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Sample records for acidic gastric environment

  1. Dietary proteins extend the survival of Salmonella Dublin in a gastric acid environment.

    PubMed

    Birk, Tina; Kristensen, Kim; Harboe, Anne; Hansen, Tina Beck; Ingmer, Hanne; De Jonge, Rob; Takumi, Katsuhisa; Aabo, Søren

    2012-02-01

    The pH of the human stomach is dynamic and changes over time, depending on the composition of the food ingested and a number of host-related factors such as age. To evaluate the number of bacteria surviving the gastric acid barrier, we have developed a simple gastric acid model, in which we mimicked the dynamic pH changes in the human stomach. In the present study, model gastric fluid was set up to imitate pH dynamics in the stomachs of young and elderly people after ingestion of a standard meal. To model a serious foodborne pathogen, we followed the survival of Salmonella enterica serotype Dublin, and found that the addition of proteins such as pepsin, ovalbumin, and blended turkey meat to the simple gastric acid model significantly delayed pathogen inactivation compared with the control, for which no proteins were added. In contrast, no delay in inactivation was observed in the presence of bovine serum albumin, indicating that protection could be protein specific. The simple gastric acid model was validated against a more laborious and complex fermenter model, and similar survival of Salmonella Dublin was observed in both models. Our gastric acid model allowed us to evaluate the influence of food components on survival of pathogens under gastric conditions, and the model could contribute to a broader understanding of the impact of specific food components on the inactivation of pathogens during gastric passage.

  2. A gastric acid secretion model.

    PubMed Central

    de Beus, A M; Fabry, T L; Lacker, H M

    1993-01-01

    A theory of gastric acid production and self-protection is formulated mathematically and examined for clinical and experimental correlations, implications, and predictions using analytic and numerical techniques. In our model, gastric acid secretion in the stomach, as represented by an archetypal gastron, consists of two chambers, circulatory and luminal, connected by two different regions of ion exchange. The capillary circulation of the gastric mucosa is arranged in arterial-venous arcades which pass from the gastric glands up to the surface epithelial lining of the lumen; therefore the upstream region of the capillary chamber communicates with oxyntic cells, while the downstream region communicates with epithelial cells. Both cell types abut the gastric lumen. Ion currents across the upstream region are calculated from a steady-state oxyntic cell model with active ion transport, while the downstream ion fluxes are (facilitated) diffusion driven or secondarily active. Water transport is considered iso-osmotic. The steady-state model is solved in closed form for low gastric lumen pH. A wide variety of previously performed static and dynamic experiments on ion and CO2 transport in the gastric lumen and gastric blood supply are for the first time correlated with each other for an (at least) semiquantitative test of current concepts of gastric acid secretion and for the purpose of model verification. Agreement with the data is reported with a few outstanding and instructive exceptions. Model predictions and implications are also discussed. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8396457

  3. Human gastric epithelial cells contribute to gastric immune regulation by providing retinoic acid to dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bimczok, D; Kao, J Y; Zhang, M; Cochrun, S; Mannon, P; Peter, S; Wilcox, C M; Mönkemüller, K E; Harris, P R; Grams, J M; Stahl, R D; Smith, P D; Smythies, L E

    2015-05-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by Helicobacter pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule retinol (ROL), and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA response genes, indicative of active RA biosynthesis. Moreover, primary gastric epithelial cells cultured in the presence of ROL synthesized RA in vitro and induced RA biosynthesis in co-cultured monocytes through an RA-dependent mechanism, suggesting that gastric epithelial cells may also confer the ability to generate RA on gastric dendritic cells (DCs). Indeed, DCs purified from gastric mucosa had similar levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and RA biosynthesis gene expression as small intestinal DCs, although gastric DCs lacked CD103. In H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa, gastric RA biosynthesis gene expression was severely disrupted, which may lead to reduced RA signaling and thus contribute to disease progression. Collectively, our results support a critical role for RA in human gastric immune regulation.

  4. Acupuncture and gastric acid studies.

    PubMed

    Sodipo, J O; Falaiye, J M

    1979-01-01

    The effects of therapeutic acupuncture on gastric acid secretion on pain relief in chronic duodenal ulcer patients were studied. Ten adult Nigerian patients with clinical, endoscopic as well as radiological evidence of duodenal ulcer constituted the "Ulcer Group." Four other patients who gave history of dyspepsia formed the "Dyspeptic Group." Pentagastrin stimulation test was performed on all subjects pre- and post-acupuncture therapy. The classical Chinese acupuncture loci were employed. The mean Basal Acid Output (BAO) in the duodenal ulcer group was markedly reduced from 4.04 +/- 1.01 mMols/hour to 1.05 +/- 2.5 mMols/hour. The mean Maximal Acid Output (MAO) was lowered from 34.72 +/- 13.81 mMols/hour to 15.34 +/- 4.01 mMols/hour. The difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.001). It is more probable, therefore, that the relief of pain is attributable to the therapeutic inhibition of gastric hyperacidity in our patients. Thus, though pain relief has been previously demonstrated in response to acupuncture, the results of this investigation have gone further to show that acupunture achieves symptomatic relief through therapeutic gastric depression in duodenal ulcer patients.

  5. Gastric acid secretion: changes during a century.

    PubMed

    Di Mario, Francesco; Goni, Elisabetta

    2014-12-01

    The advances in knowledge of gastric physiology within the past century have been the most exciting and important in this area of interest for many decades. The aim of this presentation consists of a comprehensive review of the extensive recent literature on this topic in order to highlight milestones in the field of gastric physiology, in particular in gastric acid secretion, gastric pathophysiology, acid-related diseases and use of acid regulatory drugs. Moreover, in the 21st century there have been many epidemiologic changes as well as a decrease of Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer together with an increase of gastroesophageal reflux disease and the related increase of pomp proton inhibitor wide use.

  6. Polyamines are Inhibitors of Gastric Acid Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Tushar K.; Nandi, Jyotirmoy; Pidhorodeckyj, Nykolai; Meng-Ai, Zhou

    1982-03-01

    The naturally occurring organic polycations such as spermine and spermidine inhibit histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion by bullfrog gastric mucosa in vitro; spermine is much more potent than spermidine. Unlike the H2 receptor antagonists, the polyamines are completely ineffective from the nutrient side and are effective only from the secretory side of the chambered mucosa. The polyamine effects could be reversed by increasing K+ concentration in the secretory solution. Studies with isolated gastric microsomal vesicles demonstrate that the polyamines do not inhibit the gastric H+,K+-ATPase but greatly decrease the ATPase-mediated uptake of H+ under appropriate conditions. For the latter effects the presence of polyamine within the vesicle interior was found to be essential. Our data strongly suggest an uncoupling of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase system by the polyamines. The therapeutic potential of these and similar compounds in the treatment of hyperacidity and peptic ulcer is discussed.

  7. NERP-2 regulates gastric acid secretion and gastric emptying via the orexin pathway.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Cherl; Toshinai, Koji; Waise, T M Zaved; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Kazuki; Ueta, Yoichi; Kim, Min-Seon; Minamino, Naoto; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2017-02-16

    Neuroendocrine regulatory peptide (NERP)-2 is derived from a distinct region of VGF, a neurosecretory protein originally identified as a product of a nerve growth factor-responsive gene in rat PC12 cells. Colocalization of NERP-2 with orexin-A in the lateral hypothalamus increases orexin-A-induced feeding and energy expenditure in both rats and mice. Orexigenic and anorectic peptides in the hypothalamus modulate gastric function. In this study, we investigated the effect of NERP-2 on gastric function in rats. Intracerebroventricular administration of NERP-2 to rats increased gastric acid secretion and gastric emptying, whereas peripheral administration did not affect gastric function. NERP-2-induced gastric acid secretion and gastric emptying were blocked by an orexin 1 receptor antagonist, SB334867. NERP-2 also induced Fos expression in the lateral hypothalamus and the dorsomotor nucleus of the vagus X, which are key sites in the central nervous system for regulation of gastric function. Atropine, a blocker of vagal efferent signal transduction, completely blocked NERP-2-induced gastric acid secretion. These results demonstrate that central administration of NERP-2 activates the orexin pathway, resulting in elevated gastric acid secretion and gastric emptying.

  8. Gastric stenosis following the ingestion of car battery acid.

    PubMed

    Phelps, G; Srinivasa, A; Sengupta, S K

    1991-03-01

    The acute consequences of the ingestion of corrosive substances include acute necrosis of the upper gastrointestinal tract, haemorrhage and perforation. Late complications include the development of stenotic lesions. A case of fibrous gastric stenosis following the ingestion of car battery acid is presented. Endoscopically, the appearances were consistent with gastric carcinoma.

  9. Three aromatic amino acids in gastric juice as potential biomarkers for gastric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Lin, Sanren; Zhou, Liya; Geng, Qiuming; Li, Yuan; Xu, Ming; Na, Renhua

    2011-05-23

    For screening early-stage gastric malignancies, the existing serum biomarkers have limited sensitivity and specificity. Gastric juice biomarkers are scarce and require further investigation. We divided this study on searching potential biomarkers into four parts: (1) detection of differential fluorescence spectrum and peaks in the gastric juice from patients using fluorescence spectroscopy and HPLC, (2) identification and validation of differential peaks using LC/MS and NMR, (3) quantification of potential biomarkers, and (4) establishment of diagnostic detection. The fluorescence intensity (FI), tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and total protein content were significantly higher in the gastric juice of patients with gastric malignancies (all P<0.01). With all P<0.001, the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of the biomarkers were tyrosine, 0.838; phenylalanine, 0.856; and tryptophan, 0.816. At a specificity of 79.4%, the sensitivity for gastric malignancy detection with phenylalanine was 87.9% only. Aromatic amino acids in gastric juices could be used as potential diagnostic biomarkers to screen gastric malignancies. It is a less-invasive and economical method compared to gastric biopsy.

  10. Perfluorodecanoic acid stimulates NLRP3 inflammasome assembly in gastric cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Dong, Tianyi; Fan, Ziyan; Peng, Yanping; Zhou, Rongbin; Wang, Xiaqiong; Song, Ning; Han, Mingyong; Fan, Bingbing; Jia, Jihui; Liu, Shili

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), a perfluorinated carboxylic acid, presents in the environment and accumulates in human blood and organs, but its association with tumor promotion are not clear. Given that inflammation plays a significant role in the development of gastric malignancies, we evaluated the effects of PFDA on activation of the inflammasome and inflammation regulation in the gastric cell line AGS. When added to cell cultures, PFDA significantly stimulated IL-1β and IL18 secretion and their mRNA levels compared with control cells. By RT-PCR and western-blot we found that up-regulation of NLRP3 were associated with promotion of IL-1β and IL-18 production. Then expression variation of cIAP1/2, c-Rel and p52 were analyzed, the results demonstrated raised mRNA expression in all the tested genes concomitant with enhanced inflammasome activity after exposure to PFDA. Assays with cIAP2 siRNA and NFκB reporter provided additional evidence that these genes were involved in PFDA-induced inflammasome assembly. Furthermore, increased secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 were detected in stomach of PFDA-treated mice, disorganized alignment of epithelial cells and inflammatory cell infiltration were also observed in the stomach tissues upon PFDA treatment. This study reports for the first time that PFDA regulates inflammasome assembly in human cells and mice tissues. PMID:28367997

  11. Gastrin, gastric acid secretion, and gastric microflora in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, K; Uvnäs-Moberg, K; Nord, C E; Johansson, C; Gullberg, R

    1986-01-01

    The relation between the basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion, plasma gastrin, and the gastric microflora was examined in 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Sixteen patients (36%) had basal achlorhydria, and of these, 10 (22%) had achlorhydria or hypochlorhydria after stimulation with pentagastrin. The peak acid output and acidity showed inverse correlation with the disease duration but were not associated with age or with the degree of physical disability. Hypergastrinaemia was found in nine patients (20%), of whom 6 (13%) had significant titres of parietal cell antibody. The acidity of the peak acid output showed negative correlation with plasma gastrin. It was confirmed that the gastric secretory state is a determinant of plasma gastrin levels and in addition influences the growth of micro-organisms in the gastric lumen. The type of microflora in the non-acid stomach was similar to that found in the saliva. A subgroup of eight females was identified who showed low gastric acid secretion rates, positive bacterial cultures, and atlantoaxial subluxation. Gastrin- and insulin-like immunoreactivities were found in joint fluid. The concentrations reflected their plasma levels, suggesting that the peptides are not released at the inflammatory site, but rather that they reach synovial fluid from circulating blood. PMID:3524480

  12. Transport of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in a Simulated Gastric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayfield, Ryan T.

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the use of many types of nano sized materials in the consumer sector. Potential uses include encapsulation of nutrients, providing antimicrobial activity, altering texture, or changing bioavailability of nutrients. Engineered nanoparticles (ENP) possess properties that are different than larger particles made of the same constituents. Properties such as solubility, aggregation state, and toxicity can all be changed as a function of size. The gastric environment is an important area for study of engineered nanoparticles because of the varied physical, chemical, and enzymatic processes that are prevalent there. These all have the potential to alter those properties of ENP that make them different from their bulk counterparts. The Human Gastric Simulator (HGS) is an advanced in vitro model that can be used to study many facets of digestion. The HGS consists of a plastic lining that acts as the stomach cavity with two sets of U-shaped arms on belts that provide the physical forces needed to replicate peristalsis. Altering the position of the arms or changing the speed of the motor which powers them allows one to tightly hone and replicate varied digestive conditions. Gastric juice, consisting of salts, enzymes, and acid levels which replicate physiological conditions, is introduced to the cavity at a controllable rate. The release of digested food from the lumen of simulated stomach is controlled by a peristaltic pump. The goal of the HGS is to accurately and repeatedly simulate human digestion. This study focused on introducing foods spiked with zinc oxide ENP and bulk zinc oxide into the HGS and then monitoring how the concentration of each changed at two locations in the HGS over a two hour period. The two locations chosen were the highest point in the lumen of the stomach, which represented the fundus, and a point just beyond the equivalent of the pylorus, which represented the antrum of the stomach. These points were

  13. Localization of gastric peroxidase and its inhibition by mercaptomethylimidazole, an inducer of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, U; Bhattacharyya, D K; Chatterjee, R; Banerjee, R K

    1992-01-01

    Mercaptomethylimidazole (MMI) is a potent inducer of gastric acid secretion which is associated with significant inhibition of peroxidase activity of rat gastric mucosa in vivo. A time-dependent increase in acid secretion correlates well with time-dependent decrease in the peroxidase activity. In a chamber experiment in vitro using isolated gastric mucosa, MMI stimulates acid secretion, showing an almost linear response up to 600 microM. The time-dependent increase in acid secretion is also correlated with time-dependent inhibition of the peroxidase activity. This effect is not mediated through oxidation of MMI by flavin-containing mono-oxygenase, which is absent from gastric mucosa. The peroxidase has been localized mainly in parietal cells isolated and purified from gastric mucosa by controlled digestion with collagenase followed by Percoll-density-gradient centrifugation. Peroxidase activity was further localized in the outer membrane of the purified mitochondria of the parietal cell by some membrane-impermeant reagents, indicating outward orientation of the enzyme. MMI can inhibit the peroxidase activity of both the parietal cell and its mitochondria in a concentration-dependent manner. The possible involvement of the parietal-cell peroxidase-H2O2 system in MMI-induced acid secretion may be suggested. PMID:1318028

  14. Beyond gastric acid reduction: Proton pump inhibitors induce heme oxygenase-1 in gastric and endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Jan C. . E-mail: beckeja@uni-muenster.de; Grosser, Nina; Waltke, Christian; Schulz, Stephanie; Erdmann, Kati; Domschke, Wolfram; Schroeder, Henning; Pohle, Thorsten

    2006-07-07

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been demonstrated to prevent gastric mucosal injury by mechanisms independent of acid inhibition. Here we demonstrate that both omeprazole and lansoprazole protect human gastric epithelial and endothelial cells against oxidative stress. This effect was abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnBG. Exposure to either PPI resulted in a strong induction of HO-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, and led to an increased activity of this enzyme. Expression of cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 remained unaffected, and COX-inhibitors did not antagonize HO-1 induction by PPIs. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense protein HO-1 is a target of PPIs in both endothelial and gastric epithelial cells. HO-1 induction might account for the gastroprotective effects of PPIs independently of acid inhibition, especially in NSAID gastropathy. Moreover, our findings provide additional perspectives for a possible but yet unexplored use of PPIs in vasoprotection.

  15. Gastric acid response to acute exposure to hypergravity

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2017-01-01

    The influence of environmental stressors on the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disease has received increased awareness. Stress affects different physiological functions of the gastrointestinal tract, including gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow. Repeated exposures of rapid-onset, highly-sustained hypergravity cause severe physical stress in the pilot. Although the effects of exposure to hypergravity on cardiovascular and cerebral functions have been the subjects of numerous studies, crucial information regarding pathophysiological changes in the gastrointestinal tract following hypergravity exposure is lacking. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute exposure to hypergravity on gastric secretory activity and gastrin release. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to +10Gz three times for 3 min. Gastric juice and blood were collected. The volume and total acidity of gastric juice, and the plasma gastrin level was measured. Acute exposure to +10Gz significantly decreased the gastric juice parameters. The gastric juice volume and total acidity of hypergravity-exposed rats were 3.54 ± 0.32 mL/100 g and 84.90 ± 5.17 mEq/L, respectively, which were significantly lower than those of the nonexposed rats (4.62 ± 0.39 mL/100 g and 97.37 ± 5.42 mEq/L; P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). In contrast, plasma gastrin level was not significantly altered following hypergravity exposure. We demonstrated that acute exposure to hypergravity led to a significant decrease in the gastric juice volume and acidity but did not alter the plasma gastrin level. PMID:27992379

  16. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  1. Enhancement of intragastric acid stability of a fat emulsion meal delays gastric emptying and increases cholecystokinin release and gallbladder contraction.

    PubMed

    Marciani, Luca; Wickham, Martin; Singh, Gulzar; Bush, Debbie; Pick, Barbara; Cox, Eleanor; Fillery-Travis, Annette; Faulks, Richard; Marsden, Charles; Gowland, Penny A; Spiller, Robin C

    2007-06-01

    Preprocessed fatty foods often contain calories added as a fat emulsion stabilized by emulsifiers. Emulsion stability in the acidic gastric environment can readily be manipulated by altering emulsifier chemistry. We tested the hypothesis that it would be possible to control gastric emptying, CCK release, and satiety by varying intragastric fat emulsion stability. Nine healthy volunteers received a test meal on two occasions, comprising a 500-ml 15% oil emulsion with 2.5% of one of two emulsifiers that produced emulsions that were either stable (meal A) or unstable (meal B) in the acid gastric environment. Gastric emptying and gallbladder volume changes were assessed by MRI. CCK plasma levels were measured and satiety scores were recorded. Meal B layered rapidly owing to fat emulsion breakdown. The gastric half-emptying time of the aqueous phase was faster for meal B (72 +/- 13 min) than for meal A (171 +/- 35 min, P < 0.008). Meal A released more CCK than meal B (integrated areas, respectively 1,095 +/- 244 and 531 +/- 111 pmol.min.l(-1), P < 0.02), induced a greater gallbladder contraction (P < 0.02), and decreased postprandial appetite (P < 0.05), although no significant differences were observed in fullness and hunger. We conclude that acid-stable emulsions delayed gastric emptying and increased postprandial CCK levels and gallbladder contraction, whereas acid-instability led to rapid layering of fat in the gastric lumen with accelerated gastric emptying, lower CCK levels, and reduced gallbladder contraction. Manipulation of the acid stability of fat emulsion added to preprocessed foods could maximize satiety signaling and, in turn, help to reduce overconsumption of calories.

  2. Should peri-gastrectomy gastric acidity be our focus among gastric cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Xu, A-Man; Li, Tuan-Jie; Han, Wen-Xiu; Xu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the necessity and correctness of acid suppression pre- and post-gastrectomy among gastric carcinoma (GC) patients. METHODS: From June 2011 to April 2013, 99 patients who were diagnosed with GC or adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction (type II or III) and needed surgical management were enrolled. They all underwent gastrectomy by the same operators [35 undergoing total gastrectomy (TG) plus Roux-en-Y reconstruction, 34 distal gastrectomy (DG) plus Billroth I reconstruction, and 30 proximal gastrectomy (PG) plus gastroesophagostomy]. We collected and analyzed their gastrointestinal juice and tissues from the pre-operational day to the 5th day post-operation, and 6 mo post-surgery. Gastric pH was detected with a precise acidity meter. Gastric juice contents including potassium, sodium and bicarbonate ions, urea nitrogen, direct and indirect bilirubin, and bile acid were detected using Automatic Biochemical Analyzer. Data regarding tumor size, histological type, tumor penetration and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage were obtained from the pathological records. Reflux symptoms pre- and 6 mo post-gastrectomy were evaluated by reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GERD-Q). SPSS 16.0 was applied to analyze the data. RESULTS: Before surgery, gastric pH was higher than the threshold of hypoacidity (4.25 ± 1.45 vs 3.5, P = 0.000), and significantly affected by age, tumor size and differentiation grade, and potassium and bicarbonate ions; advanced malignancies were accompanied with higher pH compared with early ones (4.49 ± 1.31 vs 3.66 ± 1.61, P = 0.008). After operation, gastric pH in all groups was of weak-acidity and significantly higher than that pre-gastrectomy; on days 3-5, comparisons of gastric pH were similar between the 3 groups. Six months later, gastric pH was comparable to that on days 3-5; older patients were accompanied with higher total bilirubin level, indicating more serious

  3. Docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated acid protects against indomethacin-induced gastric injury.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Peña, Elizabeth Arlen; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Chávez-Piña, Aracely Evangelina

    2012-12-15

    Previous studies have shown gastroprotective effect of fish oil in several experimental models. However, the mechanisms and active compounds underlying this effect are not fully understood. Fish oil has several components; among them, one of the most studied is docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is an omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid. The aim of this study was to examine the gastroprotective effect of DHA as a pure compound in a rat model of indomethacin-induced gastric injury as well as elucidate some of the mechanism(s) behind DHA's gastroprotective effect. Indomethacin was orally administered to induce an acute gastric injury (3, 10 and 30mg/kg). Omeprazol (a proton pump inhibitor, 30mg/kg, p.o.) and DHA (3, 10, 30mg/kg, p.o.) were gavaged 30 and 120min, respectively, before indomethacin insult (30mg/kg p.o.). Three hours after indomethacin administration, rats were sacrificed, gastric injury was evaluated by determining the total damaged area. A sample of gastric tissue was harvested and processed to quantify prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Indomethacin produced gastric injury in dose-dependent manner. DHA protected against indomethacin-induced gastric damage, and this effect was comparable with omeprazol's gastroprotective effect. DHA did not reverse the indomethacin-induced reduction of PGE(2) gastric levels. In contrast, DHA partially prevented the indomethacin-induced increase in LTB(4) gastric levels. This is the first report demonstrating DHA's gastroprotective effect as a pure compound. Furthermore, the results reveal that the gastroprotective effect is mediated by a decrease in gastric LTB(4) levels in indomethacin-induced gastric damage.

  4. Deoxycholic Acid Could Induce Apoptosis and Trigger Gastric Carcinogenesis on Gastric Epithelial Cells by Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pathologic duodenogastric reflux can induce or aggravate gastritis because of the presence of bile acids. Bile reflux has been generally considered to be associated with intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of the effects of bile acids on gastric mucosa are still unknown. Methods. To explore the mechanisms by which bile acids induce gastric mucosal lesions, we examined cell apoptosis in the gastric epithelial cell line GES-1 and investigated the changes in protein profiles of GES-1 cells in response to a bile acid deoxycholic acid using a proteomics approach. Changes in the profiles of the differently expressed proteins were analyzed using the DAVID and STRING programs. Results. We found apoptosis was significantly induced in GES-1 cells by deoxycholic acid. Using liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) methods, 134 upregulated proteins and 214 downregulated proteins were identified in the bile acid treated GES-1 cells. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the interactions and signaling networks of these differentially expressed proteins. Conclusion. These findings may improve the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of bile acids on gastric mucosa. PMID:28070185

  5. Deoxycholic Acid Could Induce Apoptosis and Trigger Gastric Carcinogenesis on Gastric Epithelial Cells by Quantitative Proteomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanyan; Wei, Ying; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Ye; Ding, Shigang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pathologic duodenogastric reflux can induce or aggravate gastritis because of the presence of bile acids. Bile reflux has been generally considered to be associated with intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of the effects of bile acids on gastric mucosa are still unknown. Methods. To explore the mechanisms by which bile acids induce gastric mucosal lesions, we examined cell apoptosis in the gastric epithelial cell line GES-1 and investigated the changes in protein profiles of GES-1 cells in response to a bile acid deoxycholic acid using a proteomics approach. Changes in the profiles of the differently expressed proteins were analyzed using the DAVID and STRING programs. Results. We found apoptosis was significantly induced in GES-1 cells by deoxycholic acid. Using liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) methods, 134 upregulated proteins and 214 downregulated proteins were identified in the bile acid treated GES-1 cells. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the interactions and signaling networks of these differentially expressed proteins. Conclusion. These findings may improve the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of bile acids on gastric mucosa.

  6. Cadmium inhibits acid secretion in stimulated frog gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Caroppo, Rosa; Curci, Silvana; Colella, Matilde

    2010-06-01

    Cadmium, a toxic environmental pollutant, affects the function of different organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. Less is known about its toxic effects on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which cadmium impacts on the physiology of gastric mucosa. To this end, intact amphibian mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and the rate of acid secretion, short circuit current (I{sub sc}), transepithelial potential (V{sub t}) and resistance (R{sub t}) were recorded in the continuous presence of cadmium. Addition of cadmium (20 {mu}M to 1 mM) on the serosal but not luminal side of the mucosae resulted in inhibition of acid secretion and increase in NPPB-sensitive, chloride-dependent short circuit current. Remarkably, cadmium exerted its effects only on histamine-stimulated tissues. Experiments with TPEN, a cell-permeant chelator for heavy metals, showed that cadmium acts from the intracellular side of the acid secreting cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced inhibition of acid secretion and increase in I{sub sc} cannot be explained by an action on: 1) H{sub 2} histamine receptor, 2) Ca{sup 2+} signalling 3) adenylyl cyclase or 4) carbonic anhydrase. Conversely, cadmium was ineffective in the presence of the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase blocker omeprazole suggesting that the two compounds likely act on the same target. Our findings suggest that cadmium affects the functionality of histamine-stimulated gastric mucosa by inhibiting the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase from the intracellular side. These data shed new light on the toxic effect of this dangerous environmental pollutant and may result in new avenues for therapeutic intervention in acute and chronic intoxication.

  7. Sevalamer Hydrochloride, Sevelamer Carbonate and Lanthanum Carbonate: In Vitro and In Vivo Effects on Gastric Environment.

    PubMed

    Coppolino, Giuseppe; Lucisano, Silvia; Rivoli, Laura; Fuiano, Giorgio; Villari, Antonino; Villari, Iole; Leonello, Grazia; Lacquaniti, Antonio; Santoro, Domenico; Buemi, Michele

    2015-10-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is common in patients with chronic renal failure. Phosphate binders are associated with gastric intolerance, representing the main reason of drug discontinuation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects in vitro and in vivo of sevelamer hydrochloride (SH), sevelamer carbonate (SC) and lanthanum carbonate (LC) on gastric microenvironment. We have also evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of these drugs in hemodialysis (HD) patients. In vitro analysis: Dissolution time, ability to uptake phosphorus, changes in pH starting from gastric milieu and the amount of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) produced were the variables analyzed. In vivo analysis: 24-h esophago-gastric pH measurement was evaluated in 24 HD patients treated with phosphate binders and proton pump inhibitor (PPI). In vitro: LC dissolved over a longer time compared with SC (58 ± 2.4 vs. 12 ± 0.6 min; P < 0.001) and SH (58 ± 2.4 vs. 10.3 ± 0.8 min; P < 0.001), determining the most alkaline pH. SC had the highest chelation power, binding 4.00 × 10(-9)  mol/L of phosphoric acid. CO2 volume released was increased in LC solution (53.2 ± 7.8) compared to SC (33.9 ± 6.2; P < 0.001) and SH (2.3 ± 1.8; P < 0.001). In vivo: gastric pH increased after administration of phosphate binder. The most alkaline pH was recorded in patients treated with SC. The alkalinization of the gastric environment was not prevented by PPI therapy. 424 episodes of esophageal reflux were registered, 74% of them were alkaline. The LC group was characterized by the highest number of episodes. Sevelamer carbonate had a greater capacity and rapidity to chelate phosphorus, with a mild tolerability, due to its low CO(2) production. Sevelamer HCl was the most tolerated chelator because it did not produce CO(2), while lanthanum carbonate was the least soluble.

  8. Gastric acid secretion and mucosal appearances in Addison's disease and hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Smith, A W; Delamore, I W; Williams, A W

    1961-06-01

    Studies of gastric acid secretion and mucosal appearances have been made in a group of 14 patients suffering from hypopituitarism. Achlorhydria was found in six of the patients suffering from Addison's disease but in only one patient suffering from hypopituitarism. In both groups the mean gastric secretion of hydrochloric acid was considerably lower than in a group of control subjects and replacement therapy with cortisone and DOCA in Addison's disease and cortisone and thyroid extract in hypopituitarism failed to restore gastric function to normal. A constant correlation was not found between gastric acid secretion and mucosal appearances.

  9. Fluoxetine and sertraline stimulate gastric acid secretion via a vagal pathway in anaesthetised rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Salam, Omar M E

    2004-09-01

    The effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, fluoxetine and sertraline on basal, secretagogues (histamine or bethanechol)- and distention-stimulated gastric acid secretion was investigated in the urethane-anaesthetised acute gastric fistula rat. Gastric acid secretion was measured by flushing of the gastric contents with saline every 15 min. Fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) produced a dose-dependent increase in basal gastric acid secretion. These stimulatory effects were abolished by vagotomy. Intraperitoneally administered sertraline also stimulated gastric acid secretion. The stimulatory effect of lower doses (5 mg kg(-1)) of sertraline was similar to that of the higher (30 mg kg(-1)) doses. The gastric secretory response to i.p. sertraline was long lasting (greater than 60 min), and blocked by vagotomy. Intraperitoneally administered fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg kg(-1)) or sertraline (5 mg kg(-1)) also increased gastric secretion induced by histamine, bethanechol or distention. The fluoxetine or sertraline stimulatory effects of histamine-induced acid secretion were abolished by vagotomy. Data indicate a stimulatory effect for fluoxetine and sertraline mediated by vagal nerve on gastric acid secretion in urethane-anaesthetised rats.

  10. Conservative and nonconservative inhibitors of gastric acid secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Ekblad, E.B.M.; Licko, V.

    1987-09-01

    Inhibitors of the initial step (H/sub 2/-antagonist) and of the final step (thiocyanate, SCN/sup -/; and nitrite, NO/sub 2//sup -/) were used to study the dynamics of acid secretion in isolated frog gastric mucosa. Tissues were mounted in flow-through chambers, and the acid secretion rate (SR) was recorded on a pH-stat microprocessor. Continuous presence of H/sub 2/-antagonist decreases the SR to a lower steady state, and on removal the SR returns to basal SR, causing a net loss of acid, the nonconservative effect. The amount of lost acid is a unique function of exposure, thus, independent of the patterns (pulses or steps) of inhibition. In contrast, continuous presence of SCN/sup -/ or NO/sub 2//sup -/ (below 3 mM) results in an undershoot in SR with a return to basal SR, whereas at higher concentrations there is not return. Removal of these inhibitors causes an overshoot in SR with return to basal SR. The rebound acid is equal to acid suppressed by NO/sub 2//sup -/ and low concentration of SCN/sup -/, resulting in no net loss of acid, the conservative effect, whereas at high concentrations of SCN/sup -/ there is an apparent loss of acid. In maximally secreting tissue the overshoot of SR is not observed. However, the acid is not lost, merely delayed. In resting tissue NO/sub 2//sup -/ also merely delays the exit of the acid produced in response to forskolin. The rebound acid is proposed to reside in a sequestered acid pool that is stable for at least 120 min. Results with NO/sub 2//sup -/ and SCN/sup -/ suggest an effect on a saturable exit enzyme, possibly the K/sup +/-H/sup +/-ATPase.

  11. Gastric acid inhibition in the treatment of peptic ulcer hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, Kevin A; Kovacs, Thomas O G; Jensen, Dennis M

    2009-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding from peptic ulcer disease is a common clinical event, resulting in considerable patient morbidity and significant health care costs. Inhibiting gastric acid secretion is a key component in improving clinical outcomes, including reducing rebleeding, transfusion requirements, and surgery. Raising intragastric pH promotes clot stability and reduces the influences of gastric acid and pepsin. Patients with high-risk stigmata for ulcer bleeding (arterial bleeding, nonbleeding visible vessels, and adherent clots) benefit significantly from and should receive high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) after successful endoscopic hemostasis. For patients with low-risk stigmata (flat spots or clean ulcer base), oral PPI therapy alone is sufficient. For oozing bleeding (an intermediate risk finding), successful endoscopic hemostasis and oral PPI are recommended. Using intravenous PPIs before endoscopy appears to reduce the frequency of finding high-risk stigmata on later endoscopy, but has not been shown to improve clinical outcomes. High-dose oral PPIs may be as effective as intravenous infusion in achieving positive clinical outcomes, but this has not been documented by randomized studies and its cost-effectiveness is unclear.

  12. Stimulation of acid formation in permeable gastric glands by valinomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, S.J.; Steiner, L. )

    1988-09-01

    Isolated gastric glands made permeable with digitonin treatment were employed to study the ionic requirements of acid formation. Acid formation was monitored by the accumulation of a novel weak base probe, ({sup 14}C)benzylamine. ATP-dependent acid formation was found to require K{sup +} in a concentration-dependent manner, with an apparent K{sub 0.5} = 7 mM. The anion dependence of acid formation gave a selectivity sequence of Cl = I > Br < NO{sub 3} > SO{sub 4} = isethionate, with isethionate being {approximately}50% as effective as Cl. The dependence of acid formation on (Cl) gave an apparent K{sub 0.5} = 6 mM. Addition of the K{sup +} ionophore, valinomycin, to resting glands (cimetidine pretreatment) resulted in a two- to threefold increase in ATP-dependent acid formation. In contrast, stimulated (forskolin pretreated) glands showed a greater accumulation of benzylamine with ATP but significantly less valinomycin stimulation. The valinomycin stimulation required both K{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} and was inhibited by omeprazole and Sch 28080. The results and interpreted to indicate that major events in the transition from a resting to a stimulated state include changes in both K{sup +} and anion permeability of the secretory membrane of parietal cells.

  13. Mucosal acid causes gastric mucosal microcirculatory disturbance in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Funatsu, Toshiyuki; Chono, Koji; Hirata, Takuya; Keto, Yoshihiro; Kimoto, Aishi; Sasamata, Masao

    2007-01-05

    The mechanism by which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suppress gastric mucosal blood flow is not fully understood, although the depletion of mucosal prostaglandin E2 has been proposed as one possible explanation. We investigated the role of gastric acid on gastric mucosal blood flow in NSAID-treated rats. A rat stomach was mounted in an ex vivo chamber, and gastric mucosal blood flow was measured sequentially in a 5-mm2 area of the gastric corpus using a scanning laser Doppler perfusion image system. Results showed that diclofenac (5 mg/kg s.c.) and indomethacin (10 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect gastric mucosal blood flow, although both strongly decreased mucosal prostaglandin E2 when saline was instilled into the gastric chamber. On replacement of the saline in the chamber with 100 mM hydrochloric acid, these drugs caused a decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow levels within 30 min. The specific cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors celecoxib (50 mg/kg s.c.) and rofecoxib (25 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect mucosal prostaglandin E2 level, nor did they decrease gastric mucosal blood flow, even when hydrochloric acid was added to the chamber. Furthermore, measurement of vasoconstrictive factors present in the mucosa showed that endothelin-1 levels increased after administration of diclofenac s.c. in the presence of intragastric hydrochloric acid. This indicates that the presence of mucosal hydrochloric acid plays an important role in the NSAID-induced decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow, while the COX-1-derived basal prostaglandin E2, which is unlikely to control gastric mucosal blood flow itself, protects microcirculatory systems from mucosal hydrochloric acid.

  14. Motilin Stimulates Gastric Acid Secretion in Coordination with Ghrelin in Suncus murinus

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Chayon; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Makoto; Mondal, Anupom; Oda, Sen-ichi; Tanaka, Toru; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Motilin and ghrelin constitute a peptide family, and these hormones are important for the regulation of gastrointestinal motility. In this study, we examined the effect of motilin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion in anesthetized suncus (house musk shrew, Suncus murinus), a ghrelin- and motilin-producing mammal. We first established a gastric lumen-perfusion system in the suncus and confirmed that intravenous (i.v.) administration of histamine (1 mg/kg body weight) stimulated acid secretion. Motilin (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg BW) stimulated the acid output in a dose-dependent manner in suncus, whereas ghrelin (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg BW) alone did not induce acid output. Furthermore, in comparison with the vehicle administration, the co-administration of low-dose (1 μg/kg BW) motilin and ghrelin significantly stimulated gastric acid secretion, whereas either motilin (1 μg/kg BW) or ghrelin (1 μg/kg BW) alone did not significantly induce gastric acid secretion. This indicates an additive role of ghrelin in motilin-induced gastric acid secretion. We then investigated the pathways of motilin/motilin and ghrelin-stimulated acid secretion using receptor antagonists. Treatment with YM 022 (a CCK-B receptor antagonist) and atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) had no effect on motilin or motilin-ghrelin co-administration-induced acid output. In contrast, famotidine (a histamine H2 receptor antagonist) completely inhibited motilin-stimulated acid secretion and co-administration of motilin and ghrelin induced gastric acid output. This is the first report demonstrating that motilin stimulates gastric secretion in mammals. Our results also suggest that motilin and co-administration of motilin and ghrelin stimulate gastric acid secretion via the histamine-mediated pathway in suncus. PMID:26115342

  15. The effects of aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaves on the gastric acid secretion and brain and intestinal water content following acetic acid- induced gastric ulcer in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarzi, Zakieh; Rezapour, Taha Mohammad; Vatanchian, Mehran; Zare Hesari, Mohammad; Nabizade Haghighi, Hadi; Izanlu, Mostafa; Sabaghian, Maryam; Shahveisi, Kaveh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Gut–brain axis (GBA) is very important in creation and modulation of gastrointestinal problems. Aloe vera gel has gastroprotective properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaves on the gastric acid secretion and brain and intestinal water content following acetic acid gastric ulcer induction. Materials and Methods: Gastric ulcer was induced by injection of 20% acetic acid into the subserosal layer in male rats. Rats were randomly assigned into three groups: intact group, gastric ulcer group and Aloe vera group (treatment with Aloe vera following gastric ulcer induction). The acid levels and brain and intestinal water content of each sample were measured eight days after the gastric ulcer induction. Results: Gastric acid levels were significantly decreased in Aloe vera group when compared with gastric ulcer group (p<0.05). However, there were no differences in acid output between gastric ulcer and Aloe vera groups with intact group. After Aloe vera administration, the amount of brain water content had no difference with intact and gastric ulcer groups (p<0.05). The duodenal water content in Aloe vera group was significantly reduced compared with intact group (p<0.05) but gastric ulcer group had no significant difference with intact and Aloe vera group. Conclusions: The administration of Aloe vera has an inhibitory effect on the gastric acid output. PMID:25050311

  16. [Gastric acid secretion and absorption of levodopa in patients with Parkinson's disease--the effect of supplement therapy to gastric acid].

    PubMed

    Yazawa, I; Terao, Y; Sai, I; Hashimoto, K; Sakuta, M

    1994-03-01

    Since an oral regimen of levodopa has been instituted for treatment of Parkinson's disease, its absorption and metabolism has been well demonstrated. However, its chemical characteristics of high solubility in acid solution and low solubility in water have not been well known. We paid attention to this characteristic and studied the relationship between its absorption and gastric acid secretion in 38 patients with Parkinson's disease who became refractory to therapy of levodopa. We measured the pH and amount of collected fasting gastric juice. Gastric acid secretion was decreased in 22 patients (58%). In ten of these 22 patients, 30 ml of lemon juice was prescribed in every administration of levodopa as a supplement to gastric acid for two weeks. Increases of L-dopa concentration after 60 min. and 180 min. were observed after lemon juice supplement therapy. Among the Parkinson symptoms, rigidity, akinesia, and small step gait were improved in every case except one patient who showed decrease of L-dopa concentration at 180 minutes. However, improvement of tremor was less remarkable. We consider this supplement therapy to gastric acid is one of the effective and useful methods in the management of Parkinson's disease.

  17. The intriguing relationship of Helicobacter pylori infection and acid secretion in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Malfertheiner, P

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induces chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa and thus profoundly affects gastric physiology. In the acute phase of infection, gastric acid secretion is transiently impaired. The morphological damage of the gastric mucosa, changes in gastric hormone release, and disruption of neural pathways all contribute to influence gastric acid secretion in a distinct manner. Changes in gastric acid secretion, whether impaired or increased, are intimately related with the topographic phenotypes of gastritis and the presence of atrophy or absence of corpus atrophy. The interplay of gastritis phenotype and acid secretion are key determinants in disease outcomes. Corpus-predominant gastritis and corpus atrophy are accompanied by hypochlorhydria and carry the highest risk for gastric cancer, whereas antrum-predominant gastritis with little involvement of the corpus-fundic mucosa is associated with hyperchlorhydria and predisposes to duodenal ulcer disease.

  18. Effect of capsaicin and cimetidine on the healing of acetic acid induced gastric ulceration in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J Y; Teng, C H; Chen, F C

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Capsaicin protects the gastric mucosa against experimental injury while capsaicin desensitisation reduces the rate of gastric ulcer healing. The effect of exogenous capsaicin on gastric ulcer healing has not to date been reported. AIM/METHOD: To investigate the effect of capsaicin, cimetidine, and in combination, given intragastrically in the healing of acetic acid induced chronic gastric ulcer in the rat. Treatment started immediately after ulcer induction. RESULTS: At the end of one week, capsaicin, cimetidine, and in combination increased ulcer healing but the effect of combined treatment was less than that of capsaicin alone. In an in vivo gastric chamber preparation, capsaicin increased, while cimetidine decreased, gastric mucosal blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. A dose response effect in reduction of gastric mucosal blood flow could be demonstrated for cimetidine. The gastric hyperaemic effect of capsaicin was blunted by prior administration of cimetidine. In contrast, capsaicin had no effect on gastric acid secretion and its addition to cimetidine did not affect the acid suppressant effect of the latter. CONCLUSIONS: Capsaicin promotes the healing of acetic acid induced gastric ulcer, probably by its gastric hyperaemic effect. Although cimetidine also promotes ulcer healing due to its inhibitory effect on acid secretion it may have an antagonistic effect on the gastric ulcer healing effect of capsaicin by virtue of inhibition of gastric hyperaemia. PMID:8984019

  19. The effect of haemorrhage on gastric circulation and acid output in the dog.

    PubMed

    Szabó, G; Benyó, I; Sándor, J

    1979-02-01

    Blood flow in the portal vein and the left gastric artery was measured electromagnetically and gastric mucosal perfusion was determined by pertechnetate clearance in anaesthetized dogs. Bleeding the animals to arterial pressures of 100 and 60 mmHg respectively reduced portal venous flow and markedly increased the mesenteric inflow resistance. Left gastric arterial and gastric mucosal blood flow were decreased without significant vascular resistance change only in proportion to perfusion pressure reduction. Gastric acid output decreased but did not stop even at the lower level of haemorrhagic hypotension. It is concluded that ischaemia and acid, probably in the presence of regurgitated bile, may play an important role in the development of stress ulcers.

  20. Complexity of gastric acid secretion revealed by targeted gene disruption in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan; Zhao, Chun-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Physiology of gastric acid secretion is one of the earliest subjects in medical research and education. Gastric acid secretion has been sometimes inadequately expressed as pH value rather than amount of gastric H(+) secreted per unit time. Gastric acid secretion is regulated by endocrine, paracrine and neurocrine signals via at least three messenger pathways: gastrin-histamine, CCK-somatostatin, and neural network. These pathways have been largely validated and further characterized by phenotyping a series of knockout mouse models. The complexity of gastric acid secretion is illustrated by both expected and unexpected phenotypes of altered acid secretion. For examples, in comparison with wild-type mice, gastrin and CCK double knockout and SSTR(2) knockout mice displayed a shift in the regulation of ECL cells from somatostatin-SSTR(2) pathway to galanin-Gal1 receptor pathway; a shift in the regulation of parietal cells from gastrin-histamine pathway to vagal pathway; and a shift in the CCK(2) receptors on parietal cells from functional silence to activation. The biological function of glycine-extended gastrin in synergizing gastrin-17 has been revealed in gastrin knockout mice. The roles of gastric acid secretion in tumorigenesis and ulceration have not been fully understood. Transgenic hypergastrinemic INS-GAS mice developed a spontaneous gastric cancer, which was associated with an impaired acid secretion. Gastrin knockout mice were still able to produce acid in response to vagal stimulation, especially after H. pylori infection. Taken together, phenotyping of a series of genetically engineered mouse models reveals a high degree of complexity of gastric acid secretion in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  1. Retarded gastric acid secretion in rats infected with larval Taenia taeniaeformis.

    PubMed

    Oku, Y; Yamanouchi, T; Matsuda, K; Abella, J A C; Ooi, H K; Ohtsubo, R; Goto, Y; Kamiya, M

    2002-09-01

    The influence of hepatic larval Taenia taeniaeformis infection on gastric acid secretory activity and gastric mucosal integrity was investigated. After 12 weeks of infection with 2,000 T. taeniaeformis eggs, the gastric pH values of control and infected rats were 4.1+/-0.6 (mean +/- SD) and 8.4+/-0.2, respectively. There was no difference in the basal acid secretion between control (1.7+/-0.7 micro Eq.H(+)/15 min) and infected (1.9+/-0.3) rats. However, infected rats failed to respond to histamine stimulation, the maximum acid output level being 2.8+/-0.4 in the infected rats, compared to 12.9+/-3.3 in control rats. Larval T. taeniaeformis infection resulted in the suppression of gastric acid secretion leading to hypergastrinemia.

  2. Gastric acid reduction leads to an alteration in lower intestinal microflora

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Takayuki; Matsuki, Takahiro; Oka, Masashi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Inada, Kenichi; Magari, Hirohito; Inoue, Izumi; Maekita, Takao; Ueda, Kazuki; Enomoto, Shotaro; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Yanaoka, Kimihiko; Tamai, Hideyuki; Akimoto, Shigeru; Nomoto, Koji; Tanaka, Ryuichiro; Ichinose, Masao

    2009-04-17

    To clarify the alterations in lower intestinal microflora induced by gastric acid reduction, the dynamics of 12 major genera or groups of bacteria comprising the microflora in feces and colonic contents were examined by quantitative real-time PCR in proton pump inhibitor-treated rats and in asymptomatic human subjects with hypochlorhydria. In both rat and human experiments, most genera or groups of intestinal microflora (facultative and obligate anaerobes) proliferated by gastric acid reduction, and marked and significant increases in the Lactobacilli group and Veillonella, oropharyngeal bacteria, were observed. In rats, potent gastric acid inhibition led to a marked and significant increase of intestinal bacteria, including the Bacteroidesfragilis group, while Bifidobacterium, a beneficial bacterial species, remained at a constant level. These results strongly indicate that the gastric acid barrier not only controls the colonization and growth of oropharyngeal bacteria, but also regulates the population and composition of lower intestinal microflora.

  3. Risk of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis associated with gastric Acid suppression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shy-Shin; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Meng-tse Gabriel; Lee, Yu-Chien; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Wan-Ting; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2015-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the association between the use of gastric acid suppressants (GAS) and the risk of developing spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis (LC). A case-control study nested within a cohort of 480,000 representatives of Taiwan National Health Insurance beneficiaries was carried out. A case was matched with 100 controls on age, gender, and index date of SBP diagnosis. GAS use was identified from the 1-year period before the index date. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for various unbalanced covariates between users and nonusers of GAS. A total of 947 cases of SBP were identified among the 86,418 patients with advanced LC. A significant increased risk of developing SBP was found to be associated with current (within 30 days), and recent (within 30-90 day) use of 2 different classes of GAS: proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs). The confounder adjusted rate ratio (aRR) for the current use of PPIs was 2.77 (95% CI: 1.90-4.04) and H2RAs was 2.62 (95% CI: 2.00-3.42). The risk of SBP attenuated for the recent use of PPIs (aRR: 2.20, 95%CI: 1.60-3.02) or H2RAs (aRR: 1.72, 95% CI: 1.25-2.37). In addition, sensitivity analysis using hospitalized SBP as the primary outcome showed a similar risk for the current use of PPIs (aRR, 3.24; 95% CI: 2.08-5.05) and H2RAs (aRR 2.43; 95% CI 1.71-3.46). Furthermore, higher cumulative days of gastric acid suppression were associated with a higher risk of SBP (trend P < 0.0001). To conclude, exposure to GAS was associated with an increased risk of SBP in patients with advanced LC. The association was more pronounced in current PPI users compared with nonusers.

  4. Influence of amino acids on gastric adaptive relaxation (accommodation) in rats as evaluated with a barostat

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Masayuki; Iwamoto, Chizuru

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of selected straight alkyl chain, hydroxylated chain and branched chain amino acids on gastric adaptive relaxation, as these have previously been shown to have differing effects on gastric emptying. Materials and Methods: Gastric adaptive relaxation was evaluated using a barostat in rats under urethane anesthesia. The pressure within the balloon, introduced from the mouth to the stomach, was changed stepwise from 1 to 8 mmHg. The increased volume just after the increase of balloon pressure was defined as distension-induced gastric adaptive relaxation (accommodation). Amino acids were administered orally or intravenously. Results: As compared with control rats administered with distilled water, those rats that were orally administered amino acids having straight alkyl chain and extra hydroxylated alkyl chain, such as glycine and l-serine, had significantly enhanced gastric adaptive relaxation, but administration of l-alanine and l-threonine did not. Branched chain amino acids, such as l-isoleucine, l-leucine and l-valine, also did not significantly influence gastric adaptive relaxation. Glycine and l-serine showed the same efficacy when administered intravenously. Conclusion: Among the amino acids evaluated in the present study, glycine and l-serine significantly enhanced gastric adaptive relaxation, suggesting that short alkyl chain amino acids may enhance gastric adaptive relaxation as compared with the other amino acids. These findings may suggest that glycine and l-serine would be useful in the therapy of functional dyspepsia, especially for early satiety, because the dysfunction of adaptive relaxation is one of the causes of early satiety. PMID:27558952

  5. Acute effects of N-terminal progastrin fragments on gastric acid secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Jens P; Hansen, Carsten P; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2017-03-01

    We previously identified an N-terminal fragment of progastrin in human antrum and plasma, where it circulates in high concentrations. In this study, we examined the effects of N-terminal progastrin fragments on gastric acid secretion by infusion in healthy individuals. Increasing doses of progastrin fragment 1-35 were infused intravenously during constant gastric acid stimulation by gastrin-17. In addition, the effects of progastrin fragment 1-35, fragment 6-35, and fragment 1-19 on gastrin-17 stimulated acid secretion were tested. The gastrin-17 stimulated acid secretion decreased 30% after administration of a high dose of progastrin fragment 1-35 (P < 0.05). In extension, a 1-h infusion of fragment 1-35 also decreased gastric acid output. In contrast, fragment 6-35 did not affect acid secretion, and a single infusion of gastrin-17 alone did not reveal fading of gastric acid output during the time course of the experiments. The results show that N-terminal fragments of progastrin may acutely affect gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in vivo. Structure-function analysis suggests that the N-terminal pentapeptide of progastrin is required for the effect.

  6. Toxic bile acids in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: influence of gastric acidity

    PubMed Central

    Nehra, D; Howell, P; Williams, C; Pye, J; Beynon, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Bile acid toxicity has been shown in the gastric, colonic, and hepatic tissues; the effect on oesophageal mucosa is less well known. 
AIMS—To determine the spectrum of bile acids refluxing in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and its relation to oesophageal pH using a new technique of combined oesophageal aspiration and pH monitoring. 
METHODS—Ten asymptomatic subjects and 30 patients with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (minimal mucosal injury, erosive oesophagitis (grade 2 or 3 Savary-Miller), Barrett's oesophagus/stricture; n=10 in each group) underwent 15 hour continuous oesophageal aspiration with simultaneous pH monitoring. Bile acid assay of the oesophageal samples was performed using modified high performance liquid chromatography. 
RESULTS—The peak bile acid concentration and DeMeester acid scores were significantly higher in the patients with oesophagitis (median bile acid concentration 124 µmol/l; acid score 20.2) and Barrett's oesophagus/stricture (181 µmol/l; 43.3) than patients with minimal injury (14 µmol/l; 12.5) or controls (0 µmol/l; 11.1). The predominant bile acids detected were cholic, taurocholic, and glycocholic acids but there was a significantly greater proportion of secondary bile acids, deoxycholic and taurodeoxycholic acids, in patients with erosive oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus/stricture. Although bile acid reflux episodes occurred at variable pH, a temporal relation existed between reflux of taurine conjugates and oesophageal acid exposure (r=0.58, p=0.009). 
CONCLUSION—Toxic secondary bile acid fractions have been detected in patients with extensive mucosal damage. Mixed reflux is more harmful than acid reflux alone with possible toxic synergism existing between the taurine conjugates and acid. 

 Keywords: bile acids; reflux oesophagitis; Barrett's oesophagus PMID:10205192

  7. A Mechanistic Study on the Destabilization of Whole Inactivated Influenza Virus Vaccine in Gastric Environment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo-Jick; Ebersbacher, Charles F.; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo; Montemagno, Carlo D.

    2013-01-01

    Oral immunization using whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine promises an efficient vaccination strategy. While oral vaccination was hampered by harsh gastric environment, a systematic understanding about vaccine destabilization mechanisms was not performed. Here, we investigated the separate and combined effects of temperature, retention time, pH, and osmotic stress on the stability of influenza vaccine by monitoring the time-dependent morphological change using stopped-flow light scattering. When exposed to osmotic stress, clustering of vaccine particles was enhanced in an acidic medium (pH 2.0) at ≥25°C. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies showed that hyper-osmotic stress at pH 2.0 and 37°C caused a considerable increase in conformational change of antigenic proteins compared to that in acidic iso-osmotic medium. A structural integrity of membrane was destroyed upon exposure to hyper-osmotic stress, leading to irreversible morphological change, as observed by undulation in stopped-flow light scattering intensity and transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with these analyses, hemagglutination activity decreased more significantly with an increasing magnitude of hyper-osmotic stress than in the presence of the hypo- and iso-osmotic stresses. This study shows that the magnitude and direction of the osmotic gradient has a substantial impact on the stability of orally administrated influenza vaccine. PMID:23776657

  8. Tachykinin inhibition of acid-induced gastric hyperaemia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, A.; Jocic, M.; Herzeg, G.; Holzer, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Primary afferent neurones releasing the vasodilator, calcitonin gene-related peptide, mediate the gastric hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion. The tachykinins neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) are located in the same neurones and are co-released with calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study we investigated the effect and possible role of tachykinins in the acid-evoked gastric vasodilatation in urethane-anaesthetized rats. 2. Gastric acid back-diffusion, induced by perfusing the stomach with 15% ethanol in the presence of 0.05 M HCl, increased gastric mucosal blood flow by 60-90%, as determined by the hydrogen clearance technique. NKA and SP (0.14-3.78 nmol min-1 kg-1, infused intra-aortically) inhibited the gastric mucosal hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was accompanied by aggravation of ethanol/acid-induced macroscopic haemorrhagic lesions. 3. The inhibitory effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) on the acid-induced gastric mucosal vasodilatation was prevented by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists, MEN 10,627 (200 nmol kg-1) but left unaltered by the NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140,333 (300 nmol kg-1) and the mast-cell stabilizer, ketotifen (4.6 mumol kg-1). 4. Under basal conditions, with 0.05 M HCl being perfused through the stomach, NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) reduced gastric mucosal blood flow by about 25%, an effect that was abolished by SR 140,333 but not MEN 10,627 or ketotifen. 5. SR 140,333, MEN 10,627 or ketotifen had no significant effect on basal gastric mucosal blood flow nor did they modify the gastric mucosal hyperaemic reaction to acid back-diffusion. 6. The effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) in causing vasoconstriction and inhibiting the vasodilator response to acid back-diffusion was also seen when blood flow in the left gastric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. 7. Arginine vasopressin (AVP, 0.1 nmol min-1 kg-1) induced gastric

  9. Review of immediate-release omeprazole for the treatment of gastric acid-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Castell, Donald

    2005-11-01

    Immediate-release omeprazole (Zegerid, Santarus) is the first immediate-release oral proton pump inhibitor to reach the market. As a powder formulation for oral suspension, it is indicated for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive oesophagitis, duodenal ulcer and gastric ulcer, and is the only proton pump inhibitor approved for the reduction of risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill patients. Administration of immediate-release omeprazole at bedtime results in a rapid and sustained elevation of gastric pH, and seems to provide better night time control of gastric acidity than that observed with conventional morning dosing of delayed-release proton pump inhibitors. The immediate-release formulation may provide a good treatment option for patients who require flexible dosing, quick onset of action and nocturnal gastric acid control.

  10. Contribution of gastrin to cysteamine-induced gastric acid secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    van de Brug, F J; Jansen, J B; Kuijpers, I J; Lamers, C B

    1993-01-01

    The role of circulating gastrin in cysteamine induced gastric acid secretion was examined in conscious male Wistar rats, provided with a portal vein catheter, a jugular vein catheter and a pyloric drainage tube. Intravenous infusion of 0.3 nmol/kg.30 min of gastrin 17-l resulted in serum gastrin concentrations of 1138 +/- 151 pg/ml and gastric acid secretion of 104 +/- 36 mumol H+/kg.30 min. This acid response was abolished by intravenous injection of 60 microliters of a gastrin-antiserum, indicating the efficacy of immunoneutralization with this antiserum in vivo. Intravenous bolus administration of 125 mg/kg of cysteamine induced increases in serum gastrin concentration (864 +/- 96 pg/ml) and gastric acid outputs (107 +/- 27 mumol H+/kg.30 min) not significantly different from the gastrin 17-l infusion experiments. Gastrin antiserum abolished cysteamine-induced gastric acid secretion, indicating that gastric acid secretion induced by 125 mg/kg of cysteamine is largely mediated by circulating gastrin in rats.

  11. Expression of HSP72 in the gastric mucosa is regulated by gastric acid in rats-Correlation of HSP72 expression with mucosal protection

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Isao; Otaka, Michiro . E-mail: otaka@med.akita-u.ac.jp; Jin, Mario; Odashima, Masaru; Komatsu, Koga; Konishi, Noriaki; Matsuhashi, Tamotsu; Horikawa, Youhei; Ohba, Reina; Itoh, Hideaki; Watanabe, Sumio

    2006-10-20

    Background and aim: The real mechanism of adaptive cytoprotection in the gastric mucosa is not well established. In the present study, we investigated the effect of acid suppressing agents on a 72-kDa heat shock protein (HSP72) expression, which is known as endogenous cytoprotective factor, in the gastric mucosa. Also, the association of gastric mucosal protective function against HCl-challenge was compared between HSP72-induced and -reduced group. Materials and methods: Expression of HSP72 was measured by Western blotting in the gastric mucosa before and after administration of famotidine or omeprazole. The gastric mucosal protective function against 0.6 N HCl was compared between control group and HSP72-reduced group. Also, the effect of increased expression of gastric HSP72 by additional administration of zinc sulfate or zinc L-carnosine, which is known as HSP72-inducer, on mucosal protective function was studied. Results: HSP72 expression in the gastric mucosa was reduced by acid suppressing agents. The lowest expression level of HSP72 was observed 12 h (famotidine, H2-receptor antagonist) or 48 h (omeprazole, proton pump inhibitor) after administration. The gastric mucosal protective ability against 0.6 N HCl was also reduced when HSP72 expression was decreased by famotidine or omeprazole. This phenomenon was reversed by HSP72 induction by additional administration of zinc derivatives. Conclusion: Our results might indicate that the expression of HSP72 in the gastric mucosa is physiologically regulated by gastric acid, and that HSP72 induction could be important in view of mucosal protection especially when HSP72 expression is reduced by administration of acid suppressing agents such as proton pump inhibitor or H2 receptor antagonist.

  12. Nitric oxide donors preferentially inhibit neuronally mediated rat gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Barrachina, D; Calatayud, S; Esplugues, J; Whittle, B J; Moncada, S; Esplugues, J V

    1994-09-01

    Continuous i.v. infusion of the nitric oxide (NO) donors, S-nitroso-glutathione (10-50 micrograms kg-1 min-1) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (10 micrograms kg-1 min-1) inhibited neuronally mediated gastric acid secretion, as induced by gastric distension (20 cm water) or i.v. bolus administration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (150 mg kg-1) in the anaesthetized rat. By contrast, gastric acid responses to i.v. infusion of submaximal doses of pentagastrin (8 micrograms kg-1 h-1) or histamine (1 mg kg-1 h-1) were not influenced by these NO donors. These findings suggest that NO does not directly influence acid secretion in vivo but could play an inhibitory modulator role in neuronally mediated acid responses.

  13. The H+/K+-ATPase inhibitory activities of Trametenolic acid B from Trametes lactinea (Berk.) Pat, and its effects on gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiaoyin; Huang, Nianyu; Wang, Junzhi; Luo, Huajun; He, Haibo; Ding, Mingruo; Deng, Wei-Qiao; Zou, Kun

    2013-09-01

    Trametenolic acid B (TAB), the bioactive component in the Trametes lactinea (Berk.) Pat, was reported to possess cytotoxic activities and thrombin inhibiting effects. This study was performed to investigate the effects of TAB on H(+)/K(+)-ATPase and gastric cancer. The H(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitory activity was determined by gastric parietal cells. Compared to the normal control group, TAB (10, 20, 40 and 80 μg/mL) inhibited the H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity by 15.97, 16.96, 24.86 and 16.25%, respectively. In the study, 36 Kunming mice were randomly divided into six groups: control, model, TAB-L (TAB, 5 mg/kg/day, i.g.), TAB-M (TAB, 20 mg/kg/day, i.g.), TAB-H (TAB, 40 mg/kg/day, i.g.) and omeprazole (OL, 10 mg/kg/day, i.g.). All mice except the control group were administrated with anhydrous alcohol (5.0 mL/kg, i.g.) for induced gastric-ulcer 1h after the 5th day. At the same time, the control mice were given the same volume of physiological saline. After 4h, TAB was evaluated for H(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitory activities of ulcerative gaster, gastric ulcer index and ulcer inhibition. In vitro, the anti-proliferation effect of TAB to gastric cancer cell (HGC-27) in acid environment was detected by MTT, and the apoptosis morphological changes were also observed by Hoechst 33258 dye assay. The results indicated that TAB inhibited moderately H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in vitro. Compared to the model group, TAB showed anti-ulcer effects in gastric tissue with the dosages of 20 and 5 mg/kg in vivo. Apart from that, TAB could selectively inhibit gastric cancer cell viability and reduce cell apoptosis against HGC-27 cells at low doses in acid environment.

  14. Association between Increased Gastric Juice Acidity and Sliding Hiatal Hernia Development in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kishikawa, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kayoko; Ito, Asako; Arahata, Kyoko; Takarabe, Sakiko; Kaida, Shogo; Kanai, Takanori; Miura, Soichiro; Nishida, Jiro

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Several clinical factors; overweight, male gender and increasing age, have been implicated as the etiology of hiatal hernia. Esophageal shortening due to acid perfusion in the lower esophagus has been suggested as the etiological mechanism. However, little is known about the correlation between gastric acidity and sliding hiatus hernia formation. This study examined whether increased gastric acid secretion is associated with an endoscopic diagnosis of hiatal hernia. Methods A total of 286 consecutive asymptomatic patients (64 were diagnosed as having a hiatal hernia) who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were studied. Clinical findings including fasting gastric juice pH as an indicator of acid secretion, age, sex, body mass index, and Helicobacter pylori infection status determined by both Helicobacter pylori serology and pepsinogen status, were evaluated to identify predictors in subjects with hiatal hernia. Results Male gender, obesity with a body mass index >25, and fasting gastric juice pH were significantly different between subjects with and without hiatal hernia. The cut-off point of fasting gastric juice pH determined by receiver operating curve analysis was 2.1. Multivariate regression analyses using these variables, and age, which is known to be associated with hiatal hernia, revealed that increased gastric acid secretion with fasting gastric juice pH <2.1 (OR = 2.60, 95% CI: 1.38–4.90) was independently associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, previously reported risk factors including male gender (OR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.23–4.35), body mass index >25 (OR = 3.49, 95% CI: 1.77–6.91) and age >65 years (OR = 1.86, 95% CI: 1.00–3.45), were also significantly associated with hiatal hernia. Conclusions This study suggests that increased gastric acid secretion independently induces the development of hiatal hernia in humans. These results are in accordance with the previously reported hypothesis that high gastric acid itself induces

  15. Alcoholic beverages produced by alcoholic fermentation but not by distillation are powerful stimulants of gastric acid secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Teyssen, S; Lenzing, T; González-Calero, G; Korn, A; Riepl, R L; Singer, M V

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of commonly ingested alcoholic beverages on gastric acid output and release of gastrin in humans is unknown. AIM AND METHODS: In 16 healthy humans the effect of some commonly ingested alcoholic beverages produced by fermentation plus distillation (for example, whisky, cognac, calvados, armagnac, and rum) or by alcoholic fermentation (beer, wine, champagne, martini, and sherry) on gastric acid output and release of gastrin was studied. Gastric acid output was determined by the method of intragastric titration. Plasma gastrin was measured using a specific radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: None of the alcoholic beverages produced by fermentation plus distillation had any significant effect on gastric acid output and release of gastrin compared with control (isotonic glucose and distilled water). Alcoholic beverages produced only by fermentation significantly (p < 0.05) increased the gastric acid output by 57% to 95% of maximal acid output (MAO) and release of gastrin up to 5.1-fold compared with control. If beer, wine, and sherry were distilled, only their remaining parts increased gastric acid output by 53% to 76% of MAO and increased release of gastrin up to 4.3-fold compared with control. CONCLUSIONS: (1) Alcoholic beverages produced by fermentation but not by distillation are powerful stimulants of gastric acid output and release of gastrin; (2) the alcoholic beverage constituents that stimulate gastric acid output and release of gastrin are most probably produced during the process of fermentation and removed during the following process of distillation. PMID:9155575

  16. Gastric acid barrier to ingested microorganisms in man: studies in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giannella, R A; Broitman, S A; Zamcheck, N

    1972-04-01

    Reassessment of the ;gastric bactericidal barrier' to enteric bacteria in man included studies of the bactericidal activity of (1) the normal and achlorhydric stomach in vivo and (2) normal and achlorhydric gastric juice and other media in vitro. Within 30 minutes virtually all bacteria (Serratia marcescens) were eliminated in the normal stomach whereas no reduction occurred in the achlorhydric stomach in one hour. In vitro, identical bactericidal activity was observed at the same pH (from 2.0 to 7.0) in normal gastric juice, achlorhydric gastric juice, aqueous HCl, and nutrient broth. At pH less than 4.0, 99.9% of the bacteria were killed within 30 minutes. The presence of profuse bacterial flora, including coliforms, found in markedly acid-deficient but not in normal stomachs, correlates well with the absence of bactericidal activity. Thus, the ;gastric bactericidal barrier' is primarily pH-hydrochloric acid dependent, with other constituents of gastric juice contributing little, if any, detectable effect on the destruction of microorganisms.

