gas processing plants, but is often looking for a more cost effective approach to dealing with small volume plants. PanCanadian Petroleum Limited and DPH Engineering Inc. have developed a disposal scheme that makes low volume sour gas processing more affordable and easier to operate by disposing of acid gases in an aqueous phase to a disposal well. The development of this scheme utilized the results of reservoir studies, computer simulations, laboratory tests and field tests. This work has further resulted in the implementation of two full scale schemes to dissolve acid gas in produced water and inject it into deep subsurface formations. These schemes have operated with minimal problems and have met their environmental requirements.

  15. Inactivation of H1N1 viruses exposed to acidic ozone water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Lee, Kwang H.; Seong, Baik L.

    2009-10-01

    The inactivation of H1N1 viruses upon exposure to acidic ozone water was investigated using chicken allantoic fluids of different dilutions, pH values, and initial ozone concentrations. The inactivation effect of the acidic ozone water was found to be stronger than the inactivation effect of the ozone water combined with the degree of acidity, indicating a synergic effect of acidity on ozone decay in water. It is also shown that acidic ozone water with a pH value of 4 or less is very effective means of virus inactivation if provided in conjunction with an ozone concentration of 20 mg/l or higher.

  16. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts.

  17. The ASY-EOS Experiment at GSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Chartier, M.; Cozma, M. D.; De Filippo, E.; Le Fèvre, A.; Gannon, S.; Gašparić, I.; Kiš, M.; Kupny, S.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q.; Łukasik, J.; Marini, P.; Pawłowski, P.; Trautmann, W.; Acosta, L.; Adamczyk, M.; Al-Ajlan, A.; Al-Garawi, M.; Al-Homaidhi, S.; Amorini, F.; Auditore, L.; Aumann, T.; Ayyad, Y.; Baran, V.; Basrak, Z.; Bassini, R.; Benlliure, J.; Boiano, C.; Boisjoli, M.; Boretzky, K.; Brzychczyk, J.; Budzanowski, A.; Cardella, G.; Cammarata, P.; Chajecki, Z.; Chbihi, A.; Colonna, M.; Czech, B.; Di Toro, M.; Famiano, M.; Greco, V.; Grassi, L.; Guazzoni, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Heil, M.; Heilborn, L.; Introzzi, R.; Isobe, T.; Kezzar, K.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kurz, N.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Lasko, P.; Lombardo, I.; Lynch, W. G.; Matthews, Z.; May, L.; Minniti, T.; Mostazo, M.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Pleskac, R.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Reifarth, R.; Reisdorf, W.; Riccio, F.; Rizzo, F.; Rosato, E.; Rossi, D.; Santoro, S.; Simon, H.; Skwirczynska, I.; Sosin, Z.; Stuhl, L.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tsang, M. B.; Verde, G.; Veselsky, M.; Vigilante, M.; Wieloch, A.; Wigg, P.; Wolter, H. H.; Wu, P.; Yennello, S.; Zambon, P.; Zetta, L.; Zoric, M.

    2016-05-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons or light complex particles in reactions of heavy ions at pre-relativistic energies has been proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term of the nuclear equation of state at supra-saturation densities. In the ASY-EOS experiment at the GSI laboratory, flows of neutrons and light charged particles were measured for 197Au+197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon. Flow results obtained for the Au+Au system, in comparison with predictions of the UrQMD transport model, confirm the moderately soft to linear density dependence of the symmetry energy deduced from the earlier FOPI-LAND data.

  18. Pre-sedation and transport of Rhamdia quelen in water containing essential oil of Lippia alba: metabolic and physiological responses.

    PubMed

    Becker, Alexssandro G; Parodi, Thaylise V; Zeppenfeld, Carla C; Salbego, Joseânia; Cunha, Mauro A; Heldwein, Clarissa G; Loro, Vania L; Heinzmann, Berta M; Baldisserotto, Bernardo

    2016-02-01

    The effects of transporting silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) for 6 h in plastic bags containing 0 (control), 30 or 40 µL/L of essential oil (EO) from Lippia alba leaves were investigated. Prior to transport, the fish in the two experimental groups were sedated with 200 µL/L of EO for 3 min. After transport, dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, alkalinity, water hardness, pH, temperature and un-ionized ammonia levels in the transport water did not differ significantly among the groups. However, total ammonia nitrogen levels and net Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+) effluxes were significantly lower in the groups transported with EO of L. alba than those in the control group. PvO2, PvCO2 and HCO3(-) were higher after transporting fish in 40 µL/L of EO of L. alba, but there were no significant differences between groups regarding blood pH or hematocrit. Cortisol levels were significantly higher in fish transported in 30 µL/L of EO of L. alba compared to those of the control group. The metabolic parameters (glycogen, lactate, total amino acid, total ammonia and total protein) showed different responses after adding EO to the transport water. In conclusion, while the EO of L. alba is recommended for fish transport in the conditions tested in the present study because it was effective in reducing waterborne total ammonia levels and net ion loss, the higher hepatic oxidative stress in this species with the same EO concentrations reported by a previous study led us to conclude that the 10-20 µL/L concentration range of EO and lack of pre-sedation before transport are more effective.

  19. GDAL Enhancements for Interoperability with EOS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisdale, M.; Mathews, T. J.; Tisdale, B.; Sun, M.; Yang, C. P.; Lee, H.; Habermann, T.

    2015-12-01

    Historically, Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) data products have been difficult to consume by GIS tools, weather commercial or open-source. This has resulted in a reduced acceptance of these data products by GIS and general user communities. Common problems and challenges experienced by these data users include difficulty when: Consuming data products from NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) that pre-date modern application software with commercial and open-source geospatial tools; Identifying an initial approach for developing a framework and plug-ins that interpret non-compliant data; Defining a methodology that is extensible across NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), scientific communities, and GIS communities by enabling other data centers to construct their own plug-ins and adjust specific data products; and Promoting greater use of NASA Data and new analysis utilizing GIS tools. To address these challenges and to make EOS data products more accessible and interpretable by GIS applications, a collaborative approach has been taken that includes the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC), Esri, George Mason University (GMU), and the Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) Group to create a framework and plugins to be applied to Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). This framework and its plugins offer advantages of extensibility within NASA EOSDIS, permitting other data centers to construct their own plugins necessary to adjust their data products. In this session findings related to the framework and the development of GDAL plugins will be reviewed. Specifically, this session will offer a workshop to review documentation and training materials that have been generated for the purpose of guiding other NASA DAACs through the process of constructing plug-ins consistent with the framework as well as a review of the certification process by which the plugins can be independently verified as properly converting the

  20. EO system concepts in the littoral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwering, Piet B. W.; van den Broek, Sebastiaan P.; van Iersel, Miranda

    2007-04-01

    In recent years, operations executed by naval forces have taken place at many different locations. At present, operations against international terrorism and asymmetric warfare in coastal environments are of major concern. In these scenarios, the threat caused by pirates on-board of small surface targets, such as jetskis and fast inshore attack crafts, is increasing. In the littoral environment, the understanding of its complexity and the efficient use of the limited reaction time, are essential for successful operations. Present-day electro-optical sensor suites, also incorporating Infrared Search and Track systems, can be used for varying tasks as detection, classification and identification. By means of passive electro-optical systems, infrared and visible light sensors, improved situational awareness can be achieved. For long range capability, elevated sensor masts and flying platforms are ideally suited for the surveillance task and improve situational awareness. A primary issue is how to incorporate new electro-optical technology and signal processing into the new sensor concepts, to improve system performance. It is essential to derive accurate information from the high spatial-resolution imagery created by the EO sensors. As electro-optical sensors do not have all-weather capability, the performance degradation in adverse scenarios must be understood, in order to support the operational use of adaptive sensor management techniques. In this paper we discuss the approach taken at TNO in the design and assessment of system concepts for future IRST development. An overview of our maritime programme in future IRST and EO system concepts including signal processing is presented.

  1. Acidic deposition--ecological effects on surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, P.

    1989-01-01

    The acidification of soft water aquatic ecosystems, with consequent damage to the flora and fauna, is considered in this report. The evidence that environmental effects are ocurring is examined to see if a trend of increasing acidification can be related to changes in atmospheric deposition of sulphates and nitrates. Possible causes of change are considered, to clarify the contributions of variations in human activities and natural factors. It is concluded that acidic deposition, originating partly from emissions of sulphur and nitrogen compounds arising from man-made sources including combustion of fossil fuels, is causing acidification of surface waters in some areas of Europe and North America. There is proof that acidification of surface waters (to less than pH 6) is deleterious to many of the organisms whose habitat it forms. Acidified surface waters in some of the impacted areas are showing signs of recovery, where emissions of sulphur and nitrogen compounds from human activities are decreasing. There is some evidence that reversibility of acidification has started to occur, in some instances, about a decade after emissions were reduced. 219 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Analysis of carbonic acid in water samples by ion-exclusion chromatography with pure water as eluent.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Ding, Mingyu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Hu, Wenzhi

    2005-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid ion-exclusion chromatographic method for the simultaneous separation of carbonic acid and short chain organic acids (formic acid, acetic acid, and propionic acid) has been developed. A weakly acidic cation exchange resin column TSKgel OApak-A was used for the separation; pure water, owing to its lower background conductance, was employed as eluent in order to obtain high detection sensitivity. A good separation of these weak acids was achieved in 16 min. The linear range of the peak area calibration curve for carbonic acid was from 3.0 mg/L to 500 mg/L. The conductivity detection limit calculated at S/N = 3 was 0.084 mg/L for carbonic acid. The method developed in this work was successfully applied to the determination of carbonic acid in several environmental water samples without any pretreatment.

  3. Effects of Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water on Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus Spores in Suspension and on Carriers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunling; Li, Baoming; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh; Hung, Yen-Con

    2016-01-01

    Spores of some Bacillus species are responsible for food spoilage and foodborne disease. These spores are highly resistant to various interventions and cooking processes. In this study, the sporicidal efficacy of acidic electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water (AEW) and slightly acidic EO water (SAEW) with available chlorine concentration (ACC) of 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 mg/L and treatment time for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 min were tested on Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus spores in suspension and on carrier with or without organics. The reduction of spore significantly increased with increasing ACC and treatment time (P < 0.05). Nondetectable level of B. cereus spore in suspension occurred within 2 min after exposure to both EO waters containing 120 mg/L ACC, while only SAEW at 120 mg/L and 2 min treatment achieved >6 log reductions of B. subtilis spore. Both types of EO water with ACC of 60 mg/L and 6 min treatment achieved a reduction of B. subtilis and B. cereus spores to nondetectable level. EO water with ACC of 80 mg/L and treatment time of 3 min on carrier test without organics addition resulted in reductions of B. subtilis spore to nondetectable level. But, addition of 0.3% organics on carrier decreased the inactivation effect of EO water. This study indicated that EO water was highly effective in inactivation of B. subtilis and B. cereus spores in suspension or on carrier, and therefore, rendered it as a promising disinfectant to be applied in food industry.

  4. Supernova constraints on neutrino oscillation and EoS for proto-neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-05-02

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We here discuss how to determine the neutrino temperatures and propose a method to determine still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with isotopic ratios of the light elements discovered in presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show that our method suggests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  5. Analytic EoS and PTW strength model recommendation for Starck Ta

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, Sky K.; Prime, Michael B.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an analytic EoS and PTW strength model for Starck Ta that can be consistently used between different platforms and simulations at three labs. This should provide a consistent basis for comparison of the results of calculations, but not the best implementation for matching a wide variety of experimental data. Another version using SESAME tables should follow, which will provide a better physical representation over a broader range of conditions. The data sets available at the time only include one Hopkinson bar at a strain rate of 1800/s; a broader range of high-rate calibration data would be preferred. The resulting fit gives the PTW parameter p = 0. To avoid numerical issues, p = 0:001 has been used in FLAG. The PTW parameters that apply above the maximum strain rate in the data use the values from the original publication.

  6. Sulfidogenic fluidized bed treatment of real acid mine drainage water.

    PubMed

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Gunes, Fatih M; Ucar, Deniz; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of real acid mine drainage water (pH 2.7-4.3) containing sulfate (1.5-3.34 g/L) and various metals was studied in an ethanol-fed sulfate-reducing fluidized bed reactor at 35°C. The robustness of the process was tested by increasing stepwise sulfate, ethanol and metal loading rates and decreasing feed pH and hydraulic retention time. Highest sulfate reduction rate (4.6g/L day) was obtained with feed sulfate concentration of 2.5 g/L, COD/sulfate ratio of 0.85 and HRT of 12 h. The corresponding sulfate and COD removal efficiencies were about 90% and 80%, respectively. The alkalinity produced in sulfidogenic ethanol oxidation neutralized the acidic mine water. Highest metal precipitation efficiencies were observed at HRT of 24 h, the percent metal removal being over 99.9% for Al (initial concentration 55 mg/L), Co (9.0 mg/L), Cu (49 mg/L), Fe (435 mg/L), Ni (3.8 mg/L), Pb (7.5 mg/L) and Zn (6.6 mg/L), and 94% for Mn (7.21 mg/L).

  7. Superheated water extraction of glycyrrhizic acid from licorice root.

    PubMed

    Shabkhiz, Mohammad A; Eikani, Mohammad H; Bashiri Sadr, Zeinolabedin; Golmohammad, Fereshteh

    2016-11-01

    Superheated water extraction (SWE) has become an interesting green extraction method for different classes of compounds. In this study, SWE was used to extract glycyrrhizic acid (GA) from licorice root. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to evaluate and optimize the extraction conditions. The influence of operating conditions such as water temperature (100, 120 and 140°C) and solvent flow rates (1, 3 and 5mL/min) were investigated at 0.5mm mean particle size and 20bar pressure. Separation and identification of the glycyrrhizic acid, as the main component, was carried out by the RP-HPLC method. The best operating conditions for the SWE of licorice were determined to be 100°C temperature,15mL/min flow rate and 120min extraction time. The results showed that the amount of the obtained GA was relatively higher using SWE (54.760mg/g) than the Soxhlet method (28.760mg/g) and ultrasonic extraction (18.240mg/g).

  8. The influence of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and stream waters on a seasonal basis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Pippa J; Clark, Joanna M; Reynolds, Brian; Adamson, John K

    2008-01-01

    Much uncertainty still exists regarding the relative importance of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and surface waters. This paper contributes to this debate by presenting analysis of seasonal variations in atmospheric deposition, soil solution and stream water chemistry for two UK headwater catchments with contrasting soils. Acid neutralising capacity (ANC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and the Na:Cl ratio of soil and stream waters displayed strong seasonal patterns with little seasonal variation observed in soil water pH. These patterns, plus the strong relationships between ANC, Cl and DOC, suggest that cation exchange and seasonal changes in the production of DOC and seasalt deposition are driving a shift in the proportion of acidity attributable to strong acid anions, from atmospheric deposition, during winter to predominantly organic acids in summer.

  9. Hydrate sulfuric acid after sulfur implantation in water ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strazzulla, G.; Baratta, G. A.; Leto, G.; Gomis, O.

    2007-12-01

    For many years an ongoing research program performed at our laboratory has had the aim to investigate the implantation of reactive ions in ices relevant to planetology by using IR spectroscopy. We present new results obtained by implanting 200 keV sulfur ions into water ice at 80 K. We have looked at the formation of sulfur-bearing molecules such as sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. We find that hydrated sulfuric acid is formed with high yield ( 0.65±0.1 molecules/ion). An upper limit to the production yield of SO 2 ( Y⩽0.025 molecules/ion) has been estimated; no hydrogen sulfide has been detected. The formation of hydrogen peroxide is confirmed. Ozone is not detected. The results are discussed relevant to the inquiry on the radiolytic sulfur cycle considered responsible for the formation of sulfur-bearing molecules on the surfaces of the Galilean satellites. We demonstrate that sulfur implantation efficiently forms hydrated sulfuric acid whose observed abundance is explained as caused by an exogenic process. It is more difficult to say if the observed sulfur dioxide is quantitatively supported by only sulfur implantation; additional experimental studies are necessary along with direct observations, especially at UV wavelengths such as those that could be performed by instruments on board Hubble Space Telescope or by the forthcoming World Space Observatory (WSO/UV).

  10. Anharmonic effect on the equation of state (EoS) for NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumita, Tatsuya; Yoneda, Akira

    2014-02-01

    We find clear intrinsic anharmonicity in the NaCl-B1 phase by examining the equation of state (EoS) based on previous ultrasonic velocity data for pressures up to 0.8 GPa and temperatures up to 800 K. The experimental EoS for this phase shows that its specific heat at constant volume ( C V ) is significantly smaller than that based on a harmonic model. Also, the sign of which is normally negative in the quasi-harmonic approximation, is unexpectedly positive. The thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter ( γ), which has frequently been assumed to be a single-variable function of molar volume, shows not only volume dependence but also negative temperature dependence. To understand these features of C V and γ, we introduce a thermodynamic model including positive quartic anharmonicity. To make an anharmonic model advancing the ordinarily quasi-harmonic approximation model, we introduce two parameters: anharmonic characteristic temperature ( θ a ) and its volume derivative. In the anharmonic model, the value of C V is calculated along an isochore using classical statistical mechanics and a harmonic quantum correction. At high temperatures, the decrease in C V from the Dulong-Petit limit is related to the value of T/ θ a . For infinitely large θ a , the system is approximately quasi-harmonic. The temperature dependence of γ is related to C V by the thermodynamic identity Even though our modification of the quasi-harmonic approximation is simple, our anharmonic model succeeds in reproducing the experimental γ and C V simultaneously for the NaCl-B1 phase.

  11. di-EOS - "distributed EOS": Initial experience with split-site persistency in a production service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, A. J.; Mascetti, L.; Iven, J.; Espinal Curull, X.

    2014-06-01

    In order to accommodate growing demand for storage and computing capacity from the LHC experiments, in 2012 CERN tendered for a remote computer centre. The potential negative performance implications of the geographical distance (aka network latency) within the same "site" and storage service on physics computing have been investigated. Overall impact should be acceptable, but for some access patterns might be significant. Recent EOS changes should help to mitigate the effects, but experiments may need to adjust their job parameters.

  12. Effect of Gallic acid on mechanical and water barrier properties of zein-oleic acid composite films.

    PubMed

    Masamba, Kingsley; Li, Yue; Hategekimana, Joseph; Liu, Fei; Ma, Jianguo; Zhong, Fang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the effect of gallic acid on mechanical and water barrier properties of zein-oleic acid 0-4 % composite films was investigated. Molecular weight distribution analysis was carried out to confirm gallic acid induced cross linking through change in molecular weight in fraction containing zein proteins. Results revealed that gallic acid treatment increased tensile strength from 17.9 MPa to 26.0 MPa, decreased water vapour permeability from 0.60 (g mm m(-2) h(-1) kPa(-1)) to 0.41 (g mm m(-2) h(-1) kPa(-1)), increased solubility from 6.3 % to 10.2 % and marginally increased elongation at break from 3.7 % to 4.2 % in zein films only. However, gallic acid treatment in zein-oleic composite films did not significantly influence mechanical and water barrier properties and in most instances irrespective of oleic acid concentration, the properties were negatively affected. Results from scanning electron microscopy showed that both gallic acid treated and untreated zein films and composite films containing 3 % oleic acid had a compact and homogeneous structure while those containing 4 % oleic acid had inhomogeneous structure. The findings have demonstrated that gallic acid treatment can significantly improve mechanical and water barrier properties especially in zein films only as opposed to when used in composite films using zein and oleic acid.

  13. The development of the EOS data and information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Thomas D.; Ramapriyan, H. K.; Dozier, Jeffrey C.

    1991-01-01

    The architecture of the Earth Observing System (EOS), a major component of NASA's contribution to the U.S. Global Change Research Program, is described with emphasis on its development strategy. It is noted that the EOS is comprised of a scientific research program, a space measurement system, and an EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Details are presented concerning the EOS program and its candidate instruments. Major components of EOS include Version 0 (V0) built on existing Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), the EOSDIS core system (ECS), DAAC-unique functions, science computing facilities (SCF), and independent verification validation of the ECS. Requirements for EODIS are also reviewed noting that, among other requirements, it must keep up with an orbital average data rate of more than 30 Mbps as well as store, distribute, and manage information about tens of Petabytes of data during and after the 15-year mission.

  14. Organic acids in cloud water and rainwater at a mountain site in acid rain areas of South China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Wang, Yan; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Xueqiao; Sun, Lei; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the chemical characteristics of organic acids and to identify their source, cloud water and rainwater samples were collected at Mount Lu, a mountain site located in the acid rain-affected area of south China, from August to September of 2011 and March to May of 2012. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentration of organic acids in cloud water was 38.42 μeq/L, ranging from 7.45 to 111.46 μeq/L, contributing to 2.50 % of acidity. In rainwater samples, organic acid concentrations varied from 12.39 to 68.97 μeq/L (VWM of 33.39 μeq/L). Organic acids contributed significant acidity to rainwater, with a value of 17.66 %. Formic acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid were the most common organic acids in both cloud water and rainwater. Organic acids had an obviously higher concentration in summer than in spring in cloud water, whereas there was much less discrimination in rainwater between the two seasons. The contribution of organic acids to acidity was lower during summer than during spring in both cloud water (2.20 % in summer vs 2.83 % in spring) and rainwater (12.24 % in summer vs 19.89 % in spring). The formic-to-acetic acid ratio (F/A) showed that organic acids were dominated by primary emissions in 71.31 % of the cloud water samples and whole rainwater samples. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis determined four factors as the sources of organic acids in cloud water, including biogenic emissions (61.8 %), anthropogenic emissions (15.28 %), marine emissions (15.07 %) and soil emissions (7.85 %). The findings from this study imply an indispensable role of organic acids in wet deposition, but organic acids may have a limited capacity to increase ecological risks in local environments.

  15. 76 FR 7106 - Food Additives Permitted in Feed and Drinking Water of Animals; Formic Acid

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Drinking Water of Animals; Formic Acid AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule... in feed and drinking water of animals to provide for the safe use of formic acid as an acidifying... safe use of formic acid as an acidifying agent at levels not to exceed 1.2 percent in swine feed....

  16. EOS ground data systems: A description and interface overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gene

    1993-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is planned as a space-based measurement system, earth-science research program, and data and information system (EOSDIS). It will consist of several high data rate spacecraft with multiple earth sensing instruments which provide investigators with a thorough, longterm view of the earth's environment. Up to seven spacecraft may be supported at once, either in operational, checkout, or testing phases; and the average data rate from the EOS satellites in orbit at any one time is expected to be from 18 to 60 Mbps. Providing the data processing and flight operations support for EOS will be the EOSDIS Core System (ECS). The ECS will command and control the spacecraft; process and store the EOS data; provide access to the data for years; and support researchers. The data processing aspects of the ECS consist of a collection of Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC's) which perform the product generation, data archive and distribution, and information management services. Flight operations aspects will be provided by the EOS Operations Center, by instrument control centers, and by widely distributed instrument support terminals. The communications and system management aspects will be provided by the EOSDIS Science Network and the System Management Center. In addition to the EOS satellite data, other data sets from earlier earth science missions are also to be added to designated DAAC's. Other ground data systems which will provide support to EOS for acquiring, transporting, processing, and distributing the transformed spacecraft data are currently being defined or are being upgraded for the EOS era. These systems include the Space Network consisting of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), the TDRSS Ground Terminals, and the Network Control Center as well as the night Dynamics Facility, the EOS Data and Operations System, and EOS Communications. This paper briefly describes data handling by the ECS, the support data

  17. EOS Data Products Latency and Reprocessing Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Wanchoo, L.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) program has been processing, archiving, and distributing EOS data since the launch of Terra platform in 1999. The EOSDIS Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) and Science-Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPSs) are generating over 5000 unique products with a daily average volume of 1.7 Petabytes. Initially EOSDIS had requirements to make process data products within 24 hours of receiving all inputs needed for generating them. Thus, generally, the latency would be slightly over 24 and 48 hours after satellite data acquisition, respectively, for Level 1 and Level 2 products. Due to budgetary constraints these requirements were relaxed, with the requirement being to avoid a growing backlog of unprocessed data. However, the data providers have been generating these products in as timely a manner as possible. The reduction in costs of computing hardware has helped considerably. It is of interest to analyze the actual latencies achieved over the past several years in processing and inserting the data products into the EOSDIS archives for the users to support various scientific studies such as land processes, oceanography, hydrology, atmospheric science, cryospheric science, etc. The instrument science teams have continuously evaluated the data products since the launches of EOS satellites and improved the science algorithms to provide high quality products. Data providers have periodically reprocessed the previously acquired data with these improved algorithms. The reprocessing campaigns run for an extended time period in parallel with forward processing, since all data starting from the beginning of the mission need to be reprocessed. Each reprocessing activity involves more data than the previous reprocessing. The historical record of the reprocessing times would be of interest to future missions, especially those involving large volumes of data and/or computational loads due to

  18. Arachidonic Acid and Eicosapentaenoic Acid Metabolism in Juvenile Atlantic Salmon as Affected by Water Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Norambuena, Fernando; Morais, Sofia; Emery, James A.; Turchini, Giovanni M.

    2015-01-01

    Salmons raised in aquaculture farms around the world are increasingly subjected to sub-optimal environmental conditions, such as high water temperatures during summer seasons. Aerobic scope increases and lipid metabolism changes are known plasticity responses of fish for a better acclimation to high water temperature. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of high water temperature on the regulation of fatty acid metabolism in juvenile Atlantic salmon fed different dietary ARA/EPA ratios (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6/ eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3), with particular focus on apparent in vivo enzyme activities and gene expression of lipid metabolism pathways. Three experimental diets were formulated to be identical, except for the ratio EPA/ARA, and fed to triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) kept either at 10°C or 20°C. Results showed that fatty acid metabolic utilisation, and likely also their dietary requirements for optimal performance, can be affected by changes in their relative levels and by environmental temperature in Atlantic salmon. Thus, the increase in temperature, independently from dietary treatment, had a significant effect on the β-oxidation of a fatty acid including EPA, as observed by the apparent in vivo enzyme activity and mRNA expression of pparα -transcription factor in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation genes- and cpt1 -key enzyme responsible for the movement of LC-PUFA from the cytosol into the mitochondria for β-oxidation-, were both increased at the higher water temperature. An interesting interaction was observed in the transcription and in vivo enzyme activity of Δ5fad–time-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis pathway of EPA and ARA. Such, at lower temperature, the highest mRNA expression and enzyme activity was recorded in fish with limited supply of dietary EPA, whereas at higher temperature these were recorded in fish with limited ARA supply. In consideration that fish at higher water temperature

  19. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EE) or (EoE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the esophagus. One example is acid reflux . Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medications that help reduce ... other conditions caused by too much stomach acid. Proton-pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia or PPI-REE ...

  20. Engineering crassulacean acid metabolism to improve water-use efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Anne M.; Hartwell, James; Weston, David J.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Climatic extremes threaten agricultural sustainability worldwide. One approach to increase plant water-use efficiency is to introduce crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) into C3 crops. Such a task requires comprehensive systems-level understanding of the enzymatic and regulatory pathways underpinning this temporal CO2 pump. Here, we review the progress that has been made in achieving this goal. Given that CAM arose through multiple independent evolutionary origins, comparative transcriptomics and genomics of taxonomically diverse CAM species are being used to define the genetic ‘parts list’ required to operate the core CAM functional modules of nocturnal carboxylation, daytime decarboxylation, and inverse stomatal regulation. Engineered CAM offers the potential to sustain plant productivity for food, feed, fiber, and biofuel production in hotter and drier climates. PMID:24559590

  1. Engineering crassulacean acid metabolism to improve water-use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Borland, Anne M; Hartwell, James; Weston, David J; Schlauch, Karen A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C

    2014-05-01

    Climatic extremes threaten agricultural sustainability worldwide. One approach to increase plant water-use efficiency (WUE) is to introduce crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) into C3 crops. Such a task requires comprehensive systems-level understanding of the enzymatic and regulatory pathways underpinning this temporal CO2 pump. Here we review the progress that has been made in achieving this goal. Given that CAM arose through multiple independent evolutionary origins, comparative transcriptomics and genomics of taxonomically diverse CAM species are being used to define the genetic 'parts list' required to operate the core CAM functional modules of nocturnal carboxylation, diurnal decarboxylation, and inverse stomatal regulation. Engineered CAM offers the potential to sustain plant productivity for food, feed, fiber, and biofuel production in hotter and drier climates.

  2. Shear rigidity of spread stearic acid monolayers on water

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.M.; Ketterson, J.B.; Miyano, K.; Kueny, A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of Al/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and of pH on the two-dimensional shear modulus of stearic acid spread on a water substrate was determined. A large shear modulus was displayed by the films when the subphase contained Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ ions at the self buffered pH. With Fe/sup 3 +/ dissolved in the subphase, the film displayed a viscous relaxation when strained but no residual stress was observed. No effect was observed with the Ca/sup 2 +/ or Mg/sup 2 +/. Reducing the pH value in the subphase with the trivalent ions caused the shear modulus to disappear. The observations are interpreted in terms of hydrogen bonding.

  3. [Study advance on haloacetic acids in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Ye, Bi-Xiong; Wang, Wu-Yi; Yang, Lin-Sheng; Wang, Yong-Hua

    2006-05-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) in drinking water have attracted more and more attention of researchers due to their higher potential combination of chlorine, their carcinogenic and mutagenic effects and higher carcinogenic. The formation mechanism, analytical methods, the effects of many factors on HAAs formation such as precursor types, chlorine doses, pH, temperature, bromide, reaction time and seasonal change, toxicological character and the minimizing technology of HAAs in resent studies about HAAs are discussed in details in this paper. Further researches are still needed to clarify the formation mechanism of HAAs and find a feasible minimizing technology. New concerns including toxicological characters that correlate with human and other HAAs exposure routes besides oral ingestion (i.e., inhalation and dermal adsorption) should be put forward.

  4. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DBPS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  5. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo- prope...

  6. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo...

  7. Study on the kinetics and transformation products of salicylic acid in water via ozonation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruikang; Zhang, Lifeng; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-06-01

    As salicylic acid is one of widely used pharmaceuticals, its residue has been found in various environmental water systems e.g. wastewater, surface water, treated water and drinking water. It has been reported that salicylic acid can be efficiently removed by advanced oxidation processes, but there are few studies on its transformation products and ozonation mechanisms during ozonation process. The objective of this study is to characterize the transformation products, investigate the degradation mechanisms at different pH, and propose the ozonation pathways of salicylic acid. The results showed that the rate of degradation was about 10 times higher at acidic condition than that at alkaline condition in the first 1 min when 1 mg L(-1) of ozone solution was added into 1 mg L(-1) of salicylic acid solution. It was proposed that ozone direct oxidation mechanism dominates at acidic condition, while indirect OH radical mechanism dominates at alkaline condition. A two stages pseudo-first order reaction was proposed at different pH conditions. Various hydroxylation products, carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acids, such as 2,5-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, catechol, formaldehyde, glyoxal, acetaldehyde, maleic acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid etc. were identified as ozonation transformation products. In addition, acrylic acid was identified, for the first time, as ozonation transformation products through high resolution liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometer. The information demonstrated in this study will help us to better understand the possible effects of ozonation products on the water quality. The degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed. As both O3 and OH radical were important in the reactions, the degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed at acidic and basic conditions. To our knowledge, there was no integrated study reported on the ozonation of

  8. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids: A new class of organic micropollutants in the water cycle.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Daniel; Frömel, Tobias; Knepper, Thomas P

    2016-09-15

    Mobile and persistent organic micropollutants may impact raw and drinking waters and are thus of concern for human health. To identify such possible substances of concern nineteen water samples from five European countries (France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Spain and Germany) and different compartments of the water cycle (urban effluent, surface water, ground water and drinking water) were enriched with mixed-mode solid phase extraction. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry non-target screening of these samples led to the detection and structural elucidation of seven novel organic micropollutants. One structure could already be confirmed by a reference standard (trifluoromethanesulfonic acid) and six were tentatively identified based on experimental evidence (chloromethanesulfonic acid, dichloromethanesulfonic acid, trichloromethanesulfonic acid, bromomethanesulfonic acid, dibromomethanesulfonic acid and bromochloromethanesulfonic acid). Approximated concentrations for these substances show that trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, a chemical registered under the European Union regulation REACH with a production volume of more than 100 t/a, is able to spread along the water cycle and may be present in concentrations up to the μg/L range. Chlorinated and brominated methanesulfonic acids were predominantly detected together which indicates a common source and first experimental evidence points towards water disinfection as a potential origin. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids were detected in drinking waters and thus may be new substances of concern.

  9. Effect of water hardness on the production and microbicidal efficacy of slightly acidic electrolyzed water.

    PubMed

    Forghani, Fereidoun; Park, Joong-Hyun; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    Slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) has been proved as an effective sanitizer against microorganisms attached to foods. However, its physical properties and inactivation efficacy are affected by several factors such as water hardness. Therefore, in this study the effect of water hardness on SAEW properties were studied. Pure cultures of foodborne bacteria were used in vitro and in vivo to evaluate the inactivation efficacy of the SAEWs produced. Results obtained showed water hardness to be an important factor in the production of SAEW. Low water hardness may result in the necessity of further optimization of production process. In this study the addition of 5% HCl and 2 M NaCl at 1.5 mL/min flow rate was found to be the best electrolyte concentration for the optimization of SAEW production from low hardness water (34 ± 2 mg/L). Furthermore, the results showed that pre-heating was a better approach compared to post-production heating of SAEW, resulting in higher ACC values and therefor better sanitization efficacy.

  10. Integrating new Storage Technologies into EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andreas J.; van der Ster, Dan C.; Rocha, Joaquim; Lensing, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The EOS[1] storage software was designed to cover CERN disk-only storage use cases in the medium-term trading scalability against latency. To cover and prepare for long-term requirements the CERN IT data and storage services group (DSS) is actively conducting R&D and open source contributions to experiment with a next generation storage software based on CEPH[3] and ethernet enabled disk drives. CEPH provides a scale-out object storage system RADOS and additionally various optional high-level services like S3 gateway, RADOS block devices and a POSIX compliant file system CephFS. The acquisition of CEPH by Redhat underlines the promising role of CEPH as the open source storage platform of the future. CERN IT is running a CEPH service in the context of OpenStack on a moderate scale of 1 PB replicated storage. Building a 100+PB storage system based on CEPH will require software and hardware tuning. It is of capital importance to demonstrate the feasibility and possibly iron out bottlenecks and blocking issues beforehand. The main idea behind this R&D is to leverage and contribute to existing building blocks in the CEPH storage stack and implement a few CERN specific requirements in a thin, customisable storage layer. A second research topic is the integration of ethernet enabled disks. This paper introduces various ongoing open source developments, their status and applicability.

  11. A COTS-MQS shipborne EO/IR imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Mark A.; Miller, John L.; Weaver, James

    2005-05-01

    The Sea Star SAFIRE is a commercially developed, off the shelf, military qualified system (COTS-MQS) consisting of a 640 by 480 InSb infrared imager, laser rangefinder and visible imager in a gyro-stabilized platform designed for shipborne applications. These applications include search and rescue, surveillance, fire control, fisheries patrol, harbor security, and own-vessel perimeter security and self protection. Particularly challenging considerations unique to shipborne systems include the demanding environment conditions, man-machine interfaces, and effects of atmospheric conditions on sensor performance. Shipborne environmental conditions requiring special attention include electromagnetic fields, as well as resistance to rain, ice and snow, shock, vibration, and salt. Features have been implemented to withstand exposure to water and high humidity; anti-ice/de-ice capability for exposure to snow and ice; wash/wipe of external windows; corrosion resistance for exposure to water and salt spray. A variety of system controller configurations provide man-machine interfaces suitable for operation on ships. EO sensor developments that address areas of haze penetration, glint, and scintillation will be presented.

  12. Alicyclobacillus fodiniaquatilis sp. nov., isolated from acid mine water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wu, Yu-Fan; Song, Jin-Long; Huang, Zhong-Sheng; Wang, Bao-Jun; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Jiang, Cheng-Ying

    2015-12-01

    Two novel, Gram-stain-variable, moderately thermophilic, acidophilic, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacteria, G45-16T and G45-17, were isolated from acid mine water of Zijin copper mine in Fujian Province, China. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that they were closely related to Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris ATCC 49025T with sequence similarities of 96.8 %. Cells grew aerobically at 20-45 °C (optimum, 40 °C), at pH 2.5-5.5(optimum, pH 3.5) and in the presence of 0-4.0 % (w/v) NaCl. Strains contained MK-7 as the major menaquinone and the major cellular fatty acids were ω-cyclohexane C19 : 0 and ω-cyclohexane C17 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 51.3 and 49.8 mol% (Tm) for G45-16T and G45-17, respectively. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic comparisons with their relatives and DNA-DNA relatedness values, it is concluded that strains G45-16T and G45-17 represent a novel species within the genus Alicyclobacillus, for which the name Alicyclobacillus fodiniaquatilis sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is G45-16T(=CGMCC 1.15049T=NBRC 111483T).

  13. Neurotoxicity produced by dibromoacetic acid in drinking water of rats.

    PubMed

    Moser, V C; Phillips, P M; Levine, A B; McDaniel, K L; Sills, R C; Jortner, B S; Butt, M T

    2004-05-01

    An evaluation of potential adverse human health effects of disinfection byproducts requires study of both cancer and noncancer endpoints; however, no studies have evaluated the neurotoxic potential of a common haloacetic acid, dibromoacetic acid (DBA). This study characterized the neurotoxicity of DBA during 6-month exposure in the drinking water of rats. Adolescent male and female Fischer 344 rats were administered DBA at 0, 0.2, 0.6, and 1.5 g/l. On a mg/kg/day basis, the consumed dosages decreased greatly over the exposure period, with average intakes of 0, 20, 72, and 161 mg/kg/day. Weight gain was depressed in the high-concentration group, and concentration-related diarrhea and hair loss were observed early in exposure. Testing with a functional observational battery and motor activity took place before dosing and at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months. DBA produced concentration-related neuromuscular toxicity (mid and high concentrations) characterized by limb weakness, mild gait abnormalities, and hypotonia, as well as sensorimotor depression (all concentrations), with decreased responses to a tail-pinch and click. Other signs of toxicity at the highest concentration included decreased activity and chest clasping. Neurotoxicity was evident as early as one month, but did not progress with continued exposure. The major neuropathological finding was degeneration of spinal cord nerve fibers (mid and high concentrations). Cellular vacuolization in spinal cord gray matter (mostly) and in white matter (occasionally) tracts was also observed. No treatment-related changes were seen in brain, eyes, peripheral nerves, or peripheral ganglia. The lowest-observable effect level for neurobehavioral changes was 20 mg/kg/day (produced by 0.2 g/l, lowest concentration tested), whereas this dosage was a no-effect level for neuropathological changes. These studies suggest that neurotoxicity should be considered in the overall hazard evaluation of haloacetic acids.

  14. EOS7CA Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Gas Migration in Shallow Subsurface Porous Media Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2015-06-22

    EOS7CA is a TOUGH2 module for mixtures of a non-condensible gas (NCG) and air (with or without a gas tracer), an aqueous phase, and water vapor. The user can select the NCG as being CO2, N2, or CH4. EOS7CA uses a cubic equation of state with a multiphase version of Darcy’s Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to shallow subsurface porous media systems. The limitation to shallow systems arises from the use of Henry’s Law for gas solubility which is appropriate for low pressures but begins to over-predict solubility starting at pressures greater than approximately 1 MPa (10 bar). The components modeled in EOS7CA are water, brine, NCG, gas tracer, air, and optional heat.

  15. Amino Acid and Protein Metabolism in Bermuda Grass During Water Stress 12

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, N. M.; Naylor, A. W.

    1966-01-01

    The ability of Arizona Common and Coastal Bermuda grass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] to synthesize amino acids and proteins during water stress was investigated. Amino acids were continually synthesized during the water stress treatments, but protein synthesis was inhibited and protein levels decreased. Water stress induced a 10- to 100-fold accumulation of free proline in shoots and a 2- to 6-fold accumulation of free asparagine, both of which are characteristic responses of water-stressed plants. Valine levels increased, and glutamic acid and alanine levels decreased. 14C labeling experiments showed that free proline turns over more slowly than any other free amino acid during water stress. This proline is readily synthesized and accumulated from glutamic acid. It is suggested that during water stress free proline functions as a storage compound. No significant differences were found in the amino acid and protein metabolism of the 2 varieties of Bermuda grass. PMID:16656387

  16. 76 FR 15859 - Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... Chapters 5 and 61 Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review under E.O. 13563 AGENCY: Office of... Executive Order (EO) 13563, ``Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review.'' E.O. 132563 was signed...

  17. 76 FR 15224 - Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Labor. ACTION...: E.O. 13653, 76 FR 3821, Jan. 21, 2011; E.O. 12866, 58 FR 51735, Oct. 4, 1993. Dated: March 15,...

  18. 76 FR 18104 - Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Labor. ACTION...: E.O. 13653, 76 FR 3821, Jan. 21, 2011; E.O. 12866, 58 FR 51735, Oct. 4, 1993. William E....

  19. The coagulation characteristics of humic acid by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and chitosan coagulant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Wu, Chung-Yu; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a potential substitute for traditional aluminium salts in water treatment systems. This study compared the characteristics of humic acid (HA) removal by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and coagulant mixtures of chitosan with aluminium sulphate (alum) or polyaluminium chloride (PACl). In addition, we evaluated their respective coagulation efficiencies at various coagulant concentrations, pH values, turbidities, and hardness levels. Furthermore, we determined the size and settling velocity of flocs formed by these coagulants to identify the major factors affecting HA coagulation. The coagulation efficiency of acid- and water-soluble chitosan for 15 mg/l of HA was 74.4% and 87.5%, respectively. The optimal coagulation range of water-soluble chitosan (9-20 mg/l) was broader than that of acid-soluble chitosan (4-8 mg/l). Notably, acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum coagulant mixtures exhibited a higher coagulation efficiency for HA than for PACl or alum alone. Furthermore, these coagulant mixtures yielded an acceptable floc settling velocity and savings in both installation and operational expenses. Based on these results, we confidently assert that coagulant mixtures with a 1:1 mass ratio of acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum provide a substantially more cost-effective alternative to using chitosan alone for removing HA from water.

  20. Water-enhanced solubility of carboxylic acids in organic solvents and its applications to extraction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, J.N.; King, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    The solubilities of carboxylic acids in certain organic solvents increase remarkably with an increasing amount of water in the organic phase. This phenomenon leads to a novel extract regeneration process in which the co-extracted water is selectively removed from an extract, and the carboxylic acid precipitates. This approach is potentially advantageous compared to other regeneration processes because it removes a minor component of the extract in order to achieve a large recovery of acid from the extract. Carboxylic acids of interest include adipic acid, fumaric acid, and succinic acid because of their low to moderate solubilities in organic solvents. Solvents were screened for an increase in acid solubility with increased water concentration in the organic phase. Most Lewis-base solvents were found to exhibit this increased solubility phenomena. Solvents that have a carbonyl functional group showed a very large increase in acid solubility. 71 refs., 52 figs., 38 tabs.

  1. Effect of Periodic Water Addition on Citric Acid Production in Solid State Fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utpat, Shraddha S.; Kinnige, Pallavi T.; Dhamole, Pradip B.

    2013-09-01

    Water addition is one of the methods used to control the moisture loss in solid state fermentation (SSF). However, none of the studies report the timing of water addition and amount of water to be added in SSF. Therefore, this work was undertaken with an objective to evaluate the performance of periodic water addition on citric acid production in SSF. Experiments were conducted at different moistures (50-80 %) and temperatures (30-40 °C) to simulate the conditions in a fermenter. Citric acid production by Aspergillus niger (ATCC 9029) using sugarcane baggase was chosen as a model system. Based on the moisture profile, citric acid and sugar data, a strategy was designed for periodic addition of water. Water addition at 48, 96, 144 and 192 h enhanced the citric acid production by 62 % whereas water addition at 72, 120, and 168 h increased the citric acid production by just 17 %.

