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Sample records for acidic gastric environment

  1. Effect of gastric acid suppressants on human gastric motility

    PubMed Central

    Parkman, H; Urbain, J; Knight, L; Brown, K; Trate, D; Miller, M; Maurer, A; Fisher, R

    1998-01-01

    Background—The effect of histamine H2 receptor antagonists on gastric emptying is controversial. 
Aims—To determine the effects of ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole on gastric motility and emptying. 
Patients and methods—Fifteen normal subjects underwent simultaneous antroduodenal manometry, electrogastrography (EGG), and gastric emptying with dynamic antral scintigraphy (DAS). After 30 minutes of fasting manometry and EGG recording, subjects received either intravenous saline, ranitidine, or famotidine, followed by another 30 minutes recording and then three hours of postprandial recording after ingestion of a radiolabelled meal. Images were obtained every 10-15 minutes for three hours to measure gastric emptying and assess antral contractility. Similar testing was performed after omeprazole 20 mg daily for one week. 
Results—Fasting antral phase III migrating motor complexes (MMCs) were more common after ranitidine (9/15 subjects, 60%), famotidine (12/15, 80%), and omeprazole (8/12, 67%) compared with placebo (4/14, 29%; p<0.05). Postprandially, ranitidine, famotidine, and omeprazole slowed gastric emptying, increased the amplitude of DAS contractions, increased the EGG power, and increased the antral manometric motility index. 
Conclusions—Suppression of gastric acid secretion with therapeutic doses of gastric acid suppressants is associated with delayed gastric emptying but increased antral motility. 

 Keywords: gastric motility; gastric emptying; histamine H2 receptor antagonists; proton pump inhibitors; gastric acid secretion; scintigraphy PMID:9536950

  2. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intended to measure the acidity of gastric fluid. Measurements of gastric acidity are used in the diagnosis...-secreting tumor of the pancreas), and related gastric disorders. (b) Classification. Class I...

  3. Circadian reduction of chromium in the gastric environment.

    PubMed

    De Flora, S; Badolati, G S; Serra, D; Picciotto, A; Magnolia, M R; Savarino, V

    1987-11-01

    Samples of gastric juice from variously treated subjects efficiently reduced hexavalent chromium and decreased its mutagenicity. Chromium reduction was due to thermostable components of gastric secretions and was favoured by the acidity of the intragastric environment. The circadian monitoring of pH and of chromium reduction, as assessed by colorimetric analysis at hourly intervals, showed a basal activity (less than 10 micrograms/ml gastric juice) during the night and interdigestive periods, and peaks (tens of micrograms/ml) during the 3-4-h periods after each meal. Assays in the Ames reversion test confirmed that the decrease in mutagenicity of sodium dichromate produced by gastric juice was significantly enhanced after meals. This physiological mechanism is expected to provide an important protective barrier against the oral toxicity of this metal, and may explain its lack of oral carcinogenicity.

  4. Polyamines are Inhibitors of Gastric Acid Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Tushar K.; Nandi, Jyotirmoy; Pidhorodeckyj, Nykolai; Meng-Ai, Zhou

    1982-03-01

    The naturally occurring organic polycations such as spermine and spermidine inhibit histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion by bullfrog gastric mucosa in vitro; spermine is much more potent than spermidine. Unlike the H2 receptor antagonists, the polyamines are completely ineffective from the nutrient side and are effective only from the secretory side of the chambered mucosa. The polyamine effects could be reversed by increasing K+ concentration in the secretory solution. Studies with isolated gastric microsomal vesicles demonstrate that the polyamines do not inhibit the gastric H+,K+-ATPase but greatly decrease the ATPase-mediated uptake of H+ under appropriate conditions. For the latter effects the presence of polyamine within the vesicle interior was found to be essential. Our data strongly suggest an uncoupling of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase system by the polyamines. The therapeutic potential of these and similar compounds in the treatment of hyperacidity and peptic ulcer is discussed.

  5. Effects of phenylalaninol on centrally induced gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, H; Miyamae, T; Morikawa, T; Hagiwara, M

    1992-11-01

    The effects of phenylalaninol (D-isomer) on gastric acid secretion and gastric ulcer were studied in rats. The compound reduced the gastric acid secretion stimulated by intracisternal thyrotropin releasing hormone and intravenous 2-deoxy-D-glucose, but not that stimulated by subcutaneous carbachol or histamine. Phenylalaninol prevented stress- and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers. We conclude that phenylalaninol inhibits ulcer formation mainly by central inhibition of gastric acid secretion. PMID:1477931

  6. Helicobacter pylori modulation of gastric acid.

    PubMed Central

    Calam, J.

    1999-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori plays major causative roles in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Elevated acid secretion in patients with duodenal ulcers (DUs) contributes to duodenal injury, and diminished acid secretion in patients with gastric cancer allows carcinogen-producing bacteria to colonize the stomach. Eradication of H. pylori normalizes acid secretion both in hyper-secreting DU patients and hypo-secreting relatives of gastric cancer patients. Therefore, we and others have asked how H. pylori causes these disparate changes in acid secretion. H. pylori gastritis more or less restricted to the gastric antrum in DU patients is associated with increased acid secretion. This is probably because gastritis increases release of the antral acid-stimulating hormone gastrin and diminished mucosal expression of the inhibitory peptide somatostatin. Bacterial products and inflammatory cytokines including TNFalpha may cause these changes in endocrine function. Gastritis involving the gastric corpus tends to diminish acid secretion, probably because bacterial products and cytokines including IL-1 inhibit parietal cells. Pharmacological inhibition of acid secretion increases corpus gastritis in H. pylori-infected subjects, so it is envisaged that gastric hypo-secretion of any cause might become self-perpetuating. H. pylori-associated mucosal atrophy will also contribute to acid hypo-secretion and is more likely in when the diet is high in salt or lacking in antioxidant vitamins. Data on gastric acid secretion in patients with esophagitis are limited but suggest that acid secretion is normal or slightly diminished. Nevertheless, H. pylori infection may be relevant to the management of esophagitis because: (i) H. pylori infection increases the pH-elevating effect of acid inhibiting drugs; (ii) proton pump inhibitors may increase the tendency of H. pylori to cause atrophic gastritis; and (iii) successful eradication of H. pylori is reported to increase the likelihood of

  7. An investigation of the chemical stability of arsenosugars in simulated gastric juice and acidic environments using IC-ICP-MS and IC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Bryan M; Gallagher, Patricia A; Shoemaker, Jody A; Wei, Xinyi; Schwegel, Carol A; Creed, John T

    2002-06-01

    A more quantitative extraction of arsenic-containing compounds from seafood matrices is essential in developing better dietary exposure estimates. More quantitative extraction often implies a more chemically aggressive set of extraction conditions. However, these conditions may result in undesirable chemical changes in the native arsenicals which may further complicate the toxicological risk assessment. This balance between quantitative extraction and species-specific integrity may be best addressed by using simulated gastric juice as an extraction solvent to mimic 'bioavailability'. This, conceptually, should extract the bioavailable fraction and induce any chemical changes that would occur because of ingestion. The most chemically labile species associated with seafood are thought to be the arsenosugars and for this reason their chemical stability is investigated in this study. Four arsenosugars (3-[5'-deoxy-5'-(dimethylarsinoyl)-beta-ribofuranosyloxy]-2-hydroxypropylene glycol, As(328); 3-[5'-deoxy-5'-(dimethylarsinoyl)-beta-ribofuranosyloxy]-2-hydroxypropanesulfonic acid, As(392); 3-[5'-deoxy-5'-(dimethylarsinoyl)-beta-ribofuranosyloxyl-2-hydroxypropyl hydrogen sulfate, As(408); and 3-[5'-deoxy-5'-(dimethylarsinoyl)-beta-ribofuranosyloxy]-2-hydroxypropyl-2,3-hydroxypropyl phosphate, As(482)) were isolated from seaweed extracts and subjected to simulated gastric juice and acidic conditions which mimic the stomach's pH of 1.1. Three acid solutions were used to test the chemical stability of the arsenosugars: simulated gastric juice, 78 mM nitric acid and 78 mM hydrochloric acid. The composition of the solutions was monitored over time (up to 48 h) using IC-ICP-MS for detection. The arsenosugars were found to degrade at the rate of 1.4% per h at 38 degrees C and 12.2% per h at 60 degrees C. The plots of percent conversion versus time were found to be independent of the starting arsenosugar and all had r2 values of greater than 0.97. A single common degradation

  8. A model study of the regulation of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Van Duijn, B; Ypey, D L; de Goede, J; Verveen, A A; Hekkens, W

    1989-07-01

    A computer simulation model is presented of the gastric phase regulation of gastric acid secretion in humans. The model is based on experimental data from the literature and includes terms representing gastric pH and gastric volume-dependent gastrin secretion, gastrin-dependent acid secretion, food storage in the stomach, and gastric emptying. We have explored the predictive value of the model in assessing the relative importance of gastric pH-dependent and gastric volume-dependent acid secretion mechanisms under various conditions. Similarly we have studied the role of gastric acid deregulation in achlorhydria, the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and duodenal ulcer, and the influence of the antacid drugs cimetidine and ranitidine under duodenal ulcer conditions. Model analysis of normal gastric acid regulation suggests that gastric volume-controlled acid secretion is of major importance during eating and predicts that pH-dependent gastrin secretion is of major importance in preventing excessively low pH levels between meals and during the night.

  9. Helicobacter pylori and gastric acid: an intimate and reciprocal relationship

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, Helge L.; Kleveland, Per M.; Sørdal, Øystein F.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is the main cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. There are still unanswered questions related to the interaction between Hp and man, like what determines the susceptibility for the initial infection and the mechanisms for the carcinogenic effect. The initial infection seems to require a temporal gastric hypoacidity. For Hp to survive in the gastric mucous layer, some acidity is necessary. Hp itself is probably not directly carcinogenic. Only when inducing oxyntic mucosal inflammation and atrophy with hypoacidity, Hp predisposes for gastric cancer. Gastrin most likely plays a central role in the Hp pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer. PMID:27803738

  10. Helicobacter pylori impedes acid-induced tightening of gastric epithelial junctions

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Vagin, Olga; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Sachs, George

    2013-01-01

    Gastric infection by Helicobacter pylori is the most common cause of ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The mechanism of progression from gastritis and inflammation to ulcers and cancer in a fraction of those infected is not definitively known. Significant acidity is unique to the gastric environment and is required for ulcer development. The interplay between gastric acidity and H. pylori pathogenesis is important in progression to advanced disease. The aim of this study was to characterize the impact of acid on gastric epithelial integrity and cytokine release and how H. pylori infection alters these responses. Human gastric epithelial (HGE-20) cells were grown on porous inserts, and survival, barrier function, and cytokine release were studied at various apical pH levels in the presence and absence of H. pylori. With apical acidity, gastric epithelial cells demonstrate increased barrier function, as evidenced by increased transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and decreased paracellular permeability. This effect is reduced in the presence of wild-type, but not urease knockout, H. pylori. The epithelial inflammatory response is also modulated by acidity and H. pylori infection. Without H. pylori, epithelial IL-8 release decreases in acid, while IL-6 release increases. In the presence of H. pylori, acidic pH diminishes the magnitude of the previously reported increase in IL-8 and IL-6 release. H. pylori interferes with the gastric epithelial response to acid, contributing to altered barrier function and inflammatory response. H. pylori diminishes acid-induced tightening of cell junctions in a urease-dependent manner, suggesting that local pH elevation promotes barrier compromise and progression to mucosal damage. PMID:23989011

  11. Ghrelin stimulates gastric emptying but is without effect on acid secretion and gastric endocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Dornonville de la Cour, Charlotta; Lindström, Erik; Norlén, Per; Håkanson, Rolf

    2004-08-15

    Ghrelin, a recently discovered peptide hormone, is produced by endocrine cells in the stomach, the so-called A-like cells. Ghrelin binds to the growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor and releases GH. It is claimed to be orexigenic and to control gastric acid secretion and gastric motility. In this study, we examined the effects of ghrelin, des-Gln14-ghrelin, des-octanoyl ghrelin, ghrelin-18, -10 and -5 (and motilin) on gastric emptying in mice and on gastric acid secretion in chronic fistula rats and pylorus-ligated rats. We also examined whether ghrelin affected the activity of the predominant gastric endocrine cell populations, G cells, ECL cells and D cells. Ghrelin and des-Gln14-ghrelin stimulated gastric emptying in a dose-dependent manner while des-octanoyl ghrelin and motilin were without effect. The C-terminally truncated ghrelin fragments were effective but much less potent than ghrelin itself. Ghrelin, des-Gln14-ghrelin and des-octanoyl ghrelin neither stimulated nor inhibited gastric acid secretion, and ghrelin, finally, did not affect secretion from either G cells, ECL cells or D cells.

  12. Gastrin, gastric acid secretion, and gastric microflora in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, K; Uvnäs-Moberg, K; Nord, C E; Johansson, C; Gullberg, R

    1986-01-01

    The relation between the basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion, plasma gastrin, and the gastric microflora was examined in 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Sixteen patients (36%) had basal achlorhydria, and of these, 10 (22%) had achlorhydria or hypochlorhydria after stimulation with pentagastrin. The peak acid output and acidity showed inverse correlation with the disease duration but were not associated with age or with the degree of physical disability. Hypergastrinaemia was found in nine patients (20%), of whom 6 (13%) had significant titres of parietal cell antibody. The acidity of the peak acid output showed negative correlation with plasma gastrin. It was confirmed that the gastric secretory state is a determinant of plasma gastrin levels and in addition influences the growth of micro-organisms in the gastric lumen. The type of microflora in the non-acid stomach was similar to that found in the saliva. A subgroup of eight females was identified who showed low gastric acid secretion rates, positive bacterial cultures, and atlantoaxial subluxation. Gastrin- and insulin-like immunoreactivities were found in joint fluid. The concentrations reflected their plasma levels, suggesting that the peptides are not released at the inflammatory site, but rather that they reach synovial fluid from circulating blood. PMID:3524480

  13. Gastric acid inhibitory and gastric protective effects of Cannabis and cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis sativa has long been known for its psychotropic effect. Only recently with the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous legends and the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation, the role of this 'endocannabinoid system' in different pathophysiologic processes is beginning to be delineated. There is evidence that CB1 receptor stimulation with synthetic cannabinoids or Cannabis sativa extracts rich in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibit gastric acid secretion in humans and experimental animals. This is specially seen when gastric acid secretion is stimulated by pentagastrin, carbachol or 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Cannabis and/or cannabinoids protect the gastric mucosa against noxious challenge with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ethanol as well as against stress-induced mucosal damage. Cannabis/cannabinoids might protect the gastric mucosa by virtue of its antisecretory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilator properties. PMID:27261847

  14. Gastric acid inhibitory and gastric protective effects of Cannabis and cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis sativa has long been known for its psychotropic effect. Only recently with the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous legends and the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation, the role of this 'endocannabinoid system' in different pathophysiologic processes is beginning to be delineated. There is evidence that CB1 receptor stimulation with synthetic cannabinoids or Cannabis sativa extracts rich in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibit gastric acid secretion in humans and experimental animals. This is specially seen when gastric acid secretion is stimulated by pentagastrin, carbachol or 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Cannabis and/or cannabinoids protect the gastric mucosa against noxious challenge with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ethanol as well as against stress-induced mucosal damage. Cannabis/cannabinoids might protect the gastric mucosa by virtue of its antisecretory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilator properties.

  15. Transport of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in a Simulated Gastric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayfield, Ryan T.

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the use of many types of nano sized materials in the consumer sector. Potential uses include encapsulation of nutrients, providing antimicrobial activity, altering texture, or changing bioavailability of nutrients. Engineered nanoparticles (ENP) possess properties that are different than larger particles made of the same constituents. Properties such as solubility, aggregation state, and toxicity can all be changed as a function of size. The gastric environment is an important area for study of engineered nanoparticles because of the varied physical, chemical, and enzymatic processes that are prevalent there. These all have the potential to alter those properties of ENP that make them different from their bulk counterparts. The Human Gastric Simulator (HGS) is an advanced in vitro model that can be used to study many facets of digestion. The HGS consists of a plastic lining that acts as the stomach cavity with two sets of U-shaped arms on belts that provide the physical forces needed to replicate peristalsis. Altering the position of the arms or changing the speed of the motor which powers them allows one to tightly hone and replicate varied digestive conditions. Gastric juice, consisting of salts, enzymes, and acid levels which replicate physiological conditions, is introduced to the cavity at a controllable rate. The release of digested food from the lumen of simulated stomach is controlled by a peristaltic pump. The goal of the HGS is to accurately and repeatedly simulate human digestion. This study focused on introducing foods spiked with zinc oxide ENP and bulk zinc oxide into the HGS and then monitoring how the concentration of each changed at two locations in the HGS over a two hour period. The two locations chosen were the highest point in the lumen of the stomach, which represented the fundus, and a point just beyond the equivalent of the pylorus, which represented the antrum of the stomach. These points were

  16. A Changing Gastric Environment Leads to Adaptation of Lipopolysaccharide Variants in Helicobacter pylori Populations during Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Christina; Björkholm, Britta; Normark, Staffan; Engstrand, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of half of the human population, and causes development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori-associated chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG) with loss of the acid-producing parietal cells, is correlated with an increased risk for development of gastric adenocarinoma. The majority of H. pylori isolates produce lipopolysaccharides (LPS) decorated with human-related Lewis epitopes, which have been shown to phase-vary in response to different environmental conditions. We have characterized the adaptations of H. pylori LPS and Lewis antigen expression to varying gastric conditions; in H. pylori isolates from mice with low or high gastric pH, respectively; in 482 clinical isolates from healthy individuals and from individuals with ChAG obtained at two time points with a four-year interval between endoscopies; and finally in isolates grown at different pH in vitro. Here we show that the gastric environment can contribute to a switch in Lewis phenotype in the two experimental mouse models. The clinical isolates from different human individuals showed that intra-individual isolates varied in Lewis antigen expression although the LPS diversity was relatively stable within each individual over time. Moreover, the isolates demonstrated considerable diversity in the levels of glycosylation and in the sizes of fucosylated O-antigen chains both within and between individuals. Thus our data suggest that different LPS variants exist in the colonizing H. pylori population, which can adapt to changes in the gastric environment and provide a means to regulate the inflammatory response of the host during disease progression. PMID:19517017

  17. Beyond gastric acid reduction: Proton pump inhibitors induce heme oxygenase-1 in gastric and endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Jan C. . E-mail: beckeja@uni-muenster.de; Grosser, Nina; Waltke, Christian; Schulz, Stephanie; Erdmann, Kati; Domschke, Wolfram; Schroeder, Henning; Pohle, Thorsten

    2006-07-07

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been demonstrated to prevent gastric mucosal injury by mechanisms independent of acid inhibition. Here we demonstrate that both omeprazole and lansoprazole protect human gastric epithelial and endothelial cells against oxidative stress. This effect was abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnBG. Exposure to either PPI resulted in a strong induction of HO-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, and led to an increased activity of this enzyme. Expression of cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 remained unaffected, and COX-inhibitors did not antagonize HO-1 induction by PPIs. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense protein HO-1 is a target of PPIs in both endothelial and gastric epithelial cells. HO-1 induction might account for the gastroprotective effects of PPIs independently of acid inhibition, especially in NSAID gastropathy. Moreover, our findings provide additional perspectives for a possible but yet unexplored use of PPIs in vasoprotection.

  18. Quantitatively metabolic profiles of salvianolic acids in rats after gastric-administration of Salvia miltiorrhiza extract.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanli; Zheng, Xunyang; Guo, Yanlei; Qin, Weihan; Hua, Lei; Yang, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Salvianolic acids, the well-known active components in Salvia miltiorrhiza, have been shown to possess markedly pharmacological activities. However, due to the complex in vivo course after administration, the pharmacologically active forms are still poorly understood. In present study, we evaluated the stability of eight major salvianolic acids from Danshen extract under different chemical and physiological conditions. We also quantitatively explained the absorption, metabolism and excretion of these salvianolic acids in rats after gastric-administration, which was carried out by simultaneously determining the amounts of salvianolic acids and their metabolites in the rat gastrointestinal contents, gastrointestinal mucosa, plasma, bile and urine. We found that: 1) protocatechuic aldehyde (PAL) was much stable whether in acidic environment (pH4.0) or in alkaline environment (pH8.0), while other salvianolic acids were stable in acidic environment and instable in alkaline environment; 2) PAL, salvianoli acid A (SAA) and salvianolic acid B (SAB) were instable whether in rat stomach or in small intestine, while other salvianolic acids were stable in rat stomach and instable in small intestine; 3) after gastric-administration, except PAL and Danshensu (DSS), other phenolic acids would be metabolized into DSS and caffeic acid (CA) in the rat gastrointestinal tract before absorption, and only free and glucuronidated PAL, CA and DSS were detected in rat plasma, bile and urine. In conclusion, it was the free and glucuronidated PAL, CA and DSS rather than the prototypes of other salvianolic acids that were present in plasma with considerable concentrations after gastric-administration. PMID:27370098

  19. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastric acidity test system. 862.1320 Section 862.1320 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  1. The effect of Aloe vera A. Berger (Liliaceae) on gastric acid secretion and acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Sadiq; Agunu, Abdulkarim; Diana, Mshelia

    2004-07-01

    The effect of varying doses of ethanol extract of Aloe vera (Liliaceae) on acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by 0.6 M HCl and acid output was studied in the pylorus ligated and lumen perfuse rats, respectively. Acid secretion was determined by titration of the collected gastric juice to pH 7.0. Intraperitoneal injection of Aloe vera, dose dependently inhibited gastric acid secretion. The plant was more active as a gastroprotective agent at lower concentration against mucosal injury induced by 0.6 M HCl. In conclusion, Aloe vera is endowed with gastric acid anti-secretory activity and could protect the gastric mucosa at low concentrations against injurious agents.

  2. Concentrations of acidic antiinflammatory drugs in gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Frey, H H; El-Sayed, M A

    1977-12-01

    In rats, the concentrations of the acidic antiinflammatory drugs salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, phenylbutazone, flufenamic acid and indomethacin in the glandular portion of the gastric mucosa were determined 30 and 60 min after oral or subcutaneous administration. In another series of experiments, solutions of the drugs were introduced into the ligated stomach and the concentrations in the mucosa and in the contents of the stomach were determined after 60 min. The ratio between the concentrations in the musoca and those in serum or gastric contents were much lower than expected according to the distribution by passive non-ionic diffusion. This apparent discrepancy may be explained as a result of a drug-induced damage to the mucosal cell allowing free diffusion of ionized drug across the cell membrane. PMID:603322

  3. The source of carbon dioxide for gastric acid production.

    PubMed

    Steer, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The source of carbon dioxide for the chemical reaction leading to the production of gastric acid is unknown. The decarboxylation of an amino acid releases carbon dioxide. Pepsinogens provide a rich source of the amino acid arginine. Both the source of carbon dioxide, arginine, and the consequence of arginine decarboxylation, agmatine, have been studied. The site of carbon dioxide production has been related to the survival of the parietal cell. An immunohistochemical study has been carried out on glycol methacrylate embedded gastric biopsies from the normal stomach of 38 adult patients. The sections have been stained using polyclonal antibody to pepsinogen II, polyclonal antibody to agmatine, and polyclonal antibody to Helicobacter pylori. Pepsinogen II and agmatine are found in the parietal cell canaliculi. This is consistent with the production of carbon dioxide from arginine in the parietal cell canaliculi. Evidence is presented for the decarboxylation of arginine derived from the activation segment of pepsinogen as the source of carbon dioxide for the production of gastric acid. The production of carbon dioxide by the decarboxylation of arginine in the parietal cell canaliculus enables the extracellular hydration of carbon dioxide at the known site of carbonic anhydrase activity. The extracellular production of acid in the canaliculus together with the presence of agmatine helps to explain why the parietal cells are not destroyed during the formation of gastric acid. Agmatine is found in the mucus secreting cells of the stomach and its role in acid protection of the stomach is discussed. Anat Rec, 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:18951509

  4. Should peri-gastrectomy gastric acidity be our focus among gastric cancer patients?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Xu, A-Man; Li, Tuan-Jie; Han, Wen-Xiu; Xu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the necessity and correctness of acid suppression pre- and post-gastrectomy among gastric carcinoma (GC) patients. METHODS: From June 2011 to April 2013, 99 patients who were diagnosed with GC or adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction (type II or III) and needed surgical management were enrolled. They all underwent gastrectomy by the same operators [35 undergoing total gastrectomy (TG) plus Roux-en-Y reconstruction, 34 distal gastrectomy (DG) plus Billroth I reconstruction, and 30 proximal gastrectomy (PG) plus gastroesophagostomy]. We collected and analyzed their gastrointestinal juice and tissues from the pre-operational day to the 5th day post-operation, and 6 mo post-surgery. Gastric pH was detected with a precise acidity meter. Gastric juice contents including potassium, sodium and bicarbonate ions, urea nitrogen, direct and indirect bilirubin, and bile acid were detected using Automatic Biochemical Analyzer. Data regarding tumor size, histological type, tumor penetration and tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage were obtained from the pathological records. Reflux symptoms pre- and 6 mo post-gastrectomy were evaluated by reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ) and gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire (GERD-Q). SPSS 16.0 was applied to analyze the data. RESULTS: Before surgery, gastric pH was higher than the threshold of hypoacidity (4.25 ± 1.45 vs 3.5, P = 0.000), and significantly affected by age, tumor size and differentiation grade, and potassium and bicarbonate ions; advanced malignancies were accompanied with higher pH compared with early ones (4.49 ± 1.31 vs 3.66 ± 1.61, P = 0.008). After operation, gastric pH in all groups was of weak-acidity and significantly higher than that pre-gastrectomy; on days 3-5, comparisons of gastric pH were similar between the 3 groups. Six months later, gastric pH was comparable to that on days 3-5; older patients were accompanied with higher total bilirubin level, indicating more serious

  5. Fade and tachyphylaxis of gastric acid secretory response to pentagastrin in rat isolated gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hirst, B H; Holland, J; Parsons, M E; Price, C A

    1988-12-01

    1. Gastric acid secretory responses to pentagastrin were characterized in the rat isolated gastric mucosa. In particular, the mechanisms underlying fade, declining response upon continued stimulation, and tachyphylaxis, progressively reduced responses upon repeated stimulation, were investigated. 2. Pentagastrin, 10(-9)-10(-7) M, resulted in concentration-related increases in acid secretion, with a mean maximum of 2.65 mumol cm-2 h-1 in response to pentagastrin, 10(-7) M. Higher concentrations of pentagastrin produced sub-maximal secretory rates; we define this as auto-inhibition. The responses to all concentrations of pentagastrin demonstrated fade. The rate of fade was correlated with the maximum acid secretory rate, declining at about 36% of the peak over the first 16 min. 3. The PO2, PCO2, [HCO3-], pH, [glucose], [lactate], [Na+] and [K+] did not decline during the fade of the acid secretory response to pentagastrin, 10(-7) M. Addition of a second aliquot of pentagastrin was not able to reverse fade, but these tissues were responsive to histamine. Replacement of the serosal solution, before addition of a second aliquot of pentagastrin, increased the acid response from 3% to 24% of the first response. 4. Serosal solution from donor tissues, allowed to respond to pentagastrin and then the acid secretion to fade, was able to stimulate secretion in fresh recipient tissues, although at lower rates. 5. Acid secretory responses to a second dose of pentagastrin were not significantly different, whether the tissues were previously unstimulated, or stimulated with pentagastrin washed out after attaining its peak secretory response (after 10-20 min). The second response was significantly reduced if the first response was allowed to fade with the pentagastrin in contact for 100 min; i.e. fade significantly influenced the extent of tachyphylaxis. 6. Proglumide, 10(-2) M, a gastrin receptor antagonist, and omeprazole, 10(-5) M, an inhibitor of the gastric (H+ + K

  6. Cadmium inhibits acid secretion in stimulated frog gastric mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbino, Andrea; Debellis, Lucantonio; Caroppo, Rosa; Curci, Silvana; Colella, Matilde

    2010-06-01

    Cadmium, a toxic environmental pollutant, affects the function of different organs such as lungs, liver and kidney. Less is known about its toxic effects on the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which cadmium impacts on the physiology of gastric mucosa. To this end, intact amphibian mucosae were mounted in Ussing chambers and the rate of acid secretion, short circuit current (I{sub sc}), transepithelial potential (V{sub t}) and resistance (R{sub t}) were recorded in the continuous presence of cadmium. Addition of cadmium (20 {mu}M to 1 mM) on the serosal but not luminal side of the mucosae resulted in inhibition of acid secretion and increase in NPPB-sensitive, chloride-dependent short circuit current. Remarkably, cadmium exerted its effects only on histamine-stimulated tissues. Experiments with TPEN, a cell-permeant chelator for heavy metals, showed that cadmium acts from the intracellular side of the acid secreting cells. Furthermore, cadmium-induced inhibition of acid secretion and increase in I{sub sc} cannot be explained by an action on: 1) H{sub 2} histamine receptor, 2) Ca{sup 2+} signalling 3) adenylyl cyclase or 4) carbonic anhydrase. Conversely, cadmium was ineffective in the presence of the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase blocker omeprazole suggesting that the two compounds likely act on the same target. Our findings suggest that cadmium affects the functionality of histamine-stimulated gastric mucosa by inhibiting the H{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase from the intracellular side. These data shed new light on the toxic effect of this dangerous environmental pollutant and may result in new avenues for therapeutic intervention in acute and chronic intoxication.

  7. Surviving the acid barrier: responses of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae to simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atheesha; Barnard, Tobias G

    2016-01-01

    When bacteria are subjected to low acidic pHs of the gastric environment, they may enter the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of survival. In this state, bacteria cannot be cultured on solid media, still exhibit signs of metabolic activity (viability). In this study, the response of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 to low pH-simulated environments of the human stomach was evaluated for their survival by culturability (plate count) and viability (flow cytometry-FC) assays. Bacteria were acid challenged with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 over a period of 180 min. Exposure to SGF up to 120 min increased acid tolerance of the Vibrios up to pH 3.5 with acid challenge occurring at pH 4.5. Bacteria were culturable from pH 2.5 to 4.5 up to 60 min SGF exposure. The stationary-phase cultures of Vibrio were able to survive SGF at all pHs in an 'injured' state with FC. This could possibly mean that the bacteria have entered the VBNC stage of survival. This is a worrying public health concern due to the fact that once favourable conditions arise (intestines), these Vibrios can change back to an infectious state and cause disease. PMID:26496916

  8. Surviving the acid barrier: responses of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae to simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atheesha; Barnard, Tobias G

    2016-01-01

    When bacteria are subjected to low acidic pHs of the gastric environment, they may enter the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of survival. In this state, bacteria cannot be cultured on solid media, still exhibit signs of metabolic activity (viability). In this study, the response of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 to low pH-simulated environments of the human stomach was evaluated for their survival by culturability (plate count) and viability (flow cytometry-FC) assays. Bacteria were acid challenged with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 over a period of 180 min. Exposure to SGF up to 120 min increased acid tolerance of the Vibrios up to pH 3.5 with acid challenge occurring at pH 4.5. Bacteria were culturable from pH 2.5 to 4.5 up to 60 min SGF exposure. The stationary-phase cultures of Vibrio were able to survive SGF at all pHs in an 'injured' state with FC. This could possibly mean that the bacteria have entered the VBNC stage of survival. This is a worrying public health concern due to the fact that once favourable conditions arise (intestines), these Vibrios can change back to an infectious state and cause disease.

  9. Effects of paracetamol and propacetamol on gastric mucosal damage and gastric lipid peroxidation caused by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in rats.

    PubMed

    Galunska, B; Marazova, K; Tankova, T; Popov, A; Frangov, P; Krushkov, I; Di Massa, A

    2002-08-01

    We have studied the effect of paracetamol and its pro-drug propacetamol on gastric mucosal damage induced by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and its possible relation to changes in gastric lipid peroxidation status in rats. Paracetamol or propacetamol were administered intragastrically 1h before ASA (300 mg kg(-1)) in the following equivalent doses: 62.5, 125.0 and 250.0 mg kg(-1) or 125.0, 250.0 and 500.0 mg kg(-1), respectively. The effects of the tested agents were compared to that of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) 15, 30 and 60 mg kg(-1). Gastric ulcer formation was estimated morphometrically 4h after ASA administration. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (reduced, GSH, and oxidized, GSSG) and uric acid (UA) were determined in gastric mucosa and blood plasma and used as biochemical markers of the oxidative status. The results showed that paracetamol (250, 125, 62.5 mg kg(-1)) and propacetamol (500, 250, 125 mg kg(-1)) diminished the area of ASA-induced gastric lesions. The effect of propacetamol was more pronounced than that of paracetamol and similar to that of PGE2. Gastric MDA increased 3-fold in the ASA-group. The tested agents reduced it by a range of 30-70%. In all pretreated groups gastric glutathione and UA levels were found higher than that of control group and lower than that of ASA-group. Paracetamol and propacetamol, as well as PGE2, diminished the lipid peroxidation in plasma to a lesser extent than in gastric mucosa, but maintained elevated levels of the selective plasma antioxidant UA. These results show that the ASA-induced gastric mucosal damage is accompanied by the development of oxidative stress, evidenced by the accumulation of MDA, and concomitant initial activation of cell antioxidant defences. As paracetamol and propacetamol tend to decrease gastric lesions caused by ASA and alter gastric mucosal MDA, glutathione and UA values in a favorable manner, it could be suggested that their effects on the gastric mucosa could be related to interference with

  10. Gastric acid output and circulating anti-bovine serum albumin in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, S. C.; Rothberg, R. M.; Knauer, C. M.; Svoboda, A. C.; Monroe, L. S.; Farr, R. S.

    1967-01-01

    Gastric acid output and circulating antibodies to a dietary protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), were studied in 241 adult human subjects. Among individuals 41 years of age and older there was a higher than expected incidence of circulating anti-BSA which correlated with a high stimulated gastric acid output. When other possible contributing factors such as the site of gastroduodenal disease or a history of allergy were considered, the relationship between high gastric acid and an increased incidence of anti-BSA again was demonstrated. The quantity and immunoglobulin classes of anti-BSA were not correlated with differences in gastric acid output or dietary histories, except that none of the sixteen patients who denied recent BSA intake had demonstrable anti-BSA activity. These data suggest that for a given individual the capacity to maintain or reinitiate anti-BSA production is a multifaceted phenomenon subject to many variables, one of which is gastric acidity. PMID:6035195

  11. Mucosal acid causes gastric mucosal microcirculatory disturbance in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Funatsu, Toshiyuki; Chono, Koji; Hirata, Takuya; Keto, Yoshihiro; Kimoto, Aishi; Sasamata, Masao

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism by which nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) suppress gastric mucosal blood flow is not fully understood, although the depletion of mucosal prostaglandin E2 has been proposed as one possible explanation. We investigated the role of gastric acid on gastric mucosal blood flow in NSAID-treated rats. A rat stomach was mounted in an ex vivo chamber, and gastric mucosal blood flow was measured sequentially in a 5-mm2 area of the gastric corpus using a scanning laser Doppler perfusion image system. Results showed that diclofenac (5 mg/kg s.c.) and indomethacin (10 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect gastric mucosal blood flow, although both strongly decreased mucosal prostaglandin E2 when saline was instilled into the gastric chamber. On replacement of the saline in the chamber with 100 mM hydrochloric acid, these drugs caused a decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow levels within 30 min. The specific cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors celecoxib (50 mg/kg s.c.) and rofecoxib (25 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect mucosal prostaglandin E2 level, nor did they decrease gastric mucosal blood flow, even when hydrochloric acid was added to the chamber. Furthermore, measurement of vasoconstrictive factors present in the mucosa showed that endothelin-1 levels increased after administration of diclofenac s.c. in the presence of intragastric hydrochloric acid. This indicates that the presence of mucosal hydrochloric acid plays an important role in the NSAID-induced decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow, while the COX-1-derived basal prostaglandin E2, which is unlikely to control gastric mucosal blood flow itself, protects microcirculatory systems from mucosal hydrochloric acid.