  17. Gastric acid barrier to ingested microorganisms in man: studies in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Giannella, R. A.; Broitman, S. A.; Zamcheck, N.

    1972-01-01

    Reassessment of the `gastric bactericidal barrier' to enteric bacteria in man included studies of the bactericidal activity of (1) the normal and achlorhydric stomach in vivo and (2) normal and achlorhydric gastric juice and other media in vitro. Within 30 minutes virtually all bacteria (Serratia marcescens) were eliminated in the normal stomach whereas no reduction occurred in the achlorhydric stomach in one hour. In vitro, identical bactericidal activity was observed at the same pH (from 2·0 to 7·0) in normal gastric juice, achlorhydric gastric juice, aqueous HCl, and nutrient broth. At pH less than 4·0, 99·9% of the bacteria were killed within 30 minutes. The presence of profuse bacterial flora, including coliforms, found in markedly acid-deficient but not in normal stomachs, correlates well with the absence of bactericidal activity. Thus, the `gastric bactericidal barrier' is primarily pH-hydrochloric acid dependent, with other constituents of gastric juice contributing little, if any, detectable effect on the destruction of microorganisms. PMID:4556018

  18. Flexible and transparent gastric battery: energy harvesting from gastric acid for endoscopy application.

    PubMed

    Mostafalu, Pooria; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we present the potential to harvest energy directly from the digestive system for powering a future wireless endoscopy capsule. A microfabricated electrochemical cell on flexible parylene film is proposed as a gastric battery. This electrochemical cell uses gastric juice as a source of unlimited electrolyte. Planar fabricated zinc [Zn] and palladium [Pd] electrodes serve as anode and cathode respectively. Due to planar geometry, no separator is needed. Moreover the annular structure of the electrodes provides lower distance between cathode and anode reducing the internal resistance. Both electrodes are biocompatible and parylene provides flexibility to the system. For a surface area of 15 mm(2), 1.25 mW is generated which is sufficient for most implantable endoscopy applications. Open circuit output voltage of this battery is 0.75 V. Since this gastric battery does not require any external electrolyte, it has low intrinsic weight, and since it is flexible and is made of biocompatible materials, it offers a promising solution for power in implantable applications.

  19. Simultaneous detection of gastric acid and histamine release to unravel the regulation of acid secretion from the guinea pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Bitziou, Eleni; Patel, Bhavik Anil

    2012-08-01

    Gastric acid secretion is regulated by three primary components that activate the parietal cell: histamine, gastrin, and acetylcholine (ACh). Although much is known about these regulatory components individually, little is known on the interplay of these multiple activators and the degree of regulation they pose on the gastric acid secretion mechanism. We utilized a novel dual-sensing approach, where an iridium oxide sensor was used to monitor pH and a boron-doped diamond electrode was used for the detection of histamine from in vitro guinea pig stomach mucosal sections. Under basal conditions, gastrin was shown to be the main regulatory component of the total acid secretion and directly activated the parietal cell rather than by mediating gastric acid secretion through the release of histamine from the enterochromaffin-like cell, although both pathways were active. Under stimulated conditions with ACh, the gastrin and histamine components of the total acid secretion were not altered compared with levels observed under basal conditions, suggestive that ACh had no direct effect on the enterochromaffin-like cell and G cell. These data identify a new unique approach to investigate the regulation pathways active during acid secretion and the degree that they are utilized to drive total gastric acid secretion. The findings of this study will enhance our understanding on how these signaling mechanisms vary under pathophysiology or therapeutic management.

  20. Liberation of hydrogen from gastric acid following administration of oral magnesium.

    PubMed

    Sack, D A; Stephensen, C B

    1985-12-01

    We are in the process of developing a noninvasive test for gastric acid secretion based on the reaction of orally administered magnesium metal with gastric acid: Mg + 2HCl in equilibrium with MgCl2 + H2. We hypothesized that the hydrogen gas thus evolved could be detected in exhaled air and belches and that the amount of hydrogen released could be related to the amount of acid in the stomach. To validate this hypothesis, we gave magnesium to two groups of young adult volunteers following either betazole stimulation or cimetidine inhibition of acid secretion. In group I we gave subcutaneous betazole and gave magnesium in doses from 10 to 200 mg. In group II we gave oral betazole and used a constant dose of 150 mg of magnesium. In both groups we consistently detected significant increases in breath and belch hydrogen following magnesium in the betazole-stimulated volunteers. This response was blocked by cimetidine. The magnitude of the response was related to the magnesium dose, with 150 mg appearing to induce a maximum response. Administration of oral magnesium up to 200 mg was not associated with any untoward effects. We conclude that magnesium led to the release of hydrogen gas in vivo and that the quantity of hydrogen gas recovered was related to the amount of gastric acid. With further development, this principle might be used to develop a simple noninvasive test for gastric acid secretion.

  1. Lead exposure changes gastric acid secretion in rat: role of nitric oxide (NO).

    PubMed

    Vahedian, Zakieh; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Keshavarz, Mansoor; Vahedian, Jalal; Mirershadi, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    Sub chronic exposure to lead in rats slows gastric emptying, but little is known about the effects of lead on gastric secretion. This study was designed to investigate the effects of lead on gastric acid secretion and its possible mechanisms in rats. Lead acetate was dissolved in drinking water in a concentration of 1%. Sodium acetate-containing water with a molar concentration similar to lead was also prepared. We had nine groups of animals (n=8); four of them were exposed to lead for 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks (Pb1, Pb2, Pb3 and Pb4 groups, respectively). Sodium acetate solution was given to another four groups for 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks (Na1, Na2, Na3 and Na4 groups, respectively). Gastric secretion was collected by washout technique and its acid output was measured in the basal (Basal Acid Output, BAO), vogotomy (Vagotomized Acid Output, VAO), and vagally stimulated (Vagally Stimulated Acid Output, VSAO) states using titrator instrument. Nitric oxide (NO) metabolite of gastric tissue was determined by Griess micro assay method to evaluate the possible mechanism of lead effect on gastric secretion. VSAO was significantly less in Pb1 and Pb2 groups than Na1 and Na2 ones respectively (1.75 ± 0.17, 2.10 ± 0.30 vs. 5.79 ± 0.20, 6.18 ± 0.27 µmol/15min) (P=0.001, P=0.001). BAO was significantly more in Pb3 and Pb4 groups than Na3 and Na4 ones respectively (2.77 ± 0.37, 2.80 ± 0.31 vs. 1.73 ± 0.16, 1.79 ± 0.34 µmol/15min) (P=0.01, P=0.02), but it was the same after vagotomy. VSAO was more in Pb3 and Pb4 groups than their Na counterparts (P=0.001, P=0.0001). NO metabolite of gastric tissue was more in all Pb groups in comparison to their Na counterparts (P=0.0001). In this study, it seems that lead exposure, via NO mechanism, has different effects on acid secretion. Nitric oxide in small and large amounts decrease and increase gastric acid secretion, respectively.

  2. Evaluation of the morphological changes of gastric mucosa induced by a low concentration of acetic acid using a rat model.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Ken-ichiro; Ro, Ayako; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Oral ingestion of concentrated acetic acid causes corrosive injury of the gastrointestinal tract. To assess the effects of a low concentration of acetic acid on gastric mucosa, we examined the gastric mucosal changes in rats at 1 and 3 days after the injection of 5% or 25% acetic acid into the gastric lumen. The area of the gastric ulcerative lesions in the 25% acetic acid group was significantly larger than that in the 5% acetic acid group. The lesion area was reduced significantly at 3 days after injection in the 5% acetic acid group, whereas no significant difference in lesion area was observed at 1 and 3 days in the 25% acetic acid group. Histologically, corrosive necrosis was limited to the mucosal layer in the 5% acetic acid group, whereas necrosis extended throughout the gastric wall in the 25% acetic acid group. At 3 days post-injection, the 25% acetic acid group showed widespread persistent inflammation, whereas the 5% acetic acid group showed widespread appearance of fibroblasts indicative of a healing process. These results indicate that a low concentration of acetic acid damages the gastric mucosa and that the degree of mucosal damage depends on the concentration of acetic acid.

  3. The dynamic gastric environment and its impact on drug and formulation behaviour.

    PubMed

    Van Den Abeele, Jens; Rubbens, Jari; Brouwers, Joachim; Augustijns, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Before being absorbed in the small intestine and/or colon, orally administered drugs inevitably need to pass through the stomach. Hence, it seems reasonable that the residence of a dosage form in the gastric environment, however brief it may be, may influence drug disposition further down the gastrointestinal tract and may potentially impact systemic exposure to a drug of interest. However, research efforts in the past mainly focused on drug disposition at the level of the intestine, i.e. the main site of absorption, hereby disregarding or oversimplifying the stomach's contribution to gastrointestinal drug disposition. In the first part of this review, the complexity of the stomach with regard to anatomy, physiology and gastric fluid composition is emphasized. Between-population differences in gastric functioning and physicochemical characteristics of gastric fluids are discussed. The second part of this review focuses on several of the processes to which a dosage form can be exposed during its passage through the stomach and the implications for gastrointestinal drug behaviour and systemic drug disposition. Finally, the influence of real-life dosing conditions on drug disposition is discussed in the context of the stomach.

  4. Amperometric microsensor for direct probing of ascorbic acid in human gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Emily A; Pauliukaitė, Rasa; Hocevar, Samo B; Ogorevc, Božidar; Smyth, Malcolm R

    2010-09-30

    demonstrated the unique featuring of the proposed NiO-RuHCF microsensor under acidic conditions with enhanced sensitivity and stability and proved its promising potentiality for direct amperometric probing of AA at physiological levels in real gastric juice environments.

  5. The effect of oligomycin and some nitrophenols on acid secretion and oxygen uptake by gastric mucosa of the frog.

    PubMed

    Bannister, W H

    1966-09-01

    1. The ability of the three nitrophenols, m-nitrophenol, p-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol, to inhibit acid secretion and stimulate oxygen uptake by gastric mucosa paralleled their extent of dissociation at physiological pH.2. Oligomycin inhibited oxygen uptake by gastric mucosa, and showed a tendency to inhibit acid secretion.3. 2,4-dinitrophenol lowered the value of the ratio between acid secretion and the associated oxygen uptake. Oligomycin did not affect the value of this ratio.4. It would appear that a non-phosphorylated high-energy intermediate of oxidative phosphorylation might be involved in acid secretion by gastric mucosa.

  6. Gastric giardiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; De Boni, M.; Cielo, R.; Laurino, L.; Pelosio, P.; Braidotti, P.; Viale, G.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prevalence of gastric giardiasis in patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and to define the clinicopathological correlates of gastric Giardia lamblia infection. METHODS: Consecutive gastric biopsy specimens (n = 15,023) from 11,085 patients, taken at Feltre City Hospital (north eastern Italy) from January 1986 to December 1991, were histologically and immunocytochemically examined for the occurrence of G lamblia trophozoites. Three gastric biopsy specimens from patients harbouring G lamblia infection, who repeated endoscopy before treatment, were also examined electron microscopically. RESULTS: Forty one patients (0.37% of the population study) harboured gastric giardiasis. All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of dyspepsia, epigastric pain, or abdominal distension. Only two patients had diarrhoea at the time of investigation. Giardiasis was clinically unsuspected in all cases, although the nine patients who also had duodenal biopsies performed had concomitant intestinal giardiasis. Gastric giardiasis was invariably associated with chronic atrophic gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia of the gastric mucosa and Helicobacter pylori infection were found in 32 and 37 of the 41 patients with gastric giardiasis, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The invariable association of gastric giardiasis with chronic atrophic gastritis, most often showing intestinal metaplasia and H pylori infection, indicates that a decreased gastric acidity is a prerequisite for localisation of G lamblia to the gastric mucosa. Though its possible role as a gastric pathogen remains to be elucidated, these findings suggest that trophozoites should be carefully searched for when examining gastric biopsy specimens showing chronic atrophic gastritis. Images PMID:1452790

  7. Identification of Catechin, Syringic Acid, and Procyanidin B2 in Wine as Stimulants of Gastric Acid Secretion.

    PubMed

    Liszt, Kathrin Ingrid; Eder, Reinhard; Wendelin, Sylvia; Somoza, Veronika

    2015-09-09

    Organic acids of wine, in addition to ethanol, have been identified as stimulants of gastric acid secretion. This study characterized the influence of other wine compounds, particularly phenolic compounds, on proton secretion. Forty wine parameters were determined in four red wines and six white wines, including the contents of organic acids and phenolic compounds. The secretory activity of the wines was determined in a gastric cell culture model (HGT-1 cells) by means of a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye. Red wines stimulated proton secretion more than white wines. Lactic acid and the phenolic compounds syringic acid, catechin, and procyanidin B2 stimulated proton secretion and correlated with the pro-secretory effect of the wines. Addition of the phenolic compounds to the least active white wine sample enhanced its proton secretory effect by 65 ± 21% (p < 0.05). These results indicate that not only malic and lactic acid but also bitter and astringent tasting phenolic compounds in wine contribute to its stimulatory effect on gastric acid secretion.

  8. Modulation by peripheral opioids of basal and distension-stimulated gastric acid secretion in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Esplugues, J. V.; Barrachina, M. D.; Esplugues, J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The influence of opioids in modulating gastric acid secretory responses has been investigated in the continuously perfused stomach of the anaesthetized rat. 2. Intravenous administration of morphine (0.75-3 mg kg-1) or the peripherally acting enkephalin analogue, BW443C (0.75-3 mg kg-1), substantially augmented acid secretion in basal conditions. These effects were significantly inhibited by the opioid antagonists naloxone (1 mg kg-1) and the peripherally acting N-methylnalorphine (2 mg kg-1). When administered alone, neither opioid antagonist influenced basal acid output. 3. Acid secretory responses to different levels of gastric distension (5-20 cmH2O) were significantly and dose-dependently reduced in rats pretreated with morphine (3 mg kg-1) or BW443C (1.5 mg kg-1). Previous administration of either naloxone or N-methyl nalorphine reversed the inhibitory effects of opioids on gastric acid secretion stimulated by distension. Likewise, blockade of opioid receptors with naloxone or N-methylnalorphine significantly increased acid output induced by distension. 4. Levels of serum gastrin in control animals were not increased after intragastric distension (20 cmH2O). Pretreatment with BW443C (1.5 mg kg-1) did not modify the levels of gastrin present during basal or distension stimulated conditions. 5. Pretreatment with morphine or BW443C did not influence the acid responses to i.v. injection of pentagastrin (100 micrograms kg-1), histamine (5 mg kg-1) or carbachol (4 micrograms kg-1). Acid secretion induced by i.v. administration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (150 mg kg-1) was reduced in rats pretreated with morphine but not with BW443C. Gastric secretory responses to insulin (0.3 i.u. kg-1) were not modified by i.v. morphine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1504729

  9. Mechanisms behind changes in gastric acid and bicarbonate outputs during the human interdigestive motility cycle.

    PubMed

    Dalenbäck, J; Fändriks, L; Olbe, L; Sjövall, H

    1996-01-01

    Human gastric interdigestive acid and bicarbonate outputs vary cyclically in association with the migrating motor complex (MMC). These phenomena were studied in 26 healthy volunteers by constant-flow gastric perfusion, with continuous recording of pH and Pco2 in mixed gastric effluent and concomitant open-tip manometry of gastroduodenal motility. Stable acid and bicarbonate outputs were registered during less than 50% of the MMC cycle. Acid secretion started to increase 71 +/- 3% into the cycle, with maximum output during antral phase III. Bicarbonate output increased biphasically 1) 40 +/- 5% into the cycle, coinciding with reflux of bile, and 2) at the end of duodenal phase III when the aspirate was devoid of bile. The bicarbonate peak associated with phase III was abolished by atropine (0.01 mg/kg iv, n = 8) and by pyloric occlusion (n = 9) but remained unchanged after omeprazole (n = 10). The acid peak was abolished by both atropine and omeprazole. It is concluded that the MMC-related changes in acid and alkaline outputs represent two different and independent phenomena. Acid secretion cyclicity is due to periodical variations in cholinergic stimulation of the parietal cells. In contrast, the phase III-associated increase in bicarbonate output is due to duodenogastric reflux.

  10. Gastric cancer risk and erythrocyte composition of docosahexaenoic acid with anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Kuriki, Kiyonori; Wakai, Kenji; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hiraki, Akio; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yamamura, Yoshitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Nakamura, Tsuneya; Tatematsu, Masae; Tajima, Kazuo

    2007-11-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is linked to inflammation and is the main cause of peptic ulcer, gastritis, and gastric malignancies. To examine associations between gastric cancer risk and the erythrocyte composition of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fatty acid with anti-inflammatory and apoptosis-inducing effects, here we conducted a case-control study of 179 incident gastric cancer cases and 357 noncancer controls (matched by age, sex, and season of sample collection). Dietary information and blood samples were collected from all subjects, and erythrocyte fatty acid levels were measured using accelerated solvent extraction and gas-liquid chromatography. Gastric cancer risk did not seem to be directly associated with dietary intake of fish and n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs), such as DHA, derived from fish. However, risk was inversely associated with erythrocyte compositions of n-3 HUFAs [the highest to the lowest tertile, odds ratio (OR), 0.39; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.23-0.68; P(trend)<0.005] and DHA (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.28-0.79; P(trend)<0.01). Particularly strong associations were noted for well-differentiated type lesions and n-3 HUFAs (OR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.03-0.35; P(trend)=0.0005) as well as DHA (OR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.07-0.58; P(trend)<0.01) values. In conclusion, the erythrocyte composition of DHA was found to be negatively linked to risk of gastric cancer, especially of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Further studies are needed to investigate mechanisms of action of DHA relevant to antitumor effects in the stomach.

  11. Interferon-inducer polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid: a potent anti-gastric ulcer agent and inhibitor of the gastric proton pump in rats.

    PubMed

    Nath, C; Rastogi, L; Dikshit, M; Patnaik, G K; Saxena, R C; Gupta, M B

    1998-01-01

    1. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (Poly I:Poly C), an interferon inducer was studied for its effect on gastric ulceration in rats. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, i.m.) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of gastric ulcers induced by aspirin, cold restraint stress and pylorus ligation (Shay's model). Protective dose (PD50) +/- SEM values of Poly I:Poly C on these models of ulcers were 1.9 +/- 0.2, 2.3 +/- 0.4 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 (mg/kg, i.m.) respectively. 2. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (10-60 micrograms) produced dose-dependent inhibition of gastric proton pump (H+/K(+)-ATPase) activity in the gastric parietal microsomal fraction. The concentration of Poly I:Poly C causing a 50% inhibition (IC50) +/- SEM was found to be 17.6 +/- 1.2 micrograms. 3. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid caused a significant decrease in free and total acid and pepsin and an increase in mucin content in Shay (pylorus-ligated) rat. 4. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid did not exert a significant influence on isolated tissue preparations for anti-cholinergic (acetylcholine-induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum) and H2-anti-histaminic (histamine-induced contraction of rat uterus and guinea-pig auricle) activities. 5. Thus, the present study indicates that Poly I:Poly C may possess anti-gastric ulcer activity as a result of inhibition of the gastric proton pump.

  12. Bile acid regulates c-Jun expression through the orphan nuclear receptor SHP induction in gastric cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Won Il; Park, Min Jung; An, Jin Kwang; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Hye Young; Cheong, JaeHun Yang, Ung Suk

    2008-05-02

    Bile reflux is considered to be one of the most important causative factors in gastric carcinogenesis, due to the attendant inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. In this study, we have assessed the molecular mechanisms inherent to the contribution of bile acid to the transcriptional regulation of inflammatory-related genes. In this study, we demonstrated that bile acid induced the expression of the SHP orphan nuclear receptor at the transcriptional level via c-Jun activation. Bile acid also enhanced the protein interaction of NF-{kappa}B and SHP, thereby resulting in an increase in c-Jun expression and the production of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF{alpha}. These results indicate that bile acid performs a critical function in the regulation of the induction of inflammatory-related genes in gastric cells, and that bile acid-mediated gene expression provides a pre-clue for the development of gastric cellular malformation.

  13. Widespread use of gastric acid inhibitors in infants: Are they needed? Are they safe?

    PubMed Central

    Safe, Mark; Chan, Wei H; Leach, Steven T; Sutton, Lee; Lui, Kei; Krishnan, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a common phenomenon in infants, but the differentiation between gastroesophageal reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease can be difficult. Symptoms are non-specific and there is increasing evidence that the majority of symptoms may not be acid-related. Despite this, gastric acid inhibitors such as proton pump inhibitors are widely and increasingly used, often without objective evidence or investigations to guide treatment. Several studies have shown that these medications are ineffective at treating symptoms associated with reflux in the absence of endoscopically proven oesophagitis. With a lack of evidence for efficacy, attention is now being turned to the potential risks of gastric acid suppression. Previously assumed safety of these medications is being challenged with evidence of potential side effects including GI and respiratory infections, bacterial overgrowth, adverse bone health, food allergy and drug interactions. PMID:27867686

  14. Widespread use of gastric acid inhibitors in infants: Are they needed? Are they safe?

    PubMed

    Safe, Mark; Chan, Wei H; Leach, Steven T; Sutton, Lee; Lui, Kei; Krishnan, Usha

    2016-11-06

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a common phenomenon in infants, but the differentiation between gastroesophageal reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease can be difficult. Symptoms are non-specific and there is increasing evidence that the majority of symptoms may not be acid-related. Despite this, gastric acid inhibitors such as proton pump inhibitors are widely and increasingly used, often without objective evidence or investigations to guide treatment. Several studies have shown that these medications are ineffective at treating symptoms associated with reflux in the absence of endoscopically proven oesophagitis. With a lack of evidence for efficacy, attention is now being turned to the potential risks of gastric acid suppression. Previously assumed safety of these medications is being challenged with evidence of potential side effects including GI and respiratory infections, bacterial overgrowth, adverse bone health, food allergy and drug interactions.

  15. Elemental composition of dog foods using nitric acid and simulated gastric digestions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David G; White, Steven D; Weir, Ron D

    2013-05-01

    Eighteen dry dog foods obtained commercially in the United States were digested using microwave assisted nitric acid digestion and a simulated gastric digestion. Digests were analysed for 23 elements using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Data, expressed as dry matter concentrations, were compared to published nitric acid digestion results. Nitric acid data obtained in the present study were not statistically different from published data, with the exception of Mo, Sn, Sb, Tl and Th. However, significant differences in individual intra-sample results were observed between published studies and the present work. Simulated gastric digestions demonstrated lower extraction efficiencies (<50% nitric acid digestions) that were statistically significant. Much lower bioavailability was observed for Al, Ba and Pb. In general, elemental concentrations were determined to be lower than the appropriate Mineral Tolerance Limit or consistent with background concentrations in foodstuffs. Evaluation against Reference Doses (RfDs) showed concentrations for many elements obtained by nitric acid digestion to be above RfD levels. However, the respective simulated gastric digestion data were below or only moderately elevated above RfDs. Only arsenic displayed median and maximum concentrations at factors of five and ten above the relevant RfD.

  16. Somatic pain sensitivity during formation and healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yarushkina, Natalya; Bogdanov, Anatoly; Filaretova, Ludmila

    2006-06-30

    A classical feature of visceral pain is its referring to somatic locations. Gastric ulcer is a source of visceral pain. In the present study we investigated whether gastric ulcers may trigger the changes in somatic nociception. For this aim somatic pain sensitivity was estimated under conditions of gastric ulcer development and healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by luminal application of 60% acetic acid under surgical conditions. Control rats were subjected to the same surgical procedure, but with the application of saline instead of the acid. Somatic pain sensitivity (tail flick latency), plasma corticosterone level, adrenal and thymus weight were investigated under conditions of the formation and the healing of gastric ulcers. The application of the acid resulted in the formation of kissing gastric ulcers, the increase of somatic pain sensitivity (the decrease of tail flick latency) as well as the appearance of typical signs of chronic stress: long-lasting increase of plasma corticosterone level, adrenal gland hypertrophy and thymus gland involution. Natural healing of gastric ulcers was accompanied by restoration of pain sensitivity as well as attenuation of the signs of chronic stress. Delay of ulcer healing by the daily indomethacin administration (2 mg/kg, s.c.) prevented the restoration of somatic pain sensitivity. The results suggest that chronic gastric ulcers may trigger somatic hypersensitivity.

  17. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors affecting gastric proton pump expression and acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Charles E; Beeson, Craig; Suarez, Giovanni; Peek, Richard M; Backert, Steffen; Smolka, Adam J

    2015-08-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric epithelial cells and human gastric biopsies represses H,K-ATPase α subunit (HKα) gene expression and inhibits acid secretion, causing transient hypochlorhydria and supporting gastric H. pylori colonization. Infection by H. pylori strains deficient in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) genes cagL, cagE, or cagM, which do not transfer CagA into host cells or induce interleukin-8 secretion, does not inhibit HKα expression, nor does a cagA-deficient strain that induces IL-8. To test the hypothesis that virulence factors other than those mediating CagA translocation or IL-8 induction participate in HKα repression by activating NF-κB, AGS cells transfected with HKα promoter-Luc reporter constructs containing an intact or mutated NF-κB binding site were infected with wild-type H. pylori strain 7.13, isogenic mutants lacking cag PAI genes responsible for CagA translocation and/or IL-8 induction (cagA, cagζ, cagε, cagZ, and cagβ), or deficient in genes encoding two peptidoglycan hydrolases (slt and cagγ). H. pylori-induced AGS cell HKα promoter activities, translocated CagA, and IL-8 secretion were measured by luminometry, immunoblotting, and ELISA, respectively. Human gastric biopsy acid secretion was measured by microphysiometry. Taken together, the data showed that HKα repression is independent of IL-8 expression, and that CagA translocation together with H. pylori transglycosylases encoded by slt and cagγ participate in NF-κB-dependent HKα repression and acid inhibition. The findings are significant because H. pylori factors other than CagA and IL-8 secretion are now implicated in transient hypochlorhydria which facilitates gastric colonization and potential triggering of epithelial progression to neoplasia.

  18. (Acidic deposition and the environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

    1990-10-24

    The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

  19. Effect of ethanol on acid secretion by isolated gastric glands from rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Reichstein, B.J.; Okamoto, C.; Forte, J.G.

    1986-08-01

    Isolated gastric glands from rabbit, as well as basolateral and microsomal membranes derived therefrom, were used to examine the effect of ethanol on several parameters related to acid secretion. Low concentrations of ethanol, 0.2%-5% (vol/vol), had no effect on basal aminopyrine accumulation by isolated gastric glands but significantly potentiated aminopyrine accumulation stimulated by histamine. In contrast, this dose range of ethanol inhibited aminopyrine accumulation stimulated by forskolin or dibutyryl-cyclic adenosine monophosphate. This dose range of ethanol produced a similar effect on adenylate cyclase activity of basolateral membranes from isolated gastric glands, with potentiation of histamine stimulation and inhibition of forskolin stimulation. Low-dose ethanol was found to produce increased proton permeability of the apical membrane of the parietal cell but had no effect on hydrogen-potassium-stimulated adenosine triphosphatase activity. Ethanol (10%) significantly inhibited all parameters of acid secretion studied. Ethanol has a biphasic effect on acid secretion with potentiation of histamine-stimulated aminopyrine accumulation and adenylate cyclase activity at low doses and inhibition of all parameters of acid secretion at high doses.

  20. Protective effect of sulglycotide on human gastric mucosa exposed to taurocholic acid.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, R; Zurita, J; Cenedese, A; Stanghellini, V; Cavalli, G; Paparo, G; Barbara, L

    1987-01-01

    Sulglycotide is a non-systemic drug used in the treatment of peptic ulcer. It seems also to possess cytoprotective action. A double-blind cross-over study on the influence of oral sulglycotide on gastric mucosal cell loss induced by taurocholic acid (20 mM + HCl 7mM in 100 ml normal saline) was carried out in sixteen healthy volunteers by means of the DNA-loss technique. Each subject received either sulglycotide (400 mg thrice daily) or a placebo in random order on the basis of a double-blind cross-over design. Sulglycotide appeared to reduce the gastric cell loss induced by taurocholic acid. These results can explain the therapeutic effect of sulglycotide in peptic disease.

  1. Is there any role of acid reducing gastric surgery in peptic ulcer perforation?

    PubMed

    Nivatvongs, Supanit

    2005-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is known to be the prime factor of peptic ulcer disease as well as NSAID usage. Although medical treatment of the bacteria can eliminate the problem for more than 90% of the infected people but the cost of treatment is high then acid reducing gastric surgery still has a definite role. The prevalence of H. pylori in peptic ulcer perferation is still unknown also whether vagotomy and gastrectomy could eradicate H. pylori. Now laparoscopic surgery especially the simple repair of the perforation has became routinely used in many part of the world. So acid reducing gastric surgery is a good choice in chronic user of NSAID and also an option for people who have H. pylori infection.

  2. Upregulation of bile acid receptor TGR5 and nNOS in gastric myenteric plexus is responsible for delayed gastric emptying after chronic high-fat feeding in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Shiyi; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Guanpo; Lu, Yuanxu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic high-fat feeding is associated with functional dyspepsia and delayed gastric emptying. We hypothesize that high-fat feeding upregulates gastric neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression, resulting in delayed gastric emptying. We propose this is mediated by increased bile acid action on bile acid receptor 1 (TGR5) located on nNOS gastric neurons. To test this hypothesis, rats were fed regular chow or a high-fat diet for 2 wk. Rats fed the high-fat diet were subjected to concurrent feeding with oral cholestyramine or terminal ileum resection. TGR5 and nNOS expression in gastric tissue was measured by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and Western blot. Gastric motility was assessed by organ bath and solid-phase gastric emptying studies. The 2-wk high-fat diet caused a significant increase in neurons coexpressing nNOS and TGR5 in the gastric myenteric plexus and an increase in nNOS and TGR5 gene expression, 67 and 111%, respectively. Enhanced nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxation, deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced inhibition in fundic tissue, and a 26% delay in gastric emptying accompanied these changes. A 24-h incubation of whole-mount gastric fundus with DCA resulted in increased nNOS and TGR5 protein expression, 41 and 37%, respectively. Oral cholestyramine and terminal ileum resection restored the enhanced gastric relaxation, as well as the elevated nNOS and TGR5 expression evoked by high-fat feeding. Cholestyramine also prevented the delay in gastric emptying. We conclude that increased levels of circulatory bile acids induced by high-fat feeding upregulate nNOS and TGR5 expression in the gastric myenteric plexus, resulting in enhanced NANC relaxation and delayed gastric emptying. PMID:25540233

  3. Ursodeoxycholic acid effectively kills drug-resistant gastric cancer cells through induction of autophagic death.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung-Chul; Han, Song Iy

    2015-09-01

    Carcinoma cells that have acquired drug resistance often exhibit cross-resistance to various other cytotoxic stimuli. Here, we investigated the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a gastrointestinal tumor-suppressor, on a cisplatin‑resistant SNU601 gastric cancer subline (SNU601/R). While other anticancer drugs, including L-OHP, etoposide, and death ligand TRAIL, had minimal effects on the viability of these resistant cells, they were sensitive to UDCA. The UDCA‑induced reduction in the viability of the SNU601/R cells was accomplished through autophagy while the primary means of cell death in the parental SNU601 cells (SNU601/WT) was apoptosis. Previously, we demonstrated that the UDCA-triggered apoptosis of gastric cancer cells was regulated by a cell surface death receptor, TRAIL-R2/DR5, which was upregulated and re-distributed on lipid rafts. The UDCA stimulation of TRAIL-R2/DR5 also occurred in the SNU601/R cells despite the lack of apoptosis. In the present study, we found that CD95/Fas, another cell surface death receptor, was also translocated into lipid rafts in response to UDCA although it was not involved in the decrease in cell viability. Specifically, raft relocalization of CD95/Fas was triggered by UDCA in the SNU601/WT cells in which apoptosis occurred, but not in the SNU601/R cells where autophagic death occurred. Notably, UDCA reduced ATG5 levels, an essential component of autophagy, in the SNU601/WT, but not in the SNU601/R cell line. Moreover, in CD95/Fas-silenced SNU601/WT cells, UDCA did not decrease ATG5 levels and induced autophagic cell death rather than apoptosis. These results imply that raft‑distributed CD95/Fas may support UDCA-induced apoptosis via downregulation of ATG5 levels, preventing the autophagic pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that UDCA induces both apoptotic and autophagic cell death depending on the intracellular signaling environment, thereby conferring the advantage to overcome drug resistance

  4. Perceptually Docked Control Environment for Multiple Microbots: Application to the Gastric Wall Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Ka Wai; Sun, Loi Wah; Vitiello, Valentina; James, David R C; Mylonas, George P; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a human-robot interface with perceptual docking to allow for the control of multiple microbots. The aim is to demonstrate that real-time eye tracking can be used for empowering robots with human vision by using knowledge acquired in situ. Several micro-robots can be directly controlled through a combination of manual and eye control. The novel control environment is demonstrated on a virtual biopsy of gastric lesion through an endoluminal approach. Twenty-one subjects were recruited to test the control environment. Statistical analysis was conducted on the completion time of the task using the keyboard control and the proposed eye tracking framework. System integration with the concept of perceptual docking framework demonstrated statistically significant improvement of task execution.

  5. Evidence for a significant role of gastrin in cysteamine-induced hypersecretion of gastric acid.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, K; Shimizu, K; Ikeda, M; Watanabe, S; Hayashi, N

    1997-01-01

    Cysteamine has been known to stimulate gastric acid secretion and to induce duodenal ulcers in rats. We investigated the role of gastrin in cysteamine-induced acid hypersecretion in the perfused rat stomach. Intravenous infusion of cysteamine (75 mg/kg/h) resulted in a significant increase in acid secretion, which was accompanied by a marked increase in the plasma gastrin concentration. The cysteamine-induced increase in gastric acid secretion was completely blocked by i.v. injection of anti-gastrin rabbit serum (500 microliters). In addition, i.v. infusion of a CCK-B/gastrin receptor antagonist (L-365,260) (1 mg/kg/h) also suppressed the cysteamine-induced increase in acid secretion. Atropine significantly, but only partially, inhibited the increase. The elevated plasma gastrin levels induced by cysteamine were unaffected by atropine and L-365,260. In conclusion, cysteamine-induced acid hypersecretion is mediated mainly by cysteamine-induced gastrin release and partially by cholinergic factors. Furthermore, gastrin release caused by cysteamine appears to be independent of cholinergic tone.

  6. Does oral lansoprazole really reduce gastric acidity in VLBW premature neonates?

    PubMed

    Tham, Sock Ying; Rogers, Ian M; Samuel, K F; Singh, A; Ong, King Kok

    2012-06-01

    Premature neonates of very low birth weight (VLBW) whose treatment required the use of naso-gastric tube feeding were investigated. 10 infants suspected of having GERD (gastroesophageal reflux) received oral lansoprazole therapy by tube administration. 9 other infants formed a control group. In the treated group a fasting pH was determined before treatment and again after 7 days treatment. The control group was similarly assessed at an interval of 7 days. Despite acid reduction, the post-treatment pH mean of 1.31 would continue to pose a threat to the esophageal mucosa. The physiology of neonatal acid secretion is discussed to explain these findings.

  7. Recent advances in photodynamic diagnosis of gastric cancer using 5-aminolevulinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Noriaki; Harada, Yoshinori; Minamikawa, Takeo; Tanaka, Hideo; Otsuji, Eigo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis based on 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX has been clinically applied in many fields based upon its evidenced efficacy and adequate safety. In order to establish a personalized medicine approach for treating gastric cancer patients, rapid intraoperative detection of malignant lesions has become important. Feasibility of photodynamic diagnosis using 5-aminolevulinic acid for gastric cancer patients has been investigated, especially for the detection of peritoneal dissemination and lymph node metastasis. This method enables intraoperative real-time fluorescence detection of peritoneal dissemination, exhibiting higher sensitivity than white light observation without histopathological examination. The method also enables detection of metastatic foci within excised lymph nodes, exhibiting a diagnostic accuracy comparable to that of a current molecular diagnostics technique. Although several complicating issues still need to be resolved, such as the effect of tissue autofluorescence and the insufficient depth penetration of excitation light, this simple and rapid method has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool for gastric cancer, as well as urinary bladder cancer and glioma. PMID:26811665

  8. Recent advances in photodynamic diagnosis of gastric cancer using 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Noriaki; Harada, Yoshinori; Minamikawa, Takeo; Tanaka, Hideo; Otsuji, Eigo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2016-01-21

    Photodynamic diagnosis based on 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX has been clinically applied in many fields based upon its evidenced efficacy and adequate safety. In order to establish a personalized medicine approach for treating gastric cancer patients, rapid intraoperative detection of malignant lesions has become important. Feasibility of photodynamic diagnosis using 5-aminolevulinic acid for gastric cancer patients has been investigated, especially for the detection of peritoneal dissemination and lymph node metastasis. This method enables intraoperative real-time fluorescence detection of peritoneal dissemination, exhibiting higher sensitivity than white light observation without histopathological examination. The method also enables detection of metastatic foci within excised lymph nodes, exhibiting a diagnostic accuracy comparable to that of a current molecular diagnostics technique. Although several complicating issues still need to be resolved, such as the effect of tissue autofluorescence and the insufficient depth penetration of excitation light, this simple and rapid method has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool for gastric cancer, as well as urinary bladder cancer and glioma.

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection prevents erosive reflux oesophagitis by decreasing gastric acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Koike, T; Ohara, S; Sekine, H; Iijima, K; Abe, Y; Kato, K; Toyota, T; Shimosegawa, T

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Helicobacter pylori infection is less prevalent and atrophic gastritis is less extensive in patients with reflux oesophagitis than those without it, but few studies have examined this relationship directly.
AIMS—We investigated the relationship between H pylori infection, acid secretion, and reflux oesophagitis in Japanese subjects.
SUBJECTS—A total of 105 patients with erosive reflux oesophagitis were compared with 105 sex and age matched patients without reflux oesophagitis.
METHODS—The diagnosis of H pylori infection was made by histological examination of gastric mucosal biopsy specimens, rapid urease test, and detection of serum IgG antibodies. Acid secretion was assessed by the endoscopic gastrin test.
RESULTS—H pylori infection was present in 36 patients with erosive reflux oesophagitis (34.3%) and in 80 control subjects (76.2%) (odds ratio 0.163, 95% confidence interval 0.09-0.29). Overall acid secretion was significantly greater in patients with reflux oesophagitis. Among H pylori positive patients, acid secretion was greater in patients with reflux oesophagitis than those without oesophagitis.
CONCLUSION—In Japan, erosive reflux oesophagitis occurs most often in the absence of H pylori infection and gastric hyposecretion. Even in the presence of H pylori infection, reflux oesophagitis is more likely to develop in patients without gastric hyposecretion. H pylori infection may inhibit reflux oesophagitis by inducing hypoacidity.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; gastro-oesophageal reflux disease; reflux oesophagitis; acid secretion PMID:11511552

  10. Inhibition of acid formation by epidermal growth factor in the isolated rabbit gastric glands.

    PubMed Central

    Dembiński, A; Drozdowicz, D; Gregory, H; Konturek, S J; Warzecha, Z

    1986-01-01

    The effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on basal and stimulated (with histamine, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, and high concentrations of K+) acid formation have been studied in isolated glands from the rabbit gastric mucosa. The changes in the accumulation of [14C]aminopyrine [14C]AP have been used as an indirect measurement of acid production in the glands. Unstimulated gastric glands accumulated [14C]AP indicating the existence of basal acid production in these glands, and EGF caused a small but significant reduction in basal [14C]AP uptake. A similar reduction of basal [14C]AP uptake was observed after exposure to omeprazole but not after ranitidine or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Histamine, dibutyryl cyclic AMP and K+ caused a strong and dose-dependent stimulation of acid formation by the glands. EGF, like omeprazole, reduced dose-dependently the [14C]AP accumulation stimulated by both histamine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, while ranitidine and PGE2 reduced histamine- but not dibutyryl-cyclic-AMP-stimulated accumulation of [14C]AP. In the absence of other external stimuli, an increased K+ concentration enhanced [14C]AP accumulation to levels similar to those produced by histamine and this effect was not changed by EGF, ranitidine or PGE2 but was inhibited by omeprazole. We conclude that EGF interferes with the final steps of acid production between cyclic nucleotides and proton pump of the parietal cells. PMID:3025433

  11. Augmentation of gastric acid secretion by chloroquine and amodiaquine in the rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Ajeigbe, K O; Emikpe, B O; Olaleye, S B

    2012-06-07

    Gastrointestinal mucosal integrity has been shown to be altered by chloroquine and amodiaquine, although the exact mechanism is not clear. Since Gastric Acid Secretion (GAS) plays significant role in the etiology of ulcer, the present study was aimed at investigating the effect of chloroquine and amodiaquine on GAS, Parietal Cell Mass (PCM) and Gastric Mucous Cell Population (GMP) in rats. Male albino wistar rats were randomly assigned into three groups viz: control, chloroquine (CQ, 3 mg/kg), amodiaquine (AQ, 10 mg/kg). Basal GAS as well as secretion in response to histamine and carbachol was measured by continuous perfusion of the stomach with normal saline (1ml/minute) under urethane anaesthesia (0.6 mg/100 g). After obtaining a steady basal output response to normal saline in all animals, the antimalaria drugs were administered intramuscularly and the peak responses to each drug obtained. Further assessment of the roles of histaminergic and muscarinic receptors were done using ranitidine (H2 antagonist) and atropine (M antagonist) in the treated animals. PCM and GMP were determined in the stomach samples by histometry. The basal acid output was 0.70 ± 0.01 mmol/10 mins. Chloroquine and amodiaquine produced increase in acid output to a peak of 1.35 ±0.03 mmol/10 mins (92.9%) and 1.40 ± 0.03 mmol/10 mins (100%) respectively. Histamine and carbachol elicited 107% and 100% increase acid secretion when compared with the basal output respectively. CQ and AQ potentiated histamine-induced secretory rate which peaked at 1.60 ± 0.02 mmol/10 mins and 1.70 ± 0.03 mmol/10 mins respectively. Similarly, the carbachol-induced acid secretory response was potentiated by CQ and AQ to a peak of 1.45 ± 0.02 mmol/10 mins and 1.50 ± 0.03 mmol/10 mins. Ranitidine and atropine attenuated histamine and carbachol induced acid secretion, but did not abolish it. CQ and AQ increased significantly the parietal cell numbers in the gastric mucosa (21±0.7 and 24±0.7 versus 15.2±0

  12. Effect of netazepide, a gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist, on gastric acid secretion and rabeprazoleinduced hypergastrinaemia in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Malcolm; Dowen, Sally; Turnbull, Gillian; van den Berg, Frans; Zhao, Chun-Mei; Chen, Duan; Black, James

    2015-01-01

    Aims To compare gastric acid suppression by netazepide, a gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist, with that by a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), and to determine if netazepide can prevent the trophic effects of PPI-induced hypergastrinaemia. Methods Thirty healthy subjects completed a double-blind, randomized, parallel group trial of oral netazepide and rabeprazole, alone and combined, once daily for 6 weeks. Primary end points were: basal and pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid and 24 h circulating gastrin and chromogranin A (CgA) at baseline, start and end of treatment, gastric biopsies at baseline and end of treatment and basal and pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid and dyspepsia questionnaire after treatment withdrawal. Results All treatments similarly inhibited pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion. All treatments increased serum gastrin, but the combination and rabeprazole did so more than netazepide alone. The combination also reduced basal acid secretion. Rabeprazole increased plasma CgA, whereas netazepide and the combination reduced it. None of the biopsies showed enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell hyperplasia. Withdrawal of treatments led neither to rebound hyperacidity nor dyspepsia. Conclusions Netazepide suppressed pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion as effectively as did rabeprazole. The reduction in basal acid secretion and greater increase in serum gastrin by the combination is consistent with more effective acid suppression. Despite our failure to show rabeprazole-induced ECL cell hyperplasia and rebound hyperacidity, the increase in plasma CgA after rabeprazole is consistent with a trophic effect on ECL cells, which netazepide prevented. Thus, netazepide is a potential treatment for the trophic effects of hypergastrinaemia and, with or without a PPI, is a potential treatment for acid-related conditions. PMID:25335860

  13. An extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaves and purified gymnemic acid inhibits glucose-stimulated gastric inhibitory peptide secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Fushiki, T; Kojima, A; Imoto, T; Inoue, K; Sugimoto, E

    1992-12-01

    Gastric inhibitory peptide release into the portal vein in response to duodenal infusion of D-glucose was studied in the presence of a leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and inhibitors of some putative glucose sensors and carriers in the intestinal lumen. Intraduodenal infusion of D-glucose significantly increased the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentration in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide induced by glucose was significantly depressed by concomitantly infused leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin but not by cytochalasin B. Mannoheptulose, which inhibits glycolysis, and procaine and lidocaine, which inhibit the vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen, did not affect portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentrations. These results suggest that a glucose receptor, which interacts with the leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin, exists for the release of immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide and that the glucose receptor for gastric inhibitory peptide release is not likely to be identical with a glucose transporter or a vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen.

  14. Gastric bicarbonate secretion, acid secretion, and mucosal blood flow during influence of pentagastrin and omeprazole in the cat.

    PubMed

    Guttu, K; Røsok, B; Gislason, H; Fändriks, L; Svanes, K; Grønbech, J E

    1991-04-01

    In this study secretion of bicarbonate and acid and mucosal blood flow were determined simultaneously in cats. The gastric lumen of anesthetized cats was continuously perfused with isotonic saline. Secretion of HCO-3 and H+ was calculated from continuous measurements of pH and PCO2 in the perfusate. Mucosal blood was measured by means of radiolabeled microspheres. Under resting acid secretory conditions, bicarbonate secretion into the gastric lumen averaged 1.0 mumol/min. Somewhat surprising, both omeprazole (4 mg/kg as bolus) and pentagastrin (16 micrograms/kg.h intravenously) significantly reduced the HCO-3 secretion. Omeprazole did not influence mucosal blood flow, whereas corpus mucosal blood flow increased during pentagastrin stimulation. Under resting acid secretory conditions and during omeprazole treatment there was a close linear relationship between acid and bicarbonate secretion. No such relationship was found during pentagastrin stimulation of the mucosa. No consistent relationship was obtained between blood flow and bicarbonate secretion in normal gastric mucosa.

  15. Genetic Ablation of the ClC-2 Cl- Channel Disrupts Mouse Gastric Parietal Cell Acid Secretion.

    PubMed

    Nighot, Meghali P; Nighot, Prashant K; Ma, Thomas Y; Malinowska, Danuta H; Shull, Gary E; Cuppoletti, John; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2015-01-01

    The present studies were designed to examine the effects of ClC-2 ablation on cellular morphology, parietal cell abundance, H/K ATPase expression, parietal cell ultrastructure and acid secretion using WT and ClC-2-/- mouse stomachs. Cellular histology, morphology and proteins were examined using imaging techniques, electron microscopy and western blot. The effect of histamine on the pH of gastric contents was measured. Acid secretion was also measured using methods and secretagogues previously established to give maximal acid secretion and morphological change. Compared to WT, ClC-2-/- gastric mucosal histological organization appeared disrupted, including dilation of gastric glands, shortening of the gastric gland region and disorganization of all cell layers. Parietal cell numbers and H/K ATPase expression were significantly reduced by 34% (P<0.05) and 53% (P<0.001) respectively and cytoplasmic tubulovesicles appeared markedly reduced on electron microscopic evaluation without evidence of canalicular expansion. In WT parietal cells, ClC-2 was apparent in a similar cellular location as the H/K ATPase by immunofluorescence and appeared associated with tubulovesicles by immunogold electron microscopy. Histamine-stimulated [H+] of the gastric contents was significantly (P<0.025) lower by 9.4 fold (89%) in the ClC-2-/- mouse compared to WT. Histamine/carbachol stimulated gastric acid secretion was significantly reduced (range 84-95%, P<0.005) in ClC-2-/- compared to WT, while pepsinogen secretion was unaffected. Genetic ablation of ClC-2 resulted in reduced gastric gland region, reduced parietal cell number, reduced H/K ATPase, reduced tubulovesicles and reduced stimulated acid secretion.

  16. Genetic Ablation of the ClC-2 Cl- Channel Disrupts Mouse Gastric Parietal Cell Acid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Nighot, Meghali P.; Nighot, Prashant K.; Ma, Thomas Y.; Malinowska, Danuta H.; Shull, Gary E.; Cuppoletti, John; Blikslager, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    The present studies were designed to examine the effects of ClC-2 ablation on cellular morphology, parietal cell abundance, H/K ATPase expression, parietal cell ultrastructure and acid secretion using WT and ClC-2-/- mouse stomachs. Cellular histology, morphology and proteins were examined using imaging techniques, electron microscopy and western blot. The effect of histamine on the pH of gastric contents was measured. Acid secretion was also measured using methods and secretagogues previously established to give maximal acid secretion and morphological change. Compared to WT, ClC-2-/- gastric mucosal histological organization appeared disrupted, including dilation of gastric glands, shortening of the gastric gland region and disorganization of all cell layers. Parietal cell numbers and H/K ATPase expression were significantly reduced by 34% (P<0.05) and 53% (P<0.001) respectively and cytoplasmic tubulovesicles appeared markedly reduced on electron microscopic evaluation without evidence of canalicular expansion. In WT parietal cells, ClC-2 was apparent in a similar cellular location as the H/K ATPase by immunofluorescence and appeared associated with tubulovesicles by immunogold electron microscopy. Histamine-stimulated [H+] of the gastric contents was significantly (P<0.025) lower by 9.4 fold (89%) in the ClC-2-/- mouse compared to WT. Histamine/carbachol stimulated gastric acid secretion was significantly reduced (range 84–95%, P<0.005) in ClC-2-/- compared to WT, while pepsinogen secretion was unaffected. Genetic ablation of ClC-2 resulted in reduced gastric gland region, reduced parietal cell number, reduced H/K ATPase, reduced tubulovesicles and reduced stimulated acid secretion. PMID:26378782

  17. Teaching the Role of Secretin in the Regulation of Gastric Acid Secretion Using a Classic Paper by Johnson and Grossman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Kristen L. W.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of gastric acid secretion has been the subject of investigation for over a century. Inhibition of gastrin-induced acid secretion by the intestine-derived hormone secretin provides a classic physiological example of negative feedback in the gastrointestinal tract. A classic paper by Leonard R. Johnson and Morton I. Grossman clearly…

  18. Transcriptomes of purified gastric ECL and parietal cells: identification of a novel pathway regulating acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Nils W G; Yakubov, Iskandar; Zer, Cindy; Sachs, George

    2006-03-13

    The gastric entero-chromaffin-like (ECL) cell plays a key regulatory role in peripheral regulation of acid secretion due to the release of histamine that stimulates acid secretion by the parietal cell. Studies in intact animals, gastric glands, and isolated cells after short-term culture have shown expression of stimulatory CCK2 and PAC1 and inhibitory SST2 and Gal1 receptors as well as histidine decarboxylase. However, the pattern of its gene expression as a neuroendocrine cell has not been explored. Comparison of gene expression by 95% pure ECL cells obtained by density gradient, elutriation, and fluorescence-assisted cell sorting with isolates of the intact fundic gastric epithelium (i.e., "subtractive hybridization") identified a variety of additional expressed gene families characteristic of this neuroendocrine cell. These include genes 1) involved in neuropeptide synthesis and secretory vesicle exocytosis, 2) involved in control of inflammation, 3) implicated in healing of the epithelium, 4) encoding inhibitory Gi protein-coupled receptors, 5) playing a role in neuroendocrine regulation of food intake, and 6) encoding proteins likely involved in maintenance of circadian rhythm, in addition to the ECL cell-specific genes histidine decarboxylase and monoamine transporter. Particularly, the inhibitory apelin receptor gene, APJ, was highly expressed in the ECL cell preparation. Because parietal cells express apelin, immunohistochemical and functional studies showed that there is an inhibitory feed back loop between the parietal and ECL cell during gastrin stimulation, providing evidence for a novel pathway of downregulation of acid secretion due to interaction between these two cell types.

  19. Effect of gastric acid suppressants and prokinetics on peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ji Eun; Koh, Seong-Joon; Chun, Jaeyoung; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of gastric acid suppressants and prokinetics on peritonitis development in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. METHODS: This was a single-center, retrospective study. The medical records of 398 PD patients were collected from January 2000 to September 2012 and analyzed to compare patients with at least one episode of peritonitis (peritonitis group, group A) to patients who never had peritonitis (no peritonitis group, group B). All peritonitis episodes were analyzed to compare peritonitis caused by enteric organisms and peritonitis caused by non-enteric organisms. RESULTS: Among the 120 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 61 patients had at least one episode of peritonitis and 59 patients never experienced peritonitis. Twenty-four of 61 patients (39.3%) in group A and 15 of 59 patients (25.4%) in group B used gastric acid suppressants. Only the use of H2-blocker (H2B) was associated with an increased risk of PD-related peritonitis; the use of proton pump inhibitors, other antacids, and prokinetics was not found to be a significant risk factor for PD-related peritonitis. A total of 81 episodes of peritonitis were divided into enteric peritonitis (EP) or non-enteric peritonitis, depending on the causative organism, and gastric acid suppressants and prokinetics did not increase the risk of EP in PD patients. CONCLUSION: The use of H2B showed a trend for an increased risk of overall PD-related peritonitis, although further studies are required to clarify the effects of drugs on PD-related peritonitis. PMID:25057226

  20. The susceptibility of Streptococcus thermophilus 14085 to organic acid, simulated gastric juice, bile salt and disinfectant as influenced by cold shock treatment.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shiu-Hui; Lai, Ying-Jang; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2013-02-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is a thermophilic lactic acid bacterium which is used as the starter organism for the fermentation of yoghurt and some cheese. In the present study, S. thermophilus BCRC 14085 was subjected to cold shock treatment by exposure at 10 °C for 2 h. The effect of cold shock on the susceptibility of S. thermophilus in subsequent lethal stress environments such as simulated gastric juice (pH 2.0-3.0), bile solution (2.0%) and various organic acids (0.75 M, pH 3.5) including propionic, lactic, acetic, citric and tartaric acid was investigated. In addition, the survival of cold-shocked and non-shocked S. thermophilus exposed to disinfectants, Clidox-S and Quatricide, were compared. Results revealed that cold shock enhanced the tolerance of S. thermophilus in the presence of simulated gastric juice (pH 2.5 and 2.8), while in bile solution, the population increase of cold-shocked cells is higher than that of non-shocked cells after 12 h of incubation. Furthermore, the susceptibility of S. thermophilus, regardless of cold shock, to organic acid varied with the kinds of organic acid examined. The cold-shocked S. thermophilus showed a significantly less survival (P < 0.05) than that of the non-shocked cells when exposed to lactic or acetic acid. Furthermore, cold shock reduced the survival of S. thermophilus when exposed to Quatricide but not Clidox-S.

  1. The bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5) is expressed in human gastric cancers and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastric cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Sabrina; Marchianò, Silvia; Marino, Elisabetta; Zampella, Angela; Rende, Mario; Mosci, Paolo; Distrutti, Eleonora; Donini, Annibale; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    GPBAR1 (also known as TGR5) is a bile acid activated receptor expressed in several adenocarcinomas and its activation by secondary bile acids increases intestinal cell proliferation. Here, we have examined the expression of GPBAR1 in human gastric adenocarcinomas and investigated whether its activation promotes the acquisition of a pro-metastatic phenotype. By immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis we found that expression of GPBAR1 associates with advanced gastric cancers (Stage III-IV). GPBAR1 expression in tumors correlates with the expression of N-cadherin, a markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) (r=0.52; P<0.01). Expression of GPBAR1, mRNA and protein, was detected in cancer cell lines, with MKN 45 having the higher expression. Exposure of MKN45 cells to GPBAR1 ligands, TLCA, oleanolic acid or 6-ECDCA (a dual FXR and GPBAR1 ligand) increased the expression of genes associated with EMT including KDKN2A, HRAS, IGB3, MMP10 and MMP13 and downregulated the expression of CD44 and FAT1 (P<0.01 versus control cells). GPBAR1 activation in MKN45 cells associated with EGF-R and ERK1 phosphorylation. These effects were inhibited by DFN406, a GPBAR1 antagonist, and cetuximab. GPBAR1 ligands increase MKN45 migration, adhesion to peritoneum and wound healing. Pretreating MKN45 cells with TLCA increased propensity toward peritoneal dissemination in vivo. These effects were abrogated by cetuximab. In summary, we report that GPBAR1 is expressed in advanced gastric cancers and its expression correlates with markers of EMT. GPBAR1 activation in MKN45 cells promotes EMT. These data suggest that GPBAR1 antagonist might have utility in the treatment of gastric cancers. PMID:27409173

  2. Adaptation of Salmonella spp. in juice stored under refrigerated and room temperature enhances acid resistance to simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Yuk, H G; Schneider, K R

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acid resistance of Salmonella spp. adapted in juices stored under refrigeration and room temperatures to simulated gastric fluid (SGF, pH 1.5). Five Salmonella serovars, Agona, Gaminara, Michigan, Montevideo, and Poona were used in this study. Apple, orange, and tomato juices inoculated with five serovars were stored at refrigeration (7 degrees C) and room temperature (20 degrees C) for 24 h for adaptation. Acid resistances of serovars adapted in juice were determined in SGF at 37 degrees C. All acid-adapted Salmonella serovars in juices displayed enhanced survival time compared to non-adapted controls. Among serovars, S. Poona adapted in apple at 20 degrees C and orange juices at 7 and 20 degrees C showed >2.0 log cfu/ml survivors, while the other serovars decreased to non-detectable level or <2.0 log cfu/ml for 100 s in SGF. Unlike apple and orange juices, all serovars adapted in tomato juice survived with >2.0 log cfu/ml for 100 s. For D-values, all Salmonella serovars adapted in apple and tomato juice enhanced their acid resistances compared to orange juices. S. Agona adapted in tomato juice at 7 degrees C and S. Poona in apple juice at 20 degrees C had the highest D-values with 82.9 and 82.5s, respectively. Results showed that the adaptation in juice increased acid resistance in SGF and varied by serovar, juice type, and adaptation temperature. Therefore, this study indicates that the introduction of Salmonella spp. to an acidic juice environment during processing can enhance their ability to survive in a human stomach, possibly increasing the risk of a Salmonella outbreak by juice.

  3. Comparison of intraduodenal and intravenous administration of amino acids on gastric secretion in healthy subjects and patients with duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecień, N; Obtułowicz, W; Mikoś, E; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1978-01-01

    The ability of an amino acid mixture given intraduodenally or intravenously to stimulate gastric secretion is compared in healthy subjects and in duodenal ulcer patients. Graded amounts of amino acids by both routes produced a similar increase in acid output in healthy subjects, reaching about 30% of the maximal response to pentagastrin. Serum gastrin concentrations remained virtually unchanged but serum alpha amino acid nitrogen levels were about twice as high with intravenous as with intraduodenal administration. Intravenously administered amino acids produced a significantly higher acid output in patients with duodenal ulcer than in healthy subjects, but did not produce a significant increase in gastric acid or pepsin secretion when combined with a pentagastrin infusion as compared with pentagastrin alone. Cimetidine (2 mg/kg/h) added to intravenous amino acid infusions caused almost complete suppression of acid secretion. This study indicates that amino acids are capable of stimulating gastric secretion after intraduodenal and after intravenous administration. The response to the latter is significantly higher in patients with duodenal ulcer than in healthy subjects, does not appear to involve gastrin release, is not affected by pentagastrin, and is strongly suppressed by histamine H2-blocker. PMID:361509

  4. [Effect of mild irritants on gastric outputs of bicarbonates and pepsinogen depends on the rate of acid secretion].

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, V A; Andreeva, Iu V; Khropycheva, R P

    2012-06-01

    The aggressive luminal content in the stomach activates gastroprotective processes affecting exocrine and endocrine secretion of gastric glands and permeability of the pre-epithelial mucus layer. The aim of the study was to investigate effects of chemical irritants similar to physiological characteristics of digestion (pH 2.0 and/or 500 mM NaCl) on outputs of bicarbonates and pepsinogen as well as assess the role of endogenous acid production in control ofnon-parietal secretion during irritation of the gastric mucosa. In experiments on conscious rats with chronic gastric fistula as well as on anesthetized animals it was demonstrated that luminal infusion of acidic hyperosmotic solution of NaCl enhances basal secretions of bicarbonates and pepsinogen that was fully blocked by indomethacin. Suppression of gastric acid secretion by omeprazole potentiates the stimulative effect of mild irritants likely due to the reduction of pH gradient on the surface of gastric mucosa which causes the growth of sensitivity of the epithelium to chemical stimuli and the increase of synthesis ofprostaglandins. Additionally, mild irritation enhances secretion of HCO3(-) and pepsinogen induced by stimulation of the vagus nerve; and this response does not depend on the action ofprostaglandins. The enhancing effect of irritation on the vagally induced bicarbonate output was eliminated after the treatment with omeprazole.

  5. Acidified bile acids enhance tumor progression and telomerase activity of gastric cancer in mice dependent on c-Myc expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Sun, Lei; Wang, Xijing; Kang, Huafeng; Ma, Xiaobin; Wang, Meng; Lin, Shuai; Liu, Meng; Dai, Cong; Dai, Zhijun

    2017-03-01

    c-Myc overexpression has been implicated in several malignancies including gastric cancer. Here, we report that acidified bile acids enhance tumor progression and telomerase activity in gastric cancer via c-Myc activation both in vivo and in vitro. c-Myc mRNA and protein levels were assessed in ten primary and five local recurrent gastric cancer samples by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analysis. The gastric cancer cell line MGC803 was exposed to bile salts (100 μmol/L glycochenodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid) in an acid medium (pH 5.5) for 10 min daily for 60 weeks to develop an MGC803-resistant cell line. Control MGC803 cells were grown without acids or bile salts for 60 weeks as a control. Cell morphology, proliferation, colony formation and apoptosis of MGC803-resistant cells were analyzed after 60 weeks. To determine the involvement of c-Myc in tumor progression and telomere aging in MGC803-resistant cells, we generated xenografts in nude mice and measured xenograft volume and in vivo telomerase activity. The c-Myc and hTERT protein and mRNA levels were significantly higher in local recurrent gastric cancer samples than in primary gastric cancer samples. MGC803-resistant cells showed a marked phenotypic change under normal growth conditions with more clusters and acini, and exhibited increased cell viability and colony formation and decreased apoptosis in vitro. These phenotypic changes were found to be dependent on c-Myc activation using the c-Myc inhibitor 10058-F4. MGC803-resistant cells also showed a c-Myc-dependent increase in xenograft growth and telomerase activity in vivo. In conclusion, these observations support the hypothesis that acidified bile acids enhance tumor progression and telomerase activity in gastric cancer and that these effects are dependent on c-Myc activity. These findings suggest that acidified bile acids play an important role in the malignant progression of local recurrent

  6. Body temperature dependency of gastric regional blood flow, acid secretion and ulcer formation in restraint and water-immersion stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Arai, I; Muramatsu, M; Aihara, H

    1986-04-01

    The effect of water temperature during restraint and water-immersion stress (RWIS) on gastric regional blood flow, acid secretion and ulcer formation were compared to those of restraint stress (RS) alone in rats. RS had no effect on the gastric regional blood flow. In contrast, the gastric regional blood flow was significantly decreased by RWIS. A water temperature dependent reduction of gastric regional blood flow induced by RWIS was observed between 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C. The decrease in gastric regional blood flow for RWIS rats was related to a lowering of the body temperature, which almost coincided with the temperature of water for the immersion. The gastric acid output was not influenced by RS. However, RWIS significantly increased the gastric acid output. The temperature of water in order of increasing acid output induced by RWIS was 25 degrees C greater than 30 degrees C greater than 20 degrees C. Little ulcer formation was found in RS rats, while exposure to RWIS caused marked ulceration. The temperature of water in order of severity of ulceration by RWIS was 25 degrees C greater than 20 degrees C greater than 30 degrees C. The severity of ulceration was not related to the decrease in gastric regional blood flow or increase of acid output, but was correlated to the ratio of the gastric blood flow/the acid output. These findings suggest that the decrease of gastric regional blood flow is in good agreement with the fall of body temperature, and the combined effects of the gastric blood flow and the acid secretion are involved in the ulceration caused by RWIS.