  2. Applications of the EOS SAR to monitoring global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schier, Marguerite; Way, Jobea; Holt, Benjamin

    1991-01-01

    The SAR employed by NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is a multifrequency multipolarization radar which can conduct global monitoring of geophysical and biophysical parameters. The present discussion of the EOS SAR's role in global monitoring emphasizes geophysical product variables applicable to global hydrologic, biogeochemical, and energy cycle models. EOS SAR products encompass biomass, wetland areas, and phenologic and environmental states, in the field of ecosystem dynamics; soil moisture, snow moisture and extent, and glacier and ice sheet extent and velocity, in hydrologic cycle studies; surface-wave fields and sea ice properties, in ocean/atmosphere circulation; and the topography, erosion, and land forms of the solid earth.

  3. Eos, Koronis, and Maria Family Asteroids: Infrared (JHK) Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Owensby, Pamela D.; Gradie, Jonathan C.; Bell, Jeffrey F.; Tedesco, Edward F.

    1995-01-01

    Infrared photometry at 1.2, 1.6, and 2.2 micrometer (JHK) is reported for 56 asteroids in the Eos, Koronis and, Maria dynamical families. These data are consistent with similar surface composition for all of the asteroids of each family. The infrared colors within each family cluster in the region observed for the S taxonomic class, but Eos asteroids may belong to a separable K class. Asteroid 243 Ida, which was observed by the Galileo spacecraft, is a typical member of the Koronis family. The average infrared colors of the Maria family are slightly redder than those of the Eos and Koronis families.

  4. EOS production on the Space Station. [Electrophoresis Operations/Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, F. C.; Gleason, M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses a conceptual integration of the equipment for EOS (Electrophoresis Operations/Space) on the Space Station in the early 1990s. Electrophoresis is a fluid-constituent separation technique which uses forces created by an electrical field. Aspects covered include EOS equipment and operations, and Space Station installations involving a pressurized module, a resupply module, utility provisions and umbilicals and crew involvement. Accommodation feasibility is generally established, and interfaces are defined. Space Station production of EOS-derived pharmaceuticals will constitute a significant increase in capability compared to precursor flights on the Shuttle in the 1980s.

  5. PROPERTIES OF MONOLAYERS OF OMEGAMONOHALOGENATED FATTY ACIDS AND ALCOHOLS ABSORBED ON WATER.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FATTY ACIDS , *ALCOHOLS, MONOMOLECULAR FILMS, MONOMOLECULAR FILMS, HALOGENS, CHLORINE COMPOUNDS, FLUORINE COMPOUNDS, IODINE COMPOUNDS, SURFACE PROPERTIES, SURFACES, DIPOLE MOMENTS, IONS, PH FACTOR, WATER, ADSORPTION.

  6. EOS-AM1 Nickel Hydrogen Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles W.; Keys, Denney J.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Wannemacher, Hari E.; Vaidyanathan, Harry

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports the interim results of the Earth Observing System AM-1 project (EOS-AM-1) nickel hydrogen cell life test being conducted under contract to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) at the Lockheed Martin Missile and Space (LMMS) facility in East Windsor, NJ; and at COMSAT Labs., Clarksburg, MD. The purpose of die tests is to verify that the EOS-AM-1 cell design can meet five years of real-time Low Earth Orbit (LEO) cycling. The tests include both real-time LEO and accelerated stress tests. At LMMS, the first real-time LEO simulated 99 minute orbital cycle started on February 7, 1994 and the test has been running continuously since that time, with 18,202 LEO cycles completed as of September 1, 1997. Each cycle consists of a 64 minute charge (VT at 1.507 volts per cell, 1.06 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge) and a 35 minute constant power discharge at 177 watts (22.5% DOD). At COMSAT, the accelerated stress test consists of 90 minute orbital cycles at 60% DOD with a 30 minute discharge at 60 amperes and a 60 minute charge at 40 amperes (VT at 1.54 volts per cell to 1.09 C/D ratio, followed by 0.6 ampere trickle charge). The real-time LEO life test battery consists of seven, 50AH (nameplate rating) Eagle-Picher, Inc. (EPI) Mantech cells manufactured into three, 3-cell pack assemblies (there are two place holder cells that are not part of the life test electrical circuit). The test pack is configured to simulate the conductive thermal design of the spacecraft battery, including: conductive aluminum sleeves, 3-cell pack aluminum baseplate, and honeycomb panel all mounted to a liquid (-5 C) cold plate. The entire assembly is located in a thermal chamber operating at +30 C. The accelerated stress test unit consists of five cells mounted in machined aluminum test sleeves and is operating at +10 C. The real-time LEO life test battery has met all performance requirements through the first 18

  7. Brown trout exposed to acid-treated and nontreated humic water from Lake Skjervatjern

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, L. )

    1994-01-01

    Lake Skjervatjern was divided into two separate basins. One basin and its catchment were treated with sulphuric acid and ammonium nitrate. The other part was kept as a control. Brown trout was exposed to acid-treated and nontreated water from the outlets of the basins. The results showed higher mortality in acid-treated water compared to nontreated water from Lake Skjervatjern. Chloride concentration in blood plasma was lower in fish exposed to acid-treated water, indicating a higher degree of stress. Some physical/chemical parameters showed different values for the acid-treated basin compared to water from the nontreated one, e.g., increasing concentrations of sulphur and nitrogen were seen in the acid-treated basin. However, no physical/chemical parameter or group of parameters has been identified from the two basins that can explain the difference in fish mortality and stress. 6 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  8. Effects of EoS in viscous hydro + cascade model for the RHIC Beam Energy Scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Iu.; Bleicher, M.; Huovinen, P.; Petersen, H.

    2016-12-01

    A state-of-the-art 3+1 dimensional cascade + viscous hydro + cascade model vHLLE+UrQMD has been applied to heavy ion collisions in RHIC Beam Energy Scan range √{sNN} = 7.7 , … , 200 GeV. Based on comparison to available experimental data it was estimated that an effective value of shear viscosity over entropy density ratio η / s in hydrodynamic stage has to decrease from η / s = 0.2 to 0.08 as collision energy increases from √{sNN} = 7.7 to 39 GeV, and to stay at η / s = 0.08 for 39 ≤√{ s} ≤ 200 GeV. In this work we show how an equation of state with first order phase transition affects the hydrodynamic evolution at those collision energies and changes the results of the model as compared to "default scenario" with a crossover type EoS from chiral model.

  9. XML DTD and Schemas for HDF-EOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullman, Richard; Yang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    An Extensible Markup Language (XML) document type definition (DTD) standard for the structure and contents of HDF-EOS files and their contents, and an equivalent standard in the form of schemas, have been developed.

  10. ASPEN: EO-1 Mission Activity Planning Made Easy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Rob; Govindjee, Anita; Yan, David; Rabideau, Gregg; Chien, Steve; Fukunaga, Alex

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the application of an automated planning and scheduling system to the NASA Earth Orbitin 1 (EO-1) missions. The planning system, ASPEN, is used to autonomously schedule the daily activites of the satellite.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of the water adsorption around malonic acid aerosol models.

    PubMed

    Darvas, Maria; Picaud, Sylvain; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2013-07-14

    Water nucleation around a malonic acid aggregate has been studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations in the temperature and pressure range relevant for atmospheric conditions. Systems of different water contents have been considered and a large number of simulations have allowed us to determine the phase diagram of the corresponding binary malonic acid-water systems. Two phases have been evidenced in the phase diagrams corresponding either to water adsorption on a large malonic acid grain at low temperatures, or to the formation of a liquid-like mixed aggregate of the two types of molecules, at higher temperatures. Finally, the comparison between the phase diagrams simulated for malonic acid-water and oxalic acid-water mixtures emphasizes the influence of the O : C ratio on the hydrophilic behavior of the aerosol, and thus on its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus, in accordance with recent experimental conclusions.

  12. Behavioral responses by migratory chum salmon to amino acids in natal stream water.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuzo; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    We propose that amino acids in natal stream water have Important roles in Pacific salmon homing. This study hypothesized that amino acids found in natal stream water have a role in the ability of mature male chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) to home to the Osaru River (OR), Hokkaido, Japan. Behavioral experiments were conducted in a two-choice test tank using various combinations of control water (natural Toya Lake water; NLW and three artificial stream waters using amino acids: 1) artificial OR water (AOR); 2) AOR without L-glutamic acid, the major amino acid in OR water (AOR-E); and 3) artificial water matching another stream (ALS) that had much higher amino acid concentrations than OR. In behavioral tests, the fish did not select between AOR and AOR-E, but still chose AOR over NLW, AOR-E over NLW, and AOR over ALS. These results suggest that migratory male chum salmon respond to amino acid mixtures in their natal stream water and appear to be affected by multiple amino acids.

  13. Arrangement of ceramide [EOS] in a stratum corneum lipid model matrix: new aspects revealed by neutron diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Kessner, Doreen; Kiselev, Mikhail; Dante, Silvia; Hauss, Thomas; Lersch, Peter; Wartewig, Siegfried; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2008-07-01

    The lipid matrix in stratum corneum (SC) plays a key role in the barrier function of the mammalian skin. The major lipids are ceramides (CER), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFA). Especially the unique-structured omega-acylceramide CER[EOS] is regarded to be essential for skin barrier properties by inducing the formation of a long-periodicity phase of 130 angstroms (LPP). In the present study, the arrangement of CER[EOS], either mixed with CER[AP] and CHOL or with CER[AP], CHOL and palmitic acid (PA), inside a SC lipid model membrane has been studied for the first time by neutron diffraction. For a mixed CER[EOS]/CER[AP]/CHOL membrane in a partly dehydrated state, the internal membrane nanostructure, i.e. the neutron scattering length density profile in the direction normal to the surface, was obtained by Fourier synthesis from the experimental diffraction patterns. The membrane repeat distance is equal to that of the formerly used SC lipid model system composed of CER[AP]/CHOL/PA/ChS. By comparing both the neutron scattering length density profiles, a possible arrangement of synthetic long-chain CER[EOS] molecules inside a SC lipid model matrix is suggested. The analysis of the internal membrane nanostructure implies that one CER[EOS] molecule penetrates from one membrane layer into an adjacent layer. A 130 angstroms periodicity phase could not be observed under experimental conditions, either in CER/CHOL mixtures or in CER/CHOL/FFA mixture. CER[EOS] can be arranged inside a phase with a repeat unit of 45.2 angstroms which is predominately formed by short-chain CER[AP] with distinct polarity.

  14. Global mapping of minor atmospheric constituents with AIRS on EOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Haskins, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating-array spectrometer on EOS. It covers the region from 650 to 3000/cm with spectral resolution of 1200. The prime objective of AIRS is the global retrieval of temperature and water vapor profiles and of surface temperatures. The wide spectral coverage of AIRS permits the measurement of a number of additional atmospheric and surface parameters. Of particular interest is the potential to produce daily global maps of the spatial distribution of the more abundant of the minor gases, e.g. ozone, CO, CH4, and N2O. This potential capability for CH4 and N2O is strongly affected by cloud residual. Using the CH4 band at 1306/cm as example, spatial averaging of AIRS data is required to measure a 10 percent change in the nominal CH4 column abundance. At 1300/cm, this requires cloud clearing at the 0.3 percent level. The mapping capability for ozone and CO in terms of rural/urban abundance patterns is not likely to be impacted with cloud-clearing residuals as high as 5 percent.

  15. Toward a complete EOS data and information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Robert R. P.

    1989-01-01

    Based on NASA EOS data panel analyses, an architectural concept is described in terms of elemental composition, top-level functions, and external and internal interfaces. This concept has been evaluated through the use of realistic user-generated scenarios consistent with existing plans for the 1990s and the Space Station. Developmental approaches for the requisite EOS data and information system are presented and a hybrid methodology for implementing this system is discussed.

  16. Probing the acidity of carboxylic acids in protic ionic liquids, water, and their binary mixtures: activation energy of proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shashi Kant; Kumar, Anil

    2013-02-28

    Acidity functions were used to express the ability of a solvent/solution to donate/accept a proton to a solute. The present work accounts for the acidity determination of HCOOH, CH3COOH, and CH3CH2COOH in the alkylimidazolium-based protic ionic liquids (PILs), incorporated with carboxylate anion, water, and in a binary mixture of PIL and water using the Hammett acidity function, H0. A reversal in the acidity trend was observed, when organic acids were transferred from water to PIL. It was emphasized that an increased stabilization offered by PIL cation toward the more basic conjugate anion of organic acid was responsible for this anomalous change in acidity order in PILs, which was absent in water. The greater stabilization of a basic organic anion by PIL cation is discussed in terms of the stable hard–soft acid base (HSAB) pairing. A change in the H0 values of these acids was observed with a change in temperature, and a linear correlation between the ln H0 and 1/T was noted. This relationship points toward the activation energy of proton transfer (E(a,H+)), a barrier provided by the medium during the proton transfer from Brønsted acid to indicator. The H0 function in binary mixtures points to the involvement of pseudosolvent, the behavior of which changes with the nature and concentration of acid. The presence of the maxima/minima in the H0 function is discussed in terms of the synergetic behavior of the pseudosolvent composed of the mixtures of aqueous PILs.

  17. The Polar HDF-EOS Data Imaging and Subsetting Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalsa, S. S.; Weaver, R. L.

    2001-05-01

    The Polar HDF-EOS Data Imaging and Subsetting (PHDIS) Tool realizes the promise of HDF-EOS, the standard data format selected by NASA for its EOS data products. Focused especially on the needs of the polar research community, the PHDIS Tool can open any HDF-EOS gridded data product that is in the Lambert Azimuthal Equal Area (LAMAZ) projection, the basis of the Equal-Area Scalable Earth Grid (EASE-Grid) widely used for polar data products. The PHDIS Tool can also open and grid in LAMAZ any HDF-EOS swath data product. A simple and easy-to-use graphical user interface is used to open, geolocate, and visualize any number of swath or grid products in separate but dynamically linked windows. The products do not need to be at the same resolution. A box drawn in one window is simultaneously displayed in the other windows. Data in the selected region can be displayed in a new window, viewed in table format, or written to a file, for any of the data sets currently displayed. This tool provides an easy way for researchers to compare and analyze data from a variety of polar data sets. The National Snow and Ice Data Center is planning on making available the PHDIS Tool, which is written in IDL, to assist its users working with polar gridded data sets in HDF-EOS, including the MODIS Level 3 sea ice product. This presentation is the debut of the first public release of this tool.

  18. Fumaric Acid and Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water Inactivate Gram Positive and Gram Negative Foodborne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Tango, Charles Nkufi; Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-02-12

    Sanitizing effectiveness of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) and fumaric acid (FA) at different dipping temperatures (25-60 °C), times (1-5 min), and concentrations (5-30 ppm for SAEW and 0.125%-0.5% for FA) on pure cultures of two Gram positive pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Listeria monocytogenes (LM) and two Gram negative pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EC) and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) was evaluated. FA (0.25%) showed the strongest sanitizing effect, demonstrating complete inactivation of EC, ST, and LM, while SA was reduced by 3.95-5.76 log CFU/mL at 25-60 °C, respectively, after 1 min of treatment. For SAEW, the complete inactivation was obtained when available chlorine concentration was increased to 20 ppm at 40 °C for 3 and 5 min. Moreover, Gram positive pathogens have been shown to resist to all treatment trends more than Gram negative pathogens throughout this experiment. Regardless of the different dipping temperatures, concentrations, and times, FA treatment was more effective than treatment with SAEW for reduction of foodborne pathogens. This study demonstrated that application of FA in food systems may be useful as a method for inactivation of foodborne pathogens.

  19. Fumaric Acid and Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water Inactivate Gram Positive and Gram Negative Foodborne Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Tango, Charles Nkufi; Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Sanitizing effectiveness of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) and fumaric acid (FA) at different dipping temperatures (25–60 °C), times (1–5 min), and concentrations (5–30 ppm for SAEW and 0.125%–0.5% for FA) on pure cultures of two Gram positive pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Listeria monocytogenes (LM) and two Gram negative pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EC) and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) was evaluated. FA (0.25%) showed the strongest sanitizing effect, demonstrating complete inactivation of EC, ST, and LM, while SA was reduced by 3.95–5.76 log CFU/mL at 25–60 °C, respectively, after 1 min of treatment. For SAEW, the complete inactivation was obtained when available chlorine concentration was increased to 20 ppm at 40 °C for 3 and 5 min. Moreover, Gram positive pathogens have been shown to resist to all treatment trends more than Gram negative pathogens throughout this experiment. Regardless of the different dipping temperatures, concentrations, and times, FA treatment was more effective than treatment with SAEW for reduction of foodborne pathogens. This study demonstrated that application of FA in food systems may be useful as a method for inactivation of foodborne pathogens. PMID:27682077

  20. Inactivation of bacteria on surfaces by sprayed slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water: in vitro experiments

    PubMed Central

    HAKIM, Hakimullah; ALAM, Md. Shahin; SANGSRIRATANAKUL, Natthanan; NAKAJIMA, Katsuhiro; KITAZAWA, Minori; OTA, Mari; TOYOFUKU, Chiharu; YAMADA, Masashi; THAMMAKARN, Chanathip; SHOHAM, Dany; TAKEHARA, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water (SAHW), in both liquid and spray form, to inactivate bacteria was evaluated as a potential candidate for biosecurity enhancement in poultry production. SAHW (containing 50 or 100 ppm chlorine, pH 6) was able to inactivate Escherichia coli and Salmonella Infantis in liquid to below detectable levels (≤2.6 log10 CFU/ml) within 5 sec of exposure. In addition, SAHW antibacterial capacity was evaluated by spraying it using a nebulizer into a box containing these bacteria, which were present on the surfaces of glass plates and rayon sheets. SAHW was able to inactivate both bacterial species on the glass plates (dry condition) and rayon sheets within 5 min spraying and 5 min contact times, with the exception of 50 ppm SAHW on the rayon sheets. Furthermore, a corrosivity test determined that SAHW does not corrode metallic objects, even at the longest exposure times (83 days). Our findings demonstrate that SAHW is a good candidate for biosecurity enhancement in the poultry industry. Spraying it on the surfaces of objects, eggshells, egg incubators and transport cages could reduce the chances of contamination and disease transmission. These results augment previous findings demonstrating the competence of SAHW as an anti-viral disinfectant. PMID:27052464

  1. Strategising for the future Indian EO programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mukund; Jayaraman, V.; Kalyanraman, S.; Joseph, George; Navalgund, R. R.; Kasturirangan, K.

    2002-07-01

    The Indian Earth Observations Program, over the past three decades, has been mainly driven by the national need of natural resources management, infrastructure development, environment monitoring and disaster management support. With an array of seven Indian Remote Sensing Satellites (IRS), national development support has been supported, through a well-knit institutional framework of a National Natural Resources Management System (NNRMS), a wide variety of applications developed as an inter-agency effort over the past 20 years. Now, the capacity of the programme has been extended into the global arena and IRS is providing operational data services to the global user community. The future Earth Observation Systems will have to take into consideration the aspects related to the commercialisation and standardisation of programmes world-over; transitioning into a business environment; data continuity and the need to monitor processes rather than events. Technological changes are also going to re-define many of the concepts of observation from space and issues like spatial resolution, spectral resolution and temporal resolution may no more be a concern for observation systems. ISRO is presently defining a strategy for the Indian EO Programme that will chart the progress with a vision for the next 25 years. Based on a thorough analysis, the observation needs of the future are planned and presently systems design and implementation are underway. The Need Analysis has been done keeping in mind the Global change applications; Mapping and Cartographic applications; Natural Resources and Environmental management applications etc. Issues related to defining the space and data acquisition as a national "public good", costing of data products and services and evolving a commercial remote sensing policy have been addressed for providing the overall thrust of the Indian Earth Observations program. The paper discusses the strategy adopted for assessing the future user requirements

  2. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): Observing the Atmosphere, Land, Oceans, and Ice from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During this year, the last of the first series of EOS missions, Aura, was launched. Aura is designed exclusively to conduct research on the composition, chemistry, and dynamics of the Earth's upper and lower atmosphere, employing multiple instruments on a single spacecraft. Aura is the third in a series of major Earth observing satellites to study the environment and climate change and is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. The first and second missions, Terra and Aqua, are designed to study the land, oceans, atmospheric constituents (aerosols, clouds, temperature, and water vapor), and the Earth's radiation budget. The other seven EOS spacecraft include satellites to study (i) land cover & land use change, (ii) solar irradiance and solar spectral variation, (iii) ice volume, (iv) ocean processes (vector wind and sea surface topography), and (v) vertical variations of clouds, water vapor, and aerosols up to and including the stratosphere. Aura's chemistry measurements will also follow up on measurements that began with NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and continue the record of satellite ozone data collected from the TOMS missions. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using EOS data to examine the health of the earth's atmosphere, including atmospheric chemistry, aerosol properties, and cloud properties, with a special but not exclusive look at the latest earth observing mission, Aura.

  3. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): Observing the Atmosphere, Land, Oceans, and Ice from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by whch scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During this year, the last of the first series of EOS missions, Aura, was launched. Aura is designed exclusively to conduct research on the composition, chemistry, and dynamics of the Earth's upper and lower atmosphere, employing multiple instruments on a single spacecraft. Aura is the third in a series of major Earth observing satellites to study the environment and climate change and is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. The first and second missions, Terra and Aqua, are designed to study the land, oceans, atmospheric constituents (aerosols, clouds, temperature, and water vapor), and the Earth's radiation budget. The other seven EOS spacecraft include satellites to study (i) land cover & land use change, (ii) solar irradiance and solar spectral variation, (iii) ice volume, (iv) ocean processes (vector wind and sea surface topography), and (v) vertical variations of clouds, water vapor, and aerosols up to and including the stratosphere. Aura's chemistry measurements will also follow up on measurements that began with NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and continue the record of satellite ozone data collected from the TOMS missions. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using EOS data to examine the health of the earth's atmosphere, including atmospheric chemistry, aerosol properties, and cloud properties, with a special look at the latest earth observing mission, Aura.

  4. Extraction of amino acids from soils and sediments with superheated water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C. N.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1974-01-01

    A method of extraction for amino acids from soils and sediments involving superheated water has been investigated. About 75-97 per cent of the amino acids contained in four soils of a soil profile from Illinois were extracted by this method. Deep penetration of water into soil aggregates and partial hydrolysis of peptide bonds during this extraction by water at high temperature are likely mechanisms responsible for the release of amino acids from samples. This extraction method does not require subsequent desalting treatments when analyses are carried out with an ion-exchange amino acid analyzer.

  5. Comparison between the single-bubble sonoluminescences in sulfuric acid and in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Chen, Weizhong; Gao, Xianxian; Liang, Yue

    2009-02-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is achieved with strong stability in sulfuric acid solutions. Bubble dynamics and the SBSL spectroscopy in the sulfuric acid solutions with different concentrations are studied with phase-locked integral stroboscopic photography method and a spectrograph, respectively. The experimental results are compared with those in water. The SBSL in sulfuric acid is brighter than that in water. One of the most important reasons for that is the larger viscosity of sulfuric acid, which results in the larger ambient radius and thus the more contents of luminous material inside the bubble. However, sonoluminescence bubble’s collapse in sulfuric acid is less violent than that in water, and the corresponding blackbody radiation temperature of the SBSL in sulfuric acid is lower than that in water.

  6. Phase diagrams and water activities of aqueous dicarboxylic acid systems of atmospheric importance.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Keith D; Friesen, Katherine; Bothe, Jameson R; Palet, Benjamin

    2008-11-20

    We have studied liquid/solid phase diagrams and water activities of the dicarboxylic acid/water binary systems for maleic, dl-malic, glutaric, and succinc acids using differential scanning calorimetry, infrared (IR) spectroscopy of thin films, and conductivity analysis of saturated solutions. For each binary system we report the measurements of the ice melting envelope, the acid dissolution envelope, and the ice/acid eutectic temperature and composition. Water activities have been determined by using the freezing point depression of ice. Additionally, an irreversible solid/solid phase transition for maleic acid was observed in both DSC and IR studies likely due to the conversion of a meta-stable crystal form of maleic acid to its most stable crystal form. In general we find good agreement with literature values for temperature-dependent acid solubilities.

  7. [Analysis of aliphatic carboxylic acids in anaerobic digestion process waters by ion-exclusion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuaki; Sakamoto, Jun; Nagaoka, Kazuya; Takayama, Yohichi; Kanahori, Takashi; Sunahara, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Tsuneo; Sato, Shinji; Hirokawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of seven aliphatic carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, iso-butyric, n-butyric, iso-valeric and n-valeric acid) in anaerobic digestion process waters for biogas production was examined by ion-exclusion chromatography with dilute acidic eluents (benzoic acid, perfluorobutyric acid (PFBA) and sulfuric acid) and non-suppressed conductivity/ultraviolet (UV) detection. The columns used were a styrene/divinylbenzene-based strongly acidic cation-exchange resin column (TSKgel SCX) and a polymethacrylate-based weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column (TSKgel Super IC-A/C). Good separation was performed on the TSKgel SCX in shorter retention times. For the TSKgel Super IC-A/C, peak shape of the acids was sharp and symmetrical in spite of longer retention times. In addition, the mutual separation of the acids was good except for iso- and n-butyric acids. The better separation and good detection was achieved by using the two columns (TSKgel SCX and TSKgel Super IC-A/C connected in series), lower concentrations of PFBA and sulfuric acid as eluents, non-suppressed conductivity detection and UV detection at 210 nm. This analysis was applied to anaerobic digestion process waters. The chromatograms with conductivity detection were relatively simpler compared with those of UV detection. The use of two columns with different selectivities for the aliphatic carboxylic acids and the two detection modes was effective for the determination and identification of the analytes in anaerobic digestion process waters containing complex matrices.

  8. EOS Reference Handbook 1999: A Guide to NASA's Earth Science Enterprise and the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. D. (Editor); Greenstone, R. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The content of this handbook includes Earth Science Enterprise; The Earth Observing System; EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS); Data and Information Policy; Pathfinder Data Sets; Earth Science Information Partners and the Working Prototype-Federation; EOS Data Quality: Calibration and Validation; Education Programs; International Cooperation; Interagency Coordination; Mission Elements; EOS Instruments; EOS Interdisciplinary Science Investigations; and Points-of-Contact.

  9. 76 FR 70927 - USACE's Plan for Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Chapter II USACE's Plan for Retrospective Review Under E.O.... Executive Order 13563, ``Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review'' (E.O.), issued on January 18, 2011... pursuant to E.O. 13563. The E.O. further directs each agency to periodically review its...

  10. 77 FR 3211 - USACE's Plan for Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... 33 CFR Chapter II USACE's Plan for Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of... Executive Order 13563, ``Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review'' (E.O.), issued on January 18, 2011... pursuant to E.O. 13563. The E.O. further directs each agency to periodically review its...

  11. Biological Properties of Acidic Cosmetic Water from Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Ting; Huang, Tsi-Shu; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Pan, Jian-Liang; Liang, Shih-Shin; Chen, Bing-Hung; Chen, Shi-Hui; Liu, Po-Len; Wang, Hui-Chun; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hui-Min; Hsiao, Shu-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This current work was to investigate the biological effects of acidic cosmetic water (ACW) on various biological assays. ACW was isolated from seawater and demonstrated several bio-functions at various concentration ranges. ACW showed a satisfactory effect against Staphylococcus aureus, which reduced 90% of bacterial growth after a 5-second exposure. We used cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to test the properties of ACW in inflammatory cytokine release, and it did not induce inflammatory cytokine release from un-stimulated, normal PBMCs. However, ACW was able to inhibit bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine TNF-α released from PBMCs, showing an anti-inflammation potential. Furthermore, ACW did not stimulate the rat basophilic leukemia cell (RBL-2H3) related allergy response on de-granulation. Our data presented ACW with a strong anti-oxidative ability in a superoxide anion radical scavenging assay. In mass spectrometry information, magnesium and zinc ions demonstrated bio-functional detections for anti-inflammation as well as other metal ions such as potassium and calcium were observed. ACW also had minor tyrosinase and melanin decreasing activities in human epidermal melanocytes (HEMn-MP) without apparent cytotoxicity. In addition, the cell proliferation assay illustrated anti-growth and anti-migration effects of ACW on human skin melanoma cells (A375.S2) indicating that it exerted the anti-cancer potential against skin cancer. The results obtained from biological assays showed that ACW possessed multiple bioactivities, including anti-microorganism, anti-inflammation, allergy-free, antioxidant, anti-melanin and anticancer properties. To our knowledge, this was the first report presenting these bioactivities on ACW. PMID:22754342

  12. Supercritical water oxidation of acrylic acid production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gong, Y M; Wang, S Z; Tang, X Y; Xu, D H; Ma, H H

    2014-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of wastewater from an acrylic acid manufacturing plant has been studied on a continuous flow experimental system, whose reactor was made of Hastelloy C-276. Experimental conditions included a reaction temperature (T) ranging from 673 to 773K, a residence time (t) ranging from 72.7 to 339s, a constant pressure (P) of 25 MPa and a fixed oxidation coefficient (alpha) of 2.0. Experimental results indicated that reaction temperature and residence time had significant influences on the oxidation reaction, and increasing the two operation parameters could improve both degradation of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N). The COD removal efficiency could reach up to 98.73% at 25 MPa, 773 K and 180.1 s, whereas the destruction efficiency of NH3-N was only 43.71%. We further carried out a kinetic analysis considering the induction period through free radical chain mechanism. It confirms that the power-law rate equation for COD removal was 345 exp(-52200/RT)[COD]1.98[O2]0.17 and for NH3-N removal was 500 exp(-64492.19/RT)[NH3-N]1.87 [O2]0.03. Moreover, the induction time formulations for COD and NH3-N were suspected to be exp(38250/RT)/173 and exp(55690/RT)/15231, respectively. Correspondingly, induction time changed from 2.22 to 5.38 s for COD and 0.38 to 1.38 s for NH3-N. Owing to the catalysis of reactor inner wall surface, more than 97% COD removal was achieved in all samples.

  13. Autonomous Volcanic Activity Detection with ASE on EO-1 Hyperion: Applications for Planetary Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Baker, V.; Castano, R.; Chien, S.; Cichy, B.; Doggett, T.; Dohm, J.; Greeley, R.; Rabideau, G.; Sherwood, R.; Williams, K.; ASE Project Team

    2003-05-01

    The New Millennium Program (NMP) Space Technology 6 (ST-6) Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) will fly two scene classifiers on the Earth Orbiting 1 (EO-1) spacecraft in the fall of 2003, and will demonstrate autonomous, onboard processing of Hyperion imager 0.4-2.4 micron hyperspectral data, and autonomous, science-driven planning and acquisition of subsequent observations. ASE is an experiment to meet NASA's call for systems with reduced downlink and onboard data processing to enable autonomous missions. ASE software is divided into three classes: (1) spacecraft command and control; (2) an onboard planner (CASPER); and (3) modular science algorithms, which are used to process raw data to search out specific features and spectral signatures. The ASE Science Team has developed scene classifiers to detect thermal emission in both day and nighttime Hyperion data, and are continuing to develop other scene classifiers for ice, snow, water and land for future release and flight on EO-1. Once uploaded, the thermal scene classifier effectively turns the EO-1 spacecraft into an autonomously operating and reacting volcanic activity detector. It is possible to envision such a capability on spacecraft observing volcanism on Io and Triton, autonomously identifying and classifying activity, identifying sites deserving of closer scrutiny, and retasking the spacecraft to observe them, thus fulfilling NASA's goal of fully-autonomous, science-driven spacecraft. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA.

  14. Insights on How NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Monitors Our World Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During this year, four EOS science missions were launched, representing observations of (1) total solar irradiance, (2) Earth radiation budget, (3) land cover and land use change, (4) ocean processes (vector wind, sea surface temperature, and ocean color), (5) atmospheric processes (aerosol and cloud properties, water vapor, and temperature and moisture profiles), and (6) tropospheric chemistry. In succeeding years many more satellites will be launched that will contribute immeasurably to our understanding of the Earth's environment. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using EOS data to examine land use and natural hazards, environmental air quality, including dust storms over the world's deserts, cloud and radiation properties, sea surface temperature, and winds over the ocean.

  15. The Integration, Testing and Flight of the EO-1 GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, David A.; Sanneman, Paul A.; Shulman, Seth E.; Sager, Jennifer A.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Positioning System has long been hailed as the wave of the future for autonomous on-board navigation of low Earth orbiting spacecraft despite the fact that relatively few spacecraft have actually employed it for this purpose. While several missions operated out of the Goddard Space Flight Center have flown GPS receivers on board, the New Millenium Program (NMP) Earth Orbiting-1 (EO-1) spacecraft is the first to employ GPS for active, autonomous on-board navigation. Since EO-1 was designed to employ GPS as its primary source of the navigation ephemeris, special care had to be taken during the integration phase of spacecraft construction to assure proper performance. This paper is a discussion of that process: a brief overview of how the GPS works, how it fits into the design of the EO-1 Attitude Control System (ACS), the steps taken to integrate the system into the EO-1 spacecraft, the ultimate on-orbit performance during launch and early operations of the EO-1 mission and the performance of the on-board GPS ephemeris versus the ground based ephemeris. Conclusions will include a discussion of the lessons learned.

  16. (abstract) The EOS SAR Mission: A New Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, JoBea

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Earth Orbiting System Synthetic Aperture Radar (EOS SAR) program is to help develop the modeling and observational capabilities to predict and monitor terrestrial and oceanic processes that are either causing global change or resulting from global change. Specifically, the EOS SAR will provide important geophysical products to the EOS data set to improve our understanding of the state and functioning of the Earth system. The strategy for the EOS SAR program is to define the instrument requirements based on required input to geophysical algorithms, provide the processing capability and algorithms to generate such products on the required spatial (global) and temporal (3-5 days) scales, and to provide the spaceborne instrumentation with international partnerships. Initially this partnership has been with Germany; currently we are exploring broader international partnerships. A MultiSAR approach to the EOS SAR which includes a number of SARs provided by Japan, ESA, Germany, Canada, and the US in synergistic orbits could be used to attain a truly global monitoring capability using multifrequency polarimetric signatures. These concepts and several options for mission scenarios will be presented.

  17. Exponential 6 parameterization for the JCZ3-EOS

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, B.C.; Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.

    1998-07-01

    A database has been created for use with the Jacobs-Cowperthwaite-Zwisler-3 equation-of-state (JCZ3-EOS) to determine thermochemical equilibrium for detonation and expansion states of energetic materials. The JCZ3-EOS uses the exponential 6 intermolecular potential function to describe interactions between molecules. All product species are characterized by r*, the radius of the minimum pair potential energy, and {var_epsilon}/k, the well depth energy normalized by Boltzmann`s constant. These parameters constitute the JCZS (S for Sandia) EOS database describing 750 gases (including all the gases in the JANNAF tables), and have been obtained by using Lennard-Jones potential parameters, a corresponding states theory, pure liquid shock Hugoniot data, and fit values using an empirical EOS. This database can be used with the CHEETAH 1.40 or CHEETAH 2.0 interface to the TIGER computer program that predicts the equilibrium state of gas- and condensed-phase product species. The large JCZS-EOS database permits intermolecular potential based equilibrium calculations of energetic materials with complex elemental composition.

  18. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodo-acids were recently identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, (Z)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, and (E)-2-iodo-3...

  19. Surface behavior of malonic acid adsorption at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Blower, Patrick G; Shamay, Eric; Kringle, Loni; Ota, Stephanie T; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2013-03-28

    The presence of organic materials adsorbed to the surfaces of aerosol particles has been demonstrated to be a determining factor in relevant atmospheric processes. Malonic acid is a small, water-soluble organic acid that is common in aerosols and is surface-active. A comprehensive investigation of the adsorption of malonic acid to the air/water interface was accomplished using vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) and surface tension measurements as functions of concentration and pH. Malonic acid was found to be weakly solvated at the air/water interface, and its orientation as a function of concentration was explored through different VSFS polarization schemes. pH-dependent experiments revealed that the surface-active species is the fully protonated species. Computational analyses were used to obtain depth-specific geometries of malonic acid at the air/water interface that confirm and enrich the experimental results.

  20. New water-soluble metal working fluids additives from phosphonic acid derivatives for aluminum alloy materials.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Ichitaro; Tomoda, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Shoji

    2007-01-01

    Water-soluble metal working fluids are used for processing of aluminum alloy materials. This short paper describes properties of new additives for water-soluble cutting fluids for aluminum alloy materials. Some alkyldiphosphonic acids were prepared with known method. Amine salts of these phosphonic acids showed anti-corrosion property for aluminum alloy materials. However, they have no hard water tolerance. Monoesters of octylphosphonic acid were prepared by the reaction of octylphosphonic acid dichloride with various alcohols in the presence of triethylamine. Amine salts of monoester of octylphosphonic acid with diethyleneglycol monomethyl ether, ethyleneglycol monomethyl ether and triethyleneglycol monomethyl ether showed both of a good anti-corrosion property for aluminum alloy materials and hard water tolerance.

  1. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.

    1984-01-01

    The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon from most natural waters ranges from 1 to 20 milligrams carbon per liter, of which approximately 75 percent are organic acids. These acids can be chromatographically fractionated into hydrophobic organic acids, such as humic substances, and hydrophilic organic acids. To effectively study any of these organic acids, they must be isolated from other organic and inorganic species, and concentrated. Usually, large volumes of water must be processed to obtain sufficient quantities of material, and adsorption chromatography on synthetic, macroporous resins has proven to be a particularly effective method for this purpose. The use of the nonionic Amberlite XAD-8 and Amberlite XAD-4 resins and the anion exchange resin Duolite A-7 for isolating and concentrating organic acids from water is presented.

  2. Phase equilibria and distribution constants of metal ions in diantipyryl alkane-organic acid-hydrochloric acid-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtev, M. I.; Popova, O. N.; Yuminova, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability of antipyrine and its derivatives (diantipyryl alkanes) to form separating systems in the presence of salicylic (sulfosalicylic) acid and hydrochloric acid and water is studied. The optimum volume of the organic phase, the composition of complexes, and the mechanism for the distribution of metal ions are determined, depending on the concentrations of the main components and the salting-out agent. The complex distribution and extraction constants are calculated.

  3. Effects of advanced oxidation pretreatment on residual aluminum control in high humic acid water purification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendong; Li, Hua; Ding, Zhenzhen; Wang, Xiaochang

    2011-01-01

    Due to the formation of disinfection by-products and high concentrations of Al residue in drinking water purification, humic substances are a major component of organic matter in natural waters and have therefore received a great deal of attention in recent years. We investigated the effects of advanced oxidation pretreatment methods usually applied for removing dissolved organic matters on residual Al control. Results showed that the presence of humic acid increased residual Al concentration notably. With 15 mg/L of humic acid in raw water, the concentrations of soluble aluminum and total aluminum in the treated water were close to the quantity of Al addition. After increasing coagulant dosage from 12 to 120 mg/L, the total-Al in the treated water was controlled to below 0.2 mg/L. Purification systems with ozonation, chlorination, or potassium permanganate oxidation pretreatment units had little effects on residual Al control; while UV radiation decreased Al concentration notably. Combined with ozonation, the effects of UV radiation were enhanced. Optimal dosages were 0.5 mg O3/mg C and 3 hr for raw water with 15 mg/L of humic acid. Under UV light radiation, the combined forces or bonds that existed among humic acid molecules were destroyed; adsorption sites increased positively with radiation time, which promoted adsorption of humic acid onto polymeric aluminum and Al(OH)3(s). This work provides a new solution for humic acid coagulation and residual Al control for raw water with humic acid purification.

  4. Concentration and fractionation of hydrophobic organic acid constituents from natural waters by liquid chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A scheme is presented which used adsorption chromatography with pH gradient elution and size-exclusion chromatography to concentrate and separate hydrophobic organic acids from water. A review of chromatographic processes involved in the flow scheme is also presented. Organic analytes which appear in each aqueous fraction are quantified by dissolved organic carbon analysis. Hydrophobic organic acids in a water sample are concentrated on a porous acrylic resin. These acids usually constitute approximately 30-50 percent of the dissolved organic carbon in an unpolluted water sample and are eluted with an aqueous eluent (dilute base). The concentrate is then passed through a column of polyacryloylmorpholine gel, which separates the acids into high- and low-molecular-weight fractions. The high- and low-molecular-weight eluates are reconcentrated by adsorption chromatography, then are eluted with a pH gradient into strong acids (predominately carboxylic acids) and weak acids (predominately phenolic compounds). For standard compounds and samples of unpolluted waters, the scheme fractionates humic substances into strong and weak acid fractions that are separated from the low molecular weight acids. A new method utilizing conductivity is also presented to estimate the acidic components in the methanol fraction.

  5. Characterization of biodegradation intermediates of nonionic surfactants by MALDI-MS. 2. Oxidative biodegradation profiles of uniform octylphenol polyethoxylate in 18O-labeled water.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroaki; Shibata, Atsushi; Wang, Yang; Yoshikawa, Hiromichi; Tamura, Hiroto

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the characterization of the biodegradation intermediates of octylphenol octaethoxylate (OP(8)EO) by means of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The biodegradation test study was carried out in a pure culture (Pseudomonas putida S-5) under aerobic conditions using OP(8)EO as the sole carbon source and (18)O-labeled water as an incubation medium. In the MALDI-MS spectra of biodegraded samples, a series of OP(n)EO molecules with n = 2-8 EO units and their corresponding carboxylic acid products (OP(n)EC) were observed. The use of purified OP(8)EO enabled one to distinguish the shortened OPEO molecules as biodegradation intermediates. Furthermore, the formation of OP(8)EC (the oxidized product of OP(8)EO) supported the notion that terminal oxidation is a step in the biodegradation process. When biodegradation study was carried out in (18)O-labeled water, incorporation of (18)O atoms into the carboxyl group was observed for OPEC, while no incorporation was observed for the shortened OPEO products. These results could provide some rationale to the biodegradation mechanism of alkylphenol polyethoxylates.

  6. Water-enhanced solubility of carboxylic acids in organic solvents and its application to extraction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, J.N. ); King, C.J. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports on solubilities of carboxylic acids in certain organic solvents which increase sharply as the concentration of water in the solvent increases. This phenomenon leads to a method of regeneration for solvent-extraction processes whereby coextracted water is selectively removed from the extract, such as by stripping, thereby precipitating the acid. The removal of a minor constituent to cause precipitation reduces energy consumption, in contrast with bulk removal of solvent. Solubilities of fumaric acid were measured in a number of organic solvents, with varying amounts of water in the organic phase. Cyclohexanone and methylcyclohexanone were chosen as solvents for which detailed solid-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibria were measured for adipic, fumaric, and succinic acids in the presence of varying concentrations of water, at both 25 and 45[degrees]C. Batch precipitation experiments were performed to demonstrate the processing concept and determine the relative volatility of water to solvent in the presence of carbon.

  7. Vapor-deposited water and nitric acid ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    Ices formed by vapor deposition have been the subject of numerous laboratory investigations in connection with snow and glaciers on the ground, ice clouds in the terrestrial atmosphere, surfaces of other planets and their satellites, and the interstellar medium. In this review we will focus on these specific subjects: (1) heterogeneous chemistry on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and (2) surfaces of satellites of the outer planets in our solar system. Stratospheric ozone provides a protective shield for mankind and the global biosphere from harmful ultraviolet solar radiation. In past decades, theoretical atmospheric models for the calculation of ozone balance frequently used only homogeneous gas-phase reactions in their studies. Since the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985, however, it has been demonstrated that knowledge of heterogeneous reactions on the surface of PSCs is definitely needed to understand this significant natural event due to the anthropogenic emission of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). We will briefly discuss the experimental techniques for the investigation of heterogeneous chemistry on ice surfaces carried out in our laboratories. The experimental apparatus used include: several flow-tube reactors, an electron-impact ionization mass spectrometer, a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, a BET adsorption apparatus, and a scanning environmental electron microscope. The adsorption experiments and electron microscopic work have demonstrated that the vapor-deposited ices are highly porous. Therefore, it is necessary to develop theoretical models for the elucidation of the uptake and reactivity of trace gases in porous ice substrates. Several measurements of uptake and reaction probabilities of these trace gases on water ices and nitric acid ices have been performed under ambient conditions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, mainly in the temperature range 180-220 K. The trace gases of atmospheric importance

  8. [Effects of simulated acid rain on water physiological characteristics of Myrica rubra seedlings].