  12. Acute Helicobacter pylori infection: clinical features, local and systemic immune response, gastric mucosal histology, and gastric juice ascorbic acid concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Sobala, G M; Crabtree, J E; Dixon, M F; Schorah, C J; Taylor, J D; Rathbone, B J; Heatley, R V; Axon, A T

    1991-01-01

    The symptomatology of a case of acute infection with Helicobacter pylori is described, together with the accompanying changes in gastric mucosal histology, local and systemic humoral immune response, and gastric ascorbic acid concentration. The patient was an endoscopist, previously negative for the carbon-14 urea breath test, who had a week of epigastric pain and then became asymptomatic. H pylori was detected by culture of antral biopsy specimens and was still present after 74 days. Five days after infection the histological findings showed acute neutrophilic gastritis; by day 74 changes of chronic gastritis were evident. The patient seroconverted by IgG enzyme linked immunosorbent assay by day 74, but a mucosal IgM and IgA response was evident as early as day 14. Infection was accompanied by a transient hypochlorhydria but a sustained fall in gastric juice ascorbic acid concentration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1752479

  13. Motilin Stimulates Gastric Acid Secretion in Coordination with Ghrelin in Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Chayon; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Makoto; Mondal, Anupom; Oda, Sen-ichi; Tanaka, Toru; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Motilin and ghrelin constitute a peptide family, and these hormones are important for the regulation of gastrointestinal motility. In this study, we examined the effect of motilin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion in anesthetized suncus (house musk shrew, Suncus murinus), a ghrelin- and motilin-producing mammal. We first established a gastric lumen-perfusion system in the suncus and confirmed that intravenous (i.v.) administration of histamine (1 mg/kg body weight) stimulated acid secretion. Motilin (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg BW) stimulated the acid output in a dose-dependent manner in suncus, whereas ghrelin (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg BW) alone did not induce acid output. Furthermore, in comparison with the vehicle administration, the co-administration of low-dose (1 μg/kg BW) motilin and ghrelin significantly stimulated gastric acid secretion, whereas either motilin (1 μg/kg BW) or ghrelin (1 μg/kg BW) alone did not significantly induce gastric acid secretion. This indicates an additive role of ghrelin in motilin-induced gastric acid secretion. We then investigated the pathways of motilin/motilin and ghrelin-stimulated acid secretion using receptor antagonists. Treatment with YM 022 (a CCK-B receptor antagonist) and atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) had no effect on motilin or motilin-ghrelin co-administration-induced acid output. In contrast, famotidine (a histamine H2 receptor antagonist) completely inhibited motilin-stimulated acid secretion and co-administration of motilin and ghrelin induced gastric acid output. This is the first report demonstrating that motilin stimulates gastric secretion in mammals. Our results also suggest that motilin and co-administration of motilin and ghrelin stimulate gastric acid secretion via the histamine-mediated pathway in suncus. PMID:26115342

  14. Motilin Stimulates Gastric Acid Secretion in Coordination with Ghrelin in Suncus murinus

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Chayon; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Makoto; Mondal, Anupom; Oda, Sen-ichi; Tanaka, Toru; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Motilin and ghrelin constitute a peptide family, and these hormones are important for the regulation of gastrointestinal motility. In this study, we examined the effect of motilin and ghrelin on gastric acid secretion in anesthetized suncus (house musk shrew, Suncus murinus), a ghrelin- and motilin-producing mammal. We first established a gastric lumen-perfusion system in the suncus and confirmed that intravenous (i.v.) administration of histamine (1 mg/kg body weight) stimulated acid secretion. Motilin (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg BW) stimulated the acid output in a dose-dependent manner in suncus, whereas ghrelin (0.1, 1.0, and 10 μg/kg BW) alone did not induce acid output. Furthermore, in comparison with the vehicle administration, the co-administration of low-dose (1 μg/kg BW) motilin and ghrelin significantly stimulated gastric acid secretion, whereas either motilin (1 μg/kg BW) or ghrelin (1 μg/kg BW) alone did not significantly induce gastric acid secretion. This indicates an additive role of ghrelin in motilin-induced gastric acid secretion. We then investigated the pathways of motilin/motilin and ghrelin-stimulated acid secretion using receptor antagonists. Treatment with YM 022 (a CCK-B receptor antagonist) and atropine (a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) had no effect on motilin or motilin-ghrelin co-administration-induced acid output. In contrast, famotidine (a histamine H2 receptor antagonist) completely inhibited motilin-stimulated acid secretion and co-administration of motilin and ghrelin induced gastric acid output. This is the first report demonstrating that motilin stimulates gastric secretion in mammals. Our results also suggest that motilin and co-administration of motilin and ghrelin stimulate gastric acid secretion via the histamine-mediated pathway in suncus. PMID:26115342

  15. Luminal Nalpha-methyl histamine stimulates gastric acid secretion in duodenal ulcer patients via releasing gastrin.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Konturek, S J; Sito, E; Kwiecien, N; Obtulowicz, W; Bielanski, W; Hahn, E G

    2001-01-26

    Nalpha-methyl histamine is an unusual histamine metabolite which is produced in the stomach infected by Helicobacter pylori and which was shown in animals to stimulate gastric acid secretion and to release gastrin in vitro isolated G-cells, but no information is available regarding its influence on gastric secretion and gastrin release in duodenal ulcer patients before and after H. pylori eradication. In this study, we compared the effects of intragastric administration of single or graded doses of Nalpha-methyl histamine on gastric acid secretion and plasma gastrin levels in 16 male duodenal ulcer patients (aging from 35 to 48 years and weighing 65-82 kg) before and after the eradication of H. pylori. Furthermore, the gastric luminal histamine and gastrin contents were determined before and after H. pylori eradication. In H. pylori-infected duodenal ulcer patients, the intragastric application of Nalpha-methyl histamine failed to affect gastric acid secretion or plasma gastrin levels. Following eradication of H. pylori, gastric luminal histamine and gastrin, and both basal gastric acid secretion and plasma gastrin levels, were significantly reduced. Nalpha-methyl histamine given intragastrically in graded doses to such H. pylori-eradicated duodenal ulcer patients was found to increase dose-dependently gastric acid output reaching at a dose of 5 mg, about 80% of histamine maximum induced by i.v. infusion of 25 microg/kg h of histamine dihydrochloride. We conclude that Nalpha-methyl histamine is a potent luminally active stimulant of gastrin release and gastric acid secretion in H. pylori-eradicated patients when luminal histamine is low but is not effective in H. pylori infected patients when luminal histamine is enhanced, possibly due to desensitization of gastrin (G-cells) and acid-producing (parietal) cells by Nalpha-methyl histamine produced excessively in H. pylori-infected stomach.

  16. Absorption and metabolism of chlorogenic acids in cultured gastric epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Tracy L; Dew, Tristan P; Poquet, Laure; Hanson, Peter; Williamson, Gary

    2011-12-01

    Gastric absorption of feruloylquinic acid and di-O-caffeoylquinic acid analogs has never been investigated despite their potential contribution to the proposed beneficial health effects leading to reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Using a cultured gastric epithelial model, with an acidic apical pH, the relative permeability coefficients (P(app)) and metabolic fate of a series of chlorogenic acids (CGAs) were investigated. Mechanistic studies were performed in the apical to basal direction and demonstrated differential rates of absorption for different CGA subgroups. For the first time, we show intact absorption of feruloylquinic acids and caffeoylquinic acid lactones across the gastric epithelium (P(app) ∼ 0.2 cm/s). Transport seemed to be mainly by passive diffusion, because good linearity was observed over the incubation period and test concentrations, and we speculate that a potential carrier-mediated component may be involved in uptake of certain 4-acyl CGA isomers. In contrast, absorption of intact di-O-caffeoylquinic acids was rapid (P(app) ∼ 2-10 cm/s) but nonlinear with respect to time and concentration dependence, which was potentially limited by interaction with an efflux transporter and/or pH gradient dependence. For the first time, methylation is shown in gastric mucosa. Furthermore, isoferulic acid, dimethoxycinnamic acid, and ferulic acid were identified as novel gastric metabolites of CGA biotransformation. We propose that the stomach is the first location for the release of hydroxycinnamic acids, which could explain their early detection after coffee consumption.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862...-secreting tumor of the pancreas), and related gastric disorders. (b) Classification. Class I...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1320 - Gastric acidity test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862...-secreting tumor of the pancreas), and related gastric disorders. (b) Classification. Class I...

  19. Effects of epidermal growth factor on acid secretion from guinea pig gastric mucosa: in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Finke, U; Rutten, M; Murphy, R A; Silen, W

    1985-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been tested on guinea pig gastric mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers to investigate the suitability of using in vitro methods for examining EGF's effects on acid secretion. Epidermal growth factor reduced the rate of histamine-induced acid secretion to near basal levels when applied to the serosal gastric surface at nanomolar concentrations. Inhibitory effects were evident 10-15 min after EGF treatment and were maximal by 40 min. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-induced secretion was also reduced by EGF, although the effect occurred more slowly than in histamine-treated tissues. Epidermal growth factor increased transmucosal resistance in histamine-treated, but not cyclic adenosine monophosphate-treated mucosa; potential difference was unaffected. Nerve growth factor had no effect when tested in the in vitro system. The EGF binding protein was found to enhance slightly the inhibitory activity of EGF on acid secretion. When applied to the luminal (mucosal) gastric surface, EGF inhibited secretion marginally but only at micromolar concentrations. These results indicate that EGF acts directly upon cells within the gastric mucosa, and is most effective when applied to the serosal gastric surface. They further suggest that in vitro preparations of intact gastric mucosa can be used for analyzing the inhibitory effects of EGF on gastric acid secretion. PMID:2984079

  20. Risk of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Associated With Gastric Acid Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shy-Shin; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Meng-tse Gabriel; Lee, Yu-Chien; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Wan-Ting; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The primary objective of this study was to determine the association between the use of gastric acid suppressants (GAS) and the risk of developing spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis (LC). A case–control study nested within a cohort of 480,000 representatives of Taiwan National Health Insurance beneficiaries was carried out. A case was matched with 100 controls on age, gender, and index date of SBP diagnosis. GAS use was identified from the 1-year period before the index date. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for various unbalanced covariates between users and nonusers of GAS. A total of 947 cases of SBP were identified among the 86,418 patients with advanced LC. A significant increased risk of developing SBP was found to be associated with current (within 30 days), and recent (within 30–90 day) use of 2 different classes of GAS: proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs). The confounder adjusted rate ratio (aRR) for the current use of PPIs was 2.77 (95%CI: 1.90–4.04) and H2RAs was 2.62 (95%CI: 2.00–3.42). The risk of SBP attenuated for the recent use of PPIs (aRR: 2.20, 95%CI: 1.60–3.02) or H2RAs (aRR: 1.72, 95%CI: 1.25–2.37). In addition, sensitivity analysis using hospitalized SBP as the primary outcome showed a similar risk for the current use of PPIs (aRR, 3.24; 95%CI: 2.08–5.05) and H2RAs (aRR 2.43; 95%CI 1.71–3.46). Furthermore, higher cumulative days of gastric acid suppression were associated with a higher risk of SBP (trend P < 0.0001). To conclude, exposure to GAS was associated with an increased risk of SBP in patients with advanced LC. The association was more pronounced in current PPI users compared with nonusers. PMID:26039135

  1. Two distinct etiologies of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma: interactions among pH, Helicobacter pylori, and bile acids.

    PubMed

    Mukaisho, Ken-Ichi; Nakayama, Takahisa; Hagiwara, Tadashi; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer can be classified as cardia and non-cardia subtypes according to the anatomic site. Although the gastric cancer incidence has decreased steadily in several countries over the past 50 years, the incidence of cardia cancers and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) continue to increase. The etiological factors involved in the development of both cardia cancers and EACs are associated with high animal fat intake, which causes severe obesity. Central obesity plays roles in cardiac-type mucosa lengthening and partial hiatus hernia development. There are two distinct etiologies of cardia cancer subtypes: one associated with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), which predominantly occurs in patients without Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and resembles EAC, and the other associated with H. pylori atrophic gastritis, which resembles non-cardia cancer. The former can be developed in the environment of high volume duodenal content reflux, including bile acids and a higher acid production in H. pylori-negative patients. N-nitroso compounds, which are generated from the refluxate that includes a large volume of bile acids and are stabilized in the stomach (which has high levels of gastric acid), play a pivotal role in this carcinogenesis. The latter can be associated with the changing colonization of H. pylori from the distal to the proximal stomach with atrophic gastritis because a high concentration of soluble bile acids in an environment of low acid production is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori in the distal stomach. The manuscript introduces new insights in causative factors of adenocarcinoma of the cardia about the role of bile acids in gastro-esophageal refluxate based upon robust evidences supporting interactions among pH, H. pylori, and bile acids. PMID:26029176

  2. Tachykinin inhibition of acid-induced gastric hyperaemia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, A.; Jocic, M.; Herzeg, G.; Holzer, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Primary afferent neurones releasing the vasodilator, calcitonin gene-related peptide, mediate the gastric hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion. The tachykinins neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) are located in the same neurones and are co-released with calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study we investigated the effect and possible role of tachykinins in the acid-evoked gastric vasodilatation in urethane-anaesthetized rats. 2. Gastric acid back-diffusion, induced by perfusing the stomach with 15% ethanol in the presence of 0.05 M HCl, increased gastric mucosal blood flow by 60-90%, as determined by the hydrogen clearance technique. NKA and SP (0.14-3.78 nmol min-1 kg-1, infused intra-aortically) inhibited the gastric mucosal hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was accompanied by aggravation of ethanol/acid-induced macroscopic haemorrhagic lesions. 3. The inhibitory effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) on the acid-induced gastric mucosal vasodilatation was prevented by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists, MEN 10,627 (200 nmol kg-1) but left unaltered by the NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140,333 (300 nmol kg-1) and the mast-cell stabilizer, ketotifen (4.6 mumol kg-1). 4. Under basal conditions, with 0.05 M HCl being perfused through the stomach, NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) reduced gastric mucosal blood flow by about 25%, an effect that was abolished by SR 140,333 but not MEN 10,627 or ketotifen. 5. SR 140,333, MEN 10,627 or ketotifen had no significant effect on basal gastric mucosal blood flow nor did they modify the gastric mucosal hyperaemic reaction to acid back-diffusion. 6. The effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) in causing vasoconstriction and inhibiting the vasodilator response to acid back-diffusion was also seen when blood flow in the left gastric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. 7. Arginine vasopressin (AVP, 0.1 nmol min-1 kg-1) induced gastric

  3. [Changes of acid-producing function of the stomach before and after operation performed for gastric ulcer type I].

    PubMed

    Futuĭma, Iu M

    2007-01-01

    The gastric acid-producing function changes were analyzed in 48 patients suffering gastric ulcer (Johnson-I type), using the computer pH-metry. The dependence of the gastric glands acid-production on the ulcer defect localization was established. Hyperchlorhydria was revealed in 84.6% of patients suffering gastric distal third ulcer and in its subcardial localization--in 30.8%. In the late follow-up period after the operation, performed for gastric ulcer disease, the gastric stump capacity to restore its glands production of acid depends mainly on the method of surgical procedure applied. The best indices were revealed after application of organpreserving method--the partial resection of gastric ischemized segment according to L. Ya. Kovahlchuk combined with selective proximal vagotomy, comparing with such after application of resectional methods according to Billroth.

  4. Effect of zinc sulphate on acetic acid-induced gastric ulceration in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, K M

    1990-09-01

    The effects of zinc sulphate on gastric ulcer healing rate and mucosal mucus content of acetic acid-induced ulceration in rats have been assessed. Daily treatment with zinc sulphate progressively accelerated ulcer healing in a dose-dependent manner with a significant increase observed on day 15 after ulcer induction in rats treated with 44 and 88 mg kg-1 zinc sulphate. A significant increase in gastric mucosal adherent mucus was also observed in those animals treated with 88 mg kg-1 zinc sulphate. The results suggest that a minimum treatment period of 15 days is needed for the zinc sulphate to be effective, and that zinc ions may promote gastric ulcer healing by enhancing mucus formation to prevent acid back-diffusion into the gastric mucosa.

  5. Effects of celecoxib on acid-challenged gastric mucosa of rats: comparison with metamizol and piroxicam.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Bettina; Alarcón De La Lastra, Catalina; Motilva, Virginia; La Casa, Carmen; Herrerias, Juan Manuel; Pozo, David; Calero, María José Martin

    2004-06-01

    Selective COX-2 inhibitors have been shown to produce fewer gastrointestinal adverse reactions than classical NSAIDs. Nevertheless, these new agents may worsen and delay the healing of experimentally induced gastric ulcers in animals. In this study, we compared the effects of a selective COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib), a preferential COX-1 inhibitor (piroxicam), and a nonnarcotic analgesic (metamizol) on normal gastric mucosa of rats and, on the other hand, in a setting of preexisting acute gastric lesions induced by 0.6 N hydrochloric acid. Under normal conditions, only piroxicam produced appreciable gastric lesions. However, after acid challenge the three assayed drugs induced significant macroscopic and microscopic damage. Myeloperoxidase activity as an index of neutrophil infiltration was elevated with celecoxib and piroxicam on normal gastric mucosa. On inflamed mucosa, celecoxib augmented enzymatic activity at the lower dose, which was parallelled by an increase in the interleukin 1beta level. Acid instillaton produced a significant rise in PGE2 content at 7 hr. Drug treatment after acid challenge decreased prostaglandin values in all cases, although to a lesser extent than after single drug dose administration. COX-2 mRNA expression was visible 1 hr after acid application, whereas COX-2 protein could only be detected at 7 hr. Piroxicam increased both expression levels. All NSAIDs enhanced transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor receptor immunoreactivity around the acid-induced lesions. It is concluded that selective COX-2 inhibitors, like conventional NSAIDs, impair the healing of gastric damage, and therefore special attention should be paid in patients with gastric pathologies.

  6. Helicobacter pylori environmental interactions: effect of acidic conditions on H. pylori-induced gastric mucosal interleukin-8 production

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Il Ju; Fujimoto, Saori; Yamauchi, Kazuyoshi; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    Summary To explore the interactions between the host, environment and bacterium responsible for the different manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection, we examined the effect of acidic conditions on H. pylori-induced interleukin (IL)-8 expression. AGS gastric epithelial cells were exposed to acidic pH and infected with H. pylori [wild-type strain, its isogenic cag pathogenicity island (PAI) mutant or its oipA mutant]. Exposure of AGS cells to acidic pH alone did not enhance IL-8 production. However, following exposure to acidic conditions, H. pylori infection resulted in marked enhancement of IL-8 production which was independent of the presence of the cag PAI and OipA, indicating that H. pylori and acidic conditions act synergistically to induce gastric mucosal IL-8 production. In neutral pH environments H. pylori-induced IL-8 induction involved the NF-κB pathways, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)→ c-Fos/c-Jun→activating protein (AP-1) pathways, JNK→c-Jun→AP-1 pathways and the p38 pathways. At acidic pH H. pylori-induced augmentation of IL-8 production involved markedly upregulated the NF-κB pathways and the ERK→c-Fos→AP-1 pathways. In contrast, activation of the JNK→c-Jun→AP-1 pathways and p38 pathways were pH independent. These results might explain the clinical studies in which patients with duodenal ulcers had higher levels of IL-8 in the antral gastric mucosa than patients with simple H. pylori gastritis. PMID:17517062

  7. Expression of HSP72 in the gastric mucosa is regulated by gastric acid in rats-Correlation of HSP72 expression with mucosal protection

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Isao; Otaka, Michiro . E-mail: otaka@med.akita-u.ac.jp; Jin, Mario; Odashima, Masaru; Komatsu, Koga; Konishi, Noriaki; Matsuhashi, Tamotsu; Horikawa, Youhei; Ohba, Reina; Itoh, Hideaki; Watanabe, Sumio

    2006-10-20

    Background and aim: The real mechanism of adaptive cytoprotection in the gastric mucosa is not well established. In the present study, we investigated the effect of acid suppressing agents on a 72-kDa heat shock protein (HSP72) expression, which is known as endogenous cytoprotective factor, in the gastric mucosa. Also, the association of gastric mucosal protective function against HCl-challenge was compared between HSP72-induced and -reduced group. Materials and methods: Expression of HSP72 was measured by Western blotting in the gastric mucosa before and after administration of famotidine or omeprazole. The gastric mucosal protective function against 0.6 N HCl was compared between control group and HSP72-reduced group. Also, the effect of increased expression of gastric HSP72 by additional administration of zinc sulfate or zinc L-carnosine, which is known as HSP72-inducer, on mucosal protective function was studied. Results: HSP72 expression in the gastric mucosa was reduced by acid suppressing agents. The lowest expression level of HSP72 was observed 12 h (famotidine, H2-receptor antagonist) or 48 h (omeprazole, proton pump inhibitor) after administration. The gastric mucosal protective ability against 0.6 N HCl was also reduced when HSP72 expression was decreased by famotidine or omeprazole. This phenomenon was reversed by HSP72 induction by additional administration of zinc derivatives. Conclusion: Our results might indicate that the expression of HSP72 in the gastric mucosa is physiologically regulated by gastric acid, and that HSP72 induction could be important in view of mucosal protection especially when HSP72 expression is reduced by administration of acid suppressing agents such as proton pump inhibitor or H2 receptor antagonist.

  8. A relation between the chain length of fatty acids and the slowing of gastric emptying

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, J. N.; Knox, M. T.

    1968-01-01

    1. Test meals of solutions and suspensions of potassium and sodium salts of a series of saturated fatty acids, from C2 to C18, were given to healthy subjects. 2. From the volume of these meals recovered after a fixed interval the relative effectiveness of the salts of the acids in slowing gastric emptying was assessed. 3. On a molar basis the salts of fatty acids from acetic up to decanoic were relatively ineffective in slowing gastric emptying. 4. The salts of fatty acids with 12-18 carbon atoms were much more effective than those with up to 10 carbon atoms. Myristate was the most effective of the salts. 5. Buffering the test meals with 33 mM sodium citrate increased the effectiveness of the salts in slowing gastric emptying. PMID:5639357

  9. Acupuncture inhibits vagal gastric acid secretion stimulated by sham feeding in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Lux, G; Hagel, J; Bäcker, P; Bäcker, G; Vogl, R; Ruppin, H; Domschke, S; Domschke, W

    1994-01-01

    In a prospective randomised study, the effect of acupuncture on sham feeding stimulated gastric acid secretion was investigated. In eight healthy volunteers (five men, three women, mean (SEM) age 26.3 (4.7) years) various methods of acupuncture were performed. Apart from the sham procedure, the acupuncture was performed at the classic acupuncture points. Electroacupuncture reduced gastric acid secretion expressed as median (range) significantly during the first 30 minute period to 1.6 (0-5.2) mmol compared with 3.8 (2.3-14.5) mmol (p < 0.05) during control period (sham feeding without acupuncture). Inhibition of gastric acid secretion by electroacupuncture was also significant during the second 30 minute period (0.2 (0-5.6) v 3.6 (0.3-9.1) mmol; p < 0.05) and for peak acid output (0.8 (0.2-5.1) v 7.6 (3.4-12.1) mmol; p < 0.05). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation also resulted in significant reduction of gastric acid secretion during the first 30 minute period (1.0 (0-3.6) mmol v 3.8 (2.3-14.5) mmol; p < 0.05), and peak acid output (3.6 (1.2-12.0) v 7.6 (3.4-12.1) mmol; p < 0.05). The classic needle acupuncture, laser acupuncture, and sham acupuncture had no significant effect on gastric acid secretion. This study shows firstly that in healthy volunteers, only the versions of acupuncture using more pronounced stimulation (electroacupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation), but not those with only mild stimulation of the nerves (classic needle acupuncture, laser acupuncture), and secondly only acupuncture performed at defined points lead to significant reduction in gastric acid secretion. PMID:7926899

  10. Acupuncture inhibits vagal gastric acid secretion stimulated by sham feeding in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lux, G; Hagel, J; Bäcker, P; Bäcker, G; Vogl, R; Ruppin, H; Domschke, S; Domschke, W

    1994-08-01

    In a prospective randomised study, the effect of acupuncture on sham feeding stimulated gastric acid secretion was investigated. In eight healthy volunteers (five men, three women, mean (SEM) age 26.3 (4.7) years) various methods of acupuncture were performed. Apart from the sham procedure, the acupuncture was performed at the classic acupuncture points. Electroacupuncture reduced gastric acid secretion expressed as median (range) significantly during the first 30 minute period to 1.6 (0-5.2) mmol compared with 3.8 (2.3-14.5) mmol (p < 0.05) during control period (sham feeding without acupuncture). Inhibition of gastric acid secretion by electroacupuncture was also significant during the second 30 minute period (0.2 (0-5.6) v 3.6 (0.3-9.1) mmol; p < 0.05) and for peak acid output (0.8 (0.2-5.1) v 7.6 (3.4-12.1) mmol; p < 0.05). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation also resulted in significant reduction of gastric acid secretion during the first 30 minute period (1.0 (0-3.6) mmol v 3.8 (2.3-14.5) mmol; p < 0.05), and peak acid output (3.6 (1.2-12.0) v 7.6 (3.4-12.1) mmol; p < 0.05). The classic needle acupuncture, laser acupuncture, and sham acupuncture had no significant effect on gastric acid secretion. This study shows firstly that in healthy volunteers, only the versions of acupuncture using more pronounced stimulation (electroacupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation), but not those with only mild stimulation of the nerves (classic needle acupuncture, laser acupuncture), and secondly only acupuncture performed at defined points lead to significant reduction in gastric acid secretion.

  11. Involvement of BID translocation in glycyrrhetinic acid and 11-deoxy glycyrrhetinic acid-induced attenuation of gastric cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dejian; Zhong, Wei; Li, Juan; Zhang, Bing; Song, Gang; Hu, Tianhui

    2014-01-01

    Glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), the main chemical constituents of licorice, has shown remarkable anticancer activity. However, the side effects limit its widespread use. 11-DOGA is produced through reduction of GA 11-carbonyl to 11-hydroxyl to reduce its side effects, although its anticancer activities are largely unknown. Here, we report that the functional mechanisms of GA and 11-DOGA in gastric cancers, as well as the comparison between these two drugs' pharmacological potential. Firstly, we found that GA and 11-DOGA significantly inhibits the viabilities of gastric cancer cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. Both GA and 11-DOGA induce gastric cancer cells apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in G2 phase by upregulation of p21 and downregulation of cdc2 and cyclin B1. Further studies show that GA and 11-DOGA-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells is associated with BID translocation from nucleus to mitochondria. Moreover, GA and 11-DOGA could effectively inhibit tumor formation of gastric cancer cells in nude mice. Comparing with 11-DOGA, GA presents higher toxicity toward gastric cancer cells both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, the elucidation of the functional mechanisms of GA and 11-DOGA-induced attenuation of gastric cancer growth suggests a possible therapeutic role of GA and its derivatives.

  12. A new method for determining gastric acid output using a wireless ph sensing capsule

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, D.H.; deRijke, S.; Chow, C. C.; Foruraghi, L.; Zhao, X.; Wright, E.C.; Whatley, M.; Maass-Moreno, R.; Chen, C. C.; Wank, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and gastric acid hypersecretion respond well to suppression of gastric acid secretion. However, clinical management and research in diseases of acid secretion have been hindered by the lack of a non-invasive, accurate and reproducible tool to measure gastric acid output (GAO). Thus, symptoms or, in refractory cases, invasive testing may guide acid suppression therapy. AIM To present and validate a novel, non-invasive method of GAO analysis in healthy subjects using a wireless pH sensor, SmartPill® (SP) (SmartPill® Corporation, Buffalo, NY). METHODS Twenty healthy subjects underwent conventional GAO studies with a nasogastric tube. Variables impacting liquid meal-stimulated GAO analysis were assessed by modeling and in vitro verification. Buffering capacity of Ensure Plus® was empirically determined. SP GAO was calculated using the rate of acidification of the Ensure Plus® meal. Gastric emptying scintigraphy and GAO studies with radiolabeled Ensure Plus® and SP assessed emptying time, acidification rate and mixing. Twelve subjects had a second SP GAO study to assess reproducibility. RESULTS Meal stimulated SP GAO analysis was dependent on acid secretion rate and meal buffering capacity but not on gastric emptying time. On repeated studies, SP GAO strongly correlated with conventional BAO (r=0.51, P=0.02), MAO (r=0.72, P=0.0004) and PAO; (r=0.60, P=0.006). The SP sampled the stomach well during meal acidification. CONCLUSIONS SP GAO analysis is a non-invasive, accurate and reproducible method for the quantitative measurement of GAO in healthy subjects. SP GAO analysis could facilitate research and clinical management of GERD and other disorders of gastric acid secretion. PMID:23639004

  13. Effects of calcium channel blockers on gastric emptying and acid secretion of the rat in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Brage, R.; Cortijo, J.; Esplugues, J.; Esplugues, J. V.; Martí-Bonmatí, E.; Rodriguez, C.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate the effects of three calcium channel blockers (verapamil, diltiazem and cinnarizine) on gastric emptying and secretion in the rat. Pretreatment with the calcium blockers delayed gastric emptying of phenol red in a dose-dependent manner. Verapamil was the most effective of the agents tested. Verapamil and diltiazem inhibited gastric acid secretion in the pylorus-ligated rat without affecting pepsin output. Cinnarizine was ineffective in this model. When the perfused lumen of the anaesthetized rat was used, verapamil was found to inhibit responses to carbachol or histamine more than those to pentagastrin. Further, we found a greater sensitivity to verapamil for basal compared with vagal-stimulated (2-deoxy-D-glucose) acid secretion. Neither diltiazem nor cinnarizine modified gastric acid secretion in this experimental model. These findings are discussed in relation to the role of extracellular calcium in gastric motility and secretion, and the existence of a regional and functional selectivity for calcium blockers is proposed. PMID:3814903

  14. Dehydroabietic Acid Derivative QC4 Induces Gastric Cancer Cell Death via Oncosis and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dongjun; Ni, Qing; Ji, Anlai; Gu, Wen; Wu, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    Aim. QC4 is the derivative of rosin's main components dehydroabietic acid (DHA). We investigated the cytotoxic effect of QC4 on gastric cancer cells and revealed the mechanisms beneath the induction of cell death. Methods. The cytotoxic effect of QC4 on gastric cancer cells was evaluated by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. The underlying mechanisms were tested by administration of cell death related inhibitors and detection of apoptotic and oncosis related proteins. Cytomembrane integrity and organelles damage were confirmed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay, mitochondrial function test, and cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration detection. Results. QC4 inhibited cell proliferation dose- and time-dependently and destroyed cell membrane integrity, activated calpain-1 autolysis, and induced apoptotic protein cleavage in gastric cancer cells. The detection of decreased ATP and mitochondrial membrane potential, ROS accumulation, and cytosolic free Ca2+ elevation confirmed organelles damage in QC4-treated gastric cancer cells. Conclusions. DHA derivative QC4 induced the damage of cytomembrane and organelles which finally lead to oncosis and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Therefore, as a derivative of plant derived small molecule DHA, QC4 might become a promising agent in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27057539

  15. Potassium channel KCNJ15 is required for histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianye; Liu, Wensheng; Karvar, Serhan; Baker, Susan S; He, Wenjun; Baker, Robert D; Ji, Guang; Xie, Jianqun; Zhu, Lixin

    2015-08-15

    Gastric acid secretion is mediated by the K(+)-dependent proton pump (H(+),K(+)-ATPase), which requires a continuous supply of K(+) at the luminal side of the apical membrane. Several K(+) channels are implicated in gastric acid secretion. However, the identity of the K(+) channel(s) responsible for apical K(+) supply is still elusive. Our previous studies have shown the translocation of KCNJ15 from cytoplasmic vesicles to the apical membrane on stimulation, indicating its involvement in gastric acid secretion. In this study, the stimulation associated trafficking of KCNJ15 was observed in a more native context with a live cell imaging system. KCNJ15 molecules in resting live cells were scattered in cytoplasm but exhibited apical localization after stimulation. Furthermore, knocking down KCNJ15 expression with a short hairpin RNA adenoviral construct abolished histamine-stimulated acid secretion in rabbit primary parietal cells. Moreover, KCNJ15, like H(+),K(+)-ATPase, was detected in all of the parietal cells by immunofluorescence staining, whereas only about half of the parietal cells were positive for KCNQ1 under the same condition. Consistently, the endogenous protein levels of KCNJ15, analyzed by Western blotting, were higher than those of KCNQ1 in the gastric mucosa of human, mouse, and rabbit. These results provide evidence for a major role of KCNJ15 in apical K(+) supply during stimulated acid secretion. PMID:26108660

  16. Evaluation of the morphological changes of gastric mucosa induced by a low concentration of acetic acid using a rat model.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Ken-ichiro; Ro, Ayako; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Oral ingestion of concentrated acetic acid causes corrosive injury of the gastrointestinal tract. To assess the effects of a low concentration of acetic acid on gastric mucosa, we examined the gastric mucosal changes in rats at 1 and 3 days after the injection of 5% or 25% acetic acid into the gastric lumen. The area of the gastric ulcerative lesions in the 25% acetic acid group was significantly larger than that in the 5% acetic acid group. The lesion area was reduced significantly at 3 days after injection in the 5% acetic acid group, whereas no significant difference in lesion area was observed at 1 and 3 days in the 25% acetic acid group. Histologically, corrosive necrosis was limited to the mucosal layer in the 5% acetic acid group, whereas necrosis extended throughout the gastric wall in the 25% acetic acid group. At 3 days post-injection, the 25% acetic acid group showed widespread persistent inflammation, whereas the 5% acetic acid group showed widespread appearance of fibroblasts indicative of a healing process. These results indicate that a low concentration of acetic acid damages the gastric mucosa and that the degree of mucosal damage depends on the concentration of acetic acid.

  17. Functional Photoacoustic Imaging of Gastric Acid Secretion Using pH-Responsive Polyaniline Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Li, Junwei; Xiao, Hong; Yoon, Soon Joon; Liu, Chengbo; Matsuura, Drew; Tai, Wanyi; Song, Liang; O'Donnell, Matthew; Cheng, Du; Gao, Xiaohu

    2016-09-01

    A stomach functional imaging technique based on photoacoustics achieves noninvasive gastric acid secretory assessment utilizing pH-responsive polyaniline nanoprobes. A testing protocol mimicking clinical practice is established using a mouse model. After imaging, the nanoprobes are excreted outside the body without inducing systematic toxicity. Further optimization and translation of this technology can help alleviate patients' suffering and side effects.