  7. Effects of inhibition gastric acid secretion on arterial acid-base status during digestion in the toad Bufo marinus.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Johnnie B; Andrade, Denis V; Wang, Tobias

    2003-07-01

    Digestion affects acid-base status, because the net transfer of HCl from the blood to the stomach lumen leads to an increase in HCO3(-) levels in both extra- and intracellular compartments. The increase in plasma [HCO3(-)], the alkaline tide, is particularly pronounced in amphibians and reptiles, but is not associated with an increased arterial pH, because of a concomitant rise in arterial PCO2 caused by a relative hypoventilation. In this study, we investigate whether the postprandial increase in PaCO2 of the toad Bufo marinus represents a compensatory response to the increased plasma [HCO3(-)] or a state-dependent change in the control of pulmonary ventilation. To this end, we successfully prevented the alkaline tide, by inhibiting gastric acid secretion with omeprazole, and compared the response to that of untreated toads determined in our laboratory during the same period. In addition, we used vascular infusions of bicarbonate to mimic the alkaline tide in fasting animals. Omeprazole did not affect blood gases, acid-base and haematological parameters in fasting toads, but abolished the postprandial increase in plasma [HCO3(-)] and the rise in arterial PCO2 that normally peaks 48 h into the digestive period. Vascular infusion of HCO3(-), that mimicked the postprandial rise in plasma [HCO3(-)], led to a progressive respiratory compensation of arterial pH through increased arterial PCO2. Thus, irrespective of whether the metabolic alkalosis is caused by gastric acid secretion in response to a meal or experimental infusion of bicarbonate, arterial pH is being maintained by an increased arterial PCO2. It seems, therefore, that the elevated PCO2, occuring during the postprandial period, constitutes of a regulated response to maintain pH rather than a state-dependent change in ventilatory control.

  8. Colonization of an acid resistant Kingella denitrificans in the stomach may contribute to gastric dysbiosis by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Hidekazu; Yanai, Hideo; Nishikawa, Jun; Nakazawa, Teruko; Iizasa, Hisashi; Jinushi, Masahisa; Sakaida, Isao; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2014-03-01

    In the stomach of a gastric ulcer patient who had been administered an anti-acid, a gram-negative and urease-negative bacillus similar in size to Helicobacter pylori was infected together with H. pylori. According to biochemical test and 16S rRNA gene analysis, the urease-negative bacterium was identified as Kingella denitrificans, a human nasopharyngeal commensal. In contrast to the standard strain of K. denitrificans, the isolate showed catalase activity, did not produce acid from glucose, and exhibited acid tolerance. Acid tolerance of H. pylori was increased by cocultivation with the K. denitrificans isolate, but not with other isolates of K. denitrificans. Disruption of physiological and immunological niche by dysbiotic colonization of bacterium may provide pathological attributes to human stomach. Collectively, a careful administration of anti-acids to the elderly, especially those with atrophic gastritis, is necessary to avoid repression of the gastric barrier to bacteria.

  9. Quantitative ultrastructural analysis of the human parietal cell during acid inhibition and increase of gastric potential difference by glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Ivey, K J; Tarnawski, A; Sherman, D; Krause, W J; Ackman, K; Burks, M; Hewett, J

    1980-01-01

    Glucagon inhibits gastric acid secretion and increases the negativity of gastric mucosal potential difference (PD) in man. To test the hypothesis that the increased negativity of PD after glucagon in man could be due to decreased parietal cell canalicular membrane area, a quantitative ultrastructural analysis was carried out. Four healthy volunteers with normal gastric mucosa were submitted to biopsy before and 20 minutes after intravenous injection of 2 mg glucagon (G). This time corresponded with the maximal change in PD and a decrease in gastric acid secretion. Canalicular and tubulovesicular membrane area of 80 parietal cells (40 cells before glucagon and 40 cells after glucagon) were quantified by the Loud morphometric method. After glucagon, the oxyntic cell canalicular membrane area was reduced by one-fourth (P less than 0.05), while tubulovesicular membrane area showed an increase (P less than 0.05) at the same time. The decrease in the area of parietal cell canalicular membrane caused by glucagon may in part be responsible for increased negativity of the gastric PD caused by this hormone. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7364316

  10. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw < 3 kDa) and high molecular CCP (HMCCP, Mw > 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer.

  11. Mycophenolic Acid Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Gastric Cancer Cells via Multiple Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Boying; Sharma, Ashok; Teng, Yong; Liu, Haitao; Purohit, Sharad; Xu, Heng; Zeng, Lingwen; She, Jin-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is the metabolized product and active element of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) that has been widely used for the prevention of acute graft rejection. MPA potently inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) that is up-regulated in many tumors and MPA is known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation as well as fibroblast and endothelial cell migration. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time MPA’s antimigratory and anti-invasion abilities of MPA-sensitive AGS (gastric cancer) cells. Genome-wide expression analyses using Illumina whole genome microarrays identified 50 genes with ≥2 fold changes and 15 genes with > 4 fold alterations and multiple molecular pathways implicated in cell migration. Real-time RT-PCR analyses of selected genes also confirmed the expression differences. Furthermore, targeted proteomic analyses identified several proteins altered by MPA treatment. Our results indicate that MPA modulates gastric cancer cell migration through down-regulation of a large number of genes (PRKCA, DOCK1, INF2, HSPA5, LRP8 and PDGFRA) and proteins (PRKCA, AKT, SRC, CD147 and MMP1) with promigratory functions as well as up-regulation of a number of genes with antimigratory functions (ATF3, SMAD3, CITED2 and CEAMCAM1). However, a few genes that may promote migration (CYR61 and NOS3) were up-regulated. Therefore, MPA’s overall antimigratory role on cancer cells reflects a balance between promigratory and antimigratory signals influenced by MPA treatment. PMID:24260584

  12. Enhancement of Radiation Effects by Ursolic Acid in BGC-823 Human Adenocarcinoma Gastric Cancer Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jiang, Man; Hu, Jing; Lv, Xin; Yu, Lixia; Qian, Xiaoping; Liu, Baorui

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that certain plant-derived polyphenols, i.e., ursolic acid (UA), which are reported to have antitumor activities, might be used to sensitize tumor cells to radiation therapy by inhibiting pathways leading to radiation therapy resistance. This experiment was designed to investigate the effects and possible mechanism of radiosensitization by UA in BGC-823 cell line from human adenocarcinoma gastric cancer in vitro. UA caused cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, and we used a sub-cytotoxicity concentration of UA to test radioenhancement efficacy with UA in gastric cancer. Radiosensitivity was determined by clonogenic survival assay. Surviving fraction of the combined group with irradiation and sub-cytotoxicity UA significantly decreased compared with the irradiation group. The improved radiosensitization efficacy was associated with enhanced G2/M arrest, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), down-regulated Ki-67 level and improved apoptosis. In conclusion, as UA demonstrated potent antiproliferation effect and synergistic effect, it could be used as a potential drug sensitizer for the application of radiotherapy.

  13. Okadaic Acid Toxin at Sublethal Dose Produced Cell Proliferation in Gastric and Colon Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Miguel; Toledo, Héctor; Lagos, Néstor

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of Okadaic Acid (OA) on the proliferation of gastric and colon epithelial cells, the main target tissues of the toxin. We hypothesized that OA, at sublethal doses, activates multiple signaling pathways, such as Erk and Akt, through the inhibition of PP2A. To demonstrate this, we carried out curves of doses and time response against OA in AGS, MKN-45 and Caco 2 cell lines, and found an increase in the cell proliferation at sublethal doses, at 24 h or 48 h exposure. Indeed, cells can withstand high concentrations of the toxin at 4 h exposure, the time chosen considering the maximum time before total gastric emptying. We have proved that this increased proliferation is due to an overexpression of Cyclin B, a cyclin that promotes the passage from G2 to mitosis. In addition, we have demonstrated that OA induces activation of Akt and Erk in the three cells lines, showing that OA can activate pathways involved in oncogenesis. In conclusion, this study contributes to the knowledge about the possible effects of chronic OA consumption. PMID:24317467

  14. Radiographic and endoscopic regression of metastatic gastric cancer to the colon in the setting of 5-aminosalicylic acid use

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Shannon J.; Zhang, Xuefeng; Jaffe, Tracy; Shimpi, Rahul A.

    2016-01-01

    Colonic metastases from gastric cancer are a rare phenomenon and sparsely reported in the literature. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who presented with vague abdominal symptoms and initial computer tomography (CT) imaging suggestive of a colonic apple-core lesion with serial colonoscopic biopsies diagnostic of metastatic signet ring cell gastric adenocarcinoma. This case is unique given the evolving CT and endoscopic findings that suggested a regression in colonic wall thickening in the setting of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) use prior to histologic diagnosis. PMID:28078130

  15. PMK-S005 Alleviates Age-Related Gastric Acid Secretion, Inflammation, and Oxidative Status in the Rat Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Ju Yup; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Suh, Ji Hyung; Lee, Sun Min; Ham, Min Hee; Jo, Hyun Jin; Shim, Young Kwang; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Jong-Chan; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the synthetic S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC) PMK-S005 on gastric acid secretion, inflammation, and antioxidant enzymes in aging rats. Methods The rats were divided into four groups at 31 weeks of age and were continuously fed a diet containing a vehicle control, PMK-S005 (5 or 10 mg/kg), or lansoprazole (5 mg/kg). Gastric acid secretion and connective tissue thickness of the lamina propria were evaluated at 74 weeks and 2 years of age. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and COX-2 levels were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) or Western blot assays. Levels of antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxyganase 1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), were also measured. Results As the rats aged, gastric acid secretion significantly decreased, and the connective tissue of the lamina propria increased. However, 74-week-old rats in the PMK-S005 group exhibited greater levels of gastric acid secretion than those of the control and lansoprazole groups. The increase of TNF-α, IL-1β, and COX-2 expression in 74-week and 2-year-old control rats were inhibited by PMK-S005. In addition, the decrease in HO-1 and NQO-1 protein expression that occurred with aging was inhibited by PMK-S005 in the 74-week-old rats. Conclusions These results suggest that PMK-S005 has therapeutic potential as an antiaging agent to ameliorate age-related gastric acid secretion, inflammation, and oxidative stress in the stomach. PMID:27172930

  16. Gastric acid induces mucosal H2S release in rats by upregulating mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine gamma lyase.

    PubMed

    Mard, Seyyed Ali; Veisi, Ali; Ahangarpour, Akram; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects the gastric mucosa against gastric acid and other noxious stimulants by several mechanisms but until now the effect of gastric acid on H2S production has not been evaluated. This study was performed to determine the effect of basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion on mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta synthase (CBS), and on mucosal release of H2S in rats. Seventy-two male rats were randomly assigned into 9 groups (8 in each)-control, distention, and pentagastrin-induced gastric acid secretion groups. The effects of 15% alcohol solution, propargylglycine (PAG), L-NAME, and pantoprazole were also investigated. Under anesthesia, animals underwent tracheostomy and midline laparotomy. A catheter was inserted into the stomach through the duodenum for gastric washout. At the end of the experiments, the animals were killed and the gastric mucosa was collected to measure H2S concentration and to quantify mRNA expression of CSE and CBS by quantitative real-time PCR, and expression of their proteins by western blot. Basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion increased mucosal levels of H2S, and mRNA and protein expression of CSE. Pantoprazole and L-NAME reversed H2S release and restored protein expression of CSE to the control level. Pantoprazole, but not propargylglycine, pretreatment inhibited the elevated level of protein expression of eNOS in response to distention-induced gastric acid secretion. Our findings indicated that NO mediated the stimulatory effect of gastric acid on H2S release and protein expression of CSE.

  17. Gastric acid secretion and gastrin production in the short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, N S; Evans, P; King, R F

    1985-01-01

    Excess gastric acid secretion and gastrin production may occur in patients with the short bowel syndrome but the two measurements have never been made simultaneously in man in response to a food stimulus. Using the technique of intragastric titration, this was carried out in eight patients after extensive small bowel resection resulting mainly from vascular occlusion and in eight matched normal control subjects. Basal acid output and peak acid output in response to pentagastrin was also measured separately. Although peak and integrated serum gastrin concentrations were significantly greater in patients (450 +/- SE 109 pg/ml; 113 +/- 2.9X10(-3) pg/ml/min) compared with control subjects (174 +/- 98 pg/ml; 6.1 +/- 2.0X10(-3) pg/ml/min p less than 0.05), no concomitant increase in acid secretion was shown either during intragastric titration or in response to pentagastrin. These findings indicate that there is no rationale for treating these patients with long term anti-ulcer therapy. PMID:4029719

  18. Fatal spontaneous Clostridium septicum gas gangrene: a possible association with iatrogenic gastric acid suppression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiru E; Baras, Alexander; Cornish, Toby; Riedel, Stefan; Burton, Elizabeth C

    2014-06-01

    The long-term use of proton pump inhibitors has been linked to an increased risk for the development of gastric polyps, hip fractures, pneumonia, and Clostridium difficile colitis. There is evidence that chronic acid suppression from long-term use of proton pump inhibitors poses some risk for the development of C difficile-associated diarrhea by decreasing the elimination of pathogenic microbes before reaching the lower gastrointestinal tract. Here we present a case of a 51-year-old woman with a recent history of abdominal pain and fever who presented to the emergency department with rapidly progressive spontaneous necrotizing fasciitis and gas gangrene and died within hours of presentation. Postmortem examination confirmed spreading tissue gas gangrene and myonecrosis. In addition, multiple intestinal ulcers containing Clostridium septicum were present at autopsy. This case illustrates a possible association between proton pump inhibitor therapy and fatal C septicum infection.

  19. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of omeprazole suspension following oral administration in rats: effect of neutralization of gastric acid.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Matsuka, N; Furuno, K; Eto, K; Kawasaki, H; Gomita, Y

    1996-08-01

    In order to evaluate a clinical use of omeprazole suspension, we examined the pharmacokinetics of omeprazole after oral administration in rats. Although the administration of omeprazole suspension buffered by NaHCO3 solution did not produce a significant increase in the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) value compared with non-buffered group, the administration of NaHCO3 buffer immediately after dosing of omeprazole suspension buffered by NaHCO3 caused a significant increase in the AUC value. These results suggest that the NaHCO3 treatment following the administration of omeprazole buffered suspension effectively decreased the degradation of the compound by gastric acid. Therefore, the successive administration of NaHCO3 solution after the omeprazole dosing seems to be a simple and useful method for the administration to patients who cannot receive tablets.

  20. Inhibition of gastric mucosal prostaglandin synthetase activity by mercaptomethylimidazole, an inducer of gastric acid secretion--plausible involvement of endogenous H2O2.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, M; Chakraborty, T; Ganguly, C; Banerjee, R K

    1998-10-01

    We have reported earlier that mercaptomethylimidazole (MMI), an antithyroid drug of thionamide group, induces gastric acid secretion at least partially through the liberation of histamine, sensitive to cimetidine. Now, we show that the drug has a significant inhibitory effect on the cyclooxygenase and peroxidase activity of the prostaglandin (PG) synthetase of the gastric mucosal microsomal preparation. The effect can also be mimicked by low concentrations of H2O2. While studying the possible intracellular effect of MMI on acid secretion, a cell fraction (F3) enriched in parietal cell was isolated by controlled digestion of the mucosa with protease. This cell fraction is activated by MMI as measured by increased O2 consumption. The activation is sensitive to omeprazole, a proton-pump inhibitor, indicating that the activation is due to increased acid secretion by MMI. MMI was also found to directly inhibit the peroxidase activity of the F3 cell fraction and may thus increase the intracellular level of H2O2. The cyclooxygenase activity of the PG synthetase of the F3 cell fraction is also inhibited by MMI and the effect can be reproduced by low concentrations of H2O2. Both MMI and H2O2 can also inhibit the peroxidase activity of the PG synthetase. We suggest that in addition to the activation of the parietal cell by MMI possibly through endogenous H2O2, MMI induces acid secretion in vivo by inactivating the PG synthetase thereby inhibiting the biosynthesis of PG and removing its inhibitory influence on acid secretion so that the histamine released by MMI can stimulate acid secretion with maximum efficiency.

  1. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy.

  2. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  3. Protective effect of anacardic acids from cashew (Anacardium occidentale) on ethanol-induced gastric damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Morais, Talita C; Pinto, Natália B; Carvalho, Karine Maria M B; Rios, Jeison B; Ricardo, Nagila Maria P S; Trevisan, Maria Teresa S; Rao, Vietla S; Santos, Flávia A

    2010-01-05

    Cashew nut-shell liquid and the contained anacardic acids (AAs) have been shown to possess antioxidant, lipoxygenase inhibitory, anti-Helicobacter pylori and antitumor properties. Despite these known effects, hitherto there were no published reports on their likely gastroprotective effects. The present study was designed to verify whether AAs afford gastroprotection against the ethanol-induced gastric damage and to examine the underlying mechanism(s). Gastric damage was induced by intragastric administration of 0.2mL of ethanol (96%). Mice in groups were pretreated orally with AAs (10, 30 and 100mg/kg), misoprostol (50 microg/kg), or vehicle (2% Tween 80 in saline, 10mL/kg), 45min before ethanol administration. They were sacrificed 30min later, the stomachs excised, and the mucosal lesion area (mm(2)) measured by planimetry. Gastroprotection was assessed in relation to inhibition of gastric lesion area. To study the gastroprotective mechanism(s), its relations to capsaicin-sensitive fibers, endogenous prostaglandins, nitric oxide and ATP-sensitive potassium channels were analysed. Treatments effects on ethanol-associated oxidative stress markers GSH, MDA, catalase, SOD, and total nitrate/nitrite levels as an index of NO were measured in gastric tissue. Besides, the effects of AAs on gastric secretory volume and total acidity were analysed in 4-h pylorus-ligated rat. AAs afforded a dose-related gastroprotection against the ethanol damage and further prevented the ethanol-induced changes in the levels of GSH, MDA, catalase, SOD and nitrate/nitrite. However, they failed to modify the gastric secretion or the total acidity. It was observed that the gastroprotection by AAs was greatly reduced in animals pretreated with capsazepine, indomethacin, l-NAME or glibenclamide. These results suggest that AAs afford gastroprotection principally through an antioxidant mechanism. Other complementary mechanisms include the activation of capsaicin-sensitive gastric afferents

  4. Body temperature dependency in baclofen-induced gastric acid secretion in rats relation to capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Kato, S; Araki, H; Kawauchi, S; Takeuchi, K

    2001-03-16

    Body temperature dependency in gastric functional responses to baclofen, a GABA(B) agonist, such as acid secretion, mucosal blood flow (GMBF) and motor activity, was examined in urethane-anesthetized rats under normal (37+/-1 degrees C) and hypothermic (31+/-1 degrees C) conditions. A rat stomach was mounted in an ex-vivo chamber, perfused with saline, and the acid secretion was measured using a pH-stat method, simultaneously with GMBF by a laser Doppler flowmeter. Gastric motility was measured using a miniature balloon as intraluminal pressure recordings. Intravenous administration of baclofen significantly increased acid secretion at the doses > 0.3 mg/kg under hypothermic conditions, yet it caused a significant stimulation only at doses > 10 mg/kg under normothermic conditions. The increases in gastric motility and GMBF were similarly induced by baclofen, irrespective of whether the animals were subjected to normothermic or hypothermic conditions. These functional responses to baclofen under hypothermic conditions were totally attenuated by either bilateral vagotomy or atropine (3 mg/kg, s.c.). Baclofen at a lower dose (1 mg/kg i.v.) significantly increased the acid secretion even under normothermic conditions when the animals were subjected to chemical deafferenation of capsaicin-sensitive neurons or pretreatment with intracisternal injection of CGRP8-37 (30 ng/rat). These results suggest that 1) gastric effects of baclofen are dependent on body temperature in stimulating acid secretion but not GMBF or motor activity, 2) the acid stimulatory action of baclofen is enhanced under hypothermic conditions, and 3) the suppression of baclofen-induced acid response under normothermic conditions may be related to capsaicin-sensitive afferent neuronal activity, probably mediated by central release

  5. Yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL 2716 (LG21 yogurt) accelerated the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masayuki; Shimizu, Kimiko; Kurakazu, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    We have reported that LG21 yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL 2716 (LG21 yogurt) inhibits the formation of HCl-induced acute gastric lesions through the generation of prostaglandin E₂. This study aimed to determine the role of viable Lactobacillus in the healing of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer. LG21 yogurt or γ-ray radiated LG21 yogurt was administered orally twice a day for 10 d at a dose of 5 ml/kg. LG21 yogurt significantly accelerated the healing of the ulcer, but γ-ray radiated LG21 yogurt did not. However, both yogurts significantly inhibited HCl-induced gastric erosive lesions and enhanced the generation of gastric mucosal prostaglandin E₂. From the above results, it was found that viable bacteria are needed to accelerate the healing of chronic gastric ulcer, but not to inhibit gastric lesions.

  6. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitors. Part 91. Metal Complexes of Heterocyclic Sulfonamides as Potential Pharmacological Agents in the Treatment of Gastric Acid Secretion Imbalances

    PubMed Central

    Ilies, Marc A.; Scozzafava, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    Zinc, magnesium, aluminum and copper complexes of several potent, clinically used carbonic anhydrase (CA) sulfonamide inhibitors, such as acetazolamide, methazolamide, ethoxzolamide and benzolamide were tested for their possible applications as antacids, in experimental animals. Gastric acid secretion parameters 3 days after treatment with these CA inhibitors (2 × 500 mg, twice a day), in dogs with chronic gastric fistulas, led to the observation that the gastric acid parameters BAO (the basal acid output), and MAO (the maximal acid output after stimulation with histamine) were drastically reduced, as compared to the same parameters in animals that did not receive these enzyme inhibitors. These are promising results for the possible use of metal complexes of heterocyclic sulfonamides as treatment alternatives (alone or in combination with other drugs) for gastric acid secretion imbalances. PMID:18475926

  7. Effect of acid secretion blockade on acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxin in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Melo, Júnio Rios; de Araújo, Gnana Keith Marques; da Luz, Magda Maria Profeta; da Conceição, Sérgio Alexandre; Lisboa, Felipe Assis; Moraes-Santos, Tasso; Cunha-Melo, José Renan

    2006-10-01

    Scorpion venom (TX) promotes gastric acid and pepsin secretion leading to acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML), when injected in animals. The goal of the present study was to observe the effects of acid gastric secretion blockers over the incidence of TX-induced AGML in vivo. To verify this model, we used male albino rats, fasted 18-20 h (n=122) and anaesthetized with urethane (1.4 g/kg, i.p.). Their trachea and left femoral vein were both cannulated; the first to avoid airway obstructions during scorpion intoxication and the second for administration of saline, TX and acid blockers. Following the surgical procedure, the animals were divided in 10 groups of at least 10 animals each. Control groups were injected with NaCl 0.9% 1 ml/kg (n=10) or TX 375 microg/kg (n=32). Test groups (n=10, each) received atropine 5 mg/kg, cimetidine 10mg/kg, ranitidine 2.5mg/kg, ranitidine 5mg/kg, omeprazol 1 mg/kg, omeprazol 4 mg/kg, octreotide 80 and octreotide 100 microg/kg 10 min before the TX was injected. After 1h of intoxication, the stomach was resected for macroscopic study and the gastric secretion was collected for volume, pH and acid output assessment. We observed that all blockers were able to completely or partially prevent the TX-induced acid secretion as well as the AGML (p<0.05). Our data suggest the TX-induced AGML can be prevented by different class of acid blockers injected before the intoxication.

  8. ClC-7 expression levels critically regulate bone turnover, but not gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Supanchart, C; Wartosch, L; Schlack, C; Kühnisch, J; Felsenberg, D; Fuhrmann, J C; de Vernejoul, M-C; Jentsch, T J; Kornak, U

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the 2Cl(-)/1H(+)-exchanger ClC-7 impair osteoclast function and cause different types of osteoclast-rich osteopetrosis. However, it is unknown to what extent ClC-7 function has to be reduced to become rate-limiting for bone resorption. In osteoclasts from osteopetrosis patients expression of the mutated ClC-7 protein did not correlate with disease severity and resorption impairment. Therefore, a series of transgenic mice expressing ClC-7 in osteoclasts at different levels was generated. Crossing of these mice with Clcn7(-/-) mutants rescued the osteopetrotic phenotype to variable degrees. One resulting double transgenic line mimicked human autosomal dominant osteopetrosis. The trabecular bone of these mice showed a reduction of osteoblast numbers, osteoid, and osteoblast marker gene expression indicative of reduced osteoblast function. In osteoclasts from these mutants ClC-7 expression levels were 20 to 30% of wildtype levels. These reduced levels not only impaired resorptive activity, but also increased numbers, size and nucleus numbers of osteoclasts differentiated in vitro. Although ClC-7 was expressed in the stomach and PTH levels were high in Clcn7(-/-) mutants loss of ClC-7 did not entail a relevant elevation of gastric pH. In conclusion, we show that in our model a reduction of ClC-7 function by approximately 70% is sufficient to increase bone mass, but does not necessarily enhance bone formation. ClC-7 does not appear to be crucially involved in gastric acid secretion, which explains the absence of an osteopetrorickets phenotype in CLCN7-related osteopetrosis.

  9. Relative Amino Acid Composition Signatures of Organisms and Environments

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Alexandra; Savageau, Michael A.; Alves, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying organism-environment interactions at the molecular level is crucial to understanding how organisms adapt to and change the chemical and molecular landscape of their habitats. In this work we investigated whether relative amino acid compositions could be used as a molecular signature of an environment and whether such a signature could also be observed at the level of the cellular amino acid composition of the microorganisms that inhabit that environment. Methodologies/Principal Findings To address these questions we collected and analyzed environmental amino acid determinations from the literature, and estimated from complete genomic sequences the global relative amino acid abundances of organisms that are cognate to the different types of environment. Environmental relative amino acid abundances clustered into broad groups (ocean waters, host-associated environments, grass land environments, sandy soils and sediments, and forest soils), indicating the presence of amino acid signatures specific for each environment. These signatures correlate to those found in organisms. Nevertheless, relative amino acid abundance of organisms was more influenced by GC content than habitat or phylogeny. Conclusions Our results suggest that relative amino acid composition can be used as a signature of an environment. In addition, we observed that the relative amino acid composition of organisms is not highly determined by environment, reinforcing previous studies that find GC content to be the major factor correlating to amino acid composition in living organisms. PMID:24204807

  10. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake to Regulate Helicobacter pylori-Associated Gastric Diseases as Nonantimicrobial Dietary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Min; Jeong, Migyeong; Kim, Eun-Hee; Han, Young-Min; Kwon, Sung Hun; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), commonly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have been acknowledged as essential long-chain fatty acids imposing either optimal health promotion or the rescuing from chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and various inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Recent studies dealing with EPA and DHA have sparked highest interests because detailed molecular mechanisms had been documented with the identification of its receptor, G protein coupled receptor, and GPR120. In this review article, we have described clear evidences showing that n-3 PUFAs could reduce various Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori-) associated gastric diseases and extended to play even cancer preventive outcomes including H. pylori-associated gastric cancer by influencing multiple targets, including proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, inflammation, and metastasis. Since our previous studies strongly concluded that nonantimicrobial dietary approach for reducing inflammation, for instance, application of phytoceuticals, probiotics, natural products including Korean red ginseng, and walnut plentiful of n-3 PUFAs, might be prerequisite step for preventing H. pylori-associated gastric cancer as well as facilitating the rejuvenation of precancerous atrophic gastritis, these beneficial lipids can restore or modify inflammation-associated lipid distortion and correction of altered lipid rafts to send right signaling to maintain healthy stomach even after chronic H. pylori infection. PMID:26339635

  11. Do sensory neurons mediate adaptive cytoprotection of gastric mucosa against bile acid injury?

    PubMed

    Mercer, D W; Ritchie, W P; Dempsey, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate protects the gastric mucosa from the injury induced by the subsequent application of 5 mmol acidified taurocholate, a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive cytoprotection." How this occurs remains an enigma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of sensory neurons and mucus secretion in this phenomenon. Prior to injury with 5 mmol acidified taurocholate (pH 1.2), the stomachs of six groups of rats were subjected to the following protocol. Two groups were topically pretreated with either saline or the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Two other groups received the topical anesthetic 1% lidocaine prior to pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. The last two groups got the mucolytic agent 10% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Injury was assessed by measuring net transmucosal ion fluxes, luminal appearance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and gross and histologic injury. Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate significantly decreased bile acid-induced luminal ion fluxes and DNA accumulation, suggesting mucosal protection (corroborated by gross and histologic injury analysis). This effect was negated by lidocaine but not by NAC. Thus, it appears that sensory neurons, and not increased mucus secretion, play a critical role in adaptive cytoprotection.

  12. Suppressed Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric tumorigenesis in Fat-1 transgenic mice producing endogenous ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Migyeung; Park, Jong-Min; Go, Eun-Jin; Kang, Jing X; Hong, Sung Pyo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-01-01

    Dietary approaches to preventing Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric carcinogenesis are widely accepted because surrounding break-up mechanisms are mandatory for cancer prevention, however, eradication alone has been proven to be insufficient. Among these dietary interventions, omega-3-polyunsaturated-fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) are often the first candidate selected. However, there was no trial of fatty acids in preventing H. pylori-associated carcinogenesis and inconclusive results have been reported, likely based on inconsistent dietary administration. In this study, we developed an H. pylori initiated-, high salt diet promoted-gastric tumorigenesis model and conducted a comparison between wild-type (WT) and Fat-1-transgenic (TG)-mice. Gross and pathological lesions in mouse stomachs were evaluated at 16, 24, 32, and 45 weeks after H. pylori infection, and the underlying molecular changes to explain the cancer preventive effects were investigated. Significant changes in: i) ameliorated gastric inflammations at 16 weeks of H. pylori infection, ii) decreased angiogenic growth factors at 24 weeks, iii) attenuated atrophic gastritis and tumorigenesis at 32 weeks, and iv) decreased gastric cancer at 45 weeks were all noted in Fat-1-TG-mice compared to WT-mice. While an increase in the expression of Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and reduced expression of the tumor suppressive 15-PGDH were observed in WT-mice throughout the experimental periods, the expression of Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) was preserved in Fat-1-TG-mice. Using a comparative protein array, attenuated expressions of proteins implicated in proliferation and inflammation were observed in Fat-1-TG-mice compared to WT-mice. Conclusively, long-term administration of ω-3 PUFAs can suppress H. pylori-induced gastric tumorigenesis through a dampening of inflammation and reduced proliferation in accordance with afforded rejuvenation. PMID:27528223

  13. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety.

  14. Accelerated Ulcer Healing and Resistance to Ulcer Recurrence with Gastroprotectants in Rat Model of Acetic Acid-induced Gastric Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Young Oh, Tae; Ok Ahn, Byung; Jung Jang, Eun; Sang Park, Joo; Jong Park, Sang; Wook Baik, Hyun; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2008-01-01

    Quality of ulcer healing (QOUH) is defined as ideal ulcer healing featuring with the fine granular ulcer scar, high functional restoration and the resistance to recurrence. This study was designed to compare the rates of QOUH achievement in rat gastric ulcer model between acid suppressant treated group and gastroprotectant treated group accompanied with elucidations of molecular mechanisms. Serosal injection of acetic acids for generating gastric ulcer and intraperitoneal (ip) injection of recombinant interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β) for recurring healed ulcer was done in SD rats. The 72 rats were divided into three groups according to treatment as follows; Group I, no further treatment, Group II, 8 weeks treatment of omeprazole, and Group III, 8 weeks of gastroprotectant treatment. IL-1β was administered for ulcer recurrence after 28 weeks of acetic acid injection. At four weeks after gastric ulcerogenesis, 58.3% (7/12) of active gastric ulcer were converted to healing stage in Group III, but 16.7% (2/12) in Group II and none in Group I, for which significant levels of epidermal growth factor, mucin, and pS2/trefoil peptide1 were contributive to these accelerated healings of Group III. ip injections of rIL-1β (200 µg/kg) at 28 weeks after acetic acid injection led to 100% of ulcer recurrence in Group I and 75.0% in Group II, but only 16.7% of Group III rats showed ulcer recurrence. Significantly attenuated levels of inflammatory cytokines including IL-2, transforming growth factor-alpha (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitrotyrosine were responsible for the resistance to ulcer recurrence in Group III. Conclusively, gastroprotectant might be prerequisite in order to achieve ideal QOUH through significant inductions of remodeling. PMID:18545642

  15. Effect of sodium hydrosulfide on mRNA expression of prostaglandin E2 receptors in response to mucosal acidification and distention-induced gastric acid secretion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mard, Seyyed Ali; Mahini, Simin; Dianat, Mahin; Farbood, Yaghoob

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Prostaglandins have been shown to mediate the gastro-protective effect of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) but effect of NaHS on mRNA expression of prostaglandin E2 receptors (EP1, 3-4; EPs) has not been investigated. Therefore, this study designed to evaluate the effect of NaHS on mRNA expression of EPs receptors in response to mucosal acidification and distention-induced gastric acid secretion in rats. Materials and Methods: Fasted rats were randomly assigned into 4 groups (n=6/group). They were control, and NaHS-treated groups. To evaluate the effect of NaHS on mucosal mRNA expression of EPs receptors, the gastric mucosa exposed to stimulated gastric acid output and mucosal acidification. The pylorus sphincter catheterized for instillation of isotonic neutral saline or acidic solution. Ninety min after beginning the experiments, animals sacrificed and the gastric mucosa collected to determine the pH, mucus secretion and to quantify the mRNA expression of EPs receptors by quantitative real-time PCR. Results: present results showed that a) NaHS increased the mucus secretion, mRNA expression of EP3 and EP4 receptors in response to distention-induced expression; b) The mRNA expression of EP1 receptors increased while EP4 mRNA receptors decreased in response to mucosal acidification in NaHS-pretreated rats; and c) NaHS increased pH of gastric contents both in response to distention-induced gastric acid secretion and mucosal acidification. Conclusion: NaHS behaves in a different manner. It effectively only increased the pH of gastric contents to reinforce the gastric mucosa against a highly acidic solution but modulated both acid and mucus secretion when the rate of acid increase in the stomach was slower. PMID:28293390

  16. Influence of acetic, citric, and lactic acids on Escherichia coli O157:H7 membrane lipid composition, verotoxin secretion, and acid resistance in simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Hyun-Gyun; Marshall, Douglas L

    2005-04-01

    The effect of organic acid (acetic, citric, and lactic acids) adaptation at equivalent initial pH values (6.4 and 5.4) on changes in membrane lipid composition, verotoxin concentration, and acid resistance in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.5, 37 degrees C) was determined for Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 (HEC) and an rpoS mutant of E. coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 (RM, FRIK 816-3). For HEC, lactic acid-adapted (pH 5.4) cells had the greatest D-value (32.2 min) and acetic acid-adapted (pH 5.4) cells had the smallest D-value (16.6 min) in simulated gastric fluid. For RM, D-values of citric and acetic acid-adapted cells were similar to those for nonadapted cells grown at pH 7.3, but D-values increased from 13.1 to 27.9 min in lactic acid-adapted cells (from pH 7.3 to pH 5.4). For both strains, the ratio of cis-vaccenic to palmitic acids decreased for citric and lactic acid-adapted cells, but the ratio increased for acetic acid-adapted cells at pH 5.4. Organic acid-adapted cells produced less total verotoxin than did nonadapted cells at approximately 10(8) CFU/ml. Extracellular verotoxin concentration proportionally decreased with decreasing pH for both HEC and RM. Changes in membrane lipid composition, verotoxin concentration, and acid resistance in HEC and RM were dependent on both pH and organic acid. Deletion of the rpoS gene did not affect these changes but did decrease acid resistance in citric acid-adapted cells. Results indicate that decreased membrane fluidity may have caused increased acid resistance and decreased verotoxin secretion.

  17. Effects of straight alkyl chain, extra hydroxylated alkyl chain and branched chain amino acids on gastric emptying evaluated using a non-invasive breath test in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Orie; Iwasawa, Kaori; Shimizu, Kimiko

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Some amino acids been known to influence gastric emptying. Thus we have evaluated the effects of straight alkyl chain, extra hydroxylated alkyl chain and branched chain amino acids on gastric emptying. Materials and Methods: Gastric emptying was evaluated in rats after feeding with Racol (nutrient formulae) containing [1-13C] acetic acid. Using a breath test, the content of 13CO2 in their expired air was measured by infrared analyzers. Rats were orally administered with test amino acids, while control rats were administered orally with distilled water. Results: The expired 13CO2 content in the expired air increased with time, peaked after about 30 min and decreased thereafter. Among the amino acids having an alkyl chain, l-serine, l-alanine and l-glycine, significantly decreased the 13CO2 content and Cmax, and delayed Tmax, suggesting inhibition and delay of gastric emptying. AUC120 min values of l-alanine and l-glycine also decreased significantly. l-Threonine significantly decreased 13CO2 content and delayed Tmax, but had no influence on Cmax and AUC120 min values, suggesting a delay of gastric emptying. l-Isoleucine and l-leucine and l-valine significantly decreased 13CO2 content, suggesting inhibition of the gastric emptying, but Cmax, Tmax and AUC120 min values were not significantly affected. Conclusion: The results show that the amino acids used in the present study had different effects on gastric emptying. Moreover, it was found that inhibition and delay of gastric emptying were clearly classifiable by analyzing the change in 13CO2 content of the expired air and the Cmax, Tmax and AUC120 min values. PMID:27169776

  18. Acetic Acid Enhanced Narrow Band Imaging for the Diagnosis of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bingliang; Zhu, Minghui; Li, Xueliang; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) is a precancerous lesion of the stomach. The detection of GIM using conventional white-light endoscopy (WLE) is difficult. In this study, we determined whether acetic acid-enhanced narrow band imaging (AA-NBI) improves the detection of GIM. A consecutive cohort of 132 individuals aged 40 years or older was subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy using WLE, NBI and AA-NBI. The ability of the three methods to diagnose GIM in patients was compared. Histological assessment (per-patient and per-biopsy) was used for the accuracy assessment. Sixty-six (50.0%) out of the 132 individuals examined were found to have GIM, of which 44 (66.7%) were diagnosed correctly by NBI (sensitivity 66.7% and specificity 68.2%) and 58 (87.9%) were correctly identified by AA–NBI (sensitivity 87.9% and specificity 68.2%), as compared to only 22 (33.3%) by WLE (sensitivity 33.3% and specificity 28.8%). Therefore, the sensitivity of AA–NBI in the diagnosis of GIM was significantly higher than NBI (p<0.05) and WLE (p < 0.001). Our study indicates that AA-NBI can improve the accuracy of endoscopy-targeted biopsies for GIM. PMID:28135297

  19. Liquid biopsy of gastric cancer patients: circulating tumor cells and cell-free nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Tsujiura, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Konishi, Hirotaka; Komatsu, Shuhei; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2014-03-28

    To improve the clinical outcomes of cancer patients, early detection and accurate monitoring of diseases are necessary. Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to oncogenesis and cancer progression, and analyses of these changes have been increasingly utilized for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic purposes in malignant diseases including gastric cancer (GC). Surgical and/or biopsy specimens are generally used to understand the tumor-associated alterations; however, those approaches cannot always be performed because of their invasive characteristics and may fail to reflect current tumor dynamics and drug sensitivities, which may change during the therapeutic process. Therefore, the importance of developing a non-invasive biomarker with the ability to monitor real-time tumor dynamics should be emphasized. This concept, so called "liquid biopsy", would provide an ideal therapeutic strategy for an individual cancer patient and would facilitate the development of "tailor-made" cancer management programs. In the blood of cancer patients, the presence and potent utilities of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free nucleic acids (cfNAs) such as DNA, mRNA and microRNA have been recognized, and their clinical relevance is attracting considerable attention. In this review, we discuss recent developments in this research field as well as the relevance and future perspectives of CTCs and cfNAs in cancer patients, especially focusing on GC.

  20. Gastric HCO3- secretion induced by mucosal acidification: different mechanisms depending on acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Eitaro; Hayashi, Masamune; Sasaki, Yoko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2005-01-01

    We compared the HCO3- secretory responses induced by mucosal acidification at different HCl concentrations (100 and 200 mM HCl) in the rat stomach. Under urethane anesthesia, the stomach was mounted on an ex vivo chamber and perfused with saline under inhibition of acid secretion by omeprazole (60 mg/kg, i.p.). TheHCO3- secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by adding 2 mM HCl. The acidification was performed by exposure of the mucosa to 100 mMor 200 mM HCl for 10 min. The secretion of HCO3- was increased by acidification of the mucosa at both 100 and 200 mM of HCl, and the maximal HCO3- response was 1.5-times greater at the latter concentration. The HCO3- responses induced by 100 and 200 mM HCl were both totally inhibited by prior administration of indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin (PG) production. The HCO3- stimulatory effect of 200 mM HCl was also significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with N(G)-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), the inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, as well as chemical ablation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons, whereas that of 100 mM HCl was affected by neither of these treatments. We conclude that the mucosal acidification stimulates gastric HCO3- secretion in different mechanisms, depending on the concentration of acid; the response caused by 100 mM HCl is mediated only by PGs, while that caused by 200 mM HCl is mediated by both capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons and NO, in addition to PGs.

  1. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa.

  2. [The clinical effectiveness of rabeprazole in patients with acid-related gastric and duodenal diseases with various sensitivity of different types of parietal gastric cell receptors].

    PubMed

    Serebrova, S Iu

    2007-01-01

    The authors studied the duration of intragastric acid production at 20 mg of pariet in patients with hypergastric gastritis after determination of the individual type of parietal gastric cell reception. The study included 40 patients (12 women and 28 men aged 33.3 +/- 6.7 years). Predominant activity of H2 receptors was detected in 32 patients, while M-cholinoreceptor activity prevailed in six patients; in two patients receptor type was not defined. Latent period (3.1 +/- 0.5 hours), pH(max) (5.4 +/- 0.7), pH24h (3.5 +/- 0.4), pH(stimulated24h) (3.0 +/- 0.7) did not depend on the predominant sensitivity of either receptor type and was significantly higher in patients taking pariet than in patients receiving standard doses of omeprazole (2.2 +/- 0.5 h, 4.0 +/- 0.3, 2.4 +/- 0.3, and 1.2 +/- 0.3, respectively) or lansoprazole (2.2 +/- 0.6, 4.3 +/- 0.6, 2.6 +/- 0.3, and 1.3 +/- 0.3, respectively). The clinical effectiveness of pariet was evaluated in 20 patients (15 men and 5 women aged 51.6 +/- 5.4) after gastric resection, needing antisecretory therapy. Individual reception type was studied. The effects of pirenzepine and ranitidine (or famotidine) given in standard doses at the beginning of the week were studied in patients with predominant H2-hystaminergic, M-cholinergic, or unclear type. After that all patients received pariet 20 mg a day. None of the patients displayed predominant H2 receptor activity. In 14 patients predominant M-cholinoreceptor activity was noted; in six patients receptor type remained unclear. All the patients were administered ranitidine (or famotidine) during one week with no clinical effect. Six patients with unclear reception type were given gastrozepine for one more week, with no effect either. After the beginning of pariet 20 mg a day complaints disappeared in all patients within one or two days. The conclusion is that pariet in a standard dose possesses higher antisecretory effect vs. other proton pump inhibitors, unlike that of H2

  3. Structural identifiability analysis of pharmacokinetic models using DAISY: semi-mechanistic gastric emptying models for 13C-octanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Ogungbenro, Kayode; Aarons, Leon

    2011-04-01

    Structural identifiability analysis is necessary for efficient parameter estimation and it is concerned with determination of whether the parameters in a model can be identified from specified experiments with perfect input-output data. Structural identifiability analysis is very important in mathematical modelling of biological and biomedical experiments and should be considered at the design stage of these experiments. There are three possible outcomes from a structural identifiability analysis; globally/uniquely identifiable, locally/non-uniquely identifiable or non-identifiable/unidentifiable. An ideal outcome is a globally/uniquely identifiable model, however a locally/non-uniquely identifiable outcome can help to identify areas of the model or experiment that need improvement. Despite the importance of structural identifiability analysis, it is still not widely used due to the heavy computational burden involved and the lack of software. A new software package, DAISY, that implemented differential algebra for identifiability analysis was recently released. DAISY is freely available, easy to use and does not require any high-level programming skill. The (13)C-octanoic acid breath test is now widely used for assessing the rate of gastric emptying in patients. Unlike scintigraphy, which is the gold standard and is a direct measure of the rate of gastric emptying, the (13)C-octanoic acid breath test is an indirect method for assessing the rate of gastric emptying. However the (13)C-octanoic acid breath test is cheaper, safer and easy to perform. Because the rate of excretion of (13)CO(2) in breath does not only reflect the rate of gastric emptying but other processes involved between the ingestion of (13)C-octanoic acid and elimination of (13)CO(2) in breath, the parameters commonly derived from the excretion data are not direct measures of gastric emptying. The aim of this paper was to propose a new semi-mechanistic model for the analysis of (13)C-octanoic acid

  4. Ethanolic extract of roots from Arctium lappa L. accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats: Involvement of the antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Allemand, Alexandra; Mendes, Daniel Augusto G B; Dos Santos, Ana Cristina; André, Eunice; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Dartora, Nessana; Marques, Maria Consuelo Andrade; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Werner, Maria Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the curative efficacy of the ethanolic extract (EET) of roots from Arctium lappa (bardana) in healing of chronic gastric ulcers induced by 80% acetic acid in rats and additionally studies the possible mechanisms underlying this action. Oral administration of EET (1, 3, 10 and 30mg/kg) reduced the gastric lesion area in 29.2%, 41.4%, 59.3% and 38.5%, respectively, and at 10mg/kg promoted significant regeneration of the gastric mucosa, which was confirmed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. EET (10mg/kg) treatment did not increase the gastric mucus content but restored the superoxide dismutase activity, prevented the reduction of glutathione levels, reduced lipid hydroperoxides levels, inhibited the myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the microvascular permeability. In addition, EET reduced the free radical generation and increased scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals in vitro. Furthermore, intraduodenal EET (10 and 30mg/kg) decreased volume and acidity of gastric secretion. Total phenolic compounds were high in EET (Folin-Ciocalteau assay) and the analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that the main compounds present in EET were a serie of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acid isomers. In conclusion, these data reveal that EET promotes regeneration of damaged gastric mucosa, probably through its antisecretory and antioxidative mechanisms.

  5. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  6. A comparative study on the modes of action of TAK-438, a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, and lansoprazole in primary cultured rabbit gastric glands.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Jun; Hori, Yasunobu; Nishida, Haruyuki; Kajino, Masahiro; Inatomi, Nobuhiro

    2011-05-01

    TAK-438 is a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker (P-CAB) type antisecretory agent that reversibly inhibits gastric H+, K+-ATPase. Previously, we showed that TAK-438 has superior efficacy compared to lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, in the inhibition of acid secretion in vivo. In this study, we investigated the differences in the mode of actions of the two drugs using primary cultured rabbit gastric glands. TAK-438 and lansoprazole inhibited gastric acid formation in acutely isolated gastric glands (IC₅₀) values, 0.30 and 0.76 μM, respectively). In cultured gastric glands that were preincubated with TAK-438, the inhibitory effect on forskolin-stimulated acid formation was augmented over the incubation period, whereas the inhibitory effect of lansoprazole was not affected by time of incubation. Next, we evaluated the durations of the actions of TAK-438 and lansoprazole after gastric glands were incubated with either drug for 2h followed by washout. Even 8h after the drug washout, TAK-438 at higher concentrations inhibited acid formation, but the inhibitory effect of lansoprazole disappeared immediately after washout. Additionally, only a small amount of [¹⁴C] lansoprazole accumulated in resting glands, and this accumulation was enhanced by treatment with 1 μM of forskolin. In contrast, high levels of [¹⁴C] TAK-438 accumulated in both resting and forskolin-treated glands. Furthermore, a 2-h preincubation followed by washout demonstrated a slow clearance of [¹⁴C] TAK-438 from the glands. These findings suggest that TAK-438 exerts a longer and more potent antisecretory effect than lansoprazole as a result of its high accumulation and slow clearance from the gastric glands.

  7. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Enhance Cisplatin Efficacy in Gastric Cancer Cells by Inducing Apoptosis via ADORA1.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Hong; Chen, Xuehua; Liu, Binya; Li, Pu; Cao, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that administration of the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs), including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), can alter the toxicity and/or activity of several anticancer drugs in in vitro and in vivo studies. Here, we investigated the ability of ω-3 PUFAs to potentiate the antineoplastic activity of cisplatin (CDDP) in gastric cancer cells. The increase in CDDP-induced growth inhibition was measured by the IC50 values obtained when the cells were incubated with CDDP alone or with CDDP plus DHA or EPA. DHA and EPA enhanced the growth-inhibition activity of increasing concentrations of CDDP. The interactions between CDDP and DHA or EPA at the cellular level were assessed through the combination index (CI) method of Chou-Talalay. The results demonstrated synergism between CDDP and DHA or EPA in MKN45 cells. Cell cycle analysis showed that the combination treatment increased G0/G1 phase and S phase arrest, and significantly increased the number of apoptotic cells. According to our previous study, ω -3 PUFAs induce apoptosis of gastric cells via ADORA1, a subtype of adenosine receptor functionally related to cell death. The ADORA1 mRNA and protein expression was higher in the combination treatment than in the individual treatments. Notable, when GC cells were pretreated with DPCPX, a selective ADORA1 antagonist, the combination treatment effect on apoptosis was significantly reduced. Our results suggest that ω-3 PUFAs enhance the antineoplastic effects of CDDP in gastric cancer cells, and the synergistic effect between ω-3 PUFAs and CDDP is partly dependent on activating the ADORA1-mediated apoptosis pathway.

  8. Inhibition of gastric acid secretion by a standardized aqueous extract of Cecropia glaziovii Sneth and underlying mechanism.

    PubMed

    Souccar, C; Cysneiros, R M; Tanae, M M; Torres, L M B; Lima-Landman, M T R; Lapa, A J

    2008-06-01

    Cecropia glazioui Sneth (Cecropiaceae) is used in folk medicine in tropical and subtropical Latin America as cardiotonic, diuretic, hypotensive, anti-inflammatory and anti-asthmatic. The hypotensive/antihypertensive activity of the plant aqueous extract (AE) and isolated butanolic fraction (BuF) has been confirmed and putatively related to calcium channels blockade in vascular smooth musculature [Lapa, A.J., Lima-Landman, M.T.R., Cysneiros, R.M, Borges, A.C.R., Souccar, C., Barreta, I.P., Lima, T.C.M., 1999. The Brazilian folk medicine program to validate medicinal plants - a topic in new antihypertensive drug research. In: Hostettman, K., Gupta, M.P., Marston, A. (Eds.), Proceedings Volume, IOCD/CYTED Symposium, Panamá City, Panamá, 23-26 February 1997. Chemistry, Biological and Pharmacological Properties of Medicinal Plants from the Americas. Harwood Academic Publishers, Amsterdam, pp. 185-196; Lima-Landman, M.T., Borges, A.C., Cysneiros, R.M., De Lima, T.C., Souccar, C., Lapa, A.J., 2007. Antihypertensive effect of a standardized aqueous extract of Cecropia glaziovii Sneth in rats: an in vivo approach to the hypotensive mechanism. Phytomedicine 14, 314-320]. Bronchodilation and antidepressant-like activities of both AE and BuF have been also shown [Delarcina, S., Lima-Landman, M.T., Souccar, C., Cysneiros, R.M., Tanae, M.M., Lapa, A.J., 2007. Inhibition of histamine-induced bronchospasm in guinea pigs treated with Cecropia glaziovi Sneth and correlation with the in vitro activity in tracheal muscles. Phytomedicine 14, 328-332; Rocha, F.F., Lima-Landman, M.T., Souccar, C., Tanae, M.M., De Lima, T.C., Lapa, A.J., 2007. Antidepressant-like effect of Cecropia glazioui Sneth and its constituents -in vivo and in vitro characterization of the underlying mechanism. Phytomedicine 14, 396-402]. This study reports the antiulcer and antisecretory gastric acid activities of the plant AE, its BuF and isolated compounds with the possible mechanism involved. Both AE and Bu

  9. L-Type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) expression in lymph node metastasis of gastric carcinoma: Its correlation with size of metastatic lesion and Ki-67 labeling.

    PubMed

    Ichinoe, Masaaki; Yanagisawa, Nobuyuki; Mikami, Tetuo; Hana, Kiyomi; Nakada, Norihiro; Endou, Hitoshi; Okayasu, Isao; Murakumo, Yoshiki

    2015-07-01

    L-Type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is one of the major amino acid transporters. High levels of LAT1 expression have been reported in various tumors, which can act as a novel prognostic marker. Previously, we demonstrated that LAT1 is highly expressed in advanced gastric carcinoma with lymph node metastasis, and proposed that LAT1 is an independent prognostic factor in non-scirrhous gastric carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between LAT1 expression and the size of lymph node metastatic lesions in gastric carcinoma. LAT1 and Ki-67 expression was immunohistochemically analyzed in 64 cases of advanced gastric carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. LAT1 expression in the metastatic lymph nodes was correlated with that in the primary lesions. The high LAT1 expression group showed a larger size of metastatic lesion and a higher Ki-67 labeling index than the low LAT1 expression group. LAT1 expression had a weak association with Ki-67 labeling index and tumor diameter of lymph nodes. These results suggest that LAT1 expression is associated with disease progression in gastric carcinoma. We proposed that LAT1 could be a potential therapeutic target for gastric carcinoma cases with large lymph node metastasis.

  10. Omeprazole pharmacodynamics and gastric acid suppression in critically ill pediatric transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Olsen, K M; Bergman, K L; Kaufman, S S; Rebuck, J A; Collier, D S

    2001-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of omeprazole suspension in critically ill pediatric liver/intestinal transplant patients. DESIGN: Open-label pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic study. SETTING: Pediatric intensive care unit of an academic medical center. PATIENTS: Eleven pediatric liver and/or intestinal transplant patients. INTERVENTIONS: Extemporaneously prepared 0.5 mg/kg omeprazole suspension every 12 hrs via nasogastric tube before sequential measurements of omeprazole serum concentration and gastric pH monitoring. Gastric pH was monitored continuously for 48 hrs and plasma omeprazole concentrations were determined upon first and multiple dosing. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Mean onset of action of omeprazole in a sodium bicarbonate vehicle was 62 +/- 82 mins (range, 2-226 mins). Subjects <4 yrs of age exhibited a more variable onset of omeprazole action (range, 3-226 mins) when compared with older subjects (onset of action, 2-40 min). Omeprazole maximum concentration and area under the concentration-time curve for the dosage interval were significantly greater upon multiple dosing when compared with the first dose. Mean baseline gastric pH in this study population was 1.0 +/- 0.8. Gastric pH remained >4.0 for 78.8% +/- 18.9% of the first dosage interval and 97.8% +/- 5.4% of multiple dosage intervals regardless of age when administered twice daily as a suspension. CONCLUSION: These results support the use of omeprazole administered twice daily as a suspension to maintain gastric pH of >4.0 and to achieve maximal pharmacodynamic effect in pediatric liver and/or intestinal transplant patients.

  11. Acetylsalicylic Acid Daily vs Acetylsalicylic Acid Every 3 Days in Healthy Volunteers: Effect on Platelet Aggregation, Gastric Mucosa, and Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Plinio Minghin Freitas; Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; Zaminelli, Tiago; Sampaio, Marinalva Ferreira; Blackler, Rory Willian; Trevisan, Miriam da Silva; Novaes Magalhães, Antônio Frederico; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2016-07-01

    Substantial platelet inhibition was observed 3 days after a single administration of acetylsalicylic acid 81 mg to healthy volunteers. Here we investigate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) antrum concentrations and gastrointestinal symptoms in two treatment groups: one receiving losartan and acetylsalicylic acid every day and the other receiving losartan every day and acetylsalicylic acid every 3 days. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers from both sexes received either 50 mg losartan and acetylsalicylic acid 81 mg daily or 50 mg losartan and acetylsalicylic acid 81 every 3 days with placebo on the other days. Therapy was delivered for 30 days for both groups. Gastric endoscopy was performed before and after treatment period. Biopsies were collected for PGE2 quantification. Platelet function tests were carried out before and during treatment and TXB2 release on platelet rich plasma was measured. The every 3 day low-dose acetylsalicylic acid regimen produced complete inhibition of platelet aggregation compared to the daily treatment. Thromboxane B2 release was substantially abolished for both groups during treatment. There was no significant difference on the endoscopic score of both treatment groups after the 30-day treatment (P = .215). There was over 50% suppression of antrum PGE2 content on volunteers receiving acetylsalicylic acid daily (P = .0016), while for the every 3 day dose regimen there was no significant difference between pre and post-treatment antrum PGE2 dosages (P = .4193). Since PGE2 is involved in gastric healing, we understand that this new approach could be safer and as efficient as the standard daily therapy on a long-term basis.

  12. Effect of K-diformate in starter diets on acidity, microbiota, and the amount of organic acids in the digestive tract of piglets, and on gastric alterations.

    PubMed

    Canibe, N; Steien, S H; Overland, M; Jensen, B B

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the effect of K-diformate on the intraluminal pH, microbial composition in digesta and feces, organic acids along the digestive tract, and alterations of the gastric epithelium of pigs. Pigs (n = 36) weaned at 28 d of age were allotted to two groups and fed without (control diet) or with 1.8% supplemental K-diformate. Fecal samples were taken from the rectum on d 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 postweaning. Half of the animals from each group were killed on d 7 and the other half on d 29 postweaning. Growth performance was not different for both groups (P > or = 0.73). The gastric epithelium was not negatively affected by K-diformate (P = 0.25). Potassium-diformate decreased (P < or = 0.04) or tended to decrease (P < or = 0.10) the counts of total anaerobic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, and yeasts in feces and digesta samples from the stomach, distal small intestine, cecum, and middle segment of the colon. The pH along the gastrointestinal tract of piglets was not affected by K-diformate (P > or = 0.30). On d 7, the concentration of lactic acid along the gastrointestinal tract was similar with both diets (P = 0.15). On d 29, the concentrations of lactic acid tended to be lower along the small intestine (P < or = 0.08) and the stomach (P = 0.11) of the pigs fed K-diformate. Formic acid in digesta was detected at significant levels only in the distal segment of the small intestine of the control pigs (from 4 to 11 mmol/kg of wet digesta), whereas considerable amounts were measured in the stomach (from 23 to 40 mmol/kg of wet digesta) and all segments of the small intestine (from 7 to 25 mmol/kg of wet digesta) in the K-diformate-fed pigs on both days. On d 7, pigs fed the K-diformate diet had a tendency (P < or = 0.08) to have higher concentrations of organic acids (acetic + propionic + butyric) in the digesta of the distal small intestine, cecum, and proximal colon. On d 29, both groups had similar concentrations of these

  13. Suppression of gastric acid increases the risk of developing Immunoglobulin E-mediated drug hypersensitivity: human diclofenac sensitization and a murine sensitization model

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, A. B.; Gruber, S.; Pali-Schöll, I.; Kinaciyan, T.; Untersmayr, E.; Jensen-Jarolim, E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Hypersensitivity reactions towards non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are common, although true allergies are detectable only in a subgroup of patients. The current study was prompted by a case observation, where a patient experienced generalized urticaria following his second course of diclofenac and proton pump inhibitor medication, and was found to have diclofenac-specific IgE. During recent years, our group has been investigating the importance of gastric digestion in the development of food allergies, demonstrating anti-acid medication as a risk factor for sensitization against food proteins. Objective Here, we aimed to investigate whether the mechanism of food allergy induction described can also be causative in NSAID allergy, using diclofenac as a paradigm. Methods We subjected BALB/c mice to several oral immunization regimens modelled after the patient’s medication intake. Diclofenac was applied with or without gastric acid suppression, in various doses, alone or covalently coupled to albumin, a protein abundant in gastric juices. Immune responses were assessed on the antibody level, and functionally examined by in vitro and in vivo crosslinking assays. Results Only mice receiving albumin-coupled diclofenac under gastric acid suppression developed anti-diclofenac IgG1 and IgE, whereas no immune responses were induced by the drug alone or without gastric acid suppression. Antibody induction was dose dependent with the group receiving the higher dose of the drug showing sustained anti-diclofenac titres. The antibodies induced triggered basophil degranulation in vitro and positive skin tests in vivo. Conclusion Gastric acid suppression was found to be a causative mechanism in the induction of IgE-mediated diclofenac allergy. PMID:19817752

  14. Performance of microbial phytases for gastric inositol phosphate degradation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anne Veller Friis; Nyffenegger, Christian; Meyer, Anne S

    2015-01-28

    Microbial phytases catalyze dephosphorylation of phytic acid, thereby potentially releasing chelated iron and improving human iron absorption from cereal-based diets. For this catalysis to take place in vivo, the phytase must be robust to low pH and proteolysis in the gastric ventricle. This study compares the robustness of five different microbial phytases, evaluating thermal stability, activity retention, and extent of dephosphorylation of phytic acid in a simulated low-pH/pepsin gastric environment and examines secondary protein structural changes at low pH via circular dichroism. The Peniophora lycii phytase was found to be the most thermostable, but the least robust enzyme in gastric conditions, whereas the Aspergillus niger and Escherichia coli phytases proved to be most resistant to gastric conditions. The phytase from Citrobacter braakii showed intermediate robustness. The extent of loss of secondary structure at low pH correlated positively with the extent of activity loss at low pH.

  15. Role of nitric oxide in the central interferon-alpha-induced inhibition of gastric acid secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Czimmer, Jozsef; Király, Ágnes; Szabó, Imre Laszlo; Mózsik, Gyula; Sütő, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play a key role in regulation of gastric functions. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has been published to impair gastric motility. Aims of this study were to clarify effect of IFN-α on gastric acid secretion (GAS) and determine role of nitric oxide (NO) in the process. Both subcutaneous (1000, 10000, 100 000 IU, s.c.) and intracisternal (10, 100, 1000 IU, i.c.) injections of IFN-α dose-dependently inhibited GAS induced by pylorus ligation in male SD rats in 2 hrs (370±40, 233±39, 208±50 micromol vs control 415±59 micromol and 481±50, 249±75, 141±25 micromol vs control 485±65 micromol, respectively). Central doses inducing same level inhibition were 100 times lower. NOS inhibitor L-NAME (3 mg/kg, i.v.) blocked the inhibitory effect of i.c. ED(50) dose 100 IU IFN-α (507±75 micromol/2 hrs), while L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) prevented L-NAME action (266±82 micromol/2 hrs). D-arginine failed to prevent L-NAME action on IFN-α-induced inhibition of GAS. Aminoguanidine, a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (iNOS) failed to block IFN-α induced inhibition of GAS. Results suggest that IFN-α inhibits GAS centrally through nitric oxide pathways probably mediated by continuous isoform of NOS that can be important in regulation of GAS in healthy or pathological conditions.

  16. Hydroethanolic extract of Baccharis trimera promotes gastroprotection and healing of acute and chronic gastric ulcers induced by ethanol and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Ferreira, Daniele Maria; Galuppo, Larissa Favaretto; Borato, Debora Gasparin; Prando, Thiago Bruno Lima; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Acco, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol is a psychoactive substance highly consumed around the world whose health problems include gastric lesions. Baccharis trimera is used in folk medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, few studies have evaluated its biological and toxic effects. To validate the popular use of B. trimera and elucidate its possible antiulcerogenic and cytotoxic mechanisms, a hydroethanolic extract of B. trimera (HEBT) was evaluated in models of gastric lesions. Rats and mice were used to evaluate the protective and antiulcerogenic effects of HEBT on gastric lesions induced by ethanol, acetic acid, and chronic ethanol consumption. The effects of HEBT were also evaluated in a pylorus ligature model and on gastrointestinal motility. The LD50 of HEBT in mice was additionally estimated. HEBT was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance, and a high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint analysis was performed. Oral HEBT administration significantly reduced the lesion area and the oxidative stress induced by acute and chronic ethanol consumption. However, HEBT did not protect against gastric wall mucus depletion and did not alter gastric secretory volume, pH, or total acidity in the pylorus ligature model. Histologically, HEBT accelerated the healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats, reflected by contractions of the ulcer base. Flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acids were detected in HEBT, which likely contributed to the therapeutic efficacy of HEBT, preventing or reversing ethanol- and acetic acid-induced ulcers, respectively. HEBT antiulcerogenic activity may be partially attributable to the inhibition of free radical generation and subsequent prevention of lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that HEBT has both gastroprotective and curative activity in animal models, with no toxicity.