    PubMed

    Yaho, Zhao-bin; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Shu-quan; Lu, Mei-juan

    2011-08-01

    Taking the seedlings of typical subtropical economic tree species Myrica rubra in Zhejiang Province as test materials, a pot experiment was conducted to study their water physiological characteristics under effects of simulated acid rain (pH 2.5 and pH 4.0), with water (pH 5.6) as the control. Season, year, and acid rain all had significant effects on the photosynthetic rate (Pn). Among the treatments, the Pn had a greater difference in summer than in spring and autumn, and was higher in treatment acid rain (pH 4.0). Season, year, acid rain, and the interactions of season and year and of the three factors had significant effects on the stomata conductance (Gs), and also, the Gs had a greater difference among the treatments in summer than in spring and autumn. Acid rain had inhibitory effect on Gs. Season, year, acid rain, and the interactions of season and year and of season and acid rain affected the transpiration rate (Tr) significantly. Same as Pn and Gs, the Tr had a greater difference among the treatments in summer than in spring and autumn. Acid rain (pH 2.5) had the strongest inhibitory effect on Tr. Acid rain and the interactions of season and year and of season and acid rain had significant effects on the water use efficiency (WUE), and acid rain (pH 2.5) had definitely positive effect on the WUE.

  9. Reference MWA EoR Power Spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, Bryna; Pober, Jonathan; Beardsley, Adam; Morales, Miguel F.; Sullivan, Ian S.; MWA Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the Epoch of Reionization using redshifted 21cm HI emission promise to provide sensitive new cosmological constraints in the next few years. The current generation of HI EoR telescopes are targeting a statistical detection of the EoR in the power spectrum of the 21cm emission. The principal challenge lies in extracting the faint cosmological signal in the face of bright foregrounds and instrumental systematics that threaten to overwhelm it.We present the UW EoR power spectrum code, the reference code for the MWA and the first power spectrum analysis to analytically propagate the error bars through the full data analysis pipeline. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the power spectrum as a diagnostic tool for identifying subtle systematics and show power spectra of the first season of MWA observations.

  10. CERNBox + EOS: end-user storage for science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascetti, L.; Gonzalez Labrador, H.; Lamanna, M.; Mościcki, JT; Peters, AJ

    2015-12-01

    CERNBox is a cloud synchronisation service for end-users: it allows syncing and sharing files on all major mobile and desktop platforms (Linux, Windows, MacOSX, Android, iOS) aiming to provide offline availability to any data stored in the CERN EOS infrastructure. The successful beta phase of the service confirmed the high demand in the community for an easily accessible cloud storage solution such as CERNBox. Integration of the CERNBox service with the EOS storage back-end is the next step towards providing “sync and share” capabilities for scientific and engineering use-cases. In this report we will present lessons learnt in offering the CERNBox service, key technical aspects of CERNBox/EOS integration and new, emerging usage possibilities. The latter includes the ongoing integration of “sync and share” capabilities with the LHC data analysis tools and transfer services.

  11. Cold water fish gelatin modification by a natural phenolic cross-linker (ferulic acid and caffeic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Araghi, Maryam; Moslehi, Zeinab; Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza; Mostahsan, Amir; Salamat, Nima; Daraei Garmakhany, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays use of edible films and coatings is increasing due to their biodegradability and environment friendly properties. Fish gelatin obtained from fish skin wastage can be used as an appropriate protein compound for replacing pork gelatin to produce edible film. In this study films were prepared by combination of fish gelatin and different concentration (0%, 1%, 3%, and 5%) of two phenolic compounds (caffeic acid and ferulic acid). The film was prepared at pH > 10 and temperature of 60˚c under continuous injection of O2 and addition of the plasticizer sorbitol/glycerol. Results showed that solubility, oxygen permeability, and water vapor permeability were decreased for caffeic acid and the highest effect was observed at concentration of 5%. Solubility had a linear relationship with concentration of phenolic compound in film containing ferulic acid, however, no significant change was observed in vapor and O2 permeability. A comparison between two phenolic compounds showed that caffeic acid had the highest effect in decreasing solubility, water vapor permeability, and oxygen permeability. Caffeic acid is more effective phenolic compound compared with Ferulic acid that can increase safety of biodegradable packaging by improving their barrier and physicochemical properties. PMID:26405523

  12. Acid generation upon thermal concentration of natural water: The critical water content and the effects of ionic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulvirenti, April L.; Needham, Karen M.; Adel-Hadadi, Mohamad A.; Marks, Charles R.; Gorman, Jeffrey A.; Shettel, Donald L.; Barkatt, Aaron

    2009-10-01

    Thermal evaporation of a variety of simulated pore waters from the region of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, produced acidic liquids and gases during the final stages of evaporation. Several simulated pore waters were prepared and then thermally distilled in order to collect and analyze fractions of the evolved vapor. In some cases, distillates collected towards the end of the distillation were highly acidic; in other cases the pH of the distillate remained comparatively unchanged during the course of the distillation. The results suggest that the pH values of the later fractions are determined by the initial composition of the water. Acid production stems from the hydrolysis of magnesium ions, especially at near dryness. Near the end of the distillation, magnesium nitrate and magnesium chloride begin to lose water of hydration, greatly accelerating their thermal decomposition to form acid. Acid formation is promoted further when precipitated calcium carbonate is removed. Specifically, calcium chloride-rich pore waters containing moderate (10-20 ppm) levels of magnesium and nitrate and low levels of bicarbonate produced mixtures of nitric and hydrochloric acid, resulting in a precipitous drop in pH to values of 1 or lower after about 95% of the original volume was distilled. Waters with either low or moderate magnesium content coupled with high levels of bicarbonate produced slightly basic fractions (pH 7-9). If calcium was present in excess of bicarbonate, waters containing moderate levels of magnesium produced acid even in the presence of bicarbonate, due to the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Other salts such as halite and anhydrite promote the segregation of acidic vapors from residual basic solids. The concomitant release of wet acid gas has implications for the integrity of the alloys under consideration for containers at the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. Condensed acid gases at very low pH, especially mixtures of nitric and hydrochloric acid, are

  13. Treatment of iron(II)-rich acid mine water with limestone and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Mohajane, G B; Maree, J P; Panichev, N

    2014-01-01

    The main components of acid mine water are free acid, sulphate, and Fe²⁺. Limestone is the most cost-effective alkali that can be used for neutralization. The purpose of this investigation was to identify conditions where Fe²⁺ is removed with limestone and simultaneously oxidized with oxygen to Fe³⁺, in a polyvinyl chloride pipe under pressure. Gypsum scaling is prevented by passing rubber balls through the pipe of the so-called Oxygen-Pipe-Neutralization (OPeN) process pilot plant. Two synthetic waters were treated: (A) acid mine water containing 123 mg L⁻¹ Fe²⁺ representing gold mine water, and (B) acid mine water containing 6,032 mg L⁻¹ Fe²⁺ representing coal mine water. Batch studies were carried out in a pipe reactor and showed that the rate of Fe²⁺ oxidation depended on the Fe²⁺ concentration, oxygen pressure, amount of recycled sludge, limestone dosage and the mixing rate. Continuous studies in an OPeN process pilot plant resulted in 100% removal of total acidity from synthetic coal mine water and a 98% removal from synthetic gold mine water. Fe²⁺ was removed completely as precipitated Fe(OH)₃ from both synthetic coal and gold mine water at around pH 7 at 200 and 100 kPa oxygen pressure, respectively.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of the pressure dependence of the water-acid gas interfacial tensions.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2009-10-29

    We report two-phase Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the binary water-acid gas mixtures at high temperature and high pressure. Simulations are performed in the Np(N)AT ensemble in order to reproduce the pressure dependence of the interfacial tensions of the water-CO(2) and water-H(2)S mixtures. The interfacial tension of the binary water-CO(2) mixture is determined from 5 to 45 MPa along the isotherm T = 383 K. Water-H(2)S interfacial tensions are computed along one supercritical isotherm (T = 393 K) in a pressure range of 1-15 MPa. The temperature and pressure conditions investigated here by the MC simulations are typical of the geological storage conditions of these acid gases. The coexisting densities and the compositions of the water-rich and acid-gas-rich phases are compared with experiments and with data calculated from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo (GEMC) simulations.

  15. Cholesterol reduces the effects of dihydroxy bile acids and fatty acids on water and solute transport in the human jejunum.

    PubMed Central

    Broor, S L; Slota, T; Ammon, H V

    1980-01-01

    Jejunal perfusion studies were performed in 16 healthy volunteers to test the hypothesis that intraluminal cholesterol can mitigate the fluid secretion induced by dihydroxy bile acids and fatty acids. Fluid secretion in the presence of 5 mM taurodeoxycholate was somewhat reduced by 4 mM mono-olein which was used for the solubilization of cholesterol. Addition of 0.8 mM cholesterol reduced fluid secretion further (P less than 0.05). Fluid secretion induced by 4 mM oleic acid was changed to net absorption in a linear fashion with increasing cholesterol concentration in the perfusion solutions. 1 mM cholesterol reduced fluid secretion induced by 6 mM oleic acid (P less than 0.005), but had no effect on fluid secretion induced by 6 mM linolenic acid. Glucose absorption was generally affected in a similar manner as water transport. In vitro, 1 mM cholesterol reduced monomer activity of 6 mM oleic acid to 72.3 +/- 0.9% of control and that of linolenic acid to 81.1 +/- 1.7% of control. Although statistically significant (P less than 0.001), the difference in the effects of cholesterol on monomer activities of the two fatty acids was rather small and it is unlikely that changes in monomer concentration of fatty acids and bile acids account for the protective effect of cholesterol. The in vivo observations point to a new physiological role for biliary cholesterol: the modification of the response of the small intestine to the effects of dihydroxy bile acids and fatty acids. PMID:7358850

  16. Effect of Lactic Acid Etching on Bonding Effectiveness of Orthodontic Bracket after Water Storage

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Fahad F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effect of lactic acid at various concentrations on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with the resin adhesive system before and after water storage. Materials and Methods. Hundred extracted human premolars were divided into 5 treatment groups and etched for 30 seconds with one of the following agents: lactic acid solution with (A) 10%, (B) 20%, (C) 30%, and (D) 50%; group E, 37% phosphoric acid (control). Metal brackets were bonded using a Transbond XT. Bonding effectiveness was assessed by shear bond strength after 24 hours and 6 months of water storage at 37°C. The data were analyzed with 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (α = .001). Results. Lactic acid concentration and water storage resulted in significant differences for brackets bond strength (P < .001). 20% lactic acid had significantly higher mean bond strength values (SD) for all conditions: 24 hours [12.2 (.7) MPa] and 6 months [10.1 (.6) MPa] of water storage. 37% phosphoric acid had intermediate bond strength values for all conditions: 24 hours [8.2 (.6) MPa] and 6 months [6.2 (.6) MPa] of water storage. Also, there were differences in bond strength between storage time, with a reduction in values from 24 hours and 6 months for all experimental groups (P < .001). Conclusion. Lactic acid could be used in place of phosphoric acid as an enamel etchant for bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:25006465

  17. Analysis of free amino acids in natural waters by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    How, Zuo Tong; Busetti, Francesco; Linge, Kathryn L; Kristiana, Ina; Joll, Cynthia A; Charrois, Jeffrey W A

    2014-11-28

    This paper reports a new analytical method for the analysis of 18 amino acids in natural waters using solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Two different preconcentration methods, solid-phase extraction and concentration under reduced pressure, were tested in development of this method. Although concentration under reduced pressure provided better recoveries and method limits of detection for amino acids in ultrapure water, SPE was a more suitable extraction method for real samples due to the lower matrix effects for this method. Even though the strong cation exchange resin used in SPE method introduced exogenous matrix interferences into the sample extracts (inorganic salt originating from the acid-base reaction during the elution step), the SPE method still incorporates a broad sample clean-up and minimised endogenous matrix effects by reducing interferences originating from real water samples. The method limits of quantification (MLQ) for the SPE LC-MS/MS method in ultrapure water ranged from 0.1 to 100 μg L(-1) as N for the different amino acids. The MLQs of the early eluting amino acids were limited by the presence of matrix interfering species, such as inorganic salts in natural water samples. The SPE LC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the analysis of amino acids in 3 different drinking water source waters: the average total free amino acid content in these waters was found to be 19 μg L(-1) as N, while among the 18 amino acids analysed, the most abundant amino acids were found to be tyrosine, leucine and isoleucine.

  18. CEMS: A New Infrastructure For EO And Climate Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Victoria L.; Kershaw, Philip; Busswell, Geoff; Hilton, Richard; O'Neill, Alan

    2013-12-01

    CEMS, the facility for Climate and Environmental Monitoring from Space, has been created as a collaboration between UK academic and industrial partners at Harwell, Oxfordshire, UK, offering Climate and Earth Observation (EO) data and services. Since going operational in September 2012, CEMS has been supporting a range of research and commercial users. Applications include production of climate-quality long- term global datasets, processing satellite observations, and development of novel algorithms and products combining EO with other environmental datasets. This paper briefly describes the CEMS infrastructure, present some example uses with initial indications of benefits of the CEMS environment, and outline plans for future evolution.

  19. Musculoskeletal imaging in progress: the EOS imaging system.

    PubMed

    Wybier, Marc; Bossard, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    The EOS 2D/3D radio-imaging device (Biospace med, France) can disclose a digital radiographic image of bones with a very low radiation dose. This in turn allows in obtaining a single image of a large field of view, as wide as the full skeleton. The simultaneous capturing of spatially paired AP and lateral X-ray images is also a specificity of EOS imaging, which further provides secondary 3D (volumic) reformation of skeletal images. The main indications of this new imaging technology are assessment and follow-up of balance disorders of the spine and of the lower limbs.

  20. Earth Observation Training and Education with ESA LearnEO!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byfield, Valborg; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Dobson, Malcolm; Rosmorduc, Vinca; Del Frate, Fabio; Banks, Chris; Picchiani, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    For society to benefit fully from its investment in Earth observation, EO data must be accessible and familiar to a global community of users who have the skills, knowledge and understanding to use the observations appropriately in their work. Achieving this requires considerable education effort. LearnEO! (www.learn-eo.org) is a new ESA education project that contributes towards making this a reality. LearnEO! has two main aims: to develop new training resources that use data from sensors on ESA satellites to explore a variety of environmental topics, and to stimulate and support members of the EO and education communities who may be willing to develop and share new education resources in the future. The project builds on the UNESCO Bilko project, which currently supplies free software, tutorials, and example data to users in 175 countries. Most of these users are in academic education or research, but the training resources are also of interest to a growing number of professionals in government, NGOs and private enterprise. Typical users are not remote sensing experts, but see satellite data as one of many observational tools. They want an easy, low-cost means to process, display and analyse data from different satellite sensors as part of their work in environmental research, monitoring and policy development. Many of the software improvements and training materials developed in LearnEO! are in response to requests from this user community. The LearnEO! tutorial and peer-reviewed lessons are designed to teach satellite data processing and analysis skills at different levels, from beginner to advanced - where advanced lessons requires some previous experience with Earth observation techniques. The materials are aimed at students and professionals in various branches of Earth sciences who have not yet specialised in specific EO technologies. The lessons are suitable for self-study, university courses at undergraduate to MSc level, or for continued professional

  1. Mission operations concepts for Earth Observing System (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Taylor, Thomas D.; Hawkins, Frederick J.

    1991-01-01

    Mission operation concepts are described which are being used to evaluate and influence space and ground system designs and architectures with the goal of achieving successful, efficient, and cost-effective Earth Observing System (EOS) operations. Emphasis is given to the general characteristics and concepts developed for the EOS Space Measurement System, which uses a new series of polar-orbiting observatories. Data rates are given for various instruments. Some of the operations concepts which require a total system view are also examined, including command operations, data processing, data accountability, data archival, prelaunch testing and readiness, launch, performance monitoring and assessment, contingency operations, flight software maintenance, and security.

  2. Influence of Decenylsuccinic Acid on Water Permeability of Plant Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, O. Y.; Stadelmann, Ed. J.; Weiser, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    Decenylsuccinic acid altered permeability to water of epidermal cells of bulb scales of Allium cepa and of the leaf midrib of Rhoeo discolor. Water permeability, as determined by deplasmolysis time measurements, was related to the dose of undissociated decenylsuccinic acid (mm undissociated decenylsuccinic acid × minute). No relationship was found between permeability and total dose of decenylsuccinic acid, or dose of dissociated decenylsuccinic acid, suggesting that the undissociated molecule was the active factor in permeability changes and injury. At doses which did not damage cells (0.0008 to 0.6 [mm of the undissociated molecule × minute]) decenylsuccinic acid decreased water permeability. At higher doses (e.g., 4 to 8 [mm × minute]) injury to cells was common and decenylsuccinic acid increased permeability. Doses above the 10 to 20 (mm × minute) range were generally lethal. The plasmolysis form of uninjured cells was altered and protoplasmic swelling occasionally was observed. The dose-dependent reversal of water permeability changes (decreased to increased permeability) may reflect decenylsuccinic acid-induced changes in membrane structure. Reported effects of decenylsuccinic acid on temperature dependence of permeability and frost resistance were not verified. Images PMID:16658227

  3. [VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS IN SALIVA--BIOLOGICAL MARKERS FOR ASSESSMENT OF DRINKING WATER POLLUTANTS ON CHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Akaizina, A E; Akaizin, E S; Starodumov, V L

    2015-01-01

    The use of modern methods of analysis is aimed to the search of ultimately novel biological markers. Volatile fatty acids in saliva were not used previously for the assessment of the effects of contaminating substances in the drinking water on the body of children. The aim of the study is to investigate the informative value of volatile fatty acids in saliva as biological markers of the impact for the assessment of the exposure to contaminating substances in the drinking water on the body of children. Hygienic assessment of drinking water quality was made according to data of the own research of drinking water from centralized supply system of the city of Ivanovo. For the comparison of indices there was investigated the drinking water from wells at the village Podvyaznovsky of the Ivanovo region. In the Ivanovo water from the distributing network of centralized drinking water supply system of the city of Ivanovo, there were identified indices of the permanganate oxidation and the total concentration of residual chlorine exceeding norms, and also chloroform and carbon tetrachloride were in concentrations not exceeding the norms. Studied by us the samples of drinking water from Podvyaznovsky village wells, the water met the standards for all investigated parameters. The was studied the informative value of volatile fatty acids in the saliva of children aged 9-14 years from the city of Ivanovo and the Podvyaznovsky village, Ivanovo region. There was established the fall in acetic, butyric, isovaleric acids and the total amount of volatile fatty acids in the saliva in children of the city of Ivanovo, consuming water treated with chlorine of Ivanovo centralized drinking water supply system. Indices of volatile fatty acids in saliva are informative for the assessment of the impact of organic pollutants, residual chlorine and organic chlorine compounds of drinking water on the body of children.

  4. Examples of EO-1 Hyperion Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    divided in eight regions. Regions colored in orange, light sienna, and dark sienna represent soil while five shades from yellow to dark green delineate... chlorophyll -a concentration varies over several orders of magnitude, from about 0.01 to 100 mg m-3. "* Each of the three major components of the...understood that chlorophyll -a absorbs relatively more blue and red light than green, and the spectrum of backscattered sunlight or color of ocean water

  5. Reducing and verifying haloacetic acids in treated drinking water using a biological filter system.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jie C; Chan, Hung Y; Yang, Chih Y; Tseng, Wei B; Han, Jia Y

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on reducing the haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations in treated drinking water. HAA has been thought to be one possible nutrient supporting heterotrophic bacteria regrowth in drinking water. In this study, experiments were conducted using a pilot-scale system to evaluate the efficiency of biological filters (BF) for reducing excess HAA concentrations in water. The BF system reduced the total HAA concentration and the concentrations of five HAA species in the water. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were the three main HAA5 species that were present in the treated drinking water in this investigation. Combined, these three species represent approximately 77% of the HAA5 in the finished water after BF. The verification of the empirical HAA equation for the outlet in the BF system indicated linear relationships with high correlation coefficients. The empirical equation for the HAA5 concentrations in the finished water was established by examining other nutrients (e.g., dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm wavelength (UV254), and ammonia nitrogen) that can reduce pathogenic contamination. These findings may be useful for designing advanced processes for conventional water treatment plants or for managing water treatment and distribution systems for providing high-quality drinking water.

  6. Molecular mechanism of flip-flop in triple-layer oleic-acid membrane: correlation between oleic acid and water.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Van A; Kalia, Rajiv K; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-11-15

    We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study a pure oleic acid (OA) membrane in water that results in a triple-layer structure. We compute the pressure profiles to examine the hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions, and to estimate the surface tension (≈34.5 mN/m), which is similar to those of lipid membranes. We observe that the membrane of OAs having a large diffusion coefficient (0.4 × 10(-7) cm(2)/s) along the normal to the membrane is an ideal model to study oleic acid flip-flop. In the model, the membrane contains a middle layer serving as an intermediate for water and OAs to easily migrate (flip-flop) from one to other leaflets. Water molecules surrounding OA head-groups help to reduce the barriers at the hydrophobic interface to trigger flip-flop events. Within 500 ns, we observe 175 flip-flop events of OAs and 305 events of water traversing the membrane. The ratio of water passing rate (k(H(2)O) = 0.673 ns(-1)) to OA flip-flop rate (k(OA) = 0.446 ns(-1)) is 3/2. The ratio of the totally correlated water-OA events to the totally uncorrelated water-OA events, n(cor)/n(uncor), is also 3/2. The probability of the totally and partially correlated events is 69%. The results indicate that the trans-membrane movement of water and OAs is cooperative and correlated, and agrees with experimentally measured absorption rates. They support the idea that OA flip-flop is more favorable than transport by means of functional proteins. This study might provide further insight into how primitive cell membranes work, and how the interplay and correlation between water and fatty acids may occur.

  7. Enhanced enteral bioavailability of vancomycin using water-in-oil-in-water multiple emulsion incorporating highly purified unsaturated fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Kajita, M; Morishita, M; Takayama, K; Chiba, Y; Tokiwa, S; Nagai, T

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of an emulsion incorporating unsaturated fatty acids to improve the mucosal absorption of poorly absorbed drugs from rat intestinal loops in situ, using a water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsion. Vancomycin hydrochloride (VCM) was used as a model drug with low oral bioavailability. The entrapment efficiency of VCM in the emulsion was approximately 60% and remained constant over storage for 1 month at 4 degrees C. The emulsion incorporating C18 unsaturated fatty acids or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) markedly enhanced VCM absorption after colonic and rectal dosing. The effectiveness of DHA on VCM colonic absorption improvement was the same as that of oleic acid, and less than that of linoleic and linolenic acids. For rectal dosing, bioavailability was similar among various emulsions, in the range 40-50%. The effect of the emulsion incorporating oleic acid or DHA on improving VCM enteral bioavailability was not increased proportional to the incorporated amount. The electrical resistance of membranes was not changed by the incorporation of various fatty acids in emulsions. Our results indicated that W/O/W emulsions incorporating C18 unsaturated fatty acid or DHA were useful carriers for improving the absorption of poorly absorbable drugs via the intestinal tract without gross changes to tight junction function.

  8. [FATTY ACID COMPOSITION ALTEROMONAS-LIKE BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM THE BLACK SEA WATER].

    PubMed

    Klochko, V V; Avdeeva, L V

    2015-01-01

    Alteromonas macleodii strains isolated from the Black sea water were similar in their fatty acids composition with the type strain of this species. Analysis of lipid composition of 10 A. macleodii strains isolated from the deep and surface water layers in different World ocean regions including the Black sea water has shown that the deep and surface isolates of this species formed two groups different in their fatty acids profiles. The Black sea isolates of Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, P. citrea, P. flavipulchra conformed to these species type strains in their fatty acids composition. On the basis of the fatty acids spectra similarity of three Pseudoalteromonas species strains with Plipolytica described in 2010 has been established. Presence of three isomers C16:1ψ7, C 16:1ψ9 and C16:1ψ6--components of hexadecenic acid in the Black sea isolates of Shewanella baltica has been shown.

  9. Tensile properties and water absorption of zein sheets plasticized with oleic and linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Budi Santosa, F X; Padua, G W

    1999-05-01

    Corn zein has been investigated for fabrication of biodegradable packaging materials. Our objective was to investigate the effect of added plasticizers, oleic and linoleic acids, on tensile properties and water absorption of zein sheets. Moldable resins were precipitated from aqueous ethanol dispersions of zein and fatty acids and rolled into sheets of approximately 0.5 mm in thickness. To increase plasticization effects, zein-oleic acid sheets were replasticized by heating them in fatty acid baths. Plasticization resulted in flexible sheets of high clarity, low modulus, and high elongation and toughness, although low tensile strength. Water absorption of zein sheets was lowered by plasticization, attributed in part to reduced mass fraction of zein. Polymerization of linoleic acid may have sealed off pores on sheet surfaces, thus slowing water absorption.

  10. Assessment of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis potentialities to recover metals, sulfuric acid, and recycled water from acid gold mining effluent.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Bárbara C; Ferreira, Carolina D; Marques, Larissa S; Martins, Sofia S; Amaral, Míriam C S

    This work assessed the potential of nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) to treat acid streams contaminated with metals, such as effluent from the pressure oxidation process (POX) used in refractory gold ore processing. NF and RO were evaluated in terms of rejections of sulfuric acid and metals. Regarding NF, high sulfuric acid permeation (∼100%), was observed, while metals were retained with high efficiencies (∼90%), whereas RO led to high acid rejections (<88%) when conducted in pH values higher than 1. Thus, sequential use of NF and RO was proved to be a promising treatment for sulfuric acid solutions contaminated by metals, such as POX effluent. In this context, a purified acid stream could be recovered in NF permeate, which could be further concentrated in RO. Recovered acid stream could be reused in the gold ore processing or commercialized. A metal-enriched stream could be also recovered in NF retentate and transferred to a subsequent metal recovery stage. In addition, considering the high acid rejection obtained through the proposed system, RO permeate could be used as recycling water.

  11. Negative pH and extremely acidic mine waters from Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D.K.; Alpers, C.N.; Ptacek, C.J.; Blowes, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Extremely acidic mine waters with pH values as low as -3.6, total dissolved metal concentrations as high as 200 g/L, and sulfate concentrations as high as 760 g/L, have been encountered underground in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA. These are the most acidic waters known. The pH measurements were obtained by using the Pitzer method to define pH for calibration of glass membrane electrodes. The calibration of pH below 0.5 with glass membrane electrodes becomes strongly nonlinear but is reproducible to a pH as low as -4. Numerous efflorescent minerals were found forming from these acid waters. These extreme acid waters were formed primarily by pyrite oxidation and concentration by evaporation with minor effects from aqueous ferrous iron oxidation and efflorescent mineral formation.

  12. Solid/liquid phase diagram of the ammonium sulfate/succinic acid/water system.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Christian S; Beyer, Keith D

    2015-05-14

    We have studied the low-temperature phase diagram and water activities of the ammonium sulfate/succinic acid/water system using differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy of thin films. Using the results from our experiments, we have mapped the solid/liquid ternary phase diagram, determined the water activities based on the freezing point depression, and determined the ice/succinic acid phase boundary as well as the ternary eutectic composition and temperature. We also compared our results to the predictions of the extended AIM aerosol thermodynamics model (E-AIM) and found good agreement for the ice melting points in the ice primary phase field of this system; however, differences were found with respect to succinic acid solubility temperatures. We also compared the results of this study with those of previous studies that we have published on ammonium sulfate/dicarboxylic acid/water systems.

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW BROMINATED ACIDS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since chloroform was identified as the first disinfection by-product (DBP) in drinking water, there has been more than 25 years of research on DBPs. Despite these efforts, more than 50% of the total organic halide (TOX) formed in chlorinated drinking water remains unknown. Ther...

  14. Amino acids release in two red tide events in Chinese coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Chen, J.; Jin, H.

    2013-12-01

    During two red tide events and in situ experiments the East China Sea and the Pearl River Estuary, we analyzed DOC, POC, dissolved free amino acids (DFAA), dissolved combined amino acids (DCAA) and particulate hydrolysable amino acids (PHAA) and nutrients in samples from red tides areas as well as surrounding waters. The results show that POC and PHAA in red tide waters increased dramatically by about one order compared with those in surrounding waters. DCAA, DFAA and DOC also increased in red tide waters but only less than 2 folds increasing were observed. DFAA was only accounted for less than 5% of total amino acids (DFAA+DCAA+PHAA) and varied distinctly for all samples. Particulate organic carbon presented as amino acids (PHAA-C/POC) was accounted for about 35-60% of POC while dissolved organic carbon presented as amino acids (DCAA-C/DOC) was accounted for about 20-30% of DOC. Organic carbon pool shifted from DOC dominating at normal waters to POC dominating during red tides. During red tide most inorganic nitrogen nutrients (NO3+NO2) was seemly transformed into amino acids (here we called PHAA-N, DCAA-N, DFAA-N), in particular PHAA. Molecular composition of amino acids in organic matter suggested that POC mainly derived from phytoplankton in red tide waters, but the percentages of zooplanton and bacterial derived POC or DOC increased after one week of red tide. Our observations suggest that amino acids actually act as intergradation of nitrogen nutrients regeneration. We hypothesize that although zooplankton grazing and bacterial activities could lead to transformation of amino acids from phytoplankton into zooplankton and bacterial as well as from particulate organic matter into dissolved organic matter, nitrogen still present in its organic pool thus delay the regeneration of inorganic nitrogen.

  15. Sub-critical water hydrolysis of hog hair for amino acid production.

    PubMed

    Esteban, M B; García, A J; Ramos, P; Márquez, M C

    2010-04-01

    A recycling method using sub-critical water hydrolysis to convert hog hair from slaughterhouses into amino acids was developed. The influence of the reaction parameters such as temperature, time of reaction and initial substrate concentration were investigated in a batch reactor. The quality and quantity of amino acids in hydrolysates were determined and 17 kinds of amino acids were obtained. Under the tested conditions, the highest amino acid yield (325 mg/g protein) was reached at an initial substrate concentration of 10 g/l, a temperature of 250 degrees C and a reaction time of 60 min. A large amount of low-molecular weight amino acids, such alanine and glycine, was observed at these operating conditions. Sub-critical water hydrolysis was confirmed as an effective and practical process to recover amino acids from hog hair waste.

  16. Multicopy suppression of oxidant-sensitive eos1 mutation by IZH2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the involvement of Eos1 in zinc homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshihide; Takahashi, Shunsuke; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2010-05-01

    EOS1 is required for tolerance to oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; mutants are defective in the gene sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and tolerant to tunicamycin. To clarify the function of Eos1, we screened yeast genomic DNA libraries for heterologous genes that, when overexpressed from a plasmid, can suppress the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive eos1 mutation. We identified one such gene, IZH2, which has previously been reported to be a Zap1-regulated gene. However, the EOS1 and IZH2 genes do not themselves appear to be functionally interchangeable. Double disruption of the EOS1 and IZH2 genes yielded a slow-growth phenotype, suggesting that the two proteins are involved in related cellular processes. DNA microarray analysis revealed decreased expression of Zap1-regulated genes in the eos1-deletion mutant (Deltaeos1). Thus, it is likely that Eos1 is involved in zinc homeostasis.

  17. EOS7C Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Carbon Dioxide or Nitrogen inNatural Gas (Methane) Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Moridis,George J.; Spycher, Nicholas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-06-29

    EOS7C is a TOUGH2 module for multicomponent gas mixtures in the systems methane carbon dioxide (CH4-CO2) or methane-nitrogen (CH4-N2) with or without an aqueous phase and H2O vapor. EOS7C uses a cubic equation of state and an accurate solubility formulation along with a multiphase Darcy s Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a wide range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to subsurface geologic carbon sequestration sites and natural gas reservoirs. EOS7C models supercritical CO2 and subcritical CO2 as a non-condensible gas, hence EOS7C does not model the transition to liquid or solid CO2 conditions. The components modeled in EOS7C are water, brine, non-condensible gas, gas tracer, methane, and optional heat. The non-condensible gas (NCG) can be selected by the user to be CO2 or N2. The real gas properties module has options for Peng-Robinson, Redlich-Kwong, or Soave-Redlich-Kwong equations of state to calculate gas mixture density, enthalpy departure, and viscosity. Partitioning of the NCG and CH4 between the aqueous and gas phases is calculated using a very accurate chemical equilibrium approach. Transport of the gaseous and dissolved components is by advection and Fickian molecular diffusion. We present instructions for use and example problems to demonstrate the accuracy and practical application of EOS7C.

  18. Water chemical ionization mass spectrometry of aldehydes, ketones esters, and carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Miller, D.J.

    1986-11-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI) of aliphatic and aromatic carbonyl compounds using water as the reagent gas provides intense pseudomolecular ions and class-specific fragmentation patterns that can be used to identify aliphatic aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and esters. The length of ester acyl and alkyl groups can easily be determined on the basis of loss of alcohols from the protonated parent. Water CI provides for an approximately 200:1 selectivity of carbonyl species over alkanes. No reagent ions are detected above 55 amu, allowing species as small as acetone, propanal, acetic acid, and methyl formate to be identified. When deuterate water was used as the reagent, only the carboxylic acids and ..beta..-diketones showed significant H/D exchange. The use of water CI to identify carbonyl compounds in a wastewater from the supercritical water extraction of lignite coal, in lemon oil, and in whiskey volatiles is discussed.

  19. A comparison of neutralization efficiency of chemicals with respect to acidic Kopili River water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapil, Nibedita; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G.

    2016-02-01

    Among all the renewable sources of energy, hydropower is the most potential source which is economical, non-polluting and eco-friendly. The efficiency of hydropower plant in the long run depends on many factors like water and sediment quality. Erosive and corrosive wear of machine parts like turbine is a complex phenomenon. The problem becomes more acute if the hydroenvironment is acidic in nature. The wear and tear due to corrosion/erosion caused by acid mine drainage (AMD) from coal mines reduces the efficiency and the life of the equipments. In this work, neutralization of the acidic water of the Kopili River, Assam, India was investigated using a number of basic chemicals and quantitatively estimating their effectiveness and actual requirement. The acidic water of the river, used as the cooling water, has been found responsible for damaging the equipments of the Kopili Hydro Electric Power Project (KHEP), Assam/Meghalaya, India by reducing the life of all metallic parts through corrosion. In this work, use is made of a number of basic materials like calcium carbonate, calcium hydroxide, calcium oxide, sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide, and ammonia to examine their neutralization efficiency with respect to the acidic water and it was found that quick lime or raw lime (CaO) has the highest neutralization capacity. Suggestions have been made for meeting the problem of acidity of the river water.

  20. Boric acid equilibria in near-critical and supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Wofford, W.T.; Gloyna, E.F.; Johnston, K.P.

    1998-05-01

    Greater knowledge of acid-base equilibria is crucial to understanding the chemistry of hydrothermal processes including oxidation of organics, corrosion, catalysis, hydrolysis reactions, crystal growth and formation, precipitation of metal complexes and steam power cycles. The pH values of aqueous solutions of boric acid and KOH were measured with the optical indicator 2-naphthol at temperatures from 300 to 380 C. The equilibrium constant K{sub b}{sup {minus}1} for the reaction B(OH){sub 3} + OH{sup {minus}} = B(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} was determined from the pH measurements and correlated with a modified Born model. The titration curve for the addition of HCl to sodium borate exhibits strong acid-strong base behavior even at 350 C and 24.1 MPa. At these conditions, aqueous solutions of sodium borate buffer the pH at 9.6 {+-} 0.25.

  1. Mission Operations of EO-1 with Onboard Autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Daniel Q.

    2006-01-01

    Space mission operations are extremely labor and knowledge-intensive and are driven by the ground and flight systems. Inclusion of an autonomy capability can have dramatic effects on mission operations. We describe the prior, labor and knowledge intensive mission operations flow for the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) spacecraft as well as the new autonomous operations as part of the Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment.

  2. Potential commercial uses of EOS remote sensing products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Leslie L.

    1991-01-01

    The instrument complement of the Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite system will generate data sets with potential interest to a variety of users who are now just beginning to develop geographic information systems tailored to their special applications and/or jurisdictions. Other users may be looking for a unique product that enhances competitive position. The generally distributed products from EOS will require additional value added processing to derive the unique products desired by specific users. Entrepreneurs have an opportunity to create these proprietary level 4 products from the EOS data sets. Specific instruments or collections of instruments could provide information for crop futures trading, mineral exploration, television and printed medium news products, regional and local government land management and planning, digital map directories, products for third world users, ocean fishing fleet probability of harvest forecasts, and other areas not even imagined at this time. The projected level 3 product are examined that will be available at launch from EOS instruments and commercial uses of the data after value added processing is estimated.

  3. The EOSTA model for opacities and EOS calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barshalom, Avraham; Oreg, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    The EOSTA model developed recently combines the STA and INFERNO models to calculate opacities and EOS on the same footing. The quantum treatment of the plasma continuum and the inclusion of the resulted shape resonances yield a smooth behavior of the EOS and opacity global quantities vs density and temperature. We will describe the combined model and focus on its latest improvements. In particular we have extended the use of the special representation of the relativistic virial theorem to obtain an exact differential equation for the free energy. This equation, combined with a boundary condition at the zero pressure point, serves to advance the LDA EOS results significantly. The method focuses on applicability to high temperature and high density plasmas, warm dens matter etc. but applies at low temperatures as well treating fluids and even solids. Excellent agreement is obtained with experiments covering a wide range of density and temperature. The code is now used to create EOS and opacity databases for the use of hydro-dynamical simulations.

  4. Downlink Probability Density Functions for EOS-McMurdo Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, P.; Jackson, A. H.

    1996-01-01

    The visibility times and communication link dynamics for the Earth Observations Satellite (EOS)-McMurdo Sound direct downlinks have been studied. The 16 day EOS periodicity may be shown with the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) and the entire 16 day period should be simulated for representative link statistics. We desire many attributes of the downlink, however, and a faster orbital determination method is desirable. We use the method of osculating elements for speed and accuracy in simulating the EOS orbit. The accuracy of the method of osculating elements is demonstrated by closely reproducing the observed 16 day Landsat periodicity. An autocorrelation function method is used to show the correlation spike at 16 days. The entire 16 day record of passes over McMurdo Sound is then used to generate statistics for innage time, outage time, elevation angle, antenna angle rates, and propagation loss. The levation angle probability density function is compared with 1967 analytic approximation which has been used for medium to high altitude satellites. One practical result of this comparison is seen to be the rare occurrence of zenith passes. The new result is functionally different than the earlier result, with a heavy emphasis on low elevation angles. EOS is one of a large class of sun synchronous satellites which may be downlinked to McMurdo Sound. We examine delay statistics for an entire group of sun synchronous satellites ranging from 400 km to 1000 km altitude. Outage probability density function results are presented three dimensionally.

  5. Science Quality Assessment in Support of EOS MISR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, S.; Crean, K.; Kahn, R.

    1999-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument, scheduled to fly on board the first Earth Observing System (EOS) spacecraft, will have a data stream that produces over 100 GB of data per day, once in full operation, of information about the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface.

  6. EOS Terra Terra Constellation Exit/Future Maneuver Plans Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantziaras, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    This EOS Terra Constellation Exit/Future Maneuver Plans Update presentation will discuss brief history of Terra EOM work; lifetime fuel estimates; baseline vs. proposed plan origin; resultant exit orbit; baseline vs. proposed exit plan; long term orbit altitude; revised lifetime proposal and fallback options.

  7. Scaling the Pipe: NASA EOS Terra Data Systems at 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Robert E.; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2010-01-01

    Standard products from the five sensors on NASA's Earth Observing System's (EOS) Terra satellite are being used world-wide for earth science research and applications. This paper describes the evolution of the Terra data systems over the last decade in which the distributed systems that produce, archive and distribute high quality Terra data products were scaled by two orders of magnitude.

  8. EOS Operations Systems: EDOS Implemented Changes to Reduce Operations Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordier, Guy R.; Gomez-Rosa, Carlos; McLemore, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe in this paper the progress achieved to-date with the reengineering of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Operations System (EDOS), the experience gained in the process and the ensuing reduction of ground systems operations costs. The reengineering effort included a major methodology change, applying to an existing schedule driven system, a data-driven system approach.

  9. EOS Aura and Future Satellite Studies of the Ozone Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    The EOS Aura mission, launched in 2004, provides a comprehensive assessment of the stratospheric dynamics and chemistry. This talk will focus on results from Aura including the chemistry of polar ozone depletion. The data from Aura can be directly linked to UARS data to produce long term trends in stratospheric trace gases.

  10. EOS Aqua: Mission Status at Earth Science Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2016-01-01

    This is an EOS Aqua Mission Status presentation to be given at the MOWG meeting in Albuquerque NM. The topics to discus are: mission summary, spacecraft subsystems summary, recent and planned activities, inclination adjust maneuvers, propellant usage and lifetime estimate, and mission summary.

  11. Mission Status at Aura Science Team MOWG Meeting: EOS Aura

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Presentation at the 24797-16 Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Science Team Meeting (Mission Operations Work Group (MOWG)) at Rotterdam, Netherlands August 29, 2016. Presentation topics include mission summary, spacecraft subsystems summary, recent and planned activities, spacecraft anomalies, data capture, propellant usage and lifetime estimates, spacecraft maneuvers and ground track history, mission highlights and past spacecraft anomalies and reliability estimates.

  12. Chemical dynamics of acidity and heavy metals in a mine water-polluted soil during decontamination using clean water.

    PubMed

    Chen, A; Lin, C; Lu, W; Ma, Y; Bai, Y; Chen, H; Li, J

    2010-03-15

    A column leaching experiment was conducted to investigate the chemical dynamics of the percolating water and washed soil during decontamination of an acidic mine water-polluted soil. The results show that leaching of the contaminated soil with clean water rapidly reduced soluble acidity and ion concentrations in the soils. However, only <20% of the total actual acidity in the soil column was eliminated after 30 leaching cycles. It is likely that the stored acidity continues to be released to the percolating water over a long period of time. During the column leaching, dissolved Cu and Pb were rapidly leached out, followed by mobilization of colloidal Cu and Pb from the exchangeable and the oxide-bound fractions as a result of reduced ionic strength in the soil solution. The soluble Fe contained in the soil was rare, probably because the soil pH was not sufficiently low; marked mobility of colloidal Fe took place after the ionic strength of the percolating water was weakened and the mobilized Fe was mainly derived from iron oxides. In contrast with Cu, Pb and Fe, the concentration of leachate Zn and Mn showed a continuously decreasing trend during the entire period of the experiment.

  13. EOS imaging versus current radiography: A health technology assessment study

    PubMed Central

    Mahboub-Ahari, Alireza; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Yusefi, Mahmoud; Velayati, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background: EOS is a 2D/3D muscle skeletal diagnostic imaging system. The device has been developed to produce a high quality 2D, full body radiographs in standing, sitting and squatting positions. Three dimensional images can be reconstructed via sterEOS software. This Health Technology Assessment study aimed to investigate efficacy, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new emerged EOS imaging system in comparison with conventional x-ray radiographic techniques. Methods: All cost and outcome data were assessed from Iran's Ministry of Health Perspective. Data for clinical effectiveness was extracted using a rigorous systematic review. As clinical outcomes the rate of x-ray emission and related quality of life were compared with Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Radiography (DR). Standard costing method was conducted to find related direct medical costs. In order to examine robustness of the calculated Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs) we used two-way sensitivity analysis. GDP Per capita of Islamic Republic of Iran (2012) adopted as cost-effectiveness threshold. Results: Review of related literature highlighted the lack of rigorous evidence for clinical outcomes. Ultra low dose EOS imaging device is known as a safe intervention because of FDA, CE and CSA certificates. The rate of emitted X-ray was 2 to 18 fold lower for EOS compared to the conventional techniques (p<0.001). The Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio for EOS relative to CR calculated $50706 in baseline analysis (the first scenario) and $50714, $9446 respectively for the second and third scenarios. Considering the value of neither $42146 as upper limit, nor the first neither the second scenario could pass the cost-effectiveness threshold for Iran. Conclusion: EOS imaging technique might not be considered as a cost-effective intervention in routine practice of health system, especially within in-patient wards. Scenario analysis shows that, only in an optimum condition such as lower

  14. Water Deficit-Induced Changes in Abscisic Acid, Growth, Polysomes, and Translatable RNA in Soybean Hypocotyls

    PubMed Central

    Bensen, Robert J.; Boyer, John S.; Mullet, John E.