  18. Anti-inflammatory/anti-pyretic salicylic acid esters with low gastric ulcerogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Rainsford, K D; Whitehouse, M W

    1980-11-01

    The methyl and some other esters of acetylsalicylic and salicylic acids and their derivatives were found to have much lower gastric ulcerogenic activity (when assayed in the stress-sensitized rat) compared with their corresponding acids. There was little or no loss in therapeutic potencies of these salicylate esters as determined by assessment of anti-inflammatory activity (against the carrageenan-induced oedema) and antipyretic activity (against yeast-induced fever in rats. The methyl ester of acetylsalicylic acid (=AME) was almost devoid of gastric irritancy/ulcerogenicity (as observed with acetylsalicylic acid) when given orally to pigs for 10 days. AME had appreciable anti-inflammatory activity in the adjuvant-arthritis model and at high doses (200 mg/kg t.i.d.) was without the lethal effects seen with acetylsalicylic acid. Moreover, no toxic effects were seen after long-term administration of 100-1000 mg/kg/day AME for 3-4 months. The results provide further evidence for the hypothesis that the carboxylic acid moiety of salicylates is a major factor in the gastric ulcerogenic activity of these drugs. The methyl esters of these salicylates may be considered as models for the development of pro-drugs and in some cases may be therapeutic alternatives to acetylsalicylic acid or salicylate. PMID:6971045

  19. Identification of Catechin, Syringic Acid, and Procyanidin B2 in Wine as Stimulants of Gastric Acid Secretion.

    PubMed

    Liszt, Kathrin Ingrid; Eder, Reinhard; Wendelin, Sylvia; Somoza, Veronika

    2015-09-01

    Organic acids of wine, in addition to ethanol, have been identified as stimulants of gastric acid secretion. This study characterized the influence of other wine compounds, particularly phenolic compounds, on proton secretion. Forty wine parameters were determined in four red wines and six white wines, including the contents of organic acids and phenolic compounds. The secretory activity of the wines was determined in a gastric cell culture model (HGT-1 cells) by means of a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye. Red wines stimulated proton secretion more than white wines. Lactic acid and the phenolic compounds syringic acid, catechin, and procyanidin B2 stimulated proton secretion and correlated with the pro-secretory effect of the wines. Addition of the phenolic compounds to the least active white wine sample enhanced its proton secretory effect by 65 ± 21% (p < 0.05). These results indicate that not only malic and lactic acid but also bitter and astringent tasting phenolic compounds in wine contribute to its stimulatory effect on gastric acid secretion.

  20. The estimation of deoxyribonucleic acid in the presence of sialic acid: application to analysis of human gastric washings

    PubMed Central

    Croft, D. N.; Lubran, M.

    1965-01-01

    1. Sialic acid has been found to interfere with three colorimetric reactions used for the estimation of DNA: a modified diphenylamine reaction at 100° (Dische, 1930), the nitrophenylhydrazine method (Webb & Levy, 1955) and the diphenylamine reaction at 30° (Burton, 1956). 2. Evidence is presented that sialic acid is present in hydrolysates obtained from gastric wash-out material. 3. A mathematical method for correcting for interference from sialic acid in the diphenylamine reaction at 30° is described. 4. The diphenylamine reaction has been modified to make it suitable for the estimation of DNA in the presence of sialic acid. The modifications are to increase the concentration of diphenylamine to 2% and to perform the reaction at 6–13° for 48hr. These modifications increase the sensitivity 25% above Burton's (1956) modification of the diphenylamine reaction. 5. The precipitation, extraction and recovery of DNA from gastric wash-out material have been investigated. PMID:14342494

  1. Effect of vitamin C-releasing acetylsalicylic acid on gastric mucosal damage before and after Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Konturek, Peter C; Kania, Joanna; Gessner, Uwe; Konturek, Stanisław J; Hahn, Eckhart G; Konturek, Jan W

    2004-12-15

    The interaction between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as acetylsalicylic acid is still controversial. This study was designed to compare the effect of acetylsalicylic acid and vitamin C-releasing acetylsalicylic acid on the gastric mucosal damage and microbleeding before and after eradication of H. pylori in 10 young healthy volunteers. Acetylsalicylic acid induced significantly more gastric lesions and higher microbleeding than acetylsalicylic acid-vitamin C. After successful H. pylori eradication therapy, acetylsalicylic acid induced significantly higher mucosal lesions and microbleeding than before eradication. In contrast, after acetylsalicylic acid-vitamin C, gastric lesion index was significantly lower and eradication therapy failed to aggravate it. All H. pylori-positive subjects showed significant up-regulation of antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase). Plain acetylsalicylic acid stronger than acetylsalicylic acid-vitamin C reduced gastric gene expression of these antioxidant enzymes. H. pylori eradication significantly decreased expression of these enzymes and this was further enhanced by plain acetylsalicylic acid, but not acetylsalicylic acid-vitamin C. Under plain acetylsalicylic acid therapy, the expression of proinflammatory cytokines was increased before and after eradication of H. pylori. We conclude that vitamin C combined with acetylsalicylic acid, unlike plain acetylsalicylic acid without vitamin C, protects gastric mucosa in man probably due the attenuation of oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines.

  2. Electron microscopy of the oxyntic cell in the gastric glands of the bullfrog, Rana catesbiana. II. The acid-secreting gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    SEDAR, A W

    1961-05-01

    The oxyntic cell in the gastric glands of the bullfrog was examined in lead hydroxide-stained sections of gastric mucosae fixed in buffered osmium tetroxide and embedded in n-butyl methacrylate. During gastric acid secretion (pH 1-2) induced by histamine administration in cannulated frogs, the pattern of fine structure in the oxyntic cell differs strikingly from that in the oxyntic cell of the non-acid-secreting stomach. The relative number of smooth surfaced profiles decreases and a greater concentration of these elements is associated with the apical region of the oxyntic cell facing the lumen of the gastric gland. Similar concentrations of these elements are found in those regions of cytoplasm surrounding intercellular canaliculi which lie between adjacent cells and communicate with the lumen of a gastric gland. In these regions, the smooth surfaced profiles (35 to 65 mmicro in width) characteristically form a tubular network. The membrane-bounded contents appear to be continuous with the extracellular medium, both on the capillary side and at the apical surface of the cell adjoining the lumen of the gastric gland. Mitochondria are distributed randomly in the cytoplasmic matrix of the oxyntic cell. PMID:13749582

  3. Effective gastric acid suppression after oral administration of enteric-coated omeprazole granules.

    PubMed

    Mohiuddin, M A; Pursnani, K G; Katzka, D A; Gideon, R M; Castell, J A; Castell, D O

    1997-04-01

    Omeprazole is inactivated by exposure to gastric acid and is formulated as a gelatin capsule containing enteric-coated granules that release the drug in alkaline medium. In clinical situations where patients are unable to take the capsule orally, the optimum means of administration is uncertain. Eleven normal volunteers were given omeprazole 20 mg every day for one week before breakfast in random order as either a 20-mg capsule with water or free enteric-coated granules with either 8 oz of orange juice, 8 oz of water with 2 Alka-Seltzer antacid tablets (aspirin free), or 1 teaspoon of apple sauce. On day 7 of each regimen, an 8-hr intragastric pH study was performed following omeprazole 20 mg and standard breakfast. The median percentage of time of gastric acid pH > 4 after an omeprazole capsule was 68.5 (25-100); after granules with orange juice 59 (43-100); after granules in Alka-Seltzer solution 63 (31-100), and after granules in apple sauce 65 (30-99), with no significant differences (ANOVA). The time for the gastric pH to reach <4' after having been above was also similar for all four regimens (ANOVA). Omeprazole granules administered orally in a variety of ways achieve gastric acid suppression as effectively as the intact capsule. PMID:9125637

  4. Inhibitory effects of acidic xylooligosaccharide on stress-induced gastric inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kyoji; Higashi, Naoki; Koga, Kunimasa

    2006-12-01

    The preventive effects of acidic xylooligosaccharide prepared from xylan of corncobs and related sugars on stress-induced gastric inflammation in mice were investigated. Oral administration of acidic xylooligosaccharide and hydrocortisone at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight significantly reduced the number of bleeding points in the gastric mucosa of mice loaded with cold-restraint stress. Acidic xylooligosaccharide showed concentration-dependent superoxide anion radical-scavenging activity at concentrations of 3.3-4.3 mg/mL and its IC50 was 3.5 mg/mL, although this value is approximately six times that of quercetin. The antioxidant activity of acidic xylooligosaccharide could contribute, in part, to its suppressive activities on stress-induced mouse gastritis. Xylose, xylobiose, xylan, and glucuronic acid showed no significant suppressive activities on mouse gastric inflammation at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. These results suggest that an appropriate degree of polymerization of xylan (larger than trimer) is necessary for the activities of acidic xylooligosaccharide.

  5. Bile acid regulates c-Jun expression through the orphan nuclear receptor SHP induction in gastric cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Won Il; Park, Min Jung; An, Jin Kwang; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Hye Young; Cheong, JaeHun Yang, Ung Suk

    2008-05-02

    Bile reflux is considered to be one of the most important causative factors in gastric carcinogenesis, due to the attendant inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. In this study, we have assessed the molecular mechanisms inherent to the contribution of bile acid to the transcriptional regulation of inflammatory-related genes. In this study, we demonstrated that bile acid induced the expression of the SHP orphan nuclear receptor at the transcriptional level via c-Jun activation. Bile acid also enhanced the protein interaction of NF-{kappa}B and SHP, thereby resulting in an increase in c-Jun expression and the production of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF{alpha}. These results indicate that bile acid performs a critical function in the regulation of the induction of inflammatory-related genes in gastric cells, and that bile acid-mediated gene expression provides a pre-clue for the development of gastric cellular malformation.

  6. Trichloroacetic acid in the environment.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, A

    2002-05-01

    Suppositions that the trichloroacetic acid (TCA, CCl3C(O)OH) found in nature was a consequence solely of the use of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents prompted this critical review of the literature on its environmental fluxes and occurrences. TCA is widely distributed in forest soils (where it was rarely used as an herbicide) and measurements suggest a soil flux of 160 000 tonnes yr(-1) in European forests alone. TCA is also produced during oxidative water treatment and the global flux could amount to 55 000 tonnes yr(-1) (from pulp and paper manufacture, potable water and cooling water treatments). By contrast, the yields of TCA from chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents are small: from tetrachloroethene 13 600 tonnes yr(-1) and from 1,1,1-trichloroethane 4300 tonnes yr(-1) on a global basis, at the atmospheric burdens and removal rates typical of the late 1990s. TCA is ubiquitous in rainwater and snow. Its concentrations are highly variable and the variations cannot be connected with location or date. However, there is no significant difference between the concentrations found in Chile and in eastern Canada (by the same analysts), or between Malawi and western Canada, or between Antarctica and Switzerland, nor any significant difference globally between the concentrations in cloud, rain and snow (although local enhancement in fog water has been shown). TCA is present in old ice and firn. At the deepest levels, the firn was deposited early in the 19th century, well before the possibility of contamination by industrial production of reactive chlorine, implying a non-industrial background. This proposition is supported by plume measurements from pulp mills in Finland. TCA is ubiquitous in soils; concentrations are very variable but there are some indications that soils under coniferous trees contain higher amounts. The concentrations of TCA found in plant tissue are region-specific and may also be plant-specific, to the extent that conifers seem to contain more than other

  7. Elemental composition of dog foods using nitric acid and simulated gastric digestions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, David G; White, Steven D; Weir, Ron D

    2013-05-01

    Eighteen dry dog foods obtained commercially in the United States were digested using microwave assisted nitric acid digestion and a simulated gastric digestion. Digests were analysed for 23 elements using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Data, expressed as dry matter concentrations, were compared to published nitric acid digestion results. Nitric acid data obtained in the present study were not statistically different from published data, with the exception of Mo, Sn, Sb, Tl and Th. However, significant differences in individual intra-sample results were observed between published studies and the present work. Simulated gastric digestions demonstrated lower extraction efficiencies (<50% nitric acid digestions) that were statistically significant. Much lower bioavailability was observed for Al, Ba and Pb. In general, elemental concentrations were determined to be lower than the appropriate Mineral Tolerance Limit or consistent with background concentrations in foodstuffs. Evaluation against Reference Doses (RfDs) showed concentrations for many elements obtained by nitric acid digestion to be above RfD levels. However, the respective simulated gastric digestion data were below or only moderately elevated above RfDs. Only arsenic displayed median and maximum concentrations at factors of five and ten above the relevant RfD. PMID:23402861

  8. Helicobacter pylori virulence factors affecting gastric proton pump expression and acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Charles E; Beeson, Craig; Suarez, Giovanni; Peek, Richard M; Backert, Steffen; Smolka, Adam J

    2015-08-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric epithelial cells and human gastric biopsies represses H,K-ATPase α subunit (HKα) gene expression and inhibits acid secretion, causing transient hypochlorhydria and supporting gastric H. pylori colonization. Infection by H. pylori strains deficient in the cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) genes cagL, cagE, or cagM, which do not transfer CagA into host cells or induce interleukin-8 secretion, does not inhibit HKα expression, nor does a cagA-deficient strain that induces IL-8. To test the hypothesis that virulence factors other than those mediating CagA translocation or IL-8 induction participate in HKα repression by activating NF-κB, AGS cells transfected with HKα promoter-Luc reporter constructs containing an intact or mutated NF-κB binding site were infected with wild-type H. pylori strain 7.13, isogenic mutants lacking cag PAI genes responsible for CagA translocation and/or IL-8 induction (cagA, cagζ, cagε, cagZ, and cagβ), or deficient in genes encoding two peptidoglycan hydrolases (slt and cagγ). H. pylori-induced AGS cell HKα promoter activities, translocated CagA, and IL-8 secretion were measured by luminometry, immunoblotting, and ELISA, respectively. Human gastric biopsy acid secretion was measured by microphysiometry. Taken together, the data showed that HKα repression is independent of IL-8 expression, and that CagA translocation together with H. pylori transglycosylases encoded by slt and cagγ participate in NF-κB-dependent HKα repression and acid inhibition. The findings are significant because H. pylori factors other than CagA and IL-8 secretion are now implicated in transient hypochlorhydria which facilitates gastric colonization and potential triggering of epithelial progression to neoplasia.

  9. Butyl hydroxy toluene antagonizes the gastric toxicity but not the pharmacological activity of acetylsalicylic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    van Kolfschoten, A A; Hagelen, F; van Noordwijk, J

    1984-03-01

    Butyl hydroxy toluene reduced gastric erosion due to acetylsalicylic acid in the rat, but not the antiinflammatory, anti-pyretic and analgesic activity. By itself, BHT exhibited activity only in the test on analgesia. PMID:6728039

  10. Is there any role of acid reducing gastric surgery in peptic ulcer perforation?

    PubMed

    Nivatvongs, Supanit

    2005-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is known to be the prime factor of peptic ulcer disease as well as NSAID usage. Although medical treatment of the bacteria can eliminate the problem for more than 90% of the infected people but the cost of treatment is high then acid reducing gastric surgery still has a definite role. The prevalence of H. pylori in peptic ulcer perferation is still unknown also whether vagotomy and gastrectomy could eradicate H. pylori. Now laparoscopic surgery especially the simple repair of the perforation has became routinely used in many part of the world. So acid reducing gastric surgery is a good choice in chronic user of NSAID and also an option for people who have H. pylori infection.

  11. Upregulation of bile acid receptor TGR5 and nNOS in gastric myenteric plexus is responsible for delayed gastric emptying after chronic high-fat feeding in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Shiyi; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Guanpo; Lu, Yuanxu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic high-fat feeding is associated with functional dyspepsia and delayed gastric emptying. We hypothesize that high-fat feeding upregulates gastric neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression, resulting in delayed gastric emptying. We propose this is mediated by increased bile acid action on bile acid receptor 1 (TGR5) located on nNOS gastric neurons. To test this hypothesis, rats were fed regular chow or a high-fat diet for 2 wk. Rats fed the high-fat diet were subjected to concurrent feeding with oral cholestyramine or terminal ileum resection. TGR5 and nNOS expression in gastric tissue was measured by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and Western blot. Gastric motility was assessed by organ bath and solid-phase gastric emptying studies. The 2-wk high-fat diet caused a significant increase in neurons coexpressing nNOS and TGR5 in the gastric myenteric plexus and an increase in nNOS and TGR5 gene expression, 67 and 111%, respectively. Enhanced nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxation, deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced inhibition in fundic tissue, and a 26% delay in gastric emptying accompanied these changes. A 24-h incubation of whole-mount gastric fundus with DCA resulted in increased nNOS and TGR5 protein expression, 41 and 37%, respectively. Oral cholestyramine and terminal ileum resection restored the enhanced gastric relaxation, as well as the elevated nNOS and TGR5 expression evoked by high-fat feeding. Cholestyramine also prevented the delay in gastric emptying. We conclude that increased levels of circulatory bile acids induced by high-fat feeding upregulate nNOS and TGR5 expression in the gastric myenteric plexus, resulting in enhanced NANC relaxation and delayed gastric emptying. PMID:25540233

  12. Quality of healing of gastric ulcers: Natural products beyond acid suppression.

    PubMed

    Kangwan, Napapan; Park, Jong-Min; Kim, Eun-Hee; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2014-02-15

    Gastric ulcer is a chronic disease featured with unexpected complications, including bleeding, stenosis and perforation, as well as a high incidence of recurrence. Clinical treatments for gastric ulcer have allowed the rapid development of potent anti-ulcer drugs during the last several decades. Gastric ulcer healing is successful with conventional treatments including H2-receptor antagonists, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been essential for ulcer healing and prevention of complications. Additionally, Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is effective in reducing ulcer recurrence and leads to physiological changes in the gastric mucosa which affect the ulcer healing process. However, in spite of these advancements, some patients have suffered from recurrence or intractability in spite of continuous anti-ulcer therapy. A new concept of the quality of ulcer healing (QOUH) was initiated that considers the reconstruction of the mucosal structure and its function for preventing ulcer recurrence. Although several gastroprotection provided these achievements of the QOUH, which PPI or other acid suppressants did not accomplish, we found that gastroprotection that originated from natural products, such as a newer formulation from either Artemisia or S-allyl cysteine from garlic, were very effective in the QOUH, as well as improving clinical symptoms with fewer side effects. In this review, we will introduce the importance of the QOUH in ulcer healing and the achievements from natural products.

  13. The effect of cola acuminata and cola nitida on gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Ibu, J O; Iyama, A C; Ijije, C T; Ishmael, D; Ibeshi, M; Nwokediuko, S

    1986-01-01

    Cola nuts are obtained from cola trees growing both wild and cultivated in the equatorial rain forest belf of Nigeria and the rest of West Coast of Africa. There are two common species namely cola accuminata which is multicotyledonous and cola nitida which is dicotyledonous. The cola nitida has two subspecies, alba and rubra (white and red respectively). The cola accuminata is more popular in the Ibo and Igedde tribes of the Eastern and Middle Belt regions respectively in Nigeria, while cola nitida is preferred by the Hausa-Fulani tribes of the Northern part of Nigeria. Both cola species contain xanthines--the same type of alkaloids found in tea and coffee. Common among these xanthine derivatives are caffeine, theophylline and theobromine. These xanthines are known to stimulate gastric acid secretion. We therefore decided to find out the effect of both species of the cola on gastric acid secretion, since this has not been reported previously. We found that both cola species significantly induced gastric acid secretion. This corroborates our clinical advice to peptic ulcer patients not to eat cola nuts.

  14. (Acidic deposition and the environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

    1990-10-24

    The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

  15. Helicobacter pylori eradication and reflux disease onset: did gastric acid get "crazy"?

    PubMed

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2013-02-14

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is highly prevalent in the general population. In the last decade, a potential relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication and GORD onset has been claimed. The main putative mechanism is the gastric acid hypersecretion that develops after bacterial cure in those patients with corpus-predominant gastritis. We performed a critical reappraisal of the intricate pathogenesis and clinical data available in this field. Oesophagitis onset after H. pylori eradication in duodenal ulcer patients has been ascribed to a gastric acid hypersecretion, which could develop following body gastritis healing. However, the absence of an acid hypersecretive status in these patients is documented by both pathophysiology and clinical studies. Indeed, duodenal ulcer recurrence is virtually abolished following H. pylori eradication. In addition, intra-oesophageal pH recording studies failed to demonstrated increased acid reflux following bacterial eradication. Moreover, oesophageal manometric studies suggest that H. pylori eradication would reduce--rather than favor--acid reflux into the oesophagus. Finally, data of clinical studies would suggest that H. pylori eradication is not significantly associated with either reflux symptoms or erosive oesophagitis onset, some data suggesting also an advantage in curing the infection when oesophagitis is already present. Therefore, the legend of "crazy acid" remains--as all the others--a fascinating, but imaginary tale.

  16. Wine and five percent ethanol are potent stimulants of gastric acid secretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Lenz, H J; Ferrari-Taylor, J; Isenberg, J I

    1983-11-01

    Previous studies reported that intragastric ethanol was not a stimulus of gastric acid secretion in humans. The effect of 240 ml of 5%, 10%, and 20% ethanol (vol/vol), equicaloric-equiosmolar control solutions, white wine (12% ethanol), bourbon whiskey (1:4 dilution with water, 10% ethanol), and water on gastric acid secretion and serum gastrin concentrations were evaluated in 8 healthy subjects. Also, to stimulate the before-meal cocktail, white wine, whiskey, or water was administered 30 min before a 50-g liquid protein meal. Five percent ethanol and white wine significantly (p less than 0.01) increased basal secretion to 58% and 82%, respectively, of the peak pentagastrin response (24.2 +/- 1.6 mmol/h). After each of the 5%, 10%, and 20% ethanol solutions, 3-h acid outputs were significantly greater than their respective equicaloric-equiosmolar controls, but only the responses to 5% and 10% ethanol were significantly greater than water alone. Total 3-h responses to white wine, 5% ethanol, and 10% whiskey, respectively, were 5, 4.5, and 2 times greater than water (p less than 0.05). Although serum gastrin was not altered by any of the ethanol solutions or bourbon whiskey, white wine significantly increases serum gastrin concentration, similar to the 50-g protein meal. These results indicate that 5% ethanol and 10% bourbon whiskey increase gastric acid secretion by a mechanism other than gastrin release. White wine markedly stimulates both an increase in acid secretion and serum gastrin concentration. The constituent(s) in wine responsible for the marked acid secretory and gastrin response is unknown.

  17. Evaluation of the efficacy of Alka-Seltzer Effervescent in gastric acid neutralization.

    PubMed

    Chen, C T; Toung, T J; Haupt, H M; Hutchins, G M; Cameron, J L

    1984-03-01

    A commercially available antacid, a mixture of sodium and potassium bicarbonates and citric acid (Alka-Seltzer Effervescent), was evaluated experimentally and clinically for its efficacy in neutralizing 0.1 N HCl and gastric contents. In an in vitro titration study, Alka-Seltzer Effervescent buffered 5-30 times the volume of HCl with a pH between 1.0 and 2.0 to above a pH of 2.5. In an isolated canine pulmonary lobe model, aspiration of the antacid or acid-antacid mixture caused only a mild increase in lobe weight and did not increase intrapulmonary shunting. In the clinical study, when the antacid was given 5-40 min before administration of general anesthesia in a group of patients for emergency surgery, the pH of the gastric contents in each patient was increased to above 4.0. This contrasts with the control group of patients, which showed 50% (P less than 0.05) of the patients were at risk when no antacid was administered. Preoperative administration of Alka-Seltzer effectively increases the pH of the gastric contents in patients undergoing emergency surgery. PMID:6703349

  18. Correlation of salivary and gastric acid secretions in duodenal ulcer patients in tropics

    PubMed Central

    Nagwani, P. L.; Naik, S. R.; Sachdev, S.; Srivastava, P. N.; Chuttani, H. K.

    1979-01-01

    Salivary flow rates on mechanical stimulation by forced spitting method and by chemical stimulation with 10% citric acid and gastric acidity using an augmented histamine test were determined in 20 adult patients suffering from duodenal ulcer and in 20 adult control subjects matched with respect to age, sex, and body weight. Salivary flow rates were found to be much higher in response to chemical than to mechanical stimulus in both the groups. Duodenal ulcer patients exhibited an unexplained exaggerated response to chemical stimulation. Salivary pH, amylase, sodium, and potassium levels showed no significant differences between the two groups. The flow rates by either method generally showed a positive correlation with body weight in both the groups. Histamine stimulated gastric acid secretion was higher in duodenal ulcer patients than in controls. Acid secretion did not appear to be related to weight and also showed no consistent correlation with the salivary flow rates. It was concluded that (1) the salivary flow was dependent on body weight in duodenal ulcer patients as well as in controls, and (2) although salivary gland hyperplasia could be postulated in duodenal ulcer patients on the basis of increased salivary flow, the latter was poorly related to maximal acid secretion and therefore, if a combination of parietal cell and salivary gland hyperplasia did exist, it should be considered as incidental. PMID:488755

  19. Gastric ulcer treatment: cure of Helicobacter pylori infection without subsequent acid-suppressive therapy: is it effective?

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen; van der Knoop, Bloeme

    2008-06-01

    Whether it is a requirement to continue with anti-secretory therapy following anti-Helicobacter therapy in H. pylori positive gastric ulcers is an important question. As gastric ulcers tend to heal more slowly than duodenal ulcers, may be asymptomatic or only causing mild symptoms and success at curing H. pylori with current fist line therapies is 80% at best, clinicians will likely err on the side of caution and continue acid suppressive therapy to ensure healing of gastric ulcers. This is certainly recommended when dealing with bleeding ulcers.

  20. Perceptually Docked Control Environment for Multiple Microbots: Application to the Gastric Wall Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Ka Wai; Sun, Loi Wah; Vitiello, Valentina; James, David R. C.; Mylonas, George P.; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a human-robot interface with perceptual docking to allow for the control of multiple microbots. The aim is to demonstrate that real-time eye tracking can be used for empowering robots with human vision by using knowledge acquired in situ. Several micro-robots can be directly controlled through a combination of manual and eye control. The novel control environment is demonstrated on a virtual biopsy of gastric lesion through an endoluminal approach. Twenty-one subjects were recruited to test the control environment. Statistical analysis was conducted on the completion time of the task using the keyboard control and the proposed eye tracking framework. System integration with the concept of perceptual docking framework demonstrated statistically significant improvement of task execution. PMID:24748996

  1. Potential immunological consequences of pharmacological suppression of gastric acid production in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sangita; Benedict, Stephen H; Lynch, Sharon G; LeVine, Steven M

    2012-06-07

    Corticosteroids are standard treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing acute relapse. Because dyspeptic pain is a common side effect of this intervention, patients can be given a histamine receptor-2 antagonist, proton pump inhibitor or antacid to prevent or ameliorate this disturbance. Additionally, patients with multiple sclerosis may be taking these medications independent of corticosteroid treatment. Interventions for gastric disturbances can influence the activation state of the immune system, a principal mediator of pathology in multiple sclerosis. Although histamine release promotes inflammation, activation of the histamine receptor-2 can suppress a proinflammatory immune response, and blocking histamine receptor-2 with an antagonist could shift the balance more towards immune stimulation. Studies utilizing an animal model of multiple sclerosis indicate that histamine receptor-2 antagonists potentially augment disease activity in patients with multiple sclerosis. In contrast, proton pump inhibitors appear to favor immune suppression, but have not been studied in models of multiple sclerosis. Antacids, histamine receptor-2 antagonists and proton pump inhibitors also could alter the intestinal microflora, which may indirectly lead to immune stimulation. Additionally, elevated gastric pH can promote the vitamin B12 deficiency that patients with multiple sclerosis are at risk of developing. Here, we review possible roles of gastric acid inhibitors on immunopathogenic mechanisms associated with multiple sclerosis.

  2. Pancreatic spasmolytic polypeptide protects the gastric mucosa but does not inhibit acid secretion or motility.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, C; Marchbank, T; Playford, R J; Otto, W; Thim, L; Parsons, M E

    1997-07-01

    The objectives of these studies were to examine whether the trefoil peptide porcine pancreatic spasmolytic polypeptide (PSP) had gastric mucosal protectant properties similar to its human equivalent human spasmolytic polypeptide (hSP) and to confirm the antisecretory and antimotility action of the peptide. PSP and recombinant hSP reduced gastric mucosal damage caused by a combination of subcutaneous indomethacin and restraint stress in the conscious rat. At a dose of 500 micrograms/kg bolus plus 500 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 sc, PSP significantly reduced the total area of damage by 58%. PSP at a dose of 150 micrograms/kg iv had no inhibitory effect on pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in the perfused stomachs of anesthetized rats. This lack of antisecretory activity was confirmed in vitro using an isolated stomach preparation from the immature rat. PSP and hSP at concentrations up to 800 nM did not inhibit electrically or chemically evoked contractions of the guinea pig ileum and duodenum in vitro. Thus antisecretory and antimotility actions do not underlie the mucosal protectant properties of PSP. PSP did, however, stimulate cell migration, and this may, at least in part, account for its protectant properties.

  3. Potential immunological consequences of pharmacological suppression of gastric acid production in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Corticosteroids are standard treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing acute relapse. Because dyspeptic pain is a common side effect of this intervention, patients can be given a histamine receptor-2 antagonist, proton pump inhibitor or antacid to prevent or ameliorate this disturbance. Additionally, patients with multiple sclerosis may be taking these medications independent of corticosteroid treatment. Interventions for gastric disturbances can influence the activation state of the immune system, a principal mediator of pathology in multiple sclerosis. Although histamine release promotes inflammation, activation of the histamine receptor-2 can suppress a proinflammatory immune response, and blocking histamine receptor-2 with an antagonist could shift the balance more towards immune stimulation. Studies utilizing an animal model of multiple sclerosis indicate that histamine receptor-2 antagonists potentially augment disease activity in patients with multiple sclerosis. In contrast, proton pump inhibitors appear to favor immune suppression, but have not been studied in models of multiple sclerosis. Antacids, histamine receptor-2 antagonists and proton pump inhibitors also could alter the intestinal microflora, which may indirectly lead to immune stimulation. Additionally, elevated gastric pH can promote the vitamin B12 deficiency that patients with multiple sclerosis are at risk of developing. Here, we review possible roles of gastric acid inhibitors on immunopathogenic mechanisms associated with multiple sclerosis. PMID:22676575

  4. Teaching the Role of Secretin in the Regulation of Gastric Acid Secretion Using a Classic Paper by Johnson and Grossman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Kristen L. W.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of gastric acid secretion has been the subject of investigation for over a century. Inhibition of gastrin-induced acid secretion by the intestine-derived hormone secretin provides a classic physiological example of negative feedback in the gastrointestinal tract. A classic paper by Leonard R. Johnson and Morton I. Grossman clearly…

  5. Effects of L-glutamine on acetylsalycylic acid induced gastric lesions and acid back diffusion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hung, C R; Takeuchi, K; Okabe, S; Murata, T; Takagi, K

    1976-12-01

    Effects of L-glutamine on acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)-induced gastric mucosal lesions were studied in mongrel dogs. It was confirmed that when oral ASA at 1.0 or 2.0 g per dog is given in two divided doses, there is severe and consistent dose-dependent mucosal damage in the glandular portion of the stomach in fasted dogs. However, when L-glutamine 2.0 or 4.0 g per dog in two divided doses is given concomitantly with ASA 2.0 g per dog orally, the gastric irritation is significantly inhibited. Instillation of 20 mM of ASA in 100 mM HCl solution into the Heidenhain pouch of Beagle dogs produced a significant loss of H+ from the pouch and a gain of Na+ in the lumen compared with ASA-free controls. When L-glutamine (100 mM) was given concomitantly with ASA (20 mM) into the pouch, changes of electrolyte fluxes in response to ASA alone were significantly suppressed. However, 50 mM of L-glutamine had no appreciable effect on acid back diffusion caused by ASA 20 mM. The amino acid itself had little effect on the ionic movement in the pouch. Gross bleeding from the pouch treated with ASA was never observed with the concomitant dosing of ASA and L-glutamine 50 or 100 mM. PMID:15154

  6. Gastric mycosis following gastric resection and vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Rehnberg, O; Faxen, A; Haglund, U; Kewenter, J; Stenquist, B; Olbe, L

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective five-year follow-up study of 289 consecutive patients subjected to antrectomy and gastroduodenostomy with or without vagotomy, 130 patients underwent gastroscopy. Gastric mycosis was present almost exclusively in patients subjected to combined antrectomy and vagotomy (36%). Gastric acidity seemed to be of only minor or no importance in the development of the mycosis. The residual volume in the gastric remnant was significantly higher in patients with gastric mycosis. The impaired emptying of the gastric remnant is most likely a vagotomy effect and may be the main reason for the development of gastric mycosis. A simple but effective method was developed to evacuate gastric yeast cell aggregates. Gastric mycosis seems to give rise to only slight symptoms, mainly nausea and foul-smelling belching, whereas the reflux of duodenal contents that often occurred in combination with gastric mycosis was more likely to cause gastritis and substantial discomfort. PMID:7092348

  7. Investigation of mechanism of fade of gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in the cat.

    PubMed

    Hirst, B H

    1988-01-01

    1. In conscious cats prepared with gastric fistulae gastric acid secretion in response to pentagastrin was found to reach a maximum after 45 min of stimulation, and to fade thereafter. Over the period 45-150 min of stimulation the fade was 5.4-7.8% of the maximum response per 15 min. 2. Once the response to pentagastrin had declined, acid secretion could not be restored by doubling the dose of pentagastrin, although an equisecretory dose of histamine could restore it. 3. Low doses of histamine were additive to the pentagastrin acid secretory response; they tended to prolong the peak response, but did not alter the subsequent fade of acid secretion. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist mepyramine did not affect maximal acid secretion or the fade of the pentagastrin response. 4. The beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist propranolol increased the secretory response to pentagastrin, whilst the alpha-adrenoreceptor antagonist phentolamine was without effect. Neither agent altered the fade of the pentagastrin response. Isoprenaline tended to inhibit pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion and increase the rate of fade of the response. 5. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor antagonist methylsergide slightly enhanced the acid secretory response to pentagastrin, but did not alter the fade of the response. A low dose of 5-HT did not alter pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion, whilst a higher dose of 5-HT inhibited it. 6. Tetra-, penta- and pentadecagastrin demonstrated tachyphylaxis, i.e. progressively reduced responses upon repeated stimulation, whilst histamine did not. A low dose of histamine did not prevent tachyphylaxis of the pentagastrin response. 7. It is concluded that fade of pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion in the conscious cat cannot be satisfactorily explained by the failure of the acid secretory mechanism, depletion of histamine, release of 5-HT, or activation of histamine H1-, alpha- or beta-adreno-, or 5-HT-receptors. The similar characteristics of fade

  8. Electron microscopy of the oxyntic cell in the gastric glands of the bullfrog (Rana catesbiana). I. The non-acid-secreting gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    SEDAR, A W

    1961-01-01

    The fine structure of the oxyntic cell from the gastric glands of the bullfrog was studied in lead hydroxide-stained sections of gastric mucosa fixed in buffered osmium tetroxide and embedded in n-butyl methacrylate. The oxyntic cell in non-acid-secreting stomachs (gastric juice pH, 7.4-7.8) is characterized by: (a) numerous closely packed smooth surfaced vesicular and tubular profiles disposed randomly in the cell; some of these elements show interconnections making it possible to identify this component with smooth surfaced endoplasmic reticula of certain other cell types, (b) a small percentage of rough surfaced profiles characteristic of endoplasmic reticula possessing RNP particles on the outer membrane surfaces, (c) a Golgi complex consisting of multiple isolated non-polarized arrays of smooth surfaced parallel elongated profiles and associated vesicular elements, (d) a sparse granular component (140 A) scattered freely in the cytoplasmic matrix, (e) numerous mitochondria with a dense matrix and containing an unusually large number of closely approximated cristae, (f) a number of zymogen granules consisting of either a dense body limited by a membrane or surrounded by a halo of less dense material which is in turn limited by a membrane, and (g) a number of granules ( approximately 260 A) containing several smaller granules ( approximately 80 A) identified presumably as glycogen. Intracellular canaliculi were not observed. Instead the free surface of the oxyntic cell facing the lumen of the gastric gland shows a complicated plication of the plasma membrane. Intercellular canaliculi are seen frequently between adjacent oxyntic cells. The walls of these canaliculi are made up of folded and ruffled cell membranes. The basal surface of the cell also exhibited this type of configuration. Occasional smooth surfaced profiles are seen communicating with the free surface, the wall of an intercellular canaliculus, or the basal surface of the cell. Although nerve endings

  9. The Effect of Cochinchina momordica Seed Extract on Gastric Acid Secretion and Morphologic Change in Aged Rat Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyun Jin; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Chang, Hyun; Kim, Joo-Hyon; Park, Ji Hyun; Kang, Jung Mook; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Cochinchina momordica seed extract (SK-MS10) has a gastric protective effect. We aimed to assess the effect of SK-MS10 on gastric acid secretion with morphologic changes in the aged rat. Methods Acid secretions were evaluated in the male F344 rats of four different ages (6-, 31-, 74-week, and 2-year). The 31-week-old rats were divided to three groups and continuously administered chow containing vehicle, SK-MS10 and lansoprazole, respectively. At the age of 74 weeks and 2 years, basal and stimulated acid was measured and the expression of mRNA and protein of H+-K+-ATPase were determined. The area of connective tissue of lamina propria was measured. Results Basal and stimulated gastric acid significantly decreased and connective tissue of lamina propria increased with age. The expression of mRNA and protein of H+-K+-ATPase significantly decreased with age. However, 74-week-old rats in the SK-MS10 group had higher stimulated gastric acid secretion than those in the vehicle and lansoprazole groups. In 2-year-old rats of SK-MS10 group, there was no increase of connective tissue. Conclusions As SK-MS10 kept the capacity of acid secretion as well as connective tissue area to comparable to young rats, it might valuable to perform further research regarding mechanism of SK-MS10 as an antiaging agent in the stomach. PMID:24073314

  10. Complete inhibition of food-stimulated gastric acid secretion by combined application of pirenzepine and ranitidine.

    PubMed Central

    Londong, W; Londong, V; Ruthe, C; Weizert, P

    1981-01-01

    In a double-blind, placebo controlled and randomised secretory study the effectiveness of pirenzepine, ranitidine, and their combination was compared intraindividually in eight healthy subjects receiving intravenous bolus injections. Pirenzepine (0.15 mg/kg) plus ranitidine (0.6 mg/kg) suppressed peptone-stimulated gastric acid secretion from 69 +/- 11 to 2 +/- 0.4 mmol H+/3 h; the mean percentage inhibition was 97%. Postprandial gastrin was unaffected. There were only minor side-effects in a few experiments (reduction of salivation, brief blurring of vision), but no prolactin stimulation after ranitidine or ranitidine plus pirenzepine. The combined application of ranitidine and pirenzepine inhibited meal-stimulated acid secretion more effectively and produced fewer side-effects than the combination of cimetidine plus pirenzepine studied previously. PMID:6114900

  11. Effects of inhibition gastric acid secretion on arterial acid-base status during digestion in the toad Bufo marinus.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Johnnie B; Andrade, Denis V; Wang, Tobias

    2003-07-01

    Digestion affects acid-base status, because the net transfer of HCl from the blood to the stomach lumen leads to an increase in HCO3(-) levels in both extra- and intracellular compartments. The increase in plasma [HCO3(-)], the alkaline tide, is particularly pronounced in amphibians and reptiles, but is not associated with an increased arterial pH, because of a concomitant rise in arterial PCO2 caused by a relative hypoventilation. In this study, we investigate whether the postprandial increase in PaCO2 of the toad Bufo marinus represents a compensatory response to the increased plasma [HCO3(-)] or a state-dependent change in the control of pulmonary ventilation. To this end, we successfully prevented the alkaline tide, by inhibiting gastric acid secretion with omeprazole, and compared the response to that of untreated toads determined in our laboratory during the same period. In addition, we used vascular infusions of bicarbonate to mimic the alkaline tide in fasting animals. Omeprazole did not affect blood gases, acid-base and haematological parameters in fasting toads, but abolished the postprandial increase in plasma [HCO3(-)] and the rise in arterial PCO2 that normally peaks 48 h into the digestive period. Vascular infusion of HCO3(-), that mimicked the postprandial rise in plasma [HCO3(-)], led to a progressive respiratory compensation of arterial pH through increased arterial PCO2. Thus, irrespective of whether the metabolic alkalosis is caused by gastric acid secretion in response to a meal or experimental infusion of bicarbonate, arterial pH is being maintained by an increased arterial PCO2. It seems, therefore, that the elevated PCO2, occuring during the postprandial period, constitutes of a regulated response to maintain pH rather than a state-dependent change in ventilatory control.