  17. Roles of α and β Carbonic Anhydrases of Helicobacter pylori in the Urease-Dependent Response to Acidity and in Colonization of the Murine Gastric Mucosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Bury-Moné, Stéphanie; Mendz, George L.; Ball, Graham E.; Thibonnier, Marie; Stingl, Kerstin; Ecobichon, Chantal; Avé, Patrick; Huerre, Michel; Labigne, Agnès; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; De Reuse, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    Carbon dioxide occupies a central position in the physiology of Helicobacter pylori owing to its capnophilic nature, the large amounts of carbon dioxide produced by urease-mediated urea hydrolysis, and the constant bicarbonate supply in the stomach. Carbonic anhydrases (CA) catalyze the interconversion of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate and are involved in functions such as CO2 transport or trapping and pH homeostasis. H. pylori encodes a periplasmic α-CA (α-CA-HP) and a cytoplasmic β-CA (β-CA-HP). Single CA inactivation and double CA inactivation were obtained for five genetic backgrounds, indicating that H. pylori CA are not essential for growth in vitro. Bicarbonate-carbon dioxide exchange rates were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using lysates of parental strains and CA mutants. Only the mutants defective in the α-CA-HP enzyme showed strongly reduced exchange rates. In H. pylori, urease activity is essential for acid resistance in the gastric environment. Urease activity measured using crude cell extracts was not modified by the absence of CA. With intact CA mutant cells incubated in acidic conditions (pH 2.2) in the presence of urea there was a delay in the increase in the pH of the incubation medium, a phenotype most pronounced in the absence of H. pylori α-CA. This correlated with a delay in acid activation of the urease as measured by slower ammonia production in whole cells. The role of CA in vivo was examined using the mouse model of infection with two mouse-adapted H. pylori strains, SS1 and X47-2AL. Compared to colonization by the wild-type strain, colonization by X47-2AL single and double CA mutants was strongly reduced. Colonization by SS1 CA mutants was not significantly different from colonization by wild-type strain SS1. However, when mice were infected by SS1 Δ(β-CA-HP) or by a SS1 double CA mutant, the inflammation scores of the mouse gastric mucosa were strongly reduced. In conclusion, CA contribute to the urease

  18. Comparison of the effect of a single dose of erythromycin with pantoprazole on gastric content volume and acidity in elective general surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Nidhi; Palta, Sanjeev; Arora, Kanika

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents remains one of the most feared complications of anesthesia. A gastric pH of 2.5 or less and a volume of 25 ml (0.4 ml/kg body weight) or more in average adult patients are considered critical factors for the development of pulmonary damage in adults. Materials and Methods: This study compared the efficacy of a single oral dose of erythromycin (a macrolide antibiotic) with oral pantoprazole (a proton pump inhibitor) on pre-operative gastric fluid volume and pH in a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled fashion in 80 adult patients (of ASA physical status I and II) planned for elective surgery under general anesthesia. Patients were divided into two groups of 40 patients each. The pantoprazole group (Group I) received oral pantoprazole 40 mg and the erythromycin group (Group II) received oral erythromycin 250 mg at least 1 h prior to the induction of anesthesia. After tracheal intubation, gastric fluid was aspirated via a Salem Sump tube and its volume and pH were measured. Results: Although both erythromycin and pantoprazole decreased the gastric fluid volume to a similar extent, the decrease in gastric fluid acidity by pantoprazole was significantly greater than that by erythromycin. The proportion of patients at risk of pulmonary aspiration according to traditional criteria, i.e. pH ≤2.5 and volume ≥25ml, was lower in the pantoprazole group. Conclusion: Administration of pantoprazole was found to be more useful than a sub-therapeutic dose of erythromycin in decreasing both volume and acidity of gastric content. PMID:21772679

  19. High saturated fatty acid intake induces insulin secretion by elevating gastric inhibitory polypeptide levels in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazue; Moriguchi, Ririko; Yamada, Yuichiro; Fujita, Misuzu; Yamato, Takako; Oumi, Masayo; Holst, Jens Juul; Seino, Yutaka

    2014-08-01

    Insulin resistance is central to the etiology of the metabolic syndrome cluster of diseases. Evidence suggests that a high-fat diet is associated with insulin resistance, which may be modulated by dietary fatty acid composition. We hypothesized that high saturated fatty acid intake increases insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) secretion. To clarify the effect of ingested fatty acid composition on glucose levels, we conducted an intervention study to investigate the insulin and plasma GIP responses in 11 healthy women, including a dietary control. Subjects were provided daily control meals (F-20; saturated fatty acids/monounsaturated fatty acids/polyunsaturated fatty acids [S/M/P] ratio, 3:4:3) with 20 energy (E) % fat, followed by 2 isoenergetic experimental meals for 7 days each. These meals comprised 60 E% carbohydrate, 15 E% protein, and 30 E% fat (FB-30; high saturated fatty acid meal; S/M/P, 5:4:1; F-30: reduced saturated fatty acid meal; S/M/P, 3:4:3). On the second day of the F-20 and the last day of F-30 and FB-30, blood samples were taken before and 30, 60, and 120 minutes after a meal tolerance test. The plasma glucose responses did not differ between F-20 and FB-30 or F-30. However, insulin levels were higher after the FB-30 than after the F-20 (P < .01). The GIP response after the FB-30 was higher than that after the F-30 (P < .05). In addition, the difference in the incremental GIP between FB-30 and F-30 correlated significantly and positively with that of the insulin. These results suggest that a high saturated fatty acid content stimulates postprandial insulin release via increased GIP secretion.

  20. Effect of dietary corn oil supplementation on equine gastric fluid acid, sodium, and prostaglandin E2 content before and during pentagastrin infusion.

    PubMed

    Cargile, Jana L; Burrow, James A; Kim, Inyoung; Cohen, Noah D; Merritt, A M

    2004-01-01

    The effect of corn oil (approximately 60% [wt/vol] linoleic acid) dietary supplementation on various components of equine gastric secretion was studied by use of a repeated-measures experimental design. Four healthy adult ponies were surgically fitted with gastric cannulas. The ponies were then fed a free-choice hay diet for 5 weeks, which was followed by 5 weeks of the same diet supplemented with 45 mL of corn oil daily. Gastric contents were analyzed under basal and pentagastrin-stimulated conditions once weekly during the latter 2 weeks on each diet. Gastric contents were collected at 30-minute intervals, and volume, hydrogen ion concentration, sodium content, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) content were measured. Data were analyzed by a linear fixed-effect modeling procedure. During the diet supplemented with corn oil, the ponies had, under basal and pentagastrin-stimulated conditions, significantly decreased acid output and significantly increased PGE2 and sodium outputs compared to those measured before corn oil supplementation. We conclude that corn oil supplementation may be an effective and inexpensive way to increase the protective properties of equine glandular gastric mucosa. This could be particularly helpful in reducing the chances of ulceration associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) administration.

  1. Effects of transdermal scopolamine, alone or in combination with cimetidine, on total 24 hour gastric acid secretion in patients with duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, C T; Feldman, M

    1986-01-01

    Transdermal scopolamine is an antimuscarinic preparation approved for use in the United States for prevention of motion sickness. A recent study using this drug (0.5 mg/patch) suggested that enough scopolamine was absorbed through the skin to reduce basal gastric acid secretion in patients with duodenal ulcer. We have compared the effect of transdermal scopolamine and oral cimetidine (400 mg twice daily) in seven men with chronic duodenal ulcer, both alone and in combination, on acid secretion throughout an entire 24 hour period in a placebo-controlled, randomised, double blinded cross over study. The effect of these drugs on basal, interprandial, and nocturnal gastric juice volume and hydrogen ion concentration also was measured. Transdermal scopolamine had no significant effect on mean 24 hour acid secretion (placebo, 409.4 mmol/day; scopolamine, 364.0 mmol/day) nor did it have a significant effect on gastric juice volume or hydrogen ion concentration. The combination of transdermal scopolamine plus cimetidine was not more effective than cimetidine alone in reducing total 24 hour acid secretion (mean, 231.8 versus 235.3 mmol/day) nor in reducing gastric juice volume or hydrogen ion concentration. PMID:3804025

  2. Deoxycholic acid inhibits the growth of BGC-823 gastric carcinoma cells via a p53‑mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Bo; Song, Wei; Cheng, Mei-Die; Fan, Hai-Fang; Gu, Xu; Qiao, Ying; Lu, Xin; Yu, Rui-He; Chen, Lan-Ying

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of deoxycholic acid (DCA) on BGC‑823 human gastric carcinoma cells and to explore the possible mechanisms underlying any such effects. Cell proliferation was detected using a 3‑(4,5‑Dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, cell morphology was observed by inverted microscopy, and cell cycle progression and the mitochondrial membrane potential were analyzed using flow cytometry. The expression of Bcl‑2, Bax, p53, Cyclin D1 and cyclin‑dependent kinase (CDK)2 proteins in BGC‑823 cells was analyzed with western blotting. The results demonstrated that DCA significantly inhibited cell growth, and that the cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase. DCA was also shown to induce BGC‑823 cell apoptosis, which was associated with the collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The mitochondria‑dependent pathway was activated via an increase in the ratio of Bax:Bcl‑2 in BGC‑823 cells. In addition, the expression of p53, cyclin D1 and CDK2 was altered following DCA treatment. These results suggest that DCA induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells through activation of an intrinsic mitochondrial‑dependent pathway, in which p53 is involved.

  3. The Protective Effects of 18β-Glycyrrhetinic Acid on Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gastric Mucosa in Mongolian Gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Donghui; Jiang, Jing; You, Lili; Jia, Zhifang; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Cai, Hongke; Wang, Shidong; Hou, Zhen; Suo, Yue-er; Cao, Xueyuan

    2016-01-01

    18β-Glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA), a major component of Glycyrrhiza glabra, is widely used therapeutically in clinic. In this study, the effect of GRA on Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori-) infected gastritis was investigated in Mongolian gerbils in vivo. The gerbils were randomly divided into groups: uninfected; H. pylori-infected; H. pylori + antibiotics (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and esomeprazole); and H. pylori + GRA. The gastric intraluminal pH value, histopathological changes, and the expression levels of inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS) were investigated. The results showed that, in the H. pylori + GRA group, the intraluminal gastric pH value was lower (2.14 ± 0.08 versus 3.17 ± 0.23, P < 0.05), erosion and hyperplasia were alleviated, the infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells was attenuated (P < 0.05), and the expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, and iNOS were decreased (P < 0.05) compared with the H. pylori-infected group. There was no significant difference in results between the H. pylori + GRA group and the H. pylori + antibiotics group. This study indicated that GRA significantly attenuated H. pylori-infected gastritis in gerbils and has the potential to be developed as a new therapeutic drug. PMID:27006947

  4. Gastrin and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, Helge L.; Sagatun, Liv; Mjønes, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer although occurring in reduced frequency is still an important disease, partly because of the bad prognosis when occurring in western countries. This decline in occurrence may mainly be due to the reduced prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, which is the most important cause of gastric cancer. There exist many different pathological classifications of gastric carcinomas, but the most useful seems to be the one by Lauren into intestinal and diffuse types since these types seldom transform into the other and also have different epidemiology. During the nearly 30 years that have passed since the groundbreaking description of Hp as the cause of gastritis and gastric cancer, a continuous search for the mechanism by which Hp infection causes gastric cancer has been done. Interestingly, it is mainly atrophic gastritis of the oxyntic mucosa that predisposes to gastric cancer possibly by inducing hypoacidity and hypergastrinemia. There are many arguments in favor of an important role of gastrin and its target cell, the enterochromaffin-like cell, in gastric carcinogenesis. The role of gastrin in gastric carcinogenesis implies caution in the long-term treatment with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion inducing secondary hypergastrinemia, in a common disease like gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:28144230

  5. The effect of ω-fatty acids on the expression of phospholipase A2 group 2A in human gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shariati, Mahboube; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Movahedian, Ahmad; Somi, Mohammad Hosein; Dolatkhah, Homayun; Aghazade, Ahmad Mirza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies show that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may have an inhibitory role in carcinogenesis. It was previously shown that PLA2 group 2A (PLA2G2A) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression is associated with less frequent metastasis and longer survival in gastric adenocarcinoma. This study intends to investigate the effect of PUFAs on the expression of PLA2G2A in patients with gastric cancer. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four patients with gastric cancer (GC) were randomly divided into two groups. The first group received cisplatin medication. The second group received cisplatin medication and supplements of ω-fatty acids for three courses. The total RNA was extracted from the tissues and cDNA was synthesized. The gene expression of PLA2G2A was evaluated by the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. To confirm the changes in gene expression, frozen section was utilized. The frozen tissue samples were sectioned and stained using the immunohistochemistry technique. Results: After chemotherapy and chemotherapy plus supplement, the relative mean of PLA2G2A gene expression increased 1.5 ± 0.5-fold and 7.4 ± 2.6-fold, respectively (P = 0.006). The relative mean of gene expression in patients who received cisplatin and ω-fatty acids supplement increased more significantly (7.5 ± 3.3-fold) than in patients who received only cisplatin (P = 0.016). Conclusion: It was found that PUFAs increased the gene and protein expression of PLA2G2A in gastric cancer. Concerning the fact that studies reveal protective function of PLA2G2A in gastric cancer, it is suggested that increased expression of PLA2G2A is helpful. Furthermore, PUFAs can be considered as a useful therapeutic supplement for patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27904556

  6. Effects of a histamine type 2 receptor antagonist, BMY-26539-01, on equine gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, J A; Spencer, P A

    2001-01-01

    A dose-response study was undertaken of the effects of a newly developed histamine type 2 receptor antagonist, BMY-26539-01, on gastric acid secretion in 4 fasted horses. Doses of 0.1 mg/kg, 0.3 mg/kg, 0.5 mg/kg, or placebo were administered in a randomly assigned treatment sequence. Hydrogen ion concentration and pH were variable during baseline measurements in all 4 animals; however, following BMY-26539-01 administration, mean pH increased and hydrogen ion concentration decreased in a dose-related pattern. At the 0.3 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg dose levels, pH remained elevated for > 4 h and > 8 h, respectively. No adverse effects were observed. A significant level of 0.01 was used for all statistical methods. PMID:11227196

  7. 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid suppresses gastric cancer by activation of miR-149-3p-Wnt-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Donghui; Jia, Zhifang; You, Lili; Wu, Yanhua; Hou, Zhen; Suo, Yueer; Zhang, Houjun; Wen, Simin; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Masanobu; Jiang, Jing; Cao, Xueyuan

    2016-01-01

    18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA) exerts anti-tumor effects on various types of cancer. In the present study, we found that GRA attenuated the severity of gastritis and suppressed gastric tumorigenesis in transgenic mice. We also discovered that miR-149-3p was downregulated in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines as compared to normal gastric tissues and epithelial cells, but was upregulated by GRA. miR-149-3p expression also correlated negatively with lymphnode metastasis. Our functional assays showed that miR-149-3p overexpression inhibited cell proliferation and cell cycle progression while inducing apoptosis, while inhibition of miR-149-3p had the opposite effects. In addition, we identified Wnt-1 as a direct target of miR-149-3p. These data suggest that GRA inhibits the initiation and progression of gastric tumors by ameliorating the inflammatory microenvironment through downregulation of COX-2 expression and by inhibiting Wnt-1 expression through the upregulation of tumor suppressor miR-149-3p. GRA may thus have the potential to serve as a useful therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27713126

  8. Melatonin is more effective than ascorbic acid and β-carotene in improvement of gastric mucosal damage induced by intensive stress

    PubMed Central

    Akinci, Aysin; Cetin, Asli; Ates, Burhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress has been considered to play a primary role in the pathogenesis of stress-induced gastric damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin, ascorbic acid and β-carotene on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage. Material and methods Fifty-six male Wistar albino rats were divided into control, stress, stress + standard diet, stress + saline, stress + melatonin, stress + ascorbic acid and stress + β-carotene groups. The rats from stress groups were exposed to starvation, immobilization and cold by immobilizing for 8 h at +4°C following 72-hour food restriction. Following stress application, melatonin, ascorbic acid and β-carotene were administered for 7 days. Specimens of gastric tissue were prepared for microscopic and biochemical examinations. Results Mean histopathological damage scores and mean tissue malondialdehyde levels were significantly decreased but mean tissue glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities were increased in treatment groups vs. stress groups in general. Mean histopathological damage scores of the stress + Mel group was lower than those of stress + D, stress + S, stress + β-car (p < 0.05) and stress + Asc groups (p < 0.005). Additionally, mean tissue catalase activity of the stress + Mel group was higher than that of stress + S (p < 0.005), stress + D (p < 0.05) and stress + β-car groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions Melatonin is more effective than ascorbic acid and β-carotene in improvement of gastric damage induced by intensive stress. We suggest that as well as the direct antioxidant and free radical scavenging potency of melatonin, its indirect effect via the brain-gut axis might account for its greater beneficial action against stress-induced gastric damage. PMID:26528359

  9. Orally active fumagillin analogues: transformations of a reactive warhead in the gastric environment.

    PubMed

    Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Blanchette, Heather; Benjamin, Dennis R; Caiazzo, Teresa M; Centrella, Paolo A; DeLorey, Jennifer; Doyle, Elisabeth G; Johnson, Steven R; Labenski, Matthew T; Morgan, Barry A; O'Donovan, Gary; Sarjeant, Amy A; Skinner, Steven; Thompson, Charles D; Griffin, Sarah T; Westlin, William; White, Kerry F

    2013-04-11

    Semisynthetic analogues of fumagillin, 1, inhibit methionine aminopeptidase-2 (MetAP2) and have entered the clinic for the treatment of cancer. An optimized fumagillin analogue, 3 (PPI-2458), was found to be orally active, despite containing a spiroepoxide function that formed a covalent linkage to the target protein. In aqueous acid, 3 underwent ring-opening addition of water and HCl, leading to four products, 4-7, which were characterized in detail. The chlorohydrin, but not the diol, products inhibited MetAP2 under weakly basic conditions, suggesting reversion to epoxide as a step in the mechanism. In agreement, chlorohydrin 6 was shown to revert rapidly to 3 in rat plasma. In an ex vivo assay, rats treated with purified acid degradants demonstrated inhibition of MetAP2 that correlated with the biochemical activity of the compounds. Taken together, the results indicate that degradation of the parent compound was compensated by the formation of active equivalents leading to a pharmacologically useful level of MetAP2 inhibition.

  10. Influence of five neutralizing products on intra-oral pH after rinsing with simulated gastric acid.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Birgitta; Lingström, Peter; Fändriks, Lars; Birkhed, Dowen

    2011-08-01

    The aetiology of dental erosion may be of both extrinsic and intrinsic origin. The aim of the present study was to test the ability of various neutralizing products to raise the low intra-oral pH after an erosive exposure, in this case to gastric acid, which was simulated using hydrochloric acid (HCl). Eleven adults participated. They rinsed with 10 ml of 10 mM HCl (pH 2) or 10 ml of 100 mM HCl (pH 1) for 1 min, after which the pH was measured intra-orally for up to 30 min at four sites (two approximal, one buccal, and the dorsum of the tongue). After rinsing with the two acid solutions (pH 1 and pH 2), the following products were used: (i) antacid tablet; (ii) gum arabic lozenge; (iii) mineral water; (iv) milk; and (v) tap water (positive control). The negative control was no product use. The five test products were used for 2 min after the erosive challenge. All the products produced an initially higher pH compared with the negative control. The antacid tablet resulted in the greatest and most rapid increase in pH, followed by the lozenge. In dental practice, the use of any of the neutralizing products tested, especially the antacid tablet, could be recommended in order to increase the intra-oral pH after an erosive challenge.

  11. R-alpha-methylhistamine-induced inhibition of gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats via central histamine H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Barocelli, E; Ballabeni, V; Chiavarini, M; Impicciatore, M

    1995-08-01

    1. The effect of central H3 histamine receptor activation on gastric acid and pepsin production has been investigated in pylorus-ligated rats. 2. Intracerebroventricular injections (i.c.v.) of the selective H3 agonist, R-alpha-methylhistamine (0.5-50 nmol per rat) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of gastric acid secretion while intravenous administration (5-500 nmol per rat) was completely ineffective. 3. I.c.v. microinjections of mepyramine, tiotidine and thioperamide (51 nmol per rat), selective antagonists at H1-, H2- and H3-sites respectively, failed to modify the acid secretory response to pylorus ligation. 4. The antisecretory effect of R-alpha-methylhistamine (5 nmol per rat, i.c.v.) was selectively prevented by the H3-blocker, thioperamide (51 nmol per rat, i.c.v.), mepyramine and tiotidine pretreatment being completely inactive. 5. Unlike acid secretion, pepsin production was not significantly affected by all the tested compounds. 6. These findings provide the first pharmacological evidence that the activation of central H3 histamine receptors exerts a negative control in the regulation of gastric acid secretion in conscious pylorus-ligated rats.

  12. Novel acid resistance genes from the metagenome of the Tinto River, an extremely acidic environment.

    PubMed

    Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Morgante, Verónica; Mirete, Salvador; González-Pastor, José E

    2013-04-01

    Microorganisms that thrive in acidic environments are endowed with specialized molecular mechanisms to survive under this extremely harsh condition. In this work, we performed functional screening of six metagenomic libraries from planktonic and rhizosphere microbial communities of the Tinto River, an extremely acidic environment, to identify genes involved in acid resistance. This approach has revealed 15 different genes conferring acid resistance to Escherichia coli, most of which encoding putative proteins of unknown function or previously described proteins not known to be related to acid resistance. Moreover, we were able to assign function to one unknown and three hypothetical proteins. Among the recovered genes were the ClpXP protease, the transcriptional repressor LexA and nucleic acid-binding proteins such as an RNA-binding protein, HU and Dps. Furthermore, nine of the retrieved genes were cloned and expressed in Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis and, remarkably, most of them were able to expand the capability of these bacteria to survive under severe acid stress. From this set of genes, four presented a broad-host range as they enhance the acid resistance of the three different organisms tested. These results expand our knowledge about the different strategies used by microorganisms to survive under extremely acid conditions.

  13. Evidence that d-cysteine protects mice from gastric damage via hydrogen sulfide produced by d-amino acid oxidase.

    PubMed

    Souza, Luan Kelves M; Araújo, Thiago S L; Sousa, Nayara A; Sousa, Francisca Beatriz M; Nogueira, Kerolayne M; Nicolau, Lucas A D; Medeiros, Jand Venes R

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a signaling molecule in the gastrointestinal tract. H2S production can derive from d-cysteine via various pathways, thus pointing to a new therapeutic approach: delivery of H2S to specific tissues. This study was designed to evaluate the concentration and effects of H2S (generated by d-amino acid oxidase [DAO] from d-cysteine) in the gastric mucosa and the protective effects against ethanol-induced lesions in mice. Mice were treated with l-cysteine or d-cysteine (100 mg/kg per os). Other groups received oral l-propargylglycine (cystathionine γ-lyase inhibitor, 100 mg/kg) or indole-2-carboxylate (DAO inhibitor), and 30 min later, received d- or l-cysteine. After 30 min, 50% ethanol (2.5 mL/kg, per os) was administered. After 1 h, the mice were euthanized and their stomachs excised and analyzed. Pretreatment with either l-cysteine or d-cysteine significantly reduced ethanol-induced lesions. Pretreatment of d-cysteine- or l-cysteine-treated groups with indole-2-carboxylate reversed the gastroprotective effects of d-cysteine but not l-cysteine. Histological analysis revealed that pretreatment with d-cysteine decreased hemorrhagic damage, edema, and the loss of the epithelium, whereas the administration of indole-2-carboxylate reversed these effects. d-Cysteine also reduced malondialdehyde levels but maintained the levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, pretreatment with d-cysteine increased the synthesis of H2S. Thus, an H2S-generating pathway (involving d-cysteine and DAO) is present in the gastric mucosa and protects this tissue from ethanol-induced damage by decreasing direct oxidative damage.

  14. Acidic pH environment induces autophagy in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhichao; Lai, Qingguo; Li, Yanan; Xu, Chao; Tang, Xiaopeng; Ci, Jiangbo; Sun, Shaolong; Xu, Bingbing; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Osteoblasts (OBs) play an important role in bone fracture healing, yet the extreme adverse microenvironment in fracture sites has a negative impact on the survival of OBs. Therefore, it is important to study how OBs behave in the complex fracture microenvironment. Studies have shown that autophagy plays a pivotal role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and defending the cell against adverse microenvironments. In this study we found the induction of autophagy in OBs at femoral bone fracture sites, which may be a result of ischemia, oxidative stress and hypoxia within the local area. At fracture sites a low pH environment also developed. Until now it has been unclear whether the induction of autophagy in osteoblasts is triggered by the acidic pH environment. Therefore, we cultured OBs in vitro in media of different pH values, and found both autophagy and apoptosis increased in OBs in acidic conditions. However, when autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) was used, apoptosis increased significantly compared with that without CQ. Thus indicating that inhibition of autophagy may promote apoptosis in OBs in an acidic environment, which may provide a new therapeutic strategy to decrease cell apoptosis in OBs through the use of drugs that modulate the autophagic state. PMID:28382973

  15. Pseudolaric acid B circumvents multidrug resistance phenotype in human gastric cancer SGC7901/ADR cells by downregulating Cox-2 and P-gp expression.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Li, Kai; Chen, Suning; Liu, Yunpeng; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a challenging issue in the treatment of gastric cancer. Pseudolaric acid B is a new diterpene acid compound isolated from pseudolarix, which has been found to have anti-tumor activities in recent studies. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pseudolaric acid B in an MDR gastric cancer cell line and elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms of action. SGC7901/ADR, a P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-overexpressing cell line, was used to evaluate the efficacy of pseudolaric acid B against MDR phenotypes. The effects of pseudolaric acid B and chemotherapeutic agents on cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed using the MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot were used to detect the possible relevant molecules in order to elucidate the underlying mechanism of action. The results showed that pseudolaric acid B inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in SGC7901/ADR cells. A low dose of pseudolaric acid B (0.5 µmol/L) augmented the inhibitory effects of chemotherapeutic agents on proliferation (p < 0.05). The expression of P-gp and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) was downregulated with pseudolaric acid B treatment. The present results showed that pseudolaric acid B inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, circumvented MDR, and increased the sensitivity of chemotherapeutic agents in vitro by downregulating the expression of P-gp and Cox-2.

  16. Identification and measurement of acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase activity in rabbit gastric mucosa: ending an old controversy?

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, E; Lorenz, W

    1985-04-01

    One of the main obstacles in assigning any distinct function to histamine in health and disease was the longlasting controversy on the existence of any physiological, endogenous histamine formation in man and most of the other mammals except the rat. Using a modification of Schayer's isotope dilution method, a renewed attempt was made to identify the very low activities of an acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase in rabbit gastric mucosa capable of producing endogenous histamine in physiological conditions, to develop tests for its identification in crude enzyme extracts and to demonstrate the specificity of the enzymatic assay by excluding any relevant Dopa decarboxylase activity and also nonenzymatic decarboxylation interfering with the determination of acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase. To achieve this aim five tests were developed: In the pH profile (test 1), a pH optimum was found at 7.0 in the presence of a low substrate concentration (1.6 X 10(-6)M L-[ring-2-14C]-histidine). The apparent Michaelis concentration at the pH optimum (test 2) was 1.8 X 10(-4)M, the maximum rate 12.5pmol [14C]histamine formed X min-1. To increase the specificity of inhibition experiments with alpha-methylhistidine and alpha-methyl-L-Dopa a pH profile was determined in the presence of these two enzymatic inhibitors (test 3 and 4). alpha-Methylhistidine was used for a reliable diagnostic confirmation test, alpha-methyl-L-Dopa for a reliable exclusion test. Benzene showed no influence on either blanks or recovery rates, but inhibited the enzymic activity at pH 7.0, not however that of unspecific histidine decarboxylase and hence was very valuable as an additional diagnostic exclusion test (test 5). Although these new tests identifying acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase and demonstrating the specificity of its determination were tedious, despite the use of the modified isotope dilution method, they excluded the presence of any Dopa decarboxylase activity in mixtures with

  17. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments.

    PubMed

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  18. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  19. A dark brown roast coffee blend is less effective at stimulating gastric acid secretion in healthy volunteers compared to a medium roast market blend.

    PubMed

    Rubach, Malte; Lang, Roman; Bytof, Gerhard; Stiebitz, Herbert; Lantz, Ingo; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-06-01

    Coffee consumption sometimes is associated with symptoms of stomach discomfort. This work aimed to elucidate whether two coffee beverages, containing similar amounts of caffeine, but differing in their concentrations of (β) N-alkanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamides (C5HTs), chlorogenic acids (CGAs), trigonelline, and N-methylpyridinium (N-MP) have different effects on gastric acid secretion in healthy volunteers. The intragastric pH after administration of bicarbonate with/without 200 mL of a coffee beverage prepared from a market blend or dark roast blend was analyzed in nine healthy volunteers. Coffee beverages were analyzed for their contents of C5HT, N-MP, trigonelline, CGAs, and caffeine using HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS/MS. Chemical analysis revealed higher concentrations of N-MP for the dark brown blend (87 mg/L) compared to the market blend coffee (29 mg/L), whereas concentrations of C5HT (0.012 versus 0.343 mg/L), CGAs (323 versus 1126 mg/L), and trigonelline (119 versus 343 mg/L) were lower, and caffeine concentrations were similar (607 versus 674 mg/mL). Gastric acid secretion was less effectively stimulated after administration of the dark roast blend coffee compared to the market blend. Future studies are warranted to verify whether a high ratio of N-MP to C5HT and CGAs is beneficial for reducing coffee-associated gastric acid secretion.

  20. Effect of deoxycholic acid on Ca2+ movement, cell viability and apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jau-Min; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Liang, Wei-Zhe; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Chang, Hong-Tai; Tseng, Hui-Wen; Kuo, Soong-Yu; Kuo, Chun-Chi; Chen, Fu-An; Shieh, Pochuen; Ho, Chin-Man; Lin, Jia-Rong; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2015-02-01

    Deoxycholic acid (DOA) is one of the secondary bile acids used as a mild detergent for the isolation of membrane associated proteins. This study examined whether the secondary bile acid, DOA, altered Ca(2+) movement, cell viability and apoptosis in SCM1 human gastric cancer cells. The Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2 was used to measure [Ca(2+)]i. DOA-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises concentration dependently. The response was reduced by removing extracellular Ca(2+). DOA-evoked Ca(2+) entry was inhibited by store-operated Ca(2+) channel inhibitors (nifedipine, econazole and SKF96365), the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA) and the PKC inhibitor GF109203X. In Ca(2+)-free medium, treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) abolished DOA-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises. Conversely, treatment with DOA abolished TG-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises. Inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 abolished DOA-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rises. At 100-500 μM, DOA decreased cell viability, which was not changed by chelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA/AM). DOA between 100 and 300 μM also induced apoptosis. Collectively, in SCM1 cells, DOA-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises by evoking phospholipase C-dependent Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca(2+) entry via store-operated Ca(2+) channels. DOA also caused Ca(2+)-independent apoptosis.

  1. Effect of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery on Bile Acid Metabolism in Normal and Obese Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bhutta, Hina Y; Rajpal, Neetu; White, Wendy; Freudenberg, Johannes M.; Liu, Yaping; Way, James; Rajpal, Deepak; Cooper, David C.; Young, Andrew; Tavakkoli, Ali; Chen, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    In addition to classic functions of facilitating hepatobiliary secretion and intestinal absorption of lipophilic nutrients, bile acids (BA) are also endocrine factors and regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Recent data indicate that antiobesity bariatric procedures e.g. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB), which also remit diabetes, increase plasma BAs in humans, leading to the hypothesis that BAs may play a role in diabetes resolution following surgery. To investigate the effect of RYGB on BA physiology and its relationship with glucose homeostasis, we undertook RYGB and SHAM surgery in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and normoglycemic Sprague Dawley (SD) rats and measured plasma and fecal BA levels, as well as plasma glucose, insulin, Glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and Peptide YY (PYY), 2 days before and 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after surgery. RYGB decreased body weight and increased plasma GLP-1 in both SD and ZDF rats while decreasing plasma insulin and glucose in ZDF rats starting from the first week. Compared to SHAM groups, both SD-RYGB and ZDF-RYGB groups started to have increases in plasma total BAs in the second week, which might not contribute to early post-surgery metabolic changes. While there was no significant difference in fecal BA excretion between SD-RYGB and SD-SHAM groups, the ZDF-RYGB group had a transient 4.2-fold increase (P<0.001) in 24-hour fecal BA excretion on post-operative day 3 compared to ZDF-SHAM, which paralleled a significant increase in plasma PYY. Ratios of plasma and fecal cholic acid/chenodeoxycholic acid derived BAs were decreased in RYGB groups. In addition, tissue mRNA expression analysis suggested early intestinal BA reabsorption and potentially reduced hepatic cholic acid production in RYGB groups. In summary, we present novel data on RYGB-mediated changes in BA metabolism to further understand the role of BAs in RYGB-induced metabolic effects in humans. PMID:25798945

  2. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  3. All-trans retinoic acid decreases susceptibility of a gastric cancer cell line to lymphokine-activated killer cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, T. Y.; Jiang, S. Y.; Shyu, R. Y.; Yeh, M. Y.; Chu, T. M.

    1997-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (RA) was previously shown to regulate the growth of gastric cancer cells derived from the cell line SC-M1. This study was designed to investigate the effect of RA on the sensitivity of SC-M1 cells to lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activity. RA at the concentration range of 0.001-10 microM was shown to induce SC-M1 cells to exhibit resistance to LAK activity in a dose-dependent manner. A kinetics study indicated that a significantly increased resistance was detected after 2 days of co-culturing SC-M1 cells with RA and reached a maximum after 6 days of culture. Similar results were obtained from two other cancer cell lines: promyelocytic leukaemia HL-60 and hepatic cancer Hep 3B. A binding assay demonstrated that the binding efficacy between target SC-M1 cells and effector LAK cells was not altered by RA. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that RA exhibited no effect on the expression of cell surface molecules, including HLA class I and class II antigens, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and -2, and lymphocyte function antigen-3. Cell cycle analysis revealed that culture of SC-M1 cells with RA resulted in an increase in G0/G1 phase and a decrease in S phase, accompanied by a decrease in cyclin A and cyclin B1 mRNA as determined by Northern blot analysis. Additionally, RA was shown to enhance the expression of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) in SC-M1 cells, and to have no effect on the expression of RARbeta or RARgamma. Taken together, these results indicate that RA can significantly increase gastric cancer cells SC-M1 to resist LAK cytotoxicity by means of a cytostatic effect through a mechanism relating to cell cycle regulation. The prevailing ideas, such as a decrease in effector to target cell binding, a reduced MHC class I antigen expression or an altered RARbeta expression, are not involved. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9155047

  4. Comparison of the serial dilution indicator and intragastric titration methods for measurement of meal-stimulated gastric acid secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Hogan, D L; Turken, D; Stern, A I; Isenberg, J I

    1983-11-01

    Two in vivo methods that permit quantitation of gastric acid secretion immediately after the meal are currently in use: intragastric titration and the serial dilution indicator method. During intragastric titration, intragastric pH is artificially maintained at 5.5 to 7 by the continuous addition of alkali to the gastric contents, while during serial dilution the intragastric pH is permitted to seek its natural pH. This study compared gastric acid secretion and serum gastrin in response to a liquid protein meal measured by both techniques in 10 subjects. Mean (+/- SE) 3-hr acid outputs were almost identical (53.6 +/- 6.0 mmol/3 hr with intragastric titration and 52.0 +/- 8.5 mmol/3 hr with serial dilution indicator). Furthermore, 30 min secretory responses in individual subjects were highly correlated (r = 0.98 +/- 0.01, P less than 0.001). Also, in spite of intragastric pH being less than 1.5 by 90 min after the meal during the serial dilution method, total integrated serum gastrin concentrations after the meal were similar (intragastric titration = 20.6 +/- 7.3 ng min/ml versus serial dilution indicator = 23.5 +/- 9.8 ng min/ml) and individual 30-min gastrins during the two separate tests were highly correlated (r = 0.80 +/- 0.06, P less than 0.01). It is concluded that both meal-stimulated gastric acid secretion and serum gastrin concentrations as measured by intragastric titration and by the serial dilution indicator method produced similar results.

  5. Manuka Honey Exerts Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities That Promote Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Almasaudi, Saad B.; Al-Hindi, Rashad R.; Abdel-dayem, Umama A.; Ali, Soad S.; Saleh, Rasha M.; Al Jaouni, Soad K.

    2017-01-01

    Gastric ulcers are a major problem worldwide with no effective treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of manuka honey in the treatment of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers in rats. Different groups of rats were treated with three different concentrations of honey. Stomachs were checked macroscopically for ulcerative lesions in the glandular mucosa and microscopically for histopathological alterations. Treatment with manuka honey significantly reduced the ulcer index and maintained the glycoprotein content. It also reduced the mucosal myeloperoxidase activity, lipid peroxidation (MDA), and the inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) as compared to untreated control group. In addition, honey-treated groups showed significant increase in enzymatic (GPx and SOD) and nonenzymatic (GSH) antioxidants besides levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Flow cytometry studies showed that treatment of animals with manuka honey has normalized cell cycle distribution and significantly lowered apoptosis in gastric mucosa. In conclusion, the results indicated that manuka honey is effective in the treatment of chronic ulcer and preservation of mucosal glycoproteins. Its effects are due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that resulted in a significant reduction of the gastric mucosal MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and caused an elevation in IL-10 levels. PMID:28250794

  6. [Concentration of hydrochloric acid and pepsin in gastric juice in dogs after starvation and refeeding].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Iu V; Polenov, S A

    2005-03-01

    Feeding fogs with meat after a 3-day period of starvation increased hydrochloric acid concentration with subsequent return of the parameter to normal values. Under the same conditions, pepsin concentration decreased and raised up after re-feeding. Histamine administration following the starvation decreased hydrochloric acid concentration with subsequent normalising. In three days after re-feeding and histamine administration, pepsin concentration drooped owing, probably, to a decrease of parietal cell H2-receptor affinity to histamine. Pentagastrin administration after the starvation increased hydrochloric acid concentration. The findings suggest G-cell function inhibition occurring after a 3-day starvation which is important for the stomach mucous membrane protection.

  7. Identification and measurement of nitrous acid in an indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pttts, James N.; Wallington, Timothy J.; Biermann, Heinz W.; Winer, Arthur M.

    We report here direct observation by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) of the formation of ppb levels of gaseous nitrous acid (MONO) from the reaction of ppm levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) with water vapor, in an indoor environment. The rate of formation of HONO displayed first order kinetics with respect to NO 2 with a rate of (0.25 ±0.04) ppb min -1 per ppm of NO 2 present. Assuming a lifetime of l h with respect to both physical and chemical removal processes for HONO, this leads to an estimated steady state concentration of ~ 15 ppb of HONO per ppm of NO 2 present. This relatively high level of HONO associated with NO 2-air mixtures raises new questions concerning the health implications of elevated NO 2 concentrations in indoor environments e.g. HONO is a respirable nitrite known to convert secondary amines invitro to carcinogenic nitrosamines.

  8. ACID GASES IN CO2-RICH SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Vlcek, Lukas; Cole, David

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of species behavior involving dilute fluid environments has been crucial for the advance of modern solvation thermodynamics through molecular-based formalisms to guide the development of macroscopic regression tools in the description of fluid behavior and correlation of experimental data (Chialvo 2013). Dilute fluid environments involving geologic formations are of great theoretical and practical relevance regardless of the thermodynamic state conditions. The most challenging systems are those involving highly compressible and reactive confined environments, i.e., where small perturbations of pressure and/or temperature can trigger considerable density changes. This in turn can alter significantly the species solvation, their preferential solvation, and consequently, their reactivity with one another and with the surrounding mineral surfaces whose outcome is the modification of the substrate porosity and permeability, and ultimately, the integrity of the mineral substrates. Considering that changes in porosity and permeability resulting from dissolution and precipitation phenomena in confined environments are at the core of the aqueous CO2-mineral interactions, and that caprock integrity (e.g., sealing capacity) depends on these key parameters, it is imperative to gain fundamental understanding of the mineral-fluid interfacial phenomena and fluid-fluid equilibria under mineral confinement at subsurface conditions. In order to undertand the potential effects of acid gases as contaminants of supercritical CO2 streams, in the next section we will discuss the thermodynamic behavior of CO2 fluid systems by addressing two crucial issues in the context of carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) technologies: (i) Why should we consider (acid gas) CO2 impurities? and (ii) Why are CO2 fluid - mineral interactions of paramount relevance?

  9. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  10. Gallic Acid Enriched Fraction of Phyllanthus emblica Potentiates Indomethacin-Induced Gastric Ulcer Healing via e-NOS-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ananya; Chatterjee, Sirshendu; Biswas, Angshuman; Bhattacharya, Sayanti; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Bandyopadhyay, Sandip K

    2012-01-01

    The healing activity of gallic acid enriched ethanolic extract (GAE) of Phyllanthus emblica fruits (amla) against the indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in mice was investigated. The activity was correlated with the ability of GAE to alter the cyclooxygenase- (COX-) dependent healing pathways. Histology of the stomach tissues revealed maximum ulceration on the 3rd day after indomethacin (18 mg/kg, single dose) administration that was associated with significant increase in inflammatory factors, namely, mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS) expression. Proangiogenic parameters such as the levels of prostaglandin (PG) E(2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), von Willebrand Factor VIII, and endothelial NOS (e-NOS) were downregulated by indomethacin. Treatment with GAE (5 mg/kg/day) and omeprazole (3 mg/kg/day) for 3 days led to effective healing of the acute ulceration, while GAE could reverse the indomethacin-induced proinflammatory changes of the designated biochemical parameters. The ulcer healing activity of GAE was, however, compromised by coadministration of the nonspecific NOS inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), but not the i-NOS-specific inhibitor, L-N6-(1-iminoethyl) lysine hydrochloride (L-NIL). Taken together, these results suggested that the GAE treatment accelerates ulcer healing by inducing PGE(2) synthesis and augmenting e-NOS/i-NOS ratio.

  11. Sub-lethal heat treatment affects the tolerance of Cronobacter sakazakii BCRC 13988 to various organic acids, simulated gastric juice and bile solution.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Wan-Ling; Ho, Wei-Li; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2010-12-15

    Cronobacter spp., formerly Enterobacter sakazakii, are considered emerging opportunistic pathogens and the etiological agent of life-threatening bacterial infections in infants. In the present study, C. sakazakii BCRC 13988 was first subjected to sub-lethal heat treatment at 47°C for 15min. Survival rates of the heat-shocked and non-shocked C. sakazakii cells in phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 4.0) containing organic acids (e.g. acetic, propionic, citric, lactic or tartaric acid), simulated gastric juice (pH 2.0-4.0), and bile solution (0.5 and 2.0%) were examined. Results revealed that sub-lethal heat treatment enhanced the test organism's tolerance to organic acids, although the extent of increased acid tolerance varied with the organic acid examined. Compared with the control cells, heat-shocked C. sakazakii cells after 120-min of exposure, exhibited the largest increase in tolerance in the lactic acid-containing PBS. Furthermore, although heat shock did not affect the behavior of C. sakazakii in bile solution, it increased the test organism's survival when exposed to simulated gastric juice with a pH of 3.0-4.0.

  12. Gastric Microbiome and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, Kyle M.; Morrow, Casey D.; Smith, Phillip D.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the stomach is the fourth most common cancer worldwide. The single strongest risk factor for gastric cancer is Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastric inflammation. Among persons with H. pylori infection, strain-specific components, host immune responses, and environmental factors influence the risk for gastric disease, including adenocarcinoma of the stomach, although only a small proportion of infected persons develop the malignancy. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have uncovered a complex community of non-cultivatable inhabitants of the human stomach. The interaction between these inhabitants, collectively referred to as the gastric microbiota, and H. pylori likely impacts gastric immunobiology and possibly the sequelae of H. pylori infection. Thus, characterization of the gastric microbiota in subjects with and without H. pylori infection could provide new insight into gastric homeostasis and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated disease, including gastric cancer. PMID:24855010

  13. Acidic digestion in a teleost: postprandial and circadian pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and pepsinogen and proton pump mRNAs expression.

    PubMed

    Yúfera, Manuel; Moyano, Francisco J; Astola, Antonio; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Two different modes for regulation of stomach acid secretion have been described in vertebrates. Some species exhibit a continuous acid secretion maintaining a low gastric pH during fasting. Others, as some teleosts, maintain a neutral gastric pH during fasting while the hydrochloric acid is released only after the ingestion of a meal. Those different patterns seem to be closely related to specific feeding habits. However, our recent observations suggest that this acidification pattern could be modified by changes in daily feeding frequency and time schedule. The aim of this study was to advance in understanding the regulation mechanisms of stomach digestion and pattern of acid secretion in teleost fish. We have examined the postprandial pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and mRNA expression for pepsinogen and proton pump in white seabream juveniles maintained under a light/dark 12/12 hours cycle and receiving only one morning meal. The pepsin activity was analyzed according to the standard protocol buffering at pH 2 and using the actual pH measured in the stomach. The results show how the enzyme precursor is permanently available while the hydrochloric acid, which activates the zymogen fraction, is secreted just after the ingestion of food. Results also reveal that analytical protocol at pH 2 notably overestimates true pepsin activity in fish stomach. The expression of the mRNA encoding pepsinogen and proton pump exhibited almost parallel patterns, with notable increases during the darkness period and sharp decreases just before the morning meal. These results indicate that white seabream uses the resting hours for recovering the mRNA stock that will be quickly used during the feeding process. Our data clearly shows that both daily illumination pattern and feeding time are involved at different level in the regulation of the secretion of digestive juices.

  14. The ecological effects of trichloroacetic acid in the environment.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T E; Wolfinger, T F; Barta, M L

    2004-10-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) is a member of the family of compounds known as chloroacetic acids, which includes mono-, di- and trichloroacetic acid. The significant property these compounds share is that they are all phytotoxic. TCAA once was widely used as a potent herbicide. However, long after TCAA's use as a herbicide was discontinued, its presence is still detected in the environment in various compartments. Methods for quantifying TCAA in aqueous and solid samples are summarized. Concentrations in various environmental compartments are presented, with a discussion of the possible formation of TCAA through natural processes. Concentrations of TCAA found to be toxic to aquatic and terrestrial organisms in laboratory and field studies were compiled and used to estimate risk quotients for soil and surface waters. TCAA levels in most water bodies not directly affected by point sources appear to be well below toxicity levels for the most sensitive aquatic organisms. Given the phytotoxicity of TCAA, aquatic plants and phytoplankton would be the aquatic species to monitor for potential effects. Given the concentrations of TCAA measured in various soils, there appears to be a risk to terrestrial organisms. Soil uptake of TCAA by plants has been shown to be rapid. Also, combined uptake of TCAA from soil and directly from the atmosphere has been shown. Therefore, risk quotients derived from soil exposure may underestimate the risk TCAA poses to plants. Moreover, TCE and TCA have been shown to be taken up by plants and converted to TCAA, thus leading to an additional exposure route. Mono- and di-chloroacetic acids can co-occur with TCAA in the atmosphere and soil and are more phytotoxic than TCAA. The cumulative effects of TCAA and compounds with similar toxic effects found in air and soil must be considered in subsequent terrestrial ecosystem risk assessments.

  15. Unsaturated Fatty Acid Synthesis in the Gastric Pathogen Helicobacter pylori Proceeds via a Backtracking Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongkai; Zhu, Lei; Jia, Jia; Zeng, Liping; Cronan, John E

    2016-12-22

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that inhabits the upper gastrointestinal tract in humans, and the presence of this pathogen in the gut microbiome increases the risk of peptic ulcers and stomach cancer. H. pylori depends on unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis for maintaining membrane structure and function. Although some of the H. pylori enzymes involved in UFA biosynthesis are functionally homologous with the enzymes found in Escherichia coli, we show here that an enzyme HP0773, now annotated as FabX, uses an unprecedented backtracking mechanism to not only dehydrogenate decanoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) in a reaction that parallels that of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, the first enzyme of the fatty acid β-oxidation cycle, but also isomerizes trans-2-decenoyl-ACP to cis-3-decenoyl-ACP, the key UFA synthetic intermediate. Thus, FabX reverses the normal fatty acid synthesis cycle in H. pylori at the C10 stage. Overall, this unusual FabX activity may offer a broader explanation for how many bacteria that lack the canonical pathway enzymes produce UFA-containing phospholipids.

  16. Survival of lactic acid bacteria from fermented milks in an in vitro digestion model exploiting sequential incubation in human gastric and duodenum juice.

    PubMed

    Faye, T; Tamburello, A; Vegarud, G E; Skeie, S

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, the survival of 9 lactic acid bacteria (5 Lactococcus strains, 3 Lactobacillus strains, and 1 strain of Enterococcus hirae), was investigated in vitro under conditions similar to human digestion using human gastric and duodenal juices. The tolerance of the bacteria was also tested with traditional methods using acidic conditions and bile salts. The strains were subjected to a model digestive system comprising sequential incubation in human gastric and duodenal juices, in a 2-step digestion assay at 37°C, simulating the human upper gastrointestinal tract with human gastric juices at pH 2.5 and human duodenal juices at pH 7. The bacterial strains were tested either as washed cells from culture media or in fermented milk. The initial in vitro testing in acid and bile salts showed that Lactobacillus strains and the E. hirae strain displayed a significantly higher acid tolerance than the lactococci. The lactobacilli and the Enterococcus numbers increased, whereas the lactococci decreased at least 1 log during the bile salt treatment. The Lactobacillus strains showed the highest survival rate in the model digestive system when washed bacterial cultures were used with a minor log reduction, whereas the lactococci numbers were reduced by at least log 4. However, when using fermented milks in the model digestion system it was demonstrated that the Enterococcus strain and 2 strains of Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris benefited significantly from the presence of the fermented milk as food matrix, with log numbers >log 7 and 5, respectively, after digestion of the fermented milk. The analyses reported comprise a comprehensive in vitro testing regimen suitable for evaluation of the survival of candidate probiotic bacteria in human digestion as an initial prescreen to clinical trials.

  17. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjustable gastric banding; Bariatric surgery - laparoscopic gastric banding; Obesity - gastric banding; Weight loss - gastric banding ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ...

  18. Effect of carnosic acid, quercetin and α-tocopherol on lipid and protein oxidation in an in vitro simulated gastric digestion model.

    PubMed

    Raes, Katleen; Doolaege, Evelyne H A; Deman, Steven; Vossen, Els; De Smet, Stefaan

    2015-03-01

    Carnosic acid, quercetin and α-tocopherol are well-known antioxidants in many biological systems. However, their antioxidative effect during food digestion against lipid and protein oxidation is not well known. Therefore, in this study, an in vitro simulated gastric digestion model was used to investigate their stability during gastrointestinal conditions and their antioxidative properties during low pH digestion. In general, the stability of the antioxidants in the different steps of digestion was in the order of α-tocopherol > quercetin > carnosic acid. Salivary components, as well as the acidity of the gastric juice, were responsible for the reduction in antioxidants. Both α-tocopherol and quercetin were able to lower lipid oxidation during digestion, while the effect on protein oxidation was not clear. In contrast, carnosic acid did not have any effect on lipid oxidation and tended to stimulate protein oxidation. This study clearly demonstrated that the environmental conditions are of major importance to the properties of antioxidant compounds.

  19. Exploring the link between gastric motility and intragastric drug distribution in man.

    PubMed

    Van Den Abeele, Jens; Brouwers, Joachim; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    In drug development, the stomach is often considered to be a simple, one-compartmental organ, a waiting room for transfer of an orally administered dosage form to the duodenum. However, factors such as gastric acidity and hydrodynamics in the gastric environment may influence drug disposition. Although a link between gastrointestinal drug behaviour and gastric motility has often been hypothesized, they have not been simultaneously investigated in humans yet. In this proof-of-concept study, the combination of a well-established intraluminal sampling technique with high-resolution manometric measurements in the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated. This new combination of in vivo techniques proved to be feasible from a practical point of view and yielded valuable additional information regarding intraluminal drug behaviour. As a first application, the link between fasted state gastric motility and (in)homogeneous distribution of an orally administered drug in the stomach was investigated in healthy subjects. To this end, drug concentrations were measured in different regions of the stomach after oral administration of a commercially available drug product (Gabbroral®, 250mg paromomycin) during a specific period of gastric contractile activity. A clear trend towards better mixing of an orally administered drug with gastric contents was observed when dosed in the presence of gastric contractions, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of the drug throughout the stomach compared to dosing in the absence of gastric contractions.

  20. Amino Acid Synthesis in Seafloor Environments on Icy Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Erika; Barge, Laura; VanderVelde, David; Kallas, Kayo; Baum, Marc M.; Russell, Michael J.; Kanik, Isik

    2016-10-01

    In 2005, the Cassini mission detected plumes erupting from Enceladus' surface, containing carbon dioxide, methane, silica, and possibly ammonia. Subsequent laboratory experiments indicated that the silica particles in the plumes were generated under alkaline conditions and at moderate temperatures of ~90°C (Hsu et al., 2015); one scenario for such conditions would be the existence of alkaline (serpentinization-driven) hydrothermal activity within Enceladus. Alkaline vents are significant since they have been proposed as a likely environment for the emergence of metabolism on the early Earth (Russell et al. 2014) and thus could also provide a mechanism for origin of life on ocean worlds with a water-rock interface. Alkaline vents in an acidic, iron-containing ocean could produce mineral precipitates that could act as primitive enzymes or catalysts mediating organic reactions; for example, metal sulfides can catalyze the reductive amination of pyruvate to alanine (Novikov and Copley 2013). We have conducted experiments testing the synthesis of amino acids catalyzed by other iron minerals that might be expected to precipitate on the seafloor of early Earth or Enceladus. Preliminary results indicate that amino acids as well as other organic products can be synthesized in 1-3 days under alkaline hydrothermal conditions. We also find that the yield and type of organic products is highly dependent on pH and temperature, implying that understanding the specifics of the geochemical hydrothermal gradients on Enceladus (or other ocean worlds) will be significant in determining their potential for synthesizing building blocks for life.Hsu, H.-W. et al. (2015), Nature 519, 207-210.Russell, M. J. et al. (2014), Astrobiology, 14, 308-43.Novikov Y. and Copley S. D. (2013) PNAS 110, 33, 13283-13288.

  1. The effect of azathioprine on gastric mucosal histology and acid secretion in chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, A. D.; Sanchez, D.

    1973-01-01

    Fourteen patients were selected with advanced superficial chronic gastritis (grade II), marked chronic gastritis with partial atrophy (grade III), or chronic gastritis with total atrophy in which intestinal metaplasia was observed (grade IV). Azathioprine was administrated to all of them for periods varying from two and a half to six months. There were no side effects except in one patient, in whom nausea and vomiting made it necessary to remove him from the trial. Acid output in these 14 patients showed an average change which was statistically significant. Statistical analysis of the sample as a whole shows that, with a 0·95 probability improvement could be expected in 37 to 85% of the patients given azathioprine. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:4696531

  2. Inhibitory potency of twice-a-day omeprazole on gastric acidity is enhanced by eradication of H. pylori in duodenal ulcer patients.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A B R; Keelan, M; Lastiwka, R; Appelman-Eszczuk, S; Zuk, L; Drozdowski, L; Prentice, A; Sinclair, P

    2003-10-01

    The gastric pH-elevating effect of proton pump inhibitors such as omeprazole has been reported to be greater in the presence than in the absence of an H. pylori infection. It is unknown if this effect persists when a higher dose of omeprazole is taken. We undertook both 24-hr pH-metry and 24-hr aspiration studies in 12 H. pylori-positive patients with a history of duodenal ulcer (DU); (1) when not on omeprazole; (2) when on omeprazole 20 mg twice a day for 8 days; (3) two months after eradication of H. pylori and when not on omeprazole; and (4) after eradication of H. pylori and when on omeprazole twice a day. Eradication of H. pylori in DU results in lower mean and median pH; decreased percent pH > or = 3/ > or = 4, and greater median H+ after breakfast, after lunch, and overnight; and omeprazole appears to have less of a pH-elevating effect in the absence than in the presence of an H. pylori infection. The fall in gastric juice NH3 concentration as a result of eradicating H. pylori partially explained the lower pH-elevating effect of omeprazole. The variation in acid inhibitory effect of omeprazole after as compared with before eradication of H. pylori could not be explained by differences; (1) in gastric juice concentrations of IL-1alpha, IL-8, IL-13, or epidermal growth factor; (2) in the fasting or fed total concentration of gastric juice bile acids; (3) in the fasting concentrations or area under-the-curve (AUC) of the gastric H+ concentrations in response to food; or (4) in the pharmacokinetics of omeprazole. The difference in H+ AUC without omeprazole minus with omeprazole was actually greater when compared after versus before eradication of H. pylori. Thus, in DU the pH-elevating potency of omeprazole taken twice a day is greater in the presence than in the absence of an H. pylori infection.

  3. Phase and Size Controllable Synthesis of NaYbF4 Nanocrystals in Oleic Acid/ Ionic Liquid Two-Phase System for Targeted Fluorescent Imaging of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Liyuan; He, Meng; Ma, Jiebing; Tang, Wei; Gao, Guo; He, Rong; Su, Haichuan; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-01-01

    Upconversion nanocrystals with small size and strong fluorescent signals own great potential in applications such as biomolecule-labeling, in vivo tracking and molecular imaging. Herein we reported that NaYbF4: 25%Gd, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals with small size and strong fluorescent signals were controllably synthesized by oleic acid (OA)/ ionic liquid (IL) two-phase system for targeted fluorescent imaging of gastric cancer in vivo. The optimal synthesis condition of NaYbF4: 25%Gd, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals by OA/IL two-phase system was established, adding more metal ion such as Na+ ion could facilitate the size control and crystal-phase transition, more importantly, markedly enhancing fluorescent intensity of beta-phase nanocrystals compared with traditional methods. Alpha-phase NaYbF4, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals with less than 10nm in diameter and beta-phase NaYbF4: 25%Gd, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals with 30 nm or so in diameter and strong fluorescent signals were obtained, these synthesized nanocrystals exhibited very low cytotoxicity. Folic acid-conjugated silica-modified beta-phase NaYbF4: 25%Gd, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals were prepared, could actively target gastric cancer tissues implanted into nude mice in vivo, and realized targeted fluorescent imaging. Folic acid-conjugated silica-modified NaYbF4: 25%Gd, 2%Tm upconversion nanocrystals show great potential in applications such as targeted near infared radiation fluorescent imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and targeted therapy of gastric cancer in the near future. PMID:23471455

  4. Exploring the potential of gastro retentive dosage form in delivery of ellagic acid and aloe vera gel powder for treatment of gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Arati N; Ranpise, Nisharani S; Ramesh, C

    2014-01-01

    Approach of novel drug delivery system (NDDS) overcomes the limitations of conventional dosage forms. However, this concept is still not practiced to a large extent in delivery of herbal drugs in Ayurveda. Thus, the potential of herbal drugs has not been explored to its fullest. Hence, there is a growing need to amalgamate the concept of NDDS in delivery of herbal constituents. The present investigation is designed to deliver and retain two herbal constituents in stomach for better action against Helicobacter pylori induced gastric ulcers. The objective was to develop a bilayer floating tablet of ellagic acid and Aloe vera gel powder through rational combination of excipients to give the lowest possible lag time with maximum drug release in the period of 4 h. Formulation F9 containing 100 mg of HPMC K15M, 27 mg of crospovidone, 80 mg of mannitol and effervescent agents in the ratio 1:2 gave 92% drug release and desired floating properties. In vivo studies showed that combination of ellagic acid and Aloe vera gave 75 % ulcer inhibition in comparison to 57% ulcer inhibition in the group which was administered with ellagic acid alone. This suggests the use of bilayer floating tablet in gastric ulcer treatment.

  5. Biodegradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an Extremely Acidic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Raymond D.; Savage, Dwayne C.; Sayler, Gary S.; Stacey, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The potential for biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons was evaluated in soil samples recovered along gradients of both contaminant levels and pH values existing downstream of a long-term coal pile storage basin. pH values for areas greatly impacted by runoff from the storage basin were 2.0. Even at such a reduced pH, the indigenous microbial community was metabolically active, showing the ability to oxidize more than 40% of the parent hydrocarbons, naphthalene and toluene, to carbon dioxide and water. Treatment of the soil samples with cycloheximide inhibited mineralization of the aromatic substrates. DNA hybridization analysis indicated that whole-community nucleic acids recovered from these samples did not hybridize with genes, such as nahA, nahG, nahH, todC1C2, and tomA, that encode common enzymes from neutrophilic bacteria. Since these data suggested that the degradation of aromatic compounds may involve a microbial consortium instead of individual acidophilic bacteria, experiments using microorganisms isolated from these samples were initiated. While no defined mixed cultures were able to evolve 14CO2 from labeled substrates in these mineralization experiments, an undefined mixed culture including a fungus, a yeast, and several bacteria successfully metabolized approximately 27% of supplied naphthalene after 1 week. This study shows that biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons can occur in environments with extremely low pH values. PMID:9797263

  6. A method for establishing human primary gastric epithelial cell culture from fresh surgical gastric tissues.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Faisal; Yang, Xuesong; Wen, Qingping; Yan, Qiu

    2015-08-01

    At present, biopsy specimens, cancer cell lines and tissues obtained by gastric surgery are used in the study and analysis of gastric cancer, including the molecular mechanisms and proteomics. However, fibroblasts and other tissue components may interfere with these techniques. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a procedure for the isolation of viable human gastric epithelial cells from gastric surgical tissues. A method was developed to culture human gastric epithelial cells using fresh, surgically excised tissues and was evaluated using immunocytochemistry, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and cell viability assays. Low cell growth was observed surrounding the gastric tissue on the seventh day of tissue explant culture. Cell growth subsequently increased, and at 12 days post-explant a high number of pure epithelial cells were detected. The gastric cancer cells exhibited rapid growth with a doubling time of 13-52 h, as compared to normal cells, which had a doubling time of 20-53 h. Immunocytochemical analyses of primary gastric cells revealed positive staining for cytokeratin 18 and 19, which indicated that the culture was comprised of pure epithelial cells and contained no fibroblasts. Furthermore, PAS staining demonstrated that the cultured gastric cells produced neutral mucin. Granulin and carbohydrate antigen 724 staining confirmed the purity of gastric cancer and normal cells in culture. This method of cell culture indicated that the gastric cells in primary culture consisted of mucin-secreting gastric epithelial cells, which may be useful for the study of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

  7. Vegetative Clostridium difficile survives in room air on moist surfaces and in gastric contents with reduced acidity: a potential mechanism to explain the association between proton pump inhibitors and C. difficile-associated diarrhea?

    PubMed

    Jump, Robin L P; Pultz, Michael J; Donskey, Curtis J

    2007-08-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been identified as a risk factor for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD), though the mechanism is unclear because gastric acid does not kill C. difficile spores. We hypothesized that the vegetative form of C. difficile, which is killed by acid, could contribute to disease pathogenesis if it survives in room air and in gastric contents with elevated pH. We compared the numbers of C. difficile spores and vegetative cells in stools of patients prior to and during the treatment of CDAD. We assessed the survival of vegetative cells on moist or dry surfaces in room air versus anaerobic conditions and in human gastric contents, in pH-adjusted gastric contents, and in gastric contents from individuals receiving PPI therapy. Stool samples obtained from patients prior to the initiation of antibiotic treatment for C. difficile contained approximately 10-fold more vegetative cells than spores. On dry surfaces, vegetative C. difficile cells died rapidly, whereas they remained viable for up to 6 h on moist surfaces in room air. Vegetative C. difficile cells had only marginal survival in gastric contents at low pH; adjustment to a pH of >5 resulted in survival similar to that in the phosphate-buffered saline control. The survival of vegetative C. difficile in gastric contents obtained from patients receiving PPIs was also increased at a pH of >5. The ability of the vegetative form of C. difficile to survive on moist surfaces and in gastric contents with an elevated pH suggests a potential mechanism by which PPI therapy could increase the risk of acquiring C. difficile.

  8. Influence of human gastric juice on oxidation of marine lipids--in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kristinova, Vera; Storrø, Ivar; Rustad, Turid

    2013-12-15

    This study evaluates whether marine lipids can oxidise in acidic stomach environment and whether authentic gastric juice has the potential to act as a pro- or anti-oxidative medium. Oxidation of herring lipids in emulsions and liposomes was followed in in vitro digestion models containing authentic human gastric juice, and compared to models containing hydrochloric acid solution. Peroxide value, concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and oxygen uptake rate increased in all the models during 2.5 h incubation at pH 4 and 37 °C in darkness. The markers showed no difference between oxidation in gastric juice and hydrochloric acid solution. Gastric juice reduced the prooxidant activity of iron ions measured as oxygen uptake rate, but did not reduce the activity of methemoglobin. Berry juice, green tea, red wine, and caffeic acid reduced oxygen uptake in the acidic environments while coffee, ascorbic acid and orange juice increased oxidation. Beverages accompanying foods containing marine lipids will therefore affect the course of post-prandial lipid oxidation.

  9. Activity-guided fractionation to characterize a coffee beverage that effectively down-regulates mechanisms of gastric acid secretion as compared to regular coffee.