    1988-01-01

    Soybean seedlings (Glycine max L.) were germinated and dark-grown in water-saturated vermiculite (water potential = −0.01 megapascal) for 48 hours, then transferred either to water-saturated vermiculite or to low water potential vermiculite (water potential = −0.30 megapascal). A decrease in growth rate was detectable within 0.8 hour post-transfer to low water potential vermiculite. A fourfold increase in the abscisic acid content of the elongating region was observed within 0.5 hour. At 24 hours post-transfer, hypocotyl elongation was severely arrested and abscisic acid reached its highest measured level: 3.7 nanograms per milligram dry weight (74-fold increase). A comparison of the polyA+ RNA populations isolated at 24 hours post-transfer from the elongating region of water-saturated and low water potential vermiculite-grown seedlings was made by two-dimensional (isoelectric focusing-sodium dodecyl sulfate) polyacrylamide gel analysis of in vitro translation products. It revealed both increases and decreases in the relative amounts of a number of translation products. Rewatering seedlings grown in low water potential vermiculite at 24 hours post-transfer led to a total recovery in growth rate within 0.5 hour, while abscisic acid in the elongating hypocotyl region required 1 to 2 hours to return to uninduced levels. Application of 1.0 millimolar (±) abscisic acid to well-watered seedlings resulted in a 48% reduction in hypocotyl growth rate during the first 2 hours after treatment. Plants treated with abscisic acid for 24 hours had a lower polysome content than control plants. However, hypocotyl growth inhibition in abscisic acid-treated seedlings preceded the decline in polysome content. Images Fig. 4 PMID:16666297

  15. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  16. Rare earth element partitioning between hydrous ferric oxides and acid mine water during iron oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kimball, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous iron rapidly oxidizes to Fe (III) and precipitates as hydrous Fe (III) oxides in acid mine waters. This study examines the effect of Fe precipitation on the rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of acid mine waters to determine the pH range over which REEs behave conservatively and the range over which attenuation and fractionation occur. Two field studies were designed to investigate REE attenuation during Fe oxidation in acidic, alpine surface waters. To complement these field studies, a suite of six acid mine waters with a pH range from 1.6 to 6.1 were collected and allowed to oxidize in the laboratory at ambient conditions to determine the partitioning of REEs during Fe oxidation and precipitation. Results from field experiments document that even with substantial Fe oxidation, the REEs remain dissolved in acid, sulfate waters with pH below 5.1. Between pH 5.1 and 6.6 the REEs partitioned to the solid phases in the water column, and heavy REEs were preferentially removed compared to light REEs. Laboratory experiments corroborated field data with the most solid-phase partitioning occurring in the waters with the highest pH. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fulvic Acid Mediated Photolysis of Ibuprofen in Water.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photolysis of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen was studied in solutions of fulvic acid (FA) isolated from Pony Lake, Antarctica; Suwannee River, GA, USA; and Old Woman Creek, OH, USA. At an initial concentration of 10 µM ibuprofen degrades by direct photolysis...

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of acidity constants of Alizarine Red S in water, water-Brij-35 and water-SDS micellar media solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, Ali; Ghalie, Mohammad; Yazdanipour, Ateesa; Ghasemi, Jahanbakhsh

    2006-06-01

    The acidity constants of Alizarine Red S in water, water-Brij-35 and water-SDS micellar media solutions at 25 °C and an ionic strength of 0.1 M have been determined spectrophotometrically. To evaluate the pH-absorbance data, a resolution method based on the combination of soft- and hard-modeling is applied. The acidity constants of all related equilibria are estimated using the whole spectral fitting of the collected data to an established factor analysis model. DATAN program applied for determination of acidity constants. Results show that the p Ka values of Alizarine Red S are influenced as the percentages of a neutral and an anionic surfactant such as Brij-35 and SDS, respectively, added to the solution of this reagent. Effect of surfactant on acidity constants and pure spectrum of each component are also discussed.

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of acidity constants of alizarine red S in water, water-Brij-35 and water-SDS micellar media solutions.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Ali; Ghalie, Mohammad; Yazdanipour, Ateesa; Ghasemi, Jahanbakhsh

    2006-06-01

    The acidity constants of Alizarine Red S in water, water-Brij-35 and water-SDS micellar media solutions at 25 degrees C and an ionic strength of 0.1 M have been determined spectrophotometrically. To evaluate the pH-absorbance data, a resolution method based on the combination of soft- and hard-modeling is applied. The acidity constants of all related equilibria are estimated using the whole spectral fitting of the collected data to an established factor analysis model. DATAN program applied for determination of acidity constants. Results show that the pKa values of Alizarine Red S are influenced as the percentages of a neutral and an anionic surfactant such as Brij-35 and SDS, respectively, added to the solution of this reagent. Effect of surfactant on acidity constants and pure spectrum of each component are also discussed.

  20. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Pain: Comparison with EoE-Dysphagia and Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Kiranmai; Gupta, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Compare EoE-AP with EoE-D for clinical, endoscopy (EGD), histology and outcomes and also with FAP-N. Method. Symptoms, physical findings, EGD, histology, symptom scores, and treatments were recorded for the three groups. Cluster analysis was done. Results. Dysphagia and abdominal pain were different in numbers but not statistically significant between EoE-AP and EoE-D. EGD, linear furrows, white exudates were more in the EoE-D and both combined were significant (p < 0.05). EoE-D, peak and mean eosinophils (p  0.06) and eosinophilic micro abscesses (p  0.001) were higher. Follow-Up. Based on single symptom, EoE-AP had 30% (p  0.25) improvement, EoE-D 86% (p < 0.001) and similar with composite score (p  0.57 and <0.001, resp.). Patients who had follow-up, EGD: 42.8% with EoE-AP and 77.8% with EoE-D, showed single symptom improvement and the eosinophil count fell from 38.5/34.6 (peak and mean) to 31.2/30.4 (p  0.70) and from 43.6/40.8 to 25.2/22.8 (p < 0.001), respectively. FAP-N patients had similar symptom improvement like EoE-D. Cluster Analysis. EoE-AP and FAP-N were similar in clinical features and response to treatment, but EoE-D was distinctly different from EoE-AP and FAP-N. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that EoE-AP and EoE-D have different histology and outcomes. In addition, EoE-AP has clinical features similar to the FAP-N group. PMID:27610357

  1. Rotational Spectroscopy of TETRAHYDRO-2-FUROIC Acid, its Chiral Aggregates and its Complex with Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Javix; Jäger, Wolfgang; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-06-01

    Rotational spectra of Tetrahydro-2-furoic acid (THA), a chiral acid, and its homo- and heterochiral dimers, and its complex with water have been recorded using a chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. This chiral acid was predicted to have nine conformers, although only the most stable one was detected experimentally and its rotational spectrum assigned. We have analyzed its intramolecular H-bonding pattern in detail. Eleven conformers have been predicted for the 1:1 hydration complex between THA and water and 14 conformers for (THA)2. The assignments of these complexes are currently underway and will be presented.

  2. Evolution of water chemistry in natural acidic environments in Yangmingshan, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ezoe, Yuka; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Noto, Masami; Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa

    2002-08-01

    In Yangmingshan National Park, located in the northern part of the Taiwan Island, there is a very rare area where fish (Channa asiatica) live in spite of acid environments. The origin of the acid in local acid ponds and rivers and the evolution of the water chemistry are discussed on the basis of sulfur stable isotope ratios and chemical equilibria. One of the sources of the acid is sulfuric acid, which is derived from the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in volcanic gas gushing out from fumaroles around the area and from acid deposition supplied from Taipei City. It is also derived from the oxidation of pyrite: the sulfur stable isotope ratios of delta 34S of +1@1000 to +4@1000 (relative to CDT) of sulfate in acid pond waters (pH 3-4) could be related to those of hydrogen sulfide in volcanic gas, pyrite in local pond sediments and soils, and sulfate in rain water. One acid source is sulfuric and hydrochloric acids arising in springs from geothermal activity: the delta 34S values were characterised by +13@1000 to +17@1000 sulfate-S, which was provided by a disproportionation reaction of sulfur dioxide in the depths. Another acid source could be the oxidation of iron(II). Under acidic conditions, the water-rock reaction gives rise to high concentrations of aluminium and iron. While flowing down surface streams, iron(II) is oxidised to iron(III) and then hydrolysed to cause further acidification under oxic conditions. The concentrations of iron and aluminium are controlled by redox and dissolution equilibria.

  3. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  4. TECHNIQUES AND METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF HALOACETIC ACIDS IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Haloethanoic (haloacetic) acids (HAAs) are formed as disinfection byproducts (DBPs) during the chlorination of natural water to make it fit for consumption. Sundry analytical techniques have been applied in order to determine the concentrations of the HAAs in potable water suppli...

  5. 1/f fluctuations of amino acids regulate water transportation in aquaporin 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs), which transport water molecules across cell membranes, are involved in many physiological processes. Recently, it is reported that the water-water interactions within the channel are broken at the aromatic/arginine selectivity filter (ar/R region), which prevents proton transportation [U. K. Eriksson et al., Science 340, 1346 (2013), 10.1126/science.1234306]. However, the effects of the conformational fluctuations of amino acids on water transportation remain unclear. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we analyze water transportation and fluctuations of amino acids within AQP1. The amino acids exhibit 1/f fluctuations, indicating possession of long-term memory. Moreover, we find that water molecules crossing the ar/R region obey a non-Poisson process. To investigate the effect of 1/f fluctuations on water transportation, we perform restrained molecular dynamics simulations of AQP1 and simple Langevin stochastic simulations. As a result, we confirm that 1/f fluctuations of amino acids contribute to water transportation in AQP1. These findings appreciably enhance our understanding of AQPs and suggest possibilities for developing biomimetic nanopores.

  6. MUTAGENICITY AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN SURFACE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTED WITH PERACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research were to study the influence of peracetic acid (PAA) on the formation of mutagens in surface waters used for human consumption and to assess its potential application for the disinfection of drinking water. The results obtained using PAA were compared to ...

  7. Partition coefficients for acetic, propionic, and butyric acids in a crude oil/water system

    SciTech Connect

    Reinsel, M.A.; Borkowski, J.J.; Sears, J.T. . National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Biofilm Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, and organic acid concentration on the partition coefficients for short-chain organic acids were measured in a crude oil/water system. Acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, as probable substrates for microbial souring of oil reservoirs, were used in conjunction with two types of crude oil. Temperatures of 35--75 C, pH values of 4.0--7.0, and acid concentrations of 10--1,000 mg/L were studied. Initial naturally occurring levels of organic acids in the crude oils were also determined. pH had by far the largest effect on the partition coefficient for all three organic acids for both types oil. At conditions normally seen in an oil reservoir (pH 5--7), the great percentage (85+%) of these acids were dissolved in the aqueous phase. The log of the partition coefficient K increased approximately linearly with the number of carbon atoms in the acid. It was seen that organic acids are readily available carbon sources for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at normal reservoir conditions, and that crude oil may provide a source of organic acids in a low-pH, water-flooded reservoir.

  8. Distribution of hydrophobic ionogenic organic compounds between octanol and water: Organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Jafvert, C.T. ); Westall, J.C. ); Grieder, E.; Schwarzenbach, R.P. )

    1990-12-01

    The octanol-water distributions of 10 environmentally significant organic acid compounds were determined as a function of aqueous-phase salt concentration (0.05-0.2 M LiCl, NaCl, KCl, CaCl{sub 2}, or MgCl{sub 2}) and pH. The compounds were pentachlorophenol, 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorophenol, (2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)acetic acid, 4-chloro-{alpha}-(4-chlorophenyl)benzeneacetic acid, 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol, (2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid, 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) butanoic acid, 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid, 2,3,6-trichlorobenzeneacetic acid, and 2-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)propionic acid. The experimental results were interpreted quantitatively with an equilibrium model that accounts for acid dissociation in the aqueous phase and partitioning into the octanol phase by the neutral organic species, free inorganic and organic ions, and ion pairs. The partition constants for the neutral ion pairs correlate well with the partition constants of the neutral acids. Two experiments address the applicability of these octanol-water distribution data to the distribution of ionogenic compounds in the environment: the distribution of 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol on a natural sorbent as a function of salt concentration (NaCl and CaCl{sub 2}) and pH, and competitive adsorption of pentachlorophenol and 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorophenol on an environmental sorbent.

  9. Treatment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated alfalfa seeds and sprouts with electrolyzed oxidizing water.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ratna R; Demirci, Ali

    2003-09-15

    Electrolyzed oxidizing water is a relatively new concept that has been utilized in agriculture, livestock management, medical sterilization, and food sanitation. Electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water generated by passing sodium chloride solution through an EO water generator was used to treat alfalfa seeds and sprouts inoculated with a five-strain cocktail of nalidixic acid resistant Escherichia coli O157:H7. EO water had a pH of 2.6, an oxidation-reduction potential of 1150 mV and about 50 ppm free chlorine. The percentage reduction in bacterial load was determined for reaction times of 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 min. Mechanical agitation was done while treating the seeds at different time intervals to increase the effectiveness of the treatment. Since E. coli O157:H7 was released due to soaking during treatment, the initial counts on seeds and sprouts were determined by soaking the contaminated seeds/sprouts in 0.1% peptone water for a period equivalent to treatment time. The samples were then pummeled in 0.1% peptone water and spread plated on tryptic soy agar with 5 microg/ml of nalidixic acid (TSAN). Results showed that there were reductions between 38.2% and 97.1% (0.22-1.56 log(10) CFU/g) in the bacterial load of treated seeds. The reductions for sprouts were between 91.1% and 99.8% (1.05-2.72 log(10) CFU/g). An increase in treatment time increased the percentage reduction of E. coli O157:H7. However, germination of the treated seeds reduced from 92% to 49% as amperage to make EO water and soaking time increased. EO water did not cause any visible damage to the sprouts.

  10. Rigorous theoretical constraint on constant negative EoS parameter [Formula: see text] and its effect for the late Universe.

    PubMed

    Burgazli, Alvina; Eingorn, Maxim; Zhuk, Alexander

    In this paper, we consider the Universe at the late stage of its evolution and deep inside the cell of uniformity. At these scales, the Universe is filled with inhomogeneously distributed discrete structures (galaxies, groups and clusters of galaxies). Supposing that the Universe contains also the cosmological constant and a perfect fluid with a negative constant equation of state (EoS) parameter [Formula: see text] (e.g., quintessence, phantom or frustrated network of topological defects), we investigate scalar perturbations of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metrics due to inhomogeneities. Our analysis shows that, to be compatible with the theory of scalar perturbations, this perfect fluid, first, should be clustered and, second, should have the EoS parameter [Formula: see text]. In particular, this value corresponds to the frustrated network of cosmic strings. Therefore, the frustrated network of domain walls with [Formula: see text] is ruled out. A perfect fluid with [Formula: see text] neither accelerates nor decelerates the Universe. We also obtain the equation for the nonrelativistic gravitational potential created by a system of inhomogeneities. Due to the perfect fluid with [Formula: see text], the physically reasonable solutions take place for flat, open and closed Universes. This perfect fluid is concentrated around the inhomogeneities and results in screening of the gravitational potential.

  11. Radiation modification of water absorption of cassava starch by acrylic acid/acrylamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiatkamjornwong, Suda; Chomsaksakul, Wararuk; Sonsuk, Manit

    2000-10-01

    Graft copolymerizations of acrylamide and/or acrylic acid onto cassava starch by a simultaneous irradiation technique using gamma-rays as the initiator were studied with regard to various parameters of importance: the monomer-to-cassava starch ratio, total dose (kGy), dose rate (kGy h -1), acrylamide-to-acrylic acid ratio, and the addition of nitric acid and maleic acid as the additives. Grafting parameters were determined in relation to the water absorption of the saponified graft copolymer. The water absorption of the saponified graft copolymer in salt and buffer solutions of different ionic strengths was also measured, from which the superabsorbent properties are found to be pH sensitive. The starch graft copolymers of acrylamide and acrylic acid give higher water absorption than the starch graft copolymers of either acrylamide or acrylic acid alone. The porosity of the saponified starch graft copolymers prepared by the acrylamide/acrylic acid ratios of 70:30 and 50:50 was much higher than the porosity of copolymers in terms of fine networks. Ionic strength and multi-oxidation states of the saline and buffer solutions markedly decreased the water absorption of the saponified cassava starch grafted superabsorbent polymers.

  12. Eco-friendly microextraction method for the quantitative speciation of 13 haloacetic acids in water.

    PubMed

    Cardador, María José; Gallego, Mercedes

    2014-05-02

    This paper describes the first micro liquid-liquid extraction (MLLE) gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the speciation of emerging iodinated acetic acids, along with conventional chlorinated and brominated acids in water. The haloacetic acids (HAAs) were derivatised using 3 reagents for their methylation, both in aqueous and organic media. The acidic methanol derivatisation in aqueous medium provided the best efficiency, requiring minimal sample manipulation. The derivatisation yield was improved through the use of microwave energy that drastically reduced reaction time (2 min). The HAA methyl esters were finally extracted using 250 μL of methyl tert-butyl ether. This MLLE combined with the use of a large-volume sample injection coupled to a programmed temperature vaporiser-GC-MS improved the sensitivity of the method and minimised the generation of hazardous residues in accordance with the principles of "Green Chemistry". Detection and quantification limits (excepting tribromoacetic acid) within the range of 0.01-0.15 μg/L and 0.03-0.5 μg/L, respectively, were obtained and the relative standard deviation was lower than 10%. The eco-friendly method was applied to the speciation of the 13 HAAs in treated (chlorinated and chloraminated water) and untreated water. Up to 8 HAAs were found at detectable levels in treated water. The highly toxic monoiodoacetic acid was detected in almost all the chloraminated water.

  13. Isolation and characterization of haloacetic acid-degrading Afipia spp. from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Hozalski, Raymond M; Leach, Lynne H; Camper, Anne K; Goslan, Emma H; Parsons, Simon A; Xie, Yuefeng F; LaPara, Timothy M

    2009-08-01

    Haloacetic acids are a class of disinfection byproducts formed during the chlorination and chloramination of drinking water that have been linked to several human health risks. In this study, we isolated numerous strains of haloacetic acid-degrading Afipia spp. from tap water, the wall of a water distribution pipe, and a granular activated carbon filter treating prechlorinated water. These Afipia spp. harbored two phylogenetically distinct groups of alpha-halocarboxylic acid dehalogenase genes that clustered with genes previously detected only by cultivation-independent methods or were novel and did not conclusively cluster with the previously defined phylogenetic subdivisions of these genes. Four of these Afipia spp. simultaneously harbored both the known classes of alpha-halocarboxylic acid dehalogenase genes (dehI and dehII), which is potentially of importance because these bacteria were also capable of biodegrading the greatest number of different haloacetic acids. Our results suggest that Afipia spp. have a beneficial role in suppressing the concentrations of haloacetic acids in tap water, which contrasts the historical (albeit erroneous) association of Afipia sp. (specifically Afipia felis) as the causative agent of cat scratch disease.

  14. Kinetic studies of the strengthening effect on liquid hot water pretreatments by organic acids.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Huisheng; Lv, Chunliu; Zhang, Minhua; Liu, Jiatao; Meng, Fanmei; Geng, Zhong Feng

    2017-03-22

    The liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatments would be accelerated by the organic acids produced from the process. In the study, the organic acids included not only acetic acid but also lactic acid during LHW hydrolysis of reeds, at 180-220°C and for 15-135min. The lactic acid was presumably produced from xylose degradation in the pretreatment process. The different organic acids, such as acetic acid, lactic acid and acetic-lactic acids, were used to strengthen the LHW pretreatments for increasing xylose production. Moreover, the work presented kinetic models of xylose and hemicellulose at different conditions, considering the generation of lactic acid. The experimental and kinetic results both indicated that acetic-lactic acids had synergistic catalytic effect on the reaction, which could not only inhibit the degradation of xylose, but also promote the hydrolysis of hemicellulose. Besides, the highest concentration of xylose of 7.323g/L was obtained at 200°C, for 45min and with 1wt% acetic-lactic acids.

  15. Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; MacKenzie, Patricia D.

    1985-01-01

    Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia, and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with steam, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

  16. Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters

    DOEpatents

    King, C.J.; Mackenzie, P.D.

    1982-09-03

    Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with stream, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

  17. Concepts For An EO Land Convoy Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutter, M. A.; Eves, S.; Remedios, J.; Humpage, N.; Hall, D.; Regan, A.

    2013-12-01

    ESA are undertaking three studies investigating possible synergistic satellite missions flying in formation with the operational Copernicus Sentinel missions and/or the METOP satellites. These three studies are focussed on:- a) ocean and ice b) land c) atmosphere Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL), the University of Leicester and Astrium Ltd are undertaking the second of these studies into the synergetic observation by missions flying in formation with European operational missions, focusing on the land theme. The aim of the study is to identify and develop, (through systematic analysis), potential innovative Earth science objectives and novel applications and services that could be made possible by flying additional satellites, (possibly of small-class type), in constellation or formation with one or more already deployed or firmly planned European operational missions, with an emphasis on the Sentinel missions, but without excluding other possibilities. In the long-term, the project aims at stimulating the development of novel, (smaller), mission concepts in Europe that may exploit new and existing European operational capacity in order to address in a cost effective manner new scientific objectives and applications. One possible route of exploitation would be via the proposed Small Mission Initiative (SMI) that may be initiated under the ESA Earth Explorer Observation Programme (EOEP). The following ESA science priority areas have been highlighted during the study [1]:- - The water cycle - The carbon cycle - Terrestrial ecosystems - Biodiversity - Land use and land use cover - Human population dynamics The study team have identified the science gaps that might be addressed by a "convoy" mission flying with the Copernicus Sentinel satellites, identified the candidate mission concepts and provided recommendations regarding the most promising concepts from a list of candidates. These recommendations provided the basis of a selection process performed by ESA

  18. Effect of zinc on the transformation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Lizhong

    2010-02-15

    Suspected carcinogen haloacetic acids (HAAs), as a major class of disinfection byproducts, are widespread in drinking water. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of zinc, a metal component of galvanized pipe in water distribution systems, on the fate of the HAAs. Results showed that zinc could induce sequential dehalogenation of HAAs. All brominated acetic acids were transformed to acetate ultimately, and chloroacetic acid (MCAA) was the final product for the dehalogenation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA). The concentrations of the parent compounds as a function of time were fitted pseudo-first-order kinetic model with R(2)>0.904. Brominated acetic acids were more activated than chlorinated acetic acids in the reaction with zinc and the activity of HAAs decreased with the number of substituents reduced. While flowing through galvanized pipe, brominated and chlorinated acetic acids except MCAA would decrease to 1% of their initial concentrations in 2.11-6.34h, and the rates would not be affected obviously by the hydrodynamic or duct conditions. The health risk due to TCAA, DCAA in drinking water tends to be magnified, and that due to TBAA, DBAA tends to be first increased and then decreased, also that due to MBAA tends to be decreased.

  19. Phase diagrams and water activities of aqueous ammonium salts of malonic acid.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Keith D; Richardson, Michael; Reusch, Breanna

    2011-04-14

    Malonic acid has been observed in the free troposphere and as a component of tropospheric aerosol, among other dicarboxylic acids. These aerosols can uptake ammonia, which partially or completely neutralizes the acids. Therefore, the impact of ammoniated dicarboxylic acids on the phases that can exist in aerosols at atmospheric temperatures needs investigation. To that end, the low temperature, solid/liquid phase diagrams of ammonium hydrogen malonate/water, ammonium malonate/water, and triammonium hydrogen malonate/water have been investigated with differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy of thin films. Results show that the order of increasing solubility is triammonium hydrogen malonate, ammonium hydrogen malonate, malonic acid, and ammonium malonate. We have also determined a hydrate may form in the ammonium malonate system and decompose below 240 K. We report water activities at the ice melting points for each system up to the respective eutectic concentrations, and find for a given mole fraction of water, increasing ammonium content leads to decreasing water activity coefficients.

  20. Influence of Sodium Carbonate on Decomposition of Formic Acid by Discharge inside Bubble in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2015-09-01

    An influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubble in water was investigated. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of addition of sodium carbonate, the pH value increased with decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the increase of pH value contributed to improve an efficiency of the formic acid decomposition because the reaction rate of ozone and formic acid increased with increasing pH value. In the case of argon injection, the decomposition rate was not affected by the pH value owing to the high rate constants for loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  1. Altered plasma and erythrocyte phospholipid fatty acid profile in elite female water polo and football players.

    PubMed

    Arsić, Aleksandra; Vučić, Vesna; Tepšić, Jasna; Mazić, Sanja; Djelić, Marina; Glibetić, Marija

    2012-02-01

    The impact of chronic, intense exercise, such as in elite athletes, on phospholipids fatty acids (FA) composition has not been studied in women so far. This study aimed to investigate FA profiles in plasma and erythrocytes phospholipids in elite female water polo (N = 15) and football (N = 19) players in comparison with sedentary women. In spite of similar dietary patterns, as assessed by a food frequency questionnaire, plasma FA profile in the football players showed significantly higher proportions of stearic acid, oleic acid, and monounsaturated FA (MUFA), and significantly lower proportions of total and n-6 polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) than in the water polo and control group. The water polo players had higher percentages of palmitoleic acid and arachidonic acid than the control subjects. Erythrocyte FA profile differed among groups. We found significantly higher proportion of oleic acid and MUFA in the football group than in the controls, and decreased stearic acid and elevated palmitic and palmitoleic acid in the water polo players than in the other 2 groups. Both groups of athletes had significantly lower percentages of n-6 dihomo-γ-linolenic acid, n-6 PUFA, and total PUFA compared with the controls. The estimated activities of elongase and desaturases in erythrocytes were also altered in the athletes. Our results indicate that long-term, intense physical training significantly affects FA status of plasma and erythrocyte phospholipids in women. The observed differences between the water polo and the football players suggest that the type of regular training may contribute to the altered metabolism of FA, although possible genetic differences among the 3 study groups cannot be ruled out.

  2. Development of a method for environmentally friendly chemical peptide synthesis in water using water-dispersible amino acid nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Due to the vast importance of peptides in biological processes, there is an escalating need for synthetic peptides to be used in a wide variety of applications. However, the consumption of organic solvent is extremely large in chemical peptide syntheses because of the multiple condensation steps in organic solvents. That is, the current synthesis method is not environmentally friendly. From the viewpoint of green sustainable chemistry, we focused on developing an organic solvent-free synthetic method using water, an environmentally friendly solvent. Here we described in-water synthesis technology using water-dispersible protected amino acids. PMID:21867548

  3. EO-199, a specific antagonist of antiarrhythmic drugs: Assessment by binding experiments and in vivo studies

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, E.; Harel, G.; Lipinsky, D.; Sarne, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    EO-199, a demethylated analog of the novel class I antiarrhythmic drug EO-122 was found to antagonize the antiarrhythmic activity of EO-122 and that of procainamide (Class I{sub A}). EO-199 did not block significantly the activity of a class I{sub B} antiarrhythmic agent, lidocaine. EO-199 also displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)EO-122 to rate heart membranes similarly to procainamide whereas lidocaine did not. The correlation between binding experiments and pharmacological effects points to a possible subclassification of these drugs; the two chemical analogs EO-199 and EO-122, as well as procainamide (I{sub A}) but not lidocaine (I{sub B}), compete at the same site or the same state of the sodium channel. The availability of a specific antagonist might be useful for studying the mechanism of action of antiarrhythmic drugs as well as an antidote in cases of antiarrhythmics overdose intoxication.

  4. 76 FR 40645 - Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... Chapter 14 50 CFR Chapters I and IV Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563... cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Authority: E.O. 13653, 76 FR 3821, Jan. 21, 2011;...

  5. 77 FR 59567 - Retrospective Regulatory Review Under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ..., 1216, 1235 RIN 1125-AA71 Retrospective Regulatory Review Under E.O. 13563 AGENCY: Executive Office for...), entitled ``Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563,'' on March 1,...

  6. State Agency Applications of EOS Data in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, G. L.

    2001-05-01

    Texas offers a good model for the introduction of remotely sensed data products into the daily operations of state agencies by virtue of its large size and population. The diversity of the Texas landscape coupled with the long distances traveled to perform site inspections place special burdens on the land resource agencies responsible for monitoring crop conditions, water availability, environmental hazards and other natural resource issues. To assist these agencies, the Texas Synergy team has adopted a two-phase approach that incorporates framework geospatial data products designed for the broad user community with remote sensing applications developed for user-specific analyses. A key element to the success of the effort is the development of remote sensing products within a Texas Reference Frame that corresponds to the components of the high-resolution National Spatial Data Infrastructure developed by the state, such as 1-meter CIR digital orthophotographs, digital elevation models, and vector layers for hypsography, hydrography, soils, transportation and boundaries. Users accustomed to working with NSDI products can easily begin to include recently-collected EOS data presented within the same reference frame. Examples of statewide data products made available through the Texas Synergy project are AVHRR NDVI and MODIS imagery, Landsat 7 ETM+ scenes and SPOT 10-meter panchromatic image tiles. Delivery of the products involves a number of mechanisms from CD distribution to Internet FTP downloads, but increasingly relies upon Internet map services, such as ESRI's ArcIMS. Beyond release of the base imagery products, the Texas Synergy team has worked with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Texas Soil and Water Conservation Board, Texas Department of Agriculture, Texas Water Development Board, National Park Service and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service on a wide range of data applications. Throughout 1999-2000, the magnitude of drought conditions was

  7. The effect of acid drinking water on rumen protozoa in the blesbok (Damaliscus dorcas phillipsi).

    PubMed

    Booyse, D G; Dehority, B A; Myburgh, J G

    2015-12-07

    Rumen contents were collected from ten adult female blesbok, five from a mine area with only acid drinking water available and five from a control group consuming normal, non-polluted drinking water. The mean concentration of total protozoa in the normal water group was almost double that in the acid drinking water group, 24.9 x 10(3) versus 14.7 x 10(3). Percent of Entodinium was higher and Diplodinium lower in those animals drinking the acid water. The number of different protozoa species present in animals from both locations was fairly similar. Diplodinium bubalidis, Ostracodinium gracile and Diplodinium consors were present in the highest percentage in the normal water group, 18.8, 18.4 and 17.7 %, respectively. The same three species, plus Entodinium dubardi, were also highest in the acid water group, O. gracile, 21.3 %; D. consors, 12.6 %; E. dubardi, 11.4 % and D. bubalidis, 10.3 %. Seventeen species of protozoa found in this study were a new host record for the blesbok, bringing the total number of species reported from the blesbok to 29.

  8. Characterization of water reservoirs affected by acid mine drainage: geochemical, mineralogical, and biological (diatoms) properties of the water.

    PubMed

    Valente, T; Rivera, M J; Almeida, S F P; Delgado, C; Gomes, P; Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L; Santisteban, M

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, and biological data obtained in water reservoirs located in one of the most paradigmatic mining regions, suffering from acid mine drainage (AMD) problems: the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB). Four water reservoirs located in the Spanish sector of the IBP, storing water for different purposes, were selected to achieve an environmental classification based on the effects of AMD: two mining dams (Gossan and Águas Ácidas), a reservoir for industrial use (Sancho), and one with water used for human supply (Andévalo). The results indicated that the four reservoirs are subject to the effect of metallic loads from polluted rivers, although with different levels: Águas Ácidas > Gossan > Sancho ≥ Andévalo. In accordance, epipsammic diatom communities have differences in the respective composition and dominant taxa. The dominant diatoms in each reservoir indicated acid water: Pinnularia acidophila and Pinnularia aljustrelica were found in the most acidic dams (Gossan and Águas Ácidas, with pH <3), Pinnularia subcapitata in Sancho (pH 2.48-5.82), and Eunotia exigua in Andévalo (pH 2.34-6.15).

  9. Formation of iodoacetic acids during cooking: interaction of iodized table salt with chlorinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Becalski, A; Lau, B P-Y; Schrader, T J; Seaman, S W; Sun, W F

    2006-10-01

    Iodoacetic and chloroiodoacetic acids were formed when municipal chlorinated tap water was allowed to react with iodized (with potassium iodide) table salt or with potassium iodide itself. Iodoacetic acid was recently shown to be a potent cytotoxic and genotoxic agent. For analysis, samples were extracted with t-amyl methyl ether and converted to the corresponding methyl esters using methanol and sulfuric acid. The concentration of iodoacetic acid was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using an authentic standard. The identities of iodoacetic and chloroiodoacetic acids were further confirmed by gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Certain influences of sodium hypochlorite and humic acid as well as the concentration of potassium iodide on the yields of these acids were investigated. The concentration of iodoacetic acid in tap water samples boiled with 2 g l-1 of iodized table salt was found to be in the 1.5 microg l-1 range, whilst the concentration of chloroiodoacetic acid was estimated to be three to five times lower.

  10. Description of the CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE), A Dedicated EOS Validation Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, K.; Charlock, T.; Smith, B.; Jin, Z.; Rose, F.; Denn, F.; Rutan, D.; Haeffelin, M.; Su, W.; Xhang, T.; Jay, M.

    2001-12-01

    A unique test site located in the mid-Atlantic coastal marine waters has been used by several EOS projects for validation measurements. A common theme across these projects is the need for a stable measurement site within the marine environment for long-term, high quality radiation measurements. The site was initiated by NASA's Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES) project. One of CERES's challenging goals is to provide upwelling and downwelling shortwave fluxes at several pressure altitudes within the atmosphere and at the surface. Operationally the radiative transfer model of Fu and Liou (1996, 1998), the CERES instrument measured radiances and various other EOS platform data are being used to accomplish this goal. We present here, a component of the CERES/EOS validation effort that is focused to verify and optimize the prediction algorithms for radiation parameters associated with the marine coastal and oceanic surface types of the planet. For this validation work, the CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE) was developed to provide detailed high-frequency and long-duration measurements for radiation and their associated dependent variables. The CERES validations also include analytical efforts which will not be described here (but see Charlock et.al, Su et.al., Smith et.al-Fall 2001 AGU Meeting) The COVE activity is based on a rigid ocean platform which is located approximately twenty kilometers off of the coast of Virginia Beach, Virginia. The once-manned US Coast Guard facility rises 35 meters from the ocean surface allowing the radiation instruments to be well above the splash zone. The depth of the sea is eleven meters at the site. A power and communications system has been installed for present and future requirements. Scientific measurements at the site have primarily been developed within the framework of established national and international monitoring programs. These include the Baseline Surface Radiation Network of the World

  11. Monitoring and assessment of surface water acidification following rewetting of oxidised acid sulfate soils.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Luke M; Zammit, Benjamin; Jolley, Ann-Marie; Barnett, Liz; Fitzpatrick, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale exposure of acid sulfate soils during a hydrological drought in the Lower Lakes of South Australia resulted in acidification of surface water in several locations. Our aim was to describe the techniques used to monitor, assess and manage these acidification events using a field and laboratory dataset (n = 1,208) of acidic to circum-neutral pH water samples. The median pH of the acidified (pH < 6.5) samples was 3.8. Significant (p < 0.05) increases in soluble metals (Al, Co, Mn, Ni and Zn above guidelines for ecosystem protection), SO4 (from pyrite oxidation), Si (from aluminosilicate dissolution) and Ca (from carbonate dissolution and limestone addition), were observed under the acidic conditions. The log of the soluble metal concentrations, acidity and SO4/Cl ratio increased linearly with pH. The pH, alkalinity and acidity measurements were used to inform aerial limestone dosing events to neutralise acidic water. Field measurements correlated strongly with laboratory measurements for pH, alkalinity and conductivity (r (2) ≥ 0.97) but only moderately with acidity (r (2) = 0.54), which could be due to difficulties in determining the indicator-based field titration endpoint. Laboratory measured acidity correlated well with calculated acidity (r (2) = 0.87, acidity present as Al(III) > H(+) ≈ Mn(II) > Fe(II/III)) but was about 20 % higher on average. Geochemical speciation calculations and XRD measurements indicated that solid phase minerals (schwertmannite and jarosite for Fe and jurbanite for Al) were likely controlling dissolved metal concentrations and influencing measured acidity between pH 2 and 5.

  12. Assessing the capability of EOS sensors in measuring ocean-atmosphere moisture exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the Science Synergism Studies to identify interdisciplinary Scientific studies, which could be addressed by the Environmental Observing System (EOS), the techniques being developed to measure ocean-atmosphere moisture exchanges using satellite sensors were evaluated. Studies required to use sensors proposed for EOS were examined. A method has been developed to compute the moisture flux using the wind speed, sea surface temperature, and preciptable water measured by satellite sensors. It relies on a statistical model which predicts surface-level humidity from precipitable water. The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) measures all 3 parameters and was found to be sensitive to the annual cycle and large interannual variations such as the 1982 to 1983 El Nino. There are systematic differences between geophysical parameters measured by Nimbus/SMMR and in situ measurements. After quadratic trends and crosstalks were removed from the parameters through multivariate regressions, the latent heat fluxes computed from SMMR agree with those computed from ship reports to within 30 W/sq m. The poor quality of ship reports may be the cause of a portion of this scatter. Similar results are found using SEASAT/SMMR data. When the scatterometer winds were used instead of the SMMR winds, the difference between the satellite fluxes and the ship fluxes was reduced.

  13. The evaluation of electrical energy per order (E(Eo)) for photooxidative decolorization of four textile dye solutions by the kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, N; Aleboyeh, A; Khataee, A R

    2005-05-01

    Photooxidative decolorization of four textile dyestuffs, C.I. Acid Orange 7 (AO7), C.I. Acid Orange 8 (AO8), C.I. Acid Orange 52 (AO52) and C.I. Acid Blue 74 (AB74), by UV/H2O2 was investigated in a laboratory scale photoreactor equipped with a 15 W low pressure mercury vapour lamp. The decolorization of the dyes was found to follow pseudo-first-order kinetics, and hence the figure-of-merit electrical energy per order (E(Eo)) is appropriate for estimating the electrical energy efficiency. The E(Eo) values were found to depend on the concentration of H2O2, concentration and basic structure of the dye. This study shows that these textile dyes can be treated easily and effectively with the UV/H2O2 process with E(Eo) values between 0.4 and 5 kW h m-3 order-1, depending on the initial concentrations of dyes and H2O2. The kinetic model, based on the initial rates of degradation, provided good prediction of the E(Eo) values for a variety of conditions.

  14. Efficient synthesis of readily water-soluble sulfonic Acid carbamates.

    PubMed

    Idzik, Krzysztof R; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias

    2015-04-16

    A series of various readily water-soluble carbamates were synthesized with good yields. These compounds are useful chemical tracers for assessing the cooling progress in a georeservoir during geothermal power plant operation. Acylation of primary amines was carried out as well as using a solution of sodium bicarbonate and without the presence of salt. Products were characterized by 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. Purity was confirmed through elemental analysis.

  15. Determination of water-soluble forms of oxalic and formic acids in soils by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karicheva, E.; Guseva, N.; Kambalina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic acids (CA) play an important role in the chemical composition origin of soils and migration of elements. The content of these acids and their salts is one of the important characteristics for agrochemical, ecological, ameliorative and hygienic assessment of soils. The aim of the article is to determine water-soluble forms of same carboxylic acids — (oxalic and formic acids) in soils by ion chromatography with gradient elution. For the separation and determination of water-soluble carboxylic acids we used reagent-free gradient elution ion-exchange chromatography ICS-2000 (Dionex, USA), the model solutions of oxalate and formate ions, and leachates from soils of the Kola Peninsula. The optimal gradient program was established for separation and detection of oxalate and formate ions in water solutions by ion chromatography. A stability indicating method was developed for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organic acids in soils. The method has shown high detection limits such as 0.03 mg/L for oxalate ion and 0.02 mg/L for formate ion. High signal reproducibility was achieved in wide range of intensities which correspond to the following ion concentrations: from 0.04 mg/g to 10 mg/L (formate), from 0.1 mg/g to 25 mg/L (oxalate). The concentration of formate and oxalate ions in soil samples is from 0.04 to 0.9 mg/L and 0.45 to 17 mg/L respectively.

  16. The fate and persistence of trifluoroacetic and chloroacetic acids in pond waters.

    PubMed

    Ellis, D A; Hanson, M L; Sibley, P K; Shahid, T; Fineberg, N A; Solomon, K R; Muir, D C; Mabury, S A

    2001-01-01

    The environmental fate of trichloro-, dichloro-, and monochloroacetic acids, and trifluoroacetic acid was investigated using field aquatic microcosms and laboratory sediment-water systems. Trifluoroacetic acid was extremely persistent and showed no degradation during a one-year field study, though it appeared to undergo transient partitioning within an unknown pond phase as the temperature of the surroundings was reduced. Of the three chloroacetic acids, trichloro had the longest residence time (induction and decay) (approximately 40 d), dichloro the shortest (approximately 4 d), and monochloro an intermediate residence time (approximately 14 d). Laboratory studies suggest that the biodegradation of trichloro-, dichloro-, and monochloroacetic acids leads primarily to the formation of chloride and oxalic, glyoxalic, and glycolic acids, respectively.

  17. Application of TOUGH2/EOS7R to modeling of radionuclide release from a low/intermediate level repository under two-phase conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K.

    1996-06-01

    The generation of gas due to corrosion of repository waste packages under water-saturated conditions will give rise to pressure increases and two-phase flow conditions. We have developed a numerical simulator TOUGH2/EOS7R for modeling the two-phase flow and transport of a parent-daughter pair of radionuclides including the processes of adsorption, first-order decay, binary diffusion, and volatilization. TOUGH2/EOS7R is a descendant of EOS7, the water, brine and air module of TOUGH2. We apply TOUGH2/EOS7R to an example problem relevant to the disposal of low- and intermediate-level nuclear wastes in crystalline rock. The conceptual model and spatial discretization were provided to us by NAGRA. We demonstrate in preliminary simulations that to good approximation, the generation of hydrogen can be modeled using air as a proxy for hydrogen. Simulations of gas generation and subsequent flow and transport away from the repository demonstrate the use and flexibility of TOUGH2/EOS7R. By small modification in the code, users can printout data for calculating the fractional release curve (FR curve), which shows the instantaneous release rate from the repository.

  18. 76 FR 10526 - Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Chapter 14 50 CFR Chapters I and IV Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563.... Authority: E.O. 13653, 76 FR 3821, Jan. 21, 2011; E.O. 12866, 58 FR 51735, Oct. 4, 1993. Dated: February...

  19. 76 FR 34177 - Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Labor. ACTION... made available to the public on http://dolregs.ideascale.com . Authority: E.O. 13653, 76 FR 3821, Jan. 21, 2011; E.O. 12866, 58 FR 51735, Oct. 4, 1993. Dated: June 7, 2011. e. christi...