  12. Anti-Warburg effect of rosmarinic acid via miR-155 in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuai; Yang, Shaohua; Cai, Zhai; Pan, Dongyue; Li, Zhou; Huang, Zonghai; Zhang, Pusheng; Zhu, Huijuan; Lei, Lijun; Wang, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    Background The Warburg effect refers to glycolytic production of adenosine triphosphate under aerobic conditions, and is a universal property of most cancer cells. Chronic inflammation is a key factor promoting the Warburg effect. This study aimed to determine whether rosmarinic acid (RA) has an anti-Warburg effect in gastric carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism for the anti-Warburg effect was also investigated. Methods An MTT assay was used to examine MKN45 cell growth in vitro. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect proinflammatory cytokines. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate levels of microRNA expression in cells. Protein expression was determined by Western blotting assay. Mouse xenograft models were established using MKN45 cells to assess the anti-Warburg effect in gastric carcinoma in vivo. Results RA suppressed glucose uptake and lactate production. It also inhibited expression of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, which affects the glycolytic pathway. Inflammation promoted the Warburg effect in cancer cells. As expected, RA inhibited proinflammatory cytokines and microRNAs related to inflammation, suggesting that RA may suppress the Warburg effect via an inflammatory pathway, such as that involving interleukin (IL)-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3). miR-155 was found to be an important mediator in the relationship between inflammation and tumorigenesis. We further showed that miR-155 was the target gene regulating the Warburg effect via inactivation of the IL-6/STAT3 pathway. Moreover, we found that RA suppressed the Warburg effect in vivo. Conclusion RA might potentially be a therapeutic agent for suppressing the Warburg effect in gastric carcinoma. PMID:26056431

  13. Effect of glyceric acid calcium salt on the viability of ethanol-dosed gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Habe, Hiroshi; Sato, Shun; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai; Sakaki, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    D-Glyceric acid (D-GA) calcium has been reported to accelerate ethanol oxidation in vivo in rats (Eriksson et al., Metabolism, 56, 895-898 (2007)). However, no other reports have shown that D-GA can reduce the harmful effects of ethanol. In this study, the effects of D-, L-, and DL-GA calcium on ethanol-dosed gastric cell viability were investigated using human gastric carcinoma cells (Kato III) and normal rat gastric mucosa cells (RGM1). Addition of 2% and 3 % ethanol to Kato III and RGM1 cells, respectively, decreased their cell viability by approximately 20-50 % after 24 or 72 h of cultivation. In 2 % ethanol-dosed Kato III cells cultivated for 24 h, addition of 0.002-20 µg/mL D- and L-GA calcium did not affect cell viability. Similarly, addition of less than 20 µg/mL DL-GA calcium did not affect cell viability. However, when 20 µg/mL DL-GA calcium was added, cell viability increased by 35.7 % after 72 h of incubation, compared to the viability of control cells without ethanol or GA. Addition of 20 µg/mL DL-GA calcium to 3 % ethanol-dosed RGM1 cells cultivated for 24 or 72 h also increased cell viability up to those observed in control cells. These results suggest that a racemic mixture of GA may have the strongest effect on enhancing the viability of ethanol-exposed cells. PMID:22027025

  14. Colonization of an acid resistant Kingella denitrificans in the stomach may contribute to gastric dysbiosis by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Hidekazu; Yanai, Hideo; Nishikawa, Jun; Nakazawa, Teruko; Iizasa, Hisashi; Jinushi, Masahisa; Sakaida, Isao; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2014-03-01

    In the stomach of a gastric ulcer patient who had been administered an anti-acid, a gram-negative and urease-negative bacillus similar in size to Helicobacter pylori was infected together with H. pylori. According to biochemical test and 16S rRNA gene analysis, the urease-negative bacterium was identified as Kingella denitrificans, a human nasopharyngeal commensal. In contrast to the standard strain of K. denitrificans, the isolate showed catalase activity, did not produce acid from glucose, and exhibited acid tolerance. Acid tolerance of H. pylori was increased by cocultivation with the K. denitrificans isolate, but not with other isolates of K. denitrificans. Disruption of physiological and immunological niche by dysbiotic colonization of bacterium may provide pathological attributes to human stomach. Collectively, a careful administration of anti-acids to the elderly, especially those with atrophic gastritis, is necessary to avoid repression of the gastric barrier to bacteria.

  15. Protective Effect of Cod (Gadus macrocephalus) Skin Collagen Peptides on Acetic Acid-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huina; Wang, Zhicong; Hou, Hu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-07-01

    This research was performed to explore the protective effect of cod skin collagen peptides (CCP) on gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. The CCP were fractionated into low molecular CCP (LMCCP, Mw < 3 kDa) and high molecular CCP (HMCCP, Mw > 3 kDa). In HMCCP and LMCCP, glycine of accounted for about one-third of the total amino acids without cysteine and tryptophan, and hydrophobic amino acids accounted for about 50%. After 21 d CCP treatment (60 or 300 mg/kg, p.o./daily), the healing effects on acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers were evaluated by macroscopic measure, microscopic measure, and immune histochemistry. Moreover, the expression levels of the growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was detected. The results showed that both LMCCP and HMCCP could significantly decrease the ulcer areas and promote the healing of the lesions. They also could improve the levels of hexosamine, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, and reduce the content of malondialdehyde and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, the expression level of TGFβ1 gene and HSP70 mRNA was significantly improved by the treatment. It suggested that CCP could be able to improve symptoms of gastric ulcer and probably be used in the treatment of gastric ulcer. PMID:27219644

  16. Mycophenolic Acid Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Gastric Cancer Cells via Multiple Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Boying; Sharma, Ashok; Teng, Yong; Liu, Haitao; Purohit, Sharad; Xu, Heng; Zeng, Lingwen; She, Jin-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is the metabolized product and active element of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) that has been widely used for the prevention of acute graft rejection. MPA potently inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) that is up-regulated in many tumors and MPA is known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation as well as fibroblast and endothelial cell migration. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time MPA’s antimigratory and anti-invasion abilities of MPA-sensitive AGS (gastric cancer) cells. Genome-wide expression analyses using Illumina whole genome microarrays identified 50 genes with ≥2 fold changes and 15 genes with > 4 fold alterations and multiple molecular pathways implicated in cell migration. Real-time RT-PCR analyses of selected genes also confirmed the expression differences. Furthermore, targeted proteomic analyses identified several proteins altered by MPA treatment. Our results indicate that MPA modulates gastric cancer cell migration through down-regulation of a large number of genes (PRKCA, DOCK1, INF2, HSPA5, LRP8 and PDGFRA) and proteins (PRKCA, AKT, SRC, CD147 and MMP1) with promigratory functions as well as up-regulation of a number of genes with antimigratory functions (ATF3, SMAD3, CITED2 and CEAMCAM1). However, a few genes that may promote migration (CYR61 and NOS3) were up-regulated. Therefore, MPA’s overall antimigratory role on cancer cells reflects a balance between promigratory and antimigratory signals influenced by MPA treatment. PMID:24260584

  17. Okadaic Acid Toxin at Sublethal Dose Produced Cell Proliferation in Gastric and Colon Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Miguel; Toledo, Héctor; Lagos, Néstor

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of Okadaic Acid (OA) on the proliferation of gastric and colon epithelial cells, the main target tissues of the toxin. We hypothesized that OA, at sublethal doses, activates multiple signaling pathways, such as Erk and Akt, through the inhibition of PP2A. To demonstrate this, we carried out curves of doses and time response against OA in AGS, MKN-45 and Caco 2 cell lines, and found an increase in the cell proliferation at sublethal doses, at 24 h or 48 h exposure. Indeed, cells can withstand high concentrations of the toxin at 4 h exposure, the time chosen considering the maximum time before total gastric emptying. We have proved that this increased proliferation is due to an overexpression of Cyclin B, a cyclin that promotes the passage from G2 to mitosis. In addition, we have demonstrated that OA induces activation of Akt and Erk in the three cells lines, showing that OA can activate pathways involved in oncogenesis. In conclusion, this study contributes to the knowledge about the possible effects of chronic OA consumption. PMID:24317467

  18. Gastric acid induces mucosal H2S release in rats by upregulating mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine gamma lyase.

    PubMed

    Mard, Seyyed Ali; Veisi, Ali; Ahangarpour, Akram; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects the gastric mucosa against gastric acid and other noxious stimulants by several mechanisms but until now the effect of gastric acid on H2S production has not been evaluated. This study was performed to determine the effect of basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion on mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta synthase (CBS), and on mucosal release of H2S in rats. Seventy-two male rats were randomly assigned into 9 groups (8 in each)-control, distention, and pentagastrin-induced gastric acid secretion groups. The effects of 15% alcohol solution, propargylglycine (PAG), L-NAME, and pantoprazole were also investigated. Under anesthesia, animals underwent tracheostomy and midline laparotomy. A catheter was inserted into the stomach through the duodenum for gastric washout. At the end of the experiments, the animals were killed and the gastric mucosa was collected to measure H2S concentration and to quantify mRNA expression of CSE and CBS by quantitative real-time PCR, and expression of their proteins by western blot. Basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion increased mucosal levels of H2S, and mRNA and protein expression of CSE. Pantoprazole and L-NAME reversed H2S release and restored protein expression of CSE to the control level. Pantoprazole, but not propargylglycine, pretreatment inhibited the elevated level of protein expression of eNOS in response to distention-induced gastric acid secretion. Our findings indicated that NO mediated the stimulatory effect of gastric acid on H2S release and protein expression of CSE. PMID:26319795

  19. PMK-S005 Alleviates Age-Related Gastric Acid Secretion, Inflammation, and Oxidative Status in the Rat Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Ju Yup; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Suh, Ji Hyung; Lee, Sun Min; Ham, Min Hee; Jo, Hyun Jin; Shim, Young Kwang; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Jong-Chan; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the synthetic S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC) PMK-S005 on gastric acid secretion, inflammation, and antioxidant enzymes in aging rats. Methods The rats were divided into four groups at 31 weeks of age and were continuously fed a diet containing a vehicle control, PMK-S005 (5 or 10 mg/kg), or lansoprazole (5 mg/kg). Gastric acid secretion and connective tissue thickness of the lamina propria were evaluated at 74 weeks and 2 years of age. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and COX-2 levels were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) or Western blot assays. Levels of antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxyganase 1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), were also measured. Results As the rats aged, gastric acid secretion significantly decreased, and the connective tissue of the lamina propria increased. However, 74-week-old rats in the PMK-S005 group exhibited greater levels of gastric acid secretion than those of the control and lansoprazole groups. The increase of TNF-α, IL-1β, and COX-2 expression in 74-week and 2-year-old control rats were inhibited by PMK-S005. In addition, the decrease in HO-1 and NQO-1 protein expression that occurred with aging was inhibited by PMK-S005 in the 74-week-old rats. Conclusions These results suggest that PMK-S005 has therapeutic potential as an antiaging agent to ameliorate age-related gastric acid secretion, inflammation, and oxidative stress in the stomach. PMID:27172930

  20. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  1. AA-PMe, a novel asiatic acid derivative, induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yue; Wang, Gang; Ge, Ying; Xu, Minjie; Tang, Shuainan; Gong, Zhunan

    2016-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AA; 2α,3β,23-trihydroxyurs-12-ene-28-oic acid) is widely used for medicinal purposes in many Asian countries due to its various bioactivities. A series of AA derivatives has been synthesized in attempts to improve its therapeutic potencies. Herein we investigated the anti-tumor activities of N-(2α,3β,23-acetoxyurs-12-en-28-oyl)-l-proline methyl ester (AA-PMe), a novel AA derivative. AA-PMe exhibited a stronger anti-cancer activity than its parent compound AA. AA-PMe inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and HGC27 human gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but had no significant toxicity in human gastric mucosa epithelial cells (GES-1). AA-PMe induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and blocked G1-S transition, which correlated well with marked decreases in levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase CKD4, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein, and increase in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P15. Further, AA-PMe induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells by affecting Bcl-2, Bax, c-Myc, and caspase-3. Moreover, AA-PMe suppressed the migration and invasion of human gastric cancer cells (SGC7901 and HGC27) cells by downregulating the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Overall, this study investigated the potential anti-cancer activities of AA-PMe including inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that AA-PMe is a promising anti-cancer drug candidate in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27073325

  2. Yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL 2716 (LG21 yogurt) accelerated the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masayuki; Shimizu, Kimiko; Kurakazu, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    We have reported that LG21 yogurt containing Lactobacillus gasseri OLL 2716 (LG21 yogurt) inhibits the formation of HCl-induced acute gastric lesions through the generation of prostaglandin E₂. This study aimed to determine the role of viable Lactobacillus in the healing of acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer. LG21 yogurt or γ-ray radiated LG21 yogurt was administered orally twice a day for 10 d at a dose of 5 ml/kg. LG21 yogurt significantly accelerated the healing of the ulcer, but γ-ray radiated LG21 yogurt did not. However, both yogurts significantly inhibited HCl-induced gastric erosive lesions and enhanced the generation of gastric mucosal prostaglandin E₂. From the above results, it was found that viable bacteria are needed to accelerate the healing of chronic gastric ulcer, but not to inhibit gastric lesions.

  3. Relation between acid back-diffusion and luminal surface hydrophobicity in canine gastric mucosa: Effects of salicylate and prostaglandin

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The stomach is thought to be protected from luminal acid by a gastric mucosal barrier that restricts the diffusion of acid into tissue. This study tested the hypothesis that the hydrophobic luminal surface of canine gastric mucosa incubated in Ussing chambers, impedes the back-diffusion of luminal acid into the tissue. Isolated sheets of mucosa were treated with cimetidine to inhibit spontaneous acid secretion, and incubated under conditions that prevented significant secretion of luminal bicarbonate. By measuring acid loss from the luminal compartment using the pH-stat technique, acid back-diffusion was continuously monitored; potential difference (PD) was measured as an index of tissue viability. Tissue luminal surface hydrophobicity was estimated by contact angle analysis at the end of each experiment. Addition of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E{sub 2} to the nutrient compartment enhanced luminal surface hydrophobicity, but did not reduce acid back-diffusion in tissues that maintained a constant PD. 10 mM salicylate at pH 4.00 in the luminal compartment reduced surface hydrophobicity, but this decrease did not occur if 1 ug/ml prostaglandin was present in the nutrient solution. Despite possessing relatively hydrophilic and relatively hydrophobic surface properties, respectively, acid back-diffusion in the absence of salicylate was not significantly different between these two groups. Neither group maintained a PD after incubation with salicylate. Lastly, radiolabeled salicylate was used to calculate the free (non-salicylate associated) acid loss in tissues incubated with salicylate and/or prostaglandin. No significant correlation was found between free acid back-diffusion and luminal surface hydrophobicity. These data do not support the hypothesis that acid back-diffusion in impeded by the hydrophobic surface presented by isolated canine gastric mucosa.

  4. A Chronological Increase in Gastric Acid Secretion from 1995 to 2014 in Young Japanese Healthy Volunteers under the Age of 40 Years Old.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Abe, Yasuhiko; Ohara, Shuichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    Gastric acid secretion levels are an important determinant of the manifestation of acid-related upper GI diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux disease. We recently reported that gastric acid secretion levels did not change from the 1990s to 2010s in H. pylori-negative asymptomatic Japanese outpatients with a mean age of 63 years old. However, because young people have a quite different lifestyle, including dietary pattern, from elderly people in Japan, it is worth investigating any chronologic changes in gastric acid secretion in younger generations. The aim of this analysis is to investigate the potential changes in gastric acid secretion from 1995 to 2014 in young Japanese healthy volunteers. Eighty-eight young Japanese healthy volunteers under the age of 40 with a mean age of 26 were extracted from a database accumulated from 1995 to 2014 for the present analysis. Their gastrin-stimulated gastric acid level was determined with the endoscopic gastrin test. In 76 H. pylori-negative subjects, gastric acid secretion levels showed a significant positive correlation with the calendar year when the test was performed (r = 0.27, p < 0.01). A similar trend was observed in 12 H. pylori-positive subjects. A chronological 5-year time period showed a significant positive association with gastric acid secretion in univariate and multivariate analyses (p < 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively). Gastric acid secretion levels have been increasing in young Japanese healthy volunteers during the last 20 years. We need to monitor future trends in the prevalence of acid-related diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease in Japan. PMID:27440759

  5. Positional specificity of gastric hydrolysis of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids of seal milk triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Iverson, S J; Sampugna, J; Oftedal, O T

    1992-11-01

    Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) of marine oils are important dietary components for both infants and adults, and are incorporated into milks following maternal dietary intake. However, little is known about the hydrolysis of these PUFA from milk triglycerides (TG) by lipases in suckling young. Seals, like humans, possess gastric lipase; however, the milk lipids of seals and sea lions are almost devoid of the readily hydrolyzable medium-chain fatty acids, and are characterized by a large percentage (10-30%) of n-3 PUFA. Gastric hydrolysis of milk lipids was studied in vivo in suckling pups of three species (the California sea lion, the harp seal and the hooded seal) in order to elucidate the actions and specificity of gastric lipases on milk TG in relation to fatty acid composition and TG structure. Regardless of milk fat content (31-61% fat) or extent of gastric hydrolysis (10-56%), the same fatty acids were preferentially released in all three species, as determined by their relative enrichment in the free fatty acid (FFA) fraction. In addition to 16:1 and 18:0, these were the PUFA of 18 carbons and longer, except for 22:6n-3. Levels of 20:5n-3 were most notably enriched in FFA, at up to five times that found in the TG. Although 22:6n-3 was apparently also released from the TG (reduced in the diglyceride), it was also notably reduced in FFA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Intake to Regulate Helicobacter pylori-Associated Gastric Diseases as Nonantimicrobial Dietary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Min; Jeong, Migyeong; Kim, Eun-Hee; Han, Young-Min; Kwon, Sung Hun; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), commonly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have been acknowledged as essential long-chain fatty acids imposing either optimal health promotion or the rescuing from chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, fatty liver, and various inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Recent studies dealing with EPA and DHA have sparked highest interests because detailed molecular mechanisms had been documented with the identification of its receptor, G protein coupled receptor, and GPR120. In this review article, we have described clear evidences showing that n-3 PUFAs could reduce various Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori-) associated gastric diseases and extended to play even cancer preventive outcomes including H. pylori-associated gastric cancer by influencing multiple targets, including proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, inflammation, and metastasis. Since our previous studies strongly concluded that nonantimicrobial dietary approach for reducing inflammation, for instance, application of phytoceuticals, probiotics, natural products including Korean red ginseng, and walnut plentiful of n-3 PUFAs, might be prerequisite step for preventing H. pylori-associated gastric cancer as well as facilitating the rejuvenation of precancerous atrophic gastritis, these beneficial lipids can restore or modify inflammation-associated lipid distortion and correction of altered lipid rafts to send right signaling to maintain healthy stomach even after chronic H. pylori infection. PMID:26339635

  7. Do sensory neurons mediate adaptive cytoprotection of gastric mucosa against bile acid injury?

    PubMed

    Mercer, D W; Ritchie, W P; Dempsey, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate protects the gastric mucosa from the injury induced by the subsequent application of 5 mmol acidified taurocholate, a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive cytoprotection." How this occurs remains an enigma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of sensory neurons and mucus secretion in this phenomenon. Prior to injury with 5 mmol acidified taurocholate (pH 1.2), the stomachs of six groups of rats were subjected to the following protocol. Two groups were topically pretreated with either saline or the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Two other groups received the topical anesthetic 1% lidocaine prior to pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. The last two groups got the mucolytic agent 10% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Injury was assessed by measuring net transmucosal ion fluxes, luminal appearance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and gross and histologic injury. Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate significantly decreased bile acid-induced luminal ion fluxes and DNA accumulation, suggesting mucosal protection (corroborated by gross and histologic injury analysis). This effect was negated by lidocaine but not by NAC. Thus, it appears that sensory neurons, and not increased mucus secretion, play a critical role in adaptive cytoprotection. PMID:1733359

  8. Do sensory neurons mediate adaptive cytoprotection of gastric mucosa against bile acid injury?

    PubMed

    Mercer, D W; Ritchie, W P; Dempsey, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate protects the gastric mucosa from the injury induced by the subsequent application of 5 mmol acidified taurocholate, a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive cytoprotection." How this occurs remains an enigma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of sensory neurons and mucus secretion in this phenomenon. Prior to injury with 5 mmol acidified taurocholate (pH 1.2), the stomachs of six groups of rats were subjected to the following protocol. Two groups were topically pretreated with either saline or the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Two other groups received the topical anesthetic 1% lidocaine prior to pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. The last two groups got the mucolytic agent 10% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Injury was assessed by measuring net transmucosal ion fluxes, luminal appearance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and gross and histologic injury. Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate significantly decreased bile acid-induced luminal ion fluxes and DNA accumulation, suggesting mucosal protection (corroborated by gross and histologic injury analysis). This effect was negated by lidocaine but not by NAC. Thus, it appears that sensory neurons, and not increased mucus secretion, play a critical role in adaptive cytoprotection.

  9. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety.

  10. Role of lipase in the regulation of postprandial gastric acid secretion and emptying of fat in humans: a study with orlistat, a highly specific lipase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Borovicka, J; Schwizer, W; Guttmann, G; Hartmann, D; Kosinski, M; Wastiel, C; Bischof-Delaloye, A; Fried, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—To investigate the importance of lipase on gastric functions, we studied the effects of orlistat, a potent and specific inhibitor of lipase, on postprandial gastric acidity and gastric emptying of fat.
METHODS—Fourteen healthy volunteers participated in a double blind, placebo controlled, randomised study. In a two way cross over study with two test periods of five days, separated by at least 14 days, orlistat 120 mg three times daily or placebo was given with standardised daily meals. In previous experiments we found that this dose almost completely inhibited postprandial duodenal lipase activity. Subjects underwent 28 hour intragastric pH-metry on day 4, and a gastric emptying study with a mixed meal (800 kcal) labelled with 999mTc sulphur colloid (solids) and 111Inthiocyanate (fat) on day 5. Gastric pH data were analysed for three postprandial hours and the interdigestive periods.
RESULTS—Orlistat inhibited almost completely (by 75%) lipase activity and accelerated gastric emptying of both the solid (by 52%) and fat (by 44%) phases of the mixed meal (p<0.03). Orlistat increased postprandial gastric acidity (from a median pH of 3.3 to 2.7; p<0.01). Postprandial cholecystokinin release was lower with orlistat (p<0.03).
CONCLUSION—Lipase has an important role in the regulation of postprandial gastric acid secretion and fat emptying in humans. These effects might be explained by lipolysis induced release of cholecystokinin.


Keywords: lipase; orlistat; gastric secretion; gastric emptying; pH-metry PMID:10807887

  11. Cellular responses induced in vitro by pestheic acid, a fungal metabolite, in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (PG100).

    PubMed

    Sousa, J M C; Matos, L A; Alcântara, D F A; Ribeiro, H F; Santos, L S; Oliveira, M N; Brito-Junior, L C; Khayat, A S; Guimarães, A C; Cunha, L A; Burbano, R R; Bahia, M O

    2013-01-01

    There is a constant search for new cancer treatments that are less aggressive and economically affordable. In this context, natural products extracted from plants, fungi, and microorganisms are of great interest. Pestheic acid, or dihidromaldoxin, is a chlorinated diphenylic ether extracted from the phytopathogenic fungus Pestalotiopsis guepinii (Amphisphaeriaceae). We assessed the cytotoxic, cytostatic, and genotoxic effects of pestheic acid in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (PG100). A decrease in clonogenic survival was observed. Pestheic acid also induced significant increases in both micronucleus and nucleoplasmic bridge frequency. However, we did not observe changes in cell cycle kinetics or apoptosis induction. Reactive oxygen species induced by diphenylic ethers may explain the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of pestheic acid. The absence of repair checkpoints that we observed is probably due to the fact that the PG100 cell line lacks the TP53 gene, which is common in gastric cancers. Even though pestheic acid has had a clear cytotoxic effect, the minimal inhibitory concentration was high, which shows that pestheic acid is not an active anticancer compound under these conditions. PMID:24114206

  12. Localization of transforming growth factor alpha and its receptor in gastric mucosal cells. Implications for a regulatory role in acid secretion and mucosal renewal.

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, R D; Barnard, J A; McCutchen, C M; Cherner, J A; Coffey, R J

    1989-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) shares with epidermal growth factor (EGF) structural homology (35%), a common cell-surface membrane receptor (TGF alpha/EGF receptor), and a nearly identical spectrum of biological activity, including inhibition of gastric acid secretion. Herein, we report expression of TGF alpha mRNA in normal gastric mucosa of the adult guinea pig, rat, and dog. TGF alpha mRNA was also detected in matched surgically resected gastric mucosa and adjacent gastric carcinoma from 10 patients, and in gastric mucosa adjacent to a benign ulcer from an additional patient. TGF alpha protein was quantitated by radioimmunoassay and was present in tumor and adjacent mucosa. TGF alpha/EGF receptor mRNA was also detected in gastric mucosa from all species studied. Localization of TGF alpha and TGF alpha/EGF receptor mRNA expression was examined in samples of unfractionated guinea pig gastric mucosa and from chief cell-enriched and parietal cell-enriched fractions. All samples exhibited TGF alpha and TGF alpha/EGF receptor expression. The TGF alpha signal was greatest in the parietal cell fraction (5.8-fold increase), but was also enhanced in the chief cell fraction (1.9-fold increase) relative to the unfractionated gastric mucosa. Like TGF alpha expression, TGF alpha/EGF receptor mRNA expression was most intense in the parietal cell-enriched fraction (7.8-fold increase), but was also increased in the chief cell-enriched fraction (2.7-fold increase) relative to the unfractionated guinea pig gastric mucosa. We conclude that TGF alpha and TGF alpha/EGF receptor genes are expressed in normal adult mammalian gastric mucosa. These findings, when interpreted in light of described actions of TGF alpha and EGF, provide evidence that local production of TGF alpha could play an important role in the regulation of acid secretion and mucosal renewal in the stomach. Images PMID:2760208

  13. Usefulness of Endoscopic Imaging to Visualize Regional Alterations in Acid Secretion of Noncancerous Gastric Mucosa after Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Katsunori; Abe, Yasuhiko; Koike, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Yasushi; Ara, Nobuyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Endoscopic diagnosis of gastric cancer (GC) that emerges after eradication of Helicobacter pylori may be affected by unique morphological changes. Using comprehensive endoscopic imaging, which can reveal biological alterations in gastric mucosa after eradication, previous studies demonstrated that Congo red chromoendoscopy (CRE) might clearly show an acid non-secretory area (ANA) with malignant potential, while autofluorescence imaging (AFI) without drug injection or dyeing may achieve early detection or prediction of GC. We aimed to determine whether AFI might be an alternative to CRE for identification of high-risk areas of gastric carcinogenesis after eradication. Materials and Methods We included 27 sequential patients with metachronous GC detected during endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 82.8 months after curative endoscopic resection for primary GC and eradication. After their H. pylori infection status was evaluated by clinical interviews and 13C-urea breath tests, the consistency in the extension of corpus atrophy (e.g., open-type or closed-type atrophy) between AFI and CRE was investigated as a primary endpoint. Results Inconsistencies in atrophic extension between AFI and CRE were observed in 6 of 27 patients, although CRE revealed all GC cases in the ANA. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements in the evaluation of atrophic extension by AFI were significantly less than those for CRE. Conclusions We demonstrated that AFI findings might be less reliable for the evaluation of gastric mucosa with malignant potential after eradication than CRE findings. Therefore, special attention should be paid when we clinically evaluate AFI findings of background gastric mucosa after eradication (University Hospital Medical Information Network Center registration number: UMIN000020849). PMID:27752392

  14. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa.

  15. Bile acid and inflammation activate gastric cardia stem cells in a mouse model of Barrett’s-like metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Quante, Michael; Bhagat, Govind; Abrams, Julian; Marache, Frederic; Good, Pamela; Lee, Michele D.; Lee, Yoomi; Friedman, Richard; Asfaha, Samuel; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Mahmood, Umar; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Kitajewski, Jan; Shawber, Carrie; Lightdale, Charles; Rustgi, Anil K.; Wang, Timothy C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) arises from Barrett esophagus (BE), intestinal-like columnar metaplasia linked to reflux esophagitis. In a transgenic mouse model of BE, esophageal overexpression of interleukin-1β phenocopies human pathology with evolution of esophagitis, Barrett’s-like metaplasia and EAC. Histopathology and gene signatures resembled closely human BE, with upregulation of TFF2, Bmp4, Cdx2, Notch1 and IL-6. The development of BE and EAC was accelerated by exposure to bile acids and/or nitrosamines, and inhibited by IL-6 deficiency. Lgr5+ gastric cardia stem cells present in BE were able to lineage trace the early BE lesion. Our data suggest that BE and EAC arise from gastric progenitors due to a tumor-promoting IL-1β-IL-6 signaling cascade and Dll1-dependent Notch signaling. PMID:22264787

  16. Bile acid and inflammation activate gastric cardia stem cells in a mouse model of Barrett-like metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Quante, Michael; Bhagat, Govind; Abrams, Julian A; Marache, Frederic; Good, Pamela; Lee, Michele D; Lee, Yoomi; Friedman, Richard; Asfaha, Samuel; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Mahmood, Umar; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Kitajewski, Jan; Shawber, Carrie; Lightdale, Charles J; Rustgi, Anil K; Wang, Timothy C

    2012-01-17

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) arises from Barrett esophagus (BE), intestinal-like columnar metaplasia linked to reflux esophagitis. In a transgenic mouse model of BE, esophageal overexpression of interleukin-1β phenocopies human pathology with evolution of esophagitis, Barrett-like metaplasia and EAC. Histopathology and gene signatures closely resembled human BE, with upregulation of TFF2, Bmp4, Cdx2, Notch1, and IL-6. The development of BE and EAC was accelerated by exposure to bile acids and/or nitrosamines, and inhibited by IL-6 deficiency. Lgr5(+) gastric cardia stem cells present in BE were able to lineage trace the early BE lesion. Our data suggest that BE and EAC arise from gastric progenitors due to a tumor-promoting IL-1β-IL-6 signaling cascade and Dll1-dependent Notch signaling.

  17. The effects of xanthoangelol E on arachidonic acid metabolism in the gastric antral mucosa and platelet of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Sakuma, S; Sumiya, T; Nishida, H; Fujimoto, Y; Baba, K; Kozawa, M

    1992-08-01

    The effects of a new chalcone derivative, xanthoangelol E, isolated from Angelica keiskei Koidzumi, on arachidonic acid metabolism in the gastric antral mucosa and platelet of the rabbit were examined. When gastric antral mucosal slices were incubated with xanthoangelol E (0.05-1.0 mM), there was no significant effect on the production of prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGF2 alpha and their metabolites. On the other hand, this compound inhibited effectively the production of thromboxane B2 and 12-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid from exogenous arachidonic acid in platelets, and the concentration required for 50% inhibition (IC50) was approximately 5 microM. The formation of 12-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid was also reduced by this drug (IC50, 50 microM). These results suggest that xanthoangelol E has the potential to modulate arachidonic acid metabolism in platelets and that this action may participate in some pharmacological effect of the plant.