    PubMed

    Rubach, Malte; Lang, Roman; Skupin, Carola; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2010-04-14

    In some individuals, the consumption of coffee beverages is related to symptoms of gastric irritation. Hot water steam-treatment of raw coffee beans is hypothesized to reduce the contents of stomach irritating compounds, and products to which this technology is applied are launched as stomach-friendly coffee. However, data on the effect of steam-treated coffee on gastric acid secretion are conflicting and it has not been proven yet as to which coffee components act as pro- or antisecretory stimulants. The work presented here aimed at the characterization of a coffee beverage that effectively down-regulates mechanisms of proton secretion in human gastric cells (HGT-1). At first, a regular coffee beverage was fractionated by using solvents of different polarity: water, ethylacetate, dichloromethane, and pentane. Functional assays on the proton secretory activity (PSA) of these solvent fractions revealed the least pronounced effect for the water fraction, for which quantitative analyses demonstrated the highest distribution of chlorogenic acid (95%), (beta)N-alkanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamides (55%), and N-methylpyridinium (N-MP, >99%) among all fractions. Following experiments demonstrated that HGT-1 cells treated with regular coffee fortified with N-MP at a concentration of about 20 mg/mL N-MP showed a significantly decreased PSA as compared to cells which were exposed to coffee beverages containing higher (32-34 mg/L) or lower (5 mg/L) N-MP concentrations. Results from cellular pathway analyses of transcription (ATF-1 and Akt1) and signaling (cAMP and EGFr) factors and kinases (ERK1/2), and experiments on the gene expression of pro (histamine-HRH2 and acetylcholine-CHRM3)- and anti (somatostatin-SSTR1)-secretory receptors and H(+),K(+)-ATPase verified this antisecretory activity of N-MP in coffee beverages.

  10. Gas-grain Modeling of Isocyanic Acid (HNCO), Cyanic Acid (HOCN), Fulminic Acid (HCNO), and Isofulminic Acid (HONC) in Assorted Interstellar Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Donghui; Herbst, Eric; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Roueff, Evelyne

    2010-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) is a well-known interstellar molecule. Evidence also exists for the presence of two of its metastable isomers in the interstellar medium: HCNO (fulminic acid) and HOCN (cyanic acid). Fulminic acid has been detected toward cold and lukewarm sources, while cyanic acid has been detected both in these sources and in warm sources in the Galactic Center. Gas-phase models can reproduce the abundances of the isomers in cold sources, but overproduce HCNO in the Galactic Center. Here we present a detailed study of a gas-grain model that contains these three isomers, plus a fourth isomer, isofulminic acid (HONC), for four types of sources: hot cores, the warm envelopes of hot cores, lukewarm corinos, and cold cores. The current model is partially able to rationalize the abundances of HNCO, HOCN, and HCNO in cold and warm sources. Predictions for HONC in all environments are also made.

  11. Cross-linked hyaluronic acid gel inhibits metastasis and growth of gastric and hepatic cancer cells: in vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Ting; Pang, Ji; Wu, Yan; Zhu, Miaolin; Yao, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Min; Qian, Hai; Zhang, Zhenyu; Gao, Jizong; Chen, Yongchang

    2016-01-01

    Cross-linked hyaluronic acid gel (CHAG) has been used to prevent postoperative adhesion of abdominal tumorectomy. However, its effect on tumor cells is still unknown. This paper was designed to investigate the effect of CHAG on metastasis and growth of tumor cells. Migration and invasion assays, Western blotting, pull down assay, siRNA interference, and nude mice implantation tumor model were applied in this study. The results of in vitro experiments with gastric cancer cell line AGS and hepatic cancer cell line HepG2 showed that CHAG inhibited the migration and invasion activities, the MAPK and PI3K/Akt mediated signaling, the activation of small G proteins Rac1 and RhoA, and the expression of MMPs and PCNA initiated by EGF, through blocking the activation of EGFR. CHAG also had inhibitory effect on activation of other membrane receptors, including integrin and VEGFR. When the expression of hyaluronic acid receptors (CD44 or RHAMM) was interfered, the above inhibitory effects of CHAG still existed. In vivo experimental results showed that CHAG suppressed colonization, growth and metastasis of gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901 in peritoneal cavity of nude mice. In conclusion, CHAG had inhibitory effect on tumor cells, through covering cell surface and blocking the interaction between extracellular stimulative factors and their receptors. PMID:27589842

  12. THE ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TRICHLORACETIC ACID (TCAA) IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) is a member of the family of compounds known as chloroacetic acids, which includes mono-, di- and trichloroacetic acid. The significant property these compounds share is that they are all phytotoxic. TCAA once was widely used as a potent herbicide. ...

  13. Gut microbiota and gastric disease.

    PubMed

    Sgambato, Dolores; Miranda, Agnese; Romano, Lorenzo; Romano, Marco

    2017-02-15

    The gut microbiota may be considered a crucial "organ" of human body because of its role in the maintenance of the balance between health as well as disease. It is mainly located in the small bowel and colon, while, the stomach was long thought to be sterile in particular for its high acid production. In particular, stomach was considered "an hostile place" for bacterial growth until the identification of Helicobacter pylori (HP). Now, the stomach and its microbiota can be considered as two different "organs" that share the same place and they have an impact on each other. In fact microscopic structures of gastric mucosa (mucus layer and luminal contents) influence local microflora and vice versa. In this article our attention is directed specifically to explain the effects of this "cross-talk" on gastric homeostais. The gastric microbiota grossly consists of two macrogroups: HP and non-HP bacteria. Here, we review the relationship between these two populations and their role in the development of the different gastric disorders: functional dyspepsia, gastric premalignant lesions (chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of the gastric mucosa) and gastric cancer. Moreover we focus on the effects on the gastric microbiota of exogenous interference as diet and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs).

  14. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric lavage; Stomach pumping; Nasogastric tube suction; Bowel obstruction - suction ... A tube is inserted through your nose or mouth, down the food pipe (esophagus), and into the stomach. Your ...

  15. Gastric sarcoidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Akinyemi, Emmanuel; Rohewal, Upinder; Tangorra, Matthew; Abdullah, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    A 58-year-old Jamaican male presented with acute-onset, right-sided facial droop and slurred speech. He had an episode of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleed on the second day of admission and endoscopy with biopsy of antral ulcer revealed gastric sarcoidosis. This case demonstrates the rare entity of gastric sarcoidosis presenting acutely with an upper GI bleed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16775918

  16. Corrosion studies in fuel element reprocessing environments containing nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J A; White, R R; Berry, W E; Griess, J C

    1982-04-01

    Nitric acid is universally used in aqueous fuel element reprocessing plants; however, in the processing scheme being developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, some of the equipment will be exposed to nitric acid under conditions not previously encountered in fuel element reprocessing plants. A previous report presented corrosion data obtained in hyperazeotropic nitric acid and in concentrated magnesium nitrate solutions used in its preparation. The results presented in this report are concerned with the following: (1) corrosion of titanium in nitric acid; (2) corrosion of nickel-base alloys in a nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution; (3) the formation of Cr(VI), which enhances corrosion, in nitric acid solutions; and (4) corrosion of mechanical pipe connectors in nitric acid. The results show that the corrosion rate of titanium increased with the refreshment rate of boiling nitric acid, but the effect diminished rapidly as the temperature decreased. The addition of iodic acid inhibited attack. Also, up to 200 ppM of fluoride in 70% HNO/sub 3/ had no major effect on the corrosion of either titanium or tantalum. In boiling 8 M HNO/sub 3/-0.05 M HF, Inconel 671 was more resistant than Inconel 690, but both alloys experienced end-grain attack. In the case of Inconel 671, heat treatment was very important; annealed and quenched material was much more resistant than furnace-cooled material.The rate of oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) increased significantly as the nitric acid concentration increased, and certain forms of ruthenium in the solution seemed to accelerate the rate of formation. Mechanical connectors of T-304L stainless steel experienced end-grain attack on the exposed pipe ends, and seal rings of both stainless steel and a titanium alloy (6% Al-4% V) underwent heavy attack in boiling 8 M HNO/sub 3/.

  17. A novel synthetic Asiatic acid derivative induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation and mobility of gastric cancer cells by suppressing STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Jing, Yue; Cao, Lingsen; Gong, Changchang; Gong, Zhunan; Cao, Xiangrong

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor, signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3), has been linked to the proliferation and migration of a variety of human cancer cells. These actions occur via the upregulation or downregulation of cell survival and tumor suppressor genes, respectively. Importantly, agents that can suppress STAT3 activation have the potential for use in the prevention and treatment of various cancers. In this study, an Asiatic acid (AA) derivative, N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), is reported to dose dependently suppress constitutive STAT3 activation in gastric cancer cells. This inhibition was mediated by blockade of Janus-activated kinase 2. Additionally, AA-PMe regulated the expression of STAT3-modulated gene products, including cyclin D1, Bax, Bcl-2, c-Myc, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Finally, transfection with both a STAT3 mimic and an inhibitor reversed the AA-PMe-driven modulation of STAT3 downstream gene products. Overall, these results suggest that AA-PMe is a novel blocker of STAT3 activation and has the potential for the prevention and treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:28053540

  18. Paclitaxel plus valproic acid versus paclitaxel alone as second- or third-line therapy for advanced gastric cancer: a randomized Phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Fushida, Sachio; Kinoshita, Jun; Kaji, Masahide; Oyama, Katsunobu; Hirono, Yasuo; Tsukada, Tomoya; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Weekly paclitaxel (wPTX) is the preferred second-line chemotherapy for gastric cancer in Japan. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to decrease proliferation through cell-cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. One histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), also inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel (PTX), shown in a murine gastric cancer model. This Phase II trial was designed to evaluate the benefits of adding VPA to wPTX in patients with gastric cancer refractory to first-line treatment with fluoropyrimidine. Patients and methods The patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive PTX 80 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15, every 4 weeks, or a dose of PTX plus VPA taken everyday at 7.5 mg/kg twice daily. Random assignment was carried out at the data center with a minimization method adjusted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0–1 vs 2), prior chemotherapy (first-line vs second-line), and measurable lesions (presence vs absence). The primary end point was the overall survival (OS) rate, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival rate and safety analysis. Results Sixty-six patients were randomly assigned to receive wPTX (n=33) or wPTX plus VPA (n=33). The median OS was 9.8 months in the wPTX group and 8.7 months in the wPTX plus VPA group (hazard ratio 1.19; 95% CI 0.702–2.026; P=0.51). The median progression-free survival was 4.5 months in the wPTX group and 3.0 months in the wPTX plus VPA group (hazard ratio 1.29; 95% CI 0.753–2.211; P=0.35). Grade 3–4 adverse events were neutropenia (3.1%), pneumonia (1.6%), liver injury (1.6%), brain infarction (1.6%), and rupture of aorta (1.6%). Conclusion No statistically significant difference was observed between wPTX and wPTX plus VPA for OS. PMID:27524882

  19. Acid in the environment: lessons learned and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Visgilio, Gerald R.; Whitelaw, Diana M.

    2007-07-01

    This book is the result of a conference held biannually at the Goodwin-Niering Center for Conservation Biology and Environmental Studies at Connecticut College. It uses an interdisciplinary approach to focus on important ecological impacts of acid deposition, the transboundary nature of the pollutants that cause acid rain, and domestic and international policies designed to reduce the emission of these pollutants. The book combines research findings and the policy analyses of experts from different academic disciplines with the positions advanced by representatives of various nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The sixteen papers are arranged in four parts entitled: ecological impacts of acid deposition; acid emissions energy and policy; sulfur dioxide and the market; and lessons learned and future prospects.

  20. Canine gastric mucosal vasodilation with prostaglandins and histamine analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, J.G.; Nies, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of direct intragastric artery infusion of prostaglandins E2 and I2, arachidonic acid, dimaprit (histamine H2 agonist), and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine (histamine H1 agonist) on gastric mucosal blood flow was examined in dogs to elucidate the relationship between gastric secretory state and mucosal blood flow in dogs. These compounds were chosen because of their diverse effect on gastric acid secretion. Gastric fundus blood flow was measured both electromagnetically with a flow probe around the left gastric artery which supplies the fundus almost exclusively, and by the radioactive microsphere technique. Intraarterial infusion of all the compounds resulted in gastric mucosal vasodilation even though PGE2, PGI2, and arachidonic acid inhibit gastric acid secretion, dimaprit stimulated gastric acid secretion, and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine does not affect gastric acid secretion. There was total agreement in the blood flow measurements by the two different techniques. Our data suggest that gastric acid secretion and gastric vasodilation are independently regulated. In addition, the validity of the studies in which the aminopyrine clearance indicates that prostaglandins are mucosal vasoconstrictors needs to be questioned because of the reliance of those measurements on the secretory state of the stomach.

  1. Attack and defence in the gastric epithelium - a delicate balance.

    PubMed

    Dimaline, Rod; Varro, Andrea

    2007-07-01

    The gastric epithelium is a complex structure formed into tubular branched gastric glands. The glands contain a wide variety of cell types concerned with the secretion of hydrochloric acid, proteases, mucus and a range of signalling molecules. All cell types originate from stem cells in the neck region of the gland, before migrating and differentiating to assume their characteristic positions and functions. Endocrine and local paracrine mediators are of crucial importance for maintaining structural and functional integrity of the epithelium, in the face of a hostile luminal environment. The first such mediator to be recognized, the hormone gastrin, was identified over a century ago and is now established as the major physiological stimulant of gastric acid secretion. Recent studies, including those using mice that overexpress or lack the gastrin gene, suggest a number of previously unrecognized roles for this hormone in the regulation of cellular proliferation, migration and differentiation. This review focuses on the identification of hitherto unsuspected gastrin-regulated genes and discusses the paracrine cascades that contribute to the maintenance of gastric epithelial architecture and secretory function. Helicobacter infection is also considered in cases where it shares targets and signalling mechanisms with gastrin.

  2. STUDIES ON THE DEPLETION AND ACCUMULATION OF MICROVILLI AND CHANGES IN THE TUBULOVESICULAR COMPARTMENT OF MOUSE PARIETAL CELLS IN RELATION TO GASTRIC ACID SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S.; Schofield, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Gastric parietal cells in mice present a spectrum of microscopic appearances due mainly to variations in the abundance of the tubular and vesicular component of the cytoplasm and in the size and number of microvilli lining the intracellular canaliculi. Differences in the range of forms among parietal cells of fasting versus fed mice were not especially striking, but cells with very numerous tubules and vesicles were more common after fasting. However, in mice treated with drugs or hormones that induce acid secretion, parietal cells were more uniform in appearance. There was a marked reduction of these cytoplasmic membranes and a concomitant increase in both the number and size of microvilli. Measurements of acid secretion in control animals and in animals treated with acid secretagogues indicated hydrogen ion secretion contemporaneous with depletion of the cytoplasmic tubulovesicular membranes and with increase of the microvilli. In mice with inhibited acid secretion, parietal cells showed an accumulation of cytoplasmic tubules and vesicles and reduction in the numbers of microvilli. Stereological methods were used to quantitate 10 different parietal cell compartments. Tracer studies with lanthanum did not reveal continuity between the tubules and the plasma membrane. However, there were regions of close apposition between the tubulovesicular membranes and the cell membrane of the canaliculus, and instances where cytoplasmic tubules extended from the cell into the core of enlarged microvilli. PMID:4138520

  3. Survival of the acid-adapted Bacillus cereus in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Lin; Chiang, Ming-Lun; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the acid tolerance of Bacillus cereus 1-4-1 after adaptation at pH 5.5 for 1, 2 and 4 h was first determined. The survival of acid-adapted and non-adapted cells of B. cereus in phosphate buffer solution (PBS pH 4.0) containing various organic acids such as acetic, propionic, citric, lactic or tartaric acid as well as in a commercial acidic beverage of mixed fruits and vegetables (pH 3.7) was then examined. Results revealed that acid adaptation time influenced the increased tolerance of B. cereus in PBS (pH 4.0). The 2 h-adapted cells exhibited the highest acid tolerance in PBS. The presence of chloramphenicol during the acid adaptation reduced the extent of increased acid tolerance. Acid adaptation was also found to enhance the tolerance of the test organism in the presence of the various organic acids tested. While the extent of increased acid tolerance varied with the organic acid examined. Acid-adapted B. cereus cells exhibited the largest extent of increased tolerance, showing an increased survival of ca. 1000 folds, in the propionic acid-containing PBS. Additionally, a higher survival percentage was noted with the acid-adapted than the non-adapted cells of B. cereus in the acidic beverage stored at 4 or 25 degrees C.

  4. Smectite Formation in Acid Sulfate Environments on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretyazhko, T. S.; Niles, P. B.; Sutter, B.; Clark, J. V.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    Phyllosilicates of the smectite group detected in Noachian and early Hesperian terrains on Mars were hypothesized to form under aqueous conditions that were globally neutral to alkaline. These pH conditions and the presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere should have been favorable for the formation of large carbonate deposits. However, large-scale carbonate deposits have not been detected on Mars. We hypothesized that smectite deposits are consistent with perhaps widespread acidic aqueous conditions that prevented carbonate precipitation. The objective of our work was to investigate smectite formation under acid sulfate conditions in order to provide insight into the possible geochemical conditions required for smectite formation on Mars. Hydrothermal batch incubation experiments were performed with Mars-analogue, glass-rich, basalt simulant in the presence of sulfuric acid of variable concentration.

  5. Application of nanoparticles for oral delivery of acid-labile lansoprazole in the treatment of gastric ulcer: in vitro and in vivo evaluations.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop nanoparticles for oral delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ), for gastric ulcer therapy. LPZ-loaded positively charged Eudragit(®) RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNPs-LPZ) and negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGANPs-LPZ) were prepared. The effect of charge on nanoparticle deposition in ulcerated and non-ulcerated regions of the stomach was investigated. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles in the intestine was evaluated in a Caco-2 cell model. The pharmacokinetic performance and ulcer healing response of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles following oral administration were evaluated in Wistar rats with induced ulcers. The prepared drug-loaded ERSNPs-LPZ and PLGANPs-LPZ possessed opposite surface charge (+38.5±0.3 mV versus -27.3±0.3 mV, respectively) and the particle size was around 200 nm with a narrow size distribution. The negatively charged PLGANPs adhered more readily to the ulcerated region (7.22%±1.21% per cm(2)), whereas the positively charged ERSNPs preferentially distributed in the non-ulcerated region (8.29%±0.35% per cm(2)). Both ERSNPs and PLGANPs were prominent uptake in Caco-2 cells, too. The nanoparticles sustained and prolonged LPZ concentrations up to 24 hours, and the half-life and mean residence time of LPZ were prolonged by 3.5-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, as compared with LPZ solution. Oral administration of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles healed 92.6%-95.7% of gastric ulcers in Wistar rats within 7 days.

  6. Application of nanoparticles for oral delivery of acid-labile lansoprazole in the treatment of gastric ulcer: in vitro and in vivo evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop nanoparticles for oral delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ), for gastric ulcer therapy. LPZ-loaded positively charged Eudragit® RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNPs-LPZ) and negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGANPs-LPZ) were prepared. The effect of charge on nanoparticle deposition in ulcerated and non-ulcerated regions of the stomach was investigated. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles in the intestine was evaluated in a Caco-2 cell model. The pharmacokinetic performance and ulcer healing response of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles following oral administration were evaluated in Wistar rats with induced ulcers. The prepared drug-loaded ERSNPs-LPZ and PLGANPs-LPZ possessed opposite surface charge (+38.5±0.3 mV versus −27.3±0.3 mV, respectively) and the particle size was around 200 nm with a narrow size distribution. The negatively charged PLGANPs adhered more readily to the ulcerated region (7.22%±1.21% per cm2), whereas the positively charged ERSNPs preferentially distributed in the non-ulcerated region (8.29%±0.35% per cm2). Both ERSNPs and PLGANPs were prominent uptake in Caco-2 cells, too. The nanoparticles sustained and prolonged LPZ concentrations up to 24 hours, and the half-life and mean residence time of LPZ were prolonged by 3.5-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, as compared with LPZ solution. Oral administration of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles healed 92.6%–95.7% of gastric ulcers in Wistar rats within 7 days. PMID:26124659

  7. Inhibition of Gastric Acid Secretion by H2 Receptor Antagonists Associates a Definite Risk of Enteric Peritonitis and Infectious Mortality in Patients Treated with Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Fontan, Miguel; Machado Lopes, Daniela; García Enríquez, Alba; López-Calviño, Beatriz; López-Muñiz, Andrés; García Falcón, Teresa; Rodríguez-Carmona, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidences linking treatment with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion (IGAS) and an increased risk of serious infections are inconclusive, both in the population at large and in the particular case of patients with chronic kidney disease. We have undertaken an investigation to disclose associations between treatment with IGAS and infectious outcomes, in patients undergoing chronic Peritoneal Dialysis (PD). Method Observational, historic cohort, single center design. Six hundred and ninety-one patients incident on PD were scrutinized for an association among treatment with IGAS (H2 antagonists H2A or proton pump inhibitors PPI) (main study variable), on one side, and the risks of enteric peritoneal infection (main outcome), overall peritoneal infection, and general and infectious mortality (secondary outcomes). We applied a three-step multivariate approach, based on classic Cox models (baseline variables), time-dependent analyses and, when appropriate, competing risk analyses. Main results The clinical characteristics of patients treated with H2A, PPI or none of these were significantly different. Multivariate analyses disclosed a consistently increased risk of enteric peritonitis in patients treated with IGAS (RR 1.65, 95% CI 1.08–2.55, p = 0.018, Cox). Stratified analysis indicated that patients treated with H2A, rather than those on PPI, supported the burden of this risk. Similar findings applied for the risk of infectious mortality. On the contrary, we were not able to detect any association among the study variables, on one side, and the general risks of peritonitis or mortality, on the other. Conclusions Treatment with IGAS associates increased incidences of enteric peritonitis and infectious mortality, among patients on chronic PD. The association is clear in the case of H2A but less consistent in the case of PPI. Our results support the convenience of preferring PPI to H2A, for gastric acid inhibition in PD patients. PMID:26872254

  8. Haloacetic acids in the aquatic environment. Part I: macrophyte toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark L; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-08-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are contaminants of aquatic ecosystems with numerous sources, both anthropogenic and natural. The toxicity of HAAs to aquatic plants is generally uncharacterized. Laboratory tests were conducted with three macrophytes (Lemna gibba, Myriophyllum sibiricum and Myriophyllum spicatum) to assess the toxicity of five HAAs. Myriophyllum spp. has been proposed as required test species for pesticide registration in North America, but few studies have been conducted under standard test conditions. The HAAs in the present experiments were monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and chlorodifluoroacetic acid (CDFA). MCA was the most toxic to Myriophyllum spp. with EC50 values ranging from 8 to 12.4 mg/l depending on the endpoint, followed by DCA (EC50 range 62-722.5 mg/l), TCA (EC50 range 49.5-1702.6 mg/l), CDFA (EC50 range 105.3 to >10,000 mg/l) and with TFA (EC50 range 222.1 to 10,000 mg/l) the least toxic. Generally, L. gibba was less sensitive to HAA toxicity than Myriophyllum spp., with the difference in toxicity between them approximately threefold. The range of toxicity within Myriophyllum spp. was normally less than twofold. Statistically, plant length and node number were the most sensitive endpoints as they had the lowest observed coefficients of variation, but they were not the most sensitive to HAA toxicity. Toxicological sensitivity of endpoints varied depending on the measure of effect chosen and the HAA, with morphological endpoints usually an order of magnitude more sensitive than pigments for all plant species. Overall, mass and root measures tended to be the most sensitive indicators of HAA toxicity. The data from this paper were subsequently used in an ecological risk assessment for HAAs and aquatic plants. The assessment found HAAs to be of low risk to aquatic macrophytes and the results are described in the second manuscript of this series.

  9. Capsaicin consumption, Helicobacter pylori CagA status and IL1B-31C>T genotypes: a host and environment interaction in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Camargo, M Constanza; Schneider, Barbara G; Sicinschi, Liviu A; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Correa, Pelayo; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2012-06-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has been associated with a complex combination of genetic and environmental factors. In contrast to most countries, available information on GC mortality trends showed a gradual increase in Mexico. Our aim was to explore potential interactions among dietary (chili pepper consumption), infectious (Helicobacter pylori) and genetic factors (IL1B-31 genotypes) on GC risk. The study was performed in three areas of Mexico, with different GC mortality rates. We included 158 GC patients and 317 clinical controls. Consumption of capsaicin (Cap), the pungent active substance of chili peppers, was estimated by food frequency questionnaire. H. pylori CagA status was assessed by ELISA, and IL1B-31 genotypes were determined by TaqMan assays and Pyrosequencing in DNA samples. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate potential interactions. Moderate to high Cap consumption synergistically increased GC risk in genetically susceptible individuals (IL1B-31C allele carriers) infected with the more virulent H. pylori (CagA+) strains. The combined presence of these factors might explain the absence of a decreasing trend for GC in Mexico. However, further research on gene-environment interactions is required to fully understand the factors determining GC patterns in susceptible populations, with the aim of recommending preventive measures for high risk individuals.

  10. Eukaryotic Organisms in Extreme Acidic Environments, the Río Tinto Case

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Angeles

    2013-01-01

    A major issue in microbial ecology is to identify the limits of life for growth and survival, and to understand the molecular mechanisms that define these limits. Thus, interest in the biodiversity and ecology of extreme environments has grown in recent years for several reasons. Some are basic and revolve around the idea that extreme environments are believed to reflect early Earth conditions. Others are related to the biotechnological potential of extremophiles. In this regard, the study of extremely acidic environments has become increasingly important since environmental acidity is often caused by microbial activity. Highly acidic environments are relatively scarce worldwide and are generally associated with volcanic activity or mining operations. For most acidic environments, low pH facilitates metal solubility, and therefore acidic waters tend to have high concentrations of heavy metals. However, highly acidic environments are usually inhabited by acidophilic and acidotolerant eukaryotic microorganisms such as algae, amoebas, ciliates, heliozoan and rotifers, not to mention filamentous fungi and yeasts. Here, we review the general trends concerning the diversity and ecophysiology of eukaryotic acidophilic microorganims, as well as summarize our latest results on this topic in one of the largest extreme acidic rivers, Río Tinto (SW, Spain). PMID:25369810

  11. pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiyi; Bellinger, Andrew M.; Glettig, Dean L.; Barman, Ross; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Zhu, Jiahua; Cleveland, Cody; Montgomery, Veronica A; Gu, Li; Nash, Landon D.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Devices resident in the stomach -- which are used for a variety of clinical applications including nutritional modulation for bariatrics, ingestible electronics for diagnosis and monitoring, and gastric retentive dosage forms for prolonged drug delivery -- typically incorporate elastic polymers to compress the devices during delivery through the esophagus and other narrow orifices in the digestive system. However, in the event of accidental device fracture or migration, the non-degradable nature of these materials risks intestinal obstruction. Here, we show that an elastic, pH-responsive supramolecular gel remains stable and elastic in the acidic environment of the stomach but can be dissolved in the neutral-pH environment of the small and large intestines. In a large animal model, prototype devices with these materials as the key component demonstrated prolonged gastric retention and safe passage. These enteric elastomers should increase the safety profile for a wide range of gastric retentive devices. PMID:26213897

  12. [Gastric lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ruskoné-Fourmestraux, A

    1997-04-15

    The stomach is the most common site involved in primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Gastric lymphoma originates from the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue so called MALT. It comprises a group of distinctive clinicopathological entities which are important to take in account for clinical behavior. In recent years, new diagnostic tools and modern modes of treatment have improved their overall prognosis. One of the most exciting recent discoveries is the hypothesis that an infection by a bacterium. Helicobacter pylori has a decisive role in gastric lymphoma.

  13. [Gastric volvulus].

    PubMed

    Solórzano, J; Acosta, D; Morales, H; Vásquez, F; Mora, G; Chávez, M; Andrade, D; Joutteaux, R; Sánchez, I; García, D; Valenzuela, E

    2006-10-01

    Gastric volvulus is a rare condition in pediatric population in which there is an abnormal rotation of one part of the stomach around itself. It's a surgical emergency. We report a six year old female admitted in the emergency due to upper abdominal distention, nausea without vomiting, physical exam revealed upper abdominal distention and abdominal tenderness, no bowel sounds. Laparotomy was performed and a gastric volvulus with occlusive vascular involvement was found. In the post operative period she required a second laparotomy due to adhesions in small bowel.

  14. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Belén Fraile, M; Serra Bartual, M; Segarra Sánchez, J; Richart Rufino, M J

    1991-11-01

    Gastric cancer represents a disorder which incidence has come down last years. Its etiology is unknown, but diet is the principal determinant risk of suffering it. Clinic history is not much useful, because in the early stage symptoms can fail and in the late stage are inespecific. Election diagnosis is endoscopy. Surgery is the only curative treatment. By these features, it would be useful to left under vigilance to: a) patients 40 years older with dispepsia; b) patients following gastric operations; c) patients with disorders presenting aclorhidria. The authors report a clinic case that can be of frequent presentation in primary assistance.

  15. [Gastric cleansing].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann Serret, Alina; Alcaraz Bravo, Judit; Carballo Alvarez, Montse; Fernández Vargas, Carmen

    2006-10-01

    Numerous cases in emergency wards are due to the ingestion of potentially toxic substances. One of the most utilized procedures under these circumstances is gastric cleansing. This procedure is a technique habitually practiced by nursing personnel but is not without its risks. Therefore, the motive of this article is to make known the indications, contraindications, related complications of gastric cleansing and its integral patient care process in order to offer quality care methods which enable their being performed in an effective and efficient manner, under the maximum security conditions with the minimum inconveniences for the patient while at the same time describing the system most commonly used by our service.

  16. New lactic acid bacterial strains from traditional Mongolian fermented milk products have altered adhesion to porcine gastric mucin depending on the carbon source.

    PubMed

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Seishi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Moriya, Naoko; Takenaka, Akio; Suzuki, Chise

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of lactic acid bacteria to the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is a major property of probiotics. Here, we examined the ability of 21 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented milk products in Mongolia to adhere to porcine gastric mucin in vitro. Higher attachment was observed with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains 6-8 and 8-1 than with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (positive control). Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain 7-1 adhered to mucin as effectively as did strain GG. Heat inactivation decreased the adhesive ability of strains 6-8 and 8-1 but did not affect strain 7-1. The adhesion of strains 6-8, 7-1 and 8-1 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with periodate and trypsin, indicating that proteinaceous and carbohydrate-like cell surface compounds are involved in the adhesion of these strains. The adhesion of strain 7-1 was affected by the type of carbohydrate present in the growth medium, being higher with fructose than with lactose, galactose or xylose as the carbon source. The sugar content of 7-1 cells grown on various carbohydrates was negatively correlated with its adhesive ability. We provide new probiotic candidate strains and new information regarding carbohydrate preference that influences lactic acid bacterial adhesion to mucin.

  17. Novel lansoprazole-loaded nanoparticles for the treatment of gastric acid secretion-related ulcers: in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to combine nanoparticle design and enteric coating technique to sustain the delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ), in the treatment of acid reflux disorders. Lansoprazole-loaded Eudragit® RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNP-LPZ) as well as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (PLGANP-LPZ) were prepared using a solvent evaporation/extraction method. The effects of nanoparticle charge and permeation enhancers on lansoprazole uptake was assessed in Caco-2 cells. The confocal microscopic images revealed the successful localization of nanoparticles in the cytoplasm of Caco-2 cells. The cellular uptake of positively charged Eudragit nanoparticles was significantly higher than that of negatively charged PLGA nanoparticles, which were enhanced by sodium caprate via the transcellular pathway. Both types of nanoparticles exhibited sustained drug release behavior in vitro. The oral administration of enteric-coated capsules filled with nanoparticles sustained and prolonged the LPZ concentration up to 24 h in ulcer-induced Wistar rats, and 92.4% and 89.2% of gastric ulcers healed after a 7-day treatment with either EC-ERSNP1010-Na caprate or EC-PLGANP1005-Na caprate, respectively.

  18. Genotype x environment interactions in eggplant for fruit phenolic acid content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eggplant fruit are a rich source of phenolic acids that contribute to fruit nutritive value and influence culinary quality. We evaluated the influence of production environment on eggplant fruit phenolic acid content. Ten Solanum melongena accessions including five F1 hybrid cultivars, three open-...

  19. [Enzymes in gastric juice. An aid in the diagnosis of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Marino Alarcón, O; Concho Lugo, H; Silva Larralte, T; Tauil Bsereni, E; Solano Nava, P; Machado, D; Chacón Patiño, A

    1996-01-01

    In the present study we measured the activities of the following enzymes: LDH (lactic dehydrogenase), beta-glucuronidase, acid maltase, phosphohexoseisomerase (PHI) and acid proteases in the gastric juice of patients with gastric cancer (n = 50) (Case Group), in endoscopically normal subjects (n = 50) and in subjects with different non tumor-like digestive pathologies (n = 55) (Control Groups). In the patients with gastric carcinoma we found a significant increase in LDH, beta-glucuronidase, PHI and acid maltase activities and a decreased activity of acid proteases. The results agree with previous findings from other workers. The variations of enzyme activities in gastric juice can help to differentiate between malignant and benign processes of the gastric mucosa.

  20. Bacteria and Archaea in acidic environments and a key to morphological identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic acidic environments are dominated by bacteria and Archaea. As many as 86 genera or species have been identified or isolated from pH <4.5 environments. This paper reviews the worldwide literature and provide tables of morphological characteristics, habitat information and a key for light microscope identification for the non-microbiologist.

  1. Influence of gastric acid secretion blockade and food intake on the bioavailability of a potassium diclofenac suspension in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Poli, A; Moreno, R A; Ribeiro, W; Dias, H B; Moreno, H; Muscara, M N; De Nucci, G

    1996-02-01

    The bioavailability of a single dose of a potassium diclofenac (KDIC) suspension (Flogan, Merck, 7ml, 105 mg) was studied in 13 healthy male volunteers in the fasting state (placebo phase, PLA), after gastric acid secretion blockade (subacute pretreatment with omeprazole, OME phase) and after food intake (FOOD phase). A 14-day washout period between phases was adopted. Serum samples were obtained over a 24 hour interval and the diclofenac concentrations were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. From the serum diclofenac concentration vs time curves, the AUC[0-infinity] (area under the concentration vs time curves from 0 to infinity), Cmax (maximum achieved concentration), tmax (time to achieve Cmax), Ke (terminal first order elimination constant), half-life values (t1/2) and AUC[0-infinity]/t1/2 ratio as an index of diclofenac clearance, were obtained. All these variables were analyzed using both parametric and non-parametric statistics. In the presence of food, KDIC absorption was delayed (as shown by lower Cmax and greater tmax values) and decreased (as shown by lower AUC[0-infinity] values), and the serum diclofenac concentration vs time curves showed a biphasic pattern. Omeprazole pretreatment did not change the absorption parameters. Both of these treatments altered the diclofenac clearance, as assessed by the AUC[0-infinity]/t1/2, t1/2 and Ke values, although the changes were not considered to be clinically significant, because of the wide therapeutic range for diclofenac. The delay in the rate of diclofenac absorption produced by food intake was not due to an increase in the gastric pH, and could be of particular importance when rapid analgesia is desired.

  2. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  3. EFFECT OF AN ACID RAIN ENVIRONMENT ON LIMESTONE SURFACES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Lindsay, James R.; Hochella, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Salem limestone samples were exposed to weathering for 1 y in several urban and one rural environments. Samples exposed in the rural location were chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone, whereas all samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the ground-facing surfaces where the stones were not washed by precipitation. The gas-solid reaction of SO//2 with calcite was selected for detailed consideration. It appears from the model that under arid conditions, the quantity of stain deposited on an unwashed surface is independent of atmospheric SO//2 concentration once the surface has been saturated with gypsum. Under wet conditions, surface sulfation and weight loss are probably dominated by mechanisms involving wet stone. However, if the rain events are frequent and delimited by periods of dryness, the quantity of gypsum produced by a gas-solid reaction mechanism should correlate with both the frequency of rain events and the atmospheric SO//2 level.

  4. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Bariatric surgery - gastric bypass - discharge; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass - discharge; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y - discharge; Obesity ... Gloy VL, Briel M, Bhatt DL, et al. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic ...

  5. A review of the occurrence and fate of naphthenic acids in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Headley, John V; McMartin, Dena W

    2004-01-01

    Naphthenic acids are comprised of a large collection of saturated aliphatic and alicyclic carboxylic acids found in hydrocarbon deposits (petroleum, oil sands bitumen, and crude oils). Naphthenic acids enter surface water systems primarily through effluent discharge, but also through groundwater mixing and erosion of riverbank oil deposits. Of the possible environmental receptors (i.e., air, soil, and water), the most significant is water. Ambient levels of naphthenic acids in northern Alberta rivers in the Athabasca Oil Sands are generally below 1 mg L(-1). However, tailings pond waters may contain as high as 110 mg L(-1). The complexity of natural naphthenic acids in petroleum deposits poses an analytical challenge as reflected by the several techniques reported for quantitation of naphthenic acids in the environment. Although naphthenic acids are known to be persistent biomarkers used in identification of oil source maturation, little is established regarding their relative degradation pathways in aquatic environments. Published research related to the potential for microbiological degradation and adsorption to typical Athabasca Oil Sands soils reveal that naphthenic acids are likely to persist in the water column and, with prolonged exposure, accumulate in sediments. However, other than a very general knowledge of environmental persistence, the occurrence and fate of naphthenic acids has been sparsely studied. This article brings together some of those environmental persistence results, as well as detailed information regarding the origin of naphthenic acids in tailings ponds, chemistry and toxicological considerations, current analytical methods for aquatic sampling, and areas of future remediation research.

  6. Effects of toxic work environments on sperm quality and ascorbic acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, E.B.; Harris, W.A.; Powell, L.C. )

    1990-02-26

    Surveys have shown that toxic work environments lower sperm quality, and controlled studies indicate that ascorbic acid supplementation improves sperm viability and agglutination. The sperm quality of 50 subjects each from: (1) office workers, (2) a lead smelter, (3) petroleum refineries, and (4) a herbicide plant were compared with serum and semen ascorbic acid levels. The sperm characteristics studied were: count as million/ml and as percent; viability, motility, clumping, and abnormal morphology. The serum ascorbic acid levels were directly proportional to sperm viability and inversely correlated to clumping of all groups. Moreover, serum ascorbic acid levels were also inversely correlated to twin tail and amorphous forms of abnormal sperm morphology. The results of the study indicate that toxic environments depress sperm quality and suggest that ascorbic acid supplementation will improve sperm quality and fertility.

  7. Assessing the capacity of growth, survival, and acid adaptive response of Listeria monocytogenes during storage of various cheeses and subsequent simulated gastric digestion.

    PubMed

    Kapetanakou, Anastasia E; Gkerekou, Maria A; Vitzilaiou, Eirini S; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2017-04-04

    Different physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of cheeses may affect Listeria monocytogenes potential to grow, survive, or exhibit an acid adaptive response during storage and digestion. The objectives of the present study were to assess: i) the survival or growth potential of L.monocytogenes on various cheeses during storage, ii) the effect of initial indigenous microbiota on pathogen growth in comparison to expected growth curves retrieved by existing predictive models, and iii) the impact of habituation on/in cheeses surfaces on the subsequent acid resistance during simulated gastric digestion. Portions of cream (Cottage and Mascarpone), soft (Anthotyros, Camembert, Mastelo®, Manouri, Mozzarella, Ricotta), and semi-hard (Edam, Halloumi, Gouda) cheeses were inoculated with ca. 100CFU/g or cm(2) of L.monocytogenes and stored under vacuum or aerobic conditions at 7°C (n=4). The impact of varying (initial) levels of starter culture or indigenous spoilage microbiota on pathogen growth was evaluated by purchasing cheese packages on different dates in relation to production and expiration date (subsequently reflecting to different batches) mimicking a potential situation of cheese contamination with L.monocytogenes during retail display. Values of pH and aw were also monitored and used to simulate growth of L. monocytogenes by existing models and compare it with the observed data of the study. Survival in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) (pH1.5; HCl; max. 120min) was assessed at three time points during storage. Mascarpone, Ricotta, Mozzarella, Camembert, and Halloumi supported L.monocytogenes growth by 0.5-0.8logCFU/g or cm(2)per day, since low initial levels of total viable counts (TVC) (1.8-3.8logCFU/g or cm(2)) and high pH/aw values (ca. 6.23-6.64/0.965-0.993) were recorded. On Cottage, Anthotyros, Manouri, Mastelo®, Edam, and Gouda, the pathogen survived at populations similar or lower than the inoculation level due to the high reported competition

  8. Biochemical changes induced by Campylobacter pylori in the gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Andreica, V; Suciu, A; Dumitraşcu, D; Drăghici, A; Pascu, O; Suciu, M; Ban, A

    1990-01-01

    The biochemical changes induced in the gastric juice by the presence of Campylobacter pylori (CP) were followed up in 151 patients with various gastric and duodenal diseases. The diagnosis of CP infection was made by the urease test. In the presence of CP urea decreased in the gastric juice and ammonia increased. The sialic acid, fucose and hexoses, glucide components of the mucus glycoproteins dissolved in the gastric juice, underwent no change in the presence of CP. The hexosamines in the gastric mucus increased significantly in CP patients. Urease activity is present in the gastric juice even in the absence of CP, probably due to other microorganisms present in the human stomach. This does not exclude the use of the urease test for the diagnosis of CP infection. However the test can only be used in the bioptically removed gastric mucosa samples, not in the gastric juice.

  9. [Acid-base blood balance in patients with ulcer under treatment by the gastric secretion inhibitors and antacids].

    PubMed

    Grinevich, V B; Sablin, O A; Uspenskiĭ, Iu L

    2002-01-01

    There was an analysis of the results of the study of intragastric acidity and acid-base balance (ABB) of the blood in 25 patients with duodenal ulcer. The patients were examined before and against the background of the 14-day monotherapy with one of the following preparations: Losec, 40 mg (omeprazole), famotidine, 80 mg (Quamatel), Phosphalugel, or placebo.

  10. Environment and solute-solvent interaction effects on photo-physical behaviors of Folic acid and Folinic acid drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadem Sadigh, M.; Zakerhamidi, M. S.; Seyed Ahmadian, S. M.; Johari-Ahar, M.; Zare Haghighi, L.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, spectral properties of Folic acid and Folinic acid as widely used drugs in the treatment of some diseases have been studied in various environments with different polarity. Our results show that the absorption, emission and stokes shifts of solute molecules depend strongly on molecular surrounding characteristics, solute-solvent interactions and, different active groups in their chemical structures. In order to investigate the contribution of specific and nonspecific interactions on various properties of drug samples, the linear solvation energy relationships concept is used. Moreover, the calculated dipole moments by means of solvatochromic method show that the high values of dipole moments in excited state are due to local intramolecular charge transfer. Furthermore, the obtained results about molecular interactions can be extended to biological systems and can indicate completely the behaviors of Folic acid and Folinic acid in polar solvents such as water in body system.

  11. Potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus rhamnosus (HN001), Lactobacillus acidophilus (HN017) and Bifidobacterium lactis (HN019) do not degrade gastric mucin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J S; Gopal, P K; Gill, H S

    2001-01-22

    The mucus layer (mucin) coating the surface of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) plays an important role in the mucosal barrier system. Any damage or disturbance of this mucin layer will compromise the host's mucosal defence function. In the present study, the ability of three potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001, Lactobacillus acidophilus HN017, Bifidobacterium lactis HN019) to degrade mucin in vitro was evaluated, in order to assess their potential pathogenicity and local toxicity. The LAB strains were incubated in medium containing hog gastric mucin (HGM, 0.3%) at 37 degrees C for 48 h, following which any decrease in carbohydrate and protein concentration in the ethanol-precipitated portion of the culture medium was determined, using phenol-sulphuric acid and bicinchonic acid (BCA) protein assays, respectively. The change in molecular weight of mucin glycoproteins, following incubation with the test strains, was monitored by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). In order to expose any ability of the test strains to degrade mucin visually and more directly, the test strains were also cultured on agarose containing 0.3% HGM and incubated anaerobically for 72 h at 37 degrees C. No significant change in the carbohydrate or protein concentration in mucin substrates was found following incubation with the test strains. No mucin fragments were derived from the mucin suspension incubated with test strains, and no mucinolysis zone was identified on agarose. These results demonstrate that the potential probiotic LAB strains tested here were unable to degrade gastrointestinal mucin in vitro, which suggests that these novel probiotic candidates are likely to be non-invasive and non-toxic at the mucosal interface.

  12. Effects of environment and genotype on phenolic acids in wheat in the HEALTHGRAIN diversity screen.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Orozco, Rebeca; Li, Li; Harflett, Claudia; Shewry, Peter R; Ward, Jane L

    2010-09-08

    Phenolic acid content and composition have been determined in 26 wheat genotypes grown in Hungary over three consecutive years and at three additional locations (France, United Kingdom, and Poland) during the third year. Fractions comprising free, soluble conjugated, and bound phenolic acids were analyzed using HPLC with measurements being made for individual phenolic acids in each fraction. Statistically significant differences in phenolic acid content occurred across the different growing locations with the average total phenolic acid content being highest in the genotypes grown in Hungary. The growth year in Hungary also had a large impact, especially on the free and conjugated phenolic acid contents. Certain genotypes were more resistant to environmental impacts than others. Of the genotypes with high levels of total phenolic acids, Lynx, Riband, Tommi, and Cadenza were most stable with respect to their total contents, whereas Valoris, Herzog, and Malacca, also high in phenolic acid content, were least stable. Of the three fractions analyzed, the free and conjugated phenolic acids were most variable and were also susceptible to the effect of environment, whereas bound phenolic acids, which comprised the greatest proportion of the total phenolic acids, were the most stable.

  13. Characterization of iron counter-ion environment in bulk and supported phosphomolybdic acid based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Q.; Millet, J. M. M.

    2005-05-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) was used to characterize the environment of iron counter-cations in Keggin type phosphomolybdic compounds used as catalysts for oxidation reactions. Iron doped compounds corresponding to bulk acid and to acid supported on the cesium salt were prepared and studied. Iron formed hexa-hydrated complex of both Fe3+ and Fe2+ in the bulk acid, whereas it was present as Fe(OH)2+ hydroxy-cations in the acid supported on the cesium salt. Upon heating the hexa-hydrated complex lost one molecule of water to bind to the Keggin anion through a terminal oxygen. (Fe O Mo bond). The environment of the iron hydroxy-cation changed upon heating while its closer coordination append to remained unchanged.

  14. Characterization of modified calcium-silicate cements exposed to acidic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Camilleri, Josette

    2011-01-15

    Portland cement which is used as a binder in concrete in the construction industry has been developed into a biomaterial. It is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate and is used in dentistry. This material has been reported to be very biocompatible and thus its use has diversified. The extended use of this material has led to developments of newer versions with improved physical properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acidic environments found in the oral cavity on fast setting calcium silicate cements with improved physical properties using a combination of techniques. Two fast setting calcium silicate cements (CSA and CFA) and two cement composites (CSAG and CFAG) were assessed by subjecting the materials to lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer gel for a period of 28 days. At weekly intervals the materials were viewed under the tandem scanning confocal microscope (TSM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The two prototype cements exhibited changes in their internal chemistry with no changes in surface characteristics. Since the changes observed were mostly sub-surface evaluation of surface characteristics of cement may not be sufficient in the determination of chemical changes occurring. - Research Highlights: {yields} An acidic environment affects modified fast setting calcium silicate-based cements. {yields} No surface changes are observed in acidic environment. {yields} An acidic environment causes sub-surface changes in the material chemistry which are only visible in fractured specimens. {yields} A combination of techniques is necessary in order to evaluate the chemical changes occurring.

  15. Coupling of a P2Z-like purinoceptor to a fatty acid-activated K+ channel in toad gastric smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Hui; Ugur, Mehmet; Drummond, Robert M; Singer, Joshua J

    2001-01-01

    Extracellular application of ATP generates two whole-cell currents in toad gastric smooth muscle cells: an immediate inward non-selective cation current (due to the activation of a P2X or P2Z-like receptor) and a slowly developing outward K+ current. The inward non-selective cation current depends on the continuous presence of ATP while the outward K+ current can last for minutes after ATP application ceases. In cell-attached patches, application of ATP to the extra-patch membrane can activate K+ channels in the patch indicating that a diffusible cellular messenger may be involved. The characteristics of these K+ channels are similar to those of a previously described fatty acid-activated K+ channel that is also a stretch-activated channel. This whole-cell K+ current can be induced by ATP in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ (with EGTA present to chelate trace amounts). However, the current generated in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ is considerably larger. The pharmacological profiles for the activation of the non-selective cation current and the K+ current are similar, suggesting that the same P2Z-like receptor could be mediating both responses. This type of plasma membrane receptor/channel-channel coupling by a process that does not appear to involve Ca2+ flow through the receptor/channel or a subsequent membrane potential change may be representative of a new class of signalling mechanisms. PMID:11432992

  16. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-03

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms.

  17. A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiyi; Bellinger, Andrew M; Glettig, Dean L; Barman, Ross; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Zhu, Jiahua; Cleveland, Cody; Montgomery, Veronica A; Gu, Li; Nash, Landon D; Maitland, Duncan J; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Devices resident in the stomach-used for a variety of clinical applications including nutritional modulation for bariatrics, ingestible electronics for diagnosis and monitoring, and gastric-retentive dosage forms for prolonged drug delivery-typically incorporate elastic polymers to compress the devices during delivery through the oesophagus and other narrow orifices in the digestive system. However, in the event of accidental device fracture or migration, the non-degradable nature of these materials risks intestinal obstruction. Here, we show that an elastic, pH-responsive supramolecular gel remains stable and elastic in the acidic environment of the stomach but can be dissolved in the neutral-pH environment of the small and large intestines. In a large animal model, prototype devices with these materials as the key component demonstrated prolonged gastric retention and safe passage. These enteric elastomers should increase the safety profile for a wide range of gastric-retentive devices.

  18. A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiyi; Bellinger, Andrew M.; Glettig, Dean L.; Barman, Ross; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Zhu, Jiahua; Cleveland, Cody; Montgomery, Veronica A.; Gu, Li; Nash, Landon D.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Devices resident in the stomach--used for a variety of clinical applications including nutritional modulation for bariatrics, ingestible electronics for diagnosis and monitoring, and gastric-retentive dosage forms for prolonged drug delivery--typically incorporate elastic polymers to compress the devices during delivery through the oesophagus and other narrow orifices in the digestive system. However, in the event of accidental device fracture or migration, the non-degradable nature of these materials risks intestinal obstruction. Here, we show that an elastic, pH-responsive supramolecular gel remains stable and elastic in the acidic environment of the stomach but can be dissolved in the neutral-pH environment of the small and large intestines. In a large animal model, prototype devices with these materials as the key component demonstrated prolonged gastric retention and safe passage. These enteric elastomers should increase the safety profile for a wide range of gastric-retentive devices.

  19. A Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variant Necessary for Gastric Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Austin, C. R.; Goodyear, A. W.; Bartek, I. L.; Stewart, A.; Sutherland, M. D.; Silva, E. B.; Zweifel, A.; Vitko, N. P.; Tuanyok, A.; Highnam, G.; Mittelman, D.; Keim, P.; Schweizer, H. P.; Vázquez-Torres, A.; Dow, S. W. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Diverse colony morphologies are a hallmark of Burkholderia pseudomallei recovered from infected patients. We observed that stresses that inhibit aerobic respiration shifted populations of B. pseudomallei from the canonical white colony morphotype toward two distinct, reversible, yet relatively stable yellow colony variants (YA and YB). As accumulating evidence supports the importance of B. pseudomallei enteric infection and gastric colonization, we tested the response of yellow variants to hypoxia, acidity, and stomach colonization. Yellow variants exhibited a competitive advantage under hypoxic and acidic conditions and alkalized culture media. The YB variant, although highly attenuated in acute virulence, was the only form capable of colonization and persistence in the murine stomach. The accumulation of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was a characteristic of YB as observed by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining of gastric tissues, as well as in an in vitro stomach model where large amounts of eDNA were produced without cell lysis. Transposon mutagenesis identified a transcriptional regulator (BPSL1887, designated YelR) that when overexpressed produced the yellow phenotype. Deletion of yelR blocked a shift from white to the yellow forms. These data demonstrate that YB is a unique B. pseudomallei pathovariant controlled by YelR that is specifically adapted to the harsh gastric environment and necessary for persistent stomach colonization. PMID:25650400

  20. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  1. The Influence of a Collaborative Learning Environment on Primary Students' Conceptions about Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinopoulos, Dimitrios; Stavridou, Heleni

    2002-01-01

    Investigates primary students' conceptions of acid rain formation and its consequences to people and the environment before and after a 10-hour constructivist teaching intervention. Reports improvement in conceptions of physical and chemical phenomena among the experimental group participants. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

  2. Environment-specific amino acid substitution tables: tertiary templates and prediction of protein folds.

    PubMed Central

    Overington, J.; Donnelly, D.; Johnson, M. S.; Sali, A.; Blundell, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    The local environment of an amino acid in a folded protein determines the acceptability of mutations at that position. In order to characterize and quantify these structural constraints, we have made a comparative analysis of families of homologous proteins. Residues in each structure are classified according to amino acid type, secondary structure, accessibility of the side chain, and existence of hydrogen bonds from the side chains. Analysis of the pattern of observed substitutions as a function of local environment shows that there are distinct patterns, especially for buried polar residues. The substitution data tables are available on diskette with Protein Science. Given the fold of a protein, one is able to predict sequences compatible with the fold (profiles or templates) and potentially to discriminate between a correctly folded and misfolded protein. Conversely, analysis of residue variation across a family of aligned sequences in terms of substitution profiles can allow prediction of secondary structure or tertiary environment. PMID:1304904

  3. Haloacetic acids in the aquatic environment. Part II: ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark L; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-08-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are environmental contaminants found in aquatic ecosystems throughout the world as a result of both anthropogenic and natural production. The ecological risk posed by these compounds to organisms in freshwater environments, with a specific focus on aquatic macrophytes, was characterized. The plants evaluated were Lemna gibba, Myriophyllum spicatum and M. sibiricum and the HAAs screened were monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and chlorodifluoroacetic acid (CDFA). Laboratory toxicity data formed the basis of the risk assessment, but field studies were also utilized. The estimated risk was calculated using hazard quotients (HQ), as well as effect measure distributions (EMD) in a modified probabilistic ecological risk assessment. EMDs were used to estimate HAA thresholds of toxicity for use in HQ assessments. This threshold was found to be a more sensitive measure of low toxicity than the no observed effect concentrations (NOEC) or the effective concentration (EC10). Using both deterministic and probabilistic methods, it was found that HAAs do not pose a significant risk to freshwater macrophytes at current environmental concentrations in Canada, Europe or Africa for both single compound and mixture exposures. Still, HAAs are generally found as mixtures and their potential interactions are not fully understood, rendering this phase of the assessment uncertain and justifying further effects characterization. TCA in some environments poses a slight risk to phytoplankton and future concentrations of TFA and CDFA are likely to increase due to their recalcitrant nature, warranting continued environmental surveillance of HAAs.

  4. Current status of proximal gastric vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, B D

    1989-01-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy is nearing its twentieth year in clinical use as an operation for peptic ulcer disease. No other acid-reducing operation has undergone as much scrutiny or study. At this time, the evidence of such studies and long-term follow-up strongly supports the use of proximal gastric vagotomy as the treatment of choice for chronic duodenal ulcer in patients who have failed medical therapy. Its application in treating the complications of peptic ulcer disease, which recently have come to represent an increasingly greater percentage of all operations done for peptic ulcer disease, is well-tested. However, initial series suggest that it should probably occupy a prominent role in treating some of these complications, particularly in selected patients, in the future. The operation has the well-documented ability to reduce gastric acid production, not inhibit gastric bicarbonate production, and also minimally inhibit gastric motility. The combination of these physiologic results after proximal gastric vagotomy, along with preservation of the normal antropyloroduodenal mechanism of gastrointestinal control, serve to allow patients with proximal gastric vagotomy the improved benefits of significantly fewer severe gastrointestinal side effects than are seen after other operations for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:2644897

  5. Muramic Acid Measurements for Bacterial Investigations in Marine Environments by High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Toru; Romano, Jean-Claude

    1985-01-01

    Muramic acid, a constituent of procaryotic cell walls, was assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatography in samples from several marine environments (water column, surface microlayer, and sediment) and a bacterial culture. It is used as a microbial biomass indicator. The method gave a good separation of muramic acid from interfering compounds with satisfactory reproducibility. A pseudomonad culture had a muramic acid content of 4.7 × 10−10 to 5.3 × 10−10 μg per cell during growth. In natural water samples, highly significant relationships were found between muramic acid concentrations and bacterial numbers for populations of 108 to 1011 cells per liter. The muramic acid content in natural marine water decreased from 5.3 × 10−10 to 1.6 × 10−10 μg per cell with increasing depth. In coastal sediments exposed to sewage pollution, concentrations of muramic acid, ATP, organic carbon, and total amino acids displayed a parallel decrease with increasing distance from the sewage outlet. Advantages of muramic acid measurement by high-pressure liquid chromatography are its high sensitivity and reduction of preparation steps, allowing a short time analysis. PMID:16346848

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Methanesulfonic Acid-Degrading Bacteria from the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A. S.; Owens, N.; Murrell, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Two methylotrophic bacterial strains, TR3 and PSCH4, capable of growth on methanesulfonic acid as the sole carbon source were isolated from the marine environment. Methanesulfonic acid metabolism in these strains was initiated by an inducible NADH-dependent monooxygenase, which cleaved methanesulfonic acid into formaldehyde and sulfite. The presence of hydroxypyruvate reductase and the absence of ribulose monophosphate-dependent hexulose monophosphate synthase indicated the presence of the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation. Cell suspensions of bacteria grown on methanesulfonic acid completely oxidized methanesulfonic acid to carbon dioxide and sulfite with a methanesulfonic acid/oxygen stoichiometry of 1.0:2.0. Oxygen electrode-substrate studies indicated the dissimilation of formaldehyde to formate and carbon dioxide for energy generation. Carbon dioxide was not fixed by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. It was shown that methanol is not an intermediate in methanesulfonic acid metabolism, although these strains grew on methanol and other one-carbon compounds, as well as a variety of heterotrophic carbon sources. These two novel marine facultative methylotrophs have the ability to mineralize methanesulfonic acid and may play a role in the cycling of global organic sulfur. PMID:16535055

  7. Evolution of water chemistry in natural acidic environments in Yangmingshan, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ezoe, Yuka; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Noto, Masami; Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa

    2002-08-01

    In Yangmingshan National Park, located in the northern part of the Taiwan Island, there is a very rare area where fish (Channa asiatica) live in spite of acid environments. The origin of the acid in local acid ponds and rivers and the evolution of the water chemistry are discussed on the basis of sulfur stable isotope ratios and chemical equilibria. One of the sources of the acid is sulfuric acid, which is derived from the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in volcanic gas gushing out from fumaroles around the area and from acid deposition supplied from Taipei City. It is also derived from the oxidation of pyrite: the sulfur stable isotope ratios of delta 34S of +1@1000 to +4@1000 (relative to CDT) of sulfate in acid pond waters (pH 3-4) could be related to those of hydrogen sulfide in volcanic gas, pyrite in local pond sediments and soils, and sulfate in rain water. One acid source is sulfuric and hydrochloric acids arising in springs from geothermal activity: the delta 34S values were characterised by +13@1000 to +17@1000 sulfate-S, which was provided by a disproportionation reaction of sulfur dioxide in the depths. Another acid source could be the oxidation of iron(II). Under acidic conditions, the water-rock reaction gives rise to high concentrations of aluminium and iron. While flowing down surface streams, iron(II) is oxidised to iron(III) and then hydrolysed to cause further acidification under oxic conditions. The concentrations of iron and aluminium are controlled by redox and dissolution equilibria.

  8. [Effect of Saussurea lappa on gastric functions].

    PubMed

    Chen, S F; Li, Y Q; He, F Y

    1994-07-01

    The patients with chronic superficial gastritis were selected in the study. The variation in gastric acidity output, serum gastrin and plasma somatostatin concentration were observed during the Saussurea lappa decoction (SLD) perfusion into the stomach. There was no significant changes in acidity output, serum gastrin and plasma somatostatin concentration after the perfusion of SLD (P > 0.05). Changes in gastric emptying and plasma motilin concentration were observed after oral administration of the SLD in 5 healthy volunteers. The time of gastric emptying was markedly shortened after oral administration of SLD (P < 0.01). A significant increase occurred in plasma motilin concentration at 30 min. after oral administration of SLD (P < 0.01). It revealed that SLD could accelerate the gastric emptying and increase the endogenous motilin release.

  9. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site in June-July of 2010 during CalNex and a site in an oil and gas producing region in January-February of 2013 during UBWOS 2013 will be discussed. Although the VOC compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 ppb in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 8%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Inclusion of recent findings on additional precursors and formation pathways of formic acid in the box model increases modeled formic acid concentrations for UBWOS 2013 and CalNex by a factor of 6.4 and 4.5, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 21 and 47% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be -7 and 0-6% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that air-snow exchange processes and morning fog events may also contribute to ambient formic acid concentrations during UBWOS 2013 (∼20% in total). In total, 50-57% in UBWOS 2013 and 48-53% in CalNex of secondary formation of formic acid remains unexplained. More work on formic acid formation pathways is needed to reduce the uncertainties in the sources and budget of formic

  10. Growth of human gastric cancer cells in nude mice is delayed by a ketogenic diet supplemented with omega-3 fatty acids and medium-chain triglycerides

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Christoph; Kaemmerer, Ulrike; Illert, Bertram; Muehling, Bettina; Pfetzer, Nadja; Wittig, Rainer; Voelker, Hans Ullrich; Thiede, Arnulf; Coy, Johannes F

    2008-01-01

    Background Among the most prominent metabolic alterations in cancer cells are the increase in glucose consumption and the conversion of glucose to lactic acid via the reduction of pyruvate even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, may provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies that inhibit tumour growth by administration of a ketogenic diet with average protein but low in carbohydrates and high in fat enriched with omega-3 fatty acids and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT). Methods Twenty-four female NMRI nude mice were injected subcutaneously with tumour cells of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line 23132/87. The animals were then randomly split into two feeding groups and fed either a ketogenic diet (KD group; n = 12) or a standard diet (SD group; n = 12) ad libitum. Experiments were ended upon attainment of the target tumor volume of 600 mm3 to 700 mm3. The two diets were compared based on tumour growth and survival time (interval between tumour cell injection and attainment of target tumour volume). Results The ketogenic diet was well accepted by the KD mice. The tumour growth in the KD group was significantly delayed compared to that in the SD group. Tumours in the KD group reached the target tumour volume at 34.2 ± 8.5 days versus only 23.3 ± 3.9 days in the SD group. After day 20, tumours in the KD group grew faster although the differences in mean tumour growth continued significantly. Importantly, they revealed significantly larger necrotic areas than tumours of the SD group and the areas with vital tumour cells appear to have had fewer vessels than tumours of the SD group. Viable tumour cells in the border zone surrounding the necrotic areas of tumours of both groups exhibited a glycolytic phenotype with expression of glucose transporter-1 and transketolase-like 1 enzyme. Conclusion Application of an unrestricted ketogenic diet enriched with omega-3 fatty acids and MCT delayed tumour growth in

  11. [Influence of KU-1257 on the recurrence and relapse of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcers in rats].

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, H; Ohsawa, A; Kobayashi, F; Ohkubo, H; Taga, F

    1996-02-01

    The influence of KU-1257 on the recurrence and relapse of acetic acid ulcers in rats was investigated grossly and histologically in comparison with that of cimetidine. The ulcer was induced by topical application of glacial acetic acid at the junction of the corpus and antrum on the anterior wall of the stomach. The drug was administered from the 5th to the 153rd day after the ulcer induction and then discontinued to the 238th day. The healing rates of the control groups (control) rose until the 119th day after the ulcer induction, followed by ups and downs. The quality of healing in the regenerated mucosa and the granulation tissue of the healed ulcer was poor, resulting in the recurrence and relapse of ulcers. The recurrence and relapse of ulcers also occurred in the cimetidine groups (CIM). On the other hand, the KU-1257 groups (KU-1257) showed much lower recurrence and relapse rates of ulcers than the control and CIM groups. Moreover, KU-1257, unlike CIM, improved the quality of ulcer healing throughout the period of its administration and even after it was discontinued. These results suggest that KU-1257 improves the quality of ulcer healing, and this may contribute to the low recurrence and relapse rates of ulcers.