  20. Effect of water content on the acid-base equilibrium of cyanidin-3-glucoside.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Isabel B; Freitas, Adilson; Maçanita, António L; Lima, J C

    2015-04-01

    Laser Flash Photolysis was employed to measure the deprotonation and reprotonation rate constants of cyanidin 3-monoglucoside (kuromanin) in water/methanol mixtures. It was found that the deprotonation rate constant kd decreases with decreasing water content, reflecting the lack of free water molecules around kuromanin, which may accommodate and stabilize the outgoing protons. On the other hand, the reprotonation rate constant, kp, increases with the decrease in water concentration from a value of kp = 2 × 10(10) l mol(-1) s(-1) in water up to kp = 6 × 10(10) l mol(-1) s(-1) at 5.6M water concentration in the mixture. The higher value of kp at lower water concentrations reflects the fact that the proton is not freely escaping the solvation shell of the molecule. The deprotonation rate constant decreases with decreasing water content, reflecting the lack of free water molecules around kuromanin that can accommodate the outgoing protons. Overall, the acidity constant of the flavylium cation decreases with the decrease in water concentration from pKa values of 3.8 in water to approximately 4.8 in water-depleted media, thus shifting the equilibrium towards the red-coloured form, AH(+), at low water contents. The presence, or lack, of water, will affect the colour shade (red to blue) of kuromanin. This is relevant for its role as an intrinsic food component and as a food pigment additive (E163).

  1. Graphene oxide. Origin of acidity, its instability in water, and a new dynamic structural model.

    PubMed

    Dimiev, Ayrat M; Alemany, Lawrence B; Tour, James M

    2013-01-22

    The existing structural models of graphene oxide (GO) contradict each other and cannot adequately explain the acidity of its aqueous solutions. Inadequate understanding of chemical structure can lead to a misinterpretation of observed experimental phenomena. Understanding the chemistry and structure of GO should enable new functionalization protocols while explaining GO's limitations due to its water instability. Here we propose an unconventional view of GO chemistry and develop the corresponding "dynamic structural model" (DSM). In contrast to previously proposed models, the DSM considers GO as a system, constantly changing its chemical structure due to interaction with water. Using potentiometric titration, (13)C NMR, FTIR, UV-vis, X-ray photoelectron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy we show that GO does not contain any significant quantity of preexisting acidic functional groups, but gradually generates them through interaction with water. The reaction with water results in C-C bond cleavage, formation of vinylogous carboxylic acids, and the generation of protons. An electrical double layer formed at the GO interface in aqueous solutions plays an important role in the observed GO chemistry. Prolonged exposure to water gradually degrades GO flakes converting them into humic acid-like structures. The proposed DSM provides an explanation for the acidity of GO aqueous solutions and accounts for most of the known spectroscopic and experimental data.

  2. Abnormal Characteristics of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids in Surface Water of the Jiaozhou Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, H.; Liu, Z.; Yang, G.; Sun, L.

    2012-12-01

    Organic acids are important components of dissolved organic matter in sea water. Generally, in oxic sea water, the concentrations of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs), such as formate, acetate and lactate are too low to be analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) directly. Our recent study of Jiaozhou Bay, Shandong, China showed that the concentrations of LMWOAs in the surface sea water were high enough to be quantified by HPLC. In the surface sea water of the bay, three typical LMWOAs----formate, acetate and lactate were identified. Concentrations of formate, lactate and acetate ranged from 1.97 to 5.29μmol/L, 5.79 to 12.77μmol/L and 1.97 to 7.23 μmol/L, respectively. The concentrations of all three organic acids varied dramatically in different areas of the bay. Low concentrations usually occurred in the central region and high concentrations usually occurred along coastal area. The contribution of LMWOAs to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was significantly higher than published data. On average, total organic acid (TOA, considered as total concentration of the three identified organic acids) accounted for more than 20% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the surface water of the Bay. The high concentrations of LMWOAs and their unusual high contribution to DOC were attributed to human activities such as sewage discharge, aquaculture and etc. along the coastal area.

  3. [Determination of trace haloacetic acids in drinking water using ion chromatography coupled with solid phase extraction].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingxue; Huang, Jianjun; Gu, Ping

    2006-05-01

    The combined solid phase extraction (SPE)-ion chromatography (IC) method was developed for the analysis of trace haloacetic acids (HAAs) in drinking water. The tested HAAs included monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA). For trace determination of HAAs in real drinking water samples, conditions of LiChrolut EN SPE cartridge were investigated for HAAs preconcentration and matrix elimination. Elution was carried out by 2 mL of sodium hydroxide (10 mmol/L) with the flow rate of 2 mL/min. The Dionex IonPac AS16 column (250 mm x 4 mm i. d.), a high capacity and hydroxide-selective anion-exchange column designed for the determination of polarizable anions, was chosen for chromatographic separation. HAAs were analyzed with a concentration gradient of NaOH with the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min and detected by suppressed conductivity. A 500 microL sample loop was used. The detection limits of this SPE-IC method for MCAA, DCAA, DBAA and TCAA were 0.38-1.69 microg/L and MBAA was 12.5 microg/L under 25-fold preconcentration. The results demonstrate that the method is suitable for the analysis of trace haloacetic acids in drinking water.

  4. Comparison of GC-MS and FTIR methods for quantifying naphthenic acids in water samples.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela C; Young, Rozlyn F; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2008-11-01

    The extraction of bitumen from the oil sands in Canada releases toxic naphthenic acids into the process-affected waters. The development of an ideal analytical method for quantifying naphthenic acids (general formula C(n)H(2n+Z)O(2)) has been impeded by the complexity of these mixtures and the challenges of differentiating naphthenic acids from other naturally-occurring organic acids. The oil sands industry standard FTIR method was compared with a newly-developed GC-MS method. Naphthenic acids concentrations were measured in extracts of surface and ground waters from locations within the vicinity of and away from the oil sands deposits and in extracts of process-affected waters. In all but one case, FTIR measurements of naphthenic acids concentrations were greater than those determined by GC-MS. The detection limit of the GC-MS method was 0.01 mg L(-1) compared to 1 mg L(-1) for the FTIR method. The results indicated that the GC-MS method is more selective for naphthenic acids, and that the FTIR method overestimates their concentrations.

  5. Southern Africa Validation of NASA's Earth Observing System (SAVE EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Privette, Jeffrey L.

    2000-01-01

    Southern Africa Validation of EOS (SAVE) is 4-year, multidisciplinary effort to validate operational and experimental products from Terra-the flagship satellite of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). At test sites from Zambia to South Africa, we are measuring soil, vegetation and atmospheric parameters over a range of ecosystems for comparison with products from Terra, Landsat 7, AVHRR and SeaWiFS. The data are also employed to parameterize and improve vegetation process models. Fixed-point and mobile "transect" sampling are used to collect the ground data. These are extrapolated over larger areas with fine-resolution multispectral imagery. We describe the sites, infrastructure, and measurement strategies developed underSAVE, as well as initial results from our participation in the first Intensive Field Campaign of SAFARI 2000. We also describe SAVE's role in the Kalahari Transect Campaign (February/March 2000) in Zambia and Botswana.

  6. Explosive Products EOS: Adjustment for detonation speed and energy release

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-05

    Propagating detonation waves exhibit a curvature effect in which the detonation speed decreases with increasing front curvature. The curvature effect is due to the width of the wave profile. Numerically, the wave profile depends on resolution. With coarse resolution, the wave width is too large and results in a curvature effect that is too large. Consequently, the detonation speed decreases as the cell size is increased. We propose a modification to the products equation of state (EOS) to compensate for the effect of numerical resolution; i.e., to increase the CJ pressure in order that a simulation propagates a detonation wave with a speed that is on average correct. The EOS modification also adjusts the release isentrope to correct the energy release.

  7. Enhancement to Hitran to Support the NASA EOS Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Kate P.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    1998-01-01

    The HITRAN molecular database has been enhanced with the object of providing improved capabilities for the EOS program scientists. HITRAN itself is the database of high-resolution line parameters of gaseous species expected to be observed by the EOS program in its remote sensing activities. The database is part of a larger compilation that includes IR cross-sections, aerosol indices of refraction, and software for filtering and plotting portions of the database. These properties have also been improved. The software has been advanced in order to work on multiple platforms. Besides the delivery of the compilation on CD-ROM, the effort has been directed toward making timely access of data and software on the world wide web.

  8. Wysession begins term as Eos Section Editor for Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysession, Michael

    In mid-April, Michael Wysession, an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Washington University, embarked on a 3-year term as section editor of Eos for seismology. Wysession brings to the position a strong background in research and teaching. Below are a few remarks from Wysession.“I recently became the new seismology editor for Eos. I look forward to presenting the many exciting areas of seismological research to the entire geophysical community. I have taught at Washington University since obtaining my Ph.D. at Northwestern University in 1991. My interest in seismology began during my undergraduate years at Brown University (Sc.B., 1984), but my experience as an educator began after I graduated and taught high school math and physics in Staten Island, N.Y.

  9. Enhancement to HITRAN to Support the NASA EOS Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Kate P.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    1999-01-01

    The HITRAN molecular database has been enhanced with the object of providing improved capabilities for the EOS program scientists. HITRAN itself is the database of high-resolution line parameters of gaseous species expected to be observed by the EOS program in its remote sensing activities. The database is part of a larger compilation that includes IR cross-sections, aerosol indices of refraction, and software for filtering and plotting portions of the database. These properties have also been improved. The software has been advanced in order to work on multiple platforms. Besides the delivery of the compilation on CD-ROM, the effort has been directed toward making timely access of data and software on the world wide web.

  10. An Overview of the EOS Data Dissemination Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H.K.; Pfister, Robin; Weinstein, Beth

    2008-01-01

    The Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is the primary data system serving the broad-scope of NASA s Earth Observing System (EOS) program and a significant portion of the "heritage" Earth science data. EOSDIS was designed to support the Earth sciences within NASA s Science Mission Directorate (previously the Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) and Mission to Planet Earth). The EOS Program was NASA s contribution to the United States Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) enacted by Congress in 1990 as part of the Global Change Act. ESE s objective was to launch a series of missions to help answer fundamental global change questions such as "How is Earth changing?" and "What are the consequences for life on Earth?" resulting support of this objective, EOSDIS distributes a wide variety of data to a diverse community.

  11. The NASA EOS User Services Offices: Supporting Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, E.; Schumacher, J.; Harrison, S.; Jones, C.; Klaassen, A.; Morris, K.; Sandoval, M.; Scott, D.; Wolf, V.; Farnham, J.

    2004-12-01

    The primary goal for NASA's Sun-Earth System Division is to use satellite remote sensing to examine the Sun and Earth as a single connected system. Within the Sun-Earth System Division, the Earth Observing System (EOS) is composed of a series of satellites, scientific research, and a data collection and management system known as EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS). EOSDIS has nine discipline-specific data centers that manage, document, archive, and distribute a variety of Earth system science data. The data centers provide an assortment of services to their data users via their User Services Offices (USO). The nine USOs communicate regularly by email, phone, and teleconference, and have meetings twice a year during which they analyze, discuss, and determine how to better serve the Earth science community. The sharing of information among USO representatives within the User Services Working Group (USWG) results in an understanding of user needs and problems with data sets within EOS. By identifying these needs, we can improve our services and data distribution methods for users, and advocate solutions on behalf of the user community to the EOS project. Each User Services Office provides timely assistance answering a variety of user questions about its data and services, assists users with their data orders, provides referrals to other data centers, and establishes data subscriptions when applicable. USO troubleshoots problems with data sets and data distribution, recommends and supports tools for data subsetting, searching and ordering, handling, and manipulation, and communicates user needs to data and software developers. The USO is each data center's interface to the public, and has many resources available to assist the user, including data set guide documents, science team members, and programmers. Additionally, the USWG represents the nine data centers in the OneNASA outreach effort. Users will always find ready support for NASA Earth science data

  12. NASA SNPP SIPS - Following in the Path of EOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Jeanne; Hall, Alfreda; Ho, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data Information System (ESDIS) Project has been operating NASA's Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) Science Data Segment (SDS) since the launch in October 2011. At launch, the SDS focused primarily on the evaluation of Sensor Data Records (SDRs) and Environmental Data Records (EDRs) produced by the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), a National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration (NOAA) Program, as to their suitability for Earth system science. During the summer of 2014, NASA transitioned to the production of standard Earth Observing System (EOS)-like science products for all instruments aboard Suomi NPP. The five Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS): Land, Ocean, Atmosphere, Ozone, and Sounder were established to produce the NASA SNPP standard Level 1, Level 2, and global Level 3 products developed by the SNPP Science Teams and to provide the products to NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) for archive and distribution to the user community. The processing, archiving and distribution of data from NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and Ozone Mapper/Profiler Suite (OMPS) Limb instruments will continue. With the implementation of the JPSS Block 2 architecture and the launch of JPSS-1, the SDS will receive SNPP data in near real-time via the JPSS Stored Mission Data Hub (JSH), as well as JPSS-1 and future JPSS-2 data. The SNPP SIPS will ingest EOS compatible Level 0 data from the EOS Data Operations System (EDOS) element for their data processing, enabling the continuous EOS-SNPP-JPSS Satellite Data Record.

  13. Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) Definition Phase Report, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    System definition studies were conducted of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS). The studies show that the concept of an Earth Observatory Satellite in a near-earth, sun-synchronous orbit would make a unique contribution to the goals of a coordinated program for acquisition of data for environmental research with applications to earth resource inventory and management. The technical details for the proposed development of sensors, spacecraft, and a ground data processing system are presented.

  14. Management approach recommendations. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Management analyses and tradeoffs were performed to determine the most cost effective management approach for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) Phase C/D. The basic objectives of the management approach are identified. Some of the subjects considered are as follows: (1) contract startup phase, (2) project management control system, (3) configuration management, (4) quality control and reliability engineering requirements, and (5) the parts procurement program.

  15. Soil water samplers in ion balance studies on acidic forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, L.; Joergensen, P.; Kruse, S.

    1986-04-01

    During the last years an increasing consciousness has appeared of the injurious effects of acid rain on the forest ecosystems both in Europe and North America. At several localities ion balance studies have been implemented in order to evaluate the impact of the atmospheric deposition of acidic substances and heavy metals on the forest ecosystem. In many localities the leaching of material to the ground water or output from the ecosystem has to be determined by means of tensiometer measurements and soil water sampling. Many different soil water samplers are available on the market and they show useful applicability under the given circumstances. But in many cases soil water samples taken with different equipment give incommensurable results leading to differing explanations of the effects of acid precipitation on elements and their cycling in the ecosystem. The purpose of the present study is twofold. Firstly, the sorption characteristics of different types of soil water samplers are examined under acidic soil conditions both by installation in the field and by laboratory experiments. Secondly, a new method is introduced for current and constant soil water sampling under varying soil suctions in the unsaturated zone.

  16. Effect of sewage sludge on formation of acidic ground water at a reclaimed coal mine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cravotta, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Data on rock, ground water, vadose water, and vadose gas chemistry were collected for two years after sewage sludge was applied at a reclaimed surface coal mine in Pennsylvania to determine if surface-applied sludge is an effective barrier to oxygen influx, contributes metals and nutrients to ground water, and promotes the acidification of ground water. Acidity, sulfate, and metals concentrations were elevated in the ground water (6- to 21-m depth) from spoil relative to unmined rock because of active oxidation of pyrite and dissolution of aluminosilicate, carbonate, and Mn-Fe-oxide minerals in the spoil. Concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals (Fe, Mn, Al, Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Zn), and nitrate, and abundances of iron-oxidizing bacteria were elevated in the ground water from sludge-treated spoil relative to untreated spoil having a similar mineral composition; however, gaseous and dissolved oxygen concentrations did not differ between the treatments. Abundances of iron-oxidizing bacteria in the ground water samples were positively correlated with concentrations of ammonia, nitrate, acidity, metals, and sulfate. Concentrations of metals in vadose water samples (<5-m depth) from sludge-treated spoil (pH 5.9) were not elevated relative to untreated spoil (pH 4.4). In contrast, concentrations of nitrate were elevated in vadose water samples from sludge-treated spoil, frequently exceeding 10 mg/L. Downgradient decreases in nitrate to less than 3 mg/L and increases in sulfate concentrations in underlying ground water could result from oxidation of pyrite by nitrate. Thus, sewage sludge added to pyritic spoil can increase the growth of iron-oxidizing bacteria, the oxidation of pyrite, and the acidification of ground water. Nevertheless, the overall effects on ground water chemistry from the sludge were small and probably short-lived relative to the effects from mining only.

  17. Lewis acid-assisted detection of nerve agents in water.

    PubMed

    Butala, Rahul R; Creasy, William R; Fry, Roderick A; McKee, Michael L; Atwood, David A

    2015-06-07

    The five-coordinate compound, Salen((t)Bu)Al(Ac), prepared in situ from Salen((t)Bu)AlBr and NH4Ac, forms Lewis acid-base adducts in aqueous solution with the G-type nerve agents, Sarin and Soman, and the VX hydrolysis product, ethylmethylphosphonate (EMPA). The resulting compounds, [Salen((t)Bu)Al(NA)](+)[Ac] (-) (with NA = Sarin, Soman, and EMPA) are sufficiently stable to be identified by ESI-MS. Molecular ion peaks were detected for every compound with little or no fragmentation. The distinctive MS signatures for the [Salen((t)Bu)Al(NA)](+) compounds provide a new technique for identifying nerve agents from aqueous solution. The energetics of the displacement of Ac(-) by the nerve agents to form [Salen((t)Bu)Al(NA)](+)[Ac](-) were determined computationally.

  18. Water evaporation rates across hydrophobic acid monolayers at equilibrium spreading pressure.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Minami; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Moroi, Yoshikiyo; Shibata, Osamu

    2008-02-15

    The effect of alkanoic acid [CH(3)(CH(2))(n-2)COOH; HCn] and perfluoroalkanoic acid [CF(3)(CF(2))(n-2)COOH; FCn] monolayers on the water evaporation rate was investigated by thermogravimetry tracing the decrease in amount of water with time. The evaporation rate from the surface covered by a monolayer was measured as a function of temperature and hydrophobic chain length of the acids, where the monolayer was under an equilibrium spreading pressure. From thermal behavior of the crystallized acids, their solid states are C-type in crystalline state over the temperature range from 298.2 to 323.2 K. The dry air was flowed through a furnace tube of a thermogravimetry apparatus at the flow rate of 80 mL min(-1), where the evaporation rate becomes almost constant irrespective of the flow rate. The temperature dependence of the evaporation rate was analyzed kinetically to evaluate the activation energy and thermodynamics values for the activated complex, which demonstrated that these values were almost the same for both alkanoic acids and perfluoroalkanoic acids, although the effect of perfluoroalkanoic acids on the evaporation rate was smaller than that of corresponding hydrogenated fatty acids. The difference in the evaporation rate between FCn and HCn was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), surface potential (DeltaV) at equilibrium spreading pressure, and Langmuir curve (pi-A isotherm), and their results were consistent and supported the difference.

  19. Effects of EOS adiabat on hot spot dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Baolian; Kwan, Thomas; Wang, Yi-Ming; Batha, Steven

    2013-10-01

    Equation of state (EOS) and adiabat of the pusher play significant roles in the dynamics and formation of the hot spot of an ignition capsule. For given imploding energy, they uniquely determine the partition of internal energy, mass, and volume between the pusher and the hot spot. In this work, we apply the new scaling laws recently derived by Cheng et al. to the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) ignition capsules and study the impacts of EOS and adiabat of the pusher on the hot spot dynamics by using the EOS adiabat index as an adjustable model parameter. We compare our analysis with the NIC data, specifically, for shots N120321 and N120205, and with the numerical simulations of these shots. The predictions from our theoretical model are in good agreements with the NIC data when a hot adiabat was used for the pusher, and with code simulations when a cold adiabat was used for the pusher. Our analysis indicates that the actual adiabat of the pusher in NIC experiments may well be higher than the adiabat assumed in the simulations. This analysis provides a physical and systematic explanation to the ongoing disagreements between the NIC experimental results and the multi-dimensional numerical simulations. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG-36.

  20. EOS7C-ECBM Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2012-11-14

    EOS7C is an equation of state module for the TOUGH2 program for CO2 or N2 in Methane (CH4) Reservoirs. In the present work, additions have been made to the EOS7C Version 1.0 module to include the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (ECBM) modifications developed by Webb (2003). In addition, the Dusty Gas Model for gas-phase diffusion (Webb 2001) has been included. The ECBM modification to the EOS7C equation of state incorporate the extended Langmuir isothem for sorbing gases, including the change in porosity associated with the sorbed gas mass. Comparison to hand calculations for pure gas and binary mixture shows very good agreement. Application to a CO2 well injection problem by Law et al. (2002). The Dusty Model modification add options to calculate gas diffusion using the Dusty-Gas Model including separate and coupled approaches. Comparison to low-permeability pure gas diffusion data shows excellent agreement. The results from the DGM are compared to the Fick's Law behavior for diffusion across a capillary fringe. The differences between the models are small due to the relatively high permeability (10-11 m2) of the problem.

  1. EOS measurements for CH foams using smoothed laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Michel; Benuzzi, Alessandra; Faral, Bernard; Philippe, Franc; Batani, Dimitri; Scianitti, Francesca; Müller, Laura; Torsiello, Flavia; Hall, Tom; Grandjouan, Nicholas; Nazarov, Wigen

    1998-11-01

    Porous material studies are of great interest in ICF physics, e. g. as a way to suppress laser nonuniformities (1), in material physics (2), or in astrophysics where foams have already been used to simulate supernovae remnants (3). The knowledge of foam Equation of State (EOS) is therefore needed. Here we present the first EOS data of CH foams obtained with lasers. The data, in the pressure range of 0.04-4 Mbar, have been obtained by reverse mismatch impedance technique, using aluminium as the reference material and foams with densities ranging from 20 to 400 mg/cc. We performed also measurements on the plastic at normal density (1100 mc/cc). A specific target design makes it possible to measure shock velocities in aluminium and in foams on the same shot. The results are compared to SESAME EOS and QEOS model which include the initial low density effects. [1]M. Dunee et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75,3858 (1995). [2] N. Holmes, Proceedings of APS Topical Conference on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter, Colorado Springs USA (1994). [3]B. Remington et al., Phys. Plasmas 4(5),1994.

  2. Development of a PPT for the EO-1 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Scott W.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Hoskins, W. Andrew; Meckel, Nicole J.

    2000-01-01

    A Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) has been developed for use in a technology demonstration flight experiment on the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) New Millennium Program mission. The thruster replaces the spacecraft pitch axis momentum wheel for control and momentum management during an experiment of a minimum three-day duration. The EO-1 PPT configuration is a combination of new technology and design heritage from similar systems flown in the 1970's and 1980's. Acceptance testing of the protoflight unit has validated readiness for flight, and integration with the spacecraft, including initial combined testing, has been completed. The thruster provides a range of capability from 90 microN-sec impulse bit at 650 sec specific impulse for 12 W input power, through 860 microN-sec impulse bit at 1400 see specific impulse for 70 W input power. Development of this thruster reinitiates technology research and development and re-establishes an industry base for production of flight hardware. This paper reviews the EO-1 PPT development, including technology selection, design and fabrication, acceptance testing, and initial spacecraft integration and test.

  3. On designing of LCAS over VCAT for an EOS chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Jin, Depeng; Zeng, Lieguang

    2005-02-01

    Ethernet over SDH/SONET (EOS), which connects different Ethernets through the existing SDH/SONET infrastructure, is a promising data transmission technology in today"s networks, for it successfully combines the simplicity and affordability of Ethernet with the resilience and scalability of SDH/SONET. Virtual Concatenation (VCAT) is one of the key technologies in EOS, which provides the capability to transmit and receive over several noncontiguous parallel Virtual Container (VC) fragments as a single flow and drastically improves efficiency of over 33 percent against standard concatenations. Link capacity adjustment scheme (LCAS) over VCAT signaling scheme further enhances VCAT to tune bandwidth dynamically at the requests of network management system without disturbing the existing traffic. In addition, the scheme will automatically decrease the capacity if some member of VCAT experiences a failure in the network, and increase the capacity when the network fault is repaired. In this paper, our design of LCAS over VCAT within an EOS chip is provided, which supports four Virtual Concatenation Groups (VCG) to adjust their bandwidth simultaneously. The block diagrams of the total design for LCAS over VCAT are also provided and several open problems that we encountered during implementation and their corresponding solutions are discussed in focus. Thoroughly functional simulations and FPGA verifications have been done to the design to prove its validity. Finally, we have the design synthesized with Synopsys"s Design Compiler, which reveals that the whole design is realizable in ASICs.

  4. Analysis of perfluorinated phosponic acids and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid in water, sludge and sediment by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Esparza, X; Moyano, E; de Boer, J; Galceran, M T; van Leeuwen, S P J

    2011-10-30

    Residues of perfluorinated phosphonic acids (PFPAs) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) were investigated in various Dutch surface waters, sludge and sediments. For this purpose, a liquid chromatographic (LC) method was optimized by testing several columns with different mobile phases. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) was chosen for the LC tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. An ion-pair reagent was added to the injection solvent to improve peak shape. Different solvents were studied for the extraction from solid samples. For clean-up and pre-concentration, weak anion-exchange solid-phase extraction cartridges were used. Water samples were extracted using the same cartridges. The method was used for screening PFPAs in the Dutch aquatic environment. PFPAs were not observed in sediment or sludge samples. PFOPA was found at 1 ng L(-1) in one surface water sample. PFOS was found at levels between 0.07 ng g(-1) and 48 ng g(-1) (dry weight) in sediments and sewage sludge samples. PFOS concentrations in surface water ranged from 3.3 ng L(-1) to 25.4 ng L(-1).

  5. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance study of low-temperature water dynamics in a water-soaked perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer Nafion film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun Hee; Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2017-01-01

    We have employed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in order to study the low-temperature water dynamics in a water-soaked perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer Nafion (NR-211) film. According to the recent models, Nafion may comprise water strongly bound to the sulfonic acid group, hydration water, and condensed water species. In this work, three separate NMR peaks from the water species revealing distinct behaviors were identified. A significant portion of the "bound" water remained unfrozen down to 200 K, whereas a slow-to-fast motional limit transition was observed at TM=220 K from the relaxation measurements.

  6. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  7. Communication: Physical origins of ionization potential shifts in mixed carboxylic acids and water complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Quanli; Tang, Zhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Yang, Zhijun; Trindle, Carl O.; Knee, Joseph L.

    2016-08-01

    The ionization potential (IP) of the aromatic alpha hydroxy carboxylic acid, 9-hydroxy-9-fluorene carboxylic acid (9HFCA), is shifted by complexation with hydrogen bonding ligands such as water and formic acid. Generalized Kohn-Sham energy decomposition analysis decomposes the intermolecular binding energies into a frozen energy term, polarization, correlation, and/or dispersion energy terms, as well as terms of geometric relaxation and zero point energy. We observe that in each dimer the attractive polarization always increases upon ionization, enhancing binding in the cation and shifting the IP toward the red. For 9HFCA—H2O, a substantial decrease of the repulsive frozen energy in cation further shifts the IP toward red. For 9HFCA—HCOOH, the increase of the frozen energy actually occurs in the cation and shifts the IP toward blue. Consistent with the experimental measurements, our analysis provides new, non-intuitive perspectives on multiple hydrogen bonds interactions in carboxylic acids and water complexes.

  8. Chemical synthesis of lactic acid from cellulose catalysed by lead(II) ions in water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanliang; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Binju; Zhang, Qinghong; Wan, Xiaoyue; Tang, Zhenchen; Wang, Ye; Zhu, Chun; Cao, Zexing; Wang, Guichang; Wan, Huilin

    2013-01-01

    The direct transformation of cellulose, which is the main component of lignocellulosic biomass, into building-block chemicals is the key to establishing biomass-based sustainable chemical processes. Only limited successes have been achieved for such transformations under mild conditions. Here we report the simple and efficient chemocatalytic conversion of cellulose in water in the presence of dilute lead(II) ions, into lactic acid, which is a high-value chemical used for the production of fine chemicals and biodegradable plastics. The lactic acid yield from microcrystalline cellulose and several lignocellulose-based raw biomasses is >60% at 463 K. Both theoretical and experimental studies suggest that lead(II) in combination with water catalyses a series of cascading steps for lactic acid formation, including the isomerization of glucose formed via the hydrolysis of cellulose into fructose, the selective cleavage of the C3-C4 bond of fructose to trioses and the selective conversion of trioses into lactic acid.

  9. Atmospheric photochemistry at a fatty acid-coated air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Tinel, Liselotte; Bianco, Angelica; Passananti, Monica; Brigante, Marcello; Donaldson, D. James; George, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Although fatty acids are believed to be photochemically inert in the actinic region, complex volatile organic compounds are produced during illumination of an air-water interface coated solely with a monolayer of carboxylic acid. When aqueous solutions containing nonanoic acid (NA) at bulk concentrations that give rise to just over a monolayer of NA coverage are illuminated with actinic radiation, saturated and unsaturated aldehydes are seen in the gas phase, and more highly oxygenated products appear in the aqueous phase. This chemistry is probably initiated by triplet-state NA molecules excited by direct absorption of actinic light at the water surface. Because fatty acids-covered interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, such photochemical processing will have a substantial impact on local ozone and particle formation.

  10. [Relationship of resistance to diseases and water-soluble amino acids in Konjac leaves].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongbo; Jiang, Qiaolong

    2008-05-01

    Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography was used to analyze water-soluble amino acids in the normal Amorphophallus Konjac, Amorphophallus albus, Amorphophallus bulbifer, and the soft rot Amorphophallus Konjac, to determine the relationship of the different soft-rot resistant Konjac varieties and the proportion and content of the multiple water-soluble amino acids. The results showed that there are remarkable differences in the content and proportion of water-soluble amino acids in different resistant varieties and the same variety of normal and diseased leaves of Amorphophallus. In this study, the bank of fingerprint 15 chromatogram was established and can be used to analyze the related characteristic peaks and the resistance of Amorphophallus.

  11. Solid/Liquid phase diagram of the ammonium sulfate/maleic acid/water system.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Keith D; Schroeder, Jason R; Pearson, Christian S

    2011-12-01

    We have studied the low temperature phase diagram and water activities of the ammonium sulfate/maleic acid/water system using differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy of thin films. Using the results from our experiments, we have mapped the solid/liquid ternary phase diagram, determined the water activities based on the freezing point depression, and determined the ice/maleic acid phase boundary as well as the ternary eutectic composition and temperature. We also compare our results to the predictions of the extended AIM aerosol thermodynamics model and find good agreement for the ice melting points in the ice primary phase field of this system; however significant differences were found with respect to phase boundaries, maleic acid dissolution, and ammonium sulfate dissolution.

  12. Acidic and hydrogen peroxide treatment of polyaluminum chloride (PACL) sludge from water treatment.

    PubMed

    Kwon, J H; Park, K Y; Park, J H; Lee, S H; Ahn, K H

    2004-01-01

    The water treatment sludge including coagulants cannot be easily removed by conventional dewatering methods. The possibility of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) oxidation as a pretreatment to enhance the dewaterability of polyaluminum chloride (PACl) sludge from water works was investigated. H2O2 treatment alone was not effective but H2O2 treatment under acidic condition significantly reduced both the cake water content and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), indicating the enhancement of dewaterability and filterability. The filterability after acid/H2O2 treatment was comparable to polymer conditioning and even more dewatered cake than polymer conditioning was produced. By H202 combined with sulfuric acid (H2SO4), leached iron caused Fenton's reaction, which showed a potential to significantly reduce the amount of solids mass and to produce more compact cake with higher filterability.

  13. Increased intake of water and NaCl solutions in omega-3 fatty acid deficient monkeys.

    PubMed

    Reisbick, S; Neuringer, M; Connor, W E; Iliff-Sizemore, S

    1991-06-01

    We previously reported that long-term omega-3 fatty acid deficiency is associated with increased water intake in rhesus monkeys. To determine whether the increase was specific to water, intakes of salt solutions were measured in 15-minute single-bottle tests. Deficient monkeys drank at least twice as much of all NaCl concentrations as controls. Overall intake decreased as salt concentration increased. In 2-bottle preference tests, deficient monkeys again drank more total fluid but neither preferred nor avoided normal saline compared to controls. When deprived of water, deficient monkeys concentrated urine as well as controls, demonstrating that the increased intake was not a result of renal failure or diabetes insipidus. Omega-3 fatty acids have roles both in neural membrane function and in metabolism of prostaglandins and other eicosanoids. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency may affect drinking through changes in one or both of these functions.

  14. Determination of boron in produced water using the carminic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Floquet, Cedric F A; Sieben, Vincent J; MacKay, Bruce A; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2016-04-01

    Using the carminic acid assay, we determined the concentration of boron in oilfield waters. We investigated the effect of high concentrations of salts and dissolved metals on the assay performance. The influence of temperature, development time, reagent concentration, and water volume was studied. Ten produced and flowback water samples of different origins were measured, and the method was successfully validated against ICP-MS measurements. In water-stressed regions, produced water is a potential source of fresh water for irrigation, industrial applications, or consumption. Therefore, boron concentration must be determined and controlled to match the envisaged waste water reuse. Fast, precise, and onsite measurements are needed to minimize errors introduced by sample transportation to laboratories. We found that the optimum conditions for our application were a 5:1 mixing volume ratio (reagent to sample), a 1 g L(-1) carminic acid concentration in 99.99% sulfuric acid, and a 30 min reaction time at ambient temperature (20 °C to 23 °C). Absorption values were best measured at 610 nm and 630 nm and baseline corrected at 865 nm. Under these conditions, the sensitivity of the assay to boron was maximized while its cross-sensitivity to dissolved titanium, iron, barium and zirconium was minimized, alleviating the need for masking agents and extraction methods.

  15. Availability of water controls Crassulacean acid metabolism in succulents of the Richtersveld (Namib desert, South Africa).

    PubMed

    von Willert, D J; Brinckmann, E; Scheitler, B; Eller, B M

    1985-05-01

    Features of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) were studied in a variety of different succulents in response to climatic conditions between March 1977 and October 1983 in the southern Namib desert (Richtersveld). A screening in 1977 and 1978 revealed that nearly all investigated succulents performed a CAM, but overnight accumulation of malate declined gradually with decreasing soil water potential, tissue osmotic potential, and leaf water content. This was further substantiated by an extended period of insufficient rainfall in 1979 and 1980 which damaged the evergreen CAM succulents between 80 and 100%. In most of the species still living, neither CO2-gas exchange nor diurnal acid fluctuation, indicative of CAM, could be detected unless an abundant rainfall restored both CAM features. Plants persisted in a stage of latent life.Water supply is one necessary prerequisite for CAM in the Richtersveld. But even well-watered plants with CAM were sensitive to short-term water stress caused by high water-vapour partialpressure deficit (VPD) in the night, which reduced or prevented CO2 uptake and resulted in a linear relation between overnight accumulated malate and VPD. The results do not support the opinion that, for the Namib succulents, CAM is an adaptive mechanism to water stress since long-term and short-term water stress stopped nocturnal malate synthesis, but instead lead to the conclusion that nocuturnal CO2 fixation is only performed when the water status of the plant can be improved simultaneously.

  16. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of naphthenic acids in natural waters surrounding the Canadian oil sands industry.

    PubMed

    Ross, Matthew S; Pereira, Alberto dos Santos; Fennell, Jon; Davies, Martin; Johnson, James; Sliva, Lucie; Martin, Jonathan W

    2012-12-04

    The Canadian oil sands industry stores toxic oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) in large tailings ponds adjacent to the Athabasca River or its tributaries, raising concerns over potential seepage. Naphthenic acids (NAs; C(n)H(2n-Z)O(2)) are toxic components of OSPW, but are also natural components of bitumen and regional groundwaters, and may enter surface waters through anthropogenic or natural sources. This study used a selective high-resolution mass spectrometry method to examine total NA concentrations and NA profiles in OSPW (n = 2), Athabasca River pore water (n = 6, representing groundwater contributions) and surface waters (n = 58) from the Lower Athabasca Region. NA concentrations in surface water (< 2-80.8 μg/L) were 100-fold lower than previously estimated. Principal components analysis (PCA) distinguished sample types based on NA profile, and correlations to water quality variables identified two sources of NAs: natural fatty acids, and bitumen-derived NAs. Analysis of NA data with water quality variables highlighted two tributaries to the Athabasca River-Beaver River and McLean Creek-as possibly receiving OSPW seepage. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of NA profiles in surface waters of the region, and demonstrates the need for highly selective analytical methods for source identification and in monitoring for potential effects of development on ambient water quality.

  17. Sulfuric acid speleogenesis (SAS) close to the water table: Examples from southern France, Austria, and Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Waele, Jo; Audra, Philippe; Madonia, Giuliana; Vattano, Marco; Plan, Lukas; D'Angeli, Ilenia M.; Bigot, Jean-Yves; Anoux, Catherine; Nobécourt, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Caves formed by rising sulfuric waters have been described from all over the world in a wide variety of climate settings, from arid regions to mid-latitude and alpine areas. H2S is generally formed at depth by reduction of sulfates in the presence of hydrocarbons and is transported in solution through the deep aquifers. In tectonically disturbed areas major fractures eventually allow these H2S-bearing fluids to rise to the surface where oxidation processes can become active producing sulfuric acid. This extremely strong acid reacts with the carbonate bedrock creating caves, some of which are among the largest and most spectacular in the world. Production of sulfuric acid mostly occurs at or close to the water table but also in subaerial conditions in moisture films and droplets in the cave environment. These caves are generated at or immediately above the water table, where condensation-corrosion processes are dominant, creating a set of characteristic meso- and micromorphologies. Due to their close connection to the base level, these caves can also precisely record past hydrological and geomorphological settings. Certain authigenic cave minerals, produced during the sulfuric acid speleogenesis (SAS) phase, allow determination of the exact timing of speleogenesis. This paper deals with the morphological, geochemical and mineralogical description of four very typical sulfuric acid water table caves in Europe: the Grotte du Chat in the southern French Alps, the Acqua Fitusa Cave in Sicily (Italy), and the Bad Deutsch Altenburg and Kraushöhle caves in Austria.

  18. Solid/liquid phase diagram of the ammonium sulfate/glutaric acid/water system.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Keith D; Pearson, Christian S; Henningfield, Drew S

    2013-05-02

    We have studied the low temperature phase diagram and water activities of the ammonium sulfate/glutaric acid/water system using differential scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy of thin films, and a new technique: differential scanning calorimetry-video microscopy. Using these techniques, we have determined that there is a temperature-dependent kinetic effect to the dissolution of glutaric acid in aqueous solution. We have mapped the solid/liquid ternary phase diagram, determined the water activities based on the freezing point depression, and determined the ice/glutaric acid phase boundary as well as the ternary eutectic composition and temperature. We have also modified our glutaric acid/water binary phase diagram previously published based on these new results. We compare our results for the ternary system to the predictions of the Extended AIM Aerosol Thermodynamics Model (E-AIM), and find good agreement for the ice melting points in the ice primary phase field of this system; however, significant differences were found with respect to phase boundaries, concentration and temperature of the ternary eutectic, and glutaric acid dissolution.

  19. Photochromic Properties of a Water Soluble Methyl Carboxylic Acid Indolylfulgimide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Islamova, Nadezhda I.; Robles, Rachel V.

    2011-01-01

    Photochromic fulgides and fulgimides have been identified as promising materials for applications in optical memory media, optical switches, and sensors. For applications in humid environments or biological systems, hydrolytic stability is crucial. A new photochromic methyl carboxylic acid indolylfulgimide was synthesized to improve hydrolytic stability in aqueous solution. The UV-vis spectra, extinction coefficient, thermal stability, and photochemical stability of the fulgimide were characterized in 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). The open and closed forms were both stable in buffer. At 37 °C after 500 h, the open forms of the fulgimide showed no degradation within experimental error (1–2%) by 1H NMR and 2.3% decomposition by UV-vis spectroscopy. The closed form degraded 22% and 11% after 500 h at 37 °C in buffer by UV-vis and 1H NMR data, respectively. In addition, the fulgimide cycled back and forth between the open and closed forms 80 times before degrading by 20% in buffer. The methyl group at the bridging position of the fulgimide significantly increased the thermal stability by overcoming the rapid hydrolysis of the trifluoromethyl group. PMID:21380459

  20. Perfluoroalkyl acids in the water cycle from a freshwater river basin to coastal waters in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaobin; Jin, Ling; Yang, Jingping; Wu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Beibei; Zhang, Xiaowei; Yu, Nanyang; Wei, Si; Wu, Jichun; Yu, Hongxia

    2017-02-01

    The distribution of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs), one class of persistent organic pollutants, in groundwater, especially in confined aquifers remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of 12 PFAAs through a water cycle from the Huai River Basin to the Yellow Sea, including confined aquifers, unconfined aquifers, rivers, and coastal waters. We found the ubiquity of PFAAs in all types of samples, including those from confined aquifers (2.7-6.8 ng/L). Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) were the major PFAAs in all samples, accounting for an average of 49.1% (0.8-84.8%) and 33.3% (6.3-92.2%) of total PFAAs, respectively. Comparing the concentration of PFOA with that of PFOS, we found a higher concentration of PFOA in rivers and a higher concentration of PFOS in confined aquifers. Short-chain perfluoropentanoic acid accounted for an average of 10.3% (1.9-24.6%) of total PFAAs in rivers and coastal waters. Branched isomers of both PFOA and PFOS were detected in most samples (36/42 and 39/42, respectively). One-way analysis of variance indicated a significant difference in the profiles of PFAAs among the different types of water samples. Principal component analysis suggested that rainwater and recent uses of PFAAs could be the major sources of PFAAs in confined aquifers, while recent and current uses of PFAAs could be the major source of PFAAs in unconfined aquifers, rivers and coastal waters. The risk quotients of PFOA and PFOS in groundwater and rivers were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than unity, indicating no immediate risks via drinking water consumption.

  1. A new class of LRS Bianchi type-II dark energy models with variable EoS parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anirudh; Amirhashchi, Hassan; Jaiswal, Rekha

    2011-08-01

    A new class of dark energy models in a Locally Rotationally Symmetric Bianchi type-II (LRS B-II) space-time with variable equation of state (EoS) parameter and constant deceleration parameter have been investigated in the present paper. The Einstein's field equations have been solved by applying a variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter given by Berman: Nuovo Cimento 74:182 (1983) which generates two types of solutions for the average scale factor, one is of power-law type and other is of the exponential-law form. Using these two forms, Einstein's field equations are solved separately that correspond to expanding singular and non-singular models of the universe respectively. The dark energy EoS parameter ω is found to be time dependent and its existing range for both models is in good agreement with the three recent observations of (i) SNe Ia data (Knop et al.: Astrophys. J. 598:102 (2003)), (ii) SNe Ia data collaborated with CMBR anisotropy and galaxy clustering statistics (Tegmark et al.: Astrophys. J. 606:702 (2004)) and latest (iii) a combination of cosmological datasets coming from CMB anisotropies, luminosity distances of high redshift type Ia supernovae and galaxy clustering (Hinshaw et al.: Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180:225 (2009); Komatsu et al. Astrophys. J. Suppl. 180:330 (2009)). The cosmological constant Λ is found to be a positive decreasing function of time and it approaches a small positive value at late time (i.e. the present epoch) which is corroborated by results from recent supernovae Ia observations. The physical and geometric behaviour of the universe have also been discussed in detail.

  2. [Study advance on reproductive and developmental toxicity of haloacetic acids in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Hong; Lu, Xiwu

    2008-03-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are major by-products of water disinfection of chlorination, Health effects on reproductive and developmental toxicities of haloacetic acids may be pay more attention to and may be interested in due to their high stability. In recent years numerous toxicological studies indicated that some HAAs could affect reproductive system and fertilizing capacity, inducing fetal anomaly and growth retardation in experimental animals. The recent studies on the reproductive and developmental effects of HAAs were discussed in this paper, the informations may be available for further study on reproductive and developmental effects of HAAs in drinking water.

  3. Role of naphthenic acids in stabilizing water-in-diluted model oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Moran, Kevin; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob

    2010-06-17

    The need for alkaline conditions in oil sands processing is, in part, to produce natural surfactants from bitumen. Previous studies have shown that the produced surfactants are primarily carboxylic salts of naphthenic acids with the possibility of sulfonic salts as well. The role of these natural surfactants, particularly those in the naphthenate class, is to provide a physicochemical basis for several subprocesses in bitumen extraction. In this study, it was found that the content of indigenous naphthenic acids in bitumen can destabilize, to some extent, the water-in-oil emulsion by lowering the interfacial tension, reducing the rigidity and promoting the coalescence of water droplets.