  18. Effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), ASA plus L-glutamine and L-glutamine on healing of chronic gastric ulcer in the rat.

    PubMed

    Okabe, S; Takeuchi, K; Honda, K; Takagi, K

    1976-01-01

    A chronic gastric ulcer model was produced in rats by the subserosal injection of 20% acetic acid solution (0.015 ml) in order to examine whether (1) acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) irritates the chronic gastric ulcer in active or healed or diminished stage, (2) L-glutamine, given together with ASA, inhibits the adverse effect of ASA. Oral ASA 200 mg/kg/day, given in two divided doses for 10 consecutive days, apparently delayed the healing of the gastric ulcer and irritated the healed ulcer to reulcerate. L-Glutamine, 1,500 mg/kg/day, which was given together with ASA in two divided doses, markedly protected the gastric ulcer both in active and healed stages from the deleterious activity of ASA. PMID:955326

  19. Ethanolic extract of roots from Arctium lappa L. accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats: Involvement of the antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Allemand, Alexandra; Mendes, Daniel Augusto G B; Dos Santos, Ana Cristina; André, Eunice; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Dartora, Nessana; Marques, Maria Consuelo Andrade; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Werner, Maria Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the curative efficacy of the ethanolic extract (EET) of roots from Arctium lappa (bardana) in healing of chronic gastric ulcers induced by 80% acetic acid in rats and additionally studies the possible mechanisms underlying this action. Oral administration of EET (1, 3, 10 and 30mg/kg) reduced the gastric lesion area in 29.2%, 41.4%, 59.3% and 38.5%, respectively, and at 10mg/kg promoted significant regeneration of the gastric mucosa, which was confirmed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. EET (10mg/kg) treatment did not increase the gastric mucus content but restored the superoxide dismutase activity, prevented the reduction of glutathione levels, reduced lipid hydroperoxides levels, inhibited the myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the microvascular permeability. In addition, EET reduced the free radical generation and increased scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals in vitro. Furthermore, intraduodenal EET (10 and 30mg/kg) decreased volume and acidity of gastric secretion. Total phenolic compounds were high in EET (Folin-Ciocalteau assay) and the analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that the main compounds present in EET were a serie of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acid isomers. In conclusion, these data reveal that EET promotes regeneration of damaged gastric mucosa, probably through its antisecretory and antioxidative mechanisms.

  20. Ethanolic extract of roots from Arctium lappa L. accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcer in rats: Involvement of the antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Allemand, Alexandra; Mendes, Daniel Augusto G B; Dos Santos, Ana Cristina; André, Eunice; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; Dartora, Nessana; Marques, Maria Consuelo Andrade; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Werner, Maria Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the curative efficacy of the ethanolic extract (EET) of roots from Arctium lappa (bardana) in healing of chronic gastric ulcers induced by 80% acetic acid in rats and additionally studies the possible mechanisms underlying this action. Oral administration of EET (1, 3, 10 and 30mg/kg) reduced the gastric lesion area in 29.2%, 41.4%, 59.3% and 38.5%, respectively, and at 10mg/kg promoted significant regeneration of the gastric mucosa, which was confirmed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. EET (10mg/kg) treatment did not increase the gastric mucus content but restored the superoxide dismutase activity, prevented the reduction of glutathione levels, reduced lipid hydroperoxides levels, inhibited the myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the microvascular permeability. In addition, EET reduced the free radical generation and increased scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals in vitro. Furthermore, intraduodenal EET (10 and 30mg/kg) decreased volume and acidity of gastric secretion. Total phenolic compounds were high in EET (Folin-Ciocalteau assay) and the analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed that the main compounds present in EET were a serie of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acid isomers. In conclusion, these data reveal that EET promotes regeneration of damaged gastric mucosa, probably through its antisecretory and antioxidative mechanisms. PMID:23036453

  1. Demand for Zn2+ in Acid-Secreting Gastric Mucosa and Its Requirement for Intracellular Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Liu, JingJing; Kohler, Jonathan E.; Blass, Amy L.; Moncaster, Juliet A.; Mocofanescu, Anca; Marcus, Matthew A.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Casey, Noel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Recent work has suggested that Zn2+ plays a critical role in regulating acidity within the secretory compartments of isolated gastric glands. Here, we investigate the content, distribution and demand for Zn2+ in gastric mucosa under baseline conditions and its regulation during secretory stimulation. Methods and Findings Content and distribution of zinc were evaluated in sections of whole gastric mucosa using X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Significant stores of Zn2+ were identified in neural elements of the muscularis, glandular areas enriched in parietal cells, and apical regions of the surface epithelium. In in vivo studies, extraction of the low abundance isotope, 70Zn2+, from the circulation was demonstrated in samples of mucosal tissue 24 hours or 72 hours after infusion (250 µg/kg). In in vitro studies, uptake of 70Zn2+ from media was demonstrated in isolated rabbit gastric glands following exposure to concentrations as low as 10 nM. In additional studies, demand of individual gastric parietal cells for Zn2+ was monitored using the fluorescent zinc reporter, fluozin-3, by measuring increases in free intracellular concentrations of Zn2+ {[Zn2+]i} during exposure to standard extracellular concentrations of Zn2+ (10 µM) for standard intervals of time. Under resting conditions, demand for extracellular Zn2+ increased with exposure to secretagogues (forskolin, carbachol/histamine) and under conditions associated with increased intracellular Ca2+ {[Ca2+]i}. Uptake of Zn2+ was abolished following removal of extracellular Ca2+ or depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, suggesting that demand for extracellular Zn2+ increases and depends on influx of extracellular Ca2+. Conclusions This study is the first to characterize the content and distribution of Zn2+ in an organ of the gastrointestinal tract. Our findings offer the novel interpretation, that Ca2+ integrates basolateral demand for Zn2+ with stimulation of secretion of HCl into the lumen of

  2. Short-chain fatty acid modulation of apoptosis in the Kato III human gastric carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Geoffrey M; Howarth, Gordon S; Butler, Ross N

    2007-07-01

    The short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) butyrate is known to induce apoptosis in colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, however, its mode of action is poorly defined, whilst less is known regarding the effects of the SCFA propionate. This study investigated the potential for butyrate and propionate to alter cell viability, cell cycle regulation and intracellular protective mechanisms in a human gastric cancer cell line (Kato III). Kato III cells were incubated with butyrate or propionate for 24, 48 and 72 hr. At each time point, cells were assessed for the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle alterations using flow cytometry. Oxidative pentose pathway (OPP) activity and glutathione (GSH) availability were also measured as an index of intracellular protection. Butyrate and propionate differentially induced apoptosis and necrosis in Kato III cells and arrested cells in the G2-M phase. OPP activity was significantly increased by both SCFAs although butyrate induced a 10-fold greater increase than propionate. GSH availability was significantly decreased in Kato III cells by butyrate and propionate. These findings demonstrate that butyrate and propionate induce apoptosis and cell cycle alterations in Kato III gastric cancer cells. Moreover, the effects of butyrate were significantly greater than propionate. We propose that alterations to intracellular redox state and GSH availability play an important role in SCFA-mediated cell death in this cell type. The inclusion of butyrate and propionate as adjunctive cancer therapies has the potential to enhance the efficacy of current chemotherapeutics in the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:17611404

  3. Molecular characterization of the stomach microbiota in patients with gastric cancer and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Dicksved, J.; Lindberg, M.; Rosenquist, M.; Enroth, H.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2009-01-15

    Persistent infection of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori, can initiate an inflammatory cascade that progresses into atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with reduced capacity for secretion of gastric acid and an increased risk in developing gastric cancer. The role of H. pylori as an initiator of inflammation is evident but the mechanism for development into gastric cancer has not yet been proven. A reduced capacity for gastric acid secretion allows survival and proliferation of other microbes that normally are killed by the acidic environment. It has been postulated that some of these species may be involved in the development of gastric cancer, however their identities are poorly defined. In this study, the gastric microbiota from ten patients with gastric cancer was characterized and compared with five dyspeptic controls using the molecular profiling approach, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), in combination with 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing. T-RFLP analysis revealed a complex bacterial community in the cancer patients that was not significantly different from the controls. Sequencing of 140 clones revealed 102 phylotypes, with representatives from five bacterial phyla (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria). The data revealed a relatively low abundance of H. pylori and showed that the gastric cancer microbiota was instead dominated by different species of the genera Streptococcus, Lactobacillus, Veillonella and Prevotella. The respective role of these species in development of gastric cancer remains to be determined.

  4. Air pollution, acid rain and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mellanby, K.

    1988-01-01

    This book reports on the Watt Committee's working group on acid rain, which was set up in 1981. The authors consider the relationship between natural and the man-made factors and the effects of possible remedial strategies. In the first phase of the study, the group looked at the fate of airborne pollution, vegetation and soils, freshwater and remedial strategy. In this report, which contains the results of a further phase of study, these topics are included and have been brought up to date. The scope of the report is extended to include buildings and non-living materials. Consideration is given to the problem of acid rain and air pollution worldwide. Emphasis is placed on the United Kingdom. The main conclusion is that more research is necessary on some aspects of acid rain and air pollution, but that some of the reports widespread damage caused by acid rain cannot be confirmed.

  5. Use of AC Impedance Analysis to Study Membrane Changes Related to Acid Secretion in Amphibian Gastric Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Chris; Machen, Terry E.; Diamond, Jared M.

    1983-01-01

    We have applied transepithelial AC impedance techniques to gastric mucosa to reconcile ultrastructural and electrophysiological findings about gastric acid secretion and the mucosal barrier. By fitting impedance data measured at different HCl secretion rates to equivalent circuit models, we extracted capacitances and resistances (as measures of membrane area and ionic conductance, respectively) for the apical and basolateral membranes. The impedance measurements were found to be incompatible with earlier equivalent circuit models that modeled membrane electrical properties as lumped circuits based on one or two cell types. A distributed circuit model was developed that assumed only one dominant electrical pathway (i.e., one cell type), but that incorporated electrical effects arising from long and narrow membrane-lined structures present in the epithelium (e.g., gastric crypts, tubulovesicles, lateral intercellular spaces). This morphologically based model was found to represent the measured data accurately, and to yield values for membrane capacitances consistent with morphometric measurements of membrane areas. The main physiological conclusions from this analysis were as follows: (a) The dominant transepithelial current pathway may reside in the oxyntic cells. (b) The transepithelial conductance increase associated with the onset of acid secretion is entirely due to increased conductance of the apical membrane. This is in turn due entirely to increased area of this membrane, resulting from incorporation of tubulovesicular membrane. (c) When membrane conductances are normalized to actual membrane area by use of membrane capacitances, it turns out that acid secretion is not associated with a change in specific ionic conductance (change in conductance per unit area) at either the apical or basolateral membrane. (d) The puzzlingly low value of transepithelial resistance (≤400 Ω-cm2) arises because there are hundreds or thousands of square centimeters of actual

  6. The anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of gallic acid against mucosal inflammation- and erosions-induced by gastric ischemia-reperfusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mard, Seyyed Ali; Mojadami, Shahnaz; Farbood, Yaghoob; Gharib Naseri, Mohammad Kazem

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of gallic acid on gastric mucosal lesions caused by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat. Forty male rats were randomly divided into sham, control (I/R injury) and three gallic acid-pretreated groups. To induce I/R lesions, the celiac artery was clamped for 30 min and then the clamp was removed to allow reperfusion for 6 hr. Pretreated rats received gallic acid (15, 30 or 60 mg kg-1, intraperitoneally) 30 min prior to the induction of I/R injury. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluations of the areas of ulceration were compared. Samples of gastric mucosa were collected to evaluate the protein expression of pro-apoptotic factor, caspase-3, and pro-inflammatory enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) using western blot. Pretreatment with gallic acid decreased the total area of gastric lesions. Gallic acid at 30 mg kg-1 decreased the levels of protein expression of caspase-3 and iNOS induced by I/R injury. Our findings showed the protective effect of gallic acid on gastric mucosa against ischemia-reperfusion injury. This effect of gallic acid was mainly mediated by reducing protein expression of iNOS and caspase-3. PMID:26973766

  7. The anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of gallic acid against mucosal inflammation- and erosions-induced by gastric ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Mard, Seyyed Ali; Mojadami, Shahnaz; Farbood, Yaghoob; Gharib Naseri, Mohammad Kazem

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of gallic acid on gastric mucosal lesions caused by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat. Forty male rats were randomly divided into sham, control (I/R injury) and three gallic acid-pretreated groups. To induce I/R lesions, the celiac artery was clamped for 30 min and then the clamp was removed to allow reperfusion for 6 hr. Pretreated rats received gallic acid (15, 30 or 60 mg kg(-1), intraperitoneally) 30 min prior to the induction of I/R injury. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluations of the areas of ulceration were compared. Samples of gastric mucosa were collected to evaluate the protein expression of pro-apoptotic factor, caspase-3, and pro-inflammatory enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) using western blot. Pretreatment with gallic acid decreased the total area of gastric lesions. Gallic acid at 30 mg kg(-1) decreased the levels of protein expression of caspase-3 and iNOS induced by I/R injury. Our findings showed the protective effect of gallic acid on gastric mucosa against ischemia-reperfusion injury. This effect of gallic acid was mainly mediated by reducing protein expression of iNOS and caspase-3.

  8. The effects of somatostatin and metiamide on tachyphylaxis of pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid and pepsin secretion in the conscious cat.

    PubMed Central

    Albinus, M; Blair, E L; Hirst, B H; Reed, J D; Schally, A V; Shaw, B

    1977-01-01

    1. Pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid and pepsin secretions show parallel rates of tachyphylaxis in the conscious cat. The responses to histamine show only slight tachyphylaxis. 2. Somatostatin 10 microng.kg(-1).hr(-1) inhibits pentagastrin but not histamine stimulated acid secretion and inhibits pentagastrin stimulated pepsin secretion. 3. The inhibition of pentagastrin stimulated acid and pepsin secretion by Somatostatin delays the tachyphylaxis of these responses, but the rates of tachyphylaxis when they do subsequently occur are identical. 4. Metiamide 10 mg-kg(-1)-hr(-1) equally inhibits histamine and pentagastrin stimulated acid secretion but does not inhibit pentagastrin stimulated pepsin secretion. 5. Inhibiton of acid secretion during metiamide infusion neither prevents nor delays acid nor pepsin tachyphylaxis. 6. It is suggested that tachyphylaxis of acid and pepsin secretion is a gastrin receptor phenomenon and that Somatostatin occupies or modifies the behaviour of these receptors, preventing tachyphylaxis. Metiamide, however, exerts its action only on the histmine H2-receptor and not the gastrin receptor mechanism, and this apparently does not prevent or delay acid tachyphylaxis. PMID:325196

  9. The effects of somatostatin and metiamide on tachyphylaxis of pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid and pepsin secretion in the conscious cat.

    PubMed

    Albinus, M; Blair, E L; Hirst, B H; Reed, J D; Schally, A V; Shaw, B

    1977-04-01

    1. Pentagastrin stimulated gastric acid and pepsin secretions show parallel rates of tachyphylaxis in the conscious cat. The responses to histamine show only slight tachyphylaxis. 2. Somatostatin 10 microng.kg(-1).hr(-1) inhibits pentagastrin but not histamine stimulated acid secretion and inhibits pentagastrin stimulated pepsin secretion. 3. The inhibition of pentagastrin stimulated acid and pepsin secretion by Somatostatin delays the tachyphylaxis of these responses, but the rates of tachyphylaxis when they do subsequently occur are identical. 4. Metiamide 10 mg-kg(-1)-hr(-1) equally inhibits histamine and pentagastrin stimulated acid secretion but does not inhibit pentagastrin stimulated pepsin secretion. 5. Inhibiton of acid secretion during metiamide infusion neither prevents nor delays acid nor pepsin tachyphylaxis. 6. It is suggested that tachyphylaxis of acid and pepsin secretion is a gastrin receptor phenomenon and that Somatostatin occupies or modifies the behaviour of these receptors, preventing tachyphylaxis. Metiamide, however, exerts its action only on the histmine H2-receptor and not the gastrin receptor mechanism, and this apparently does not prevent or delay acid tachyphylaxis.

  10. Acetylsalicylic Acid Daily vs Acetylsalicylic Acid Every 3 Days in Healthy Volunteers: Effect on Platelet Aggregation, Gastric Mucosa, and Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Plinio Minghin Freitas; Gagliano-Jucá, Thiago; Zaminelli, Tiago; Sampaio, Marinalva Ferreira; Blackler, Rory Willian; Trevisan, Miriam da Silva; Novaes Magalhães, Antônio Frederico; De Nucci, Gilberto

    2016-07-01

    Substantial platelet inhibition was observed 3 days after a single administration of acetylsalicylic acid 81 mg to healthy volunteers. Here we investigate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) antrum concentrations and gastrointestinal symptoms in two treatment groups: one receiving losartan and acetylsalicylic acid every day and the other receiving losartan every day and acetylsalicylic acid every 3 days. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers from both sexes received either 50 mg losartan and acetylsalicylic acid 81 mg daily or 50 mg losartan and acetylsalicylic acid 81 every 3 days with placebo on the other days. Therapy was delivered for 30 days for both groups. Gastric endoscopy was performed before and after treatment period. Biopsies were collected for PGE2 quantification. Platelet function tests were carried out before and during treatment and TXB2 release on platelet rich plasma was measured. The every 3 day low-dose acetylsalicylic acid regimen produced complete inhibition of platelet aggregation compared to the daily treatment. Thromboxane B2 release was substantially abolished for both groups during treatment. There was no significant difference on the endoscopic score of both treatment groups after the 30-day treatment (P = .215). There was over 50% suppression of antrum PGE2 content on volunteers receiving acetylsalicylic acid daily (P = .0016), while for the every 3 day dose regimen there was no significant difference between pre and post-treatment antrum PGE2 dosages (P = .4193). Since PGE2 is involved in gastric healing, we understand that this new approach could be safer and as efficient as the standard daily therapy on a long-term basis.

  11. The binding of folic acid and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate to folate-binding proteins during gastric passage differs in a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model.

    PubMed

    Verwei, Miriam; Arkbåge, Karin; Mocking, Hans; Havenaar, Robert; Groten, John

    2004-01-01

    Despite its low natural folate concentration, milk is responsible for 10-15% of the daily folate intake in countries with a high dairy consumption. Milk products can be considered as a potential matrix for folate fortification, e.g., with synthetic folic acid, to enhance the daily intake of folate. In untreated milk, the natural folate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-CH3-H4folate), is bound to folate-binding proteins (FBP). In this study, the extent of binding to FBP for folic acid and 5-CH3-H4folate was investigated in a dynamic in vitro model simulating human gastric passage. Protein binding of folic acid and 5-CH3-H4folate was characterized using gel-exclusion chromatography. Before gastric passage, folic acid and 5-CH3-H4folate were bound mainly to FBP (76-79%), whereas 7% was free. Folic acid remained bound to FBP to a similar extent after gastric passage. For 5-CH3-H4folate, the FBP-bound fraction gradually decreased from 79 to 5% and the free fraction increased from 7 to 93%. Although folic acid enters the proximal part of the intestine bound to FBP, 5-CH3-H4folate appears to be present mainly as free folate in the duodenal lumen. The stability of FBP was similar in both folate/FBP mixtures, i.e., 70% of the initial FBP content was retained after gastric passage. This study indicated that FBP are partly stable during gastric passage but have different binding characteristics for folic acid and 5-CH3-H4folate in the duodenal lumen. This could result in different bioavailability from folic acid- and 5-CH3-H4folate-fortified milk products.

  12. Intravenous infusion of L-isomers of phenylalanine and tryptophan stimulate gastric acid secretion at physiologic plasma concentrations in normal subjects and after parietal cell vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, K E; Isenberg, J I; Hogan, D L; Dreier, S J

    1983-01-01

    To determine whether intravenous infusion of individual amino acids stimulated gastric acid secretion in man, graded doses of phenylalanine, tryptophan, glycine, alanine, histidine, and NaCl control were infused on separate days in nine healthy subjects. Intravenous infusion of phenylalanine and tryptophan significantly stimulated gastric acid secretion to 50 and 52%, respectively, of the acid secretory response to intragastric peptone. Intravenous alanine and histidine were without effect, whereas glycine produced a slight response. Serum gastrin concentrations did not significantly change during intravenous amino acid infusion, except in response to 0.1 M phenylalanine. However, the increase in serum gastrin occurred 2 h after acid secretion had significantly increased in response to the 0.025 M phenylalanine infusion. Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured during intravenous amino acid infusion and in response to a steak meal in five of the subjects. At a time when acid secretion was significantly increased during intravenous infusion of phenylalanine and tryptophan, plasma amino acids were similar to, or less than, that observed after the steak meal, suggesting that circulating levels of these three amino acids have a physiologic effect on gastric secretion in man. Intravenous infusion of a combination of graded doses of phenylalanine plus a continuous infusion of 0.01 M tryptophan shifted the dose-response curve to the left and resulted in a significantly greater response than to either amino acid alone. In five subjects with parietal cell vagotomy, intravenous phenylalanine and tryptophan stimulated acid secretion, whereas histidine was without effect, similar to normal subjects. These studies indicate that intravenous infusion of small amounts of phenylalanine (0.025 M, 3.1 mmol/h) and tryptophan (0.01 M, 1.25 mmol/h) stimulated gastric acid secretion at plasma concentrations similar to those observed after a steak meal, suggesting a physiologic role

  13. Sulfur Reduction in Acid Rock Drainage Environments.

    PubMed

    Florentino, Anna P; Weijma, Jan; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Microbiological suitability of acidophilic sulfur reduction for metal recovery was explored by enriching sulfur reducers from acidic sediments at low pH (from 2 to 5) with hydrogen, glycerol, methanol and acetate as electron donors at 30 °C. The highest levels of sulfide in the enrichments were detected at pH 3 with hydrogen and pH 4 with acetate. Cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene showed dominance of the deltaproteobacterial sulfur-reducing genus Desulfurella in all the enrichments and subsequently an acidophilic strain (TR1) was isolated. Strain TR1 grew at a broad range of pH (3-7) and temperature (20-50 °C) and showed good metal tolerance (Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+)), especially for Ni(2+) and Pb(2+), with maximal tolerated concentrations of 0.09 and 0.03 mM, respectively. Different sources of sulfur were tested in the enrichments, from which biosulfur showed fastest growth (doubling time of 1.9 days), followed by colloidal, chemical and sublimated sulfur (doubling times of 2.2, 2.5, and 3.6 days, respectively). Strain TR1's physiological traits make it a good candidate to cope with low pH and high metal concentration in biotechnological processes for treatment of metal-laden acidic streams at low and moderately high temperature.

  14. Formation of N-nitrosamine and N-nitrosamino acids from food products and nitrite under simulated gastric conditions.

    PubMed

    Groenen, P J; de Cock-Bethbeder, M W; Bouwman, J; Dhont, J H

    1980-01-01

    Average-sized portions of a variety of food products were reacted with nitrite under realistically simulated gastric conditions. The aqueous incubation medium contained sodium nitrite (10 mg/l) and potassium thiocyanate to mimic the incoming flux of saliva, as well as pepsin, sodium chloride and hydrochloric acid, reflecting the composition of gastric juice. After incubation for 2 hr at 37 degrees C, volatile N-nitrosamines and N-nitrosamino acids were determined in the reaction mixtures. Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) was present in the incubation mixtures of smoked mackerel (8.5 micrograms per portion), canned herring (0.66 micrograms per portion) and beer (0.70 micrograms per 'portion'). Smaller amounts per portion, sometimes of other nitrosamines as well, were observed with canned salmon and anchovy, mustard, yoghurt and coffee brew. Negative results were obtained for canned tuna, soya sauce, ketchup, white bread, 'nasi goreng', tea brew and cocoa milk. Nitrosamino acids were detected in the reaction mixtures of smoked mackerel (58 micrograms per portion), soya sauce (24 micrograms per portion) and canned salmon (6.9 micrograms per portion) and in smaller amounts in those of canned herring, anchovy and cocoa milk. In order to reduce the number of analyses to be performed, most products have been studied only after incubation, so that the nitrosamines and nitrosamino acids found may already have been present -- wholly or partly -- in the original products, before incubation. Such is the case for part of the NDMA in the reaction mixture of smoked mackerel and for all the NDMA in beer. The toxicological implications of these findings remain to be established. PMID:7228254

  15. Serum Bile Acids Are Higher in Humans With Prior Gastric Bypass: Potential Contribution to Improved Glucose and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Houten, Sander M.; Bianco, Antonio C.; Bernier, Raquel; Larsen, P. Reed; Holst, Jens J.; Badman, Michael K.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Mun, Edward C.; Pihlajamaki, Jussi; Auwerx, Johan; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2015-01-01

    The multifactorial mechanisms promoting weight loss and improved metabolism following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GB) surgery remain incompletely understood. Recent rodent studies suggest that bile acids can mediate energy homeostasis by activating the G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 and the type 2 thyroid hormone deiodinase. Altered gastrointestinal anatomy following GB could affect enterohepatic recirculation of bile acids. We assessed whether circulating bile acid concentrations differ in patients who previously underwent GB, which might then contribute to improved metabolic homeostasis. We performed cross-sectional analysis of fasting serum bile acid composition and both fasting and post-meal metabolic variables, in three subject groups: (i) post-GB surgery (n = 9), (ii) without GB matched to preoperative BMI of the index cohort (n = 5), and (iii) without GB matched to current BMI of the index cohort (n = 10). Total serum bile acid concentrations were higher in GB (8.90 ± 4.84 µmol/l) than in both overweight (3.59 ± 1.95, P = 0.005, Ov) and severely obese (3.86 ± 1.51, P = 0.045, MOb). Bile acid subfractions taurochenodeoxycholic, taurodeoxycholic, glycocholic, glycochenodeoxycholic, and glycodeoxycholic acids were all significantly higher in GB compared to Ov (P < 0.05). Total bile acids were inversely correlated with 2-h post-meal glucose (r = −0.59, P < 0.003) and fasting triglycerides (r = −0.40, P = 0.05), and positively correlated with adiponectin (r = −0.48, P < 0.02) and peak glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (r = 0.58, P < 0.003). Total bile acids strongly correlated inversely with thyrotropic hormone (TSH) (r = −0.57, P = 0.004). Together, our data suggest that altered bile acid levels and composition may contribute to improved glucose and lipid metabolism in patients who have had GB. PMID:19360006

  16. Early Increases in Bile Acids Post Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Are Driven by Insulin-Sensitizing, Secondary Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Vance L.; Flynn, Charles Robb; Cai, Steven; Xiao, Yi; Tamboli, Robyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity and resolution of diabetes. Over the last decade, it has become well accepted that this resolution of diabetes occurs before significant weight loss; however, the mechanisms behind this effect remain unknown and could represent novel therapeutic targets for obesity and diabetes. Bile acids have been identified as putative mediators of these weight loss-independent effects. Objective: To identify the longitudinal changes in bile acids after RYGB, which may provide mechanistic insight into the weight loss-independent effects of RYGB. Design: Observational study before/after intervention. Setting: Academic medical center. Patients/Participants: Samples were collected from morbidly obese patients (n = 21) before and after RYGB. Intervention: RYGB. Main Outcome Measures: Seventeen individual bile acid species were measured preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Anthropometric, hormonal, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp data were also examined to identify physiological parameters associated with bile acid changes. Results: Fasting total plasma bile acids increased after RYGB; however, increases were bimodal and were observed only at 1 (P < .05) and 24 months (P < .01). One-month increases were secondary to surges in ursodeoxycholic acid and its glycine and taurine conjugates, bacterially derived bile acids with putative insulin-sensitizing effects. Increases at 24 months were due to gradual rises in primary unconjugated bile acids as well as deoxycholic acid and its glycine conjugate. Plasma bile acid changes were not significantly associated with any anthropometric or hormonal measures, although hepatic insulin sensitivity was significantly improved at 1 month. Conclusions: Overall findings suggest that bacterially derived bile acids may mediate the early improvements at 1 month after RYGB. Future studies should examine the changes in specific bile

  17. Hydroethanolic extract of Baccharis trimera promotes gastroprotection and healing of acute and chronic gastric ulcers induced by ethanol and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis Lívero, Francislaine Aparecida; da Silva, Luisa Mota; Ferreira, Daniele Maria; Galuppo, Larissa Favaretto; Borato, Debora Gasparin; Prando, Thiago Bruno Lima; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Strapasson, Regiane Lauriano Batista; Stefanello, Maria Élida Alves; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula; Acco, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol is a psychoactive substance highly consumed around the world whose health problems include gastric lesions. Baccharis trimera is used in folk medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, few studies have evaluated its biological and toxic effects. To validate the popular use of B. trimera and elucidate its possible antiulcerogenic and cytotoxic mechanisms, a hydroethanolic extract of B. trimera (HEBT) was evaluated in models of gastric lesions. Rats and mice were used to evaluate the protective and antiulcerogenic effects of HEBT on gastric lesions induced by ethanol, acetic acid, and chronic ethanol consumption. The effects of HEBT were also evaluated in a pylorus ligature model and on gastrointestinal motility. The LD50 of HEBT in mice was additionally estimated. HEBT was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance, and a high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint analysis was performed. Oral HEBT administration significantly reduced the lesion area and the oxidative stress induced by acute and chronic ethanol consumption. However, HEBT did not protect against gastric wall mucus depletion and did not alter gastric secretory volume, pH, or total acidity in the pylorus ligature model. Histologically, HEBT accelerated the healing of chronic gastric ulcers in rats, reflected by contractions of the ulcer base. Flavonoids and caffeoylquinic acids were detected in HEBT, which likely contributed to the therapeutic efficacy of HEBT, preventing or reversing ethanol- and acetic acid-induced ulcers, respectively. HEBT antiulcerogenic activity may be partially attributable to the inhibition of free radical generation and subsequent prevention of lipid peroxidation. Our results indicate that HEBT has both gastroprotective and curative activity in animal models, with no toxicity. PMID:27314669

  18. Inhibitory effect of nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a plant lignan, on Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Takeshi; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Nishibe, Sansei; Deyama, Takeshi; Takenaka, Yoshiharu; Hirano, Naoki; Tanaka, Harunari; Takasu, Shinji; Ban, Hisayo; Kumagai, Toshiko; Inada, Ken-Ichi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Tatematsu, Masae

    2007-11-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that consumption of certain natural products can lower cancer risk in humans. For example, plant-derived lignans have been shown to exert chemopreventive effects against cancer in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the effects of three such lignans, termed arctiin, arctigenin, and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), on the proliferation of Helicobacter pylori and the prevention of H. pylori-associated gastric cancer were investigated in Mongolian gerbils. To examine the effects of arctigenin and NDGA on stomach carcinogenesis, specific pathogen-free male, 5-week-old gerbils were infected with H. pylori, administered 10 p.p.m. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea in their drinking water and fed diets containing various concentrations of lignans until they were killed after 52 weeks. At a dietary level of 0.25%, NDGA significantly decreased the incidence of gastric adenocarcinomas. Arctigenin, in contrast, failed to attenuate neoplasia at a level of 0.1%. Both NDGA and arctigenin significantly reduced serum 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels at doses of 0.25 and 0.05% (NDGA), and 0.1% (arctigenin). Administration of 0.25% NDGA significantly suppressed the formation of intestinal metaplasia both in the antrum and the corpus. Although all three lignans dose-dependently inhibited the in vitro proliferation of H. pylori, there were no differences in the titers of anti-H. pylori antibodies or the amount of the H. pylori-specific urease A gene among all H. pylori-infected groups. These results suggest that NDGA might be effective for prevention of gastric carcinogenesis. The possible mechanisms appear to be related to inhibitory effects on progression of gastritis and antioxidative activity rather than direct antimicrobial influence. PMID:17894552

  19. The Protective Effects of 18β-Glycyrrhetinic Acid on Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gastric Mucosa in Mongolian Gerbils.

    PubMed

    Cao, Donghui; Jiang, Jing; You, Lili; Jia, Zhifang; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Cai, Hongke; Wang, Shidong; Hou, Zhen; Suo, Yue-er; Cao, Xueyuan

    2016-01-01

    18β-Glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA), a major component of Glycyrrhiza glabra, is widely used therapeutically in clinic. In this study, the effect of GRA on Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori-) infected gastritis was investigated in Mongolian gerbils in vivo. The gerbils were randomly divided into groups: uninfected; H. pylori-infected; H. pylori + antibiotics (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and esomeprazole); and H. pylori + GRA. The gastric intraluminal pH value, histopathological changes, and the expression levels of inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS) were investigated. The results showed that, in the H. pylori + GRA group, the intraluminal gastric pH value was lower (2.14 ± 0.08 versus 3.17 ± 0.23, P < 0.05), erosion and hyperplasia were alleviated, the infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells was attenuated (P < 0.05), and the expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, and iNOS were decreased (P < 0.05) compared with the H. pylori-infected group. There was no significant difference in results between the H. pylori + GRA group and the H. pylori + antibiotics group. This study indicated that GRA significantly attenuated H. pylori-infected gastritis in gerbils and has the potential to be developed as a new therapeutic drug.

  20. The Protective Effects of 18β-Glycyrrhetinic Acid on Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gastric Mucosa in Mongolian Gerbils

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Donghui; Jiang, Jing; You, Lili; Jia, Zhifang; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Cai, Hongke; Wang, Shidong; Hou, Zhen; Suo, Yue-er; Cao, Xueyuan

    2016-01-01

    18β-Glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA), a major component of Glycyrrhiza glabra, is widely used therapeutically in clinic. In this study, the effect of GRA on Helicobacter pylori- (H. pylori-) infected gastritis was investigated in Mongolian gerbils in vivo. The gerbils were randomly divided into groups: uninfected; H. pylori-infected; H. pylori + antibiotics (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and esomeprazole); and H. pylori + GRA. The gastric intraluminal pH value, histopathological changes, and the expression levels of inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS) were investigated. The results showed that, in the H. pylori + GRA group, the intraluminal gastric pH value was lower (2.14 ± 0.08 versus 3.17 ± 0.23, P < 0.05), erosion and hyperplasia were alleviated, the infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells was attenuated (P < 0.05), and the expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, and iNOS were decreased (P < 0.05) compared with the H. pylori-infected group. There was no significant difference in results between the H. pylori + GRA group and the H. pylori + antibiotics group. This study indicated that GRA significantly attenuated H. pylori-infected gastritis in gerbils and has the potential to be developed as a new therapeutic drug. PMID:27006947

  1. Protective effects of ascorbic acid, DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate, and sodium selenate on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury of rats.

    PubMed

    Ozdil, Sadakat; Yanardag, Refiye; Koyuturk, Meral; Bolkent, Sehnaz; Arbak, Serap

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the effect of ascorbic acid (vitamin C), DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E), and sodium selenate (selenium) on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats was investigated morphologically and biochemically. The gastric mucosal injury was produced by administration of 1 mL of absolute ethanol to each rat. Animals received vitamin C (250 mg/kg), vitamin E (250 mg/kg), and selenium (0.5 mg/kg) for 3 d 1 h prior to the administration of absolute ethanol. In gastric mucosa of rats given ethanol according to control groups, neuronal nitric oxide expression decreased. This immunoreactivity was much lower in the group given ethanol+vitamin C+vitamin E+selenium than the control group and the ethanol-induced group. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of the ethanol-induced group, when compared to control groups, revealed degenerative changes in gastric mucosa, whereas a good arrangement in surface topography of gastric mucosa in the group given ethanol + vitamin C+vitamin E + selenium was observed. In the group administered ethanol, a reduction of the stomach glutathione (GSH) and serum total protein levels and increases in serum sialic acid, triglycerides, and stomach lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were observed. Vitamin C+vitamin E+Se administration to alcohol-treated rats significantly increased the serum total protein, triglyceride levels, and stomach GSH levels and significantly lowered the levels of serum sialic acid and stomach LPO compared to untreated alcohol-supplemented rats. As a result of these findings, we can say that the combination of vitamin C, vitamin E, and selenium has a protective effect on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury of rats.