  12. Inhibition of Gastric Lipase as a Mechanism for Body Weight and Plasma Lipids Reduction in Zucker Rats Fed a Rosemary Extract Rich in Carnosic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Romo Vaquero, María; Yáñez-Gascón, María-Josefa; García Villalba, Rocío; Larrosa, Mar; Fromentin, Emilie; Ibarra, Alvin; Roller, Marc; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Espín de Gea, Juan Carlos; García-Conesa, María-Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Background Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extracts (REs) exhibit hepatoprotective, anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory properties and are widely used in the food industry. REs are rich in carnosic acid (CA) and carnosol which may be responsible for some of the biological activities of REs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether inhibition of lipase activity in the gut may be a mechanism by which a RE enriched in CA (40%) modulates body weight and lipids levels in a rat model of metabolic disorders and obesity. Methods and Principal Findings RE was administered for 64 days to lean (fa/+) and obese (fa/fa) female Zucker rats and body weight, food intake, feces weight and blood biochemical parameters were monitored throughout the study. Lipase activity (hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylbutyrate) was measured in the gastrointestinal tract at the end of the study and the contents of CA, carnosol and methyl carnosate were also determined. Sub-chronic administration of RE moderately reduced body weight gain in both lean and obese animals but did not affect food intake. Serum triglycerides, cholesterol and insulin levels were also markedly decreased in the lean animals supplemented with RE. Importantly, lipase activity was significantly inhibited in the stomach of the RE-supplemented animals where the highest content of intact CA and carnosol was detected. Conclusions Our results confirm that long-term administration of RE enriched in CA moderates weight gain and improves the plasma lipids profile, primarily in the lean animals. Our data also suggest that these effects may be caused, at least in part, by a significant inhibition of gastric lipase and subsequent reduction in fat absorption. PMID:22745826

  13. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site (Pasadena) in June-July 2010 during CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and a site in an oil and gas producing region (Uintah Basin) in January-February 2013 during UBWOS 2013 (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies) will be discussed. Although the VOC (volatile organic compounds) compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 99%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Compared to the original MCM model that includes only ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds and OH oxidation of acetylene, when we updated yields of ozonolysis of alkenes and included OH oxidation of isoprene, vinyl alcohol chemistry, reaction of formaldehyde with HO2, oxidation of aromatics, and reaction of CH3O2 with OH, the model predictions for formic acid were improved by a factor of 6.4 in UBWOS 2013 and 4.5 in CalNex, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 19 and 45% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be 0-6 and 0-5% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that

  14. Protein-silver nanoparticle interactions to colloidal stability in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Tai, Jui-Ting; Lai, Chao-Shun; Ho, Hsin-Chia; Yeh, Yu-Shan; Wang, Hsiao-Fang; Ho, Rong-Ming; Tsai, De-Hao

    2014-11-04

    We report a kinetic study of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) under acidic environments (i.e., pH 2.3 to pH ≈7) and systematically investigate the impact of protein interactions [i.e., bovine serum albumin (BSA) as representative] to the colloidal stability of AgNPs. Electrospray-differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA) was used to characterize the particle size distributions and the number concentrations of AgNPs. Transmission electron microscopy was employed orthogonally to provide visualization of AgNPs. For unconjugated AgNPs, the extent of aggregation, or the average particle size, was shown to be increased significantly with an increase of acidity, where a partial coalescence was found between the primary particles of unconjugated AgNP clusters. Aggregation rate constant, kD, was also shown to be proportional to acidity, following a correlation of log(kD) = -1.627(pH)-9.3715. Using ES-DMA, we observe BSA had a strong binding affinity (equilibrium binding constant, ≈ 1.1 × 10(6) L/mol) to the surface of AgNPs, with an estimated maximum molecular surface density of ≈0.012 nm(-2). BSA-functionalized AgNPs exhibited highly-improved colloidal stability compared to the unconjugated AgNPs under acidic environments, where both the acid-induced interfacial dissolution and the particle aggregation became negligible. Results confirm a complex mechanism of colloidal stability of AgNPs: the aggregation process was shown to be dominant, and the formation of BSA corona on AgNPs suppressed both particle aggregation and interfacial dissolution of AgNP samples under acidic environments.

  15. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Expression of IL-8 by Suppressing Activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Cho, Soon Ok

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cytokine response, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation. H. pylori induces the production of ROS, which may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and thus, expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial cells. α-lipoic acid, a naturally occurring thiol compound, is a potential antioxidant. It shows beneficial effects in treatment of oxidant-associated diseases including diabetes. The present study is purposed to investigate whether α-lipoic acid inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by suppressing activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Gastric epithelial AGS cells were pretreated with or without α-lipoic acid for 2 h and infected with H. pylori in a Korean isolate (HP99) at a ratio of 300:1. IL-8 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. IL-8 levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB-DNA binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of MAPK and Jak/Stat were assessed by Western blot analysis. ROS levels were determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. As a result, H. pylori induced increases in ROS levels, mRNA, and protein levels of IL-8, as well as the activation of MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38], Jak/Stat (Jak1/2, Stat3), and NF-κB in AGS cells, which was inhibited by α-lipoic acid. In conclusion, α-lipoic acid may be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection-associated gastric inflammation. PMID:26632410

  16. Chronic Gastric Ischemia Leading to Gastric Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Lundsmith, Emma; Zheng, Matthew; McCue, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension presented with 3 months of diffuse abdominal pain that worsened with meals, weight loss, and dysphagia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and computed tomography revealed findings consistent with chronic gastric ischemia secondary to atherosclerosis. Gastric ischemia eventually led to perforation. We discuss causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and management of gastric ischemia, an underdiagnosed and potentially fatal condition that requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. PMID:28119945

  17. Survival and expression of acid resistance genes in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli acid adapted in pineapple juice and exposed to synthetic gastric fluid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this research was to examine relative transcriptional expression of acid resistance (AR) genes, rpoS, gadA and adiA, in O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotypes after adaptation to pineapple juice (PJ) and subsequently to determine survival with e...

  18. Influence of experimental hypokinesia on gastric secretory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, O. O.; Vavryshchuk, V. I.; Rozvodovskyy, V. I.; Proshcheruk, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gastric secretory function of rats was studied in 4, 8, 16 and 30 day hypokinesia. Inhibition of both the gastric juice secretory and acid producing functions was found. The greatest inhibition was observed on day 8 of limited mobility. By days 16 and 30 of the experiment, a tendency of the gastric secretory activity to return to normal was observed, although it remained reduced.

  19. Fatty acid profiles of benthic environment associated with artificial reefs in subtropical Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Siu Gin; Wai, Ho Yin; Shin, Paul K S

    2010-02-01

    Artificial reefs can enhance habitat heterogeneity, especially in seabed degraded by bottom-dredging and trawling. However, the trophodynamics of such reef systems are not well understood. This study provided baseline data on trophic relationships in the benthic environment associated with artificial reefs in late spring and mid summer of subtropical Hong Kong, using fatty acid profiles as an indicator. Data from sediments collected at the reef base, materials from sediment traps deployed on top and bottom of the reefs, total particulate matter from the water column and oyster tissues from reef surface were subjected to principal component analysis. Results showed variations of fatty acid profiles in the total particulate matter, upper sediment trap and oyster tissue samples collected in the two samplings, indicating seasonal, trophodynamic changes within the reef system. The wastes produced by fish aggregating at the reefs can also contribute a source of biodeposits to the nearby benthic environment.

  20. Transformation of Monoaromatic hydrocarbons to organic acids in anoxic groundwater environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Baedecker, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The transformation of benzene and a series of alkylbenzenes was studied in anoxic groundwater of a shallow glacial-outwash aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, U.S.A. Monoaromatic hydrocarbons, the most water-soluble components of crude oil, were transported downgradient of an oil spill, forming a plume of contaminated groundwater. Organic acids that were not original components of the oil were identified in the anoxic groundwater. The highest concentrations of these oxidized organic compounds were found in the anoxic plume where a decrease in concentrations of structurally related alkylbenzenes was observed. These results suggest that biological transformation of benzene and alkylbenzenes to organic acid intermediates may be an important attenuation process in anoxic environments. The transformation of a complex mixture of hydrocarbons to a series of corresponding oxidation products in an anoxic subsurface environment provides new insight into in situ anaerobic degradation processes. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  1. The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is activated by alterations of its membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Axel; Lenzig, Pia; Oslender-Bujotzek, Adrienne; Kusch, Jana; Lucas, Susana Dias; Gründer, Stefan; Wiemuth, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the DEG/ENaC family of ion channels. Channels of this family are characterized by a common structure, their physiological functions and modes of activation, however, are diverse. Rat BASIC is expressed in brain, liver and intestinal tract and activated by bile acids. The physiological function of BASIC and its mechanism of bile acid activation remain a puzzle. Here we addressed the question whether amphiphilic bile acids activate BASIC by directly binding to the channel or indirectly by altering the properties of the surrounding membrane. We show that membrane-active substances other than bile acids also affect the activity of BASIC and that activation by bile acids and other membrane-active substances is non-additive, suggesting that BASIC is sensitive for changes in its membrane environment. Furthermore based on results from chimeras between BASIC and ASIC1a, we show that the extracellular and the transmembrane domains are important for membrane sensitivity.

  2. Gastric stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Ovali, Gülgün Yilmaz; Tarhan, Serdar; Serter, Selim; Pabuşçu, Yüksel

    2005-06-01

    Gastric stromal tumors are rare neoplasms of the stomach. In this report we present a gastric stromal tumor with an exophytic growth pattern, and describe magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography findings.

  3. The influence of mechanochemical modification on prevention of toxic ability of humic acids towards phenanthrene in aquatic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhovtsova, N. S.; Maltseva, E. V.; Glyzina, T. S.; Ovchinnikova, I. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the research work is to quantify interaction between phenanthrene with modified humic acids in aquatic environment. The changes in the structure and properties of humic acids after modifications were studied with 1H NMR spectroscopy and potentiometric titration methods. Our research demonstrates that the application of thiourea as a modified agent increases the binding capacity of humic acids towards phenanthrene.

  4. Viscous fingering of HCI through gastric mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, K. Ramakrishnan; Garik, Peter; Turner, Bradley S.; Bradley, James Douglas; Bansil, Rama; Stanley, H. Eugene; Lamont, J. Thomas

    1992-12-01

    THE HCI in the mammalian stomach is concentrated enough to digest the stomach itself, yet the gastric epithelium remains undamaged. One protective factor is gastric mucus, which forms a protective layer over the surface epithelium1-4 and acts as a diffusion barrier5,6 Bicarbonate ions secreted by the gastric epithelium7 are trapped in the mucus gel, establishing a gradient from pH 1-2 at the lumen to pH 6-7 at the cell surface8-10. How does HCI, secreted at the base of gastric glands by parietal cells, traverse the mucus layer without acidifying it? Here we demonstrate that injection of HCI through solutions of pig gastric mucin produces viscous fingering patterns11-18 dependent on pH, mucin concentration and acid flow rate. Above pH 4, discrete fingers are observed, whereas below pH 4, HCI neither penetrates the mucin solution nor forms fingers. Our in vitro results suggest that HCI secreted by the gastric gland can penetrate the mucus gel layer (pH 5-7) through narrow fingers, whereas HC1 in the lumen (pH 2) is prevented from diffusing back to the epithelium by the high viscosity of gastric mucus gel on the luminal side.

  5. Do calories or osmolality determine gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.B.; Levine, A.S.; Marlette, J.M.; Morley, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Recent animal studies suggest that gastric emptying is dependent on the caloric and osmotic content of the ingested food. These studies have involved intubation with infusion of liquid meals into the stomach. Scintigraphic methods, which are non-invasive and do not alter normal physiology, are now available for precise quantitation of gastric emptying. To study the role of calories and osmolality on gastric emptying, the authors employed a standardized /sup 99m/Tc-scrambled egg meal washed with 50 cc tap water in 10 normal human volunteers. A variety of simple and complex sugars, non-absorbable complex carbohydrate (polycose), medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) and gluten were dissolved in water and ingested with the test meal. Each subject acted as his own control. Coefficient of variation in control tests in each subject 12 weeks apart was 9.9%. Results showed that incremental glucose (25-66 gm) produced a linear increase in gastric emptying (T/2 control 50 +- 3, 25 gm 60 +- 3, 50 gm 79 +- 3 and 66 gm 102 +- 3 minutes). 25 gm fructose (T/2 59 +- 3 minutes) and 25 gm polycose (T/2 59 +- 3 minutes) had similar effects to glucose. 25 gm sucrose and 25 gm gluten did not significantly differ from controls. MCFA had an effect similar to 50 gm glucose - suggesting that calories are important in gastric emptying. However, 25 gm xylose markedly prolonged gastric emptying to 80 +- 5 minutes. The rank order for osmolality for substances tested MCFA = gluten < polycose < polycose < fructose < sucrose = glucose < xylose defined no relationship to gastric emptying. The authors' results suggest that neither calories nor osmolality alone determine gastric emptying. A specific food does not necessarily have the same effect on gastric emptying in different individuals.

  6. Dose-Finding Study of Omeprazole on Gastric pH in Neonates with Gastro-Esophageal Acid Reflux Using a Bayesian Sequential Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaguelidou, Florentia; Alberti, Corinne; Biran, Valerie; Bourdon, Olivier; Farnoux, Caroline; Zohar, Sarah; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    Objective Proton pump inhibitors are frequently administered on clinical symptoms in neonates but benefit remains controversial. Clinical trials validating omeprazole dosage in neonates are limited. The objective of this trial was to determine the minimum effective dose (MED) of omeprazole to treat pathological acid reflux in neonates using reflux index as surrogate marker. Design Double blind dose-finding trial with continual reassessment method of individual dose administration using a Bayesian approach, aiming to select drug dose as close as possible to the predefined target level of efficacy (with a credibility interval of 95%). Setting Neonatal Intensive Care unit of the Robert Debré University Hospital in Paris, France. Patients Neonates with a postmenstrual age ≥ 35 weeks and a pathologic 24-hour intra-esophageal pH monitoring defined by a reflux index ≥ 5% over 24 hours were considered for participation. Recruitment was stratified to 3 groups according to gestational age at birth. Intervention Five preselected doses of oral omeprazole from 1 to 3 mg/kg/day. Main outcome measures Primary outcome, measured at 35 weeks postmenstrual age or more, was a reflux index <5% during the 24-h pH monitoring registered 72±24 hours after omeprazole initiation. Results Fifty-four neonates with a reflux index ranging from 5.06 to 27.7% were included. Median age was 37.5 days and median postmenstrual age was 36 weeks. In neonates born at less than 32 weeks of GA (n = 30), the MED was 2.5mg/kg/day with an estimated mean posterior probability of success of 97.7% (95% credibility interval: 90.3–99.7%). The MED was 1mg/kg/day for neonates born at more than 32 GA (n = 24). Conclusions Omeprazole is extensively prescribed on clinical symptoms but efficacy is not demonstrated while safety concerns do exist. When treatment is required, the daily dose needs to be validated in preterm and term neonates. Optimal doses of omeprazole to increase gastric pH and decrease reflux

  7. [Gastric and intestinal bezoars].

    PubMed

    Larbi, Noureddine; Kaâbi, Samarra; Ben Salah, Khiareddine

    2003-12-01

    The authors report a retrospective study of 10 cases of gastric and small bowel bezoars. There was one gastric trichobezoar diagnosed by an abdominal mass and 9 small bowel obstruction due to phytobezoars. All patients underwent surgery: the gastric trichobezoar was removed through a gastrotomy; small bowel bezoars were treated either by enterotomy (n = 3), fragmentation (n = 5) or bowel resection (n = 1). Non operative treatment is efficient in gastric phytobezoars. Surgery is advisable for trichobezoars and small bowel bezoars. Prevention is main and patients who have gastric surgery must be alarmed from consumption of cactus in our country Tunisia.

  8. Gastric physiology and function: effects of fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Moukarzel, A A; Sabri, M T

    1996-10-01

    The stomach stores food and starts digesting protein and fat. Lipids, sugars, certain amino acids, and nutrients of high osmolality trigger sensory mechanisms from the intestine which inhibit gastric emptying. Food rich in carbohydrates leaves the stomach slower than protein-rich food, and emptying is slowest after a meal containing lipid. For carbohydrate beverages, the gastric emptying rate is primarily determined by the volume, caloric content, and osmolality of fluid ingested. Gastric emptying rates vary among isocaloric beverages of different type (e.g., sucrose, fructose, galactose) or forms (e.g., maltodextrins, starches) of carbohydrate. For instance, gastric emptying is faster for a fructose solution compared with isocaloric glucose and galactose solutions. A maltodextrin or a sucrose solution empties faster than a glucose solution. This is possibly due to the greater inhibitory feedback associated with the introduction of glucose in the duodenum. In addition, fruit juices contain soluble fibers which further modulate the gastric emptying. Noninvasive methods to study gastric emptying have recently been developed. The pattern of the myoelectric activity of the gastric contraction and the effect of meals on this pattern can now be recorded by cutaneous electrodes. In healthy children ingesting different juices, the myoelectric pattern of the stomach (indicator of the gastric emptying) correlates with the carbohydrate absorption (measured by breath hydrogen excretion). Fast gastric emptying was associated with greater production of breath hydrogen. The malabsorption of juice carbohydrates may in part be related to their effect on gastric motility.

  9. Amino acid-based ionic liquids: using XPS to probe the electronic environment via binding energies.

    PubMed

    Hurisso, Bitu Birru; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Licence, Peter

    2011-10-21

    Here we report the synthesis and characterisation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of eight high purity amino acid-based ionic liquids (AAILs), each containing the 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium, [C(8)C(1)Im](+), as a standard reference cation. All expected elements were observed and the electronic environments of these elements identified. A fitting model for the carbon 1s region of the AAILs is reported; the C aliphatic component of the cation was used as an internal reference to obtain a series of accurate and reproducible binding energies. Comparisons are made between XP spectra of the eight AAILs and selected non-functionalised ionic liquids. 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate was also studied as a model of the carboxyl containing amino acid anion. The influence of anionic substituent groups on the measured binding energies of all elements is presented, and communication between anion and cation is investigated. This data is interpreted in terms of hard and soft anions and compared to the Kamlet-Taft hydrogen bond acceptor ability, β, for the ionic liquids. A linear correlation is presented which suggests that the functional side chain, or R group, of the amino acid has little impact upon the electronic environment of the charge-bearing moieties within the anions and cations studied.

  10. Genotypic variability and genotype by environment interactions in oil and fatty acids in high, intermediate, and low oleic acid peanut genotypes.

    PubMed

    Singkham, Nattawut; Jogloy, Sanun; Kesmala, Thawan; Swatsitang, Prasan; Jaisil, Prasit; Puppala, Naveen

    2010-05-26

    Variability of genotype and genotype x environment (G x E) interactions for fatty acids are important to develop high-oleic types in peanut varietal improvement programs. The objective of this study was to determine the variation in fatty acid composition among peanut genotypes and G x E interactions of fatty acids in three groups of genotypes with high, intermediate, and low-oleic acid. Twenty-one genotypes were tested in three environments consisting of two rainy seasons and one dry season. The results indicated that G x E interactions were significant for biomass, pod yield, and harvest index and also for oleic, linoleic acids, and O/L ratio. G x E interactions were less important than genotypic main effect. For oleic acid, significant interactions were found in the intermediate and low-oleic groups only. Therefore, selection for high-oleic trait in peanut breeding programs should be effective.

  11. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  12. Acetic Acid Bacterial Biota of the Pink Sugar Cane Mealybug, Saccharococcus sacchari, and Its Environs

    PubMed Central

    Ashbolt, Nicholas J.; Inkerman, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    Saccharococcus sacchari is the primary colonizer of the developing “sterile” tissue between the leaf sheath and stem of sugar cane. The honeydew secreted by the mealybugs is acidic (about pH 3) and supports an atypical epiphytic microbiota dominated by acetobacter-like bacteria and acidophilic yeast species. However, Erwinia and Leuconostoc species predominate within the leaf sheath pocket region when the mealybugs die out. The unidentified acetobacters were readily isolated from S. sacchari throughout its life cycle and from other genera of mealybugs on sugar cane and various other plants, both above and below ground. No other insect present on sugar cane was a significant vector of acetic acid bacteria. The major factors restricting microbial diversity within the environs of mealybugs were considered to be yeast activity along with bacterial production of acetic acid, ketogluconic acids, and gamma-pyrones, in association with their lowering of pH. The microbial products may aid in suppressing the attack by the parasitic mold Aspergillus parasiticus on mealybugs but could act as attractants for the predatory fruit fly Cacoxenus perspicax. PMID:16348144

  13. Evaluation of boric acid sugar baits against Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in tropical environments.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Diana P; Qualls, Whitney A; Müller, Gunter C; Samson, Dayana M; Roque, Deborah; Alimi, Temitope; Arheart, Kristopher; Beier, John C; Xue, Rui-De

    2013-04-01

    Attractive toxic sugar bait (active ingredient, 1% boric acid) was evaluated against Aedes albopictus Skuse populations in the laboratory, semi-field trials, and field trials in residential communities in St. Augustine, Florida. Laboratory evaluations of boric acid sugar baits applied to the plant Pentas lanceolata (Rubiaceae) demonstrated 100 and 92% mortality of A. albopictus at day 7 and 14, respectively. A semi-field study evaluating the bait application to the upperside or topside of leaves resulted in no significant difference on mortality (P>0.05). Overall combined top and bottom boric acid sugar bait application mortality at day 7 was 95% based on leaf bioassays. Field application of the boric acid sugar baits significantly (P<0.05) decreased adult A. albopictus populations up to day 21 post-treatment compared to the pre-treatment population numbers. A significant reduction in oviposition was demonstrated both at day 7 and 14 post-application (P=0.001) as monitored by ovitraps. Attractive toxic sugar bait application in tropical environments demonstrated efficacy, persistence, and feasibility in controlling A. albopictus populations.

  14. Humic and fluvic acids and organic colloidal materials in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.; Clark, S.B.

    1996-04-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment, occurring in all soils, waters, and sediments of the ecosphere. Humic substances arise from the decomposition of plant and animal tissues yet are more stable than their precursors. Their size, molecular weight, elemental composition, structure, and the number and position of functional groups vary, depending on the origin and age of the material. Humic and fulvic substances have been studied extensively for more than 200 years; however, much remains unknown regarding their structure and properties. Humic substances are those organic compounds found in the environment that cannot be classified as any other chemical class of compounds. They are traditionally defined according to their solubilities. Fulvic acids are those organic materials that are soluble in water at all pH values. Humic acids are those materials that are insoluble at acidic pH values (pH < 2) but are soluble at higher pH values. Humin is the fraction of natural organic materials that is insoluble in water at all pH values. These definitions reflect the traditional methods for separating the different fractions from the original mixture. The humic content of soils varies from 0 to almost 10%. In surface waters, the humic content, expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), varies from 0.1 to 50 ppm in dark-water swamps. In ocean waters, the DOC varies from 0.5 to 1.2 ppm at the surface, and the DOC in samples from deep groundwaters varies from 0.1 to 10 ppm. In addition, about 10% of the DOC in surface waters is found in suspended matter, either as organic or organically coated inorganic particulates. Humic materials function as surfactants, with the ability to bind both hydrophobic and hydrophyllic materials, making numic and fluvic materials effective agents in transporting both organic and inorganic contaminants in the environment.

  15. TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR EXPRESSION IS AMELIORATED AFTER EXPOSURE TO AN ACIDIC ENVIRONMENT

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, Julia; Vazquez, Daniel E.; Costantini, Todd; Cauvi, David M.; Charles, Wisler; Bickler, Stephen; Talamini, Mark A.; Vega, Virginia L.; Coimbra, Raul; De Maio, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been well established that laparoscopic surgery presents several clinical benefits, including reduced pain and a shorter hospital stay. These effects have been associated with a decrease in the inflammatory response. Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced inflammation after laparoscopic surgery is the product of carbon dioxide insufflation, which decreases peritoneal pH. The objective of this study was to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the reduced response after exposure to acidic environments. Materials and methods A murine macrophage line (J744) was incubated in culture medium at pH 6.0 or pH 7.4 for 3 hours at 37°C. Then, cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at pH 7.4, the expression of TNF-α (qRT-PCR or ELISA) and intracellular pH were measured. In addition, CD14 and Toll-like receptor 4 expression and and NF-κB nuclear translocation were analyzed. Results A significant decrease in LPS-induced TNF-α expression levels was observed in cells pre-incubated at pH 6.0 in comparison with cells at neutral pH conditions. This decrease in TNF-α levels was not associated with a reduction in cell surface expression of CD14 and Toll-like receptor 4. Exposure to an extracellular acidic environment resulted in a reduction of IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation, secondary to a significant drop in cytosolic pH. Conclusions These observations provide a potential mechanism for the reduced expression of TNF-α after exposure to low extracellular pH, which may be related to acidification after CO2 insufflation during laparoscopic surgery. In addition, extracellular acidic pH environments could emerge as an important regulator of macrophage function. PMID:20888586

  16. Bacillus cereus cell response upon exposure to acid environment: toward the identification of potential biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Noémie; Broussolle, Véronique; Postollec, Florence; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Sohier, Danièle; Coroller, Louis; Leguerinel, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to adapt to different environments and evolve rapidly, allowing them to cope with their new environments. Such adaptive response and associated protections toward other lethal stresses, is a crucial survival strategy for a wide spectrum of microorganisms, including food spoilage bacteria, pathogens, and organisms used in functional food applications. The growing demand for minimal processed food yields to an increasing use of combination of hurdles or mild preservation factors in the food industry. A commonly used hurdle is low pH which allows the decrease in bacterial growth rate but also the inactivation of pathogens or spoilage microorganisms. Bacillus cereus is a well-known food-borne pathogen leading to economical and safety issues in food industry. Because survival mechanisms implemented will allow bacteria to cope with environmental changes, it is important to provide understanding of B. cereus stress response. Thus this review deals with the adaptive traits of B. cereus cells facing to acid stress conditions. The acid stress response of B. cereus could be divided into four groups (i) general stress response (ii) pH homeostasis, (iii) metabolic modifications and alkali production and (iv) secondary oxidative stress response. This current knowledge may be useful to understand how B. cereus cells may cope to acid environment such as encountered in food products and thus to find some molecular biomarkers of the bacterial behavior. These biomarkers could be furthermore used to develop new microbial behavior prediction tools which can provide insights into underlying molecular physiological states which govern the behavior of microorganisms and thus opening the avenue toward the detection of stress adaptive behavior at an early stage and the control of stress-induced resistance throughout the food chain. PMID:24106490

  17. Acid diffusion into rice boluses is influenced by rice type, variety, and presence of α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Mennah-Govela, Yamile A; Bornhorst, Gail M; Singh, R Paul

    2015-02-01

    Breakdown of rice during gastric digestion may be influenced by rice structure, presence of salivary α-amylase, and hydrolysis by gastric acid. During mastication, saliva is mixed with rice, allowing α-amylase to begin starch hydrolysis. This hydrolysis may continue in the gastric environment depending on the rate at which gastric acid penetrates into the rice bolus. The objective of this study was to determine the acid uptake into rice boluses with and without α-amylase in saliva. Two types each of brown and white rice (medium and long grain), were formed into a cylindrical-shaped bolus. Each bolus was sealed on all sides except one to allow one-dimensional mass transfer, and incubated by immersion in simulated gastric juice at 37 °C under static conditions. Acidity of the boluses was measured by titration after 1 to 96 h of incubation. Effective diffusivity of the gastric juice through the bolus was estimated using MATLAB. Average acidity values ranged from 0.04 mg HCl/g dry matter (medium grain white rice, no incubation) to 10.01 mg HCl/g dry matter (long-grain brown rice, 72 h incubation). The rice type, presence of α-amylase, and incubation time all significantly influenced rice bolus acidity (P < 0.001). Effective diffusivity of gastric juice into the bolus was greater in brown rice than in white rice. These results indicate that starch hydrolysis by α-amylase may continue in the stomach before the gastric acid penetrates the rice bolus, and the rate of acid uptake will depend on the type of rice consumed.

  18. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  19. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  20. Distribution and diversity of Verrucomicrobia methanotrophs in geothermal and acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Christine E; Smirnova, Angela V; Graham, Jaime M; Stott, Matthew B; Khadka, Roshan; Moore, Tim R; Grasby, Stephen E; Strack, Maria; Dunfield, Peter F

    2014-06-01

    Recently, methanotrophic members of the phylum Verrucomicrobia have been described, but little is known about their distribution in nature. We surveyed methanotrophic bacteria in geothermal springs and acidic wetlands via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Putative methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia were found in samples covering a broad temperature range (22.5-81.6°C), but only in acidic conditions (pH 1.8-5.0) and only in geothermal environments, not in acidic bogs or fens. Phylogenetically, three 16S rRNA gene sequence clusters of putative methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia were observed. Those detected in high-temperature geothermal samples (44.1-81.6°C) grouped with known thermoacidiphilic 'Methylacidiphilum' isolates. A second group dominated in moderate-temperature geothermal samples (22.5-40.1°C) and a representative mesophilic methanotroph from this group was isolated (strain LP2A). Genome sequencing verified that strain LP2A possessed particulate methane monooxygenase, but its 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to 'Methylacidiphilum infernorum' strain V4 was only 90.6%. A third group clustered distantly with known methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia. Using pmoA-gene targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, two geothermal soil profiles showed a dominance of LP2A-like pmoA sequences in the cooler surface layers and 'Methylacidiphilum'-like pmoA sequences in deeper, hotter layers. Based on these results, there appears to be a thermophilic group and a mesophilic group of methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia. However, both were detected only in acidic geothermal environments.

  1. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  2. Basis of decreased risk of gastric cancer in severe atrophic gastritis with eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tari, Akira; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sumii, Masaharu; Sasaki, Atsunori; Tani, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Sinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induces chronic gastritis and lowers gastric juice ascorbic acid concentrations. We investigated how H. pylori eradication affected multiple variables that could prevent or delay development of new or occult gastric cancer in patients with early gastric cancer treated by endoscopic mucosal resection. Gastric juice pH, nitrite concentrations, and total vitamin C concentrations, serum concentrations of vitamin C and specific H. pylori antibody, and intensity of neutrophil infiltration in gastric mucosa were determined before and after successful H. pylori eradication. Successful eradication increased acid output and ascorbic acid secretion into gastric juice, accompanied by disappearance of polymorphonuclear infiltration from the surface epithelium and decreased gastric juice nitrite concentrations. Our data suggest that H. pylori eradication decreases the nitrosation rate as the ratio of vitamin C to nitrite increases. This decreases reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, eliminating their damaging effect on DNA and reducing cell turnover.

  3. Gallic acid inhibits gastric cancer cells metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Hsieh-Hsun; Chang, Chi-Sen; Ho, Wei-Chi; Liao, Sheng-You; Lin, Wea-Lung; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of gallic acid (GA) for controlling tumor metastasis through its inhibitory effect on the motility of AGS cells. A noteworthy finding in our previous experiment was increased RhoB expression in GA-treated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of RhoB expression on the inhibitory effects of GA on AGS cells. By applying the transfection of RhoB siRNA into AGS cells and an animal model, we tested the effect of GA on inhibition of tumor growth and RhoB expression. The results confirmed that RhoB-siRNA transfection induced GA to inhibit AGS cells’ invasive growth involving blocking the AKT/small GTPase signals pathway and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Finally, we evaluated the effect of GA on AGS cell metastasis by colonization of tumor cells in nude mice. It showed GA inhibited tumor cells growth via the expression of RhoB. These data support the inhibitory effect of GA which was shown to inhibit gastric cancer cell metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Thus, GA might be a potential agent in treating gastric cancer. Highlights: ► GA could downregulate AKT signal via increased expression of RhoB. ► GA inhibits metastasis in vitro in gastric carcinoma. ► GA inhibits tumor growth in nude mice model.

  4. Fatty acid-binding site environments of serum vitamin D-binding protein and albumin are different

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) and albumin (ALB) are abundant serum proteins and both possess high-affinity binding for saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. However, certain differences exist. We surmised that in cases where serum albumin level is low, DBP presumably can act as a transporter of fatty acids. To explore this possibility we synthesized several alkylating derivatives of 14C-palmitic acid to probe the fatty acid binding pockets of DBP and ALB. We observed that N-ethyl-5-phenylisooxazolium-3′-sulfonate-ester (WRK ester) of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled DBP; but p-nitrophenyl- and N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-esters failed to do so. However, p-nitrophenyl ester of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled bovine ALB, indicating that the micro-environment of the fatty acid-binding domains of DBP and ALB may be different; and DBP may not replace ALB as a transporter of fatty acids. PMID:18374965

  5. Trophic relationships in an estuarine environment: A quantitative fatty acid analysis signature approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnone, Larisa; Bessonart, Martin; Gadea, Juan; Salhi, María

    2015-12-01

    In order to better understand the functioning of aquatic environments, it is necessary to obtain accurate diet estimations in food webs. Their description should incorporate information about energy flow and the relative importance of trophic pathways. Fatty acids have been extensively used in qualitative studies on trophic relationships in food webs. Recently a new method to estimate quantitatively single predator diet has been developed. In this study, a model of aquatic food web through quantitative fatty acid signature analysis was generated to identify the trophic interactions among the species in the Rocha Lagoon. The biological sampling over two consecutive annual periods was comprehensive enough to identify all functional groups in the aquatic food web (except birds and mammals). Heleobia australis seemed to play a central role in this estuarine ecosystem. As both, a grazer and a prey to several other species, probably H. australis is transferring a great amount of energy to upper trophic levels. Most of the species at Rocha Lagoon have a wide range of prey items in their diet reflecting a complex food web, which is characteristic of extremely dynamic environment as estuarine ecosystems. QFASA is a model in tracing and quantitative estimate trophic pathways among species in an estuarine food web. The results obtained in the present work are a valuable contribution in the understanding of trophic relationships in Rocha Lagoon.

  6. Corrosion behavior of low alloy steels in a wet-dry acid humid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing-he; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jian-wei; Zhu, Yi-chun; Zhang, Bin-li; Lu, Min-xu

    2016-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of corrosion resistant steel (CRS) in a simulated wet-dry acid humid environment was investigated and compared with carbon steel (CS) using corrosion loss, polarization curves, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA), N2 adsorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the corrosion kinetics of both steels were closely related to the composition and compactness of the rust, and the electrochemical properties of rusted steel. Small amounts of Cu, Cr, and Ni in CRS increased the amount of amorphous phases and decreased the content of γ-FeOOH in the rust, resulting in higher compactness and electrochemical stability of the CRS rust. The elements Cu, Cr, and Ni were uniformly distributed in the CRS rust and formed CuFeO2, Cu2O, CrOOH, NiFe2O4, and Ni2O3, which enhanced the corrosion resistance of CRS in the wet-dry acid humid environment.

  7. Placement in an acidic environment increase the solubility of white mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Hamid Reza; Borna, Zahra; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Valizadeh, Hadi; Ghojazadeh, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate solubility of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) in an acidic environment. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four metal rings were prepared, filled with WMTA and randomly divided into two groups. The samples in groups 1 and 2 were set in synthetic tissue fluid with pH values of 7.4 and 4.4, respectively and then were transferred to beakers containing synthetic tissue fluid with pH values of 7.7 and 4.4. Solubility of WMTA samples were calculated at the 9 experimental intervals. Data was analyzed with two-factor ANOVA and Bonferroni test (P < 0.03). Results: The total solubility of WMTA in groups 1 and 2 were −9.1796 ± 1.9158% and −1.1192 ± 2.6236%, (P = 0.028) with weight changes of 9.1574 ± 2.1432% and 7.3276 ± 1.5823%, respectively (P = 0.002). Statistical analysis revealed significant differences between the two groups. Conclusions: It was concluded that solubility of WMTA increases in acidic environments and additional therapeutic precautions should be taken to decrease inflammation in endodontic treatment. PMID:23833462

  8. Effects of acute administration of omeprazole or ranitidine on basal and vagally stimulated gastric acid secretion and alkalinization of the duodenum in anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Fändriks, L; Jönson, C

    1990-02-01

    Experiments were performed on acutely vagotomized cats during chloralose anaesthesia. In order to avoid sympathoadrenergic influences, the adrenal glands were ligated and the splanchnic nerves were cut bilaterally in all animals. The gastric lumen was perfused with saline and the H+ secretion was calculated from pH measurements in the perfusate. HCO3- secretion by the duodenal mucosa was titrated in situ. Omeprazole (4 mg kg-1 i.v., dissolved in PEG400, 40% w/v) did not influence basal or vagally induced HCO3- secretions, but inhibited by about 80% the H+ secretory response induced by electric vagal stimulation. Acute administration of ranitidine (5 mg kg-1 i.v.) transiently lowered arterial pressure, an effect which was followed by a sustained compensatory tachycardia. Ranitidine raised basal duodenal HCO3- secretion by 50% and inhibited vagally induced gastric H+ secretion by about 70%, whereas vagally induced HCO3- secretion was not influenced. The results suggest that vagal nerve stimulation raises the duodenal bicarbonate secretion via a mechanism independent of the level of gastric H+ secretion.

  9. Cerro Negro, Nicaragua: A key Mars Analog Environment for Acid-Sulfate Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynek, B. M.; Rogers, K. L.; McCollom, T. M.

    2008-12-01

    Sulfate-rich bedrock has been discovered in many locations on Mars and has been studied by both orbiting spacecraft and landers. It appears that in most cases these minerals are produced by acid-sulfate weathering of igneous rocks, which may have been a widespread process for the first billion years of Mars' history. The origin of life on Earth may have occurred in iron-sulfur hydrothermal settings and it is conceivable that early Mars had similar environmental conditions. An excellent terrestrial analog for acid- sulfate weathering of Mars-like basalts exists at Cerro Negro (CN), Nicaragua, where sulfur-bearing gases interact with recently erupted basaltic ash in numerous fumaroles. To date, we have made two expeditions to CN to assess the chemical, mineralogical, and biological conditions. At the fumaroles pH ranges from <1 to 5 and temperatures range from 40 to 400° C. Basalts with a chemical composition very similar to those on Mars are being chemically altered in the solfatara setting. In a few years, freshly erupted basalt can be converted into predominately Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-sulfates, Fe-hydroxides (including jarosite), clays, and free silica. Altered rocks have up to 30 wt% SO3 equivalent, which is similar to the Meridiani Planum bedrocks and inferred in other sulfate-bearing bedrock on Mars. Moreover, heavily weathered rocks have silica contents up to 80 wt%, similar to silica-rich soils at Gusev Crater that possibly formed in hydrothermal environments. Samples were collected for biological analysis including enrichment and isolation of novel thermophiles as well as molecular characterization of thermophile diversity. The low water and nutrient levels found in solfatara environments lead to less biomass when compared to hot springs with similar geochemical conditions. Nonetheless, microbes are thriving in these hot, acidic vent environments. At Cerro Negro solfatara, we are characterizing the metabolic and phylogenetic diversity of resident microbial

  10. Snails from heavy-metal polluted environments have reduced sensitivity to carbon dioxide-induced acidity.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, Hugh; Cleary, David A; Marble, Aaron M; Phillips, Morgan V; Stoddard, Timothy J; Tuthill, Lara M; Winslow, James R

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 reacts with water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3) which increases water acidity. While marine acidification has received recent consideration, less attention has been paid to the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide on freshwater systems-systems that often have low buffering potential. Since many aquatic systems are already impacted by pollutants such as heavy metals, we wondered about the added effect of rising atmospheric CO2 on freshwater organisms. We studied aquatic pulmonate snails (Physella columbiana) from both a heavy-metal polluted watershed and snails from a reference watershed that has not experienced mining pollution. We used gaseous CO2 to increase water acidity and we then measured changes in antipredatory behavior and also survival. We predicted a simple negative additive effect of low pH. We hypothesized that snails from metal-polluted environments would be physiologically stressed and impaired due to defense responses against heavy metals. Instead, snails from populations that acclimated or evolved in the presence of heavy metal mining pollution were more robust to acidic conditions than were snails from reference habitats. Snails from mining polluted sites seemed to be preadapted to a low pH environment. Their short-term survival in acidic conditions was better than snails from reference sites that lacked metal pollution. In fact, the 48 h survival of snails from polluted sites was so high that it did not significantly differ from the 24 h survival of snails from control sites. This suggests that the response of organisms to a world with rising anthropogenic carbon dioxide levels may be complex and difficult to predict. Snails had a weaker behavioral response to stressful stimuli if kept for 1 month at a pH that differed from their lake of origin. We found that snails raised at a pH of 5.5 had a weaker response (less of a decrease in activity) to concentrated heavy metals than did snails raised at their natal pH of

  11. Sulfur amino acid metabolism limits the growth of children living in environments of poor sanitation.

    PubMed

    Bickler, Stephen W; Ring, Jason; De Maio, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    Environmental enteropathy has been identified as a cause of poor growth in children living in low-income countries, but a mechanism has not been well defined. We suggest changes in sulfur amino acid metabolism can in part explain the poor growth and possibly the histological changes in the small bowel, which is the hallmark of environmental enteropathy. In environments of poor sanitation, where infection is common, we propose increased oxidative stress drives methionine metabolism toward cystathionine synthesis. This "cystathionine siphon" limits sulfur amino acids from participating in critical protein synthesis pathways. Increased expression of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) could be one mechanism, as lipopolysaccharide and TNFα increase activity of this enzyme in vivo. CBS catalyzes the first of two steps in the transsulfuration pathway that converts homocysteine to cysteine. As enterocytes are one of the most rapidly proliferating cells in the body, we suggest diminished translation might also be important in the barrier failure observed in environmental enteropathy. Identifying sulfur amino acid metabolism as a mechanism leading to poor growth provides a new testable hypothesis for the undernutrition observed in children living in settings of poor sanitation.

  12. Screening of anaerobic activities in sediments of an acidic environment: Tinto River.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Rojas-Ojeda, Patricia; Amils, Ricardo; Sanz, José Luis

    2012-11-01

    The Tinto River (Huelva, Spain) is a natural acidic rock drainage environment produced by the bio-oxidation of metallic sulfides from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. A geomicrobiological model of the different microbial cycles operating in the sediments was recently developed through molecular biological methods, suggesting the presence of iron reducers, methanogens, nitrate reducers and hydrogen producers. In this study, we used a combination of molecular biological methods and targeted enrichment incubations to validate this model and prove the existence of those potential anaerobic activities in the acidic sediments of Tinto River. Methanogenic, sulfate-reducing, denitrifying and hydrogen-producing enrichments were all positive at pH between 5 and 7. Methanogenic enrichments revealed the presence of methanogenic archaea belonging to the genera Methanosarcina and Methanobrevibacter. Enrichments for sulfate-reducing microorganisms were dominated by Desulfotomaculum spp. Denitrifying enrichments showed a broad diversity of bacteria belonging to the genera Paenibacillus, Bacillus, Sedimentibacter, Lysinibacillus, Delftia, Alcaligenes, Clostridium and Desulfitobacterium. Hydrogen-producing enrichments were dominated by Clostridium spp. These enrichments confirm the presence of anaerobic activities in the acidic sediments of the Tinto River that are normally assumed to take place exclusively at neutral pH.

  13. Gastric syphilis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Tais Ferreira; Novis, Camila Freitas Lobo; Bottino, Caroline Bertolini; D'Acri, Antonio Macedo; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Gastric syphilis is an uncommon extracutaneous manifestation of syphilis, occurring in less than 1% of patients, presenting nonspecific clinical manifestations. In general, it occurs on secondary stage. The critical point is the recognition of the syphilitic gastric involvement, without which there may be incorrect diagnosis of malignancy of the digestive tract. In this report, a case of secondary syphilis with gastric involvement that had complete remission with benzathine penicillin will be described. PMID:27828649

  14. Superoxide Triggers an Acid Burst in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Condition the Environment of Glucose-starved Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Baron, J. Allen; Laws, Kaitlin M.; Chen, Janice S.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2013-01-01

    Although yeast cells grown in abundant glucose tend to acidify their extracellular environment, they raise the pH of the environment when starved for glucose or when grown strictly with non-fermentable carbon sources. Following prolonged periods in this alkaline phase, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells will switch to producing acid. The mechanisms and rationale for this “acid burst” were unknown. Herein we provide strong evidence for the role of mitochondrial superoxide in initiating the acid burst. Yeast mutants lacking the mitochondrial matrix superoxide dismutase (SOD2) enzyme, but not the cytosolic Cu,Zn-SOD1 enzyme, exhibited marked acceleration in production of acid on non-fermentable carbon sources. Acid production is also dramatically enhanced by the superoxide-producing agent, paraquat. Conversely, the acid burst is eliminated by boosting cellular levels of Mn-antioxidant mimics of SOD. We demonstrate that the acid burst is dependent on the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase Ald4p. Our data are consistent with a model in which mitochondrial superoxide damage to Fe-S enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle leads to acetate buildup by Ald4p. The resultant expulsion of acetate into the extracellular environment can provide a new carbon source to glucose-starved cells and enhance growth of yeast. By triggering production of organic acids, mitochondrial superoxide has the potential to promote cell population growth under nutrient depravation stress. PMID:23281478

  15. Continuous measurement of nitrous acid (HONO) in indoor environment using a diffusion scrubber and chemiluminescence method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Hong, J.; Lee, J.; Cho, S.

    2006-12-01

    Recent study has demonstrated that the use of combustion appliances in indoor environments, e.g., gas stoves and heaters, results in significant concentrations of NO2 and nitrous acid (HONO). Indoor HONO is formed by both direct emissions from combustion processes and the heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with water vapor on surfaces present indoors. In this study in-situ instrument was constructed for measuring HONO concentration in both indoor and outdoor environments, utilizing diffusion scrubber and peroxynitrite-induced luminol chemiluminescent methods. We measured the HONO concentration under the conditions existing in living room of an apartment, along with NO, NO2, temperature, and relative humidity, to investigate the sources, chemical transformation, and lifetimes of nitrogen oxides and HONO. Some experiments investigated the emissions and transformations of nitrogen species from operation of unvented or vented gas appliance. Measurement data of NO, NO2, and HONO will be reported, and formation pathway of the HONO under the experimental conditions will also be discussed. In addition to measurement of indoor HONO, comparison of HONO measurements by luminol chemiluminescence and annular denuder integrated samples was made in outdoor environment. HONO in ambient air was sampled with annular denuders (Teflon-coated PM2.5 cyclone inlet followed by two Na2CO3-coated denuders coupled in series) operated at 16.7 L/min. Acknowledgement This study was supported by grant No. (# R01-2005-000-10775-0) from the Basic Research Program of the Korea Science and Engineering Foundation (KOSEF).

  16. Selective gene expression by rat gastric corpus epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, M.; Stengel, A.; Sachs, G.

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is divided into several segments that have distinct functional properties, largely absorptive. The gastric corpus is the only segment thought of as largely secretory. Microarray hybridization of the gastric corpus mucosal epithelial cells was used to compare gene expression with other segments of the columnar GI tract followed by statistical data subtraction to identify genes selectively expressed by the rat gastric corpus mucosa. This provides a means of identifying less obvious specific functions of the corpus in addition to its secretion-related genes. For example, important properties found by this GI tract comparative transcriptome reflect the energy demand of acid secretion, a role in lipid metabolism, the large variety of resident neuroendocrine cells, responses to damaging agents and transcription factors defining differentiation of its epithelium. In terms of overlap of gastric corpus genes with the rest of the GI tract, the distal small bowel appears to express many of the gastric corpus genes in contrast to proximal small and large bowel. This differential map of gene expression by the gastric corpus epithelium will allow a more detailed description of major properties of the gastric corpus and may lead to the discovery of gastric corpus cell differentiation genes and those mis-regulated in gastric carcinomas. PMID:21177383

  17. Enantioselective separation of amino acids as biomarkers indicating life in extraterrestrial environments.

    PubMed

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara

    2013-10-01

    Traces of prebiotic amino acids, i.e., the building blocks of proteins, are excellent biomarkers that could provide evidence of extinct or extant life in extra-terrestrial environments. In particular, characterization of the enantiomeric excess of amino acids gives relevant information about the biotic or abiotic origin of molecules, because it is generally assumed that life elsewhere could be based on either L or D amino acids, but not both. The analytical procedures used in in-situ space missions for chiral discrimination of amino acids must meet severe requirements imposed by flight conditions: short analysis time, low energy consumption, robustness, storage for long periods under extreme conditions, high efficiency and sensitivity, automation, and remote-control operation. Such methods are based on gas chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis, usually coupled with mass spectrometry; of these, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is the only such combination yet used in space missions. Preliminary in-situ sample derivatization is required before GC-MS analysis to convert amino acids into volatile and thermally stable compounds. The silylation reagent most commonly used, N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide, is unsuitable for detection of homochirality, and alternative derivatization techniques have been developed that preserve the stereochemical configuration of the original compounds and are compatible with spaceflight conditions. These include the reagent N,N-dimethylformamide dimethylacetal, which has already been used in the Rosetta mission, a mixture of alkyl chloroformate, ethanol, and pyridine, a mixture of perfluorinated anhydrides and perfluoro alcohols, and hexafluoroacetone, the first gaseous derivatizing agent. In all the space instruments, solvent extraction of organic matter and chemical derivatization have been combined in a single automatic and remote-controlled procedure in a

  18. Sensor capsule for diagnosis of gastric disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holen, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Motility and pH sensor capsule is developed to monitor gastric acidity, pressure, and temperature. Capsule does not interfere with digestion. Sensor is capsule which includes pH electrode, Pitran pressure transducer, and thermistor temperature sensor all potted in epoxy and enclosed in high density polyethylene sheath.

  19. Environment influences on the aromatic character of nucleobases and amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Szefler, Beata

    2010-01-01

    Geometric (HOMA) and magnetic (NICS) indices of aromaticity were estimated for aromatic rings of amino acids and nucleobases. Cartesian coordinates were taken directly either from PDB files deposited in public databases at the finest resolution available (≤1.5 Å), or from structures resulting from full gradient geometry optimization in a hybrid QM/MM approach. Significant environmental effects imposing alterations of HOMA values were noted for all aromatic rings analysed. Furthermore, even extra fine resolution (≤1.0 Å) is not sufficient for direct estimation of HOMA values based on Cartesian coordinates provided by PDB files. The values of mean bond errors seem to be much higher than the 0.05 Å often reported for PDB files. The use of quantum chemistry geometry optimization is strongly advised; even a simple QM/MM model comprising only the aromatic substructure within the QM region and the rest of biomolecule treated classically within the MM framework proved to be a promising means of describing aromaticity inside native environments. According to the results presented, three consequences of the interaction with the environment can be observed that induce changes in structural and magnetic indices of aromaticity. First, broad ranges of HOMA or NICS values are usually obtained for different conformations of nearest neighborhood. Next, these values and their means can differ significantly from those characterising isolated monomers. The most significant increase in aromaticities is expected for the six-membered rings of guanine, thymine and cytosine. The same trend was also noticed for all amino acids inside proteins but this effect was much smaller, reaching the highest value for the five-membered ring of tryptophan. Explicit water solutions impose similar changes on HOMA and NICS distributions. Thus, environment effects of protein, DNA and even explicit water molecules are non-negligible sources of aromaticity changes appearing in the rings of

  20. Comparison of the composition and gas/particle partitioning of organic acids in monoterpene and isoprene dominated environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Gas and particle-phase organic acids measurements from two different regions with different biogenic volatile organic compound emissions are used to understand gas/particle partitioning principles. A Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS), with acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion was used to selectively detect acids. Hundreds of gas and particle-phase organic acids were measured in both locations, a monoterpene and MBO-dominated environment (ponderosa pine forest in Colorado, BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011) and isoprene and terpene-dominated environment (mixed deciduous and pine forest in Alabama, SOAS 2013). Time series of gas/particle partitioning for ions consistent with tracers for isoprene oxidation such as methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) and tracers for α-pinene oxidation such as pinic and pinonic acid will be presented. Gas/particle partitioning, represented as the fraction of each species in the particle-phase, Fp, was calculated for C1-C18 alkanoic acids and biogenic VOC oxidation tracers and compared to an absorptive partitioning model. These results are compared with those of two other instruments that can also quantify gas/particle partitioning with high time resolution: a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG) and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS). Data from both environments were consistent with the values and trends predicted by the absorptive partitioning model for the tracer acids. However, for low carbon number alkanoic acids we report a higher fraction in the particle phase than predicted by the model. The Fp for the bulk-averaged acids and its relationship to the degree of oxidation and carbon number will also be presented. Temporal patterns and correlations with atmospheric conditions and composition will be explored for individual and bulk acids. We will discuss atmospheric implications of the gas/particle partitioning

  1. An environment-friendly preparation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets via amino acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dezhi; Li, Lidong; Guo, Lin

    2011-08-12

    Chemically modified graphene has been studied in many applications due to its excellent electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Among the chemically modified graphenes, reduced graphene oxide is the most important for its structure and properties, which are similar to pristine graphene. Here, we introduce an environment-friendly approach for preparation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets through the reduction of graphene oxide that employs L-cysteine as the reductant under mild reaction conditions. The conductivity of the reduced graphene oxide nanosheets produced in this way increases by about 10(6) times in comparison to that of graphene oxide. This is the first report about using amino acids as a reductant for the preparation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets, and this procedure offers an alternative route to large-scale production of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for applications that require such material.

  2. The effect of ionizing radiation on amino acids and bacterial spores in different geo- and cosmochemical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kminek, Gerhard

    In this thesis I have investigated the impact of ionizing radiation from the environment on the stability of bacterial spores and amino acids. I measured the radiolysis constant of amino acids and the inactivation constant of bacterial spores. To put these results in the context of a natural setting, I have selected four different cases and calculated the radiation environment for meteorites, the Martian subsurface, terrestrial halite fluid inclusions, and fossil bones. Bacterial spores exhibit a remarkable resistance to adverse environments and are the best example for the long-term survival of life forms. On a molecular level, amino acids are of particular interest because of their importance in biochemistry and their stability in the environment. The significance of amino acids, however, goes back to a time before life existed. The exogenous delivery of amino acids by meteorites might have been essential to provide the required supply of organic molecules for the origin of life on the Earth. There is one common threat, however, to the preservation of amino acids and bacterial spores in all known terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments: ionizing radiation. Amino acids in meteorites are exposed to radiation from internal radioactivity and space radiation. I show that this radiation decomposes substantial amounts of amino acids over time, indicating a higher exogenous delivery of amino acids to the early Earth. The total radiodecomposition since the synthesis of amino acids is between 23 and 68%. Radiodecomposition induces a certain fractionation in favor of smaller amino acids. Fossil bones show a post-mortem uranium uptake. My results suggest a substantial radiodecomposition of amino acids on a 10 million year time scale. Age determination based on racemization of amino acids will be affected in fossil bones that are older than 1--30 million years. My results on the stability of bacterial spores in halite fluid inclusions and on Mars suggest that radiation

  3. Pharmacokinetic interaction between ϵ-acetamidocaproic acid (AACA) and cimetidine in indomethacin-induced acute gastric ulcer and control rats: inhibition of active renal secretion of AACA by cimetidine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y H; Lee, U; Suh, J H; Kim, Y G; Lee, M; Oh, E; Lee, M G

    2011-05-01

    After both the intravenous and oral administration of zinc acexamate [ZAC; ion-pairing between zinc and ϵ-acetamidocaproic acid (AACA)] and cimetidine together, the areas under the curve (AUCs) of AACA were significantly greater [by 28.2 and 98.9% after the intravenous and oral administration, respectively, for control rats and 13.5 and 16.9% for indomethacin-induced acute gastric ulcer (IAGU) rats, respectively] than those of ZAC alone due to the significantly slower renal clearance (CL(R)). The significantly greater AUCs of AACA after both the intravenous and oral administration of ZAC and cimetidine together in control and IAGU rats could have been due to the inhibition of active renal tubular secretion of AACA by cimetidine. After the intravenous and oral administration of both drugs together, the AUCs of cimetidine in control and IAGU rats were not different compared with those with cimetidine alone.

  4. Pediatric primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Laszewski, M J

    1992-04-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma in the pediatric population is rare. We have described a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's type) manifested as a gastric mass. Despite its rarity in children, this tumor should be treated aggressively, since long-term survival has been reported.

  5. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Williamson, Katherine K

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies.

  6. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-11-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality.

  7. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality. PMID:26341209

  8. Thermal stability of proton conducting acid doped polybenzimidazole in simulated fuel cell environments

    SciTech Connect

    Samms, S.R.; Wasmus, S.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Recently, polybenzimidazole membrane doped with phosphoric acid (PBI) was found to have promising properties for use as a polymer electrolyte in a high temperature (ca. 150 to 200 C) proton exchange membrane direct methanol fuel cell. However, operation at 200 C in strongly reducing and oxidizing environments introduces concerns of the thermal stability of the polymer electrolyte. To simulate the conditions in a high temperature fuel cell, PBI samples were loaded with fuel cell grade platinum black, doped with ca. 480 mole percent phosphoric acid (i.e., 4.8 H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} molecules per PBI repeat unit) and heated under atmospheres of either nitrogen, 5% hydrogen, or air in a thermal gravimetric analyzer. The products of decomposition were taken directly into a mass spectrometer for identification. In all cases weight loss below 400 C was found to be due to loss of water. Judging from the results of these tests, the thermal stability of PBI is more than adequate for use as a polymer electrolyte in a high temperature fuel cell.

  9. Mineralogy and Organic Geochemistry of Acid Sulfate Environments from Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Habitability, Weathering and Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.; Kubo, M.

    2009-12-01

    We report on the mineralogy, organic preservation potential and habitability of sulfate deposits in acid sulfate volcanic settings at Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Fumaroles and acidic springs are potential analogs for aqueous environments on Mars and may offer insights into habitability of sulfate deposits such as those at Meridiani Planum. Sulfates recently detected on Mars are posited to have formed from fluids derived from basaltic weathering and igneous volatile input, ultimately precipitating from acidic brines subjected to desiccation and freeze-thaw cycles (McClennan and Grotzinger, 2008). Key issues concerning martian sulfate deposits are their relationship to aqueous clay deposits, and whether or not specific sulfates deposits represent former habitable environments (see Soderblum and Bell, 2008; Tosca et al., 2008). Modern terrestrial volcanic fumaroles and hot springs precipitate various Ca-, Mg- and Fe- sulfates along with clays, and can help clarify whether certain acid sulfate mineral assemblages reflect habitable environments. Valles caldera is a resurgent caldera last active in the Pleistocene (1.4 - 1.0 Ma) that hosts several active fumaroles and over 40 geothermal exploration wells (see Goff, 2009). Fumaroles and associated mudpots and springs at Valles range from pH < 1 to 3, and affect argillic alteration upon rhylolitic tuffs and sedimentary deposits (Charles et al., 1986). We identified assemblages containing gypsum, quartz, Al-sulfates, elemental sulfur, clays and other minerals using XRD and SEM-EDS. Our previous research has shown that sulfates from different marine depositional environments display textural and morphological traits that are indicative of biological influence, or specific conditions in the depositional environments (Vogel et al., 2009). Gypsum crystals that develop in the presence of microbial biofilms in marine environments may have distorted crystal morphologies, biofilm - associated dissolution features, and accessory

  10. Controlling on-demand gastric acidity in obese subjects: a randomized, controlled trial comparing a single dose of 20 mg rabeprazole and 20 mg omeprazole

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with a risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The pharmacodynamic efficacy of proton pump inhibitors has not been specifically evaluated in obese subjects. The aim of this study was to compare the antisecretory response to a single oral dose of 20 mg rabeprazole, 20 mg omeprazole and placebo in obese subjects. Methods Gastric pH was monitored for 24 hours on three separate occasions in eighteen H. pylori-negative, asymptomatic obese subjects. Subjects were given omeprazole, rabeprazole or placebo in a randomized order and in a double-blind fashion. The main analysis criterion was 24-h percent of time post dose with intragastric pH above 3; secondary criteria were percentage of time above pH 4, median pH, [H+] concentrations and nocturnal acid breakthrough (NAB). Results were analyzed using linear mixed models and Wilks test comparing variances. Results 24-h median [IQ] percentages of time with gastric pH above 3 and 4 were higher with rabeprazole than omeprazole (46 [37–55] vs. 30 [15–55] %, 9 [5-11] % for placebo) but the differences did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.11 and 0.24, respectively). Median acid concentrations were significantly lower with rabeprazole than with omeprazole and placebo (22 [14–53] vs. 54 [19–130] and 95 [73–170] mmoles/l, p < 0.01) for all periods. The number of NAB was significantly lower with rabeprazole than with omeprazole (median 1 [1,2] vs. 2 [1-3], p = 0.04). Variances of 24-h data (pH above 3 and 4, median pH, [H+] concentrations) were significantly lower with rabeprazole than with omeprazole (p < 0.0001). Conclusions In asymptomatic obese subjects the gastric antisecretory response to a single dose of rabeprazole and omeprazole was strong and not significantly different between drugs despite a significantly more homogeneous response with rabeprazole. Trial registration ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01136317 PMID:25027286

  11. Purification, enzymatic properties, and active site environment of a novel manganese(III)-containing acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Y; Kawabe, H; Tanaka, H; Fujimoto, S; Ohara, A

    1981-10-25

    A new manganese-containing acid phosphatase has been isolated and crystallized from sweet potato tubers. The pure enzyme contains one atom of manganese per Mr = 110,000 polypeptide and shows phosphatase activity toward various phosphate substrates. The pH optimum of the enzyme was 5.8 and the enzyme activity was inhibited by Cu2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, AsO43-, and MoO42-. This stable metalloenzyme is red-violet in color with an intense absorption band at 515 nm (epsilon - 2460). Our electronic, circular dichroism, and electron spin resonance findings strongly indicate that the Mn-valence state of the native enzyme is trivalent. When the Mn-enzyme is excited by the 5145 A line of Ar+ laser, prominent Raman lines at 1230, 1298, 1508, and 1620 cm-1 were detected. This Raman spectrum can probably be interpreted in terms of internal vibration of a coordinated tyrosine phenolate anion. The tryptophan-modified enzyme showed a positive Raman band at 370 cm-1, which is preferentially assigned to a Mn(III)-S streching mode. The modification of the Mn-enzyme by N-bromosuccinimide led to a large decrease in the fluorescence intensity of 335 nm which was dominated by its tryptophan residues within a considerable hydrophobic environment. The acid phosphatase activity was significantly decreased by the tryptophan modification. With respect to the active site donor sets, the Mn(III)-containing acid phosphatase is distinctly different from the Zn(II)-containing alkaline phosphatase. Of interest is also the appreciable similarity of some enzymatic and spectroscopic properties between the present enzyme and uteroferrin.

  12. A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Shiyi; Bellinger, Andrew M.; Glettig, Dean L.; ...

    2015-07-27

    Devices resident in the stomach used for a variety of clinical applications including nutritional modulation for bariatrics, ingestible electronics for diagnosis and monitoring, and gastric-retentive dosage forms for prolonged drug delivery typically incorporate elastic polymers to compress the devices during delivery through the oesophagus and other narrow orifices in the digestive system. In the event of accidental device fracture or migration, the non-degradable nature of these materials risks intestinal obstruction. Here, we show that an elastic, pH-responsive supramolecular gel remains stable and elastic in the acidic environment of the stomach but can be dissolved in the neutral-pH environment of themore » small and large intestines. In a large animal model, prototype devices with these materials as the key component demonstrated prolonged gastric retention and safe passage. We determine that these enteric elastomers should increase the safety profile for a wide range of gastricretentive devices.« less

  13. A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shiyi; Bellinger, Andrew M.; Glettig, Dean L.; Barman, Ross; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Zhu, Jiahua; Cleveland, Cody; Montgomery, Veronica A.; Gu, Li; Nash, Landon D.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-07-27

    Devices resident in the stomach used for a variety of clinical applications including nutritional modulation for bariatrics, ingestible electronics for diagnosis and monitoring, and gastric-retentive dosage forms for prolonged drug delivery typically incorporate elastic polymers to compress the devices during delivery through the oesophagus and other narrow orifices in the digestive system. In the event of accidental device fracture or migration, the non-degradable nature of these materials risks intestinal obstruction. Here, we show that an elastic, pH-responsive supramolecular gel remains stable and elastic in the acidic environment of the stomach but can be dissolved in the neutral-pH environment of the small and large intestines. In a large animal model, prototype devices with these materials as the key component demonstrated prolonged gastric retention and safe passage. We determine that these enteric elastomers should increase the safety profile for a wide range of gastricretentive devices.

  14. Treatment of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orditura, Michele; Galizia, Gennaro; Sforza, Vincenzo; Gambardella, Valentina; Fabozzi, Alessio; Laterza, Maria Maddalena; Andreozzi, Francesca; Ventriglia, Jole; Savastano, Beatrice; Mabilia, Andrea; Lieto, Eva; Ciardiello, Fortunato; De Vita, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    The authors focused on the current surgical treatment of resectable gastric cancer, and significance of peri- and post-operative chemo or chemoradiation. Gastric cancer is the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Surgery remains the only curative therapy, while perioperative and adjuvant chemotherapy, as well as chemoradiation, can improve outcome of resectable gastric cancer with extended lymph node dissection. More than half of radically resected gastric cancer patients relapse locally or with distant metastases, or receive the diagnosis of gastric cancer when tumor is disseminated; therefore, median survival rarely exceeds 12 mo, and 5-years survival is less than 10%. Cisplatin and fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy, with addition of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive patients, is the widely used treatment in stage IV patients fit for chemotherapy. Recent evidence supports the use of second-line chemotherapy after progression in patients with good performance status PMID:24587643

  15. Localized corrosion of high performance metal alloys in an acid/salt environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Ontiveros, C.

    1991-01-01

    Various vacuum jacketed cryogenic supply lines at the Space Shuttle launch site at Kennedy Space Center use convoluted flexible expansion joints. The atmosphere at the launch site has a very high salt content, and during a launch, fuel combustion products include hydrochloric acid. This extremely corrosive environment has caused pitting corrosion failure in the thin walled 304L stainless steel flex hoses. A search was done to find a more corrosion resistant replacement material. The study focussed on 19 metal alloys. Tests which were performed include electrochemical corrosion testing, accelerated corrosion testing in a salt fog chamber, and long term exposure at a beach corrosion testing site. Based on the results of these tests, several nickel based alloys were found to have very high resistance to this corrosive environment. Also, there was excellent agreement between the electrochemical tests and the actual beach exposure tests. This suggests that electrochemical testing may be useful for narrowing the field of potential candidate alloys before subjecting samples to long term beach exposure.

  16. The bryophyte Fontinalis antipyretica Hedw. bioaccumulates oxytetracycline, flumequine and oxolinic acid in the freshwater environment.

    PubMed

    Delépée, Raphaël; Pouliquen, Hervé; Le Bris, Hervé

    2004-04-25

    In recent years, the fate of pharmacological substances in the aquatic environment have been more and more studied. Oxolinic acid (OA), flumequine (FLU) and oxytetracycline (OTC) are commonly used antibacterial agents. A large amount of these drugs is released into water directly by dissolved fraction and indirectly in urine and feces. Monitoring these compounds in the freshwater environment is difficult because of the lack of suitable indicators. The aim of this work was to evaluate the OA, FLU and OTC bioaccumulation abilities of Fontinalis antipyretica Hedw., known for heavy metal bioaccumulation. The experiment described was decomposed for two times: a 10-days accumulation period during which bryophytes were in contact with antibiotics and a 15-days post-exposure period during which bryophytes were in water with no antibiotic. This experiment showed that this bryophyte strongly accumulates OA, FLU and OTC in freshwater. Bioaccumulation factors (ratio of concentrations in bryophyte and water) ranged between 75 and 450. Moreover, OA, FLU and OTC persisted in the bryophyte for a long time with clearance between 0.19 and 3.04 ng/g/day. Mean residence times ranged between 18 and 59 days. Accumulation and decontamination mechanism models were proposed.