  4. Effect of the treatment by slightly acidic electrolyzed water on the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid in germinated brown millet.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingfeng; Hao, Jianxiong; Liu, Xianggui; Liu, Haijie; Ning, Yawei; Cheng, Ruhong; Tan, Bin; Jia, Yingmin

    2015-11-01

    The accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid and the microbial decontamination are concerned increasingly in the production of sprouts. In this work, the effect of the treatment by slightly acidic electrolyzed water on the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid in the germinated brown millet was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography during germination. The results showed that slightly acidic electrolyzed water with appropriate available chlorine (15 or 30 mg/L) could promote the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid by up to 21% (P < 0.05). However, the treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water could not enhance the sprouts growth of the germinated brown millet. The catalase and peroxidase activities of the germinated brown millet during germination were in agreement with the sprouts growth. Our results suggested that the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid was independent of the length of sprouts in germinated grains. Moreover, the treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water significantly reduced the microbial counts in the germinated millet (P < 0.05) and the treatment with high available chlorine concentration (15 and 30 mg/L) showed stronger anti-infection potential in the germinated brown millet than that of lower available chlorine concentration (5 mg/L). In conclusion, the treatment with slightly acidic electrolyzed water is an available approach to improve the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid and anti-infection potential in the germinated brown millet, and it can avoid too long millet sprouts.

  5. Segregation of acid plume pixels from background water pixels, signatures of background water and dispersed acid plumes, and implications for calculation of iron concentration in dense plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahn, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Two files of data, obtained with a modular multiband scanner, for an acid waste dump into ocean water, were analyzed intensively. Signatures were derived for background water at different levels of effective sunlight intensity, and for different iron concentrations in the dispersed plume from the dump. The effect of increased sunlight intensity on the calculated iron concentration was found to be relatively important at low iron concentrations and relatively unimportant at high values of iron concentration in dispersed plumes. It was concluded that the basic equation for iron concentration is not applicable to dense plumes, particularly because lower values are indicated at the very core of the plume, than in the surrounding sheath, whereas radiances increase consistently from background water to dispersed plume to inner sheath to innermost core. It was likewise concluded that in the dense plume the iron concentration would probably best be measured by the higher wave length radiances, although the suitable relationship remains unknown.

  6. SenSyF Experience on Integration of EO Services in a Generic, Cloud-Based EO Exploitation Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Nuno; Catarino, Nuno; Gutierrez, Antonio; Grosso, Nuno; Andrade, Joao; Caumont, Herve; Goncalves, Pedro; Villa, Guillermo; Mangin, Antoine; Serra, Romain; Johnsen, Harald; Grydeland, Tom; Emsley, Stephen; Jauch, Eduardo; Moreno, Jose; Ruiz, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    SenSyF is a cloud-based data processing framework for EO- based services. It has been pioneer in addressing Big Data issues from the Earth Observation point of view, and is a precursor of several of the technologies and methodologies that will be deployed in ESA's Thematic Exploitation Platforms and other related systems.The SenSyF system focuses on developing fully automated data management, together with access to a processing and exploitation framework, including Earth Observation specific tools. SenSyF is both a development and validation platform for data intensive applications using Earth Observation data. With SenSyF, scientific, institutional or commercial institutions developing EO- based applications and services can take advantage of distributed computational and storage resources, tailored for applications dependent on big Earth Observation data, and without resorting to deep infrastructure and technological investments.This paper describes the integration process and the experience gathered from different EO Service providers during the project.

  7. Diamonds in the rough: identification of individual napthenic acids in oil sands process water

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Steven J.; Scarlett, Alan G.; Jones, David; West, Charles E. ); Frank, Richard A.

    2011-03-10

    Expansion of the oil sands industry of Canada has seen a concomitant increase in the amount of process water produced and stored in large lagoons known as tailings ponds. Concerns have been raised, particularly about the toxic complex mixtures of water-soluble naphthenic acids (NA) in the process water. To date, no individual NA have been identified, despite numerous attempts, and while the toxicity of broad classes of acids is of interest, toxicity is often structure-specific, so identification of individual acids may also be very important. The chromatographic resolution and mass spectral identification of some individual NA from oil sands process water is described. The authors concluded that the presence of tricyclic diamondoid acids, never before even considered as NA, suggests an unprecedented degree of biodegradation of some of the oil in the oil sands. The identifications reported should now be followed by quantitative studies, and these used to direct toxicity assays of relevant NA and the method used to identify further NA to establish which, or whether all NA, are toxic. The two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method described may also be important for helping to better focus reclamation/remediation strategies for NA as well as in facilitating the identification of the sources of NA in contaminated surface waters (auth)

  8. REE speciation in low-temperature acidic waters and the competitive effects of aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gimeno, Serrano M.J.; Auque, Sanz L.F.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of simultaneous competitive speciation of dissolved rare earth elements (REEs) in acidic waters (pH 3.3 to 5.2) has been evaluated by applying the PHREEQE code to the speciation of water analyses from Spain, Brazil, USA, and Canada. The main ions that might affect REE are Al3+, F-, SO42-, and PO43-. Fluoride, normally a significant complexer of REEs, is strongly associated with Al3+ in acid waters and consequently has little influence on REEs. The inclusion of aluminum concentrations in speciation calculations for acidic waters is essential for reliable speciation of REEs. Phosphate concentrations are too low (10-4 to 10-7 m) to affect REE speciation. Consequently, SO42- is the only important complexing ligand for REEs under these conditions. According to Millero [Millero, F.J., 1992. Stability constants for the formation of rare earth inorganic complexes as a function of ionic strength. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 56, 3123-3132], the lanthanide sulfate stability constants are nearly constant with increasing atomic number so that no REE fractionation would be anticipated from aqueous complexation in acidic waters. Hence, REE enrichments or depletions must arise from mass transfer reactions. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. One pot, rapid and efficient synthesis of water dispersible gold nanoparticles using alpha-amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangoo, Nishima; Kaur, Sarabjit; Bajaj, Manish; Jain, D. V. S.; Sharma, Rohit K.

    2014-10-01

    A detailed study on the synthesis of spherical and monodispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using all of the 20 naturally occurring α-amino acids has been reported. The synthesized nanoparticles have been further characterized using various techniques such as absorbance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance. Size control of the nanoparticles has been achieved by varying the ratio of the gold ion to the amino acid. These monodispersed water soluble AuNPs synthesized using non-toxic, naturally occurring α-amino acids as reducing and capping/stabilizing agents serve as a remarkable example of green chemistry.

  10. Efficient Route to Highly Water-Soluble Aromatic Cyclic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Michael; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-06

    2-Hydroxyisoquinolin-1-one (1,2-HOIQO) is a new member of the important class of aromatic cyclic hydroxamic acid ligands which are widely used in metal sequestering applications and metal chelating therapy. The first general approach for the introduction of substituents at the aromatic ring of the chelating moiety is presented. As a useful derivative, the highly water-soluble sulfonic acid has been synthesized by an efficient route that allows general access to 1,2-HOQIO 3-carboxlic acid amides, which are the most relevant for applications.

  11. Increase in the ozone decay time in acidic ozone water and its effects on sterilization of biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Uhm, Han S; Hong, Yi F; Lee, Han Y; Park, Yun H

    2009-09-15

    The sterilization properties of ozone in acidic water are investigated in this study. Acidification of water increases the ozone decay time by several times compared to the decay time in neutral water, thereby enhancing the sterilization strength of ozone in acidic water. A simple analytical model involving the viable microbial counts after contact with acidic ozone water was derived, and a sterilization experiment was conducted on bacterial cells using the acidic ozone water. The acidic ozone water was found to kill very effectively endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372, thereby demonstrating the potential for disinfection of a large surface area in a very short time and for reinstating the contaminated environment as free from toxic biological agents.

  12. Impacts on water quality and biota from natural acid rock drainage in Colorado's Lake Creek watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, D.A.; Sares, Matthew A.; Policky, Greg A.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Church, Stanley E.

    2006-01-01

    Colorado's Lake Creek watershed hosts natural acid rock drainage that significantly impacts surface water, streambed sediment, and aquatic life. The source of the ARD is a group of iron-rich springs that emerge from intensely hydrothermally altered, unexploited, low-grade porphyry copper mineralization in the Grizzly Peak Caldera. Source water chemistry includes pH of 2.5 and dissolved metal concentrations of up to 277 mg/L aluminum, 498 mg/L iron, and 10 mg/L copper. From the hydrothermally altered area downstream for 27 kilometers to Twin Lakes Reservoir, metal concentrations in streambed sediment are elevated and the watershed experiences locally severe adverse impacts to aquatic life due to the acidic, metal-laden water. The water and sediment quality of Twin Lakes Reservoir is sufficiently improved that the reservoir supports a trout fishery, and remnants of upstream ARD are negligible.

  13. Monthly variations of haloacetic acids in drinking water by GC/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, F.M.; Williams, D.T.; LeBel, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    In a national survey of 53 drinking water plants in Canada, haloacetic acids (HAA) were identified as major disinfection by-products (DBPs) and were found in all the chlorinated drinking water supplies examined. The HAA levels were observed to vary with season (summer and winter), water treatment practice (chlorination, chloramination and ozonation) and distance from the treatment plant. In an effort to understand better the dynamics of HAA formation, three drinking water plants that used different disinfectant combinations (chlorine - chlorine, chlorine chloramine and ozone - chlorine) were studied each month (over a period of I year, 1994) at five locations within each supply system. Three HAA (mono-(MCAA), di-(DCAA) and tri-(TCAA) chloroacetic acids) were monitored in the present study, however, MCAA were consistently found at lower levels than DCAA and TCAA; only the DCAA and TCAA results are presented here.

  14. Changes in transepidermal water loss and the composition of epidermal lecithin after applications of pure fatty acid triglycerides to skin of essential fatty acid-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Hartop, P J; Prottey, C

    1976-09-01

    The importance of various unsaturated fatty acid triglycerides to the repair of faulty skin barrier function was studied in essential fatty acid-deficient rats. Following cutaneous application of the pure triglycerides for up to 5 days, the hitherto high rate of transepidermal water loss, characteristic of essential fatty acid deficiency in rats, was reduced by the triglycerides of linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids. Incorporation of the applied fatty acids into the lecithin of the epidermis accompanied these changes in water loss, indicating that cutaneously applied triglycerides may be metabolized by the skin and incorporated into complex lipids. Other fatty acid triglycerides, including alpha-linolenic, dihomo-gamma-linolenic, arachidonic and omega-7-heneicosatrienoic acid, did not lower the rate of transepidermal water loss, although all were incorporated into epidermal structural lipids. The non-essential oleic acid also had no effect upon the rate of transepidermal water loss. These data suggest that of the two main essential fatty acids that occur in skin, linoleic acid and arachidonic acid, the former specifically plays an important role in regulating barrier function whereas the later may have a separate function, such as serving as a precursor of prostaglandins.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of water-soluble prodrugs of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), an anti-apoptotic bile acid.

    PubMed

    Dosa, Peter I; Ward, Tim; Castro, Rui E; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Steer, Clifford J

    2013-06-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is a bile acid with demonstrated anti-apoptotic activity in both in vitro and in vivo models. However, its utility is hampered by limited aqueous solubility. As such, water-soluble prodrugs of UDCA could have an advantage over the parent bile acid in indications where intravenous administration might be preferable, such as decreasing damage from stroke or acute kidney injury. Five phosphate prodrugs were synthesized, including one incorporating a novel phosphoryloxymethyl carboxylate (POMC) moiety. These prodrugs were highly water-soluble, but showed significant differences in chemical stability, with oxymethylphosphate prodrugs being the most unstable. In a series of NMR experiments, the POMC prodrug was bioactivated to UDCA by alkaline phosphatase (AP) faster than a prodrug containing a phosphate directly attached to the alcohol at the 3-position of UDCA. Both of these prodrugs showed significant anti-apoptotic activity in a series of in vitro assays, although the POMC prodrug required the addition of AP for activity, while the other compound was active without exogenous AP.

  16. Initial Scientific Assessment of the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Crucial to the success of the Earth Observing System (Eos) is the Eos Data and Information System (EosDIS). The goals of Eos depend not only on its instruments and science investigations, but also on how well EosDlS helps scientists integrate reliable, large-scale data sets of geophysical and biological measurements made from Eos data, and on how successfully Eos scientists interact with other investigations in Earth System Science. Current progress in the use of remote sensing for science is hampered by requirements that the scientist understand in detail the instrument, the electromagnetic properties of the surface, and a suite of arcane tape formats, and by the immaturity of some of the techniques for estimating geophysical and biological variables from remote sensing data. These shortcomings must be transcended if remote sensing data are to be used by a much wider population of scientists who study environmental change at regional and global scales.

  17. Microgravity Compatible Reagentless Instrumentation for Detection of Dissolved Organic Acids and Alcohols in Potable Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Jan, Darrell L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Organic Acid and Alcohol Monitor (OAAM) program has resulted in the successful development of a computer controlled prototype analyzer capable of accurately determining aqueous organic acids and primary alcohol concentrations over a large dynamic range with high sensitivity. Formic, acetic, and propionic acid were accurately determined at concentrations as low as 5 to 10 micrograms/L in under 20 minutes, or as high as 10 to 20 mg/L in under 30 minutes. Methanol, ethanol, and propanol were determined at concentrations as low as 20 to 100 micrograms/L, or as high as 10 mg/L in under 30 minutes. Importantly for space based application, the OAAM requires no reagents or hazardous chemicals to perform these analyses needing only power, water, and CO2 free purge gas. The OAAM utilized two membrane processes to segregate organic acids from interfering ions. The organic acid concentration was then determined based upon the conductiometric signal. Separation of individual organic acids was accomplished using a chromatographic column. Alcohols are determined in a similar manner after conversion to organic acids by sequential biocatalytic and catalytic oxidation steps. The OAAM was designed to allow the early diagnosis of under performing or failing sub-systems within the Water Recovery System (WRS) baselined for the International Space Station (ISS). To achieve this goal, several new technologies were developed over the course of the OAAM program.

  18. Phase Diagram and Heat Capacities of the Malonic Acid/Water System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Beyer, K. D.

    2003-12-01

    Malonic acid is one of the more ubiquitous dicarboxylic acids found in the atmosphere and is quite soluble in water. Therefore, its impact on particle/cloud droplet formation needs to be better understood through the study of the thermodynamics of its aqueous solutions. The liquid/solid phase diagram and solution heat capacities of the malonic acid/water binary system have been investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy of thin films. We report here the first measurement of the ice melting envelope as well as the ice/malonic acid eutectic temperature and composition in this binary system. Evidence from both thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy is shown for a malonic acid hydrate, possibly C3H4O4ṡ6H2O. We have observed the formation of this hydrate over a large range of concentrations, and have found it is a major fraction of samples within that region. We have also determined the enthalpy of fusion of malonic acid as well as the constant pressure heat capacities of solutions in the concentration range 5 - 55 wt% malonic acid from 323 K to the freezing point of each solution.

  19. Diurnal change in trees as observed by optical and microwave sensors - The EOS Synergism Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, Jobea; Mcdonald, Kyle; Paris, Jack; Dobson, Myron C.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.; Weber, James A.; Ustin, Susan L.; Vanderbilt, Vern C.; Kasischke, Eric S.

    1991-01-01

    The EOS (Earth Observing System) Synergism Study examined the temporal variability of the optical and microwave backscatter due to diurnal change in canopy properties of interest to ecosystem modelers. The experiment was designed to address diurnal changes in canopy water status that relate to transpiration. Multispectral optical and multifrequency, multipolarization microwave measurements were acquired using boom-truck-based systems over a two-week period. Sensor and canopy properties were collected around the clock. The canopy studied was a walnut orchard in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The results demonstrate a large diurnal variation in the dielectric properties of the tree that in turn produces significant diurnal changes in the microwave backscatter. The results suggest that permanently orbiting spaceborne sensors such as those on EOS should be placed in orbits that are optimized for the individual sensor and need not be tied together by a tight simultaneity requirement on the order of minutes to hours for the purpose of monitoring ecosystem properties.

  20. Rapid adjustment of guard-cell abscisic acid levels to current leaf-water status

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.J.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Detached broad bean (Vicia faba L.) leaflets were water stressed; within 15 minutes, guard-cell abscisic acid (ABA) concentration increased ninefold. This result eliminates the apparent discrepancy raised by reports of no correlation between initial water-stress effects on stomata and leaf ABA concentration. Six hours after stress relief, guard-cell ABA concentration was near the prestress value, which would seem to implicate other factors in stress after-effects on stomata.

  1. Aminochlorination in water: first Brønsted acid-promoted synthesis of vicinal chloramines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Liang; Wang, Guan-Wu

    2007-11-23

    A practical and scaleable route for the regio- and diastereoselective synthesis of vicinal chloramines from electron-deficient olefins and Chloramine-T promoted by Brønsted acids in water has been realized for the first time. This novel protocol is efficient, mild, ecofriendly, and broadly applicable for the aminochlorination of various electron-deficient olefins including alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones, cinnamate, and cinnamide. Water represents as a privileged solvent for the aminochlorination reaction in our system.

  2. Formation and growth of molecular clusters containing sulfuric acid, water, ammonia, and dimethylamine.

    PubMed

    DePalma, Joseph W; Doren, Douglas J; Johnston, Murray V

    2014-07-24

    The structures and thermochemistry of molecular clusters containing sulfuric acid, water, ammonia, and/or dimethylamine ((CH3)2NH or DMA) are explored using a combination of Monte Carlo configuration sampling, semiempirical calculations, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Clusters are of the general form [(BH(+))n(HSO4(-))n(H2O)y], where B = NH3 or DMA, 2 ≤ n ≤ 8, and 0 ≤ y ≤ 10. Cluster formulas are written based on the computed structures, which uniformly show proton transfer from each sulfuric acid molecule to a base molecule while the water molecules remain un-ionized. Cluster formation is energetically favorable, owing to strong electrostatic attraction among the ions. Water has a minor effect on the energetics of cluster formation, lowering the free energy of formation by ∼ 10% depending on the cluster size and number of water molecules. Cluster growth (addition of one base molecule and one sulfuric acid molecule to a pre-existing cluster) and base substitution (substituting DMA for ammonia) are also energetically favorable processes for both anhydrous and hydrated clusters. However, the effect of water is different for different bases. Hydrated ammonium bisulfate clusters have a more favorable free energy for growth (i.e., incrementing n with fixed y) than anhydrous clusters, while the reverse is observed for dimethylammonium bisulfate clusters, where the free energy for growth is more favorable for anhydrous clusters. The substitution of DMA for ammonia in bisulfate clusters is favorable but exhibits a complex water dependence. Base substitution in smaller bisulfate clusters is enhanced by the presence of water, while base substitution in larger bisulfate clusters is less favorable for hydrated clusters than that for anhydrous clusters. While DMA substitution can stabilize small clusters containing one or a few sulfuric acid molecules, the free energy advantage of forming amine clusters relative to ammonia clusters becomes less

  3. Impact of treatment processes on the removal of perfluoroalkyl acids from the drinking water production chain.

    PubMed

    Eschauzier, Christian; Beerendonk, Erwin; Scholte-Veenendaal, Petra; De Voogt, Pim

    2012-02-07

    The behavior of polyfluoralkyl acids (PFAAs) from intake (raw source water) to finished drinking water was assessed by taking samples from influent and effluent of the several treatment steps used in a drinking water production chain. These consisted of intake, coagulation, rapid sand filtration, dune passage, aeration, rapid sand filtration, ozonation, pellet softening, granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration, slow sand filtration, and finished drinking water. In the intake water taken from the Lek canal (a tributary of the river Rhine), the most abundant PFAA were PFBA (perfluorobutanoic acid), PFBS (perfluorobutane sulfonate), PFOS (perfluorooctane sulfonate), and PFOA (perfluorooctanoic acid). During treatment, longer chain PFAA such as PFNA (perfluorononanoic acid) and PFOS were readily removed by the GAC treatment step and their GAC effluent concentrations were reduced to levels below the limits of quantitation (LOQ) (0.23 and 0.24 ng/L for PFOS and PFNA, respectively). However, more hydrophilic shorter chain PFAA (especially PFBA and PFBS) were not removed by GAC and their concentrations remained constant through treatment. A decreasing removal capacity of the GAC was observed with increasing carbon loading and with decreasing carbon chain length of the PFAAs. This study shows that none of the treatment steps, including softening processes, are effective for PFAA removal, except for GAC filtration. GAC can effectively remove certain PFAA from the drinking water cycle.The enrichment of branched PFOS and PFOA isomers relative to non branched isomers during GAC filtration was observed during treatment. The finished water contained 26 and 19 ng/L of PFBA and PFBS. Other PFAAs were present in concentrations below 4.2 ng/L The concentrations of PFAA observed in finished waters are no reason for concern for human health as margins to existing guidelines are sufficiently large.

  4. In situ air-water and particle-water partitioning of perfluorocarboxylic acids, perfluorosulfonic acids and perfluorooctyl sulfonamide at a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Vierke, Lena; Ahrens, Lutz; Shoeib, Mahiba; Palm, Wolf-Ulrich; Webster, Eva M; Ellis, David A; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Harner, Tom

    2013-08-01

    In situ measurements of air and water phases at a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) were used to investigate the partitioning behavior of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) and perfluorooctyl sulfonamide (HFOSA) and their conjugate bases (PFC(-)s, PFS(-)s, and FOSA(-), respectively). Particle-dissolved (Rd) and air-water (QAW) concentration ratios were determined at different tanks of a WWTP. Sum of concentrations of C4-12,14 PFC(A)s, C4,6,8,10 PFS(A)s and (H)FOSA were as high as 50 pg m(-3) (atmospheric gas phase), 2300 ng L(-1) (aqueous dissolved phase) and 2500 ng L(-1) (aqueous particle phase). Particle-dissolved concentration ratios of total species, log Rd, ranged from -2.9 to 1.3 for PFS(A)s, from -1.9 to 1.1 for PFC(A)s and was 0.71 for (H)FOSA. These field-based values agree well with equilibrium partitioning data reported in the literature, suggesting that any in situ generation from precursors, if they are present in this system, occurs at a slower rate than the rate of approach to equilibrium. Acid QAW were also estimated. Good agreement between the QAW and the air-water equilibrium partition coefficient for C8PFCA suggests that the air above the WWTP tanks is at or near equilibrium with the water. Uncertainties in these QAW values are attributed mainly to variability in pKa values reported in the literature. The WWTP provides a unique environment for investigating environmental fate processes of the PFCAs and PFSAs under 'real' conditions in order to better understand and predict their fate in the environment.

  5. Comparison of the SAWNUC model with CLOUD measurements of sulphuric acid-water nucleation.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ickes, Luisa; Almeida, Joao; Amorim, Antonio; Barmet, Peter; Bianchi, Federico; Dommen, Josef; Dunne, Eimear M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Franchin, Alessandro; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kürten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Wagner, Paul E; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-27

    Binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water particles is expected to be an important process in the free troposphere at low temperatures. SAWNUC (Sulphuric Acid Water Nucleation) is a model of binary nucleation that is based on laboratory measurements of the binding energies of sulphuric acid and water in charged and neutral clusters. Predictions of SAWNUC are compared for the first time comprehensively with experimental binary nucleation data from the CLOUD chamber at European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experimental measurements span a temperature range of 208-292 K, sulphuric acid concentrations from 1·10(6) to 1·10(9) cm(-3), and distinguish between ion-induced and neutral nucleation. Good agreement, within a factor of 5, is found between the experimental and modeled formation rates for ion-induced nucleation at 278 K and below and for neutral nucleation at 208 and 223 K. Differences at warm temperatures are attributed to ammonia contamination which was indicated by the presence of ammonia-sulphuric acid clusters, detected by an Atmospheric Pressure Interface Time of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. APi-TOF measurements of the sulphuric acid ion cluster distributions ( (H2SO4)i·HSO4- with i = 0, 1, ..., 10) show qualitative agreement with the SAWNUC ion cluster distributions. Remaining differences between the measured and modeled distributions are most likely due to fragmentation in the APi-TOF. The CLOUD results are in good agreement with previously measured cluster binding energies and show the SAWNUC model to be a good representation of ion-induced and neutral binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water clusters in the middle and upper troposphere.

  6. Comparison of the SAWNUC model with CLOUD measurements of sulphuric acid-water nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhart, Sebastian; Ickes, Luisa; Almeida, Joao; Amorim, Antonio; Barmet, Peter; Bianchi, Federico; Dommen, Josef; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Franchin, Alessandro; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kürten, Andreas; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Wimmer, Daniela; Baltensperger, Urs; Wagner, Paul E.; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    Binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water particles is expected to be an important process in the free troposphere at low temperatures. SAWNUC (Sulphuric Acid Water Nucleation) is a model of binary nucleation that is based on laboratory measurements of the binding energies of sulphuric acid and water in charged and neutral clusters. Predictions of SAWNUC are compared for the first time comprehensively with experimental binary nucleation data from the CLOUD chamber at European Organization for Nuclear Research. The experimental measurements span a temperature range of 208-292 K, sulphuric acid concentrations from 1·106 to 1·109 cm-3, and distinguish between ion-induced and neutral nucleation. Good agreement, within a factor of 5, is found between the experimental and modeled formation rates for ion-induced nucleation at 278 K and below and for neutral nucleation at 208 and 223 K. Differences at warm temperatures are attributed to ammonia contamination which was indicated by the presence of ammonia-sulphuric acid clusters, detected by an Atmospheric Pressure Interface Time of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer. APi-TOF measurements of the sulphuric acid ion cluster distributions ((H2SO4)i·HSO4- with i = 0, 1, ..., 10) show qualitative agreement with the SAWNUC ion cluster distributions. Remaining differences between the measured and modeled distributions are most likely due to fragmentation in the APi-TOF. The CLOUD results are in good agreement with previously measured cluster binding energies and show the SAWNUC model to be a good representation of ion-induced and neutral binary nucleation of sulphuric acid-water clusters in the middle and upper troposphere.

  7. Effect of boric acid supplementation of ostrich water on the expression of Foxn1 in thymus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ke; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Rehman, Zia Ur; Khaliq, Haseeb; Song, Hui; Tang, Juan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Sun, Peng-Peng; Zhong, Juming; Peng, Ke-Mei

    2015-11-01

    Foxn1 is essential for thymus development. The relationship between boric acid and thymus development, optimal dose of boric acid in ostrich diets, and the effects of boric acid on the expression of Foxn1 were investigated in the present study. Thirty healthy ostriches were randomly divided into six groups: Group I, II, III, IV, V, VI, and supplemented with boric acid at the concentration of 0 mg/L, 40 mg/L, 80 mg/L, 160 mg/L, 320 mg/L, 640 mg/L, respectively. The histological changes in thymus were observed by HE staining, and the expression of Foxn1 analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. TUNEL method was used to label the apoptotic cells. Ostrich Foxn1 was sequenced by Race method. The results were as following: Apoptosis in ostrich thymus was closely related with boric acid concentrations. Low boric acid concentration inhibited apoptosis in thymus, but high boric acid concentration promoted apoptosis. Foxn1-positive cells were mainly distributed in thymic medulla and rarely in cortex. Foxn1 is closely related to thymus growth and development. The nucleotide sequence and the encoded protein of Foxn1 were 2736 bases and 654 amino acids in length. It is highly conserved as compared with other species. These results demonstrated that the appropriate boric acid supplementation in water would produce positive effects on the growth development of ostrich thymus by promoting Foxn1 expression, especially at 80 mg/L, and the microstructure of the thymus of ostrich fed 80 mg/L boric acid was well developed. The supplementation of high dose boron (>320 mg/L) damaged the microstructure of thymus and inhibited the immune function by inhibiting Foxn1 expression, particularly at 640 mg/L. The optimal dose of boric acid supplementation in ostrich diets is 80 mg/L boric acid. The genomic full-length of African ostrich Foxn1 was cloned for the first time in the study.

  8. The Response of Leaf Water Potential and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism to Prolonged Drought in Sedum rubrotinctum.

    PubMed

    Terri, J A; Turner, M; Gurevitch, J

    1986-06-01

    Plants of Sedum rubrotinctum R. T. Clausen were studied in a green-house over a 2-year period without watering. Only the apical leaves survived and were turgid at the end of the experiment. The midday leaf water potential of these apical leaves was -1.20 megapascals, while the leaf water potential of comparable leaves on well-watered control plants was -0.20 megapascals. The unwatered plants appear to have maintained turgor by means of an osmotic adjustment. After 2 years without water the plants no longer exhibited a nocturnal accumulation of titratable acidity. However, the daytime levels of titratable acidity of the unwatered plants were more than 2-fold greater than the levels in well-watered control plants. Well-watered plants of S. rubrotinctum exhibited seasonal shifts in biomass stble carbon isotope ratios, indicating a greater proportion of day versus night CO(2) uptake in the winter than in the summer. The imposition of water stress prevented the expression of this seasonal rhythm and restricted the plants to dark CO(2) uptake.

  9. Perfluorinated acids as novel chemical tracers of global circulation of ocean waters.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Petrick, Gert; Wei, Si; Gamo, Toshitaka; Lam, Paul K S; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2008-01-01

    Perfluorinated acids (PFAs) such as perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are global environmental contaminants. The physicochemical properties of PFAs are unique in that they have high water solubilities despite the low reactivity of carbon-fluorine bond, which also imparts high stability in the environment. Because of the high water solubilities, the open-ocean water column is suggested to be the final sink for PFOS and PFOA. However, little is known on the distribution of PFAs in the oceans around the world. Here we describe the horizontal (spatial) and vertical distribution of PFAs in ocean waters worldwide. PFOS and PFOA concentrations in the North Atlantic Ocean ranged from 8.6 to 36pg l(-1) and from 52 to 338pg l(-1), respectively, whereas the corresponding concentrations in the Mid Atlantic Ocean were 13-73pg l(-1) and 67-439pg l(-1). These were completely different from the surface waters of the South Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean (overall range of <5-11pg l(-1) for PFOS and PFOA). Vertical profiles of PFAs in the marine water column were associated with the global ocean circulation theory. Vertical profiles of PFAs in water columns from the Labrador Sea reflected the influx of the North Atlantic Current in surface waters, the Labrador Current in subsurface waters, and the Denmark Strait Overflow Water in deep layers below 2000m. Striking differences in the vertical and spatial distribution of PFAs, depending on the oceans, suggest that these persistent acids can serve as useful chemical tracers to allow us to study oceanic transportation by major water currents. The results provide evidence that PFA concentrations and profiles in the oceans adhere to a pattern consistent with the global "Broecker's Conveyor Belt" theory of open ocean water circulation.

  10. n3- polyunsaturated Fat Acid Content of Some Edible Fish from Bahrain Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Arrayedu, F. H.; Al Maskati, H. A.; Abdullah, F. J.

    1999-08-01

    This study was performed to determine the content of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids in 10 fish species that are commonly consumed in Bahrain in addition to the main commercial shrimp species. White sardinella, which is a plankton feeder, had the highest content of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids. It had the highest value of eicosapentaenoic acid (146.5 ± 20 mg 100 g-1) and linolenic acid (98.9±f 100 g-1) and the second highest value of docosahexaenoic acid at (133.7 ± 22 mg 100 g-1). Spanish mackerel which feeds mainly on sardinella was second with eicosapentaenoc acid at 55 ± 5.4 mg 100 g-1, docosahexaenoic acid at 161 ± 19.8 mg 100 g-1, linolenic acid at 16.4 mg 100 g-1 and docosapentaenoic acid at 25 ± 1.9 mg 100 g-1. Rabbitfish, the most popular edible fish in Bahrain which feeds mainly on benthic algae had the third highest content of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids with eicosapentaenoic acid at 37.5 ± 3.9 mg 100 g-1, docosahexaenoic acid at 76 ± 6.7 mg 100 g-1, and docosapentaenoic acid at 85.8 ± 10 mg 100 g-1. The other fish and crustacean species studied were Arabian carpet shark, doublebar bream, grouper, gray grunt, golden travally, keeled mullet, spangled emperor and shrimp. The study explores the transfer of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids through the food webs of the examined fish. It is apparent, generally, that plankton feeders displayed the highest content of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids followed by seaweed and algae grazers, with benthic carnivores feeding on invertebrates displaying the poorest content. The values reported here, however, are much lower than those reported for fish available in American markets and in Mediterranean fish. Warm water temperature and high salinity which lead to lowering of the density of phytoplankton and phytoplankton content of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids are suggested as the reason for the observed low values of n3- polyunsaturated fatty acids in Bahrain fish.

  11. Chemical disinfection of combined sewer overflow waters using performic acid or peracetic acids.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Thornberg, Dines; Berner, Jesper; Gramstad, Robin; Öjstedt, Ulrik; Sharma, Anitha Kumari; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2014-08-15

    We investigated the possibility of applying performic acid (PFA) and peracetic acid (PAA) for disinfection of combined sewer overflow (CSO) in existing CSO management infrastructures. The disinfection power of PFA and PAA towards Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus was studied in batch-scale and pre-field experiments. In the batch-scale experiment, 2.5 mg L(-1) PAA removed approximately 4 log unit of E. coli and Enterococcus from CSO with a 360 min contact time. The removal of E. coli and Enterococcus from CSO was always around or above 3 log units using 2-4 mg L(-1) PFA; with a 20 min contact time in both batch-scale and pre-field experiments. There was no toxicological effect measured by Vibrio fischeri when CSO was disinfected with PFA; a slight toxic effect was observed on CSO disinfected with PAA. When the design for PFA based disinfection was applied to CSO collected from an authentic event, the disinfection efficiencies were confirmed and degradation rates were slightly higher than predicted in simulated CSO.

  12. Effects of indoor drinking water handling on trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Steven; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Serodes, Jean; Beaulieu, Christine; Proulx, François

    2006-08-01

    In this study, different tap water handling strategies were investigated to evaluate the effects on two principal chlorinated DBPs, trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Tap water samples collected in the Quebec City (Canada) distribution system on a spatio-temporal basis were subjected to diverse indoor handling scenarios: storing water in the refrigerator, boiling water followed by storage and, finally, filtering water with a point-of-use commercial pitcher also followed by storage. In the first two cases, the use of covered and uncovered pitchers was investigated separately, while in the last case, both the use of new and used filters was compared. In all cases, maximum storage time was 48h. Results demonstrated that in some cases, water handling scenarios have considerable effect, and in other cases, little or no effect. Removal of THM concentrations by simple storage was high (on average 30%) and very high by boiling and filtering with subsequent storage in the refrigerator (on average, 87% and 92%, respectively). In scenarios where water was stored in uncovered pitchers (with or without previous boiling and filtering), the THM decrease was higher for increased storage times. However, storage did not have any effect on HAAs, whereas boiling decreased levels of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) (on average 42%) and increased levels of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) (on average 35%), resulting in unchanged average levels of total HAAs. The use of the filtration pitcher decreased HAA levels dramatically (on average 66%). Percentages of change in chlorinated DBPs in the different scenarios varied according to initial concentrations in tap water (baseline water), that is, according to the spatio-temporal variations of these substances in the distribution system. On the basis of these results, the paper discusses implications regarding public health protection and exposure assessment for epidemiological studies.

  13. Perfluorinated alkylated acids in groundwater and drinking water: identification, origin and mobility.

    PubMed

    Eschauzier, Christian; Raat, Klaasjan J; Stuyfzand, Pieter J; De Voogt, Pim

    2013-08-01

    Human exposure to perfluorinated alkylated acids (PFAA) occurs primarily via the dietary intake and drinking water can contribute significantly to the overall PFAA intake. Drinking water is produced from surface water and groundwater. Waste water treatment plants have been identified as the main source for PFAA in surface waters and corresponding drinking water. However, even though groundwater is an important source for drinking water production, PFAA sources remain largely uncertain. In this paper, we identified different direct and indirect sources of PFAA to groundwater within the catchment area of a public supply well field (PSWF) in The Netherlands. Direct sources were landfill leachate and water draining from a nearby military base/urban area. Indirect sources were infiltrated rainwater. Maximum concentrations encountered in groundwater within the landfill leachate plume were 1.8 μg/L of non branched perfluorooctanoic acid (L-PFOA) and 1.2 μg/L of perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA). Sum concentrations amounted to 4.4 μg/L total PFAA. The maximum concentration of ΣPFAA in the groundwater originating from the military camp was around 17 ng/L. Maximum concentrations measured in the groundwater halfway the landfill and the PWSF (15 years travel distance) were 29 and 160 ng/L for L-PFOA and PFBA, respectively. Concentrations in the groundwater pumping wells (travel distance >25 years) were much lower: 0.96 and 3.5 ng/L for L-PFOA and PFBA, respectively. The chemical signature of these pumping wells corresponded to the signature encountered in other wells sampled which were fed by water that had not been in contact with potential contaminant sources, suggesting a widespread diffuse contamination from atmospheric deposition.

  14. Acid precipitation: Effects on fresh water ecosystems. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the effects of acidification on fresh water ecosystems. Algae and diatom distribution, survival and reproduction rates of specific fish species under acid lake conditions, and tolerance to stress caused by acidic conditions in fresh water ecosystems are studied. Effects of water pH on trace metal toxicity to fresh water organisms are briefly considered. Control and reduction of acidification are excluded from this bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Microbiological degradation of organic components in oil shale retort water: organic acids.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J E; Riley, R G; Li, S W; Mann, D C; Wildung, R E

    1981-11-01

    The losses of benzoic acid and a homologous series of both mono- and dibasic aliphatic acids in oil shale retort water were monitored with time (21 days) in liquid culture (4% retort water, vol/vol) inoculated with soil. The organic acids constituted approximately 12% of the dissolved organic carbon in retort water, which served as the sole source of carbon and energy in these studies. The levels of the acids in solution were reduced by 80 to 90% within 9 days of incubation. From mass balance calculations, the decrease in dissolved organic carbon with time of incubation was equal to the formation of CO(2) and bacterial cell carbon. The decrease in the level of the acid components, either from degradation to CO(2) or incorporation into bacteria, would account for approximately 70% of the loss in dissolved organic carbon within the first 9 days of incubation and would account for approximately 50% of the loss over the entire 21-day incubation period.

  16. Water solubility enhancement of some organic pollutants and pesticides by dissolved humic and fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Malcolm, R.L.; Brinton, T.I.; Kile, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Water solubility enhancements by dissolved humic and fulvic acids from soil and aquatic origins and by synthetic organic polymers have been determined for selected organic pollutants and pesticides (p,p???-DDT, 2,4,5,2???,5???-PCB, 2,4,4???-PCB, 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene, and lindane). Significant solubility enhancements of relatively water-insoluble solutes by dissolved organic matter (DOM) of soil and aquatic origins may be described in terms of a partition-like interaction of the the solutes with the microscopic organic environment of the high-molecular-weight DOM species; the apparent solute solubilities increase linearly with DOM concentration and show no competitive effect between solutes. With a given DOM sample, the solute partition coefficient (Kdom) increases with a decrease of solute solubility (Sw) or with an increase of the solute's octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow). The Kdom values of solutes with soil-derived humic acid are approximately 4 times greater than with soil fulvic acid and 5-7 times greater than with aquatic humic and fulvic acids. The effectiveness of DOM in enhancing solute solubility appears to be largely controlled by the DOM molecular size and polarity. The relative inability of high-molecular-weight poly(acrylic acids) to enhance solute solubility is attributed to their high polarities and extended chain structures that do not permit the formation of a sizable intramolecular nonpolar environment.

  17. Synthesis of water soluble glycosides of pentacyclic dihydroxytriterpene carboxylic acids as inhibitors of α-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiancong; Nie, Xuliang; Hong, Yanping; Jiang, Yan; Wu, Guoqiang; Yin, Xiaoli; Wang, Chunrong; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-04-07

    A series of compounds were synthesized by glycosylation of maslinic acid (MA) and corosolic acid (CA) with monosaccharides and disaccharides, and the structures of the derivatives were elucidated by standard spectroscopic methods including (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and HRMS. The α-glucosidase inhibitory activities of all the novel compounds were evaluated in vitro. The solubility and inhibitory activity of α-glucosidase assays showed that the bis-disaccharide glycosides of triterpene acids possessed higher water solubility and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities than the bis-monosaccharide glycosides. Among these compounds, maslinic acid bis-lactoside (8e, IC50 = 684 µM) and corosolic acid bis-lactoside (9e, IC50 = 428 µM) had the best water solubility, and 9e exhibited a better inhibitory activity than acarbose (IC50 = 478 µM). However, most of glycosylated derivatives possessed lower inhibitory activities than the parent compounds, although their water solubility was enhanced obviously. Moreover, the kinetic inhibition studies indicated that 9e was a non-competitive inhibitor, and structure-activity relationships of the derivatives are also discussed.

  18. Glucansucrases from lactic acid bacteria which produce water-insoluble polysaccharides from sucrose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dextrans and related glucans produced from sucrose by lactic acid bacteria have been studied for many years and are used in numerous commercial applications and products. Most of these glucans are water-soluble, except for a few notable exceptions from cariogenic Streptococcus spp. and a very small ...

  19. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF ZERO-VALENT IRON TO TREAT WATER IMPACTED BY ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the applicability and limitations of granular zero-valent iron for the treatment of water impacted by mine wastes. Rates of acid neutralization and of metal (Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, Hg, Al, and Mn) and metalloid (As) uptake were determined in batch systems using simu...

  20. Ammonium salts of polymaleic acids and use as corrosion inhibitors in water-in-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenlaender, K.; Barthold, K.; Stork, K.

    1984-03-13

    The subject invention relates to salts of polymaleic acids having a molecular weight between 200 and 1500 and to their use in preventing the corrosion of metal caused by hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide in water-in-oil emulsions such as crude oil.

  1. REPRODUCTIVE AND GENOMIC EFFECTS IN TESTES FROM MICE EXPOSED TO THE WATER DISINFECTANT BYPRODUCT BROMOCHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    A byproduct of drinking water disinfection, bromochloroacetic acid (BCA), acts as a reproductive toxicant in rats. To determine if BCA produces similar reproductive toxicity in mice, juvenile and adult C57BL/6 males were exposed to 0, 8, 24, 72 or 216 mg/kg of BC...

  2. Linking Laboratory Experiences to the Real World: The Extraction of Octylphenoxyacetic Acid from Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E.; Torrents, Alba; Rosales-Rivera, Georgina C.; Rice, Clifford C.

    2006-01-01

    Several chemical concepts to the extraction of a water pollutant OPC (octylphenoxyacetic acid) is presented. As an introduction to the laboratory experiment, a discussion on endocrine disrupters is conducted to familiarize the student with the background of the experiment and to explain the need for the extraction and quantitation of the OPC which…

  3. Sulfonic acid resin-catalyzed addition of phenols, carboxylic acids, and water to olefins: Model reactions for catalytic upgrading of bio-oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Qing-Wen; Yang, Xu-Lai; Chatterjee, Sabornie; Pittman, Charles U

    2010-05-01

    Acid-catalyzed 1-octene reactions with phenol and mixtures of phenol with water, acetic acid and 1-butanol were studied as partial bio-oil upgrading models. Bio-oil from fast biomass pyrolysis has poor fuel properties due to the presence of substantial amounts of water, carboxylic acid, phenolic derivatives and other hydroxyl-containing compounds. Additions across olefins offer a route to simultaneously lower water content and acidity while increasing hydrophobicity, stability and heating value. Amberlyst15, Dowex50WX2 and Dowex50WX4 effectively catalyzed phenol O- and C-alkylation from 65 to 120 degrees C, giving high O-alkylation selectivities in the presence of water, acetic acid and 1-butanol. Octanols and dioctyl ethers were formed from water and octyl acetates and phenol acetates from acetic acid. Phenol alkylation slowed in the presence of water. Dowex50WX2 and Dowex50WX4 were more stable in the presence of water than Amberlyst15 and were successfully recycled. Adding 1-butanol to phenol/water/1-octene, gave emulsion-like mixtures which improved phenol conversion and olefin hydration.