  2. Helicobacter pylori antigens, acetylsalicylic acid, LDL and 7-ketocholesterol - their potential role in destabilizing the gastric epithelial cell barrier. An in vitro model of Kato III cells.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Adrian; Mnich, Eliza; Szymański, Karol; Hinc, Krzysztof; Obuchowski, Michał; Moran, Anthony P; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of gastric tissue in humans by H. pylori Gram-negative bacteria initiates gastric and duodenal ulcers and even gastric cancers. Infections promote inflammation and damage to gastric epithelium which might be followed by the impairment of its barrier function. The role of H. pylori components in these processes has not been specified. H. pylori cytotoxicity may potentially increase in the milieu of anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). The lipid transport-associated molecule such as low density lipoprotein (LDL), which is a classic risk factor of coronary heart disease (CHD) and 7-ketocholesterol (7-kCh) a product of cholesterol oxidation, which may occur during the oxidative stress in LDL could also be considered as pro-inflammatory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of H. pylori antigens, ASA, LDL and 7-kCh towards Kato III gastric epithelial cells, on the basis of the cell ability to reduce tetrazolium salt (MTT) and morphology of cell nuclei assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Kato III cells were stimulated for 24 h, at 37°C and 5% CO2, with H. pylori antigens: cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA) protein, the urease A subunit (UreA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ASA, LDL or 7-kCh. H. pylori LPS, ASA, LDL and 7-kCh, but not H. pylori glycine acid extract (GE), demonstrated cytotoxicity against Kato III cells, which was related to a diminished percentage of MTT reducing cells and to an increased cell population with the signs of DNA damage. The results suggest that damage to gastric epithelial cells can be induced independently by H. pylori antigens, ASA and endogenous lipid transport-associated molecules. During H. pylori infection in vivo, especially in CHD patients, synergistic or antagonistic interactions between these factors might possibly influence the disease course. Further study is necessary to explain these potential effects. PMID:26619253

  3. Melatonin is more effective than ascorbic acid and β-carotene in improvement of gastric mucosal damage induced by intensive stress

    PubMed Central

    Akinci, Aysin; Cetin, Asli; Ates, Burhan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress has been considered to play a primary role in the pathogenesis of stress-induced gastric damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin, ascorbic acid and β-carotene on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage. Material and methods Fifty-six male Wistar albino rats were divided into control, stress, stress + standard diet, stress + saline, stress + melatonin, stress + ascorbic acid and stress + β-carotene groups. The rats from stress groups were exposed to starvation, immobilization and cold by immobilizing for 8 h at +4°C following 72-hour food restriction. Following stress application, melatonin, ascorbic acid and β-carotene were administered for 7 days. Specimens of gastric tissue were prepared for microscopic and biochemical examinations. Results Mean histopathological damage scores and mean tissue malondialdehyde levels were significantly decreased but mean tissue glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities were increased in treatment groups vs. stress groups in general. Mean histopathological damage scores of the stress + Mel group was lower than those of stress + D, stress + S, stress + β-car (p < 0.05) and stress + Asc groups (p < 0.005). Additionally, mean tissue catalase activity of the stress + Mel group was higher than that of stress + S (p < 0.005), stress + D (p < 0.05) and stress + β-car groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions Melatonin is more effective than ascorbic acid and β-carotene in improvement of gastric damage induced by intensive stress. We suggest that as well as the direct antioxidant and free radical scavenging potency of melatonin, its indirect effect via the brain-gut axis might account for its greater beneficial action against stress-induced gastric damage. PMID:26528359

  4. Influence of five neutralizing products on intra-oral pH after rinsing with simulated gastric acid.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Birgitta; Lingström, Peter; Fändriks, Lars; Birkhed, Dowen

    2011-08-01

    The aetiology of dental erosion may be of both extrinsic and intrinsic origin. The aim of the present study was to test the ability of various neutralizing products to raise the low intra-oral pH after an erosive exposure, in this case to gastric acid, which was simulated using hydrochloric acid (HCl). Eleven adults participated. They rinsed with 10 ml of 10 mM HCl (pH 2) or 10 ml of 100 mM HCl (pH 1) for 1 min, after which the pH was measured intra-orally for up to 30 min at four sites (two approximal, one buccal, and the dorsum of the tongue). After rinsing with the two acid solutions (pH 1 and pH 2), the following products were used: (i) antacid tablet; (ii) gum arabic lozenge; (iii) mineral water; (iv) milk; and (v) tap water (positive control). The negative control was no product use. The five test products were used for 2 min after the erosive challenge. All the products produced an initially higher pH compared with the negative control. The antacid tablet resulted in the greatest and most rapid increase in pH, followed by the lozenge. In dental practice, the use of any of the neutralizing products tested, especially the antacid tablet, could be recommended in order to increase the intra-oral pH after an erosive challenge. PMID:21726291

  5. Control of Gastric Acid Secretion in Somatostatin Receptor 2 Deficient Mice: Shift from Endocrine/Paracrine to Neurocrine Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun-Mei; Martinez, Vicente; Piqueras, Laura; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette; Chen, Duan

    2008-01-01

    The gastrin-enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell-parietal cell axis is known to play an important role in the regulation of gastric acid secretion. Somatostatin, acting on somatostatin receptor type 2 (SSTR2), interferes with this axis by suppressing the activity of the gastrin cells, ECL cells, and parietal cells. Surprisingly, however, freely fed SSTR2 knockout mice seem to display normal circulating gastrin concentration and unchanged acid output. In the present study, we compared the control of acid secretion in these mutant mice with that in wild-type mice. In SSTR2 knockout mice, the number of gastrin cells was unchanged; whereas the numbers of somatostatin cells were reduced in the antrum (−55%) and increased in the oxyntic mucosa (35%). The ECL cells displayed a reduced expression of histidine decarboxylase and vesicle monoamine transport type 2 (determined by immunohistochemistry), and an impaired transformation of the granules to secretory vesicles (determined by electron microscopic analysis), suggesting low activity of the ECL cells. These changes were accompanied by an increased expression of galanin receptor type 1 in the oxyntic mucosa. The parietal cells were found to respond to pentagastrin or to vagal stimulation (evoked by pylorus ligation) with increased acid production. In conclusion, the inhibitory galanin-galanin receptor type 1 pathway is up-regulated in the ECL cells, and the direct stimulatory action of gastrin and vagal excitation is enhanced on the parietal cells in SSTR2 knockout mice. We suggest that there is a remodeling of the neuroendocrine mechanisms that regulate acid secretion in these mutant mice. PMID:17974627

  6. A comparative study of the effects of prostaglandins and H2-receptor antagonists on gastric acid secretion, mucosal blood flow and ulcer formation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, A K; Christmas, A J; Hall, C E

    1979-01-01

    The prostaglandins E2 and 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 methyl ester were compared with the H2-receptor antagonists burimamide and metiamide for their effects on gastric acid secretion (GAS) and gastric mucosal blood flow (MBF) in rats and dogs, and on ulcer formation in rats. Orally, both 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 methyl ester (20 microgram/kg) and metiamide (6 mg/kg) were markedly effective inhibitors of GAS stimulated by histamine acid phosphate or pentagastrin in Heidenhain pouch dogs, producing a reduction both in volume of gastric juice and in the concentration of titratable acid. In anaesthetised rats, however, the H2-receptor antagonists, when perfused into the gastric lumen, did not consistently inhibit the increased GAS caused by various secretagogues. In contrast, the prostaglandins, under the same conditions, caused marked inhibition of GAS provoked by all secretagogues. Intravenously, both burimamide and metiamide were effective in inhibiting GAS in rats but were less potent than the prostaglandins. The order of potency was: 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2 methyl ester greater than PGE2 greater than metiamide greater than burimamide. By the oral route, the H2-receptor antagonists were found to be very weak inhibitors of indometacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats, as compared to the prostaglandins. MBF studies in rats and in Heidenhain dogs showed that i.v. or p.o. administration inhibited both GAS and MBF in most cases. The ratio r = [MBF (ml/min)/GAS (mumol H+/min)] was generally increased by both types of compounds, suggesting a preferential effect on GAS.

  7. [In vitro evaluation of antacid activity in gastric acid secretion in static and dynamic systems].

    PubMed

    Vatier, J; Malikova-Sekera, E; Vitre, M T; Mignon, M

    1992-01-01

    A valid in vitro evaluation of antacid capacity should consider: 1) the intragastric pH-range; 2) the antacid mechanism; 3) the dependence of antacid activity from intraluminal flux variations; 4) the interaction between proteins and antacids. Pharmacologically, a static method allows 1) to quantify H+ binding sites at different pH-end points of the titration: pH 3.0, 2.0 and 1.0 and 2) to characterize the antacid mechanism, neutralizing activity and/or buffering capacity. In dynamic conditions, using the "artificial stomach-duodenum" model the antacid-induced resistance to acidification was measured, the antacid mechanisms were characterized in regard to intraluminal gastroduodenal flux variations and the incidence of antacid activity on duodenal pH was evaluated. These procedures were applied to antacid evaluation of proteins, as natural antacids, and of drugs containing aluminium salts alone or combined with magnesium salts. Pharmacologically, antacid drugs exhibited a greater amount of H+ binding sites when titration end-point was pH 1.0 than pH 3.0 corresponding to the development of neutralizing activity and/or buffering capacity. In dynamic conditions, the drugs, like proteins, induced a potent resistance to acidification related to gastric emptying fluxes. Antacid effect was supported by neutralizing activity and/or by buffering capacity. It was prolonged by removal of H+ ions since lagtimes for recovering initial pH were longer than antacid total emptying, the dilution of intragastric content by H+ impoverished secretory flux contributing thus to prevent gastric acidification. At duodenal site, proteins and aluminium-containing antacids induced the same duodenal pH as controls, without antacids, while magnesium-containing antacids increased it. PMID:1412150

  8. Engineering of lipid prodrug-based, hyaluronic acid-decorated nanostructured lipid carriers platform for 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin combination gastric cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying-wei; Chen, Mei-mei; Shen, Feng; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The first-line chemotherapy treatment protocol for gastric cancer is combination chemotherapy of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP). The aim of this study was to engineer prodrug-based nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) platform for codelivery of 5-FU and CDDP to enhance therapy and decrease toxicity. Methods First, 5-FU-stearic acid lipid conjugate was synthesized by two steps. Second, 5-FU-stearic acid prodrug and CDDP were loaded in NLC. Finally, hyaluronic acid (HA) was coated onto NLC surface. Average size, zeta potential, and drug loading capacity of NLC were evaluated. Human gastric cancer cell line BGC823 (BGC823 cells) was used for the testing of in vitro cytotoxicity assays. In vivo antitumor activity of NLC was evaluated in mice bearing BGC823 cells model. Results HA-coated 5-FU-stearic acid prodrug and CDDP-loaded NLC (HA-FU/C-NLC) showed a synergistic effect in combination therapy and displayed the greatest antitumor activity than all of the free drugs or uncoated NLC in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion This work reveals that HA-coated NLC could be used as a novel carrier to code-liver 5-FU and CDDP for gastric cancer therapy. HA-FU/C-NLC could be a promising targeted and combinational therapy in nanomedicine. PMID:26089667

  9. A dark brown roast coffee blend is less effective at stimulating gastric acid secretion in healthy volunteers compared to a medium roast market blend.

    PubMed

    Rubach, Malte; Lang, Roman; Bytof, Gerhard; Stiebitz, Herbert; Lantz, Ingo; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-06-01

    Coffee consumption sometimes is associated with symptoms of stomach discomfort. This work aimed to elucidate whether two coffee beverages, containing similar amounts of caffeine, but differing in their concentrations of (β) N-alkanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamides (C5HTs), chlorogenic acids (CGAs), trigonelline, and N-methylpyridinium (N-MP) have different effects on gastric acid secretion in healthy volunteers. The intragastric pH after administration of bicarbonate with/without 200 mL of a coffee beverage prepared from a market blend or dark roast blend was analyzed in nine healthy volunteers. Coffee beverages were analyzed for their contents of C5HT, N-MP, trigonelline, CGAs, and caffeine using HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS/MS. Chemical analysis revealed higher concentrations of N-MP for the dark brown blend (87 mg/L) compared to the market blend coffee (29 mg/L), whereas concentrations of C5HT (0.012 versus 0.343 mg/L), CGAs (323 versus 1126 mg/L), and trigonelline (119 versus 343 mg/L) were lower, and caffeine concentrations were similar (607 versus 674 mg/mL). Gastric acid secretion was less effectively stimulated after administration of the dark roast blend coffee compared to the market blend. Future studies are warranted to verify whether a high ratio of N-MP to C5HT and CGAs is beneficial for reducing coffee-associated gastric acid secretion. PMID:24510512

  10. Molecular Ecology of Carboxylic Acids in Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, K.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrothermal environments in the primitive ocean on the Earth must have played an important role for harnessing a molecular ecology processing various carbon through-flows in the pre-RNA world. Even carboxylic acids alone could have maintained a primitive evolutionary ecology near hot vents on the seafloor. We examined whether the citric acid cycle could run in a simulated hydrothermal environment with the aid of neither reducing agents nor enzymes of biological origin under the premise that pyruvate was already available. When the major carboxylic acid molecules constituting the citric acid cycle including pyruvate were prepared in a flow reactor and the reaction fluid was circulated between hot and cold regions in a cyclic manner, the member molecules of the cycle were found to increase with the operation of the reactor. The cycle was found robust enough to synthesize the member molecules from within even in the face of adverse or hostile disturbances from the outside. The cycle was oxidative instead of being reductive, and the effective oxidant was water molecules. Underlying the operation of a molecular ecology running on the oxidative citric acid cycle is the physical pruning principle of the faster temperature drop going with the greater stored latent heat applied to any reactants crossing sharp temperature gradients.

  11. Effect of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery on Bile Acid Metabolism in Normal and Obese Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bhutta, Hina Y; Rajpal, Neetu; White, Wendy; Freudenberg, Johannes M.; Liu, Yaping; Way, James; Rajpal, Deepak; Cooper, David C.; Young, Andrew; Tavakkoli, Ali; Chen, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    In addition to classic functions of facilitating hepatobiliary secretion and intestinal absorption of lipophilic nutrients, bile acids (BA) are also endocrine factors and regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Recent data indicate that antiobesity bariatric procedures e.g. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB), which also remit diabetes, increase plasma BAs in humans, leading to the hypothesis that BAs may play a role in diabetes resolution following surgery. To investigate the effect of RYGB on BA physiology and its relationship with glucose homeostasis, we undertook RYGB and SHAM surgery in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and normoglycemic Sprague Dawley (SD) rats and measured plasma and fecal BA levels, as well as plasma glucose, insulin, Glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and Peptide YY (PYY), 2 days before and 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after surgery. RYGB decreased body weight and increased plasma GLP-1 in both SD and ZDF rats while decreasing plasma insulin and glucose in ZDF rats starting from the first week. Compared to SHAM groups, both SD-RYGB and ZDF-RYGB groups started to have increases in plasma total BAs in the second week, which might not contribute to early post-surgery metabolic changes. While there was no significant difference in fecal BA excretion between SD-RYGB and SD-SHAM groups, the ZDF-RYGB group had a transient 4.2-fold increase (P<0.001) in 24-hour fecal BA excretion on post-operative day 3 compared to ZDF-SHAM, which paralleled a significant increase in plasma PYY. Ratios of plasma and fecal cholic acid/chenodeoxycholic acid derived BAs were decreased in RYGB groups. In addition, tissue mRNA expression analysis suggested early intestinal BA reabsorption and potentially reduced hepatic cholic acid production in RYGB groups. In summary, we present novel data on RYGB-mediated changes in BA metabolism to further understand the role of BAs in RYGB-induced metabolic effects in humans. PMID:25798945

  12. Remodeling the host environment: modulation of the gastric epithelium by the Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ik-Jung; Blanke, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Virulence mechanisms underlying Helicobacter pylori persistence and disease remain poorly understood, in part, because the factors underlying disease risk are multifactorial and complex. Among the bacterial factors that contribute to the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections, the vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is one of the most important. Analogous to a number of H. pylori genes, the vacA gene exhibits allelic mosaicism, and human epidemiological studies have revealed that several families of toxin alleles are predictive of more severe disease. Animal model studies suggest that VacA may contribute to pathogenesis in several ways. VacA functions as an intracellular-acting protein exotoxin. However, VacA does not fit the current prototype of AB intracellular-acting bacterial toxins, which elaborate modulatory effects through the action of an enzymatic domain translocated inside host cells. Rather, VacA may represent an alternative prototype for AB intracellular acting toxins that modulate cellular homeostasis by forming ion-conducting intracellular membrane channels. Although VacA seems to form channels in several different membranes, one of the most important target sites is the mitochondrial inner membrane. VacA apparently take advantage of an unusual intracellular trafficking pathway to mitochondria, where the toxin is imported and depolarizes the inner membrane to disrupt mitochondrial dynamics and cellular energy homeostasis as a mechanism for engaging the apoptotic machinery within host cells. VacA remodeling of the gastric environment appears to be fine-tuned through the action of the Type IV effector protein CagA which, in part, limits the cytotoxic effects of VacA in cells colonized by H. pylori. PMID:22919629

  13. Delayed gastric emptying rate as a potential mechanism for lowered glycemia after eating sourdough bread: studies in humans and rats using test products with added organic acids or an organic salt.

    PubMed

    Liljeberg, H G; Björck, I M

    1996-12-01

    The possible effects of organic acids or an organic salt on the rate of gastric emptying was studied to identify the cause for reduced postmeal responses of blood glucose and insulin to foods containing such components, eg, sourdough bread. Paracetamol was included in bread products with added lactic acid or sodium propionate and used as a marker for the rate of gastric emptying in healthy subjects. In parallel, postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and satiety were evaluated. The influence of lactic acid, propionic acid, and sodium propionate was also studied in rats after they were tube-fed with glucose solutions. The bread products with lactic acid or sodium propionate both lowered blood glucose and insulin responses. The bread with sodium propionate also prolonged satiety. The reason for the lowered metabolic responses with sodium propionate was probably a lowered gastric emptying rate, as judged from reduced blood paracetamol concentrations; there was no such effect observed with bread with added lactic acid. A similar amount of lactic acid in solution tube-fed to rats did not affect the disappearance of glucose from the stomach. In contrast with the finding in humans, sodium propionate had no effect on the rate of gastric emptying in rats whereas an equimolar solution of propionic acid reduced gastric emptying rate in rats. Possibly, less of this acid was produced in the gastric contents after a bolus load of a sodium propionate solution (in rats) than in an eating situation. Also, the pH and/or the osmolarity may be important, and when provided in excessive amounts, lactic acid reduced the gastric emptying rate in rats. A hydrochloric acid solution of similar pH was much less effective in this respect.

  14. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  15. Effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on matrix molecules and angiogenetic and anti-angiogenetic factors in gastric cancer cells cultured on different substrates.

    PubMed

    Kosova, F; Kurt, F O; Olmez, E; Tuğlu, I; Arı, Z

    2016-01-01

    Migration, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis associated with cancer depend on the surrounding microenvironment. Angiogenesis, the growth of new capillaries, is a regulator of cancer growth and a useful target for cancer therapy. We examined matrix protein interactions in a gastric cancer cell culture that was treated with different doses of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) phenethyl ester (CAPE). We also investigated the relations among the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), endostatin (ES) and trombospondin-1 (TSP-1). Cytotoxity of CAPE was measured using the 3-(4,5-dmethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. We examined the behavior of cells on laminin and collagen I coated surfaces in response to the angiogenic effect of these matrix molecules. We examined the protein alterations of these matrix molecules immunohistochemically and measured the levels of VEGF, MMP-9, ES and TSP-1 using the ELISA test. We showed that application of CAPE to the gastric cancer cell line on tissue culture plastic, laminin and collagen I significantly decreased the VEGF and MMP-9 protein levels. We found that TSP-1 levels were increased significantly in the gastric cancer cells after application of CAPE. The protein levels of gastric cancer cells also were increased significantly when tissue was cultured on laminin and collagen I. Application of CAPE to cells on laminin or collagen I coated surfaces significantly increased all of the proteins except ES. ES levels were increased on the collagen I covered surfaces, but the laminin surface decreased the levels of ES significantly. We demonstrated the beneficial effect of CAPE on a gastric cancer cell line including inhibition of proliferation and induction of some proteins that might be related to decreased angiogenesis. PMID:26523612

  16. Comparison of the serial dilution indicator and intragastric titration methods for measurement of meal-stimulated gastric acid secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Hogan, D L; Turken, D; Stern, A I; Isenberg, J I

    1983-11-01

    Two in vivo methods that permit quantitation of gastric acid secretion immediately after the meal are currently in use: intragastric titration and the serial dilution indicator method. During intragastric titration, intragastric pH is artificially maintained at 5.5 to 7 by the continuous addition of alkali to the gastric contents, while during serial dilution the intragastric pH is permitted to seek its natural pH. This study compared gastric acid secretion and serum gastrin in response to a liquid protein meal measured by both techniques in 10 subjects. Mean (+/- SE) 3-hr acid outputs were almost identical (53.6 +/- 6.0 mmol/3 hr with intragastric titration and 52.0 +/- 8.5 mmol/3 hr with serial dilution indicator). Furthermore, 30 min secretory responses in individual subjects were highly correlated (r = 0.98 +/- 0.01, P less than 0.001). Also, in spite of intragastric pH being less than 1.5 by 90 min after the meal during the serial dilution method, total integrated serum gastrin concentrations after the meal were similar (intragastric titration = 20.6 +/- 7.3 ng min/ml versus serial dilution indicator = 23.5 +/- 9.8 ng min/ml) and individual 30-min gastrins during the two separate tests were highly correlated (r = 0.80 +/- 0.06, P less than 0.01). It is concluded that both meal-stimulated gastric acid secretion and serum gastrin concentrations as measured by intragastric titration and by the serial dilution indicator method produced similar results.

  17. Effect of preduodenal lipase inhibition in suckling rats on dietary octanoic acid (C8:0) gastric absorption and plasma octanoylated ghrelin concentration.

    PubMed

    Lemarié, F; Cavalier, J-F; Garcia, C; Boissel, F; Point, V; Catheline, D; Legrand, P; Carrière, F; Rioux, V

    2016-09-01

    Part of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) coming from dietary triglycerides (TGs) can be directly absorbed through the gastric mucosa after the action of preduodenal lipase (lingual lipase in the rat). MCFA gastric absorption, particularly that of octanoic acid (C8:0), may have a physiological importance in the octanoylation of ghrelin, the orexigenic gastric peptide acting as an endogenous ligand of the hypothalamic growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-1a). However, the amount of C8:0 absorbed in the stomach and its metabolic fate still haven't been clearly characterized. The purpose of the present study was to further characterize and quantify the importance of preduodenal lipase activity on the release and gastric absorption of dietary C8:0 and on the subsequent ghrelin octanoylation in the stomach mucosa. Fifteen days old rats received fat emulsions containing triolein or [1,1,1-(13)C]-Tri-C8:0 and a specific inhibitor of preduodenal lipase, 5-(2-(benzyloxy)ethoxy)-3-(3-phenoxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2(3H)-one or BemPPOX. The fate of the (13)C-C8:0 was followed in rat tissues after 30 and 120min of digestion and octanoylated ghrelin was measured in the plasma. This work (1) demonstrates that part of C8:0 coming from Tri-C8:0 is directly absorbed at the gastric level, (2) allows the estimation of C8:0 gastric absorption level (1.3% of the (13)C-C8:0 in sn-3 position after 30min of digestion), as well as (3) the contribution of rat lingual lipase to total lipolysis and to duodenal absorption of dietary FAs (at least 30%), (4) shows no short-term effect of dietary Tri-C8:0 consumption and subsequent increase of C8:0 gastric tissue content on plasma octanoylated ghrelin concentration. PMID:27317984

  18. Aging study of silica optical fibers under acid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, I.; El Abdi, R.; Poulain, M.

    2005-05-01

    Optical fibers are key components in telecommunication technologies. Apart from optical specifications, optical fibers are expected to keep most of their physical properties for 10 to 20 years in current operating conditions. The reliability and the expected lifetime of optical links are closely related to the action of the chemical environment on the silica network. However, the coating also contributes largely to the mechanical properties of the fibers. The aim of this work was to study the strength and the mechanical behaviour of the silica optical fibers in an acid environment. A container with ammonium bifluoride acid salt was plunged into hot water at different temperatures (55° and 75°C). This emitted acid vapors which attacked the optical fibers for a period of 1 to 18 days. An aging study was performed on silica optical fibers with standard polyacrylate coating and with hermetic carbon coating. A dynamic two-point bending bench at different faceplate velocities (100, 200, 400 and 800 μm/s) was used. For comparison, the same dynamic measurements were also carried out on non-aged fibers. After acid vapor condensation, salt crystal deposits on the fibers were displayed using an electron scanning microscope. These crystals became visible to the naked eye from the 7th day post exposure.

  19. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  20. Body Position Modulates Gastric Emptying and Affects the Post-Prandial Rise in Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations Following Protein Ingestion in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Holwerda, Andrew M.; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Bierau, Jörgen; van Loon, Luc J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein digestion and amino acid absorption kinetics determine the post-prandial muscle protein synthetic response. Body position may affect gastrointestinal function and modulate the post-prandial rise in plasma amino acid availability. We aimed to assess the impact of body position on gastric emptying rate and the post-prandial rise in plasma amino acid concentrations following ingestion of a single, meal-like amount of protein. In a randomized, cross-over design, eight healthy males (25 ± 2 years, 23.9 ± 0.8 kg·m−2) ingested 22 g protein and 1.5 g paracetamol (acetaminophen) in an upright seated position (control) and in a −20° head-down tilted position (inversion). Blood samples were collected during a 240-min post-prandial period and analyzed for paracetamol and plasma amino acid concentrations to assess gastric emptying rate and post-prandial amino acid availability, respectively. Peak plasma leucine concentrations were lower in the inversion compared with the control treatment (177 ± 15 vs. 236 ± 15 mmol·L−1, p < 0.05), which was accompanied by a lower plasma essential amino acid (EAA) response over 240 min (31,956 ± 6441 vs. 50,351 ± 4015 AU; p < 0.05). Peak plasma paracetamol concentrations were lower in the inversion vs. control treatment (5.8 ± 1.1 vs. 10.0 ± 0.6 mg·L−1, p < 0.05). Gastric emptying rate and post-prandial plasma amino acid availability are significantly decreased after protein ingestion in a head-down tilted position. Therefore, upright body positioning should be considered when aiming to augment post-prandial muscle protein accretion in both health and disease. PMID:27089362

  1. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  2. Kir1.1 (ROMK) and Kv7.1 (KCNQ1/KvLQT1) are essential for normal gastric acid secretion: importance of functional Kir1.1.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Esad; Alfadda, Tariq; MacGregor, Gordon G; Dong, Ke; Wang, Tong; Geibel, John P

    2015-07-01

    Potassium channels comprise the apical leak pathway supplying extracellular K(+) for exchange with protons by the gastric H(+), K(+)-ATPase and provide potential therapeutic targets for inhibiting gastric acid secretion. The Kir1.1 (ROMK) potassium channel mediates the high capacity K(+) recycling necessary for NaCl reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the kidney, and this channel exhibits functional and regulatory characteristic well suited for K(+) recycling by gastric parietal cells. We report here that Kir1.1 channels are required for gastric acid secretion and that this channel participates with Kv7.1 (KCNQ1/KvLQT1) in the potassium recycling process. We show that Kir1.1 colocalizes with the β-subunit of H(+), K(+)-ATPase in gastric parietal cells of Kir1.1 wild-type mice. In Kir1.1-deficient mice, gastric mucosal morphology, as well as parietal cell number, proliferation index, and ultrastructure were normal but secretagogue-stimulated gastric acid secretion in whole stomach and perfused gastric glands was absent. Luminal application of potassium-restored acid secretion in perfused gastric glands from Kir1.1-deficient as well as barium-blocked wild-type mice. In wild-type mice, both luminal Tertiapin-Q, an inhibitor of Kir1.1, as well as XE991, an inhibitor of Kv7.1, reduced proton secretion. We propose that Kir1.1 and Kv7.1 channels collaborate in potassium and current recycling across the apical pole of parietal cells. PMID:25127675

  3. Comparison of the response using ICR mice derived from three different sources to ethanol/hydrochloric acid-induced gastric injury

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sung Hwa; Kim, Ji Eun; Go, Jun; Koh, Eun Kyoung; Sung, Ji Eun; Lee, Hyun Ah; Choi, Kyung Min; Kim, Hae Deun; Jung, Young Suk; Kim, Kil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Animal models for gastric ulcers produced by physical, pharmacological and surgical methods have been widely employed to evaluate therapeutic drugs and investigate the mechanism of action of this disease. ICR mice were selected to produce this model, even though several mice and rats have been widely used in studies of gastric ulcers. To compare the responses of ICR mice obtained from three different sources to gastric ulcer inducers, alterations in gastric injury, histopathological structure, and inflammation were measured in Korl:ICR (Korea NIFDS source), A:ICR (USA source) and B:ICR (Japan source) treated with three concentrations of ethanol (EtOH) (50, 70, and 90%) in 150 mM hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Firstly, the stomach lesion index gradually increased as the EtOH concentration increased in three ICR groups. Moreover, a significant increase in the level of mucosal injury, edema and the number of inflammatory cells was similarly detected in the EtOH/HCl treated group compared with the vehicle treated group in three ICR groups. Furthermore, the number of infiltrated mast cells and IL-1β expression were very similar in the ICR group derived from three different sources, although some differences in IL-1β expression were detected. Especially, the level of IL-1β mRNA in 50 and 90EtOH/HCl treated group was higher in Korl:ICR and A:ICR than B:ICR. Overall, the results of this study suggest that Korl:ICR, A:ICR and B:ICR derived from different sources have an overall similar response to gastric ulcer induced by EtOH/HCl administration, although there were some differences in the magnitude of their responses. PMID:27051443

  4. Comparison of the response using ICR mice derived from three different sources to ethanol/hydrochloric acid-induced gastric injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung Hwa; Kim, Ji Eun; Go, Jun; Koh, Eun Kyoung; Sung, Ji Eun; Lee, Hyun Ah; Choi, Kyung Min; Kim, Hae Deun; Jung, Young Suk; Kim, Kil Soo; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2016-03-01

    Animal models for gastric ulcers produced by physical, pharmacological and surgical methods have been widely employed to evaluate therapeutic drugs and investigate the mechanism of action of this disease. ICR mice were selected to produce this model, even though several mice and rats have been widely used in studies of gastric ulcers. To compare the responses of ICR mice obtained from three different sources to gastric ulcer inducers, alterations in gastric injury, histopathological structure, and inflammation were measured in Korl:ICR (Korea NIFDS source), A:ICR (USA source) and B:ICR (Japan source) treated with three concentrations of ethanol (EtOH) (50, 70, and 90%) in 150 mM hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Firstly, the stomach lesion index gradually increased as the EtOH concentration increased in three ICR groups. Moreover, a significant increase in the level of mucosal injury, edema and the number of inflammatory cells was similarly detected in the EtOH/HCl treated group compared with the vehicle treated group in three ICR groups. Furthermore, the number of infiltrated mast cells and IL-1β expression were very similar in the ICR group derived from three different sources, although some differences in IL-1β expression were detected. Especially, the level of IL-1β mRNA in 50 and 90EtOH/HCl treated group was higher in Korl:ICR and A:ICR than B:ICR. Overall, the results of this study suggest that Korl:ICR, A:ICR and B:ICR derived from different sources have an overall similar response to gastric ulcer induced by EtOH/HCl administration, although there were some differences in the magnitude of their responses. PMID:27051443

  5. The dual induction of apoptosis and autophagy by SZC014, a synthetic oleanolic acid derivative, in gastric cancer cells via NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Rui, Li Xiao; Shu, Song Yu; Jun, Wu Jing; Mo, Chen Zi; Wu, Sun Zheng; Min, Liu Shu; Yuan, Lin; Yong, Peng Jin; Cheng, Song Zhi; Sheng, Wang Shi; Yao, Tang Ze

    2016-04-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) possesses various pharmacological activities, such as antitumor and anti-inflammation; however, its clinical applications are limited by its relatively weak activities and low bioavailability. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic activity of seven novel OA derivatives, one of which, SZC014 [2-(pyrrolidine-1-yl) methyl-3-oxo-olean-12-en-28-oic acid], exhibited the strongest antitumor activity; its anticancer effect on gastric cancer cells and action mechanisms were investigated. The viability of OA and seven synthesized derivatives treating gastric cancer cells was detected using tetrazolium (MTT). Among them, SZC014 exhibited the strongest cytotoxic activity against gastric cancer cells (SGC7901, MGC803, and MKN-45). The effect of SZC014 on cell cycle was identified by propidium iodide (PI) staining assay. The cellular apoptosis induced by SZC014 was tested by annexin V/PI. The cellular morphological changes and ultrastructural structures affected by SZC014 were observed and imaged through inverted phase contrast microscope and transmission electron microscopy. Western blotting was performed to explore the expression of proteins associated with apoptosis (caspase 3, caspase 9, Bax, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL), autophagy (Beclin 1 and ATG 5), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signal pathway, respectively. The cytotoxic activities of all the seven synthesized OA derivatives were stronger than that of OA against gastric cancer cells. SZC014 exhibited stronger cytotoxic activity than other OA derivatives, inhibited the proliferation of gastric cancer cells, besides, induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in SGC7901 cells. Both apoptosis and autophagy were found simultaneously in SZC014-treated SGC7901 cells. Caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by SZC014 was confirmed to be associated with upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, while upregulation of Beclin 1 and ATG 5 was inferred to be involved in SZC014-induced autophagy. Moreover

  6. Acidic Digestion in a Teleost: Postprandial and Circadian Pattern of Gastric pH, Pepsin Activity, and Pepsinogen and Proton Pump mRNAs Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yúfera, Manuel; Moyano, Francisco J.; Astola, Antonio; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Two different modes for regulation of stomach acid secretion have been described in vertebrates. Some species exhibit a continuous acid secretion maintaining a low gastric pH during fasting. Others, as some teleosts, maintain a neutral gastric pH during fasting while the hydrochloric acid is released only after the ingestion of a meal. Those different patterns seem to be closely related to specific feeding habits. However, our recent observations suggest that this acidification pattern could be modified by changes in daily feeding frequency and time schedule. The aim of this study was to advance in understanding the regulation mechanisms of stomach digestion and pattern of acid secretion in teleost fish. We have examined the postprandial pattern of gastric pH, pepsin activity, and mRNA expression for pepsinogen and proton pump in white seabream juveniles maintained under a light/dark 12/12 hours cycle and receiving only one morning meal. The pepsin activity was analyzed according to the standard protocol buffering at pH 2 and using the actual pH measured in the stomach. The results show how the enzyme precursor is permanently available while the hydrochloric acid, which activates the zymogen fraction, is secreted just after the ingestion of food. Results also reveal that analytical protocol at pH 2 notably overestimates true pepsin activity in fish stomach. The expression of the mRNA encoding pepsinogen and proton pump exhibited almost parallel patterns, with notable increases during the darkness period and sharp decreases just before the morning meal. These results indicate that white seabream uses the resting hours for recovering the mRNA stock that will be quickly used during the feeding process. Our data clearly shows that both daily illumination pattern and feeding time are involved at different level in the regulation of the secretion of digestive juices. PMID:22448266

  7. Polymer materials and component evaluation in acidic-radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celina, M.; Gillen, K. T.; Malone, G. M.; Clough, R. L.; Nelson, W. H.