  17. Effect of environment on the free and peptide amino acids in rice, wheat, and soybeans.

    PubMed

    Ahn, D J; Adeola, O; Nielsen, S S

    2001-01-01

    Controlled environments (CE) in which light, carbon dioxide, and nutrients are regulated are known to affect the chemical composition of plants. Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) environments are required for a Mars or lunar base where food resupply is both impractical and risky. Astronauts in a CELSS would need to grow and process edible biomass into foods. The complete nature of the changes in chemical composition of CE-grown plants is unknown but must be determined to ensure a safe and nutritionally adequate diet. In this article, we report the changes that occur in free and peptide-bound amino acids (AA) of select CELSS crops (rice, wheat, and soybean) grown in the field or in CE. The nonnitrate nonprotein nitrogen fraction was extracted and then analyzed for free and peptide AA. For grain or seeds, AA levels tended to increase from field to CE conditions; however, for vegetative material, AA levels remained the same or decreased from field to CE conditions. As such compositional changes are identified, researchers will be better able to design safe and nutritious diets for astronauts while minimizing needed energy and other resources.

  18. Hydrogen effects on the mechanical properties of Al-Li 2090 alloy in an acid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Velez, E.; Sundaram, P.A.

    1998-01-06

    Although aluminum-lithium alloys are attractive materials for aeronautic and aerospace applications because of their lower density and higher elastic modulus compared to conventional aluminum alloys, their bane is their poor ductility and susceptibility to environment induced cracking (EIC). EIC of Al-Li alloys has been fairly well researched and the role of hydrogen in causing this phenomenon has been proposed. Of the various mechanisms proposed to explain the phenomenon of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) in Al-Li alloys, the formation of brittle hydrides, LiH and LiAlH{sub 4} has been indicated as the cause of embrittlement. This mechanism has been accepted widely, both for precharged specimens and in stress-corrosion cracking. Literature is not consistent with regard to the phenomenon of HE in Al-Li alloys, believed to be due to the widely varying experimental conditions used by each group of investigators. There is also no general agreement on the effect of aging temper on HE in these alloys. Some investigators note that the HE resistance is poor for the overaged (OA) condition while others claim the underaged (UA) temper as having poor resistance to HE. Some others have also reported that the peak aged (PA) temper is most resistant to HE. Most studies of HE for the Al-Li alloy system has been carried out in a NaOH environment. The main objective of this study is to obtain an understanding of the effect of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of a 2090 commercial alloy using electrolytic charging conditions in an acid environment for different tempers.

  19. Using Australian Acidic Playa Lakes as Analogs for Phyllosilicate and Sulfate Depositional Environments on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldridge, A. M.; Michalski, J.; Kargel, J.; Hook, S.; Marion, G.; Crowley, J.; Bridges, N.; Brown, A.; Ribeiro da Luz, B.; de Souza Filho, C. R.; Thomson, B.

    2008-12-01

    Recent work on the origin of martian sulfates and their relationship to phyllosilicate deposits suggest that these deposits formed in different eras of Mars' history, under distinct environmental conditions. In southwestern Meridiani Planum phyllosilicates exist in close proximity to sulfate deposits. One possible explanation for this relationship is that it is an unconformable stratigraphic sequence, representing a significant change in aqueous geochemical conditions over time. Specifically, it may be interpreted to record a change in environment from neutral pH aqueous alteration in the Noachian to an acidic evaporitic system in the late Noachian to the Hesperian. On Earth, two different geochemical systems need not be evoked to explain such chemical variation. Acidic playa lakes in Western Australia have large pH differences separated by only a few tens of meters and demonstrate how highly variable chemistries can coexist over short distances in natural environments. Playa lakes on Earth tend to be dominated by lateral flow of water and salts leading to lateral chemical variation. Heterogeneity of playa mineralogy in Australia is due to the varied source rocks of brines and the mixing of dilute oxidizing brines and freshwater with the saturated evaporitic brines. This is evidenced by the ferricretes in the near-shore environment and more soluble phases in basin interiors. Playa lakes on Mars would be much larger than their terrestrial counterparts, leading to the prevalence of large-scale surface and crustal advection of water and salt rather than short-distance lateral flow, except at lake boundaries. Little or no influx of freshwater would preclude the formation of playa rim (e.g., crater rim) ferricretes and silcretes. Instead, we expect to see mainly vertical facies changes, and any diachronous lateral facies changes are expected to occur on very large spatial scales. Comparison of high spatial resolution, hyperspectral airborne data for Australian playa

  20. Esomeprazole immediate release tablets: Gastric mucosa ex vivo permeation, absorption and antisecretory activity in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Camillo; Flammini, Lisa; Vivo, Valentina; Colombo, Paolo; Colombo, Gaia; Elviri, Lisa; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Buttini, Francesca; Bettini, Ruggero; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rossi, Alessandra

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this work was to study the esomeprazole activity on the control of gastric secretion after administration of a novel immediate release tablet. The ex vivo permeation of esomeprazole across porcine gastric mucosa from immediate release tablets, containing sodium carbonate or magnesium oxide as alkalinizing agents, was firstly assessed. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies in conscious rats following the administration of immediate release tablets with sodium carbonate, in comparison with delayed-release tablets having the same formula, were also conducted. The results showed an important effect of sodium carbonate and magnesium oxide on the drug release, on the ex vivo trans-mucosal transport and the stability in acid environment. In particular, the presence of sodium carbonate in esomeprazole tablet formulation provided the maximum increase of the drug in vitro transport across the mucosa. Then, the absorption and the antisecretory activity of this proton pump inhibitor orally administered in rats as immediate release tablets containing Na2CO3, was superior but not significantly different compared to delayed-release tablets having the same formula. In the adopted animal model, an activity of esomeprazole from immediate release alkaline formulation was seen also in presence of partial gastric absorption allowing inhibition of proton pumps reached via systemic circulation. This esomeprazole immediate release formulation could be used for the on-demand treatment of acid-related disorders such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

  1. Role of endogenous gastric mucosal prostaglandins in the formation of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by aspirin, ethanol, HCl and CH3COOH.

    PubMed

    Amioka, I; Arima, T; Nagashima, H

    1987-06-01

    The role of endogenous mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) in the production of acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML) was examined in rats. Aspirin, ethanol or 0.6 N-HCl was given intragastrically and 20% acetic acid was injected into the gastric wall. Endogenous gastric mucosal PG (A + B), PGE and PGF were determined by radioimmunoassay. Their gastric contents were markedly reduced by aspirin administration (p less than 0.001). The level of gastric mucosal PGs still remained low (p less than 0.001) after the aspirin-induced AGML began to heal. Furthermore, rats with AGML induced by ethanol, HCl or acetic acid, showed no decrease in endogenous gastric mucosal PGs compared with the controls. These findings indicated that endogenous PGs are not necessary for either the induction or healing of experimental AGML.

  2. Experimental Gastric Carcinogenesis in Cebus apella Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tanielly Cristina Raiol; Andrade Junior, Edilson Ferreira; Rezende, Alexandre Pingarilho; Carneiro Muniz, José Augusto Pereira; Lacreta Junior, Antonio Carlos Cunha; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Demachki, Samia; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We established two gastric carcinogenesis models in New-World nonhuman primates. In the first model, ACP03 gastric cancer cell line was inoculated in 18 animals. In the second model, we treated 6 animals with N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU). Animals with gastric cancer were also treated with Canova immunomodulator. Clinical, hematologic, and biochemical, including C-reactive protein, folic acid, and homocysteine, analyses were performed in this study. MYC expression and copy number was also evaluated. We observed that all animals inoculated with ACP03 developed gastric cancer on the 9th day though on the 14th day presented total tumor remission. In the second model, all animals developed pre-neoplastic lesions and five died of drug intoxication before the development of cancer. The last surviving MNU-treated animal developed intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma observed by endoscopy on the 940th day. The level of C-reactive protein level and homocysteine concentration increased while the level of folic acid decreased with the presence of tumors in ACP03-inoculated animals and MNU treatment. ACP03 inoculation also led to anemia and leukocytosis. The hematologic and biochemical results corroborate those observed in patients with gastric cancer, supporting that our in vivo models are potentially useful to study this neoplasia. In cell line inoculated animals, we detected MYC immunoreactivity, mRNA overexpression, and amplification, as previously observed in vitro. In MNU-treated animals, mRNA expression and MYC copy number increased during the sequential steps of intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis and immunoreactivity was only observed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. Thus, MYC deregulation supports the gastric carcinogenesis process. Canova immunomodulator restored several hematologic measurements and therefore, can be applied during/after chemotherapy to increase the tolerability and

  3. Mycogenic Mn(II) oxidation promotes remediation of acid mine drainage and other anthropogenically impacted environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santelli, C. M.; Chaput, D.; Hansel, C. M.; Burgos, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Manganese is a pollutant in worldwide environments contaminated with metals and organics, such as acid mine drainage (AMD), freshwater ponds, and agricultural waste storage sites. Microorganisms contribute to the removal of dissolved Mn compounds in the environment by promoting Mn(II) oxidation reactions. The oxidation of Mn(II) results in the precipitation of sparingly soluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, effectively removing the metal from the aqueous milieu (e.g., groundwater or wastewater streams). In recent years, our research has identified a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi inhabiting these polluted environments, however their overall contribution to the remediation process in situ remains poorly understood. Here we present results of culture-based and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies in AMD treatment systems actively remediating Mn and other metals where we profile the bacterial, fungal, algal and archaeal communities to determine the overall community diversity and to establish the relative abundance of known Mn(II) oxidizers. A variety of treatment systems with varying Mn-removal efficiencies were sampled to understand the relationship between remediation efficiency and microbial community composition and activity. Targeted-amplicon sequencing of DNA and RNA of the 16S rRNA genes (bacteria and archaea), 23S rRNA genes (algae) and ITS region (fungi) was performed using both 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina platforms. Results showed that only the fungal taxonomic profiles significantly differed between sites that removed the majority of influent Mn and those that did not. Specifically, Ascomycota (which include known Mn(II) oxidizers isolated from these treatment systems) dominated greater efficiency systems whereas less efficient systems were dominated by Basidiomycota. Furthermore, known Mn(II) oxidizers accounted for only a minor proportion of bacterial sequences but a far greater proportion of fungal sequences. These culture-independent studies lend

  4. Preparation of acetylsalicylic acid-acylated chitosan as a novel polymeric drug for drug controlled release.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changkun; Wu, Yiguang; Zhao, Liyan; Huang, Xinzheng

    2015-01-01

    The acetylsalicylic acid-acylated chitosan (ASACTS) with high degree of substitution (DS) was successfully synthesized, and characterized with FTIR, (1)H NMR and elemental analysis methods. The optimum synthesis conditions were obtained which gave the highest DS (about 60%) for ASACTS. Its drug release experiments were carried out in simulated gastric and intestine fluids. The results show that the drugs in the form of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) were released in a controlled manner from ASACTS only in simulated gastric fluid. The release profile can be best fitted with logistic and Weibull model. The research results reveal that ASACTS can be a potential polymeric drug for the controlled release of ASA and SA in the targeted gastric environment.

  5. Involvement of the G-protein-coupled receptor 4 in RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment.

    PubMed

    Okito, Asuka; Nakahama, Ken-Ichi; Akiyama, Masako; Ono, Takashi; Morita, Ikuo

    2015-03-06

    Osteoclast activity is enhanced in acidic environments following systemic or local inflammation. However, the regulatory mechanism of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts under acidic conditions is not fully understood. In the present paper, we detected the mRNA expression of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) proton sensors GPR4 and GPR65 (T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8), in osteoblasts. RANKL expression and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) level in osteoblasts were up-regulated under acidic culture conditions. Acidosis-induced up-regulation of RANKL was abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. To clarify the role of GPR4 in RANKL expression, GPR4 gain and loss of function experiments were performed. Gene knockdown and forced expression of GPR4 caused reduction and induction of RANKL expression, respectively. These results suggested that, at least in part, RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment was mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling resulting from GPR4 activation. A comprehensive microarray analysis of gene expression of osteoblasts revealed that, under acidic conditions, the phenotype of osteoblasts was that of an osteoclast supporting cell rather than that of a mineralizing cell. These findings will contribute to a molecular understanding of bone disruption in an acidic environment.

  6. Protective effects of organic acids on survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Bjornsdottir, K; Breidt, F; McFeeters, R F

    2006-01-01

    Outbreaks of disease due to acid-tolerant bacterial pathogens in apple cider and orange juice have raised questions about the safety of acidified foods. Using gluconic acid as a noninhibitory low-pH buffer, we investigated the killing of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains in the presence or absence of selected organic acids (pH of 3.2), with ionic strength adjusted to 0.60 to 0.68. During a 6-h exposure period in buffered solution (pH 3.2), we found that a population of acid-adapted E. coli O157:H7 strains was reduced by 4 log cycles in the absence of added organic acids. Surprisingly, reduced lethality for E. coli O157:H7 was observed when low concentrations (5 mM) of fully protonated acetic, malic, or l-lactic acid were added. Only a 2- to 3-log reduction in cell counts was observed, instead of the 4-log reduction attributed to pH effects in the buffered solution. Higher concentrations of these acids at the same pH aided in the killing of the E. coli cells, resulting in a 6-log or greater reduction in cell numbers. No protective effect was observed when citric acid was added to the E. coli cells. d-Lactic acid had a greater protective effect than other acids at concentrations of 1 to 20 mM. Less than a 1-log decrease in cell numbers occurred during the 6-h exposure to pH 3.2. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the protective effect of organic acids on the survival of E. coli O15:H7 under low-pH conditions.

  7. Models of Metabolic Community Structure in Martian Habitable Environments: Constraints from a Terrestrial Analog Acid-Sulfate Fumarole Environment, Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, K. L.; McCollom, T. M.; Hynek, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial habitability in extreme environments on Earth is described by microscale geochemical conditions that constrain metabolic niches in concert with long-term habitat stability that is governed by dynamic geologic processes. Using terrestrial analogs to identify habitable martian environments requires correlating microscale geochemical constraints with reconstructions of past martian environments that are based on global-scale observations. While past martian environments can be characterized by primary parameters (e.g. pH, redox, mineralogy, thermal history), microbial habitability on Earth is a complex function of both primary and derived parameters (e.g. metabolic reaction energetics, chemical & thermal gradients, flow dynamics). In recent years we have been investigating acid-sulfate fumaroles at the Mars analog site, Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua, where habitability is constrained by steep thermal gradients, spatially- and temporally-variable vent dynamics, and limited water and nutrient availability. The most common niche identified thus far is found in fumaroles that host mixed photosynthetic and chemosynthetic endolithic microbial communities. One such endolith is dominated by acidic red algae (Cyanidiales), aerobic bacterial heterotrophs (Ktedonobacteria), and archaeal thermoacidophiles (Hyperthermus, Caldisphaera, and Thermofilum). An analysis of the metabolic structure suggests that primary production by the red algae supports the growth of heterotrophic thermoacidophiles. Diversification among the chemoheterotrophs with respect to temperature and oxygen tolerance suggests community adaptation to environmental gradients or variable venting dynamics. Furthermore, individual cells within the endolith are silica-encrusted, providing the possibility for biosignature formation and preservation. Putative hydrothermal environments on early Mars with similar conditions could have supported endolithic communities with comparable metabolic strategies. Even

  8. Genetics of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Strand, Matthew S; Lockhart, Albert Craig; Fields, Ryan C

    2017-04-01

    Gastric cancer represents a major cause of cancer mortality worldwide despite a declining incidence. New molecular classification schemes developed from genomic and molecular analyses of gastric cancer have provided a framework for understanding this heterogenous disease, and early findings suggest these classifications will be relevant for designing and implementing new targeted therapies. The success of targeted therapy and immunotherapy in breast cancer and melanoma, respectively, has not been duplicated in gastric cancer, but trastuzumab and ramucirumab have demonstrated efficacy in select populations. New markers that predict therapeutic response are needed to improve patient selection for both targeted and immunotherapies.

  9. Naphthenic acids degradation and toxicity mitigation in tailings wastewater systems and aquatic environments: a review.

    PubMed

    Kannel, Prakash R; Gan, Thian Y

    2012-01-01

    Naphthenic acids, NAs (classical formula C(n)H(2n+z)O(2), where n is the carbon numbers, z represents zero or negative even integers), found in oil sands process waters (OSPWs), are toxic to aquatic environments depending upon several factors such as pH, salinity, molecular size and chemical structure of NAs. Among various available methods, biodegradation seems to be generally the most cost-effective method for decreasing concentrations of NAs (n ≤ 21) and reducing their associated toxicity in OSPW, however the mechanism by which the biodegradation of NAs occurs are poorly understood. Ozonation is superior over biodegradation in decreasing higher molecular weight alkyl branched NAs (preferentially, n ≥ 22, -6 ≥ z ≥ -12) as well as enabling accelerated biodegradation and reducing toxicity. Photolysis (UV at 254 nm) is effective in cleaving higher molecular weight NAs into smaller fragments that will be easier for microorganisms to degrade, whereas photocatalysis can metabolize selective NAs (0 ≥ z ≥ -6) efficiently and minimize their associated toxicity. Phytoremediation is applicable for metabolizing specific NAs (O(2), O(3), O(4), and O(5) species) and minimizing their associated toxicities. Petroleum coke (PC) adsorption is effective in reducing the more structurally complex NAs (preferentially 12 ≥ n ≥ 18 and z = -10, -12) and their toxicity in OSPWs, depending upon the PC content, pH and temperature. Several factors have influence on the degradation of NAs in OSPWs and aquatic environments, which include molecular mass and chemical structure of NAs, sediment structure, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and bacteria types.

  10. A Combination of Amino Acids and Caffeine Enhances Sprint Running Capacity in a Hot, Hypoxic Environment.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Tom R; Potter, Aaron; Billaut, François; Panchuk, Derek; Pyne, David B; Gore, Christopher J; Chen, Ting-Ting; McQuade, Leon; Stepto, Nigel K

    2016-02-01

    Heat and hypoxia exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) fatigue. We therefore investigated whether essential amino acid (EAA) and caffeine ingestion attenuates CNS fatigue in a simulated team sport-specific running protocol in a hot, hypoxic environment. Subelite male team sport athletes (n = 8) performed a repeat sprint running protocol on a nonmotorized treadmill in an extreme environment on 4 separate occasions. Participants ingested one of four supplements: a double placebo, 3 mg.kg-1 body mass of caffeine + placebo, 2 x 7 g EAA (Musashi Create)+placebo, or caffeine + EAA before each exercise session using a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Electromyography (EMG) activity and quadriceps evoked responses to magnetic stimulation were assessed from the dominant leg at preexercise, halftime, and postexercise. Central activation ratio (CAR) was used to quantify completeness of quadriceps activation. Oxygenation of the prefrontal cortex was measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. Mean sprint work was higher (M = 174 J, 95% CI [23, 324], p < .05, d = 0.30; effect size, likely beneficial) in the caffeine + EAA condition versus EAAs alone. The decline in EMG activity was less (M = 13%, 95% CI [0, 26]; p < .01, d = 0.58, likely beneficial) in caffeine + EAA versus EAA alone. Similarly, the pre- to postexercise decrement in CAR was significantly less (M = -2.7%, 95% CI [0.4, 5.4]; p < .05, d = 0.50, likely beneficial) when caffeine + EAA were ingested compared with placebo. Cerebral oxygenation was lower (M = -5.6%, 95% CI [1.0, 10.1]; p < .01, d = 0.60, very likely beneficial) in the caffeine + EAA condition compared with LNAA alone. Co-ingestion of caffeine and EAA appears to maintain muscle activation and central drive, with a small improvement in running performance.

  11. Potential role of probiotics in the management of gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    KHODER, GHALIA; AL-MENHALI, ASMA A.; AL-YASSIR, FARAH; KARAM, SHERIF M.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases characterized by a significant defect in the mucosal barrier. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and the frequent long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are major factors involved in gastric ulcer development. Acid inhibitors and antibiotics are commonly used to treat gastric ulcer. However, in the last few decades, the accumulating evidence for resistance to antibiotics and the side effects of antibiotics and acid inhibitors have drawn attention to the possible use of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of gastric ulcer. Probiotics are live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts confer health benefits on the host. Currently, the available experimental and clinical studies indicate that probiotics are promising for future applications in the management of gastric ulcers. This review aims to provide an overview of the general health benefits of probiotics on various systemic and gastrointestinal disorders with a special focus on gastric ulcer and the involved cellular and molecular mechanisms: i) Protection of gastric mucosal barrier; ii) upregulation of prostaglandins, mucus, growth factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines; iii) increased cell proliferation to apoptosis ratio; and iv) induction of angiogenesis. Finally, some of the available data on the possible use of probiotics in H. pylori eradication are discussed. PMID:27347010

  12. Omeprazole, a specific inhibitor of gastric (H/sup +/-K/sup +/)-ATPase, is a H/sup +/-activated oxidizing agent of sulfhydryl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Im, W.B.; Sih, J.C.; Blakeman, D.P.; McGrath, J.P.

    1985-04-25

    Omeprazole (5-methoxy-2-(((4-methoxy-3,5- dimethylpyridinyl)methyl)sulfinyl)-1H-benzimidazole) appeared to inhibit gastric (H/sup +/-K/sup +/)-ATPase by oxidizing its essential sulfhydryl groups, since the gastric ATPase inactivated by the drug in vivo or in vitro recovered its K+-dependent ATP hydrolyzing activity upon incubation with mercaptoethanol. Biological reducing agents like cysteine or glutathione, however, were unable to reverse the inhibitory effect of omeprazole. Moreover, acidic environments enhanced the potency of omeprazole. The chemical reactivity of omeprazole with mercaptans is also consistent with the biological action of omeprazole. The N-sulfenylated compound reacted at neutral pH with another stoichiometric amount of ethyl mercaptan to produce omeprazole sulfide quantitatively. The gastric polypeptides of 100 kilodaltons representing (H/sup +/-K/sup +/)-ATPase in the rat gastric mucosa or isolated hog gastric membranes were covalently labeled with (/sup 14/C)omeprazole. The radioactive label bound to the ATPase, however, could not be displaced by mercaptoethanol under the identical conditions where the ATPase activity was fully restored. These observations suggest that the essential sulfhydryl groups which reacted with omeprazole did not form a stable covalent bond with the drug, but rather that they further reacted with adjacent sulfhydryl groups to form disulfides which could be reduced by mercaptoethanol.

  13. Pristine environments harbor a new group of oligotrophic 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kamagata, Y; Fulthorpe, R R; Tamura, K; Takami, H; Forney, L J; Tiedje, J M

    1997-01-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacteria were isolated from pristine environments which had no history of 2,4-D exposure. By using 2,4-D dye indicator medium or 14C-labeled 2,4-D medium, six strains were isolated from eight enrichment cultures capable of degrading 2,4-D. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing and physiological properties revealed that one isolate from Hawaiian volcanic soil could be classified in the genus Variovorax (a member of the beta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria) and that the other five isolates from Hawaiian volcanic soils, Saskatchewan forest soil, and Chilean forest soil have 16S rDNAs with high degrees of similarity to those of the Bradyrhizobium group (a member of the alpha subdivision of the class Proteobacteria). All the isolates grow slowly on either nutrient media (0.1 x Bacto Peptone-tryptone-yeast extract-glucose [PTYG] or 0.1 x Luria broth [LB] medium) or 2,4-D medium, with mean generation times of 16 to 30 h, which are significantly slower than previously known 2,4-D degraders. Nutrient-rich media such as full-strength PTYG and LB medium did not allow their growth. PCR amplification using internal consensus sequences of tfdA (a gene encoding an enzyme for the first step of 2,4-D mineralization, found in pJP4 of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 and some other 2,4-D-degrading bacteria) as primers and Southern hybridization with pJP4-tfdA as a probe revealed that the isolate belonging to the genus Variovorax carried the tfdA gene. This gene was transmissible to A. eutrophus JMP228 carrying a plasmid with a mutant tfdA gene. The other five isolates did not appear to carry tfdA, and 2,4-D-specific alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase activity could not be detected in cell lysates. These results indicate that 2,4-D-degrading bacteria in pristine environments are slow-growing bacteria and that most of their phylogenies and catabolic genes differ from those of 2,4-D degraders

  14. Protective effect of Matricaria chamomilla on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Cemek, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Ezgi; Büyükokuroğlu, Mehmet Emin

    2010-07-01

    The antiulcerogenic and antioxidant properties of Matricaria chamomilla L. (Compositae) hydroalcoholic extract (MCE) on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury were investigated in rats. After the induction of gastric mucosal injury, all groups were sacrificed; the gastric ulcer index was calculated, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in whole blood and gastric tissue, and serum ascorbic acid, retinol, and beta-carotene levels were measured in all groups. Pretreatment with MCE at some doses significantly reduced gastric lesions. Again, some doses of MCE significantly reduced the MDA, and significantly increased GSH levels in gastric tissue or whole blood. Serum beta-carotene and retinol levels were significantly higher in the 200 mg/kg MCE-administered group with respect to control. As a result, MCE clearly has a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions, and this effect, at least in part, depends upon the reduction in lipid peroxidation and augmentation in antioxidant activity.

  15. Organic amendments increase soil solution phosphate concentrations in an acid soil: A controlled environment study

    SciTech Connect

    Schefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, R.

    2008-04-15

    Soil acidification affects at least 4 million hectares of agricultural land in Victoria, Australia. Low soil pH can inhibit plant growth through increased soluble aluminum (Al) concentrations and decreased available phosphorus (P). The addition of organic amendments may increase P availability through competition for P binding sites, solubilization of poorly soluble P pools, and increased solution pH. The effect of two organic amendments (lignite and compost) on P solubility in an acid soil was determined through controlled environment (incubation) studies. Three days after the addition of lignite and compost, both treatments increased orthophosphate and total P measured in soil solution, with the compost treatments having the greatest positive effect. Increased incubation time (26 days) increased soil solution P concentrations in both untreated and amended soils, with the greatest effect seen in total P concentrations. The measured differences in solution P concentrations between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were likely caused by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment with lignite or compost also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. Based on the results presented, it is proposed that the measured increase in soil solution P with amendment addition was likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including biotic and abiotic P solubilization reactions, and the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

  16. A pharmaceutical product as corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Samide, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    A pharmaceutical product, Trimethoprim (TMP), IUPAC name: 5-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)pyrimidine-2,4-diamine was investigated, as inhibitor to prevent carbon steel corrosion in acidic environments. The study was performed using weight loss and electrochemical measurements, in temperatures ranging between 25-55°C. The surface morphology before and after corrosion of carbon steel in 1.0 M HCl solution in the presence and absence of TMP was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The inhibition efficiency (IE) increased with the increasing of the inhibitor concentration, reaching a maximum value of 92% at 25°C and 0.9 mM TMP, and decreased with increasing temperature. The inhibition of carbon steel corrosion by TMP can be attributed to the adsorption ability of inhibitor molecules onto the reactive sites of the metal surface. The adsorption is spontaneous and it is best described by the Langmuir isotherm. The apparent activation energy (E(a)) for the corrosion process in the absence and presence of TMP was evaluated from Arrhenius equation, to elucidate its inhibitive properties.

  17. Monitoring psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria contamination in a ready-to-eat vegetable salad production environment.

    PubMed

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Snauwaert, Cindy; De Vos, Paul; Huys, Geert; Devlieghere, Frank

    2014-08-18

    A study monitoring lactic acid bacteria contamination was conducted in a company producing fresh, minimally processed, packaged and ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetable salads (stored at 4°C) in order to investigate the reason for high psychrotrophic LAB levels in the products at the end of shelf-life. Initially, high microbial counts exceeding the established psychrotrophic thresholds (>10(7)-10(8)CFU/g) and spoilage manifestations before the end of the shelf-life (7days) occurred in products containing an assortment of sliced and diced vegetables, but within a one year period these spoilage defects became prevalent in the entire processing plant. Environmental sampling and microbiological analyses of the raw materials and final products throughout the manufacturing process highlighted the presence of high numbers of Leuconostoc spp. in halved and unseeded, fresh sweet bell peppers provided by the supplier. A combination of two DNA fingerprinting techniques facilitated the assessment of the species diversity of LAB present in the processing environment along with the critical point of their introduction in the production facility. Probably through air mediation and surface adhesion, mainly members of the strictly psychrotrophic species Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum and L. gelidum subsp. gelidum were responsible for the cross-contamination of every vegetable handled within the plant.

  18. Influence of the dairy environment on gene expression and substrate utilization in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Klaenhammer, Todd R; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Altermann, Eric; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2007-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the industrial production of fermented dairy products and form a group of related low-GC-content gram-positive bacteria. The major species used in dairy manufacturing are Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Streptococcus, and Leuconostoc. Traditionally most are applied as starter cultures for dairy fermentations or used as probiotic cultures, delivered in dairy vehicles. The appearance of the genomes of Lactococcus lactis, Bidifobacterium longum, Lactobacillus plantarum, L. johnsonii, L. acidophilus, 2 strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, and pending completion of many draft genomic sequences, is now promoting in-depth investigation into the comparative genetic content of LAB. Moreover, whole-genome transcriptional arrays are quickly revealing critical genes/operons that are coordinately expressed and the impact of environmental factors on expression of multiple gene sets. Comparative genomics between multiple genomes is providing insights into genes that are important in metabolic, physiological, and functional roles for different LAB in the environments they inhabit, ranging from the gastrointestinal tract to milk and acidified dairy products.

  19. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... or "sleeve" out of the rest. The new, banana-shaped stomach is much smaller than the original ... of your stomach, leaving you with a smaller banana-shaped stomach called the gastric sleeve. Because it's ...

  20. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your legs to help prevent blood clots from forming. You will receive shots of medicine to prevent ... diversion with duodenal switch Dumping syndrome References Buchwald H. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In: Buchwald ...

  1. Self-assembly of folic acid: a chiral-aligning medium for enantiodiscrimination of organic molecules in an aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Lokesh; Suryaprakash, N

    2012-09-10

    Weak orienting medium: Self-assembly of alkaline salt of folic acid yielded a weak liquid-crystalline phase in an aqueous environment. This medium has the ability to discriminate enantiomers. The mesophase exists over a broad range and has the physical parameter dependent tunability of degree of alignment (see scheme).

  2. Aripiprazole an atypical antipsychotic protects against ethanol induced gastric ulcers in rats

    PubMed Central

    Asmari, Abdulrahman Al; Arshaduddin, Mohammed; Elfaki, Ibrahim; Kadasah, Saeed; Robayan, Abdulrahman Al; Asmary, Saeed Al

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken, to study the gastro-protective potential of aripiprazole (ARI) an atypical antipsychotic drug in ethanol induced gastric ulcers in rats. ARI (10, 30, 100 mg/kg) was tested for gastric secretion and antiulcer activity in different groups of male Sprague Dawley rats. Gastric secretion and acidity studies were performed in pylorus ligated rats while indices of gastric ulcers were measured in ethanol (1 ml-100%) induced gastric ulcers. Histological changes and the levels of gastric wall mucus, malondialdehyde (MDA), non-protein sulfhydryls (NP-SH), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and serotonin were used to assess ethanol induced gastric mucosal injuries. Exposure of rats to ethanol resulted in gastric mucosal injury and a high index of ulcer. Pretreatment with ARI significantly (P < 0.001), reduced the gastric lesions induced by ethanol and also resulted in a significant decrease in the gastric secretion, and total acidity in pylorus ligated rats. ARI also significantly attenuated the ethanol induced reduction in the levels of gastric wall mucus, and NP-SH (P < 0.001). The histological changes and the increased MDA and MPO activity were also significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited by ARI. Ethanol induced depletion in the levels of serotonin in the gastric tissue were also significantly restored by pretreatment with ARI (p < 0.001). ARI showed significant antiulcer and gastroprotective activity against ethanol induced gastric ulcers. The gastroprotective effects of ARI may be due to its anti-secretory, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and also due to the restoration of the depleted gastric serotonin levels. PMID:25232384

  3. Familial Gastric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Namrata; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Duda, Dan G.; Hong, Theodore S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Mullen, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Although the majority of gastric carcinomas are sporadic, approximately 10% show familial aggregation, and a hereditary cause is determined in 1%–3% cases. Of these, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is the most recognized predisposition syndrome. Although rare, the less commonly known syndromes also confer a markedly increased risk for development of gastric cancer. Identification and characterization of these syndromes require a multidisciplinary effort involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, biologists, and pathologists. This article reviews the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Implications for Practice: Although the majority of gastric adenocarcinomas are sporadic with many of those related to chronic Helicobacter pylori infection, approximately 10% of the cases show familial aggregation, and a specific hereditary cause is determined in 1%–3% cases. This review describes the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Ultimately, a better understanding of the biology of these conditions should allow early identification and intervention as part of a multidisciplinary approach involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, and pathologists. PMID:26424758

  4. Administration of obestatin accelerates the healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dembiński, Artur; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Dembiński, Marcin; Ptak-Belowska, Agata; Kuwahara, Atsukasu; Kato, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Previous studies have shown that administration of obestatin exhibits a protective effect in the pancreas, attenuating the development of acute pancreatitis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of obestatin administration on the healing of chronic gastric ulcers. Material/Methods Chronic gastric ulcers were induced in rats by 100% acetic acid applied to the serosal surface of the gastric wall. Obestatin was given twice a day intraperitoneally at the dose of 4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose for 6 days. Six days after induction of ulcers, rats were anesthetized and the stomach was exposed for measurement of gastric blood flow and ulcer area. Biopsy samples from the gastric mucosa were taken for determination of mucosal DNA synthesis and for measurement of gastric expression of mRNA for interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Results Induction of gastric ulcers alone increased mucosal blood flow and tissue expression of mRNA for TNF-α and IL-1β, whereas gastric mucosal DNA synthesis was reduced. In rats with gastric ulcers, administration of obestatin increased gastric mucosal blood flow, accelerated the healing rate of these ulcers and partly reversed the gastric ulcer-induced reduction in gastric mucosal DNA synthesis. These results were associated with a reduction in gastric mucosal expression of pro-inflammatory IL-1β and TNF-α. Conclusions Treatment with obestatin increases gastric mucosal blood flow and cell proliferation, leading to acceleration of healing of gastric ulcers. These effects are associated with a reduction in mucosal expression of pro-inflammatory IL-1β and TNF-α. PMID:21804455

  5. Tyramine biosynthesis is transcriptionally induced at low pH and improves the fitness of Enterococcus faecalis in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Perez, Marta; Calles-Enríquez, Marina; Nes, Ingolf; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-04-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a commensal bacterium of the human gut that requires the ability to pass through the stomach and therefore cope with low pH. E. faecalis has also been identified as one of the major tyramine producers in fermented food products, where they also encounter acidic environments. In the present work, we have constructed a non-tyramine-producing mutant to study the role of the tyramine biosynthetic pathway, which converts tyrosine to tyramine via amino acid decarboxylation. Wild-type strain showed higher survival in a system that mimics gastrointestinal stress, indicating that the tyramine biosynthetic pathway has a role in acid resistance. Transcriptional analyses of the E. faecalis V583 tyrosine decarboxylase cluster showed that an acidic pH, together with substrate availability, induces its expression and therefore the production of tyramine. The protective role of the tyramine pathway under acidic conditions appears to be exerted through the maintenance of the cytosolic pH. Tyramine production should be considered important in the adaptability of E. faecalis to acidic environments, such as fermented dairy foods, and to survive passage through the human gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Prebiotic oligomerization of amino acids inside lipid vesicles of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, E.; Furuuchi, R.; Nemoto, A.; Hatori, K.; Honda, H.; Matsuno, K.

    We have already attempted an experimental model simulating seawater circulation in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents in the primitive ocean. We used a flow reactor that was constructed for simulating the pressure and temperature conditions of the hydrothermal vents. In the flow reactor, a high-temperature high-pressure fluid at 125˜ 250°C and at 20MPa was injected into a low temperature (0˜ 40°C ) chamber that was maintained at about the same high pressure as the fluid. We then experimentally examined a possibility of oligomerizing amino acids on or inside lipid vesicles. We compared three different kinds of lipid vesicles made of unsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid), saturated fatty acids (decanoic acid) and phospholipids (DPPC). Identification of the oligomeric products was made with the aid of an HPLC analysis. The oligomeric yields from glycine increased significantly in the presence of lipid vesicles compared to the case of their absence. On the other hand, there was found no significant difference in the yields of oligomers between in the presence of lipid vesicles dissolved by surfactant and in their absence. The possibility of lipid molecules serving as catalysts for oligomerization may be dismissed. The diameters of those lipid vesicles observed under a phase contrast microscope were about 10 micrometer or less. The total volume shared by oleic acid vesicles was about 5 % of the total volume of the suspension. Oligomerization of glycine inside oleic acid vesicles was enhanced more than 15 times compared to that proceeding in their outside. Enhancement of oligomerization of glycine in the presence of lipid vesicles was repeated as the reactants revisited the interface zone between the hot and cold regions. Even those lipid vesicles made of saturated fatty acid such as decanoic acid could have been functional in enhancing the oligomerization of monomers in their inside in the primitive ocean. References E. Imai, et al. (1999) Science 283, 831-833. H

  7. Involvement of the G-protein-coupled receptor 4 in RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Okito, Asuka; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Akiyama, Masako; Ono, Takashi; Morita, Ikuo

    2015-03-06

    Osteoclast activity is enhanced in acidic environments following systemic or local inflammation. However, the regulatory mechanism of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts under acidic conditions is not fully understood. In the present paper, we detected the mRNA expression of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) proton sensors GPR4 and GPR65 (T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8), in osteoblasts. RANKL expression and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) level in osteoblasts were up-regulated under acidic culture conditions. Acidosis-induced up-regulation of RANKL was abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. To clarify the role of GPR4 in RANKL expression, GPR4 gain and loss of function experiments were performed. Gene knockdown and forced expression of GPR4 caused reduction and induction of RANKL expression, respectively. These results suggested that, at least in part, RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment was mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling resulting from GPR4 activation. A comprehensive microarray analysis of gene expression of osteoblasts revealed that, under acidic conditions, the phenotype of osteoblasts was that of an osteoclast supporting cell rather than that of a mineralizing cell. These findings will contribute to a molecular understanding of bone disruption in an acidic environment. - Highlights: • RANKL expression was increased in osteoblasts under acidosis via cAMP/PKA pathway. • GRP4 knockdown resulted in decrease of RANKL expression. • GRP4 overexpression resulted in increase of RANKL expression. • Osteoblast mineralization was reduced under acidic condition.

  8. Oleoylethanolamide-based lyotropic liquid crystals as vehicles for delivery of amino acids in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Mohammady, Sayed Z; Pouzot, Matthieu; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2009-02-18

    We have investigated the phase behavior of self-assembled lyotropic liquid crystals (LC) formed by ternary mixtures of oleoylethanolamide (OEA), water and arginine. OEA, a natural analog of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide involved in the peripheral regulation of feeding, was selected as a main component due to its capacity to induce efficient decreases in food intake and gains in body mass. Arginine was selected as representative hydrophilic amino acid and added to the OEA-water mixture at different concentrations. The phase diagrams were determined by combining cross-polarized optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. First, the phase diagram for the OEA-water system was determined. It was shown that these two compounds give rise to reverse Ia3d double gyroid and reverse Pn3m double diamond cubic phases existing in bulk over a large window of temperature and composition, and that for water content beyond 25% Pn3m coexisted with excess water. Successively, the influence of arginine as guest molecule in the water channels of the reverse LC was investigated. For the sake of comparison, results for the OEA-water-arginine system were compared with analog series of OEA-water-glucose. The results showed that, at a fixed water content and temperature, the phase behavior of the liquid crystalline phases is strongly dependent on arginine concentration. In more detail, arginine could be encapsulated in the bulk OEA-water LC up to 2.0% wt, whereas transitions from Ia3d to Pn3m cubic phase were observed with increasing arginine concentration. Interestingly, upon an increase of water concentration beyond 20-25%, Pn3m phase started to coexist with excess water releasing the arginine in external water solution. Quantitative measurements of arginine content inside the LC water channels and in the excess external water solution revealed a complete release of the amino acid, demonstrating that the investigated lyotropic liquid crystalline systems can be used as

  9. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in Acidic Geothermal Environments and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesle, M.; Beam, J.; Jay, Z.; Bodle, B.; Bogenschutz, E.; Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be produced in natural waters via photochemical reactions between dissolved oxygen, organic carbon and light. Other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are potentially formed in environments with high concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe(II), ~10-100 μM) by reaction between H2O2 and Fe(II) (i.e., Fenton chemistry). Thermophilic archaea and bacteria inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats have defense mechanisms against both extracellular and intracellular peroxide, such as peroxiredoxins (which can degrade H2O2) and against other ROS, such as superoxide dismutases. Biological cycling of H2O2 is not well understood in geothermal ecosystems, and geochemical measurements combined with molecular investigations will contribute to our understanding of microbial response to oxidative stress. We measured H2O2 and other dissolved compounds (Fe(II), Fe(III), H2S, O2), as well as photon flux, pH and temperature, over time in surface geothermal waters of several acidic springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY (Beowulf Spring and One Hundred Spring Plain). Iron-oxide mats were sampled in Beowulf Spring for on-going analysis of metatranscriptomes and RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response gene transcription (e.g., superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, and peroxidases). In situ analyses show that H2O2 concentrations are lowest in the source waters of sulfidic systems (ca. 1 μM), and increase by two-fold in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III)-oxide mat formation (ca. 2 - 3 μM). Channel transects confirm increases in H2O2 as a function of oxygenation (distance). The temporal dynamics of H2O2, O2, Fe(II), and H2S in Beowulf geothermal waters were also measured during a diel cycle, and increases in H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux. These results suggest that photochemical reactions may contribute to changes in H2O2. We hypothesize that increases in H2O2 and O2

  10. Growth-Environment Dependent Modulation of Staphylococcus aureus Branched-Chain to Straight-Chain Fatty Acid Ratio and Incorporation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Suranjana; Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Johnson, Seth R.; Song, Yang; Tefft, Ryan; Gatto, Craig; Wilkinson, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of membrane glycerolipids is a major determinant of Staphylococcus aureus membrane biophysical properties that impacts key factors in cell physiology including susceptibility to membrane active antimicrobials, pathogenesis, and response to environmental stress. The fatty acids of S. aureus are considered to be a mixture of branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs), which increase membrane fluidity, and straight-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that decrease it. The balance of BCFAs and SCFAs in USA300 strain JE2 and strain SH1000 was affected considerably by differences in the conventional laboratory medium in which the strains were grown with media such as Mueller-Hinton broth and Luria broth resulting in high BCFAs and low SCFAs, whereas growth in Tryptic Soy Broth and Brain-Heart Infusion broth led to reduction in BCFAs and an increase in SCFAs. Straight-chain unsaturated fatty acids (SCUFAs) were not detected. However, when S. aureus was grown ex vivo in serum, the fatty acid composition was radically different with SCUFAs, which increase membrane fluidity, making up a substantial proportion of the total (<25%) with SCFAs (>37%) and BCFAs (>36%) making up the rest. Staphyloxanthin, an additional major membrane lipid component unique to S. aureus, tended to be greater in content in cells with high BCFAs or SCUFAs. Cells with high staphyloxanthin content had a lower membrane fluidity that was attributed to increased production of staphyloxanthin. S. aureus saves energy and carbon by utilizing host fatty acids for part of its total fatty acids when growing in serum, which may impact biophysical properties and pathogenesis given the role of SCUFAs in virulence. The nutritional environment in which S. aureus is grown in vitro or in vivo in an infection is likely to be a major determinant of membrane fatty acid composition. PMID:27788193

  11. Mineral-microorganism interactions in Acid Mine Drainage environments: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Cristina; Zotti, Mirca; Pozzolini, Marina; Giovine, Marco; Di Piazza, Simone; Mariotti, Mauro; Lucchetti, Gabriella

    2014-05-01

    Minerals play a key role in controlling the mobility and distribution of metals and metalloids of environmental concern in supergenic environments. These are involved in a variety of processes, spanning the alteration of primary minerals to the formation of secondary authigenic phases and can represent a source or a trap for Potentially Ecotoxic Elements (PTEs). Soil, sediments, and waters heavily polluted with PTEs through AMD processes are a reservoir of a unusual bacteria and fungi well adapted to these toxic environments. Classical studies of biotic weathering have mainly focused on water-mineral interaction and on the ability of microorganism to influence the soil solution chemical composition. In this work, we analyzed two different representative ochreous and greenish-blue AMD colloidal precipitates in order to i) characterize the biota population present in these colloidal minerals and ii) verify the bioaccumulation of PTEs into the fungi and the potential impact of bacteria in the geochemistry of the system. The samples are composed by nanocrystalline goethite which contains high amounts of Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni and woodwardite that is characterized by Cu, Zn, Ni, Y, and Ce. These precipitates were examined in order to evaluate the presence of fungal strains and to extract bacteria DNA. The preliminary results of fungi characterization show an interesting and selected mycobiota able to survive under unfavourable environmental conditions. A significant number of fungal strains was isolated in pure culture. Most of them belong to the genus Mucor and Penicillium. It is worth noting the presence of Trametes versicolor, a macrofungal lignicolous species already known for heavy metal biosorption capability from aqueous solution (Gülay et al 2003). The same colloidal precipitates have been processed to extract bacteria DNA, using a specific procedure developed for DNA extraction from sediments. The results gave a good yield of nucleic acids and the positive PCR

  12. Competitive Oxidation Kinetics and Microbial Ecology: Intermediate Sulfur Transformations in Acid Mine Drainage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, G. K.; Hamers, R. J.; Banfield, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that oxidation of pyrite proceeds through several intermediate sulfur species, notably elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and polythionates (Schippers et al., 1996). However, detailed sampling and analysis of flowing waters and pore waters failed to detect intermediate sulfur species in the 5-way area of the Richmond metal sulfide deposit at the Iron Mountain Mine in northern California. Potential energy available from the oxidation of intermediate sulfur species is considerable, so microbial activity may explain absence of intermediate sulfur compounds at the site. However, the abundance of sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms in areas of active pyrite oxidation at the 5-way is generally low (Bond et al. 2000). Rapid inorganic oxidation rates may prevent microorganisms from utilizing these intermediate sulfur species, thus shaping the structure of microbial communities in acid mine drainage (AMD) environments. Rates and mechanisms of oxidation for tetrathionate and elemental sulfur have been experimentally determined. Batch and flow-through experiments have indicated very slow oxidation of elemental sulfur in inorganic solutions analogous to AMD environments. Results for tetrathionate indicate the importance of non-metabolic and inorganic processes, including surface catalysis and the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Surface catalysis occurs through trithionate on iron oxide surfaces. Hydroxyl radicals may be formed directly by microbes living in proximity to pyrite surfaces, or at pyrite surfaces undergoing wetting and drying cycles. Further experiments investigating the importance of organic compounds associated with iron-oxidizing microorganisms acting as electron transport shuttles and/or wetting agents and ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of potential reactants and intermediates are currently being performed. It is suggested that inorganic processes involved with seasonal wetting and drying of pyritic sediment

  13. Importance of gastrin in the pathogenesis and treatment of gastric tumors

    PubMed Central

    Burkitt, Michael D; Varro, Andrea; Pritchard, D Mark

    2009-01-01

    In addition to regulating acid secretion, the gastric antral hormone gastrin regulates several important cellular processes in the gastric epithelium including proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, tissue remodelling and angiogenesis. Elevated serum concentrations of this hormone are caused by many conditions, particularly hypochlorhydria (as a result of autoimmune or Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-induced chronic atrophic gastritis or acid suppressing drugs) and gastrin producing tumors (gastrinomas). There is now accumulating evidence that altered local and plasma concentrations of gastrin may play a role during the development of various gastric tumors. In the absence of H pylori infection, marked hypergastrinemia frequently results in the development of gastric enterochromaffin cell-like neuroendocrine tumors and surgery to remove the cause of hypergastrinemia may lead to tumor resolution in this condition. In animal models such as transgenic INS-GAS mice, hypergastrinemia has also been shown to act as a cofactor with Helicobacter infection during gastric adenocarcinoma development. However, it is currently unclear as to what extent gastrin also modulates human gastric adenocarcinoma development. Therapeutic approaches targeting hypergastrinemia, such as immunization with G17DT, have been evaluated for the treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma, with some promising results. Although the mild hypergastrinemia associated with proton pump inhibitor drug use has been shown to cause ECL-cell hyperplasia and to increase H pylori-induced gastric atrophy, there is currently no convincing evidence that this class of agents contributes towards the development of gastric neuroendocrine tumors or gastric adenocarcinomas in human subjects. PMID:19115463

  14. Interaction of brain fatty acid-binding protein with the polyunsaturated fatty acid environment as a potential determinant of poor prognosis in malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Elsherbiny, Marwa E.; Emara, Marwan; Godbout, Roseline

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common adult brain cancers. In spite of aggressive treatment, recurrence occurs in the great majority of patients and is invariably fatal. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are abundant in brain, particularly ω-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and ω-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Although the levels of ω-6 and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are tightly regulated in brain, the ω-6:ω-3 ratio is dramatically increased in malignant glioma, suggesting deregulation of fundamental lipid homeostasis in brain tumor tissue. The migratory properties of malignant glioma cells can be modified by altering the ratio of AA:DHA in growth medium, with increased migration observed in AA-rich medium. This fatty acid-dependent effect on cell migration is dependent on expression of the brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) previously shown to bind DHA and AA. Increased levels of enzymes involved in eicosanoid production in FABP7-positive malignant glioma cells suggest that FABP7 is an important modulator of AA metabolism. We provide evidence that increased production of eicosanoids in FABP7-positive malignant glioma growing in an AA-rich environment contributes to tumor infiltration in the brain. We discuss pathways and molecules that may underlie FABP7/AA-mediated promotion of cell migration and FABP7/DHA-mediated inhibition of cell migration in malignant glioma. PMID:23981365

  15. Gastric cancer and trastuzumab: first biologic therapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunturu, Krishna S.; Woo, Yanghee; Beaubier, Nike; Remotti, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains difficult to cure and has a poor overall prognosis. Chemotherapy and multimodality therapy has shown some benefit in the treatment of gastric cancer. Current therapies for gastric cancer have their limitations; thus, we are in need of newer treatment options including targeted therapies. Here, we review the biologic therapy with trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)+ gastric cancer. PMID:23450234

  16. Potential role of stabilized Criegee radicals in sulfuric acid production in a high biogenic VOC environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Saewung; Guenther, Alex; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James; Griffin, Robert; Rutter, Andrew P; Gong, Longwen; Cevik, Basak Karakurt

    2015-03-17

    We present field observations made in June 2011 downwind of Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, and evaluate the role of stabilized Criegee radicals (sCIs) in gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) production. Zero-dimensional model calculations show that sCI from biogenic volatile organic compounds composed the majority of the sCIs. The main uncertainty associated with an evaluation of H2SO4 production from the sCI reaction channel is the lack of experimentally determined reaction rates for sCIs formed from isoprene ozonolysis with SO2 along with systematic discrepancies in experimentally derived reaction rates between other sCIs and SO2 and water vapor. In general, the maximum of H2SO4 production from the sCI channel is found in the late afternoon as ozone increases toward the late afternoon. The sCI channel, however, contributes minor H2SO4 production compared with the conventional OH channel in the mid-day. Finally, the production and the loss rates of H2SO4 are compared. The application of the recommended mass accommodation coefficient causes significant overestimation of H2SO4 loss rates compared with H2SO4 production rates. However, the application of a lower experimental value for the mass accommodation coefficient provides good agreement between the loss and production rates of H2SO4. The results suggest that the recommended coefficient for the H2O surface may not be suitable for this relatively dry environment.

  17. Obatoclax Inhibits Alphavirus Membrane Fusion by Neutralizing the Acidic Environment of Endocytic Compartments.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Finny S; Rausalu, Kai; Hakanen, Marika; Saul, Sirle; Kümmerer, Beate M; Susi, Petri; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero

    2017-03-01

    As new pathogenic viruses continue to emerge, it is paramount to have intervention strategies that target a common denominator in these pathogens. The fusion of viral and cellular membranes during viral entry is one such process that is used by many pathogenic viruses, including chikungunya virus, West Nile virus, and influenza virus. Obatoclax, a small-molecule antagonist of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, was previously determined to have activity against influenza A virus and also Sindbis virus. Here, we report it to be active against alphaviruses, like chikungunya virus (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 0.03 μM) and Semliki Forest virus (SFV; EC50 = 0.11 μM). Obatoclax inhibited viral entry processes in an SFV temperature-sensitive mutant entry assay. A neutral red retention assay revealed that obatoclax induces the rapid neutralization of the acidic environment of endolysosomal vesicles and thereby most likely inhibits viral fusion. Characterization of escape mutants revealed that the L369I mutation in the SFV E1 fusion protein was sufficient to confer partial resistance against obatoclax. Other inhibitors that target the Bcl-2 family of antiapoptotic proteins inhibited neither viral entry nor endolysosomal acidification, suggesting that the antiviral mechanism of obatoclax does not depend on its anticancer targets. Obatoclax inhibited the growth of flaviviruses, like Zika virus, West Nile virus, and yellow fever virus, which require low pH for fusion, but not that of pH-independent picornaviruses, like coxsackievirus A9, echovirus 6, and echovirus 7. In conclusion, obatoclax is a novel inhibitor of endosomal acidification that prevents viral fusion and that could be pursued as a potential broad-spectrum antiviral candidate.

  18. Photosynthesis and photo-stability of nucleic acids in prebiotic extraterrestrial environments.

    PubMed

    Sandford, Scott A; Bera, Partha P; Lee, Timothy J; Materese, Christopher K; Nuevo, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that the UV photo-irradiation of low-temperature ices of astrophysical interest leads to the formation of organic molecules, including molecules important for biology such as amino acids, quinones, and amphiphiles. When pyrimidine is introduced into these ices, the products of irradiation include the nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine, the informational sub-units of DNA and RNA, as well as some of their isomers. The formation of these compounds, which has been studied both experimentally and theoretically, requires a succession of additions of OH, NH₂, and CH₃groups to pyrimidine. Results show that H₂O ice plays key roles in the formation of the nucleobases, as an oxidant, as a matrix in which reactions can take place, and as a catalyst that assists proton abstraction from intermediate compounds. As H₂O is also the most abundant icy component in most cold astrophysical environments, it probably plays the same roles in space in the formation of biologically relevant compounds. Results also show that although the formation of uracil and cytosine from pyrimidine in ices is fairly straightforward, the formation of thymine is not. This is mostly due to the fact that methylation is a limiting step for its formation, particularly in H₂O-rich ices, where methylation must compete with oxidation. The relative inefficiency of the abiotic formation of thymine to that of uracil and cytosine, together with the fact that thymine has not been detected in meteorites, are not inconsistent with the RNA world hypothesis. Indeed, a lack of abiotically produced thymine delivered to the early Earth may have forced the choice for an RNA world, in which only uracil and cytosine are needed, but not thymine.

  19. Assessment of Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acids in gastric but not in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing of pooled Mexican samples.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Arias, Carlos F; Torres, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Gastric (GC) and breast (BrC) cancer are two of the most common and deadly tumours. Different lines of evidence suggest a possible causative role of viral infections for both GC and BrC. Wide genome sequencing (WGS) technologies allow searching for viral agents in tissues of patients with cancer. These technologies have already contributed to establish virus-cancer associations as well as to discovery new tumour viruses. The objective of this study was to document possible associations of viral infection with GC and BrC in Mexican patients. In order to gain idea about cost effective conditions of experimental sequencing, we first carried out an in silico simulation of WGS. The next-generation-platform IlluminaGallx was then used to sequence GC and BrC tumour samples. While we did not find viral sequences in tissues from BrC patients, multiple reads matching Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) sequences were found in GC tissues. An end-point polymerase chain reaction confirmed an enrichment of EBV sequences in one of the GC samples sequenced, validating the next-generation sequencing-bioinformatics pipeline.

  20. Assessment of Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acids in gastric but not in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing of pooled Mexican samples

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Arias, Carlos F; Torres, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Gastric (GC) and breast (BrC) cancer are two of the most common and deadly tumours. Different lines of evidence suggest a possible causative role of viral infections for both GC and BrC. Wide genome sequencing (WGS) technologies allow searching for viral agents in tissues of patients with cancer. These technologies have already contributed to establish virus-cancer associations as well as to discovery new tumour viruses. The objective of this study was to document possible associations of viral infection with GC and BrC in Mexican patients. In order to gain idea about cost effective conditions of experimental sequencing, we first carried out an in silico simulation of WGS. The next-generation-platform IlluminaGallx was then used to sequence GC and BrC tumour samples. While we did not find viral sequences in tissues from BrC patients, multiple reads matching Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) sequences were found in GC tissues. An end-point polymerase chain reaction confirmed an enrichment of EBV sequences in one of the GC samples sequenced, validating the next-generation sequencing-bioinformatics pipeline. PMID:26910355

  1. A review on gastric diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The gastric fundal diverticulae are rare. They can present with variable symptoms. We are enclosing a literature review on gastric fundal diverticulum. Lessons have emerged which may help in the management of this rare condition in future. PMID:22257431

  2. Physicochemical behaviour of WPI-stabilized emulsions in in vitro gastric and intestinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jessie; Ye, Aiqian; Lee, Sung Je; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-11-01

    Most studies on the in vitro lipid digestion of protein-stabilized emulsions have been carried out under simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. In this study, the digestion behaviour of whey protein isolate (WPI)-stabilized emulsions was examined under simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) conditions (pH 7.5, 2.5mg bile salts/mL and 0.8 mg pancreatin/mL) after the emulsions had been digested in a model simulated gastric fluid (SGF) containing pepsin (pH 1.6 and 3.2mg pepsin/mL) for different times. The droplet size, ζ-potential, microstructure, surface protein and amount of free fatty acids released were examined. The results indicated that WPI emulsions did not undergo pronounced changes in droplet size and microstructure during SGF digestion followed by coalescence during the subsequent SIF digestion. When WPI emulsions were treated with SGF, α-lactalbumin and a portion of β-lactoglobulin proteins adsorbed at the interface were hydrolysed by pepsin, resulting in small peptides being produced as characterized by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In general, digestion in SGF containing pepsin accelerated coalescence of the emulsion droplets during subsequent digestion in SIF containing pancreatic lipase. However, the changes in the size, the microstructure and the proteolysis of the interfacial proteins of the emulsions under gastric conditions did not influence the rate and the extent of lipid digestion in the subsequent intestinal environment.

  3. Gastric cancer: basic aspects.

    PubMed

    Resende, Carlos; Thiel, Alexandra; Machado, José C; Ristimäki, Ari

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a world health burden, ranging as the second cause of cancer death worldwide. Etiologically, GC arises not only from the combined effects of environmental factors and susceptible genetic variants but also from the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. In the last years, molecular oncobiology studies brought to light a number of genes that are implicated in gastric carcinogenesis. This review is intended to focus on the recently described basic aspects that play key roles in the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants of the genes IL-10, IL-17, MUC1, MUC6, DNMT3B, SMAD4, and SERPINE1 have been reported to modify the risk of developing GC. Several genes have been newly associated with gastric carcinogenesis, both through oncogenic activation (GSK3β, CD133, DSC2, P-Cadherin, CDH17, CD168, CD44, metalloproteinases MMP7 and MMP11, and a subset of miRNAs) and through tumor suppressor gene inactivation mechanisms (TFF1, PDX1, BCL2L10, XRCC, psiTPTE-HERV, HAI-2, GRIK2, and RUNX3). It also addressed the role of the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its importance as a potential molecular target for therapy.

  4. Primary gastric lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Akwaa, Ahmad M; Siddiqui, Neelam; Al-Mofleh, Ibrahim A

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this review is to describe the various aspects of primary gastric lymphoma and the treatment options currently available. METHODS: After a systematic search of Pubmed, Medscape and MDconsult, we reviewed and retrieved literature regarding gastric lymphoma. RESULTS: Primary gastric lymphoma is rare however, the incidence of this malignancy is increasing. Chronic gastritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection has been considered a major predisposing factor for MALT lymphoma. Immune histochemical marker studies and molecular biology utilizing polymerase chain reaction have facilitated appropriate diagnosis and abolished the need for diagnostic surgical resection. Advances in imaging techniques including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS) have helped evaluation of tumor extension and invasion. The clinical course and prognosis of this disease is dependent on histopathological sub-type and stage at the time of diagnosis. Controversy remains regarding the best treatment for early stages of this disease. Chemotherapy, surgery and combination have been studied and shared almost comparable results with survival rate of 70%-90%. However, chemotherapy possesses the advantage of preserving gastric anatomy. Radiotherapy alone has been tried and showed good results. Stage IIIE, IVE disease treatment is solely by chemotherapy and surgical resection has been a remote consideration. CONCLUSION: We conclude that methods of diagnosis and staging of the primary gastric lymphoma have dramatically improved. The modalities of treatment are many and probably chemotherapy is superior because of high success rate, preservation of stomach and tolerable complications. PMID:14695759

  5. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions are altered after subtotal gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ching-Hung; Lin, Jaw-Town; Ho, Hsiu J; Lai, Zi-Lun; Wang, Chang-Bi; Tang, Sen-Lin; Wu, Chun-Ying

    2016-02-10

    Subtotal gastrectomy (i.e., partial removal of the stomach), a surgical treatment for early-stage distal gastric cancer, is usually accompanied by highly selective vagotomy and Billroth II reconstruction, leading to dramatic changes in the gastric environment. Based on accumulating evidence of a strong link between human gut microbiota and host health, a 2-year follow-up study was conducted to characterize the effects of subtotal gastrectomy. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequencing were analyzed before and after surgery. The results demonstrated that gastric microbiota is significantly more diverse after surgery. Ralstonia and Helicobacter were the top two genera of discriminant abundance in the cancerous stomach before surgery, while Streptococcus and Prevotella were the two most abundant genera after tumor excision. Furthermore, N-nitrosation genes were prevalent before surgery, whereas bile salt hydrolase, NO and N2O reductase were prevalent afterward. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document changes in gastric microbiota before and after surgical treatment of stomach cancer.

  6. Intramural hemorrhage simulating gastric neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Sheward, S E; Davis, M; Amparo, E G; Gogel, H K

    1988-01-01

    We report a case of benign gastric ulcer with secondary extensive intramural hemorrhage causing a radiographic appearance consistent with a large ulcerated gastric neoplasm. This is the second such case reported and the first studied with sonography and computed tomographic scan. A brief review of the literature on intramural gastric hematoma is presented.

  7. Osteopetrorickets due to Snx10 Deficiency in Mice Results from Both Failed Osteoclast Activity and Loss of Gastric Acid-Dependent Calcium Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Liang; Morse, Leslie R.; Zhang, Li; Sasaki, Hajime; Mills, Jason C.; Odgren, Paul R.; Sibbel, Greg; Stanley, James R. L.; Wong, Gee; Zamarioli, Ariane; Battaglino, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in sorting nexin 10 (Snx10) have recently been found to account for roughly 4% of all human malignant osteopetrosis, some of them fatal. To study the disease pathogenesis, we investigated the expression of Snx10 and created mouse models in which Snx10 was knocked down globally or knocked out in osteoclasts. Endocytosis is severely defective in Snx10-deficent osteoclasts, as is extracellular acidification, ruffled border formation, and bone resorption. We also discovered that Snx10 is highly expressed in stomach epithelium, with mutations leading to high stomach pH and low calcium solubilization. Global Snx10-deficiency in mice results in a combined phenotype: osteopetrosis (due to osteoclast defect) and rickets (due to high stomach pH and low calcium availability, resulting in impaired bone mineralization). Osteopetrorickets, the paradoxical association of insufficient mineralization in the context of a positive total body calcium balance, is thought to occur due to the inability of the osteoclasts to maintain normal calcium–phosphorus homeostasis. However, osteoclast-specific Snx10 knockout had no effect on calcium balance, and therefore led to severe osteopetrosis without rickets. Moreover, supplementation with calcium gluconate rescued mice from the rachitic phenotype and dramatically extended life span in global Snx10-deficient mice, suggesting that this may be a life-saving component of the clinical approach to Snx10-dependent human osteopetrosis that has previously gone unrecognized. We conclude that tissue-specific effects of Snx10 mutation need to be considered in clinical approaches to this disease entity. Reliance solely on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can leave hypocalcemia uncorrected with sometimes fatal consequences. These studies established an essential role for Snx10 in bone homeostasis and underscore the importance of gastric acidification in calcium uptake. PMID:25811986

  8. Intrahypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor elevates gastric bicarbonate and inhibits stress ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Gunion, M W; Kauffman, G L; Taché, Y

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrahyopthalamic microinfusions of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on gastric bicarbonate, acid, and pepsin content and on cold restraint-induced gastric lesion formation were tested in three experiments. Bilateral microinfusions of CRF into the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (0.86 nmol/rat) significantly increased both gastric bicarbonate concentration and total bicarbonate output. These effects were observed irrespective of whether rats were pretreated with the acid antisecretory drug omeprazole. In nonomeprazole-pretreated rats, CRF microinfusions also significantly reduced acid secretion and raised pH. The increase in bicarbonate content accounted for half of the observed decrease in acid output, suggesting that CRF microinfusions activated separable bicarbonate-stimulating and acid-inhibiting hypothalamic systems. In non-omeprazole-pretreated rats, CRF microinfusions significantly increased serum gastrin, whereas pepsin output was unchanged. Gastric mucosal damage produced by 4 h of cold restraint was significantly diminished by CRF microinfusion into the ventromedial hypothalamus. These data demonstrate that ventromedial hypothalamic microinfusions of CRF increase bicarbonate content, decrease gastric acid content, and confer protection against cold restraint-induced gastric mucosal damage. Hypothalamic CRF neuronal terminals and receptors may be involved in the central regulation of gastric bicarbonate secretion as well as acid secretion.