  4. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 3: Design/cost tradeoff studies. Appendix A: EOS program WBS dictionary. Appendix B: EOS mission functional analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The work breakdown structure (WBS) dictionary for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) is defined. The various elements of the EOS program are examined to include the aggregate of hardware, computer software, services, and data required to develop, produce, test, support, and operate the space vehicle and the companion ground data management system. A functional analysis of the EOS mission is developed. The operations for three typical EOS missions, Delta, Titan, and Shuttle launched are considered. The functions were determined for the top program elements, and the mission operations, function 2.0, was expanded to level one functions. Selection of ten level one functions for further analysis to level two and three functions were based on concern for the EOS operations and associated interfaces.

  5. A computer program for geochemical analysis of acid-rain and other low-ionic-strength, acidic waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnsson, P.A.; Lord, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    ARCHEM, a computer program written in FORTRAN 77, is designed primarily for use in the routine geochemical interpretation of low-ionic-strength, acidic waters. On the basis of chemical analyses of the water, and either laboratory or field determinations of pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, the program calculates the equilibrium distribution of major inorganic aqueous species and of inorganic aluminum complexes. The concentration of the organic anion is estimated from the dissolved organic concentration. Ionic ferrous iron is calculated from the dissolved oxygen concentration. Ionic balances and comparisons of computed with measured specific conductances are performed as checks on the analytical accuracy of chemical analyses. ARCHEM may be tailored easily to fit different sampling protocols, and may be run on multiple sample analyses. (Author 's abstract)

  6. Formic acid aided hot water extraction of hemicellulose from European silver birch (Betula pendula) sawdust.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Werner Marcelo; Ahola, Juha; Mikola, Marja; Tanskanen, Juha

    2017-02-11

    Hemicellulose has been extracted from birch (Betula pendula) sawdust by formic acid aided hot water extraction. The maximum amount of hemicellulose extracted was about 70mol% of the total hemicellulose content at 170°C, measured as the combined yield of xylose and furfural. Lower temperatures (130 and 140°C) favored hemicellulose hydrolysis rather than cellulose hydrolysis, even though the total hemicellulose yield was less than at 170°C. It was found that formic acid greatly increased the hydrolysis of hemicellulose to xylose and furfural at the experimental temperatures. The amount of lignin in the extract remained below the detection limit of the analysis (3g/L) in all cases. Formic acid aided hot water extraction is a promising technique for extracting hemicellulose from woody biomass, while leaving a solid residue with low hemicellulose content, which can be delignified to culminate in the three main isolated lignocellulosic fractions: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.

  7. EOS MLS Level 1B Data Processing Software. Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perun, Vincent S.; Jarnot, Robert F.; Wagner, Paul A.; Cofield, Richard E., IV; Nguyen, Honghanh T.; Vuu, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This software is an improvement on Version 2, which was described in EOS MLS Level 1B Data Processing, Version 2.2, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 5 (May 2009), p. 34. It accepts the EOS MLS Level 0 science/engineering data, and the EOS Aura spacecraft ephemeris/attitude data, and produces calibrated instrument radiances and associated engineering and diagnostic data. This version makes the code more robust, improves calibration, provides more diagnostics outputs, defines the Galactic core more finely, and fixes the equator crossing. The Level 1 processing software manages several different tasks. It qualifies each data quantity using instrument configuration and checksum data, as well as data transmission quality flags. Statistical tests are applied for data quality and reasonableness. The instrument engineering data (e.g., voltages, currents, temperatures, and encoder angles) is calibrated by the software, and the filter channel space reference measurements are interpolated onto the times of each limb measurement with the interpolates being differenced from the measurements. Filter channel calibration target measurements are interpolated onto the times of each limb measurement, and are used to compute radiometric gain. The total signal power is determined and analyzed by each digital autocorrelator spectrometer (DACS) during each data integration. The software converts each DACS data integration from an autocorrelation measurement in the time domain into a spectral measurement in the frequency domain, and estimates separately the spectrally, smoothly varying and spectrally averaged components of the limb port signal arising from antenna emission and scattering effects. Limb radiances are also calibrated.

  8. Science Requirements Document for OMI-EOS. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levelt, P. F.; vanderA, R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Boersma, F.; Brinksma, E.; Carpay, J.; Chance, K.; deHaan, J.; Hilsenrath, E.; Isaksen, I.

    2000-01-01

    A Dutch-Finnish scientific and industrial consortium is supplying the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for Earth Observing System-Aura (EOS-Aura). EOS-Aura is the next NASA mission to study the Earth's atmosphere extensively, and successor to the highly successful UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) mission. The 'Science Requirements Document for OMI-EOS' presents an overview of the Aura and OMI mission objectives. It describes how OMI fits into the Aura mission and it reviews the synergy with the other instruments onboard Aura to fulfill the mission. This evolves in the Scientific Requirements for OMI (Chapter 3), stating which trace gases have to be measured with what necessary accuracy, in order for OMI to meet Aura's objectives. The most important data product of OMI, the ozone vertical column, densities shall have a better accuracy and an improved global coverage than the predecessor instruments TOMS (Total Ozone Monitoring Spectrometer) and GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment), which is a.o. achieved by a better signal to noise ratio, improved calibration and a wide field-of-view. Moreover, in order to meet its role on Aura, OMI shall measure trace gases, such as NO2, OClO, BrO, HCHO and SO2, aerosols, cloud top height and cloud coverage. Improved accuracy, better coverage, and finer ground grid than has been done in the past are goals for OMI. After the scientific requirements are defined, three sets of subordinate requirements are derived. These are: the algorithm requirements, i.e. what do the algorithms need in order to meet the scientific requirements; the instrument and calibration requirements, i.e. what has to be measured and how accurately in order to provide the quality of data necessary for deriving the data products; and the validation requirements, i.e. a strategy of how the OMI program will assure that its data products are valid in the atmosphere, at least to the required accuracy.

  9. Dynamics and mass accommodation of HCl molecules on sulfuric acid-water surfaces.

    PubMed

    Behr, P; Scharfenort, U; Ataya, K; Zellner, R

    2009-09-28

    A molecular beam technique has been used to study the dynamics and mass accommodation of HCl molecules in collision with sulfuric acid-water surfaces. The experiments were performed by directing a nearly mono-energetic beam of HCl molecules onto a continuously renewed liquid film of 54-76 wt% sulfuric acid at temperatures between 213 K and 243 K. Deuterated sulfuric acid was used to separate sticking but non-reactive collisions from those that involved penetration through the phase boundary followed by dissociation and recombination with D+. The results indicate that the mass accommodation of HCl on sulfuric acid-water surfaces decreases sharply with increasing acidity over the concentration range 54-76 wt%. Using the capillary wave theory of mass accommodation this effect is explained by a change of the surface dynamics. Regarding the temperature dependence it is found that the mass accommodation of HCl increases with increasing temperature and is limited by the bulk phase viscosity and driven by the restoring forces of the surface tension. These findings imply that under atmospheric conditions the uptake of HCl from the gas phase depends crucially on the bulk phase parameters of the sulfuric acid aerosol.

  10. The Silica-Water Interface: How the Silanols Determine the Surface Acidity and Modulate the Water Properties.

    PubMed

    Sulpizi, Marialore; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sprik, Michiel

    2012-03-13

    Silica is the most abundant metal oxide and the main component of the Earth's crust. Its behavior in contact with water plays a critical role in a variety of geochemical and environmental processes. Despite its key role, the details of the aqueous silica interface at the microscopic molecular level are still elusive. Here we provide such a detailed understanding of the molecular behavior of the silica-water interface, using density functional theory based molecular dynamics (DFTMD) simulations, where a consistent treatment of the electronic structure of solvent and surface is provided. We have calculated the acidity of the silanol groups at the interface directly from the DFTMD simulations, without any fitting of parameters to the experimental data. We find two types of silanol groups at the surface of quartz: out-of-plane silanols with a strong acidic character (pKa = 5.6), which consequently results in the formation of strong and short hydrogen bonds with water molecules at the interface, and in-plane silanols with a pKa of 8.5, forming weak hydrogen bonds with the interfacial water molecules. Our estimate of the quartz point of zero charge (1.0) is found in good agreement with the experimental value of 1.9. We have also shown how the silanols orientation and their hydrogen bond properties are responsible for an amphoteric behavior of the surface. A detailed analysis has identified two species of adsorbed water molecules at the solid-liquid interface, which using the language of vibrational spectroscopy can be identified as "liquid-like" and "ice-like" water or, in other words, water molecules forming respectively weak and strong H-bonds with the oxide surface. These two populations of water are in turn responsible for two distinct peaks in the infrared spectrum of interfacial water and thus provide a molecular explanation of the experimental sum frequency generation spectrum recorded in the literature. In the specific case of quartz, we show that the liquid

  11. EOS attitude determination and next generation star tracker enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudva, P.; Throckmorton, A.

    1993-01-01

    The pointing knowledge required for the Earth Observing System (EOS) AM mission is at the limit of the current generation of star trackers, with little margin. Techniques for improving the performance of existing star trackers are explored, with performance sensitivities developed for each alternative. These are extended to define the most significant performance enhancements for a next generation star tracker. Since attitude determination studies tend to be computationally intensive, an approach for using a simpler one degree of freedom formulation is contrasted with a full three degree of freedom formulation. Additionally, covariance analysis results are compared with time domain simulation performance results.

  12. EOS radiometer concepts for soil moisture remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, J.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary work with aperture synthesis concepts for EOS is reported. The effects of nonvanishing bandwidths on image reconstruction in aperture synthesis system was studied. It is found that nonvanishing bandwidths introduce errors in off-axis pixels when naive Fourier processing is used. The net effect is for bandwidth to limit sensor field-of-view. To quantify this effect a computer program was written which is documented. Example runs are included which illustrate the resultant radiometric errors and effective fields-of-view for a plausible simple sensor.

  13. Sequential Washing with Electrolyzed Alkaline and Acidic Water Effectively Removes Pathogens from Metal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yuichiro; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Kazunori; Satoh, Katsuya; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Yoshiaki; Sugio, Tomomi; Sakai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Eiji; Ichimiya, Kazuko; Hamada, Masahisa; Nakayama, Takehisa; Fujita, Yuhzo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Removal of pathogenic organisms from reprocessed surgical instruments is essential to prevent iatrogenic infections. Some bacteria can make persistent biofilms on medical devices. Contamination of non-disposable equipment with prions also represents a serious risk to surgical patients. Efficient disinfection of prions from endoscopes and other instruments such as high-resolution cameras remains problematic because these instruments do not tolerate aggressive chemical or heat treatments. Herein, we develop a new washing system that uses both the alkaline and acidic water produced by electrolysis. Electrolyzed acidic water, containing HCl and HOCl as active substances, has been reported to be an effective disinfectant. A 0.15% NaCl solution was electrolyzed and used immediately to wash bio-contaminated stainless steel model systems with alkaline water (pH 11.9) with sonication, and then with acidic water (pH 2.7) without sonication. Two bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and a fungus (Candida albicans) were effectively removed or inactivated by the washing process. In addition, this process effectively removed or inactivated prions from the stainless steel surfaces. This washing system will be potentially useful for the disinfection of clinical devices such as neuroendoscopes because electrolyzed water is gentle to both patients and equipment and is environmentally sound. PMID:27223116

  14. Comparison of water solubility enhancements of organic solutes by aquatic humic materials and commercial humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.; Brinton, T.I.; Malcolm, R.L.; Leenheer, J.A.; MacCarthy, P.

    1987-12-01

    Water solubility enhancements of 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), 2,4,5,2',5'-pentachlorobiphenyl (2,4,5,2',5'-PCB), and 2,4,4'-trichlorobiphenyl (2,4,4'-PCB) by dissolved organic matter have been studied with the following samples: (1) acidic water samples from the Suwannee River, Georgia, and the Sopchoppy River, Florida; (2) a humic extract of a nearly neutral pH water from the Calcasieu River, Louisiana; (3) commercial humic acids from the Aldrich Chemical Co. and Fluka-Tridom Chemical Corp. The calculated partition coefficients on a dissolved organic carbon basis (K/sub doc/) for organic solutes with water samples and aquatic humic extracts from this and earlier studies indicate that the enhancement effect varies with the molecular composition of the aquatic humic materials, The K/sub doc/ values with water and aquatic humic samples are, however, far less than the observed K/sub doc/ values obtained with the two commercial samples, by factors of about 4-20. In view of this finding, one should be cautious in interpreting the effects of the dissolved organic matter on solubility enhancement of organic solutes on the basis of the use of commercial humic acids. 14 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Ground-water quality, water year 1995, and statistical analysis of ground-water-quality data, water years 1994-95, at the Chromic Acid Pit site, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Roybal, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    The Chromic Acid Pit site is an inactive waste disposal site that is regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976. The 2.2-cubic-yard cement-lined pit was operated from 1980 to 1983 by a contractor to the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss. The pit, located on the Fort Bliss military reservation in El Paso, Texas, was used for disposal and evaporation of chromic acid waste generated from chrome plating operations. The site was closed in 1989, and the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission issued permit number HW-50296 (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency number TX4213720101), which approved and implemented post-closure care for the Chromic Acid Pit site. In accordance with an approved post-closure plan, the U.S. Geological Survey is cooperating with the U.S. Army in monitoring and evaluating ground-water quality at the site. One upgradient ground-water monitoring well (MW1) and two downgradient ground-water monitoring wells (MW2 and MW3), installed adjacent to the chromic acid pit, are monitored on a quarterly basis. Ground-water sampling of these wells by the U.S. Geological Survey began in December 1993. The ground-water level, measured in a production well located approximately 1,700 feet southeast of the Chromic Acid Pit site, has declined about 29.43 feet from 1982 to 1995. Depth to water at the Chromic Acid Pit site in September 1995 was 284.2 to 286.5 feet below land surface; ground-water flow at the water table is assumed to be toward the southeast. Ground-water samples collected from monitoring wells at the Chromic Acid Pit site during water year 1995 contained dissolved- solids concentrations of 481 to 516 milligrams per liter. Total chromium concentrations detected above the laboratory reporting limit ranged from 0.0061 to 0.030 milligram per liter; dissolved chromium concentrations ranged from 0.0040 to 0.010 milligram per liter. Nitrate as nitrogen concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 2.8 milligrams per

  16. 78 FR 75337 - Eos LNG LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas Produced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Eos LNG... Eos LNG LLC (Eos), requesting long-term, multi- contract authorization to export LNG produced from... natural gas, or 1.6 Bcf per day (Bcf/d). Eos seeks authorization to export the LNG for a 25-year term...

  17. Do cytostatic drugs reach drinking water? The case of mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed

    Franquet-Griell, Helena; Ventura, Francesc; Boleda, M Rosa; Lacorte, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) has been identified as a new river contaminant according to its wide use and high predicted concentration. The aim of this study was to monitor the impact of MPA in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) that collects water downstream Llobregat River (NE Spain) in a highly densified urban area. During a one week survey MPA was recurrently detected in the DWTP intake (17-56.2 ng L(-1)). The presence of this compound in river water was associated to its widespread consumption (>2 tons in 2012 in Catalonia), high excretion rates and low degradability. The fate of MPA in waters at each treatment step of the DWTP was analyzed and complete removal was observed after pretreatment with chlorine dioxide. So far, MPA has not been described as water contaminant and its presence associated with its consumption in anticancer treatments is of relevance to highlight the importance of monitoring this compound.

  18. Measurement of Rates of Cholesterol and Fatty Acid Synthesis In Vivo Using Tritiated Water.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Adam M; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Turley, Stephen D

    2017-01-01

    Every organ in the body is capable of synthesizing cholesterol de novo but at rates that vary with a constellation of factors. A significant proportion of the hydrogen atoms present in cholesterol that is synthesized in the body are derived from water. Thus, although water ordinarily makes up the bulk of body mass, the acute enrichment of the body water pool with a sufficiently large amount of tritiated water over a short interval of time (usually 1 h) yields measurable rates of incorporation of the labeled water into newly generated cholesterol and also fatty acids. Such data can provide a quantitative measure of how specific genetic, dietary, and pharmacological manipulations impact not just the rate of cholesterol synthesis in particular organs but also rates of whole-body cholesterol production and turnover.

  19. Direct Substitution of Alcohols in Pure Water by Brønsted Acid Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Rosa; Herrera, Raquel P

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing concern for sustainability, the use of environmentally friendly media to perform chemical processes has attracted the attention of many research groups. Among them, the use of water, as the unique solvent for reactions, is currently an active area of research. One process of particular interest is the direct nucleophilic substitution of an alcohol avoiding its preliminary transformation into a good leaving group, since one of the by-products in this approach would be water. The direct substitution of allylic, benzylic, and tertiary alcohols has been achieved through SN1-type reactions with catalytic amounts of Brønsted or Lewis acids; however, organic solvents are often required. In this review, the pioneering SN1 approaches performed in pure water and in the absence of a metal based Lewis acid are compiled and discussed.

  20. Biological mechanism for the toxicity of haloacetic acid drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Pals, Justin A; Ang, Justin K; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    The halogenated acetic acids are a major class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) with five haloacetic acids regulated by the U.S. EPA. These agents are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. The decreasing toxicity rank order of the monohalogenated acetic acids (monoHAAs) is iodo- > bromo- > chloroacetic acid. We present data that the monoHAAs inhibit glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity in a concentration-dependent manner with the same rank order as above. The rate of inhibition of GAPDH and the toxic potency of the monoHAAs are highly correlated with their alkylating potential and the propensity of the halogen leaving group. This strong association between GAPDH inhibition and the monoHAA toxic potency supports a comprehensive mechanism for the adverse biological effects by this widely occurring class of regulated DBPs.

  1. Effects of Abscisic Acid and of Hydrostatic Pressure Gradient on Water Movement through Excised Sunflower Roots.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Z

    1977-05-01

    The effect of abscisic acid on the exudation rate from decapitated roots of sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus L.) was investigated in the presence and absence of an imposed hydrostatic pressure gradient. The magnitude of the abscisic acid effect was constant even when suctions up to 60 cm Hg were applied to the cut stumps.When roots were bathed in a THO-labeled nutrient solution, the course of the appearance of radioactivity in the exudate, expressed as a function of exudate volume, was not affected by abscisic acid treatment but was strongly speeded up by applying suction.The implications of those findings with regard to the water pathway through the root and the location of the abscisic acid effect are discussed.

  2. Effect of cyclic redox oscillations on water quality in freshwater acid sulfate soil wetlands.

    PubMed

    Karimian, Niloofar; Johnston, Scott G; Burton, Edward D

    2017-03-01

    Restoration of acid sulfate soil (ASS) wetlands by freshwater re-flooding can lead to the reformation of various Fe(II) and reduced inorganic sulfur (RIS) species in surface soil layers. However, in many locations, wetland water levels undergo large seasonal fluctuations that drive extreme redox oscillations. Newly formed RIS species [e.g. greigite, mackinawite, nano-pyrite and S(0)] and Fe(II) are vulnerable to rapid oxidation during dry periods and may generate substantial acidity. Rainfall following a dry period may then mobilise acidity and metal cations in surface waters prior to eventual recovery in pH by re-establishment of reducing conditions. We explore this dry-wet transition by subjecting soil samples from two freshwater re-flooded ASS wetlands to oxidative incubation for up to 130days followed by re-flooding simulation for 84days. During very early stages of re-flooding (up to 7days) there was an initial pulse-release of acidity, and trace metals/metalloids (Al, Mn, Zn and As). This was followed by a rapid reversion to anoxia, and Fe(III) and SO4 reducing conditions which generated alkalinity, ameliorated acidity and sequestered Fe, S, Zn, Mn and As. Field-observations of surface water quality in an ASS wetland at a sub-catchment scale also confirms re-establishment of SO4 reducing conditions and recovery of pH within ~4-8weeks of re-flooding after dry periods. These observations suggest that retaining surface water in ASS wetlands for ~8weeks after a dry-wet transition will allow sufficient time for alkalinity producing reductive processes to ameliorate most surface water acidity. Although management of freshwater re-flooded ASS wetlands in a highly dynamic climate will remain challenging over the long term and the post-remediation effectiveness of the method depends on initial soil characteristics, knowledge of the timing of redox oscillations and the associated changes in water geochemistry can be helpful for mitigating the risks to downstream

  3. Hormonal and hydroxycinnamic acids profiles in banana leaves in response to various periods of water stress.

    PubMed

    Mahouachi, Jalel; López-Climent, María F; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. "Grand Nain") subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA) concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA) after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA) and cinnamic acids (CA) were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress.

  4. Optimization of dilute acid pretreatment of water hyacinth biomass for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Muhammad; Adnan, Ahmad; Sheikh, Shahzad; Qureshic, Fahim Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted for the optimization of pretreatment process that was used for enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass (Water Hyacinth, WH), which is a renewable resource for the production of bioethanol with decentralized availability. Response surface methodology has been employed for the optimization of temperature (oC), time (hr) and different concentrations of maleic acid (MA), sulfuric acid (SA) and phosphoric acid (PA) that seemed to be significant variables with P < 0.05. High F and R2 values and low P-value for hydrolysis yield indicated the model predictability. The pretreated biomass producing 39.96 g/l, 39.86 g/l and 37.9 g/l of reducing sugars during enzymatic hydrolysis with yield 79.93, 78.71 and 75.9 % from PA, MA and SA treated respectively. The order of catalytic effectiveness for hydrolysis yield was found to be phosphoric acid > maleic acid > sulfuric acid. Mixture of sugars was obtained during dilute acid pretreatment with glucose being the most prominent sugar while pure glucose was obtained during enzymatic hydrolysis. The resulting sugars, obtained during enzymatic hydrolysis were finally fermented to ethanol, with yield 0.484 g/g of reducing sugars which is 95 % of theoretical yield (0.51 g/g glucose) by using commercial baker's yeast (Sacchromyces cerveasiae). PMID:26417215

  5. Radiation grafting of acrylic and methacrylic acid to cellulose fibers to impart high water sorbency

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, A.H.; Williams, J.L.; Stannett, V.T.

    1980-04-01

    Acrylic and methacrylic acids have been directly grafted to rayon and cotton using the preirradiation technique with /sup 60/ Co gamma rays. The rate of grafting increased with increasing temperature and monomer concentration, as did the final degree of grafting. The amount and rate of grafting also increased with the total irradiation dose but tended to level off at higher doses, in agreement with the leveling off of the radical content reported previously. Methacrylic acid grafted more and faster than acrylic acid to both rayon and cotton. Methacrylic acid grafted more with rayon than cotton, but acrylic acid gave somewhat similar yields with both fibers. The water abosrbency of the grafted fibers depended strongly on their posttreatment. Decrystallizing with 70% zinc chloride or with hot sodium hydroxidy developed supersorbency. The two treatments in succession, respectively, gave the highest values. Metacrylic acid brought about less sorbency than the corrsponding acrylic acid grafts. Useful levels of grafting and supersorbency could be readily and practically achieved by the methods described.

  6. Optimization of dilute acid pretreatment of water hyacinth biomass for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Muhammad; Adnan, Ahmad; Sheikh, Shahzad; Qureshic, Fahim Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted for the optimization of pretreatment process that was used for enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass (Water Hyacinth, WH), which is a renewable resource for the production of bioethanol with decentralized availability. Response surface methodology has been employed for the optimization of temperature ((o)C), time (hr) and different concentrations of maleic acid (MA), sulfuric acid (SA) and phosphoric acid (PA) that seemed to be significant variables with P < 0.05. High F and R (2) values and low P-value for hydrolysis yield indicated the model predictability. The pretreated biomass producing 39.96 g/l, 39.86 g/l and 37.9 g/l of reducing sugars during enzymatic hydrolysis with yield 79.93, 78.71 and 75.9 % from PA, MA and SA treated respectively. The order of catalytic effectiveness for hydrolysis yield was found to be phosphoric acid > maleic acid > sulfuric acid. Mixture of sugars was obtained during dilute acid pretreatment with glucose being the most prominent sugar while pure glucose was obtained during enzymatic hydrolysis. The resulting sugars, obtained during enzymatic hydrolysis were finally fermented to ethanol, with yield 0.484 g/g of reducing sugars which is 95 % of theoretical yield (0.51 g/g glucose) by using commercial baker's yeast (Sacchromyces cerveasiae).

  7. Effect of waters of crystallization on terahertz spectra: anhydrous oxalic acid and its dihydrate.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Korter, Timothy M

    2010-07-08

    Oxalic acid and oxalic acid dihydrate were studied using terahertz spectroscopy and solid-state density functional theory (DFT) in the spectral range 10-100 cm(-1). The size of the oxalic acid molecule and its limited internal degrees of freedom make it ideal for evaluating the performance of computational methods for the structural and dynamical simulation of strongly hydrogen-bonded solids. Calculations of the solid-state structures and terahertz spectra of oxalic acid and oxalic acid dihydrate were performed using the hybrid B3LYP and B3PW91 and the nonhybrid BLYP and PW91 density functionals employing the 6-311G(2d,2p) basis set. When these simulations were compared to the experimental spectra of the oxalic acid solids, a constant overprediction of the dihydrate frequencies was observed in contrast to the results of the anhydrous system. This change in behavior is connected to the nature of the vibrational motions being accessed. The primary molecular motion contributions to the terahertz vibrations of oxalic acid dihydrate were found to originate in the external motions of the cocrystallized H(2)O molecules. The observed overestimation of the vibrational energies in the simulated terahertz spectra is attributed to increased anharmonicity of the vibrational motions in the dihydrate system versus the anhydrous, resulting from weaker hydrogen bonding through the networked water molecules.

  8. Defluoridation of water using dicarboxylic acids mediated chitosan-polyaniline/zirconium biopolymeric complex.

    PubMed

    Muthu Prabhu, Subbaiah; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2016-04-01

    The present investigation describes the preparation of hydrogen bonded chitosan-polyaniline/zirconium biopolymeric matrix by grafting method under dicarboxylic acid medium for the removal of fluoride, first time. Herein, the dicarboxylic acids, oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid were used as medium. The synthesized complex was characterized by usual analytical techniques like FTIR, XRD, SEM and EDAX analysis. From the batch equilibrium experiments, the maximum defluoridation capacity (DC) was found to be 8.713 mg/g at room temperature with the minimum contact time of 24 min at 100mg of the sorbent dosage. The temperature study results of adsorption kinetics showed the adsorption behavior could be better described by the pseudo-second-order equation than pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The adsorption isotherm was well fitted by the Freundlich equation rather than Langmuir and D-R isotherms. The mechanism of fluoride removal was ligand exchange at neutral pH and electrostatic attraction at acidic pH of the medium. Regeneration studies were carried out to identify the best regenerant which makes the process cost-effective. Conclusions of this work demonstrate the potential applicability of the dicarboxylic acid mediated chitosan-polyaniline/zirconium complex as an effective adsorbent for fluoride removal from water.

  9. Hormonal and Hydroxycinnamic Acids Profiles in Banana Leaves in Response to Various Periods of Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    López-Climent, María F.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. “Grand Nain”) subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA) concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA) after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA) and cinnamic acids (CA) were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress. PMID:24977208

  10. Aircraft observations of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids in the aerosols over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Lin; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Qing Fu, Ping; Boreddy, Suresh K. R.; Watanabe, Tomomi; Hatakeyama, Shiro; Takami, Akinori; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Vertical profiles of dicarboxylic acids, related organic compounds and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracer compounds in particle phase have not yet been simultaneously explored in East Asia, although there is growing evidence that aqueous-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds may be responsible for the elevated organic aerosols (OA) in the troposphere. Here, we found consistently good correlation of oxalic acid, the most abundant individual organic compounds in aerosols globally, with its precursors as well as biogenic-derived SOA compounds in Chinese tropospheric aerosols by aircraft measurements. Anthropogenically derived dicarboxylic acids (i.e., C5 and C6 diacids) at high altitudes were 4-20 times higher than those from surface measurements and even occasionally dominant over oxalic acid at altitudes higher than 2 km, which is in contrast to the predominance of oxalic acid previously reported globally including the tropospheric and surface aerosols. This indicates an enhancement of tropospheric SOA formation from anthropogenic precursors. Furthermore, oxalic acid-to-sulfate ratio maximized at altitudes of ˜ 2 km, explaining aqueous-phase SOA production that was supported by good correlations with predicted liquid water content, organic carbon and biogenic SOA tracers. These results demonstrate that elevated oxalic acid and related SOA compounds from both the anthropogenic and biogenic sources may substantially contribute to tropospheric OA burden over polluted regions of China, implying aerosol-associated climate effects and intercontinental transport.

  11. Use of EOS Data in AWIPS for Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Haines, Stephanie L.; Suggs, Ron J.; Bradshaw, Tom; Darden, Chris; Burks, Jason

    2003-01-01

    Operational weather forecasting relies heavily on real time data and modeling products for forecast preparation and dissemination of significant weather information to the public. The synthesis of this information (observations and model products) by the meteorologist is facilitated by a decision support system to display and integrate the information in a useful fashion. For the NWS this system is called Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). Over the last few years NASA has launched a series of new Earth Observation Satellites (EOS) for climate monitoring that include several instruments that provide high-resolution measurements of atmospheric and surface features important for weather forecasting and analysis. The key to the utilization of these unique new measurements by the NWS is the real time integration of the EOS data into the AWIPS system. This is currently being done in the Huntsville and Birmingham NWS Forecast Offices under the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Program. This paper describes the use of near real time MODIS and AIRS data in AWIPS to improve the detection of clouds, moisture variations, atmospheric stability, and thermal signatures that can lead to significant weather development. The paper and the conference presentation will focus on several examples where MODIS and AIRS data have made a positive impact on forecast accuracy. The results of an assessment of the utility of these products for weather forecast improvement made at the Huntsville NWS Forecast Office will be presented.

  12. EOS Aqua AMSR-E Arctic Sea Ice Validation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalieri, D. J.; Markus, T.; Gasiewski, A.; Klein, M.; Maslanik, J.; Sturm, M.; Stroeve, J.; Heinrichs, J.

    2004-01-01

    A coordinated Arctic sea ice validation field campaign using the NASA Wallops P-3B aircraft was successfully completed in March 2003. This campaign was part of the program for validating the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) sea ice products. The AMSR-E, designed and built by the Japanese National Space Development Agency for NASA, was launched May 4,2002 on the EOS Aqua spacecraft. The AMSR-E sea ice products include sea ice concentration, sea ice temperature, and snow depth on sea ice. The primary instrument on the P-3B aircraft was the NOAA ETL Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) covering the same frequencies and polarizations as the AMSR-E. This paper describes the objectives of each of the seven flights, the Arctic regions overflown, and the coordination among satellite, aircraft, and surface-based measurements. Two of the seven aircraft flights were coordinated with scientists making surface measurements of snow and ice properties including sea ice temperature and snow depth on sea ice at a study area near Barrow, AK and at a Navy ice camp located in the Beaufort Sea. The remaining flights covered portions of the Bering Sea ice edge, the Chukchi Sea, and Norton Sound. Comparisons among the satellite and aircraft PSR data sets are presented.

  13. EOS ART: Six Artistic Projects Inspired by Earth Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerlow, Isaac

    2015-04-01

    The six projects produced under the artists' residencies at the Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) were inspired by Earth science and by the human experience in naturally hazardous regions. These contemporary artworks were created within an interdisciplinary framework that fostered collaborations between artists and scientists. EOS ART was a pilot program that also facilitated the active engagement of regional artists with issues related to Earth science, sustainable societies, and innovative methods for science outreach. An interdisciplinary jury of art critics, curators and Earth scientists selected art projects proposed by regional artists, and funds were awarded to develop and realize the projects. The artworks-including installations, photographs, and video art-were showcased in the "Unearthed" public exhibit at the Singapore Art Museum from March to July of 2014. A 92-page catalog accompanied the show and public seminars about interdisciplinary connections complemented the event. This was a unique example of collaboration between scientific and artistic institutions in Southeast Asia. The paper provides an overview of the motivations, process and accomplished results. The art projects include "Coastline" by Zhang Xiao (China), "Lupang" by Clara Balaguer and Carlos Casas (Philippines and Spain), "Sound of the Earth" by Chen Sai Hua Kuan (Singapore), "Sudden Nature" by Isaac Kerlow (Mexico/USA), "The Possibility of Knowing" by Robert Zhao Renhui (Singapore), and "When Need Moves the Earth" by Sutthirat Supaparinya (Thailand).

  14. Love and Eos make the world go round

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Deborah Imel

    2012-02-01

    After 15 years of teaching environmental science, health, and safety at the College of Engineering, University of Oklahoma (not far from the Holocene Meers Fault), it was time for a change. I took a deep breath, gave up a tenured faculty position, and moved to Boulder, Colo., to work for a well-known geological society, where my office looked out on steep slabs of Pennsylvanian sandstone at the edge of the Rocky Mountains. Seven months later, I realized there was a new neighbor next door—literally on the other side of the wall of my condo. Remembering my Oklahoma manners, I went next door to welcome the new neighbor. Alan Nelson answered the door and was momentarily speechless when I introduced myself as Deborah Nelson. He quickly recovered and invited me in. We began one of those halting conversations that proceeded until I spied a copy of Eos on the coffee table. "You must be a geologist!" I proudly exclaimed, since I knew that Eos is the weekly publication of AGU. Once again, Alan, who is indeed a geologist, was at a loss for words—but with this happy discovery, the conversation was off and running.

  15. Investigating the chemical changes of chlorogenic acids during coffee brewing: conjugate addition of water to the olefinic moiety of chlorogenic acids and their quinides.

    PubMed

    Matei, Marius Febi; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-12-12

    Coffee is one of the most popular and consumed beverages in the world and is associated with a series of benefits for human health. In this study we focus on the reactivity of chlorogenic acids, the most abundant secondary metabolites in coffee, during the coffee brewing process. We report on the hydroxylation of the chlorogenic acid cinnamoyl substituent by conjugate addition of water to form 3-hydroxydihydrocaffeic acid derivatives using a series of model compounds including monocaffeoyl and dicaffeoylquinic acids and quinic acid lactones. The regiochemistry of conjugate addition was established based on targeted tandem MS experiments. Following conjugate addition of water a reversible water elimination yielding cis-cinnamoyl derivatives accompanied by acyl migration products was observed in model systems. We also report the formation of all of these derivatives during the coffee brewing process.

  16. Coagulation removal of humic acid-stabilized carbon nanotubes from water by PACl: influences of hydraulic condition and water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Si; Liu, Changli; Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui

    2012-11-15

    Discharged carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can adsorb the widely-distributed humic acid (HA) in aquatic environments and thus be stabilized. HA-stabilized CNTs can find their way into and challenge the potable water treatment system. This study investigated the efficiency of coagulation and sedimentation techniques in the removal of the HA-stabilized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using polyaluminum chloride (PACl) as a coagulant, with a focus on the effects of hydraulic conditions and water chemistry. Stirring speeds in the mixing and reacting stages were gradually changed to examine the effect of the hydraulic conditions on the removal rate. The stirring speed in the reacting stage affected floc formation and thereby had a greater impact on the removal rate than the stirring speed in the mixing stage. Water chemistry factors such as pH and ionic strength had a significant effect on the stability of MWCNT suspension and the removal efficiency. Low pH (4-7) was favorable for saving the coagulant and maintaining high removal efficiency. High ionic strength facilitated the destabilization of the HA-stabilized MWCNTs and thereby lowered the required PACl dosage for the coagulation. However, excessively high ionic strength (higher than the critical coagulation concentration) decreased the maximum removal rate, probably by inhibiting ionic activity of PACl hydrolyzate in water. These results are expected to shed light on the potential improvement of coagulation removal of aqueous stabilized MWCNTs in water treatment systems.

  17. Remediation and selective recovery of metals from acidic mine waters using novel modular bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hedrich, Sabrina; Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-10-21

    Mine waters are widely regarded as environmental pollutants, but are also potential sources of valuable metals. Water draining the Maurliden mine (Sweden) is highly acidic (pH 2.3) and rich in zinc (∼ 460 mg L(-1)) and iron (∼ 400 mg L(-1)), and contains smaller concentrations (0.3-49 mg L(-1)) of other transition metals and arsenic. We have developed novel techniques that promote the concurrent amelioration of acidic waste waters and selective recovery of metals, and have used these systems to treat synthetic Maurliden mine water in the laboratory. The two major metals present were removed via controlled biomineralization: zinc as ZnS in a sulfidogenic bioreactor, and iron as schwertmannite by microbial iron oxidation and precipitation of ferric iron. A small proportion (∼ 11%) of the schwertmannite produced was used to remove arsenic as the initial step in the process, and other chalcophilic metals (copper, cadmium and cobalt) were removed (as sulfides) in the stage 1 metal sulfide precipitation reactor. Results from this work have demonstrated that modular biomineralization units can be effective at processing complex mine waters and generating metal products that may be recycled. The economic and environmental benefits of using an integrated biological approach for treating metal-rich mine waters is discussed.

  18. Mutagenicity and disinfection by-products in surface drinking water disinfected with peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Monarca, Silvano; Richardson, Susan D; Feretti, Donatella; Grottolo, Mario; Thruston, Alfred D; Zani, Claudia; Navazio, Giancarlo; Ragazzo, Patrizia; Zerbini, Ilaria; Alberti, Adriana

    2002-02-01

    The aims of this research were to study the influence of peracetic acid (PAA) on the formation of mutagens in surface waters used for human consumption and to assess its potential application for the disinfection of drinking water. The results obtained using PAA were compared to those found with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and chlorine dioxide (ClO2). The Ames test, root anaphase aberration assay, and root/micronuclei assay in Allium cepa and Tradescantia/micronuclei test were used to evaluate the mutagenicity of disinfected samples. Microbiological tests were also performed, and disinfection by-products (DBPs) were identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A slight bacterial mutagenicity was found in raw lake and river water, and similar activity was detected in disinfected samples. A plant test revealed genotoxicity in raw river water, and microbiological analysis showed that PAA has bactericidal activity but lower than that of the other disinfectants. The DBPs produced by PAA were mainly carboxylic acids, which are not recognized as mutagenic, whereas the waters treated with the other disinfectants showed the presence of mutagenic/carcinogenic halogenated DBPs. However, additional experiments should be performed with higher concentrations of PAA and using water with higher organic carbon content to better evaluate this disinfectant.

  19. Photon and Water Mediated Sulfur Oxide and Acid Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Vaida, Veronica

    2014-06-01

    Sulfur compounds have been observed in the atmospheres of a number of planetary bodies in our solar system including Venus, Earth, Mars, Io, Europa, and Callisto. The global cloud cover on Venus located at an altitude between 50 and 80 kilometers is composed primarily of sulfuric acid (H_2SO_4) and water. Planetary photochemical models have attempted to explain observations of sulfuric acid and sulfur oxides with significant discrepancies remaining between models and observation. In particular, high SO_2 mixing ratios are observed above 90 km which exceed model predictions by orders of magnitude. Work recently done in the Vaida lab has shown red light can drive photochemistry through overtone pumping for acids like H_2SO_4 and has been successful in explaining much of the sulfur chemistry in Earth's atmosphere. Water can have a number of interesting effects such as catalysis, suppression, and anti-catalysis of thermal and photochemical processes. We investigate the role of water complexes in the hydration of sulfur oxides and dehydration of sulfur acids and present spectroscopic studies to document such effects. We investigate these reactions using FTIR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and will report on our findings.

  20. Effects of Solution Hydrodynamics on Corrosion Inhibition of Steel by Citric Acid in Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashassi-Sorkhabi, H.; Asghari, E.; Mohammadi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion is a major problem in cooling water systems, which is often controlled using corrosion inhibitors. Solution hydrodynamics is one of the factors affecting corrosion inhibition of metals in these systems. The present work focuses on the study of the combined effects of citric acid concentration (as a green corrosion inhibitor) and fluid flow on corrosion of steel in simulated cooling water. Electrochemical techniques including Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used for corrosion studies. Laminar flow was simulated using a rotating disk electrode. The effects of solution hydrodynamics on inhibition performance of citric acid were discussed. The citric acid showed low inhibition performance in quiescent solution; however, when the electrode rotated at 200 rpm, inhibition efficiency increased remarkably. It was attributed mainly to the acceleration of inhibitor mass transport toward metal surface. The efficiencies were then decreased at higher rotation speeds due to enhanced wall shear stresses on metal surface and separation of adsorbed inhibitor molecules. This article is first part of authors' attempts in designing green inhibitor formulations for industrial cooling water. Citric acid showed acceptable corrosion inhibition in low rotation rates; thus, it can be used as a green additive to the corrosion inhibitor formulations.

  1. Acidic electrolyzed water efficiently improves the flavour of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L. cv. Mopan) wine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wanqi; Zhu, Baoqing; Li, Yao; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Bolin; Fan, Junfeng

    2016-04-15

    The ability of acidic (AcW) and alkaline electrolyzed waters (AlW) to improve the flavour of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.) wine was evaluated. Wines made with AcW (WAcW) were significantly better than wines made with AlW or pure water (PW) in aroma, taste, and colour. Volatile analysis showed that WAcW has high alcohol and ester contents, including 2-phenylethanol, isopentanol, isobutanol, ethyl dodecanoate, phenethyl acetate, and butanedioic acid diethyl ester. The total amino acid content of persimmon slurry soaked with AcW reached 531.2 mg/l, which was much higher than those of the slurries soaked in AlW (381.3 mg/l) and PW (182.7 mg/l). The composition of major amino acids in the AcW-soaked slurry may contribute to the strong ester flavour of WAcW. This is the first report to suggest that electrolyzed functional water (EFW) can be used to improve wine flavour, leading to the possible use of EFW in food processing.

  2. Chemical constituents: water-soluble vitamins, free amino acids and sugar profile from Ganoderma adspersum.

    PubMed

    Kıvrak, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Ganoderma adspersum presents a rigid fruiting body owing to chitin content and having a small quantity of water or moisture. The utility of bioactive constituent of the mushroom can only be available by extraction for human usage. In this study, carbohydrate, water-soluble vitamin compositions and amino acid contents were determined in G. adspersum mushroom. The composition in individual sugars was determined by HPLC-RID, mannitol (13.04 g/100 g) and trehalose (10.27 g/100 g) being the most abundant sugars. The examination of water-soluble vitamins and free amino acid composition was determined by UPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Essential amino acid constituted 67.79% of total amino acid, which is well worth the attention with regard to researchers and consumers. In addition, G. adspersum, which is also significantly rich in B group vitamins and vitamin C, can provide a wide range of notable applications in the pharmaceutics, cosmetics, food and dietary supplement industries. G. adspersum revealed its value for pharmacy and nutrition fields.

  3. Recovery of water and acid from leach solutions using direct contact membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Kesieme, Uchenna K; Milne, Nicholas; Cheng, Chu Yong; Aral, Hal; Duke, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes for the first time the use of direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) for acid and water recovery from a real leach solution generated by a hydrometallurgical plant. The leach solutions considered contained H2SO4 or HCl. In all tests the temperature of the feed solution was kept at 60 °C. The test work showed that fluxes were within the range of 18-33 kg/m(2)/h and 15-35 kg/m(2)/h for the H2SO4 and HCl systems, respectively. In the H2SO4 leach system, the final concentration of free acid in the sample solution increased on the concentrate side of the DCMD system from 1.04 M up to 4.60 M. The sulfate separation efficiency was over 99.9% and overall water recovery exceeded 80%. In the HCl leach system, HCl vapour passed through the membrane from the feed side to the permeate. The concentration of HCl captured in the permeate was about 1.10 M leaving behind only 0.41 M in the feed from the initial concentration of 2.13 M. In all the experiments, salt rejection was >99.9%. DCMD is clearly viable for high recovery of high quality water and concentrated H2SO4 from spent sulfuric acid leach solution where solvent extraction could then be applied to recover the sulfuric acid and metals. While HCl can be recovered for reuse using only DCMD.