    2001-07-01

    Polymeric materials used for cable/wire insulation, electrical connectors, O-rings, seals, and in critical components such as motors, level switches and resistive thermo-devices were evaluated under accelerated degradation conditions in combined radiation-oxidative elevated-temperature acidic-vapor (nitric/oxalic) environments relevant to conditions in isotope processing facilities. Experiments included the assessment of individual materials such as PEEK, polyimides, polyolefin based cable insulation, EPDM rubbers, various epoxy systems, commercial caulking materials as well as some functional testing of components. We discuss how to conduct laboratory experiments to simulate such complex hostile environments, describe some degradation effects encountered, and evaluate the impact on appropriate material and component selection.

  8. ACID GASES IN CO2-RICH SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Vlcek, Lukas; Cole, David

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of species behavior involving dilute fluid environments has been crucial for the advance of modern solvation thermodynamics through molecular-based formalisms to guide the development of macroscopic regression tools in the description of fluid behavior and correlation of experimental data (Chialvo 2013). Dilute fluid environments involving geologic formations are of great theoretical and practical relevance regardless of the thermodynamic state conditions. The most challenging systems are those involving highly compressible and reactive confined environments, i.e., where small perturbations of pressure and/or temperature can trigger considerable density changes. This in turn can alter significantly the species solvation, their preferential solvation, and consequently, their reactivity with one another and with the surrounding mineral surfaces whose outcome is the modification of the substrate porosity and permeability, and ultimately, the integrity of the mineral substrates. Considering that changes in porosity and permeability resulting from dissolution and precipitation phenomena in confined environments are at the core of the aqueous CO2-mineral interactions, and that caprock integrity (e.g., sealing capacity) depends on these key parameters, it is imperative to gain fundamental understanding of the mineral-fluid interfacial phenomena and fluid-fluid equilibria under mineral confinement at subsurface conditions. In order to undertand the potential effects of acid gases as contaminants of supercritical CO2 streams, in the next section we will discuss the thermodynamic behavior of CO2 fluid systems by addressing two crucial issues in the context of carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) technologies: (i) Why should we consider (acid gas) CO2 impurities? and (ii) Why are CO2 fluid - mineral interactions of paramount relevance?

  9. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    PubMed

    de Jonge, H J M Henk-Marijn; Gans, R O B Rijk; Huls, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate absorption. No convincing scientific evidence supporting the advice to prescribe calcium citrate instead of calcium carbonate to patients who also take antacids is available, and therefore deserves further investigation. On the contrary, the fact that calcium carbonate does not need acid in order to be absorbed, has also not been proven. In clinical practise, it appears important that calcium is taken with meals in order to improve its absorption. PMID:22914054

  10. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    PubMed

    de Jonge, H J M Henk-Marijn; Gans, R O B Rijk; Huls, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate absorption. No convincing scientific evidence supporting the advice to prescribe calcium citrate instead of calcium carbonate to patients who also take antacids is available, and therefore deserves further investigation. On the contrary, the fact that calcium carbonate does not need acid in order to be absorbed, has also not been proven. In clinical practise, it appears important that calcium is taken with meals in order to improve its absorption.

  11. Fatty acid trophic markers in the pelagic marine environment.

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard, Johanne; St John, Michael; Kattner, Gerhard; Müller-Navarra, Dörthe; Hagen, Wilhelm

    2003-01-01

    Fatty acids have been used as qualitative markers to trace or confirm predator-prey relationships in the marine environment for more than thirty years. More recently, they have also been used to identify key processes impacting the dynamics of some of the world's major ecosystems. The fatty acid trophic marker (FATM) concept is based on the observation that marine primary producers lay down certain fatty acid patterns that may be transferred conservatively to, and hence can be recognized in, primary consumers. To identify these fatty acid patterns the literature was surveyed and a partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis of the data was performed, validating the specificity of particular microalgal FATM. Microalgal group specific FATM have been traced in various primary consumers, particularly in herbivorous calanoid copepods, which accumulate large lipid reserves, and which dominate the zooplankton biomass in high latitude ecosystems. At higher trophic levels these markers of herbivory are obscured as the degree of carnivory increases, and as the fatty acids originate from a variety of dietary sources. Such differences are highlighted in a PLS regression analysis of fatty acid and fatty alcohol compositional data (the components of wax esters accumulated by many marine organisms) of key Arctic and Antarctic herbivorous, omnivorous and carnivorous copepod species. The analysis emphasizes how calanoid copepods separate from other copepods not only by their content of microalgal group specific FATM, but also by their large content of long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids and alcohols. These monounsaturates have been used to trace and resolve food web relationships in, for example, hyperiid amphipods, euphausiids and fish, which may consume large numbers of calanoid copepods. Results like these are extremely valuable for enabling the discrimination of specific prey species utilized by higher trophic level omnivores and carnivores without the employment of

  12. Fatty acid trophic markers in the pelagic marine environment.

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard, Johanne; St John, Michael; Kattner, Gerhard; Müller-Navarra, Dörthe; Hagen, Wilhelm

    2003-01-01

    Fatty acids have been used as qualitative markers to trace or confirm predator-prey relationships in the marine environment for more than thirty years. More recently, they have also been used to identify key processes impacting the dynamics of some of the world's major ecosystems. The fatty acid trophic marker (FATM) concept is based on the observation that marine primary producers lay down certain fatty acid patterns that may be transferred conservatively to, and hence can be recognized in, primary consumers. To identify these fatty acid patterns the literature was surveyed and a partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis of the data was performed, validating the specificity of particular microalgal FATM. Microalgal group specific FATM have been traced in various primary consumers, particularly in herbivorous calanoid copepods, which accumulate large lipid reserves, and which dominate the zooplankton biomass in high latitude ecosystems. At higher trophic levels these markers of herbivory are obscured as the degree of carnivory increases, and as the fatty acids originate from a variety of dietary sources. Such differences are highlighted in a PLS regression analysis of fatty acid and fatty alcohol compositional data (the components of wax esters accumulated by many marine organisms) of key Arctic and Antarctic herbivorous, omnivorous and carnivorous copepod species. The analysis emphasizes how calanoid copepods separate from other copepods not only by their content of microalgal group specific FATM, but also by their large content of long-chain monounsaturated fatty acids and alcohols. These monounsaturates have been used to trace and resolve food web relationships in, for example, hyperiid amphipods, euphausiids and fish, which may consume large numbers of calanoid copepods. Results like these are extremely valuable for enabling the discrimination of specific prey species utilized by higher trophic level omnivores and carnivores without the employment of

  13. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjustable gastric banding; Bariatric surgery - laparoscopic gastric banding; Obesity - gastric banding; Weight loss - gastric banding ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ...

  14. Effect of carnosic acid, quercetin and α-tocopherol on lipid and protein oxidation in an in vitro simulated gastric digestion model.

    PubMed

    Raes, Katleen; Doolaege, Evelyne H A; Deman, Steven; Vossen, Els; De Smet, Stefaan

    2015-03-01

    Carnosic acid, quercetin and α-tocopherol are well-known antioxidants in many biological systems. However, their antioxidative effect during food digestion against lipid and protein oxidation is not well known. Therefore, in this study, an in vitro simulated gastric digestion model was used to investigate their stability during gastrointestinal conditions and their antioxidative properties during low pH digestion. In general, the stability of the antioxidants in the different steps of digestion was in the order of α-tocopherol > quercetin > carnosic acid. Salivary components, as well as the acidity of the gastric juice, were responsible for the reduction in antioxidants. Both α-tocopherol and quercetin were able to lower lipid oxidation during digestion, while the effect on protein oxidation was not clear. In contrast, carnosic acid did not have any effect on lipid oxidation and tended to stimulate protein oxidation. This study clearly demonstrated that the environmental conditions are of major importance to the properties of antioxidant compounds.

  15. Exploring the potential of gastro retentive dosage form in delivery of ellagic acid and aloe vera gel powder for treatment of gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Arati N; Ranpise, Nisharani S; Ramesh, C

    2014-01-01

    Approach of novel drug delivery system (NDDS) overcomes the limitations of conventional dosage forms. However, this concept is still not practiced to a large extent in delivery of herbal drugs in Ayurveda. Thus, the potential of herbal drugs has not been explored to its fullest. Hence, there is a growing need to amalgamate the concept of NDDS in delivery of herbal constituents. The present investigation is designed to deliver and retain two herbal constituents in stomach for better action against Helicobacter pylori induced gastric ulcers. The objective was to develop a bilayer floating tablet of ellagic acid and Aloe vera gel powder through rational combination of excipients to give the lowest possible lag time with maximum drug release in the period of 4 h. Formulation F9 containing 100 mg of HPMC K15M, 27 mg of crospovidone, 80 mg of mannitol and effervescent agents in the ratio 1:2 gave 92% drug release and desired floating properties. In vivo studies showed that combination of ellagic acid and Aloe vera gave 75 % ulcer inhibition in comparison to 57% ulcer inhibition in the group which was administered with ellagic acid alone. This suggests the use of bilayer floating tablet in gastric ulcer treatment.

  16. [Effects of aloe extracts, aloctin A, on gastric secretion and on experimental gastric lesions in rats].

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Imanishi, K; Okabe, S

    1989-05-01

    Effect of aloctin A, glycoprotein isolated from leaves of Aloe arborescens MILL, on gastric secretion and on acute gastric lesions in rats were examined. Aloctin A given intravenously dose-dependently inhibited the volume of gastric juice, acid and pepsin output in pylorus-ligated rats. Aloctin A given intravenously significantly inhibited the development of Shay ulcers and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions in rats. It also inhibited water-immersion stress lesions induced in pylorus-ligated rats.

  17. Amino Acid Synthesis in Seafloor Environments on Icy Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Erika; Barge, Laura; VanderVelde, David; Kallas, Kayo; Baum, Marc M.; Russell, Michael J.; Kanik, Isik

    2016-10-01

    In 2005, the Cassini mission detected plumes erupting from Enceladus' surface, containing carbon dioxide, methane, silica, and possibly ammonia. Subsequent laboratory experiments indicated that the silica particles in the plumes were generated under alkaline conditions and at moderate temperatures of ~90°C (Hsu et al., 2015); one scenario for such conditions would be the existence of alkaline (serpentinization-driven) hydrothermal activity within Enceladus. Alkaline vents are significant since they have been proposed as a likely environment for the emergence of metabolism on the early Earth (Russell et al. 2014) and thus could also provide a mechanism for origin of life on ocean worlds with a water-rock interface. Alkaline vents in an acidic, iron-containing ocean could produce mineral precipitates that could act as primitive enzymes or catalysts mediating organic reactions; for example, metal sulfides can catalyze the reductive amination of pyruvate to alanine (Novikov and Copley 2013). We have conducted experiments testing the synthesis of amino acids catalyzed by other iron minerals that might be expected to precipitate on the seafloor of early Earth or Enceladus. Preliminary results indicate that amino acids as well as other organic products can be synthesized in 1-3 days under alkaline hydrothermal conditions. We also find that the yield and type of organic products is highly dependent on pH and temperature, implying that understanding the specifics of the geochemical hydrothermal gradients on Enceladus (or other ocean worlds) will be significant in determining their potential for synthesizing building blocks for life.Hsu, H.-W. et al. (2015), Nature 519, 207-210.Russell, M. J. et al. (2014), Astrobiology, 14, 308-43.Novikov Y. and Copley S. D. (2013) PNAS 110, 33, 13283-13288.

  18. Bcl-2 accelerates retinoic acid-induced growth arrest and recovery in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, H K; Chen, S L; Hsu, C T; Chao, Y C; Tsao, Y P

    2000-01-01

    The role of Bcl-2 as an anti-apoptotic protein has been well documented. In the present work, we present evidence that Bcl-2 may also be involved in cell growth regulation. SC-M1 is an unique cell line which responds to retinoic acid (RA) treatment with reversible growth arrest [Shyu, Jiang, Huang, Chang, Wu, Roffler and Yeh (1995) Eur. J. Cancer 31, 237-243]. In this study, when treated with RA, SC-M1/Bcl2 cells, which were generated by transfecting SC-M1 cells with bcl-2 DNA, were growth-arrested two days earlier than SC-M1/neo cells, which were generated by transfecting SC-M1 cells with vector DNA. This indicates that Bcl-2 accelerates RA-induced growth arrest. In addition to the accelerated growth arrest, RA-treated SC-M1/Bcl2 cells also recovered from growth arrest two days faster than SC-M1/neo cells after the removal of RA. Previously, we had identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21((WAF1/CIP1)) (p21) as a mediator of RA-induced growth arrest [Tsao, Li, Kuo, Liu and Chen (1996) Biochem. J. 317, 707-711]. In a search for the mechanism by which Bcl-2 affects growth regulation, we found that p21 gene expression was more prominent in SC-M1/Bcl2 cells than in SC-M1/neo cells in the presence of RA, but when RA was removed, p21 gene expression levels in SC-M1/Bcl2 cells were also reduced earlier than in SC-M1/neo cells. The present report is the first to show that Bcl-2 accelerates not only growth arrest but also recovery from growth arrest. Moreover, the close correlation between the effect of Bcl-2 on both RA-induced growth arrest and RA-induced p21 gene expression suggests the possibility that Bcl-2 affects cell growth through the mechanism of p21. PMID:10816444

  19. Activity-guided fractionation to characterize a coffee beverage that effectively down-regulates mechanisms of gastric acid secretion as compared to regular coffee.

    PubMed

    Rubach, Malte; Lang, Roman; Skupin, Carola; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2010-04-14

    In some individuals, the consumption of coffee beverages is related to symptoms of gastric irritation. Hot water steam-treatment of raw coffee beans is hypothesized to reduce the contents of stomach irritating compounds, and products to which this technology is applied are launched as stomach-friendly coffee. However, data on the effect of steam-treated coffee on gastric acid secretion are conflicting and it has not been proven yet as to which coffee components act as pro- or antisecretory stimulants. The work presented here aimed at the characterization of a coffee beverage that effectively down-regulates mechanisms of proton secretion in human gastric cells (HGT-1). At first, a regular coffee beverage was fractionated by using solvents of different polarity: water, ethylacetate, dichloromethane, and pentane. Functional assays on the proton secretory activity (PSA) of these solvent fractions revealed the least pronounced effect for the water fraction, for which quantitative analyses demonstrated the highest distribution of chlorogenic acid (95%), (beta)N-alkanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamides (55%), and N-methylpyridinium (N-MP, >99%) among all fractions. Following experiments demonstrated that HGT-1 cells treated with regular coffee fortified with N-MP at a concentration of about 20 mg/mL N-MP showed a significantly decreased PSA as compared to cells which were exposed to coffee beverages containing higher (32-34 mg/L) or lower (5 mg/L) N-MP concentrations. Results from cellular pathway analyses of transcription (ATF-1 and Akt1) and signaling (cAMP and EGFr) factors and kinases (ERK1/2), and experiments on the gene expression of pro (histamine-HRH2 and acetylcholine-CHRM3)- and anti (somatostatin-SSTR1)-secretory receptors and H(+),K(+)-ATPase verified this antisecretory activity of N-MP in coffee beverages.

  20. Activity-guided fractionation to characterize a coffee beverage that effectively down-regulates mechanisms of gastric acid secretion as compared to regular coffee.

    PubMed

    Rubach, Malte; Lang, Roman; Skupin, Carola; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2010-04-14

    In some individuals, the consumption of coffee beverages is related to symptoms of gastric irritation. Hot water steam-treatment of raw coffee beans is hypothesized to reduce the contents of stomach irritating compounds, and products to which this technology is applied are launched as stomach-friendly coffee. However, data on the effect of steam-treated coffee on gastric acid secretion are conflicting and it has not been proven yet as to which coffee components act as pro- or antisecretory stimulants. The work presented here aimed at the characterization of a coffee beverage that effectively down-regulates mechanisms of proton secretion in human gastric cells (HGT-1). At first, a regular coffee beverage was fractionated by using solvents of different polarity: water, ethylacetate, dichloromethane, and pentane. Functional assays on the proton secretory activity (PSA) of these solvent fractions revealed the least pronounced effect for the water fraction, for which quantitative analyses demonstrated the highest distribution of chlorogenic acid (95%), (beta)N-alkanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamides (55%), and N-methylpyridinium (N-MP, >99%) among all fractions. Following experiments demonstrated that HGT-1 cells treated with regular coffee fortified with N-MP at a concentration of about 20 mg/mL N-MP showed a significantly decreased PSA as compared to cells which were exposed to coffee beverages containing higher (32-34 mg/L) or lower (5 mg/L) N-MP concentrations. Results from cellular pathway analyses of transcription (ATF-1 and Akt1) and signaling (cAMP and EGFr) factors and kinases (ERK1/2), and experiments on the gene expression of pro (histamine-HRH2 and acetylcholine-CHRM3)- and anti (somatostatin-SSTR1)-secretory receptors and H(+),K(+)-ATPase verified this antisecretory activity of N-MP in coffee beverages. PMID:20235536

  1. Effect of formulation parameters on the drug release and floating properties of gastric floating two-layer tablets with acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Hasçiçek, Canan; Yüksel-Tilkan, Günseli; Türkmen, Berna; Ozdemir, Nurten

    2011-09-01

    Floating dosage forms of acetylsalicylic acid, used for its antithrombotic effect, were developed to prolong gastric residence time and increase bioavailability. In the two-layer tablet formulation, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) of high viscosity and an effervescent mixture of citric acid and sodium bicarbonate formed the floating layer. The release layer contained the drug, direct tableting agent and different types of matrix-forming polymers such as HPMC of low viscosity, sodium carboxymethylcellulose and chitosan. Tablets were prepared using a direct compression technique. The effect of formulation variables on physicochemical and floating properties and the drug release from tablets were investigated. Floating ability was dependent on the amount of effervescent agent and gel-forming polymer of the floating layer. Drug release was prolonged to 8 hours by changing the type and viscosity of the matrix-forming polymer in the drug-loading layer and all formulations showed a diffusion release mechanisms.

  2. Biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in an extremely acidic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, R.D.; Savage, D.C.; Sayler, G.S.; Stacey, G.

    1998-11-01

    The potential for biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons was evaluated in soil samples recovered along gradients of both contaminant levels and pH values existing downstream of a long-term coal pile storage basin. pH values for areas greatly impacted by runoff from the storage basin were 2.0. Even at such a reduced pH, the indigenous microbial community was metabolically active, showing the ability to oxidize more than 40% of the parent hydrocarbons, naphthalene and toluene, to carbon dioxide and water. Treatment of the soil samples with cycloheximide inhibited mineralization of the aromatic substrates. DNA hybridization analysis indicated that whole-community nucleic acids recovered from these samples did not hybridize with genes, such as nahA, nahG, nahH, todC1C2, and tomA, that encode common enzymes from neutrophilic bacteria. Since these data suggested that the degradation of aromatic compounds may involve a microbial consortium instead of individual acidophilic bacteria, experiments using microorganisms isolated from these samples were initiated. While no defined mixed cultures were able to evolve {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from labeled substrates in these mineralization experiments, an undefined mixed culture including a fungus, a yeast, and several bacteria successfully metabolized approximately 27% of supplied naphthalene after 1 week. This study shows that biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons can occur in environments with extremely low pH values.

  3. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Y gastric bypass; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y; Weight-loss surgery - gastric bypass; Obesity surgery - gastric bypass ... Weight-loss surgery may be an option if you are very obese and have not been able to ...

  4. GAS-GRAIN MODELING OF ISOCYANIC ACID (HNCO), CYANIC ACID (HOCN), FULMINIC ACID (HCNO), AND ISOFULMINIC ACID (HONC) IN ASSORTED INTERSTELLAR ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Quan Donghui; Herbst, Eric; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Roueff, Evelyne

    2010-12-20

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) is a well-known interstellar molecule. Evidence also exists for the presence of two of its metastable isomers in the interstellar medium: HCNO (fulminic acid) and HOCN (cyanic acid). Fulminic acid has been detected toward cold and lukewarm sources, while cyanic acid has been detected both in these sources and in warm sources in the Galactic Center. Gas-phase models can reproduce the abundances of the isomers in cold sources, but overproduce HCNO in the Galactic Center. Here we present a detailed study of a gas-grain model that contains these three isomers, plus a fourth isomer, isofulminic acid (HONC), for four types of sources: hot cores, the warm envelopes of hot cores, lukewarm corinos, and cold cores. The current model is partially able to rationalize the abundances of HNCO, HOCN, and HCNO in cold and warm sources. Predictions for HONC in all environments are also made.

  5. Gastric Banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding before deciding to have the procedure. Advertisements for a device or procedure may not include ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  6. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    ... al. Position paper update: gastric lavage for gastrointestinal decontamination. Clin Toxicol (Phila) . 2013;51(3); 140-146. ... 2012:chap 49. Zeringe M, Fowler GC. Gastrointesinal decontamination. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. Pfenninger & Fowler's ...

  7. Effect of an acid rain environment on limestone surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mossotti, V.G.; Lindsay, J.R.; Hochella, M.F. Jr.

    1987-11-01

    As part of a study to assess mineralogical alterations in building stone caused by acid rain, Salem limestone samples were exposed for one year in several urban and one rural environments. Samples exposed in the rural location were chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone (control material). All samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the grounding surfaces, where the stones were unwashed by precipitation. However, the bulk chemistry of the urban samples (not including the stain) was virtually identical to that of the control stone. Sulfur (in the form of sulfate) was disseminated over the calcite grain surfaces to a depth less than 10 nanometer in the freshly quarried limestone; an identical sulfate layer was found on the calcite grains after the 1-y exposure period. Mass balance calculations and sulfur isotope patterns indicate that the gypsum stain on the protected surfaces consists of adventitious sulfur. A model, involving the attack of SO/sub 2/ on dry calcite, was used to define the conditions for stain formation on dry, protected surfaces. This suggests that under arid conditions, once the surface has been saturated with gypsum, the quantity of stain deposited on an unwashed surface is independent of atmospheric SO/sub 2/ concentration. On rain-washed surfaces experiencing gas-solid attack during intermittent dry periods, the quantity of gypsum produced by a gas-solid reaction mechanism should strongly correlate with both the frequency of rain events and the atmospheric SO/sub 2/ level, provided that the rain events are frequent and clearly delimited by periods of dryness.

  8. Lack of release of bound anthocyanins and phenolic acids from carrot plant cell walls and model composites during simulated gastric and small intestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Padayachee, Anneline; Netzel, Gabriele; Netzel, Michael; Day, Li; Mikkelsen, Deirdre; Gidley, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Separately, polyphenols and plant cell walls (PCW) are important contributors to the health benefits associated with fruits and vegetables. However, interactions with PCW which occur either during food preparation or mastication may affect bioaccessibility and hence bioavailability of polyphenols. Binding interactions between anthocyanins, phenolic acids (PAs) and PCW components, were evaluated using both a bacterial cellulose-pectin model system and a black carrot puree system. The majority of available polyphenols bound to PCW material with 60-70% of available anthocyanins and PAs respectively binding to black carrot puree PCW matter. Once bound, release of polyphenols using acidified methanol is low with only ∼20% of total anthocyanins to ∼30% of PAs being released. Less than 2% of bound polyphenol was released after in vitro gastric and small intestinal (S.I.) digestion for both the model system and the black carrot puree PCW matter. Confocal laser scanning microscopy shows localised binding of anthocyanins to PCW. Very similar patterns of binding for anthocyanins and PAs suggest that PAs form complexes with anthocyanins and polysaccharides. Time dependent changes in extractability with acidified methanol but not the total bound fraction suggests that initial non-specific deposition on cellulose surfaces is followed by rearrangement of the bound molecules. Minimal release of anthocyanins and PAs after simulated gastric and S.I. digestion indicates that polyphenols in fruits and vegetables which bind to the PCW will be transported to the colon where they would be expected to be released by the action of cell wall degrading bacteria.

  9. Paclitaxel plus valproic acid versus paclitaxel alone as second- or third-line therapy for advanced gastric cancer: a randomized Phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Fushida, Sachio; Kinoshita, Jun; Kaji, Masahide; Oyama, Katsunobu; Hirono, Yasuo; Tsukada, Tomoya; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Weekly paclitaxel (wPTX) is the preferred second-line chemotherapy for gastric cancer in Japan. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown to decrease proliferation through cell-cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. One histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), also inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and enhances the efficacy of paclitaxel (PTX), shown in a murine gastric cancer model. This Phase II trial was designed to evaluate the benefits of adding VPA to wPTX in patients with gastric cancer refractory to first-line treatment with fluoropyrimidine. Patients and methods The patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive PTX 80 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15, every 4 weeks, or a dose of PTX plus VPA taken everyday at 7.5 mg/kg twice daily. Random assignment was carried out at the data center with a minimization method adjusted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0–1 vs 2), prior chemotherapy (first-line vs second-line), and measurable lesions (presence vs absence). The primary end point was the overall survival (OS) rate, and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival rate and safety analysis. Results Sixty-six patients were randomly assigned to receive wPTX (n=33) or wPTX plus VPA (n=33). The median OS was 9.8 months in the wPTX group and 8.7 months in the wPTX plus VPA group (hazard ratio 1.19; 95% CI 0.702–2.026; P=0.51). The median progression-free survival was 4.5 months in the wPTX group and 3.0 months in the wPTX plus VPA group (hazard ratio 1.29; 95% CI 0.753–2.211; P=0.35). Grade 3–4 adverse events were neutropenia (3.1%), pneumonia (1.6%), liver injury (1.6%), brain infarction (1.6%), and rupture of aorta (1.6%). Conclusion No statistically significant difference was observed between wPTX and wPTX plus VPA for OS. PMID:27524882

  10. Canine gastric mucosal vasodilation with prostaglandins and histamine analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, J.G.; Nies, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of direct intragastric artery infusion of prostaglandins E2 and I2, arachidonic acid, dimaprit (histamine H2 agonist), and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine (histamine H1 agonist) on gastric mucosal blood flow was examined in dogs to elucidate the relationship between gastric secretory state and mucosal blood flow in dogs. These compounds were chosen because of their diverse effect on gastric acid secretion. Gastric fundus blood flow was measured both electromagnetically with a flow probe around the left gastric artery which supplies the fundus almost exclusively, and by the radioactive microsphere technique. Intraarterial infusion of all the compounds resulted in gastric mucosal vasodilation even though PGE2, PGI2, and arachidonic acid inhibit gastric acid secretion, dimaprit stimulated gastric acid secretion, and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine does not affect gastric acid secretion. There was total agreement in the blood flow measurements by the two different techniques. Our data suggest that gastric acid secretion and gastric vasodilation are independently regulated. In addition, the validity of the studies in which the aminopyrine clearance indicates that prostaglandins are mucosal vasoconstrictors needs to be questioned because of the reliance of those measurements on the secretory state of the stomach.

  11. Effect of acid rain on the soil environment: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Rechcigl, J.E.; Sparks, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on acid rain, with emphasis on soils and leaching of soil elements. Several questions still exist concerning the effects of atmospheric acid deposition on soils: (1) does acid rain enhance mobilization of harmful heavy metals in soils which could leach into the groundwater; (2) does acid rain accelerate the kinetics of weathering of primary minerals and of secondary clay minerals in soils which would release large quantities of Al, Fe, and Si into the groundwater making it unfit for human consumption; and (3) do the beneficial effects of acid deposition outweigh the negative effects or vice versa. Literature pertaining to these questions is addressed in this review. 63 references.

  12. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Ramos, Alberto; Sánchez Sánchez, Rolando

    2008-01-01

    Since its discovery and identification in gastric tissue by Marshall and Warren in 1983, our knowledge about the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection has grown considerably. Its role in the multifactorial pathology of peptic ulcer disease (gastrodudodenal ulcer disease), gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma is now widely accepted while its involvement in extraintestinal disease is still controversial.The correlation between the colonization of the stomach by H. pylori and gastric lymphoma has been demonstrated in multiple studies. Between 65 and 80% of distal gastric adenocarcinomas are attributed to H. pylori infection. However, gastric carcinogenesis cannot be explained by H. pylori infection alone. Among those individuals infected by this bacteria, only a small percentage (2-5%) ever develops gastric cancer, the majority exhibit benign lesions. There is a wide individual variation in the outcome of this infection in patients. This individual and population specific variation is due to the intricate relationship between genetics, the environment, bacterial virulence, diet, and socio-economic status and it explains the multiple outcomes of this infection. In this article, we conduct a review of the widely accepted theories regarding gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori, the correlations and enigmas between them, the reported geographical variations, and the various proposed hypotheses on the carcinogenic mechanism of Helicobacter pylori.

  13. Inhibition of Gastric Acid Secretion by H2 Receptor Antagonists Associates a Definite Risk of Enteric Peritonitis and Infectious Mortality in Patients Treated with Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Fontan, Miguel; Machado Lopes, Daniela; García Enríquez, Alba; López-Calviño, Beatriz; López-Muñiz, Andrés; García Falcón, Teresa; Rodríguez-Carmona, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidences linking treatment with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion (IGAS) and an increased risk of serious infections are inconclusive, both in the population at large and in the particular case of patients with chronic kidney disease. We have undertaken an investigation to disclose associations between treatment with IGAS and infectious outcomes, in patients undergoing chronic Peritoneal Dialysis (PD). Method Observational, historic cohort, single center design. Six hundred and ninety-one patients incident on PD were scrutinized for an association among treatment with IGAS (H2 antagonists H2A or proton pump inhibitors PPI) (main study variable), on one side, and the risks of enteric peritoneal infection (main outcome), overall peritoneal infection, and general and infectious mortality (secondary outcomes). We applied a three-step multivariate approach, based on classic Cox models (baseline variables), time-dependent analyses and, when appropriate, competing risk analyses. Main results The clinical characteristics of patients treated with H2A, PPI or none of these were significantly different. Multivariate analyses disclosed a consistently increased risk of enteric peritonitis in patients treated with IGAS (RR 1.65, 95% CI 1.08–2.55, p = 0.018, Cox). Stratified analysis indicated that patients treated with H2A, rather than those on PPI, supported the burden of this risk. Similar findings applied for the risk of infectious mortality. On the contrary, we were not able to detect any association among the study variables, on one side, and the general risks of peritonitis or mortality, on the other. Conclusions Treatment with IGAS associates increased incidences of enteric peritonitis and infectious mortality, among patients on chronic PD. The association is clear in the case of H2A but less consistent in the case of PPI. Our results support the convenience of preferring PPI to H2A, for gastric acid inhibition in PD patients. PMID:26872254

  14. Application of nanoparticles for oral delivery of acid-labile lansoprazole in the treatment of gastric ulcer: in vitro and in vivo evaluations.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop nanoparticles for oral delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ), for gastric ulcer therapy. LPZ-loaded positively charged Eudragit(®) RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNPs-LPZ) and negatively charged poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGANPs-LPZ) were prepared. The effect of charge on nanoparticle deposition in ulcerated and non-ulcerated regions of the stomach was investigated. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles in the intestine was evaluated in a Caco-2 cell model. The pharmacokinetic performance and ulcer healing response of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles following oral administration were evaluated in Wistar rats with induced ulcers. The prepared drug-loaded ERSNPs-LPZ and PLGANPs-LPZ possessed opposite surface charge (+38.5±0.3 mV versus -27.3±0.3 mV, respectively) and the particle size was around 200 nm with a narrow size distribution. The negatively charged PLGANPs adhered more readily to the ulcerated region (7.22%±1.21% per cm(2)), whereas the positively charged ERSNPs preferentially distributed in the non-ulcerated region (8.29%±0.35% per cm(2)). Both ERSNPs and PLGANPs were prominent uptake in Caco-2 cells, too. The nanoparticles sustained and prolonged LPZ concentrations up to 24 hours, and the half-life and mean residence time of LPZ were prolonged by 3.5-fold and 4.5-fold, respectively, as compared with LPZ solution. Oral administration of LPZ-loaded nanoparticles healed 92.6%-95.7% of gastric ulcers in Wistar rats within 7 days.

  15. [Gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Belén Fraile, M; Serra Bartual, M; Segarra Sánchez, J; Richart Rufino, M J

    1991-11-01

    Gastric cancer represents a disorder which incidence has come down last years. Its etiology is unknown, but diet is the principal determinant risk of suffering it. Clinic history is not much useful, because in the early stage symptoms can fail and in the late stage are inespecific. Election diagnosis is endoscopy. Surgery is the only curative treatment. By these features, it would be useful to left under vigilance to: a) patients 40 years older with dispepsia; b) patients following gastric operations; c) patients with disorders presenting aclorhidria. The authors report a clinic case that can be of frequent presentation in primary assistance.

  16. Acid in the environment: lessons learned and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Visgilio, Gerald R.; Whitelaw, Diana M.

    2007-07-01

    This book is the result of a conference held biannually at the Goodwin-Niering Center for Conservation Biology and Environmental Studies at Connecticut College. It uses an interdisciplinary approach to focus on important ecological impacts of acid deposition, the transboundary nature of the pollutants that cause acid rain, and domestic and international policies designed to reduce the emission of these pollutants. The book combines research findings and the policy analyses of experts from different academic disciplines with the positions advanced by representatives of various nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The sixteen papers are arranged in four parts entitled: ecological impacts of acid deposition; acid emissions energy and policy; sulfur dioxide and the market; and lessons learned and future prospects.

  17. Effect of orally administered 15(R)-15-methyl prostaglandin E2 and/or an anticholinergic drug on meal-induced gastric acid secretion and serum gastrin level in patients with duodenal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Swierczek, J S; Kwiecien, N; Obtułowicz, W; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the present series of tests was to measure and compare the effects of ingestion of gelatin capsules containing 15(R)-15-methyl PGE2 (PG) and/or an anticholinergic drug (methscopolamine bromide, Pamine) on meal-induced gastric acid secretion and serum gastrin level. Eleven duodenal ulcer patients were stimulated by a 5% peptone meal. Acid secretion was determined by the intragastric titration technique, and serum gastrin was measured by radioimmunoassay. The tests were randomized and double-blind. PG alone given 30 min before a test meal at a dose of 50 micrograms or 100 micrograms produced no side effects and inhibited meal-stimulated acid secretion by about 43% and 55%, respectively. Gastric acid inhibition after a single dose of PG was most pronounced in the first hour of a test meal and was accompanied by almost complete suppression of the meal-induced serum gastrin level. Pamine alone in a dose of 2.5 mg reduced gastric acid response to a meal by about 29% but caused a further rise of postprandial serum gastrin level over control values. The combination of PG, 50 micrograms, and Pamine, 2.5 mg, did not result in significantly greater acid inhibition (about 48%) than when either compound was given alone. When the higher dose of PG (100 micrograms) was given together with Pamine (2.5 mg), the degree of inhibition produced by PG alone was not changed. It is concluded that PG given orally in capsules is a potent inhibitor of gastric acid and serum gastrin response to a meal and that this effect may be of potential value in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease.