  9. Structural basis of fluorescence fluctuation dynamics of green fluorescent proteins in acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuexin; Kim, Hye-Ryong; Heikal, Ahmed A

    2006-11-30

    slower time scale. Our results indicate that conformational rearrangement of the beta-barrel and the amino acids surrounding the embedded chromophore is a rate-determining step for external proton transfer and possibly cis/trans isomerization as nonradiative pathways that underlie fluorescence blinking of GFP mutants in an acidic environment. In addition, the neutral-state transition is likely to be involved in the blinking process previously observed for the anionic-state transition in several GFP mutants.

  10. Gastric air contrast: useful adjunct to hepatic artery scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Ziessman, H.A.; Juni, J.; Lahti, D.

    1984-08-01

    The utility of scintigraphic views obtained after administration of sodium bicarbonate-citric acid-simethicone crystals (E-Z-GAS) for the determination of gastric extrahepatic perfusion was evaluated in 20 technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin hepatic arterial perfusion studies performed in 19 patients. These crystals produce carbon dioxide gas, distend the stomach, and allow better delineation of gastric activity (extrahepatic perfusion to the stomach). Conversely, a lack of change in activity in the left upper quadrant after the effervescent crystals have been ingested suggests no gastric activity (and no extrahepatic perfusion to the stomach). These air-contrast views added useful information in 16 of 20 studies. Air contrast views of the stomach can be extremely helpful in verifying or excluding the diagnosis of gastric extrahepatic perfusion on technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin hepatic arterial perfusion studies.

  11. Prevention of acute gastric mucosal lesions by Solcoseryl.

    PubMed

    Brzozowski, T; Radecki, T; Sendur, R; Gustaw, P; Konturek, S J

    1987-04-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract from calf blood containing various biologically active substances, has been reported to promote the healing of skin wounds and gastric ulceration In this study, the gastroprotective effects of Solcoseryl vis-a-vis acute gastric mucosal damage were examined in rats. Solcoseryl significantly reduced the formation of acute lesions induced by intragastric application of absolute ethanol or acidified taurocholate and by water immersion and restraint stress, but failed to affect those caused by acidified aspirin. Since Solcoseryl did not offer protection in the absence of mucosal prostaglandins (PG) e.g. in aspirin-induced gastric damage, it is likely that PG may be involved in the observed gastroprotective activity of the drug. Solcoseryl failed to affect gastric acid or pepsin secretion, but increased mucosal blood flow. Thus PG generated by Solcoseryl might contribute to the maintenance of the observed mucosal microcirculation and the prevention of lesion formation by corrosive substances and stress conditions.

  12. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-02-21

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright.

  13. NHE1 is upregulated in gastric cancer and regulates gastric cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rui; Wang, Haibo; Jin, Hai; Wen, Guorong; Tuo, Biguang; Xu, Jingyu

    2017-03-01

    Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is known to play a key role in regulating intracellular pH and osmotic homeostasis and is involved in the development and progression of several types of cancer. However, the function and specific mechanism of NHE1 in gastric cancer (GC) are not clearly understood. In the present study, we report that NHE1 is overexpressed in tissues and cell lines from GC patients, and knockdown or inhibition of NHE1 suppressed GC cell proliferation via regulation of G1/S and G2/M cell cycle phase transitions, concomitant with a marked decrease in positive cell cycle regulators, including cyclin D1 and cyclin B1. Likewise, NHE1 was required for GC cell migration and invasion through the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) proteins, and NHE1 inhibition resulted in an acidic intracellular environment, providing possible mechanisms underlying NHE1-mediated GC progression both in vitro and in vivo. These data highlight the important role of NHE1 in GC progression and suggest that NHE1 may be a useful target for GC therapy.

  14. Carbonate-based Janus micromotors moving in ultra-light acidic environment generated by HeLa cells in situ

    PubMed Central

    Guix, Maria; Meyer, Anne K.; Koch, Britta; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    Novel approaches to develop naturally-induced drug delivery in tumor environments in a deterministic and controlled manner have become of growing interest in recent years. Different polymeric-based microstructures and other biocompatible substances have been studied taking advantage of lactic acidosis phenomena in tumor cells, which decrease the tumor extracellular pH down to 6.8. Micromotors have recently demonstrated a high performance in living systems, revealing autonomous movement in the acidic environment of the stomach or moving inside living cells by using acoustic waves, opening the doors for implementation of such smart microengines into living entities. The need to develop biocompatible motors which are driven by natural fuel sources inherently created in biological systems has thus become of crucial importance. As a proof of principle, we here demonstrate calcium carbonate Janus particles moving in extremely light acidic environments (pH 6.5), whose motion is induced in conditioned acidic medium generated by HeLa cells in situ. Our system not only obviates the need for an external fuel, but also presents a selective activation of the micromotors which promotes their motion and consequent dissolution in presence of a quickly propagating cell source (i.e. tumor cells), therefore inspiring new micromotor configurations for potential drug delivery systems. PMID:26905939

  15. Carbonate-based Janus micromotors moving in ultra-light acidic environment generated by HeLa cells in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guix, Maria; Meyer, Anne K.; Koch, Britta; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2016-02-01

    Novel approaches to develop naturally-induced drug delivery in tumor environments in a deterministic and controlled manner have become of growing interest in recent years. Different polymeric-based microstructures and other biocompatible substances have been studied taking advantage of lactic acidosis phenomena in tumor cells, which decrease the tumor extracellular pH down to 6.8. Micromotors have recently demonstrated a high performance in living systems, revealing autonomous movement in the acidic environment of the stomach or moving inside living cells by using acoustic waves, opening the doors for implementation of such smart microengines into living entities. The need to develop biocompatible motors which are driven by natural fuel sources inherently created in biological systems has thus become of crucial importance. As a proof of principle, we here demonstrate calcium carbonate Janus particles moving in extremely light acidic environments (pH 6.5), whose motion is induced in conditioned acidic medium generated by HeLa cells in situ. Our system not only obviates the need for an external fuel, but also presents a selective activation of the micromotors which promotes their motion and consequent dissolution in presence of a quickly propagating cell source (i.e. tumor cells), therefore inspiring new micromotor configurations for potential drug delivery systems.

  16. Methods of chemical analysis for selected species in marble and limestone surfaces exposed to the acidic outdoor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, K.J.; Williams, F.L.; Huff, E.A.; Youngdahl, C.A.

    1986-03-01

    There is concern for marble and limestone exposed to the acidic outdoor environment because they are widely used as the exterior structures of buildings and monuments and because the calcium carbonate stones are especially sensitive to acid. Field tests of these building materials under carefully monitored environmental conditions are being conducted to measure damage rates and ultimately to quantify the individual effects of the important damage mechanisms. The development of further quantitative understanding will provide an improved basis for control strategies. The demonstration, verification, and application of a technique to measure selected surface anionic and cationic species are important contributions to this study. These methods of stone surface chemical analysis, developed for and applied in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), are appropriate to monitor selected species of program interest and are sufficient to determine surface sulfate and nitrate reaction products.

  17. Analysis of mucin composition in gastric juices of chronic rheumatic patients with upper gastrointestinal damage.

    PubMed

    Ikezawa, Tomoaki; Ichikawa, Takafumi; Adachi, Ken; Sugano, Satoshi; Ojima, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Youko; Watanabe, Yukio; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2005-08-01

    Assessment of the mucin subclasses in the gastric juices of severe chronic rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was compared with non-RA cases which received the eradication treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Gastric juice samples were obtained from 8 RA patients (5 for H. pylori-negative and 3 for H. pylori-positive) and 5 control subjects in which we confirmed the successful eradication of H. pylori. The gastric luminal mucins were extracted and isolated by the ethanol precipitation method. These mucin solutions were digested with chymotrypsin, dialyzed, lyophilized, and redissolved. The obtained specimen was applied to an ion exchange column containing DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and eluted with a discontinuous salt gradient in three salt steps. The gastric luminal mucins were divided into three fractions based on the distinctive sialic acid content. The proportion of acidic mucin rich in sialic acid from the gastric juice of RA patients without the H. pylori infection was significantly lower than those RA patients with H. pylori or the control subjects. A decrease in the acidic mucin content after eradication of H. pylori was commonly observed in all the control subjects. Our investigation raises the possibility that the gastric mucosae of RA patients have resistance against H. pylori infection. And the analysis of the composition in the gastric luminal mucin may be a very useful tool for the evaluation of gastric homeostasis in RA patients.

  18. Helicobacter pylori eradication as a preventive tool against gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Goto, Yasuyuki; Nishio, Kazuko; Tanaka, Daisuke; Kawai, Sayo; Sakakibara, Hisataka; Kondo, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which increases the risk of gastric diseases, including digestive ulcers and gastric cancer, is highly prevalent in Asian countries. There is no doubt that eradication of the bacterium is effective as a treatment of digestive ulcer, but eradication aiming to reduce the gastric cancer risk is still controversial. Observational studies in Japan demonstrated that the eradication decreased the gastric cancer risk among 132 stomach cancer patients undergoing endoscopical resection (65 treated with omeprazol and antibiotics and 67 untreated). In Columbia, 976 participants were randomized into eight groups in a three-treatment factorial design including H. pylori eradication, resulting in significant regression in the H. pylori eradication group. A recent randomized study in China also showed a significant reduction of gastric cancer risk among those without any gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. Efficacy of eradication may vary in extent among countries with different incidence rates of gastric cancer. Since the lifetime cumulative risk (0 to 84 years old) of gastric cancer in Japan is reported to be 12.7% for males and 4.8% for females (Inoue and Tominaga, 2003), the corresponding values for H. pylori infected Japanese can be estimated at 21.2% in males and 8.0% in females under the assumptions that the relative risk for infected relative to uninfected is 5 and the proportion of those infected is 0.5. Both the fact that not all individuals are infected among those exposed and the knowledge that only a small percentage of individuals infected with the bacterium develop gastric cancer, indicate the importance of gene-environment interactions. Studies on such interactions should provide useful information for anti-H. pylori preventive strategies.

  19. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  20. Effects of gastric pH on oral drug absorption: In vitro assessment using a dissolution/permeation system reflecting the gastric dissolution process.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Makoto; Fukahori, Miho; Ikemura, Atsumi; Kubota, Ayaka; Higashino, Haruki; Sakuma, Shinji; Yamashita, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of gastric pH on the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs using an in vitro system. A dissolution/permeation system (D/P system) equipped with a Caco-2 cell monolayer was used as the in vitro system to evaluate oral drug absorption, while a small vessel filled with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) was used to reflect the gastric dissolution phase. After applying drugs in their solid forms to SGF, SGF solution containing a 1/100 clinical dose of each drug was mixed with the apical solution of the D/P system, which was changed to fasted state-simulated intestinal fluid. Dissolved and permeated amounts on applied amount of drugs were then monitored for 2h. Similar experiments were performed using the same drugs, but without the gastric phase. Oral absorption with or without the gastric phase was predicted in humans based on the amount of the drug that permeated in the D/P system, assuming that the system without the gastric phase reflected human absorption with an elevated gastric pH. The dissolved amounts of basic drugs with poor water solubility, namely albendazole, dipyridamole, and ketoconazole, in the apical solution and their permeation across a Caco-2 cell monolayer were significantly enhanced when the gastric dissolution process was reflected due to the physicochemical properties of basic drugs. These amounts resulted in the prediction of higher oral absorption with normal gastric pH than with high gastric pH. On the other hand, when diclofenac sodium, the salt form of an acidic drug, was applied to the D/P system with the gastric phase, its dissolved and permeated amounts were significantly lower than those without the gastric phase. However, the oral absorption of diclofenac was predicted to be complete (96-98%) irrespective of gastric pH because the permeated amounts of diclofenac under both conditions were sufficiently high to achieve complete absorption. These estimations of the effects of

  1. Efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in treating gastric ulcer: a review.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wei-Ping; Man, Hui-Bin; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2014-12-07

    Gastric ulcer is a common disorder of the digestive system. Current therapeutic regimens largely rely on Western medicine. However, numerous studies have demonstrated that herbal medicines can effectively treat gastric ulcer in humans and various animal models via divergent mechanisms. This review updates the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in treating gastric ulcer, and the mechanisms of their action in humans and animal models. Studies have demonstrated that the efficacy of herbal medicines is comparable or superior to that of drugs such as omeprazole or cimetidine in humans and animal models, and herbal medicines display fewer adverse effects. The mechanisms by which herbal medicines benefit gastric ulcer include stimulation of mucous cell proliferation, anti-oxidation, and inhibition of gastric acid secretion and H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. Some herbal medicines also exhibit antimicrobial properties. Utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative to treat gastric ulcer in humans effectively, with few adverse effects.

  2. Efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in treating gastric ulcer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wei-Ping; Man, Hui-Bin; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Gastric ulcer is a common disorder of the digestive system. Current therapeutic regimens largely rely on Western medicine. However, numerous studies have demonstrated that herbal medicines can effectively treat gastric ulcer in humans and various animal models via divergent mechanisms. This review updates the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in treating gastric ulcer, and the mechanisms of their action in humans and animal models. Studies have demonstrated that the efficacy of herbal medicines is comparable or superior to that of drugs such as omeprazole or cimetidine in humans and animal models, and herbal medicines display fewer adverse effects. The mechanisms by which herbal medicines benefit gastric ulcer include stimulation of mucous cell proliferation, anti-oxidation, and inhibition of gastric acid secretion and H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. Some herbal medicines also exhibit antimicrobial properties. Utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative to treat gastric ulcer in humans effectively, with few adverse effects. PMID:25493014

  3. Aqueous suspension of anise “Pimpinella anisum” protects rats against chemically induced gastric ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Al Mofleh, Ibrahim A; Alhaider, Abdulqader A; Mossa, Jaber S; Al-Soohaibani, Mohammed O; Rafatullah, Syed

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To substantiate the claims of Unani and Arabian traditional medicine practitioners on the gastroprotective potential effect of a popular spice anise, “Pimpinella anisum L.” on experimentally-induced gastric ulceration and secretion in rats. METHODS: Acute gastric ulceration in rats was produced by various noxious chemicals including 80% ethanol, 0.2 mol/L NaOH, 25% NaCl and indomethacin. Anti-secretory studies were undertaken using pylorus-ligated Shay rat technique. Levels of gastric non-protein sulfhydryls (NP-SH) and wall mucus were estimated and gastric tissue was also examined histologically. Anise aqueous suspension was used in two doses (250 and 500 mg/kg body weight) in all experiments. RESULTS: Anise significantly inhibited gastric mu-cosal damage induced by necrotizing agents and indomethacin. The anti-ulcer effect was further confirmed histologically. In pylorus-ligated Shay rats, anise suspension significantly reduced the basal gastric acid secretion, acidity and completely inhibited the rumenal ulceration. On the other hand, the suspension significantly replenished ethanol-induced depleted levels of gastric mucosal NP-SH and gastric wall mucus concentration. CONCLUSION: Anise aqueous suspension possesses significant cytoprotective and anti-ulcer activities against experimentally-induced gastric lesions. The anti-ulcer effect of anise is possibly prostaglandin-mediated and/or through its anti-secretory and antioxidative properties. PMID:17373749

  4. The Inhibitory Effects of Nesfatin-1 in Ventromedial Hypothalamus on Gastric Function and Its Regulation by Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shengli; Guo, Feifei; Sun, Xiangrong; Zhang, Nana; Gong, Yanling; Xu, Luo

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nesfatin-1 signaling in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) on gastric functions, as well as the regulation of these effects by nucleus accumbens (NAc) projections to VMH. Methods: The expression of c-fos in nesfatinergic VMH neurons induced by gastric distension (GD) was measured using the double fluoro-immunohistochemical staining. The firing rates of neurons were monitored with single-unit extracellular electric discharge recording. The projection of nesfatinergic neurons from NAc to VMH was observed by fluorogold retrograde tracer combined with fluoro-immunohistochemical staining. The effect of nesfatin-1 in VMH or electric stimulation in NAc on gastric function was studied by measuring food intake, gastric acid output, gastric motility, and gastric emptying, and the ability of the melanocortin-3/4 receptor antagonist SHU9119 or the anti-nesfatin-1 antibody to block nesfatin-1 in the VMH was assessed. Results: Expression of c-fos was observed in VMH nesfatinergic neurons following GD in rats. Further, nesfatin-1 delivery to single GD-responsive neurons changed the firing rates of these neurons in the VMH. In awake, behaving rats, intra-VMH administration of nesfatin-1 inhibited food intake, gastric acid output, gastric motility, and gastric emptying. These effects were abolished by SHU9119. Fluorogold retrograde tracing showed nesfatinergic neural projection from the NAc to the VMH. Electrical stimulation of NAc modified the firing rates of the VMH neurons and inhibited food intake and gastric functions. The pretreatment with an anti-nesfatin-1 antibody in the VMH reversed the effects of NAc electrical stimulation on the VMH neuronal firing rates and gastric function. Conclusions: Nesfatin-1 in the VMH inhibited food intake, gastric acid output, gastric motility, and gastric emptying. A nesfatinergic pathway between NAc and VMH transmitted metabolism-regulating signals. PMID:28105016

  5. Cerro Negro, Nicaragua: A Key Mars Analog Environment for Acid-Sulfate Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynek, B. M.; Rogers, K. L.; McCollom, T. M.

    2007-07-01

    Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua, is being investigated as an analog for acid-sulfate weathering of Mars-like basalts. Our goal is to better understand the mineral alteration pathways and the astrobiological potential of early Mars.

  6. Models of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, D F

    1977-01-01

    Some empirical and theoretical models of the emptying behaviour of the stomach are presented. The laws of Laplace, Hooke, and Poisseuille are used to derive a new model of gastric emptying. Published data on humans are used to test the model and evaluate empirical constants. It is shown that for meals with an initial volume of larger than or equal to 300 ml, the reciprocal of the cube root of the volume of meal remaining is proportional to the time the meal is in the stomach.For meals of initial volume of less than 300 ml the equation has to be corrected for the fact that the 'resting volume' of gastric contents is about 28 ml. The more exact formula is given in the text. As this model invokes no neural or hormonal factors, it is suggested that the gastric emptying response to the volume of a meal does not depend on these factors. The gastric emptying response to the composition of the meal does depend on such factors and a recent model of this process is used to evaluate an empirical constant. PMID:856678

  7. Melanoma with gastric metastases

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W.; Bhatia, Abhijit S.; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  8. Nuclear factor-kappaB inhibition by pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate attenuates gastric ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    El Eter, Eman; Hagar, Hanan H; Al-Tuwaijiri, Ali; Arafa, Maha

    2005-06-01

    Pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) is a potent antioxidant and an inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). The present study examined the impact of PDTC preconditioning on gastric protection in response to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury to the rat stomach. Male Wistar rats were recruited and divided into 3 groups (n = 7). One group was subjected to gastric ischemia for 30 min and reperfusion for 1 hour. The second group of rats was preconditioned with PDTC (200 mg/kg body mass i.v.) 15 min prior to ischemia and before reperfusion. The third group of rats was sham-operated and served as the control group. Gastric I/R injury increased serum lactate dehydrogenase level, vascular permeability of gastric mucosa (as indicated by Evans blue dye extravasation) and gastric content of inflammatory cytokine; tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Moreover, oxidative stress was increased as indicated by elevated lipid peroxides formation (measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and depleted reduced glutathione in gastric tissues. NF-kappaB translocation was also detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Microscopically, gastric tissues subjected to I/R injury showed ulceration, hemorrhages, and neutrophil infiltration. Immunohistochemical studies of gastric sections revealed increased expression of p53 and Bcl-2 proteins. PDTC pretreatment reduced Evans blue extravasation, serum lactate dehydrogenase levels, gastric TNF-alpha levels, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content, and increased gastric glutathione content. Moreover, PDTC pretreatment abolished p53 expression and inhibited NF-kappaB translocation. Finally, histopathological changes were nearly restored by PDTC pretreatment. These results clearly demonstrate that NF-kappaB activation and pro-apoptotic protein p53 induction are involved in gastric I/R injury. PDTC protects against gastric I/R injury by an antioxidant, NF-kappaB inhibition, and by reduction of pro

  9. Effects of gastric vagotomy on visceral cell proliferation induced by ventromedial hypothalamic lesions: role of vagal hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Kintaka, Yuri; Osaka, Toshimasa; Suzuki, Yoko; Hashiguchi, Takeo; Niijima, Akira; Kageyama, Haruaki; Fumiko, Takenoya; Shioda, Seiji; Inoue, Shuji

    2009-07-01

    In rats, ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) lesions induce cell proliferation in the visceral organs (stomach, small intestine, liver, and pancreas) due to hyperactivity of the vagus nerve. To investigate the effects of selective gastric vagotomy on VMH lesion-induced cell proliferation and secretion of gastric acid, we assessed the mitotic index (the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive cells per 1,000 cells in the gastric mucosal cell layer) and measured the volume of secreted basal gastric acid. Furthermore, to explore whether or not ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML) lead to ulcer formation in VMH-lesioned rats, we assessed the ulcer index of both sham-operated and VMH-lesioned rats after administration of ethanol. VMH lesions resulted in an increased mitotic index and thickness of the gastric mucosal cell layer and gave rise to the hypersecretion of gastric acid. Selective gastric vagotomy restored these parameters to normal without affecting cell proliferation in other visceral organs. Ethanol-induced AGML caused ulcers in sham VMH-lesioned rats, whereas VMH-lesioned rats were less likely to exhibit such ulcers. These results suggest that VMH lesion-induced vagally mediated cell proliferation in the visceral organs is associated with hyperfunction in these organs, and VMH lesion-induced resistance to ethanol may be due to thickening of the gastric mucosal cell layer resulting from cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa-this in turn is due to hyperactivity of the vagus nerve.

  10. Ammonia activates pacC and patulin accumulation in an acidic environment during apple colonization by Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Barad, Shiri; Espeso, Eduardo A; Sherman, Amir; Prusky, Dov

    2016-06-01

    Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of blue mould rot, causes severe post-harvest fruit maceration simultaneously with the secretion of d-gluconic acid (GLA) and the mycotoxin patulin in colonized tissue. The factor(s) inducing patulin biosynthesis during colonization of the host acidic environment is unclear. During the colonization of apple fruit in vivo and growth in culture, P. expansum secretes pH-modulating GLA and ammonia. Although patulin and its possible opportunistic precursor GLA accumulate together during fungal development, ammonia is detected on the colonized tissue's leading edge and after extended culture, close to patulin accumulation. Here, we demonstrate ammonia-induced transcript activation of the global pH modulator PacC and patulin accumulation in the presence of GLA by: (i) direct exogenous treatment of P. expansum growing on solid medium; (ii) direct exogenous treatment on colonized apple tissue; (iii) growth under self-ammonia production conditions with limited carbon; and (iv) analysis of the transcriptional response to ammonia of the patulin biosynthesis cluster. Ammonia induced patulin accumulation concurrently with the transcript activation of pacC and patulin biosynthesis cluster genes, indicating the regulatory effect of ammonia on pacC transcript expression under acidic conditions. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using P. expansum PacC and antibodies to the different cleaved proteins showed that PacC is not protected against proteolytic signalling at pH 4.5 relative to pH 7.0, but NH4 addition did not further enhance its proteolytic cleavage. Ammonia enhanced the activation of palF transcript in the Pal pathway under acidic conditions. Ammonia accumulation in the host environment by the pathogen under acidic pH may be a regulatory cue for pacC activation, towards the accumulation of secondary metabolites, such as patulin.

  11. Comparison of haloacetic acids in the environment of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Scott, B F; Spencer, C; Martin, J W; Barra, R; Bootsma, H A; Jones, K C; Johnston, A E; Muir, D C G

    2005-11-15

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are a family of compounds whose environmental concentrations have been extensively studied, primarily in Europe. Depending on the compound, their sources are believed to be both natural and anthropogenic. To better understand possible sources and contribute to the knowledge of the global distribution of these compounds, especially between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, samples of precipitation, soils, and conifer needles were collected from Canada, Malawi, Chile, and the U.K. Precipitation samples exhibited highest HAA concentrations in collections from Canada, and lowest in those from Malawi. Malawi samples contained measurable levels of monobromoacetic acid (MBA) (56 ng/ L) unlike those from most other locations (< 9 ng/L). Soil HAA concentration levels were highest in the U.K. (e.g., 7.3 ng/g average TCA) and lowest in Malawi (0.8 ng/g average TCA), with Chile having higher levels (4.8 ng/g average TCA) than Canada (3 ng/g average TCA). Malawi soils contained small amounts of MBA (2 ng/g), in common with the two most southern of the 11 Chilean sites. Analysis of soil cores (10-cm depth sliced at 1 cm) from sites in Malawi and Chile showed that trichloroacetic acid (TCA) generally declined with depth while mono- and dichloroacetic acid (MCA and DCA) showed no trend. MCA, DCA, and TCA concentrations in archived U.K. soil samples increased by factors of 2, 4, and 5-fold over 75 years while TFA showed no consistent trend. Monochloroacetic acid (MCA) was detected in pine needles collected from Malawi. U.K. needle samples had the highest concentrations of all chloroacetic acids (CAAs): MCA, 2-18 ng/g; dichloroacetic acid (DCA), 2-38 ng/g; and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), 28-190 ng/g. Conifer needles from Canada and Chile contained CAAs at levels ranging from < 2 to 16 ng/g wet wt. Trifluoroacetic acid concentrations generally declined with increasing elevation in the samples from the Rocky Mountains in western Canada. The results

  12. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael S.; Williamson, Katherine K.

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies. PMID:27092307

  13. Effect of Accessions and Environment Conditions on Coumarin, O-Coumaric and Kaurenoic Acids Levels of Mikania laevigata.

    PubMed

    Agostini-Costa, Tânia da Silveira; Gomes, Ismael Silva; Fonseca, Maira Christina Marques; Alonso, Araci Molnar; Pereira, Rita de Cassia Alves; Montanari Junior, Ilio; da Silva, Joseane Padilha; Pereira, Ana Maria Soares; da Silva, Dijalma Barbosa; Vieira, Roberto Fontes; Vaz, Ana Paula Artimonte

    2016-11-01

    Coumarin, o-coumaric, and kaurenoic acid are bioactive compounds usually found in the leaves of Mikania laevigata. Genetic and environmental variations in the secondary metabolites of plants may have implications for their biological effects. Three different accessions of M. laevigata cultivated in four sites between the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn in Brazil were evaluated aiming to present potential raw materials and discuss relationships among these three bioactive compounds. The results revealed effects of plant accessions and environmental factors and suggested two contrasting chemical phenotypes of M. laevigata. The first phenotype presented the highest levels of kaurenoic acid (2283 ± 316 mg/100 g) besides lower levels of coumarin (716 ± 61 mg/100 g), which was also stimulated by the environment and mild climate at the site nearest to the Tropic of Capricorn. The other phenotype presented the lowest levels of kaurenoic acid (137 ± 17 mg/100 g) besides higher levels of coumarin (1362 ± 108 mg/100 g), which was also stimulated by the environment and tropical climate at the site nearest to the Equatorial beach.

  14. Identification of gastric H,K-ATPase in an early vertebrate, the Atlantic stingray Dasyatis sabina.

    PubMed

    Smolka, A J; Lacy, E R; Luciano, L; Reale, E

    1994-10-01

    Virtually all vertebrates acidify their gastric contents to a pH between 0.8 and 2.0. In mammals, acid secretion is mediated by a K-stimulated proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase (H,K-ATPase), which establishes a million-fold gradient of protons across the apical membrane of the gastric parietal cell. The earliest phylogenetic appearance of gastric acid secretion is in cartilaginous fish, and we sought to verify in this class (Chondrichthyes) the presence and distribution of H,K-ATPase in gastric epithelial cells. An antibody against a synthetic peptide based on the C-terminus of pig H,K-ATPase alpha-subunit was localized in the gastric glands of the Atlantic stingray Dasyatis sabina. The C-terminal antibody stained all cells with tubulovesicles and the apical membrane domain of mucous neck cells. In proximal stomach, gastric glands showed the strongest immunoreactivity in cells close to the isthmus; in the distal stomach, strongest immunoreactivity was found in cells at the base of the glands. Oxyntic cells were more intensely immunoreactive than oxynticopeptic cells. This antibody labeled a single band of M(r) 100,600 on immunoblots of D. sabina gastric microsomes. These results show the earliest phylogenetic occurrence of a gastric ATPase in putative acid-secreting cells and suggest that this enzyme shares structural features with mammalian H,K-ATPase.

  15. Protective Effect of Liriodendrin Isolated from Kalopanax pictus against Gastric Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Yoon Ah; Hwang, Seon A; Lee, Sun Yi; Hwang, In Young; Kim, Sun Whoe; Kim, So Yeon; Moon, Aree; Lee, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Ho; Kang, Keum Jee; Jeong, Choon Sik

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the inhibitory activities on gastritis and gastric ulcer using liriodendrin which is a constituent isolated from Kalopanax pictus. To elucidate its abilities to prevent gastric injury, we measured the quantity of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as the protective factor, and we assessed inhibition of activities related to excessive gastric acid be notorious for aggressive factor and inhibition of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization known as a cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer. Liriodendrin exhibited higher PGE2 level than rebamipide used as a positive control group at the dose of 500 μM. It was also exhibited acid-neutralizing capacity (10.3%) and H+/K+-ATPase inhibition of 42.6% (500 μM). In pylorus-ligated rats, liriodendrin showed lower volume of gastric juice (4.38 ± 2.14 ml), slightly higher pH (1.53 ± 0.41), and smaller total acid output (0.47 ± 0.3 mEq/4 hrs) than the control group. Furthermore liriodendrin inhibited colonization of H. pylori effectively. In vivo test, liriodendrin significantly inhibited both of HCl/EtOH-induced gastritis (46.9 %) and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer (46.1%). From these results, we suggest that liriodendrin could be utilized for the treatment and/or protection of gastritis and gastric ulcer. PMID:25593644

  16. Protective Effect of Liriodendrin Isolated from Kalopanax pictus against Gastric Injury.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Yoon Ah; Hwang, Seon A; Lee, Sun Yi; Hwang, In Young; Kim, Sun Whoe; Kim, So Yeon; Moon, Aree; Lee, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Ho; Kang, Keum Jee; Jeong, Choon Sik

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the inhibitory activities on gastritis and gastric ulcer using liriodendrin which is a constituent isolated from Kalopanax pictus. To elucidate its abilities to prevent gastric injury, we measured the quantity of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as the protective factor, and we assessed inhibition of activities related to excessive gastric acid be notorious for aggressive factor and inhibition of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization known as a cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer. Liriodendrin exhibited higher PGE2 level than rebamipide used as a positive control group at the dose of 500 μM. It was also exhibited acid-neutralizing capacity (10.3%) and H(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibition of 42.6% (500 μM). In pylorus-ligated rats, liriodendrin showed lower volume of gastric juice (4.38 ± 2.14 ml), slightly higher pH (1.53 ± 0.41), and smaller total acid output (0.47 ± 0.3 mEq/4 hrs) than the control group. Furthermore liriodendrin inhibited colonization of H. pylori effectively. In vivo test, liriodendrin significantly inhibited both of HCl/EtOH-induced gastritis (46.9 %) and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer (46.1%). From these results, we suggest that liriodendrin could be utilized for the treatment and/or protection of gastritis and gastric ulcer.

  17. Mutual Exclusion of Urea and Trimethylamine N-Oxide from Amino Acids in Mixed Solvent Environment.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Pritam; Hajari, Timir; Shea, Joan-Emma; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2015-02-19

    We study the solvation of amino acids in pure-osmolyte and mixed-osmolyte urea and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) solutions using molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of Kirkwood-Buff integrals between the solution components provides evidence that in the mixed osmolytic solution, both urea and TMAO are mutually excluded from the amino acid surface, accompanied by an increase in osmolyte-osmolyte aggregation. Similar observations are made in simulations of a model protein backbone, represented by triglycine, and suggest that TMAO stabilizes proteins under urea denaturation conditions by effectively removing urea from the protein surface. The effects of the mixed osmolytes on the solvation of the amino acids and the backbone are found to be highly nonlinear in terms of the effects of the individual osmolytes and independent of differences in the strength of the TMAO-water interactions, as observed with different TMAO force fields.

  18. TESTING OF 304L STAINLESS STEEL IN NITRIC ACID ENVIRONMENTS WITH FLUORIDES AND CHLORIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2010-10-04

    Impure radioactive material processed in nitric acid solutions resulted in the presence of chlorides in a dissolver fabricated from 304L stainless steel. An experimental program was conducted to study the effects of chloride in nitric acid/fluoride solutions on the corrosion of 304L stainless steel. The test variables included temperature (80, 95, and 110 C) and the concentrations of nitric acid (6, 12, and 14 M), fluoride (0.01, 0.1, and 0.2 M) and chloride (100, 350, 1000, and 2000 ppm). The impact of welding was also investigated. Results showed that the chloride concentration alone was not a dominant variable affecting the corrosion, but rather the interaction of chloride with fluoride significantly affected corrosion.

  19. A New Green Ionic Liquid-Based Corrosion Inhibitor for Steel in Acidic Environments.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Ezzat, Abdel Rahman O

    2015-06-17

    This work examines the use of new hydrophobic ionic liquid derivatives, namely octadecylammonium tosylate (ODA-TS) and oleylammonium tosylate (OA-TS) for corrosion protection of steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Their chemical structures were determined from NMR analyses. The surface activity characteristics of the prepared ODA-TS and OA-TS were evaluated from conductance, surface tension and contact angle measurements. The data indicate the presence of a double bond in the chemical structure of OA-TS modified its surface activity parameters. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis and contact angle measurements were utilized to investigate the corrosion protection performance of ODA-TS and OA-TS on steel in acidic solution. The OA-TS and ODA-TS compounds showed good protection performance in acidic chloride solution due to formation of an inhibitive film on the steel surface.

  20. Gastric cancer and family history

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Identifying individuals at high risk is important for surveillance and prevention of gastric cancer. Having first-degree relatives diagnosed with gastric cancer is a strong and consistent risk factor for gastric cancer, but the pathogenic mechanisms behind this familial aggregation are unclear. Against this background, we reviewed the risk factors for gastric cancer in those with a first-degree relative with gastric cancer, and the possible causes for familial clustering of gastric cancer including bacterial factors, inherited genetic susceptibility, environmental factors or a combination thereof. Among individuals with a family history, current or past Helicobacter pylori infection, having two or more first-degree affected relatives or female gender was associated with an increased risk of developing gastric cancer. To date, no specific single nucleotide polymorphism has been shown to be associated with familial clustering of gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is the most important strategy for preventing gastric cancer in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients, particularly those in their 20s and 30s. Early H. pylori eradication could prevent the progression to intestinal metaplasia and reduce the synergistic effect on gastric carcinogenesis in individuals with both H. pylori infection and a family history. Endoscopic surveillance is also expected to benefit individuals with a family history. Further large-scale, prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and optimal time point for endoscopy in this population. Moreover, genome-wide association studies that incorporate environmental and dietary factors on a ‘big data’ basis will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. PMID:27809451

  1. Adsorption of Amino Acids and Peptides on Metal and Oxide Surfaces in Water Environment: A Synthetic and Prospective Review.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Savio, L; Pradier, C-M

    2016-07-28

    Amino acids and peptides are often used as "model" segments of proteins for studying their behavior in various types of environments, and/or elaborating functional surfaces. Indeed, though the protein behavior is much more complex than that of their isolated segments, knowledge of the binding mode as well as of the chemical structure of peptides on metal or oxide surfaces is a significant step toward the control of materials in a biological environment. Such knowledge has considerably increased in the past few years, thanks to the combination of advanced characterization techniques and of modeling methods. Investigations of biomolecule-surface interactions in water/solvent environments are quite numerous, but only in a few cases is it possible to reach an understanding of the molecule-(water)-surface interaction with a level of detail comparable to that of the UHV studies. This contribution aims at reviewing the recent data describing the amino acid and peptide interaction with metal or oxide surfaces in the presence of water.

  2. Comparative transcriptome analysis of Brucella melitensis in an acidic environment: Identification of the two-component response regulator involved in the acid resistance and virulence of Brucella.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianhong; Liu, Xingyu; Yan, Feng; He, Yuhua; Wei, Jie; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Lu; Sun, Youpeng

    2016-02-01

    Brucella melitensis, encounters a very stressful environment in phagosomes, especially low pH levels. So identifying the genes that contribute to the replication and survival within an acidic environment is critical in understanding the pathogenesis of the Brucella bacteria. In our research, comparative transcriptome with RNA-seq were used to analyze the changes of genes in normal-medium culture and in pH4.4-medium culture. The results reveal that 113 genes expressed with significant differences (|log2Ratio| ≥ 3); about 44% genes expressed as up-regulated. With GO term analysis, structural constituent of the ribosome, rRNA binding, structural molecule activity, and cation-transporting ATPase activity were significantly enriched (p-value ≤ 0.05). These genes distributed in 51 pathways, in which ribosome and photosynthesis pathways were significantly enriched. Six pathways (oxidative phosphorylation, iron-transporting, bacterial secretion system, transcriptional regulation, two-component system, and ABC transporters pathways) tightly related to the intracellular survival and virulence of Brucella were analyzed. A two-component response regulator gene in the transcriptional regulation pathway, identified through gene deletion and complementary technologies, played an important role in the resistance to the acid-resistance and virulence of Brucella.

  3. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE CHEMICAL STABILITY OF ARSENOSUGARS IN SIMULATED GASTRIC JUICE AND ACIDIC ENVIRONMENTS USING IC-ICP-MS AND IC-ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A more quantitative extraction of arsenic-containing compounds from seafood matrices is essential in developing better dietary exposure estimates. More quantitative extraction often implies a more chemically aggressive set of extraction conditions. However, these conditions may...

  4. Influence of thyroid states on stress gastric ulcer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Walker, C.H.; Mason, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that thyroid states may affect the acute development of gastric lesions induced by cold-resistant stress. Normal (euthyroid), hyperthyroid and hypothyroid rats were used. Gastric lesion incidence and severity was significantly increased in hypothyroid rats, whereas in contrast hyperthyroid rats developed significantly less gastric lesions. As anticipated, plasma levels of thyroxin (T/sub 4/) were significantly elevated in hyperthyroid rats, and undetectable in hypothyroid rats. Acute pretreatment with i.p. cimetidine, but not T/sub 4/ 1 h prior to stress completely prevented gastric lesions formation in hypothyroid rats. Finally, binding of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol to ..beta..-adrenergic receptors on brain membranes prepared from frontal cortex was reduced by 20% in hypothyroid rats after 3 h of stress. These and other data contained herein suggest that thyroid hormones contribute to modulate the responsiveness of the gastric mucosa to stress. The increase rate of ulcerogenesis observed in hypothyroid rats appears to be mediated by gastric acid secretion. The central mechanism for this response may involve decreased brain nonadrenergic receptor function.

  5. Inhibition of gastric secretion in guinea pig by relatively low dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Batzri, S.; Catravas, G.

    1988-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of a single dose of ionizing radiation on gastric secretion in awake guinea pigs equipped with a permanent gastric cannula. Changes in gastric secretion were measured using a dye dilution technique. Infusion of histamine increased acid and fluid output and there was a positive correlation (r = 0.93) between the two. Total body irradiation with 400 cGy, like cimetidine, suppressed acid and fluid secretion under basal conditions and during histamine stimulation by 50-90%. Recovery from the radiation damage was only partial after one week. Irradiation inhibited the rise in gastric juice volume during histamine stimulation and also reduced the normal gain in body weight of the guinea pig. These results demonstrate that ionizing radiations have an immediate and long lasting effects on the gastric mucosal function of the guinea pig.

  6. Secondary sulfate minerals associated with acid drainage in the eastern US: Recycling of metals and acidity in surficial environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Seal, R.R.; Meier, A.L.; Kornfeld, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    spells. Despite the relatively humid climate of the eastern United States, where precipitation typically exceeds evaporation, salts form intermittently in open areas, persist in protected areas when temperature and relative humidity are appropriate, and contribute to metal loadings and acidity in surface waters upon dissolution, thereby causing short-term perturbations in water quality.

  7. Studies on estrification and sulphonation of riboflavin in the environment of highly concentrated sulphuric acid.

    PubMed

    Pajak, Wojciech; Brzezińska, Elzbieta

    2003-01-01

    The article presents investigations of riboflavin reactions in aqueous solutions of sulphuric acid. Analysis of UV/VIS, 1H NMR spectra and TLC indicates that at the beginning of the reaction ester of riboflavin were obtained and then sulphonation reaction took place. From the analysis of UV/VIS spectra the kinetics of the reaction was calculated, using own computer program.

  8. Impaired gastric ulcer healing in diabetic mice: role of methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Naito, Y; Takagi, T; Oya-Ito, T; Okada, H; Suzuki, T; Hirata, I; Hirai, M; Uchiyama, K; Handa, O; Uchida, K; Yoshikawa, T

    2009-12-01

    Methylglyoxal is a reactive dicarbonyl compound produced from cellular glycolytic intermediates that reacts non-enzymatically with proteins to form products such as argpyrimidine at arginine residue. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of methylglyoxal in the delayed healing of gastric ulcer in diabetes, and to identify the methylglyoxal-modified proteins as a target molecule of this modification. Using male C57BL/6 mice, diabetes was induced by a single i.p. injection of streptozotocin and gastric ulcers were produced by the focal application of 40% of acetic acid to the serosal surface of the stomach. In order to evaluate the effect of OPB-9195, an inhibitor of methylglyoxal modification, on gastric ulcer healing, mice were given orally OPB-9195 (30 mg/kg) twice daily for 14 days, one week before and after the injection of streptozotocin. The area of gastric ulcer on day 7 was significantly increased in diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice, indicating delayed ulcer healing. This increase in ulcer area in diabetic mice was significantly reversed by the treatment with OPB-9195 without affecting blood glucose levels. Proteomics analysis showed the methylglyoxal-modification of peroxiredoxin 6 proteins in the diabetic gastric mucosa around gastric ulcer, and this modification was markedly inhibited by the treatment with OPB-9195. In conclusion, the present study suggests a link of increased methylglyoxal modification of proteins including peroxiredoxin 6 to the delayed gastric ulcer healing in diabetes, and also shows the therapeutic potential of the inhibitor of methylglyoxal modification for the treatment of diabetic gastric ulcers.

  9. Solid Loss of Carrots During Simulated Gastric Digestion.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanbin; Singh, R Paul

    2011-03-01

    The knowledge of solid loss kinetics of foods during digestion is crucial for understanding the factors that constrain the release of nutrients from the food matrix and their fate of digestion. The objective of this study was to investigate the solid loss of carrots during simulated gastric digestion as affected by pH, temperature, viscosity of gastric fluids, mechanical force present in stomach, and cooking. Cylindrical carrot samples were tested by static soaking method and using a model stomach system. The weight retention, moisture, and loss of dry mass were determined. The results indicated that acid hydrolysis is critical for an efficient mass transfer and carrot digestion. Internal resistance rather than external resistance is dominant in the transfer of soluble solids from carrot to gastric fluid. Increase in viscosity of gastric fluid by adding 0.5% gum (w/w) significantly increased the external resistance and decreased mass transfer rate of carrots in static soaking. When mechanical force was not present, 61% of the solids in the raw carrot samples were released into gastric fluid after 4 h of static soaking in simulated gastric juice. Mechanical force significantly increased solid loss by causing surface erosion. Boiling increased the disintegration of carrot during digestion that may favor the loss of solids meanwhile reducing the amount of solids available for loss in gastric juice. Weibull function was successfully used to describe the solid loss of carrot during simulated digestion. The effective diffusion coefficients of solids were calculated using the Fick's second law of diffusion for an infinite cylinder, which are between 0.75 × 10(-11) and 8.72 × 10(-11) m(2)/s, depending on the pH of the gastric fluid.

  10. Structural resistance of chemically modified 1-D nanostructured titanates in inorganic acid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Fredholm, Yann C.; Morgado, Edisson

    2010-10-15

    Sodium containing one-dimensional nanostructured layered titanates (1-D NSLT) were produced both from commercial anatase powder and Brazilian natural rutile mineral sands by alkali hydrothermal process. The 1-D NSLT were chemically modified with proton, cobalt or iron via ionic exchange and all products were additionally submitted to intensive inorganic acid aging (pH = 0.5) for 28 days. The morphology and crystal structure transformations of chemically modified 1-D NSLT were followed by transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was found that the original sodium rich 1-D NSLT and cobalt substituted 1-D NSLT were completely converted to rutile nanoparticles, while the protonated form was transformed in a 70%-30% (by weight) anatase-rutile nanoparticles mixture, very similar to that of the well-known TiO{sub 2}-photocatalyst P25 (Degussa). The iron substituted 1-D NSLT presented better acid resistance as 13% of the original structure and morphology remained, the rest being converted in rutile. A significant amount of remaining 1-D NSLT was also observed after the acid treatment of the product obtained from rutile sand. The results showed that phase transformation of NSLT into titanium dioxide polymorph in inorganic acid conditions were controllable by varying the exchanged cations. Finally, the possibility to transform, through acid aging, 1-D NSLT obtained from Brazilian natural rutile sand into TiO{sub 2}-polymorphs was demonstrated for the first time to the best of authors' knowledge, opening path for producing TiO{sub 2}-nanoproducts with different morphologies through a simple process and from a low cost precursor.

  11. Molecular biology of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, A; Rodríguez Braun, E; Pérez Fidalgo, A; Chirivella González, I

    2007-04-01

    Despite its decreasing incidence overall, gastric cancer is still a challenging disease. Therapy is based mainly upon surgical resection when the tumour remains localised in the stomach. Conventional chemotherapy may play a role in treating micrometastatic disease and is effective as palliative therapy for recurrent or advanced disease. However, the knowledge of molecular pathways implicated in gastric cancer pathogenesis is still in its infancy and the contribution of molecular biology to the development of new targeted therapies in gastric cancer is far behind other more common cancers such as breast, colon or lung. This review will focus first on the difference of two well defined types of gastric cancer: intestinal and diffuse. A discussion of the cell of origin of gastric cancer with some intriguing data implicating bone marrow derived cells will follow, and a comprehensive review of different genetic alterations detected in gastric cancer, underlining those that may have clinical, therapeutic or prognostic implications.

  12. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  13. Effect of Acidic Environment on the Push-Out Bond Strength of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sobhnamayan, Fereshte; Sahebi, Safoora; Naderi, Misagh; Shojaee, Nooshin Sadat; Shanbezadeh, Najmeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This laboratory study was performed to evaluate the effect of different acidic pH values on the push-out bond strength of calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight root dentin slices were obtained from freshly extracted single rooted human teeth and their lumen were instrumented to achieve a diameter of 1.3 mm. Then, CEM cement was mixed according to manufacturers’ instruction and placed in the lumens with minimal pressure. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n=12) which were wrapped in pieces of gauze soaked in either synthetic tissue fluid (STF) (pH=7.4) or butyric acid which was buffered at pH values of 4.4, 5.4 and 6.4. They were then incubated for 4 days at 37°C. The push-out test was performed by means of the universal testing machine. Specimens were then examined under a digital light microscope at 20× magnification to determine the nature of the bond failure. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test for pairwise comparisons. Results: The highest push-out bond strength (10.19±4.39) was seen in the pH level of 6.4, which was significantly different from the other groups (P<0.05). The values decreased to 2.42±2.25 MPa after exposure to pH value of 4.4. Conclusion: Lower pH value of highly acidic environments (pH=4.4), adversely affects the force needed for displacement of CEM cement; while in higher pH values (pH=6.4) the bond-strength was not affected. CEM cement is recommended in clinical situations where exposure to acidic environment is unavoidable. PMID:25386207

  14. Detection of trace amino acid biomarkers in ice from extreme environments with the Mars Organic Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayarajah, Christine; Jayarajah, Christine; Botta, Oliver; Aubrey, Andrew; Parker, Eric; Bada, Jeffrey; Mathies, Richard

    A portable microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) system named the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA) has been developed to analyze fluorescently-labeled biomarkers including amino acids, amines, nucleobases, and amino sugars with the goal of life detection on Mars (1,2). This system consists of a multilayer microfabricated glass wafer containing electrophoresis channels as well as microfluidic valves and pumps for sample manipulation, a confocal laser excitation and fluorescence detection system, and integrated CE power supplies. The MOA has been successfully field tested in the Panoche Valley, CA and in the Atacama Desert, Chile, detecting amino acids at the ppb levels (3). In addition, this technology has been shown to be effective in screening the formation of biogenic amines during fermentation (4). The MOA is a part of the Urey instrument package that has been selected for the 2013 European ExoMars mission by ESA. The identification of recent gully erosion sites, observations of ice on and beneath the surface of Mars, and the discovery of large reservoirs of sub-surface ice on Mars point to water-ice as an important target for astrobiological analyses (5). In addition, the ice moons Europa and Enceladus are of astrobiological interest due to the possibility that they may contain liquid water under their ice crusts. Consequently, we explore here the use of the MOA instrument for the analysis of amino acids in polar ice samples. Soil extracts as well as concentrated icecore samples tend to be highly saline and inhomogeneous. Furthermore, brine pockets in ice form potential refugia for extant extra-terrestrial life, rendering near surface ice a key target for the search for a record of past life on the planet (6). Therefore, we have determined the effect of salinity on sample injection parameters in ice-core samples retrieved from Greenland. The amino acids valine, alanine/serine, glycine, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid were found in the parts

  15. NMDA Receptors of Gastric-Projecting Neurons in the Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus Mediate the Regulation of Gastric Emptying by EA at Weishu (BL21).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Cheng, Bin; Jing, Xianghong; Qiao, Yongfa; Gao, Xinyan; Yu, Huijuan; Zhu, Bing; Qiao, Haifa

    2012-01-01

    A large number of studies have been conducted to explore the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility. While several lines of evidence addressed the basic mechanism of EA on gastrointestinal motility regarding effects of limb and abdomen points, the mechanism for effects of the back points on gastric motility still remains unclear. Here we report that the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist kynurenic acid inhibited the gastric emptying increase induced by high-intensity EA at BL21 and agonist NMDA enhanced the effect of the same treatment. EA at BL21 enhanced NMDAR, but not AMPA receptor (AMPAR) component of miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) in gastric-projecting neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). In sum, our data demonstrate an important role of NMDAR-mediated synaptic transmission of gastric-projecting DMV neurons in mediating EA at BL21-induced enhancement of gastric emptying.

  16. Investigation of the influence of gastric acid on the surface roughness of ceramic materials of metal-ceramic restorations. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Matsou, Eirini; Vouroutzis, Nikolaos; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M; Koidis, Petros

    2011-01-01

    The rehabilitation of eroded teeth in patients suffering from bulimia nervosa generally includes ceramics. This study compared the roughness of three ceramics before and after exposure to simulated vomit solution (SVS) with a pH of 3.8. Surface roughness parameters Ra, RMS, and AH were calculated using atomic force microscopy before and after exposure to SVS (novel peristaltic pump for 24 hours at 37°C) and were analyzed statistically. Apart from the initial high AH values of the glass-ceramic, none of the parameters evaluated were statistically significantly different after acid exposure. Under the limitations of this in vitro study, the investigated ceramics seem suitable for use in bulimia nervosa patients.

  17. Rett syndrome and gastric perforation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Malay B; Bittner, James G; Edwards, Michael A

    2008-04-01

    Rett Syndrome is associated with decreased peristaltic esophageal waves and gastric dysmotility, resulting in swallowing difficulties and gastric dilation. Rarely, gastric necrosis and perforation occur. Our case represents the third reported case of gastric necrosis and perforation associated with Rett Syndrome. A 31-year-old female after 11 hours of intermittent emesis and constant, sharp abdominal pain presented with evidence of multiorgan system failure including hypovolemic shock, metabolic acidosis, coagulopathy, and hepatorenal failure. A chest radiograph revealed intra-abdominal free air necessitating emergent laparotomy. During exploration, a severely dilated, thin-walled stomach with an area of necrosis and gross perforation was noted. Wedge resection of the necrotic tissue and primary closure were performed. Despite aggressive perioperative resuscitation and ventilation support, the patient died 3 hours postoperatively secondary to refractory shock and hypoxemia. Severe gastric dilation can occur with Rett Syndrome and may cause gastric necrosis and perforation. Prolonged elevated gastric pressures can decrease perfusion and may contribute to perforation. Timely decompression via percutaneous endoscopic or surgical gastrostomy could decrease the risk of perforation particularly when significant gastric distention is present. Consideration of gastric necrosis and perforation in patients with Rett Syndrome may lead to earlier intervention and decreased mortality.

  18. Gastric mucosal hyperplasia via upregulation of gastrin induced by persistent activation of gastric innate immunity in major histocompatibility complex class II deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, T; Nishio, A; Okazaki, K; Uza, N; Ueno, S; Kido, M; Inoue, S; Kitamura, H; Kiriya, K; Ohashi, S; Asada, M; Tamaki, H; Matsuura, M; Kawasaki, K; Suzuki, K; Uchida, K; Fukui, H; Nakase, H; Watanabe, N; Chiba, T

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim Major histocompatibility complex class II deficient (Aα0/0) mice have decreased CD4+ T cells, making them immunologically similar to patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Both patients with AIDS and Aα0/0 mice have hypertrophic gastric folds. To clarify the mechanism of gastric mucosal hyperplasia, we investigated the pathophysiology and the role of the innate immunity in the stomach of Aα0/0 mice. Methods Stomachs from 1–6 month old Aα0/0 mice, kept under specific pathogen free conditions, were examined at 1 month intervals histologically and immunohistochemically. Gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, Toll‐like receptors (TLRs), cyclooxygenase (COX)‐2, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the gastric mucosa was investigated. Serum gastrin levels and gastric acidity were measured. Bacterial culture of the stomach was performed. To clarify the roles of hypergastrinaemia in the gastric mucosa, a gastrin receptor antagonist (AG041R) was administered. Results Aα0/0 mice had a diffusely thick corpus mucosa with infiltration of CD11b+ granulocytes and macrophages. Anti‐Ki67 staining demonstrated expansion of the proliferating neck zone. Gene expression of interleukin 1β, interferon γ, TLR‐2, TLR‐4, and COX‐2 were upregulated, and MPO activity was increased. Only a small amount of non‐pathogenic bacteria was detected in the stomach. Serum gastrin levels and Reg‐Iα positive cells in the gastric mucosa increased, despite normal gastric acidity. After treatment with AG041R, gastric mucosal thickness was significantly reduced. Conclusion Persistent activation of innate immunity in the stomach induced gastric mucosal hyperplasia through upregulation of gastrin synthesis in Aα0/0 mice, suggesting a pathophysiology similar to the gastric changes in patients with AIDS. PMID:16322110

  19. The role of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Alén, Begoña O; Leal-López, Saúl; Alén, María Otero; Viaño, Patricia; García-Castro, Victoria; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Beiras, Andrés; Casanueva, Felipe F; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Camiña, Jesús P; Pazos, Yolanda

    2016-02-02

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, and the GPR39 receptor were reported to be involved in the control of mitogenesis of gastric cancer cell lines; however, the relationship between the obestatin/GPR39 system and gastric cancer progression remains unknown. In the present study, we determined the expression levels of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas and explored their potential functional roles. Twenty-eight patients with gastric adenocarcinomas were retrospectively studied, and clinical data were obtained. The role of obestatin/GPR39 in gastric cancer progression was studied in vitro using the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Obestatin exogenous administration in these GPR39-bearing cells deregulated the expression of several hallmarks of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, obestatin signaling promoted phenotypic changes via GPR39, increasingly impacting on the cell morphology, proliferation, migration and invasion of these cells. In healthy human stomachs, obestatin expression was observed in the neuroendocrine cells and GPR39 expression was localized mainly in the chief cells of the oxyntic glands. In human gastric adenocarcinomas, no obestatin expression was found; however, an aberrant pattern of GPR39 expression was discovered, correlating to the dedifferentiation of the tumor. Altogether, our data strongly suggest the involvement of the obestatin/GPR39 system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of human gastric adenocarcinomas and highlight the potential usefulness of GPR39 as a prognostic marker in gastric cancer.

  20. The role of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Alén, Begoña O.; Leal-López, Saúl; Alén, María Otero; Viaño, Patricia; García-Castro, Victoria; Mosteiro, Carlos S.; Beiras, Andrés; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Camiña, Jesús P.; Pazos, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, and the GPR39 receptor were reported to be involved in the control of mitogenesis of gastric cancer cell lines; however, the relationship between the obestatin/GPR39 system and gastric cancer progression remains unknown. In the present study, we determined the expression levels of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas and explored their potential functional roles. Twenty-eight patients with gastric adenocarcinomas were retrospectively studied, and clinical data were obtained. The role of obestatin/GPR39 in gastric cancer progression was studied in vitro using the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Obestatin exogenous administration in these GPR39-bearing cells deregulated the expression of several hallmarks of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, obestatin signaling promoted phenotypic changes via GPR39, increasingly impacting on the cell morphology, proliferation, migration and invasion of these cells. In healthy human stomachs, obestatin expression was observed in the neuroendocrine cells and GPR39 expression was localized mainly in the chief cells of the oxyntic glands. In human gastric adenocarcinomas, no obestatin expression was found; however, an aberrant pattern of GPR39 expression was discovered, correlating to the dedifferentiation of the tumor. Altogether, our data strongly suggest the involvement of the obestatin/GPR39 system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of human gastric adenocarcinomas and highlight the potential usefulness of GPR39 as a prognostic marker in gastric cancer. PMID:26716511

  1. The human gastric microbiota: Is it time to rethink the pathogenesis of stomach diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Compare, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although long thought to be a sterile organ, due to its acid production, the human stomach holds a core microbiome. Aim To provide an update of findings related to gastric microbiota and its link with gastric diseases. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the literature. Results The development of culture-independent methods facilitated the identification of many bacteria. Five major phyla have been detected in the stomach: Firmicutes, Bacteroidites, Actinobacteria, Fusobacteria and Proteobacteria. At the genera level, the healthy human stomach is dominated by Prevotella, Streptococcus, Veillonella, Rothia and Haemophilus; however, the composition of the gastric microbiota is dynamic and affected by such factors as diet, drugs and diseases. The interaction between the pre-existing gastric microbiota and Helicobacter pylori infection might influence an individual’s risk of gastric disease, including gastric cancer. Conclusions The maintenance of bacterial homeostasis could be essential for the stomach’s health and highlights the chance for therapeutic interventions targeting the gastric microbiota, even if gastric pH, peristalsis and the mucus layer may prevent bacteria colonization; and the definition of gastric microbiota of the healthy stomach is still an ongoing challenging task. PMID:26137299

  2. Serum n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and psychological distress in early pregnancy: Adjunct Study of Japan Environment and Children's Study.

    PubMed

    Hamazaki, K; Harauma, A; Otaka, Y; Moriguchi, T; Inadera, H

    2016-02-16

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially long-chain types such as docosahexaenoic acid, are important nutrients in pregnancy, but the relationship between n-3 PUFA levels and perinatal and postnatal depression remains controversial. This study examined the possible relationship between serum n-3 PUFA levels and psychological distress among expectant mothers in early pregnancy. Data and specimen samples were obtained in a birth cohort study started at Toyama Regional Center in July 2012 as an adjunct study of the Japan Environment and Children's Study. Blood samples were collected at 9-14 weeks' gestation (75% of samples) or after 15 weeks (25%). Subjects with a Kessler Psychological Distress Scale score (K6) ⩾ 9 were assigned to the psychological distress group (n=283). The control group (n=283) was matched for age, educational level and family income. Fatty acid composition was determined from serum samples by gas chromatography. Associations between fatty acid levels and incident psychological distress were evaluated by logistic regression. After adjusting for possible confounders, eicosapentaenoic acid showed an inverse association with risk of psychological distress, with an odds ratio of 0.47 (95% confidence interval: 0.30, 0.73) for the highest tertile. This inverse association remained even after applying a higher cutoff score (K6 ⩾ 13) indicating severe psychological distress (74 pairs). We believe this is the first study to reveal the associations between serum n-3 PUFAs and risk of psychological distress in early pregnancy. Further research is required to verify the causality of these associations.

  3. Serum n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and psychological distress in early pregnancy: Adjunct Study of Japan Environment and Children's Study

    PubMed Central

    Hamazaki, K; Harauma, A; Otaka, Y; Moriguchi, T; Inadera, H

    2016-01-01

    N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially long-chain types such as docosahexaenoic acid, are important nutrients in pregnancy, but the relationship between n-3 PUFA levels and perinatal and postnatal depression remains controversial. This study examined the possible relationship between serum n-3 PUFA levels and psychological distress among expectant mothers in early pregnancy. Data and specimen samples were obtained in a birth cohort study started at Toyama Regional Center in July 2012 as an adjunct study of the Japan Environment and Children's Study. Blood samples were collected at 9–14 weeks' gestation (75% of samples) or after 15 weeks (25%). Subjects with a Kessler Psychological Distress Scale score (K6) ⩾9 were assigned to the psychological distress group (n=283). The control group (n=283) was matched for age, educational level and family income. Fatty acid composition was determined from serum samples by gas chromatography. Associations between fatty acid levels and incident psychological distress were evaluated by logistic regression. After adjusting for possible confounders, eicosapentaenoic acid showed an inverse association with risk of psychological distress, with an odds ratio of 0.47 (95% confidence interval: 0.30, 0.73) for the highest tertile. This inverse association remained even after applying a higher cutoff score (K6 ⩾13) indicating severe psychological distress (74 pairs). We believe this is the first study to reveal the associations between serum n-3 PUFAs and risk of psychological distress in early pregnancy. Further research is required to verify the causality of these associations. PMID:26882037

  4. Inhibition of gastric H,K-ATPase activity and gastric epithelial cell IL-8 secretion by the pyrrolizine derivative ML 3000

    PubMed Central

    Smolka, Adam J; Goldenring, James R; Gupta, Sandeep; Hammond, Charles E

    2004-01-01

    Background ML 3000 ([2,2-dimethyl-6-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolizine-5-yl]-acetic acid) is an inhibitor of both cyclooxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase in vitro, and shows promise as a novel non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Unlike conventional NSAIDs which are associated with gastric ulcerogenic effects, ML 3000 causes little or no damage to the gastric mucosa, even though it significantly depresses gastric prostaglandin synthesis. Methods As part of an effort to clarify mechanisms underlying the gastric sparing properties of ML 3000, we studied the effects of ML 3000 on H,K-ATPase activity in vitro, on acid accumulation in isolated gastric parietal cells, and on IL-8 secretion by gastric epithelial cells in culture. Results SCH28080-sensitive H,K-ATPase activity in highly-purified pig gastric microsomes was dose-dependently inhibited by ML 3000 (IC50 = 16.4 μM). Inhibition was reversible, and insensitive to ML 3000 acidification in the pH range 2.0–8.0. In rabbit gastric parietal cells, ML 3000 dose-dependently inhibited histamine-stimulated acid accumulation (IC50 = 40 μM) and forskolin-stimulated acid accumulation (IC50 = 45 μM). Lastly, in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, ML 3000 dose-dependently inhibited both baseline and IL-1β-stimulated (20 ng/ml) IL-8 secretion with IC50s of 0.46 μM and 1.1 μM respectively. Conclusion The data indicate that ML 3000 affects acid-secretory mechanisms downstream of cAMP mobilization induced by histamine H2 receptor activation, that it directly inhibits H,K-ATPase specific activity, and that baseline gastric epithelial cell IL-8 secretory inhibition may be mediated by ML 3000 inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase activity. We conclude that these gastric function inhibitory data may underlie the gastric sparing properties of ML 3000. PMID:15028114

  5. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide against cold restraint stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Aboubakr, Esam M; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Hassan, Magdy K

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous mediator plays a potential role in modulating gastric inflammatory responses. However, its putative protective role remains to be defined. The present study aimed to evaluate role of the exogenously released and endogenously synthesized H2S in cold restraint stress (CRS)-induced oxidative gastric damage in rats. Rats were restrained, and maintained at 4 °C for 3 h. The H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (60 μmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) before CRS. Our results revealed that NaHS pretreatment significantly attenuated ulcer index, free and total acid output, and pepsin activity in gastric juice along with decreased gastric mucosal carbonyl content and reactive oxygen species production. This was accompanied by increased gastric juice pH and mucin concentration in addition to restoring the deficits in the gastric reduced glutathione, catalase as well as superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. NaHS pretreatment markedly reduced the serum level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase activity compared to CRS-non-treated. Moreover, NaHS preadministration significantly abrogated the inflammatory and the deleterious responses of gastric mucosa in CRS. The protective effects of H2S were confirmed by gastric histopathological examination. However, pretreatment with the H2S-synthesizing enzyme, cystathionine-gamma-lyase inhibitor, beta-cyano-L-alanine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the gastroprotection afforded by the endogenous H2S. Collectively, our results suggest that H2S can protect rat gastric mucosa against CRS-induced gastric ulceration possibly through mechanisms that involve anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions alongside enhancement of gastric mucosal barrier and reduction in acid secretory parameters.

  6. Insights from the Metagenome of an Acid Salt Lake: The Role of Biology in an Extreme Depositional Environment