  4. Influence of anionic species on uranium separation from acid mine water using strong base resins.

    PubMed

    Ladeira, Ana Claudia Queiroz; Gonçalves, Carlos Renato

    2007-09-30

    The presence of uranium and other elements in high concentrations in acid mine drainage at Poços de Caldas Uranium Mine (Brazil) is a matter of concern. The acid water pH is around 2.7, the uranium concentration is in the range of 6-14 mg L(-1), sulfate concentration near 1400 mg L(-1), fluoride 140 mg L(-1) and iron 180 mg L(-1). In this solution, where sulfate is present in elevated concentrations, uranium is basically in the form of UO(2)(SO(4))(3)(4-). This study investigated the separation of uranium from the other anions present in the acid water under batch and column mode using ion exchange technique. The pH studied was 2.7 and 3.9. Two strong base anionic resins were tested. The influence of ions, commonly found in acid waters like sulfate and fluoride, on ion exchange process was also assessed. Equilibrium studies were carried out to determine the maximum adsorption capacities of the resins. The resins showed a significant capacity for uranium uptake which varied from 66 to 108 mg g(-1) for IRA 910U and 53 to 79 mg g(-1) for Dowex A. The results also showed that SO(4)(2-) is the most interfering ion and it had a deleterious effect on the recovery in the pH range studied. Fluoride did not affect uranium removal.

  5. The removal of kaolinite suspensions by acid-soluble and water-soluble chitosans.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ying-Chien; Wu, Li-Chun; Chen, Chih-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Chitosan is a potential substitute for traditional aluminium salts in water treatment systems. This research compared the coagulant performance of acid-soluble chitosan with water-soluble chitosan and with coagulant mixtures of chitosan and aluminium sulfate (alum). We also assessed the coagulant performance of chitosan and poly-aluminium chloride (PAC) to remove kaolinite from turbid water. In addition, we evaluated their respective coagulation efficiencies under different coagulant concentrations, degrees of turbidity (NTU) and pH levels. Furthermore, we determined the size and settling velocity of flocs formed by these coagulants in order to illustrate major factors affecting kaolinite coagulation. The optimal concentrations of acid- versus water- soluble chitosan required to remove kaolinite from a 300 NTU suspension were 4.0 and 10.0 mg/l, respectively-with individual efficiencies of 79.3 and 92.4%, in that order. Optimum concentrations ofwater-soluble chitosan demonstrated a broader range than that of acid-soluble chitosan. In addition, it is of note that chitosan/alum and chitosan/PAC water-soluble coagulant mixtures demonstrated much wider ranges of optimal concentrations for turbidity reduction than either alum or PAC alone. Moreover, our water-soluble chitosan coagulant mixtures produced denser floc with elevated settling velocities that favour cost savings relevant to both installation and operational expenses. Based on our observations of these noteworthy performances, we confidently propose that a coagulant mixture with a 1:1 mass ratio of chitosan and alum presents a remarkably more cost-effective alternative to the use of chitosan alone in water treatment systems.

  6. Adsorptive removal of trace oxytetracycline from water by acid-modified zeolite: influencing factors.

    PubMed

    An, Wenhao; Xiao, Hua; Yu, Man; Chen, Xiaoyang; Xu, Yuxin; Zhou, Wenmin

    2013-01-01

    Because of the wide use of antibiotics in the livestock industry, trace tetracycline antibiotics are frequently detected in swine wastewater and water bodies near pig farms. Based on natural zeolite, modified zeolite was synthesized by treatment with nitric acid. As one kind of typical tetracyclines, oxytetracycline (OTC) was chosen as the target adsorbate. Removal of trace OTC by modified zeolite and the effects of several main water matrices on OTC adsorption were studied in detail. OTC removal efficiency by acid-modified zeolite was about 90%, compared to less than 20% by natural zeolite. In general, in acidic conditions the removal efficiency of OTC by modified zeolite was about 90%, which was much higher than 20-35% in alkaline conditions. An increase in ionic strength from 0.01 to 1.0 M led to a decrease in adsorption efficiency from 90 to 27%. The presence of 10.0 mg L(-1) dissolved humic acid accelerated sorption of OTC on modified zeolite, while 100.0 mg L(-1) humic acid resulted in the opposite effect. An increase in temperature contributed to enhancing the adsorption efficiency.

  7. Water solubility enhancement of some organic pollutants and pesticides by dissolved humic and fulvic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, C.T.; Malcolm, R.L.; Brinton, T.I.; Kile, D.E.

    1986-05-01

    Water solubility enhancements by dissolved humic and fulvic acids from soil and aquatic origins and by synthetic organic polymers have been determined for selected organic pollutants and pesticides (p,p'-DDT,2,4,5,2',5'-PCB, 2,4,4'-PCB, 1,2,3,-trichlorobenzene, and lindane). Significant solubility enhancements of relatively water-insoluble solutes by dissolved organic matter (DOM) of soil and aquatic origins may be described in terms of a partition-like interaction of the solutes with the microscopic organic environment of the high-molecular-weight DOM species; the apparent solute solubilities increase linearly with DOM concentration and show no competitive effect between solutes. The K/sub dom/ values of solutes with soil-derived humic acid are approximately 4 times greater than with soil fulvic acid and 5-7 times greater than with aquatic humic and fulvic acids. The effectiveness of DOM in enhancing solute solubility appears to be largely controlled by the DOM molecular size and polarity. The relative inability of high-molecular-weight poly(acrylic acids) to enhance solute solubility is attributed to their high polarities and extended chain structures that do not permit the formation of a sizable intramolecular nonpolar environment. 41 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Acid precipitation and drinking water quality in the eastern United States. Final report, November 1981-January 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, F.; Taylor, J.A.; Symons, G.E.; Collins, J.J.; Schock, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Research was conducted to provide accurate modern and historical data on drinking water quality and the possible effect of acid precipitation on water samples. Samples of source raw and finished water were collected from more than 300 surface and groundwater supplies in the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, and North Carolina. The samples were analyzed at EPA laboratories. Historical records were obtained dating back to 1886. Acid rain may dissolve harmful elements from soils and from water supply distribution systems. Because soils can alter the character of acid rain through buffering, causal relationships are difficult to identify. A helpful approach to this problem is the use of indices of water supply sensitiviy and corrosiveness. With these indices, drinking water standards, and reliable chemical data, an assessment of water supply characteristics has been accomplished. Though solution products of acid rain in the water supply sources studied do not exceed EPA Primary Drinking Water Regulations, a large number of tests for aluminum showed levels that could be of concern to kidney dialysis patients. Because of the present water quality conditions (low alkalinity and pH) at numerous water sources, future acid deposition could be expected to have a detrimental effect on water quality. 42 references, 15 figures, 42 tables.

  9. Metal cycling during sediment early diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Torres, E; Ayora, C; Canovas, C R; García-Robledo, E; Galván, L; Sarmiento, A M

    2013-09-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage (AMD) into a reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. To investigate the metal transfer between the water and the sediment, three cores were collected from the Sancho Reservoir (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) during different seasons: turnover event; oxic, stratified period; anoxic and under shallow perennially oxic conditions. The cores were sliced in an oxygen-free atmosphere, after which pore water was extracted by centrifugation and analyzed. A sequential extraction was then applied to the sediments to extract the water-soluble, monosulfide, low crystallinity Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide, crystalline Fe(III)-oxide, organic, pyrite and residual phases. The results showed that, despite the acidic chemistry of the water column (pH<4), the reservoir accumulated a high amount of autochthonous organic matter (up to 12 wt.%). Oxygen was consumed in 1mm of sediment due to organic matter and sulfide oxidation. Below the oxic layer, Fe(III) and sulfate reduction peaks developed concomitantly and the resulting Fe(II) and S(II) were removed as sulfides and probably as S linked to organic matter. During the oxic season, schwertmannite precipitated in the water column and was redissolved in the organic-rich sediment, after which iron and arsenic diffused upwards again to the water column. The flux of precipitates was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the aqueous one, and therefore the sediment acted as a sink for As and Fe. Trace metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Co) and Al always diffused from the reservoir water and were incorporated into the sediments as sulfides and oxyhydroxides, respectively. In spite of the fact that the benthic fluxes estimated for trace metal and Al were much higher than those reported for lake and marine sediments, they only accounted for less than 10% of their total inventory dissolved in the column water.

  10. Long term (1987-2012) trends in water chemistry of acid sensitive Swedish lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futter, Martyn; Valinia, Salar; Fölster, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Acidification of surface waters is a serious concern in Sweden. During the 1970s and 1980s, many surface waters in Sweden were acidified by long-range pollution. Legislated emissions reductions have led to the recovery of many water bodies but today, there are concerns about the possibility of re-acidification. Sweden is committed to a goal of natural acidification only (i.e. no anthropogenic acidification). Here, we present long term (1987-2012) trends in strong acid anion, base cation, organic carbon and alkalinity measurements. Lakes are defined as acidified in Sweden if pH is more than 0.4 units less than a reference (1860) pH estimated using MAGIC, a widely used process-based model of acidification. Using this criteria, many acid sensitive Swedish lakes are still acidified. A changing climate and more intensive forest harvesting may further delay the recovery from acidification. Average measured alkalinity in the 38 lakes presented here was <= 0.02 mekv/l between 2000-2012. Strong acid anion concentrations declined, primarily as a result of declines in sulfate. Chloride is now the dominant anion in many of these lakes. Base cations concentrations have declined less rapidly, leading to an increase in charge balance ANC. This increase in charge balance ANC has not been matched by an increase in measured alkalinity. Total organic carbon concentrations have increased significantly in many of these lakes, to the point where modeled organic acidity is now approximately equal to inorganic acidity. While the results presented here conform to acidification theory, they illustrate the value of long-term monitoring for assessing the effects of pollutant reduction measures, identifying new threats to water quality and corroborating model results. Most importantly, the long-term monitoring results presented here can be an important tool for informing environmental policy.

  11. Effects of acid mine drainage on water, sediment and associated benthic macroinvertebrate communities

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, L.G.; Cherry, D.S.; Dobbs, M.G.; Cairns, J. Jr.; Zipper, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    The toxic constituents of abandoned mined land (AML) discharges (acidic pH, heavy metals, total suspended solids) are extremely toxic to aquatic life . Studies were undertaken to ascertain environmental impacts to the upper Powell River, Lee and Wise Counties, Va. These impacts included disruptions in physical water quality, sediment quality, altered benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages, and toxicity of the water column and sediments from short-term impairment bioassays, and the potential to bioaccumulate selected metals (Al, Fe, Mn, P, Zn, Cu, Mg, S, Ni, Cd) by periphyton and resident bivalves. Water chemistry and macroinvertebrate assemblages were collected at upstream control, just below acid mine drainage and other downstream sites. Selected trace metal concentrations (Al, Fe, Mn, P, Zn, Cu, Mg, S, Ni, Cd) were determined for water, sediment and resident bivalves using ICP-AES. Acidic pH ranged from 2.15--3.3 at three AML-influenced seeps and varied from 6.4--8.0 at reference stations. At one AML-influenced creek, acidic pH conditions worsened from summer to fall and eradicated aquatic life throughout a 1.5 km stretch of that creek as it flowed into another creek. An additional dilution of 3.4 km in the second creek was needed to nearly neutralize the acidic pH problem. Conductivity (umhos/cm) ranged from 32--278 at reference sites and from 245--4,180 at AML-impact sites. Benthic macroinvertebrate abundance and taxon richness were essentially eliminated in the seeps or reached numbers of 1 -3 taxa totaling < 10 organisms relative to reference areas where richness values were 12--17 and comprised 300--977 organisms. Concentrations of Fe, Al, Mg and Cu and Zn were highest in the environmentally stressed stations of low pH and high conductivity relative to the reference stations. Iron was, by far, the element in highest concentration followed by Al and Mg.

  12. Characterization of an organic acid analog model in Adirondack, New York, surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhraei, H.; Driscoll, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    Natural waters include a variety of organic matter that differs in composition and functional groups. Dissolved organic matter is important but difficult to characterize acidic and metal binding (e.g., Al) functional groups in chemical equilibrium models. In this study data from Adirondack Lake Survey were used to calibrate an organic acid analog model in order to quantify the influence of organic acids on surface water chemistry. The study sites in the Adirondack region of New York have diverse levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), used as a surrogate for organic acids. DOC in 55 Adirondack surface waters varies from 180 μmol C/l (in Little Echo Pond) to 1263 μmol C/l (in Sunday Pond). To reduce the variability inherited in the large raw data set, suite of mean observations was constructed by grouping and averaging measured data into pH intervals of 0.05 pH units from pH 4.15 to 7.3. A chemical equilibrium model, which includes major solutes in natural waters, was linked to an optimization algorithm (genetic algorithm) to calibrate a triprotic organic analog model which includes proton and aluminum binding by adjusting the dissociation constants and site density of DOC. The object of fitting procedure was to simultaneously minimize the discrepancy between observed and simulated pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), organic monomeric aluminum and inorganic monomeric aluminum. A sensitivity analysis on calibrated values indicate that the speciation of the modeled solutes are most responsive to the dissociation constant of AlOrg= Al3+ + Org3- reaction (Org3- represents organic anion), the site density of DOC and the second H+ dissociation constant of the triprotic organic analog (i.e. H2Org- = 2H+ + Org3- reaction).

  13. Recovery of Zn from acid mine water and electric arc furnace dust in an integrated process.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Francisco; Romero, Rafael; Mazuelos, Alfonso; Iglesias, Nieves

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the purification of acid mine water and the treatment of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) are integrated into one process with the aim of recovering the Zn content of both effluent and waste. Zinc recovery can reduce the cost of their environmental management: purified acid mine water is discharged after removing all metals; EAFD ceases to be hazardous waste; and Zn is valorised. The process consists of the recovery of Zn as zinc oxide and its purification into commercial products. First, EAFD is leached with acid water and the dissolved metals are selectively precipitated as hydroxides. After EADF leaching, ferrous iron is bio-oxidized and Fe and Al are then precipitated; in the following stage, Cu, Ni, Co and Cd are cemented and finally Zn is precipitated as ZnO. In order to purify water that finally is discharged to a river, lime is used as the neutralizing agent, which results in a precipitate of mainly gypsum, MnO, and ZnO. From the impure zinc oxide produced, various alternatives for the attainment of commercial products, such as basic zinc carbonate and electrolytic zinc, are studied in this work.

  14. Development and operation of a hybrid acid-alkaline advanced water electrolysis cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschke, O.; Zwanziger, M.

    A hybrid acid-alkaline water electrolysis cell has been developed for hydrogen production. The cell is based on the use of an acidic solution at the cathode and a basic solution at the anode to reduce the minimum theoretical voltage for water decomposition from the thermoneutral potential of 1.47 V to close to 1.4 V at 25 C and 1 atm. The pH differential is maintained by the removal of OH ions from the cathode section and water removal from the anode section, which can be driven by heat energy. A practical cell has been built using a solid polymer electrolyte in which, however, the cathodic compartment is not acidic but neutral. Tests with a platinum black cathode catalyst and a platinum-iridium anode catalyst have resulted in steady-state water hydrolysis at an applied voltage of 0.9 V, and a V-I diagram with a considerably lower slope than that of a conventional cell has been obtained at 90 C.

  15. Excitatory amino acids in rostral ventrolateral medulla support blood pressure during water deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Virginia L; Freeman, Korrina L; Clow, Kathy A

    2004-05-01

    Water deprivation is associated with regional increases in sympathetic tone, but whether this is mediated by changes in brain stem regulation of sympathetic activity is unknown. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that water deprivation increases excitatory amino acid (EAA) drive of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), by determining whether bilateral microinjection of kynurenate (Kyn; 2.7 nmol) into the RVLM decreases arterial pressure more in water-deprived than water-replete rats. Plasma osmolality was increased in 48-h water-deprived rats (313 +/- 1 mosmol/kgH2O; P < 0.05) compared with 24-h water-deprived rats (306 +/- 2 mosmol/kgH2O) and water-replete animals (300 +/- 2 mosmol/kgH2O). Kyn decreased arterial pressure by 28.1 +/- 5.2 mmHg (P < 0.01) in 48-h water-deprived rats but had no effect in water-replete rats (-5.9 +/- 1.3 mmHg). Variable depressor effects were observed in 24-h water-deprived animals (-12.5 +/- 2.4 mmHg, not significant); however, in all rats the Kyn depressor response was strongly correlated to the osmolality level (P < 0.01; r2 = 0.47). The pressor responses to unilateral microinjection of increasing doses (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 nmol) of glutamate were enhanced (P < 0.05) during water deprivation, but the pressor responses to intravenous phenylephrine injection were smaller (P < 0.05). These data suggest that water deprivation increases EAA drive to the RVLM, in part by increasing responsiveness of the RVLM to EAA such as glutamate.

  16. In-line preconcentration capillary zone electrophoresis for the analysis of haloacetic acids in water.

    PubMed

    Bernad, Josep O; Damascelli, Anna; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria T

    2011-08-01

    Two in-line enrichment procedures (large volume sample stacking (LVSS) and field amplified sample injection (FASI)) have been evaluated for the CZE analysis of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in drinking water. For LVSS, separation on normal polarity using 20 mM acetic acid-ammonium acetate (pH 5.5) containing 20% ACN as BGE was required. For FASI, the optimum conditions were 25 s hydrodynamic injection (3.5 kPa) of a water plug followed by 25 s electrokinetic injection (-10 kV) of the sample, and 200 mM formic acid-ammonium formate buffer at pH 3.0 as BGE. For both FASI and LVSS methods, linear calibration curves (r(2) >0.992), limit of detection on standards prepared in Milli-Q water (49.1-200 μg/L for LVSS and 4.2-48 μg/L for FASI), and both run-to-run and day-to-day precisions (RSD values up to 15.8% for concentration) were established. Due to the higher sensitive enhancement (up to 310-fold) achieved with FASI-CZE, this method was selected for the analysis of HAAs in drinking water. However, for an optimal FASI application sample salinity was removed by SPE using Oasis WAX cartridges. With SPE-FASI-CZE, method detection limits in the range 0.05-0.8 μg/L were obtained, with recoveries, in general, higher than 90% (around 65% for monochloroacetic and monobromoacetic acids). The applicability of the SPE-FASI-CZE method was evaluated by analyzing drinking tap water from Barcelona where seven HAAs were found at concentration levels between 3 and 13 μg/L.

  17. X-ray studies of the liquid/vapor interface: Water and polymer and fatty acid monolayers on water

    SciTech Connect

    Schlossman, M.L.; Schwartz, D.K.; Kawamoto, E.H.; Kellogg, G.J.; Pershan, P.S. ); Ocko, B.M. ); Kim, M.W.; Chung, T.C. . Corporate Research Labs.)

    1989-01-01

    X-ray specular reflectivity is used to study the liquid-vapor interface of pure water and of fatty acid and polymer monolayers at that interface. For the pure water surface the reflectivity was measured for three different spectrometer resolutions and simultaneous fits with only one free parameter to all of the data are in excellent agreement with the prediction of capillary wave theory for the RMS surface roughness. Diffuse scattering away from the specular condition, at wavevectors corresponding to those of the capillary waves, yields intensities and line shapes in agreement with theory with no significant adjustable parameters. Reflectivity from separate monolayers of co-poly 1, 2-butadiene/butyl alcohol (50% random substitution) and lignoceric acid (CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 22}COOH) at the water/vapor interface are interpreted to obtain profiles of the average electron density {rho}(z) as a function of distance z along the surface normal. For the polymer monolayer we find the following: (1) a local maximum in the electron density approximately 10% larger than that of the bulk polymer and (2) the RMS roughness of the vapor/polymer interface agrees with capillary wave theory predictions for the lower surface pressures. For the highest surface pressure the RMS roughness exceeds the value predicted by the capillary wave model. Measurements of reflectivity from a lignoceric acid monolayer, as a function of surface pressure throughout an isotherm (near room temperature), reveal the following behavior: (1) the overall thickness of the monolayer increases with increasing pressure and (2) the head groups occupy a progressively larger region along the surface normal as the pressure increases, indicating that they rearrange normal to the interface. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Sum frequency generation surface spectra of ice, water, and acid solution investigated by an exciton model.

    PubMed

    Buch, V; Tarbuck, T; Richmond, G L; Groenzin, H; Li, I; Shultz, M J

    2007-11-28

    A new computational scheme is presented for calculation of sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra, based on the exciton model for OH bonds. The scheme is applied to unified analysis of the SFG spectra in the OH-stretch region of the surfaces of ice, liquid water, and acid solution. A significant role of intermolecularly coupled collective modes is pointed out. SFG intensity amplification observed for acid solutions in the H-bonded OH-stretch region is reproduced qualitatively and accounted for by enhanced orientational preference "into the surface" of the H(2)O bisectors within the hydronium solvation shell.

  19. Mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the haloacetic acids, a major class of drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Plewa, Michael J; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Richardson, Susan D; Wagner, Elizabeth D

    2010-01-01

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are formed during the disinfection of drinking water, wastewaters and recreational pool waters. Currently, five HAAs [bromoacetic acid (BAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA); designated as HAA5] are regulated by the U.S. EPA, at a maximum contaminant level of 60 μg/L for the sum of BAA, DBAA, CAA, DCAA, and TCAA. We present a comparative systematic analysis of chronic cytotoxicity and acute genomic DNA damaging capacity of 12 individual HAAs in mammalian cells. In addition to the HAA5, we analyzed iodoacetic acid (IAA), diiodoacetic acid (DiAA), bromoiodoacetic acid (BIAA), tribromoacetic acid (TBAA), chlorodibromoacetic acid (CDBAA), bromodichloroacetic acid (BDCAA), and bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA). Their rank order of chronic cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells was IAA > BAA > TBAA > CDBAA > DIAA > DBAA > BDCAA > BCAA > CAA > BIAA > TCAA > DCAA. The rank order for genotoxicity was IAA > BAA > CAA > DBAA > DIAA > TBAA > BCAA > BIAA > CDBAA. DCAA, TCAA, and BDCAA were not genotoxic. The trend for both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity is iodinated HAAs > brominated HAAs > chlorinated HAAs. The use of alternative disinfectants other than chlorine generates new DBPs and alters their distribution. Systematic, comparative, in vitro toxicological data provides the water supply community with information to consider when employing alternatives to chlorine disinfection. In addition, these data aid in prioritizing DBPs and their related compounds for future in vivo toxicological studies and risk assessment.

  20. Major origin of mutagenicity of chlorinated drinking water in China: humic acid or pollutants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, S W; Xu, F D; Li, S M; Song, R X; Qi, S; Zhang, Y; Bao, Y P

    1997-04-01

    Since Loper and Glatz (J. Toxicol. Environ. Health, 4:919-938;1978) discovered the presence of the mutagenicity in drinking water after chlorination in 1978, humic acid (HA) has been considered as an important source. But our research results show that only 1/8 of observed direct frameshift mutagenicity in tap water originated from chlorination of HA isolated from raw water. Contamination from industrial waste and human settlement (night soil) are important potential sources of mutagenicity in chlorinated drinking water. The results show that mutagenicity from night soil after chlorination depended upon pH of sample. Production of mutagenicity at pH 6 is ten times of that at pH 8, and decomposition process is necessary condition for mutagenicity production. Season variation of mutagenicity of tap is also presented in the paper.

  1. Abscisic Acid Elicits the Water-Stress Response in Root Hairs of Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Schnall, Jennifer A.; Quatrano, Ralph S.

    1992-01-01

    Water stress has been shown to cause root hairs to become short and bulbous. Because abscisic acid (ABA) mediates a variety of water-stress responses, we investigated the response of Arabidopsis thaliana root hairs to ABA. When wild-type root hairs were treated with ABA, they exhibited the water-stress response. The Arabidopsis mutants abi1 and abi2, which are insensitive to ABA at the seedling stage, did not display the root hair response. These data suggest that ABA may mediate the response of root hairs to water stress. The drought response of root hairs resulting in an inhibition of tip growth will provide an easy screen to select mutations that are insensitive to ABA and/or involved in tip growth. Images Figure 1 PMID:16652949

  2. Plans for the development of EOS SAR systems using the Alaska SAR facility. [Earth Observing System (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carsey, F. D.; Weeks, W.

    1988-01-01

    The Alaska SAR Facility (ASF) program for the acquisition and processing of data from the ESA ERS-1, the NASDA ERS-1, and Radarsat and to carry out a program of science investigations using the data is introduced. Agreements for data acquisition and analysis are in place except for the agreement between NASA and Radarsat which is in negotiation. The ASF baseline system, consisting of the Receiving Ground System, the SAR Processor System and the Archive and Operations System, passed critical design review and is fully in implementation phase. Augments to the baseline system for systems to perform geophysical processing and for processing of J-ERS-1 optical data are in the design and implementation phase. The ASF provides a very effective vehicle with which to prepare for the Earth Observing System (EOS) in that it will aid the development of systems and technologies for handling the data volumes produced by the systems of the next decades, and it will also supply some of the data types that will be produced by EOS.

  3. Preserving ground water samples with hydrochloric acid does not result in the formation of chloroform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, Paul J.; Pankow, James F.; Barbash, Jack E.; Price, Curtis V.; Zogorski, John S.

    1999-01-01

    Water samples collected for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are often preserved with hydrochloric acid (HCl) to inhibit the biotransformation of the analytes of interest until the chemical analyses can he performed. However, it is theoretically possible that residual free chlorine in the HCl can react with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to form chloroform via the haloform reaction. Analyses of 1501 ground water samples preserved with HCl from the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program indicate that chloroform was the most commonly detected VOC among 60 VOCs monitored. The DOC concentrations were not significantly larger in samples with detectable chloroform than in those with no delectable chloroform, nor was there any correlation between the concentrations of chloroform and DOC. Furthermore, chloroform was detected more frequently in shallow ground water in urban areas (28.5% of the wells sampled) than in agricultural areas (1.6% of the wells sampled), which indicates that its detection was more related to urban land-use activities than to sample acidification. These data provide strong evidence that acidification with HCl does not lead to the production of significant amounts of chloroform in ground water samples. To verify these results, an acidification study was designed to measure the concentrations of all trihalomethanes (THMs) that can form as a result of HCl preservation in ground water samples and to determine if ascorbic acid (C6H8O6) could inhibit this reaction if it did occur. This study showed that no THMs were formed as a result of HCl acidification, and that ascorbic acid had no discernible effect on the concentrations of THMs measured.

  4. [Development and Applicability of Analytical Methods for Quantifying Cyanide and Bromic Acid in Mineral Waters].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yusaku; Kataoka, Yohei; Sano, Yuki; Takizawa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Takahiro; Teshima, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    We developed and evaluated methods of quantifying cyanide (cyanide ion and cyanogen chloride) and bromic acid in mineral waters (MW). After performance evaluation, recovery studies were performed on 110 kinds of MW products to examine the applicability of the methods. The approximate proportion of the MW samples, in which the recovery rate of these anionic compounds was within 90 to 110%, was 95% in the cyanide ion and bromic acid analysis and 45% in the cyanogen chloride analysis. We observed low rates of recovery of cyanogen chloride from some MW products with pH values around neutral. To increase the recovery rate, we propose adding phosphoric acid buffer to adjust the pH of these MW samples. The retention times for bromic acid in some MW products differed from that in standard solution. We concluded that carbonic acid influences the retention times. It may be necessary to to exclude carbon dioxide from the MW samples by degassing to synchronize the retention times of bromic acid in the MW samples and the standard solution.

  5. Carboxymethylcellulose Obtained by Ethanol/Water Organosolv Process Under Acid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzene, Denise S.; Gonçalves, Adilson R.; Teixeira, José A.; Pessoa de Amorim, Maria T.

    Sugar cane bagasse pulps were obtained by ethanol/water organosolv process under acid and alkaline conditions. The best condition of acid pulping for the sugarcane bagasse was 0.02 mol/L sulfuric acid at 160°C, for 1h, whereas the best condition for alkaline pulping was 5% sodium hydroxide (base pulp) at 160°C, for 3h. For the residual lignin removal, the acid and alkaline pulps were submitted to a chemical bleaching using sodium chlorite. Pulps under acid and alkaline conditions bleached with sodium chlorite presented viscosities of 3.6 and 7.8 mPas, respectively, and μ-kappa numbers of 1.1 and 2.4, respectively. The pulp under acid condition, bleached with sodium chlorite was used to obtain carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). CMC yield was 35% (pulp based), showing mass gain after the carboxymethylation reaction corresponding to 23.6% of substitution or 0.70 groups-CH2COONa per unit of glucose residue. The infrared spectra showed the CMC characteristic bands and by the infrared technique it was possible to obtain a substitution degree (0.63), similar to the substitution degree calculated by mass gain (0.70).

  6. A European Collaborative EO Summer School for the Education of Undergraduate and Masters Level Students- FORMAT-EO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Rosemarie; Remedios, John; Tramutoli, Valerio; Gil, Artur; Cuca, Branka

    2014-05-01

    An Erasmus intensive programme has been successfully funded to run a Europe-lead summer school in Earth Observation for the years 2013 and 2014. The summer school, FORMAT-EO (FORmation of Multi-disciplinary Approaches to Training in Earth Observation) has been proposed and implemented by a consortium of eight partner institutions from five European countries. The consortium was facilitated through the NEREUS network. In the summer of 2013, 21 students from seven European institutions took part in the two week intensive course which involved a total of 28 teachers from six institutions. Students were from a variety of backgrounds including aeronautical engineering MSc students and PhD students in the areas of marine biology, earthquake engineering and measurement of trace gases in the atmosphere. The aims of FORMAT-EO were: To give students exposure to the wider applications of Earth Observation To highlight the interdisciplinary, collaborative and international nature of Earth Observation To offer an intensive course to better equip students with specialist skills required for a career in this field To provide expert advice on the development of careers in the EO market Partners were invited not only to recruit students for the course but to also teach at the school based on their specific area of expertise. This approach to the teaching provided a timetable which was wide-ranging and covered topics from EU policies for Earth Observation to fire detection from space and an introduction to interaction between radiation and matter. An important aspect of the course was the interactive nature of much of the teaching. A topic was introduced to the students through a lecture followed by an interactive tutorial providing students with hands-on experience of working with EO data and specialist software. The final days of the summer school were spent on group project work which required students to use all of the skills that they acquired during the course to challenge a

  7. Selective removal of transition metals from acidic mine waters by novel consortia of acidophilic sulfidogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ňancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D. Barrie

    2012-01-01

    Summary Two continuous‐flow bench‐scale bioreactor systems populated by mixed communities of acidophilic sulfate‐reducing bacteria were constructed and tested for their abilities to promote the selective precipitation of transition metals (as sulfides) present in synthetic mine waters, using glycerol as electron donor. The objective with the first system (selective precipitation of copper from acidic mine water containing a variety of soluble metals) was achieved by maintaining a bioreactor pH of ∼2.2–2.5. The second system was fed with acidic (pH 2.5) synthetic mine water containing 3 mM of both zinc and ferrous iron, and varying concentrations (0.5–30 mM) of aluminium. Selective precipitation of zinc sulfide was possible by operating the bioreactor at pH 4.0 and supplementing the synthetic mine water with 4 mM glycerol. Analysis of the microbial populations in the bioreactors showed that they changed with varying operational parameters, and novel acidophilic bacteria (including one sulfidogen) were isolated from the bioreactors. The acidophilic sulfidogenic bioreactors provided ‘proof of principle’ that segregation of metals present in mine waters is possible using simple online systems within which controlled pH conditions are maintained. The modular units are versatile and robust, and involve minimum engineering complexity. PMID:21895996

  8. Selective removal of transition metals from acidic mine waters by novel consortia of acidophilic sulfidogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D Barrie

    2012-01-01

    Two continuous-flow bench-scale bioreactor systems populated by mixed communities of acidophilic sulfate-reducing bacteria were constructed and tested for their abilities to promote the selective precipitation of transition metals (as sulfides) present in synthetic mine waters, using glycerol as electron donor. The objective with the first system (selective precipitation of copper from acidic mine water containing a variety of soluble metals) was achieved by maintaining a bioreactor pH of ≈ 2.2-2.5. The second system was fed with acidic (pH 2.5) synthetic mine water containing 3 mM of both zinc and ferrous iron, and varying concentrations (0.5-30 mM) of aluminium. Selective precipitation of zinc sulfide was possible by operating the bioreactor at pH 4.0 and supplementing the synthetic mine water with 4 mM glycerol. Analysis of the microbial populations in the bioreactors showed that they changed with varying operational parameters, and novel acidophilic bacteria (including one sulfidogen) were isolated from the bioreactors. The acidophilic sulfidogenic bioreactors provided 'proof of principle' that segregation of metals present in mine waters is possible using simple online systems within which controlled pH conditions are maintained. The modular units are versatile and robust, and involve minimum engineering complexity.

  9. Coal-water slurry viscosity reduction using olefin/maleic acid salt copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Matt, J.; Ferrara, J.M.

    1984-04-10

    An improved coal-water slurry of the type comprising at least 45% by weight of finely divided coal particles and a dispersing agent, said slurry being characterized as having a Brookfield viscosity at 60 rpm of less than 4,000 centipoise, the improvement which comprises adjusting the pH of said slurry to at least 6 and using as the dispersing agent, a water-soluble salt of an olefin/maleic acid copolymer having a molecular weight within the range of about between 3,000-50,000.

  10. Pervaporation separation of ethanol-water mixtures using polyacrylic acid composite membranes

    DOEpatents

    Neidlinger, H.H.

    1985-05-07

    Synthetic, organic, polymeric membranes were prepared from polyacrylic acid salts for use with pervaporation apparatus in the separation of ehthanol-water mixtures. The polymeric material was prepared in dilute aqueous solution and coated onto a polysulfone support film, from which excess polymeric material was subsequently removed. Cross-links were then generated by limited exposure to toluene-2,4-diisocyanata solution, after which the prepared membrane was heat-cured. The resulting membrane structure showed selectivity in permeating water over a wide range of feed concentrations. 4 tabs.

  11. Limitations in the use of commercial humic acids in water and soil research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.; MacCarthy, P.

    1986-01-01

    Seven samples of commercial "humic acids", purchased from five different suppliers, were studied, and their characteristics were compared with humic and fulvic acids isolated from streams, soils, peat, leonardite, and a dopplerite sample. Cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning 13C NMR spectroscopy clearly shows pronounced differences between the commercial materials and all other samples. Elemental and infrared spectroscopic data do not show such clear-cut differences but can be used as supportive evidence, with the 13C NMR data, to substantiate the above distinctions. As a result of these differences and due to the general lack of information relating to the source, method of isolation, or other pretreatment of the commercial materials, these commercial products are not considered to be appropriate for use as analogues of true soil and water humic substances, in experiments designed to evaluate the nature and reactivity of humic substances in natural waters and soils.

  12. Water soluble and heat resistant polymers by free radical polymerization of lactic acid-based monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hitoshi; Kibayashi, Tatsuya; Niwa, Miki

    2013-08-01

    Tactic heat resistant polymer was prepared by free radical polymerization of lactic acid-based monomers, i.e. chiral 2-isopropyl-5-methylene-1,3-dioxolan-4-ones (1). The polymerization of 1 proceeded smoothly without ring-opening to give a polymer with high isotacticity (mm) of 29.7~100% and glass transition temperature (Tg) of 172~213°C. 1 also showed high reactivity in the copolymerization with styrene and methyl methacrylate, and the incorporation of 1 unit in the copolymer structure increased Tg of each polymer. In addition, hydrolysis of poly(1) produced a new type of water soluble poly(lactic acid), i.e. poly(α-hydroxy acrylate), and poly(α-hydroxy acrylate-co-divinyl benzene) hydrogel absorbed water as high as 1000 times of the original polymer weight.

  13. Formation of an artifact of diclofenac during acidic extraction of environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Reddersen, K; Heberer, Th

    2003-09-05

    Solid-phase extraction at an acidic pH is used as a common sample preparation method for analyzing residues of the analgesic drug diclofenac (2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino] benzeneacetic acid) in environmental water samples. This paper describes the matrix-dependent formation of an artifact of diclofenac during sample preparation resulting in an up to 40% underestimation of diclofenac concentrations especially in matrix-prone samples such as sewage effluents or surface water. The artifact most likely being formed during acidification of the sample was unequivocally identified as 1-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)indolin-2-one by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To avoid an underestimation of the analytical results quantification of both diclofenac and its artifact is recommended.

  14. Water Relations, Diurnal Acidity Changes, and Productivity of a Cultivated Cactus, Opuntia ficus-indica1

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Edmundo; Badilla, Ignacio; Nobel, Park S.

    1983-01-01

    Physiological responses of the Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant Opuntia ficus-indica (Cactaceae) were studied on a commercial plantation in central Chile. Young cladodes (flattened stems) and flower buds exhibited daytime stomatal opening, whereas mature cladodes and fruit exhibited the nocturnal stomatal opening characteristic of CAM plants. Severe water stress suppressed the nocturnal stomatal opening by mature cladodes, but their high water vapor conductance occurring near dawn was not affected. Nocturnal acidity increases were not as sensitive to water stress as was the nocturnal stomatal opening. The magnitude of the nocturnal acidity increases depended on the total daily photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), being 90% PAR-saturated at 27 moles per square meter per day for a mean nighttime air temperature of 5°C and at 20 moles per square meter per day for 18°C. Inasmuch as the PAR received on unshaded vertical surfaces averaged about 21 moles per square meter per day, nocturnal acidity increases by the cladodes were on the verge of being PAR-limited in the field. The net assimilation rate, which was positive throughout the year, annually averaged 3.4 grams per square meter per day for 1.0- and 2.0-year-old plants. Plants that were 5.4 years old had 7.2 square meters of cladode surface area (both sides) and an annual dry weight productivity of 13 megagrams (metric tons) per hectare per year when their ground cover was 32%. This substantial productivity for a CAM plant was accompanied by the highest nocturnal acidity increase so far observed in the field, 0.78 mole H+ per square meter. PMID:16663084

  15. The Partitioning of Acetic, Formic, and Phosphoric Acids Between Liquid Water and Steam

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Marshall, S.L.; Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.

    1999-06-22

    The chemical carryover of impurities and treatment chemicals from the boiler to the steam phase, and ultimately to the low-pressure turbine and condenser, can be quantified based on laboratory experiments preformed over ranges of temperature, pH, and composition. The two major assumptions are that thermodynamic equilibrium is maintained and no deposition, adsorption or decomposition occurs. The most recent results on acetic, formic and phosphoric acids are presented with consideration of the effects of hydrolysis and dimerization reactions. Complications arising from thermal decomposition of the organic acids are discussed. The partitioning constants for these acids and other solutes measured in this program have been incorporated into a simple thermodynamic computer code that calculates the effect of chemical and mechanical carryover on the composition of the condensate formed to varying extents in the water/steam cycle.

  16. Pervaporation of Water from Aqueous Sulfuric Acid at Elevated Temperatures Using Nafion® Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart

    2009-01-01

    The concentration of sulfuric acid by pervaporation has been studied using Nafion-112® and Nafion-117® membranes, which have been characterized in terms of flux, permeability, and selectivity at 100 ºC and 120 ºC. Feed concentrations investigated ranged from 40 to over 80 weight percent. In general, water fluxes ranged from 100-8000 g/m2h, depending on feed acid concentration and separations factors as high as 104 were observed. Membrane stability was probed using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis that revealed some embrittlement of the membranes during use. Further studies showed that the embrittlement was due to an interaction with the acid and was not induced by the operating temperature.

  17. Supported zirconium sulfate on carbon nanotubes as water-tolerant solid acid catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Juan, Joon Ching; Jiang Yajie; Meng Xiujuan; Cao Weiliang; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar; Zhang Jingchang . E-mail: zhangjc1@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2007-07-03

    A new solid acid of zirconium sulfate (CZ) was successfully supported on carbon nanotube (CNT) for esterification reaction. Preparation conditions of the supported CZ have been investigated, to obtain highest catalytic activity for esterification reaction. XRD, TEM, BET, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and in situ FTIR analysis has also been carried out to understand the characteristics of the catalyst. In the esterification of acrylic acid with n-octanol, the supported CZ exhibited high catalytic activity and stability. The catalytic activity was nearly unchanged during four times of reuse. XRD and TEM analysis indicated that CZ was finely dispersed on CNT. XPS analysis shows that the CZ species was preserved and the chemical environment of the CZ has changed after loaded on CNT. This finding show that CNT as CZ support is an efficient water-tolerant solid acid.

  18. [Coagulation characteristics of different Al species on humic acid removal from water].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Pan-Yue; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Gao, Ying; Xiao, Hui-Huang; Zhou, Fan

    2008-07-01

    Polyaluminum chloride PAC-Al13 with high Al13 content and PAC-Al30 with high Al30 content were prepared. Coagulation behaviors of PAC-Al30, PAC-Al13 and AlCl3 for humic acid removal from water were compared by jar-test. The floc growth, the charge neutralization capacity, the effect of pH and coagulant dosage on coagulation efficiency were investigated, and the residual aluminium in the purified water was considered. The results show that the order of the floc formation capacity is PAC-Al30 > PAC-Al13 > AlCl3. PAC-Al30 and PAC-Al13 have a broader effective pH range of 5.0-8.0, compared with AlCl3. The difference of charge neutralization capacity between PAC-Al30 and PAC-Al13 is not significant, but PAC-Al30 performs a more effective coagulation at low coagulant dosages because of its stronger adsorption and bridging, and PAC-Al30 has a broader effective dosage range of 0.08-0.64 mmol/L, compared with AlCl3 and PAC-Al13. The humic acid removal reaches 98.5% at a pH of 7.0 and a PAC-Al30 dosage of 0.16 mmol/L for the sample water with a humic acid content of 10 mg/L; and the residual aluminum in the purified water is 0.066 mg/L. The results verify that Al30 is another highly efficient coagulation/flocculation species for humic acid removal.

  19. Mechanism of Glucose Isomerization Using a Solid Lewis Acid Catalyst in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Leshkov, Yuriy; Moliner, Manuel; Labinger, J. A.; Davis, Mark E.

    2010-10-20

    1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy on isotopically labeled glucose reveals that in the presence of tin-containing zeolite Sn-Beta, the isomerization reaction of glucose in water proceeds by way of an intramolecular hydride shift rather than proton transfer. This is the first mechanistic demonstration of Sn-Beta acting as a Lewis acid in a purely aqueous environment.

  20. Iron-rich drinking water and ascorbic acid supplementation improved hemolytic anemia in experimental Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Richa; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Banerjee, Saumen; Bhattacharjee, Chira R; Raul, Prasanta; Borah, Kusum; Singh, Lokendra; Veer, Vijay

    2014-11-01

    Anemia is a frequent problem in both the primary and secondary health care programs. In contrast, most areas of northeast India are vulnerable to iron toxicity. In the present study, we documented the effect of administration of iron rich water on hemolytic anemia in a Wistar rats' animal model. Hemolytic anemia was induced by phenyl hydrazine through intraperitoneal route and diagnosed by the lowering of blood hemoglobin. After inducing the hemolytic anemia, 24 Wistar rats (n = 6 in four groups) were randomly assigned to 1 mg/l, 5 mg/l, and 10 mg/l ferric oxide iron along with 1 mg/ml ascorbic acid administered through drinking water; a control group was treated with iron-free water. The hematological and biochemical parameters, iron levels in liver, spleen, and kidney were estimated after 30 d of treatment. In the group treated with 5 mg/l iron and ascorbic acid, a significant increase of serum iron and ferritin, and a decrease of TIBC (total iron binding capacity) were observed without changes in other biochemical parameters and histopathological findings. However, in the group treated with 10 mg/l iron and ascorbic acid, hematological changes with significantly higher values for white blood cell count, serum glutamic phospho transaminase, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, glucose, splenic, and liver iron content, indicate potential toxicity at this supplementation level. Data suggest that the optimum concentration of iron (5 mg/l) and ascorbic acid solution may improve anemic conditions and may be therapeutically beneficial in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia without any negative impact, while 10 mg/l in drinking water seems to be the threshold for the initiation of toxicity.