  18. pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiyi; Bellinger, Andrew M.; Glettig, Dean L.; Barman, Ross; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Zhu, Jiahua; Cleveland, Cody; Montgomery, Veronica A; Gu, Li; Nash, Landon D.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Devices resident in the stomach -- which are used for a variety of clinical applications including nutritional modulation for bariatrics, ingestible electronics for diagnosis and monitoring, and gastric retentive dosage forms for prolonged drug delivery -- typically incorporate elastic polymers to compress the devices during delivery through the esophagus and other narrow orifices in the digestive system. However, in the event of accidental device fracture or migration, the non-degradable nature of these materials risks intestinal obstruction. Here, we show that an elastic, pH-responsive supramolecular gel remains stable and elastic in the acidic environment of the stomach but can be dissolved in the neutral-pH environment of the small and large intestines. In a large animal model, prototype devices with these materials as the key component demonstrated prolonged gastric retention and safe passage. These enteric elastomers should increase the safety profile for a wide range of gastric retentive devices. PMID:26213897

  19. New lactic acid bacterial strains from traditional Mongolian fermented milk products have altered adhesion to porcine gastric mucin depending on the carbon source.

    PubMed

    Kimoto-Nira, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Seishi; Sasaki, Keisuke; Moriya, Naoko; Takenaka, Akio; Suzuki, Chise

    2015-03-01

    Attachment of lactic acid bacteria to the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract is a major property of probiotics. Here, we examined the ability of 21 lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from traditional fermented milk products in Mongolia to adhere to porcine gastric mucin in vitro. Higher attachment was observed with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strains 6-8 and 8-1 than with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (positive control). Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain 7-1 adhered to mucin as effectively as did strain GG. Heat inactivation decreased the adhesive ability of strains 6-8 and 8-1 but did not affect strain 7-1. The adhesion of strains 6-8, 7-1 and 8-1 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with periodate and trypsin, indicating that proteinaceous and carbohydrate-like cell surface compounds are involved in the adhesion of these strains. The adhesion of strain 7-1 was affected by the type of carbohydrate present in the growth medium, being higher with fructose than with lactose, galactose or xylose as the carbon source. The sugar content of 7-1 cells grown on various carbohydrates was negatively correlated with its adhesive ability. We provide new probiotic candidate strains and new information regarding carbohydrate preference that influences lactic acid bacterial adhesion to mucin.

  20. Novel lansoprazole-loaded nanoparticles for the treatment of gastric acid secretion-related ulcers: in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to combine nanoparticle design and enteric coating technique to sustain the delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ), in the treatment of acid reflux disorders. Lansoprazole-loaded Eudragit® RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNP-LPZ) as well as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (PLGANP-LPZ) were prepared using a solvent evaporation/extraction method. The effects of nanoparticle charge and permeation enhancers on lansoprazole uptake was assessed in Caco-2 cells. The confocal microscopic images revealed the successful localization of nanoparticles in the cytoplasm of Caco-2 cells. The cellular uptake of positively charged Eudragit nanoparticles was significantly higher than that of negatively charged PLGA nanoparticles, which were enhanced by sodium caprate via the transcellular pathway. Both types of nanoparticles exhibited sustained drug release behavior in vitro. The oral administration of enteric-coated capsules filled with nanoparticles sustained and prolonged the LPZ concentration up to 24 h in ulcer-induced Wistar rats, and 92.4% and 89.2% of gastric ulcers healed after a 7-day treatment with either EC-ERSNP1010-Na caprate or EC-PLGANP1005-Na caprate, respectively. PMID:24519468

  1. Capsaicin consumption, Helicobacter pylori CagA status and IL1B-31C>T genotypes: a host and environment interaction in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Camargo, M Constanza; Schneider, Barbara G; Sicinschi, Liviu A; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Correa, Pelayo; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2012-06-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has been associated with a complex combination of genetic and environmental factors. In contrast to most countries, available information on GC mortality trends showed a gradual increase in Mexico. Our aim was to explore potential interactions among dietary (chili pepper consumption), infectious (Helicobacter pylori) and genetic factors (IL1B-31 genotypes) on GC risk. The study was performed in three areas of Mexico, with different GC mortality rates. We included 158 GC patients and 317 clinical controls. Consumption of capsaicin (Cap), the pungent active substance of chili peppers, was estimated by food frequency questionnaire. H. pylori CagA status was assessed by ELISA, and IL1B-31 genotypes were determined by TaqMan assays and Pyrosequencing in DNA samples. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate potential interactions. Moderate to high Cap consumption synergistically increased GC risk in genetically susceptible individuals (IL1B-31C allele carriers) infected with the more virulent H. pylori (CagA+) strains. The combined presence of these factors might explain the absence of a decreasing trend for GC in Mexico. However, further research on gene-environment interactions is required to fully understand the factors determining GC patterns in susceptible populations, with the aim of recommending preventive measures for high risk individuals. PMID:22414649

  2. Measurement of the intracellular ph in human stomach cells: a novel approach to evaluate the gastric acid secretory potential of coffee beverages.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Carola; Rubach, Malte; Lang, Roman; Seebach, Elisabeth; Blumberg, Simone; Frank, Oliver; Hofmann, Thomas; Somoza, Veronika

    2010-02-10

    As the consumption of coffee beverages sometimes is reported to cause gastric irritation, for which an increased stomach acid secretion is one of the promoting factors, different processing technologies such as steam-treatment have been developed to reduce putative stomach irritating compounds. There is evidence-based data neither on the effect of detailed processing variations nor on individual coffee components affecting the proton secretory activity (PSA). This work aimed at developing a screening model suitable for investigating the effects of commercial coffee beverages and components thereof on human parietal cells. Human gastric cancer cells (HGT-1) were treated with reconstituted freeze-dried coffee beverages prepared from customary coffee products such as regular coffee (RC, n = 4), mild bean coffee (MBC, n = 5), stomach friendly coffee (SFC, n = 4), and SFC decaffeinated (SFCD, n = 3). PSA was analyzed by flow cytometry using the pH-sensitive dye SNARF-AM. Treatment of the cells with MBC did not result in a PSA different from RC treatment (p

  3. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  4. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  5. Eukaryotic Organisms in Extreme Acidic Environments, the Río Tinto Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeles Aguilera, Angeles

    2013-07-01

    A major issue in microbial ecology is to identify the limits of life for growth and survival, and to understand the molecular mechanisms that define these limits. Thus, interest in the biodiversity and ecology of extreme environments has grown in recent years for several reasons. Some are basic and revolve around the idea that extreme environments are believed to reflect early Earth conditions. Others are related to the biotechnological potential of extremophiles. In this regard, the study of extremely acidic environments has become increasingly important since environmental acidity is often caused by microbial activity. Highly acidic environments are relatively scarce worldwide and are generally associated with volcanic activity or mining operations. For most acidic environments, low pH facilitates metal solubility, and therefore acidic waters tend to have high concentrations of heavy metals. However, highly acidic environments are usually inhabited by acidophilic and acidotolerant eukaryotic microorganisms such as algae, amoebas, ciliates, heliozoan and rotifers, not to mention filamentous fungi and yeasts. Here, we review the general trends concerning the diversity and ecophysiology of eukaryotic acidophilic microorganims, as well as summarize our latest results on this topic in one of the largest extreme acidic rivers, Río Tinto (SW, Spain).

  6. Eukaryotic organisms in extreme acidic environments, the río tinto case.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Angeles

    2013-01-01

    A major issue in microbial ecology is to identify the limits of life for growth and survival, and to understand the molecular mechanisms that define these limits. Thus, interest in the biodiversity and ecology of extreme environments has grown in recent years for several reasons. Some are basic and revolve around the idea that extreme environments are believed to reflect early Earth conditions. Others are related to the biotechnological potential of extremophiles. In this regard, the study of extremely acidic environments has become increasingly important since environmental acidity is often caused by microbial activity. Highly acidic environments are relatively scarce worldwide and are generally associated with volcanic activity or mining operations. For most acidic environments, low pH facilitates metal solubility, and therefore acidic waters tend to have high concentrations of heavy metals. However, highly acidic environments are usually inhabited by acidophilic and acidotolerant eukaryotic microorganisms such as algae, amoebas, ciliates, heliozoan and rotifers, not to mention filamentous fungi and yeasts. Here, we review the general trends concerning the diversity and ecophysiology of eukaryotic acidophilic microorganims, as well as summarize our latest results on this topic in one of the largest extreme acidic rivers, Río Tinto (SW, Spain).

  7. Eukaryotic Organisms in Extreme Acidic Environments, the Río Tinto Case

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Angeles

    2013-01-01

    A major issue in microbial ecology is to identify the limits of life for growth and survival, and to understand the molecular mechanisms that define these limits. Thus, interest in the biodiversity and ecology of extreme environments has grown in recent years for several reasons. Some are basic and revolve around the idea that extreme environments are believed to reflect early Earth conditions. Others are related to the biotechnological potential of extremophiles. In this regard, the study of extremely acidic environments has become increasingly important since environmental acidity is often caused by microbial activity. Highly acidic environments are relatively scarce worldwide and are generally associated with volcanic activity or mining operations. For most acidic environments, low pH facilitates metal solubility, and therefore acidic waters tend to have high concentrations of heavy metals. However, highly acidic environments are usually inhabited by acidophilic and acidotolerant eukaryotic microorganisms such as algae, amoebas, ciliates, heliozoan and rotifers, not to mention filamentous fungi and yeasts. Here, we review the general trends concerning the diversity and ecophysiology of eukaryotic acidophilic microorganims, as well as summarize our latest results on this topic in one of the largest extreme acidic rivers, Río Tinto (SW, Spain). PMID:25369810

  8. A phase II study of paclitaxel, weekly, 24-hour continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and cisplatin in patients with advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kollmannsberger, C; Quietzsch, D; Haag, C; Lingenfelser, T; Schroeder, M; Hartmann, J T; Baronius, W; Hempel, V; Clemens, M; Kanz, L; Bokemeyer, C

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of combination chemotherapy with paclitaxel, cisplatin and 24 h continuous infusion of 5-FU/folinic acid in patients (pts) with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma. Forty-five chemotherapy-naive pts (28 male and 17 female) with a median age of 60 years (range 35–74) were enrolled. 5-FU 2 g/m2was given weekly over 24 h i.v. preceded by folinic acid 500 mg/m2as a 2 h infusion. Paclitaxel 175 mg/m2was administered as a 3 h-infusion on days 1 and 22 and cisplatin 50 mg/m2as 1 h infusion on days 8 and 29. Six weeks of therapy (days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36) followed by 2 weeks rest were considered one cycle. A median of 3 cycles (range 1–4) were administered to 45 pts assessable for response, survival and toxicity. Five pts (11%) obtained a CR and 18 pts (40%) a PR (ORR 51%; 95% Cl: 35.8–66.3%). Responses were achieved in the liver, lymph nodes, lungs and at the site of the primary tumour. Nine pts (20%) had stable disease. Thirteen pts (29%) were considered to have failed treatment, 8 pts (18%) due to progressive disease and 5 pts (11%) who did not receive one complete cycle of therapy due to acute non-haematologic toxicity. The median progression-free and overall survival times were 9 months (range 1–36+) and 14 months (range 2–36+), respectively. Neutropenia WHO III°/IV° occurred in 7 pts (15%) with only 1 pt having grade IV. Additional non-haematologic WHO III°/IV° toxicities included nausea/vomiting in 5 (11%), alopecia in 22 (49%), and diarrhoea in 1 patient each (2%). Dose reductions or treatment delays were necessary in 8 pts (17%), mainly due to neutropenia. All pts were treated on an outpatient basis. The combination of paclitaxel, cisplatin and continuously infused 5-FU/folinic acid appears to be a highly active regimen for the treatment of pts with advanced gastric cancer. While the overall acceptable toxicity allows its use in the palliative setting, it may also be an attractive

  9. Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge; Obesity gastric banding discharge; Weight loss - gastric banding discharge ... as your body gets used to your weight loss and your weight becomes stable. Weight loss may be slower after ...

  10. Gastric bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... bypass - discharge; Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y - discharge; Obesity gastric bypass discharge; Weight loss - gastric bypass discharge ... al. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised ...

  11. The relationship between airborne acidity and ammonia in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Suh, H H; Koutrakis, P; Spengler, J D

    1994-01-01

    Indoor acid aerosol, nitric acid (HNO3), and ammonia (NH3) concentrations were measured in 47 homes in State College, Pennsylvania, during the summer of 1991. From each home, 12-hour indoor, 12- and 24-hour outdoor, and 12-hour air exchange samples were collected continuously over a 5-day period. Additionally, questionnaires were administered daily by field technicians to obtain information on house occupant number, ventilation, gas stove use, pets, and other housing characteristics. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between NH3 and corresponding concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H+) and HNO3 inside these homes. As part of this analysis, we also examined indoor/outdoor concentration relationships and identified housing factors that may influence indoor levels. In State College, indoor NH3 concentrations were higher than corresponding outdoor levels, with air conditioner use, air exchange rates, and occupant number identified as important determinants of indoor levels. Indoor concentrations of both H+ and HNO3 were substantially lower than outdoor levels, as homes with air exchange rates less than one exchange per hour were found to have essentially no acid indoors. These low H+ and HNO3 levels likely resulted from their reaction with indoor NH3 and with indoor surfaces. Indoor NH3 concentrations were higher than outdoor levels, indicating the presence of indoor NH3 sources; however, correlations between indoor NH3 and both pets and occupants, its primary indoor sources, were weak and negative, respectively. Mass balance models that included an NH3 neutralization term were found to predict indoor H+ concentrations reasonably well, representing a substantial improvement over outdoor concentrations alone. The accumulation of NH3 indoors was found to be the primary determinant of indoor H+ and HNO3 levels.

  12. Aquatic organisms in acidic environments: a literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Eilers, J.M.; Lien, G.J.; Berg, R.G.

    1985-10-01

    Acid deposition has aroused concern about aquatic organisms in soft water lakes and streams, as the loss of indigenous species is commonly observed when pH decreases. This literature review was initiated to intensively examine the distribution of invertebrates with respect to pH, in order to define the tolerance limits of various species in acidified waters and predict how acidification would alter distributions.

  13. Conducting Polymer Based Nucleic Acid Sensor for Environment Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Bansi Dhar; Prabhakar, Nirmal; Solanki, Pratima R.

    Nucleic acid sensor based on polyaniline has been fabricated by covalently immobilizing double stranded calf thymus (dsCT) DNA onto perchlorate (ClO-4) doped polyaniline (PANI) film deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass plate using 1-(3-(dimethylamino) propyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxyl succinimide (NHS) chemistry. These dsCT-DNA-PANI/ITO and PANI/ITO electrodes have been characterized using square wave voltammetry, electrochemical impedance, and Fourier-transform-infra-red (FTIR) measurements. This disposable dsCT-DNA-PANI/ITO bioelectrode is stable for about four months, can be used to detect arsenic trioxide (0.1ppm) in 30s.

  14. Acidic Alteration Environments on Mars and Implications for Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Flahaut, J.; Weitz, C. M.; Gross, C.; Parente, M.; Horgan, B. H. N.

    2014-12-01

    Unique surface materials have been discovered recently at Valles Marineris (Roach et al., 2010; Weitz et al., 2014; Flahaut et al., 2014), Noctis Labyrinthus (Weitz et al., 2011), Mawrth Vallis (Bishop et al., 2013), and elsewhere that have CRISM features distinct from those of any known minerals. Typically these unusual sites are found in light-toned outcrops or interior layered deposits associated with phyllosilicates, sulfates or both. Frequently these units are called "doublet" materials because they exhibit a doublet absorption in CRISM spectra between 2.2 and 2.3 µm. We are investigating the spectral signatures of these martian materials compared to our library of minerals and alteration materials. We are also evaluating the stratigraphy of these unique alteration phases compared with neighboring phyllosilicate and sulfate units. A similar 2.2-2.3 µm doublet has been observed in spectra taken of acid altered clays produced in the laboratory (Madejova et al., 2009; Tosca et al., 2009). The band centers and relative intensities of these martian doublet features vary greatly suggesting that a process such as acid weathering could be acting on OH-bearing minerals to produce altered phases that differ depending on the type of substrate, water/rock ratio, solution chemistry, and duration of aqueous processes. Because these unique materials occur in many regions across a range of times on Mars, acidic alteration may have been a key process at local and regional scales throughout martian geologic history. Constraining the types of acidic alteration that have taken place on Mars will assist in defining the aqueous geochemistry at these sites and whether habitable conditions were possible. References: Bishop et al. (2013) PSS, 86, 130-149. Flahaut et al. (2014) EPSC, #211. Madejová et al. (2009) Vibrational Spectroscopy, 49, 211-218. Roach et al. (2010) Icarus, 206, 253-268. Tosca & Knoll (2009) 40th LPSC, #1538. Weitz et al. (2011) Geology, 39, 899-902. Weitz et al

  15. Genotype x environment interactions in eggplant for fruit phenolic acid content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eggplant fruit are a rich source of phenolic acids that contribute to fruit nutritive value and influence culinary quality. We evaluated the influence of production environment on eggplant fruit phenolic acid content. Ten Solanum melongena accessions including five F1 hybrid cultivars, three open-...

  16. Simultaneous measurement of gastric acid and duodenal alkali secretion by in situ titration in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P; Nundy, S

    1983-12-01

    We have devised a technique for simultaneously measuring the acid secretion into the stomach and alkali into the duodenum by in situ titration using a modification of the technique of Fordtran and Walsh. Using this technique, the results of acid and alkali secretion measured simultaneously were identical with those obtained using the conventional aspiration method on separate days. In response to stimulation with pentagastrin acid output was 17.2 +/- 1.4 vs 15.4 +/- 1.9 mmol/h and alkali response with secretin was 16.0 +/- 0.8 vs 14.4 +/- 1.5 mmol/h. The response to food was measured in 10 control subjects, 10 patients with duodenal ulcer, and 10 patients with pancreatitis. In controls, the acid and alkaline secretion were similar (15.8 +/- 1.7 vs 18.2 +/- 1.3 mmol/h), in patients with duodenal ulcer acid secretion was significantly greater than alkaline secretion (31.9 +/- 2.2 vs 21.9 +/- 1.7 mmol/h), and in patients with pancreatitis the alkali secretion was significantly less than acid (19.8 +/- 1.9 mmol/h acid vs 11.4 +/- 0.6 mmol/h alkali). It can, therefore, be concluded that in response to food the patients with duodenal ulcer are significant hypersecretors of acid (DU acid greater than DU alkali output) and patients with pancreatitis are significant hyposecretors of alkali (pancreatitis-alkaline output less than acid output) and normal subjects secrete equal amounts of acid and alkali.

  17. The dissolution behavior of scorodite in acidic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Preeti

    2001-11-01

    The safe disposal of arsenic-containing waste has been a difficult problem for the mining and metallurgical industry. One of the solutions to the arsenic problem is the precipitation of scorodite, an arsenic-containing mineral. Scorodite is reported to be relatively stable over a wide range of pH, and therefore may be a preferred disposal option. The effect of organic complexing agents on scorodite stability, however, is largely unknown. The present study is a phenomenological investigation into the dissolution kinetics of scorodite in the presence of oxalic acid under varying conditions of pH, oxalic acid concentration and temperature. The effect of scorodite particle size was also investigated. The morphological changes accompanying the dissolution process were examined by SEM and TEM analyses. Dissolution curves were divided into a linear induction period and a post-induction period. Activation energies were determined. Complete dissolution data were fit to the Prout-Tompkins/Austin-Rickett model. Dissolution data are indicative of auto-accelerated processes. The rapid increase in dissolution rate following the induction period is believed to be associated with an increase in the effective surface area. Pitting was observed on the surface of scorodite in the early stages of dissolution. In the later stages of dissolution, these pits were observed to grow and coalesce, in many cases resulting in the formation of dissolution holes.

  18. [Acid-base blood balance in patients with ulcer under treatment by the gastric secretion inhibitors and antacids].

    PubMed

    Grinevich, V B; Sablin, O A; Uspenskiĭ, Iu L

    2002-01-01

    There was an analysis of the results of the study of intragastric acidity and acid-base balance (ABB) of the blood in 25 patients with duodenal ulcer. The patients were examined before and against the background of the 14-day monotherapy with one of the following preparations: Losec, 40 mg (omeprazole), famotidine, 80 mg (Quamatel), Phosphalugel, or placebo.

  19. Bacteria and Archaea in acidic environments and a key to morphological identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic acidic environments are dominated by bacteria and Archaea. As many as 86 genera or species have been identified or isolated from pH <4.5 environments. This paper reviews the worldwide literature and provide tables of morphological characteristics, habitat information and a key for light microscope identification for the non-microbiologist.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection induced gastric cancer; advance in gastric stem cell research and the remaining challenges

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of gastric cancer, which remains an important health care challenge. Recent investigation in gastric stem cell or progenitor cell biology has uncovered valuable information in understanding the gastric gland renewal and maintenance of homeostasis, they also provide clues for further defining the mechanisms by which gastric cancer may originate and progress. Lgr5, Villin-promoter, TFF2-mRNA and Mist have recently been identified as gastric stem/progenitor cell markers; their identification enriched our understanding on the gastric stem cell pathobiology during chronic inflammation and metaplasia. In addition, advance in gastric cancer stem cell markers such as CD44, CD90, CD133, Musashi-1 reveal novel information on tumor cell behavior and disease progression implicated for therapeutics. However, two critical questions remain to be of considerable challenges for future exploration; one is how H. pylori or chronic inflammation affects gastric stem cell or their progenitors, which give rise to mucus-, acid-, pepsinogen-, and hormone-secreting cell lineages. Another one is how bacterial infection or inflammation induces oncogenic transformation and propagates into tumors. Focus on the interactions of H. pylori with gastric stem/progenitor cells and their microenvironment will be instrumental to decipher the initiation and origin of gastric cancer. Future studies in these areas will be critical to uncover molecular mechanisms of chronic inflammation-mediated oncogenic transformation and provide options for cancer prevention and intervention. We review recent progress and discuss future research directions in these important research fields. PMID:23217022

  1. Surrounding Gastric Mucosa Findings Facilitate Diagnosis of Gastric Neoplasm as Gastric Adenoma or Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miike, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Shojiro; Miyata, Yoshifumi; Hirata, Tomoya; Noda, Yuko; Noda, Takaho; Suzuki, Sho; Takeda, Sachiko; Natsuda, Shuichiro; Sakaguchi, Mai; Maemura, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Kanna; Yamaji, Takumi; Abe, Hiroo; Iwakiri, Hisayoshi; Tahara, Yoshihiro; Hasuike, Satoru; Nagata, Kenji; Kitanaka, Akira; Shimoda, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. It is difficult to master the skill of discriminating gastric adenoma from early gastric cancer by conventional endoscopy or magnifying endoscopy combined with narrow-band imaging, because the colors and morphologies of these neoplasms are occasionally similar. We focused on the surrounding gastric mucosa findings in order to determine how to discriminate between early gastric cancer and gastric adenoma by analyzing the characteristics of the gastric background mucosa. Methods. We retrospectively examined 146 patients who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastric neoplasm between October 2009 and January 2015. The boundary of atrophic gastritis was classified endoscopically according to the Kimura-Takemoto classification system. Of 146 lesions, 63 early gastric cancers and 21 gastric adenomas were ultimately evaluated and assessed. Results. Almost all gastric adenomas were accompanied by open-type gastritis, whereas 47 and 16 early gastric cancers were accompanied by open-type and closed-type gastritis, respectively (p = 0.037). Conclusions. The evaluation of the boundary of atrophic gastritis associated with gastric neoplasms appears to be useful for discrimination between early gastric cancer and gastric adenoma. When gastric neoplasm is present in the context of surrounding localized gastric atrophy, gastric cancer is probable but not certain. PMID:26858751

  2. Effect of ionizing radiation on gastric secretion and gastric motility in monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Danquechin Dorval, E.; Mueller, G.P.; Eng, R.R.; Durakovic, A.; Conklin, J.J.; Dubois, A.

    1985-08-01

    The prodromal syndrome of radiation sickness is characterized by nausea and vomiting but the pathophysiology and the treatment of this entity is largely unknown. The authors investigated this problem by determining the effects of ionizing radiation on gastric function with and without administration of the dopamine antagonist domperidone. They measured gastric electrical control activity (waves per minute), fractional emptying rate (percent per minute), acid output (microequivalents per minute), and plasma levels of immunoreactive beta-endorphin. Twelve conscious, chair-adapted rhesus monkeys were studied twice before, once immediately after, and once 2 days after a single 800-cGy (800 rads) /sup 60/Co total body irradiation. In addition to causing vomiting, total body irradiation transiently suppressed gastric electrical control activity, gastric emptying and gastric secretion, while increasing plasma levels of immunoreactive beta-endorphin. Domperidone had no effect on vomiting or gastric function either before or after irradiation, but it significantly increased plasma immunoreactive beta-endorphin.

  3. EFFECT OF AN ACID RAIN ENVIRONMENT ON LIMESTONE SURFACES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Lindsay, James R.; Hochella, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Salem limestone samples were exposed to weathering for 1 y in several urban and one rural environments. Samples exposed in the rural location were chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone, whereas all samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the ground-facing surfaces where the stones were not washed by precipitation. The gas-solid reaction of SO//2 with calcite was selected for detailed consideration. It appears from the model that under arid conditions, the quantity of stain deposited on an unwashed surface is independent of atmospheric SO//2 concentration once the surface has been saturated with gypsum. Under wet conditions, surface sulfation and weight loss are probably dominated by mechanisms involving wet stone. However, if the rain events are frequent and delimited by periods of dryness, the quantity of gypsum produced by a gas-solid reaction mechanism should correlate with both the frequency of rain events and the atmospheric SO//2 level.

  4. A review of the occurrence and fate of naphthenic acids in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Headley, John V; McMartin, Dena W

    2004-01-01

    Naphthenic acids are comprised of a large collection of saturated aliphatic and alicyclic carboxylic acids found in hydrocarbon deposits (petroleum, oil sands bitumen, and crude oils). Naphthenic acids enter surface water systems primarily through effluent discharge, but also through groundwater mixing and erosion of riverbank oil deposits. Of the possible environmental receptors (i.e., air, soil, and water), the most significant is water. Ambient levels of naphthenic acids in northern Alberta rivers in the Athabasca Oil Sands are generally below 1 mg L(-1). However, tailings pond waters may contain as high as 110 mg L(-1). The complexity of natural naphthenic acids in petroleum deposits poses an analytical challenge as reflected by the several techniques reported for quantitation of naphthenic acids in the environment. Although naphthenic acids are known to be persistent biomarkers used in identification of oil source maturation, little is established regarding their relative degradation pathways in aquatic environments. Published research related to the potential for microbiological degradation and adsorption to typical Athabasca Oil Sands soils reveal that naphthenic acids are likely to persist in the water column and, with prolonged exposure, accumulate in sediments. However, other than a very general knowledge of environmental persistence, the occurrence and fate of naphthenic acids has been sparsely studied. This article brings together some of those environmental persistence results, as well as detailed information regarding the origin of naphthenic acids in tailings ponds, chemistry and toxicological considerations, current analytical methods for aquatic sampling, and areas of future remediation research.

  5. Effects of toxic work environments on sperm quality and ascorbic acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, E.B.; Harris, W.A.; Powell, L.C. )

    1990-02-26

    Surveys have shown that toxic work environments lower sperm quality, and controlled studies indicate that ascorbic acid supplementation improves sperm viability and agglutination. The sperm quality of 50 subjects each from: (1) office workers, (2) a lead smelter, (3) petroleum refineries, and (4) a herbicide plant were compared with serum and semen ascorbic acid levels. The sperm characteristics studied were: count as million/ml and as percent; viability, motility, clumping, and abnormal morphology. The serum ascorbic acid levels were directly proportional to sperm viability and inversely correlated to clumping of all groups. Moreover, serum ascorbic acid levels were also inversely correlated to twin tail and amorphous forms of abnormal sperm morphology. The results of the study indicate that toxic environments depress sperm quality and suggest that ascorbic acid supplementation will improve sperm quality and fertility.

  6. Gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Do, Patrick H; Kang, Young S; Cahill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Gastric infarction is an extremely rare occurrence owing to the stomach’s extensive vascular supply. We report an unusual case of gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery. We describe the imaging findings and discuss possible causes of this condition. PMID:27200168

  7. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) measurement by GC-MS in blood, urine and gastric contents, following an acute intoxication in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Bodson, Q; Denooz, R; Serpe, P; Charlier, C

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB, sodium oxybate) is a compound related to neuromodulator gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), emerging as a recreational drug of abuse and as a rape drug. GHB-related emergencies have dramatically increased in the 1990s, but a decrease is observed since 2000. We describe the case of an acute GHB intoxication in a 28-year-old male who fell unconscious after ingestion of a mouthful of an unknown beverage, and required medical support for 2 days. A cocaine abuse was also detected by preliminary toxicological screening, but the clinical presentation was not typical of cocaine intoxication. A simple liquid-liquid extraction was used for quantitation of GHB, followed by disilyl-derivatization and analysis in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), using GHB-d6 as internal standard. High concentrations of GHB were detected in urine (3020 mg/L) and gastric contents (71487 mg/L) at admission. After a 6-hours delay, GHB was still present in urine at 2324 mg/L and in blood at 43 mg/L. The clinical symptoms of cocaine intoxication were diminished by GHB consumption, and the cerebral scan was modified. Attention must thus be paid to acute intoxications with surprising clinical symptoms, and GHB has probably to be added to the preliminary toxicological screening. Data available regarding GHB are briefly reviewed, and our results are compared with previously published reports of non-fatal GHB intoxication.

  8. Delivery of ursolic acid (UA) in polymeric nanoparticles effectively promotes the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through enhanced inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Xiaolin; Ding, Jing; Xu, Huae; Dai, Xinzheng; Hou, Zhibo; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Kun; Sun, Weihao

    2013-01-30

    It has been demonstrated that ursolic acid (UA) could effectively induces apoptosis of cancer cells by inhibiting the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which constitutively expresses in gastric cancer. However, the hydrophobicity of UA increases the difficulty in its potential clinical application, which raises the possibility for its application as a novel model drug in nanoparticle-based delivery system. UA-loaded nanoparticles (UA-NPs) were prepared by a nano-precipitation method using amphilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-polycaprolactone (mPEG-PCL) block copolymers as drug carriers. UA was effectively transported into SGC7901 cells by nanoparticles and localized around the nuclei in the cytoplasms. The in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis test indicated that UA-NPs significantly elicited more cell death at almost equivalent dose and corresponding incubation time. Moreover, UA-NPs led to more cell apoptosis through stronger inhibition of COX-2 and activation of caspase 3. The most powerful evidence from this report is that the significant differences between the cytotoxicity of free UA and UA-NPs are closely related to the expression levels of COX-2 and caspase-3, which demonstrates the superiority of UA-NPs over free UA through penetrating cell membrane. Therefore, the study offer an effective way to improve the anticancer efficiency of UA through nano-drug delivery system.

  9. Temporal changes in bile acid levels and 12α-hydroxylation after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dutia, R; Embrey, M; O’Brien, S; Haeusler, RA; Agénor, KK; Homel, P; McGinty, J; Vincent, RP; Alaghband-Zadeh, J; Staels, B; le Roux, CW; Yu, J; Laferrère, B

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gastric bypass surgery (GBP) leads to sustained weight loss and significant improvement in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Bile acids (BAs), signaling molecules which influence glucose metabolism, are a potential mediator for the improvement in T2DM after GBP. This study sought to investigate the effect of GBP on BA levels and composition in individuals with T2DM. METHODS Plasma BA levels and composition and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-19 levels were measured during fasting and in response to an oral glucose load before and at 1 month and 2 years post GBP in 13 severely obese women with T2DM. RESULTS A striking temporal change in BA levels and composition was observed after GBP. During the fasted state, BA concentrations were generally reduced at 1 month, but increased 2 years post GBP. Postprandial BA levels were unchanged 1 month post GBP, but an exaggerated postprandial peak was observed 2 years after the surgery. A significant increase in the 12α-hydroxylated/non12α-hydroxylated BA ratio during fasting and postprandially at 2 years, but not 1 month, post GBP was observed. Significant correlations between BAs vs FGF-19, body weight, the incretin effect and peptide YY (PYY) were also found. CONCLUSIONS This study provides evidence that GBP temporally modifies the concentration and composition of circulating BAs in individuals with T2DM, and suggests that BAs may be linked to the improvement in T2DM after GBP. PMID:25599611

  10. Inappropriate Use of Gastric Acid Suppression Therapy in Hospitalized Patients with Clostridium difficile—Associated Diarrhea: A Ten-Year Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Sadat; Rajan, Dhyan; Iqbal, Javed; Lipka, Seth; Jacob, Robin; Zilberman, Valeria; Shah, Mitanshu; Mustacchia, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The incidence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) has steadily increased over the past decade. A multitude of factors for this rise in incidence of CDAD have been postulated, including the increased use of gastric acid suppression therapy (GAST). Despite the presence of practice guidelines for use of GAST, studies have demonstrated widespread inappropriate use of GAST in hospitalized patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of inpatients with CDAD, with special emphasis placed on determining the appropriateness of GAST. Methods. A retrospective analysis was conducted at a multidisciplinary teaching hospital on inpatients with CDAD over a 10-year period. We assessed the use of GAST in the cases of CDAD. Data collection focused on the appropriate administration of GAST as defined by standard practice guidelines. Results. An inappropriate indication for GAST was not apparent in a majority (69.4%) of patients with CDAD. The inappropriate use of GAST was more prevalent in medical (86.1%) than on surgical services (13.9%) (P < 0.001). There were more cases (67.6%) of inappropriate use of GAST in noncritical care than in critical care areas (37.4%) (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Our study found that an inappropriate use of inpatient GAST in patients with CDAD was nearly 70 percent. Reduction of inappropriate use of GAST may be an additional approach to reduce the risk of CDAD and significantly decrease patient morbidity and healthcare costs. PMID:22701180

  11. Environment and solute-solvent interaction effects on photo-physical behaviors of Folic acid and Folinic acid drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadem Sadigh, M.; Zakerhamidi, M. S.; Seyed Ahmadian, S. M.; Johari-Ahar, M.; Zare Haghighi, L.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, spectral properties of Folic acid and Folinic acid as widely used drugs in the treatment of some diseases have been studied in various environments with different polarity. Our results show that the absorption, emission and stokes shifts of solute molecules depend strongly on molecular surrounding characteristics, solute-solvent interactions and, different active groups in their chemical structures. In order to investigate the contribution of specific and nonspecific interactions on various properties of drug samples, the linear solvation energy relationships concept is used. Moreover, the calculated dipole moments by means of solvatochromic method show that the high values of dipole moments in excited state are due to local intramolecular charge transfer. Furthermore, the obtained results about molecular interactions can be extended to biological systems and can indicate completely the behaviors of Folic acid and Folinic acid in polar solvents such as water in body system.

  12. Gastric leiomyoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bose, B.; Candy, J.

    1970-01-01

    This paper describes two cases of gastric leiomyoblastoma (bizarre smooth muscle tumour), one of them having evidence of metastases. Both patients remain well after seven years and three and a half years respectively. The literature is reviewed, and the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed. The histological appearances are described in detail and an attempt is made to assess the criteria for the diagnosis of malignancy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:5485837

  13. A Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variant Necessary for Gastric Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Austin, C. R.; Goodyear, A. W.; Bartek, I. L.; Stewart, A.; Sutherland, M. D.; Silva, E. B.; Zweifel, A.; Vitko, N. P.; Tuanyok, A.; Highnam, G.; Mittelman, D.; Keim, P.; Schweizer, H. P.; Vázquez-Torres, A.; Dow, S. W. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Diverse colony morphologies are a hallmark of Burkholderia pseudomallei recovered from infected patients. We observed that stresses that inhibit aerobic respiration shifted populations of B. pseudomallei from the canonical white colony morphotype toward two distinct, reversible, yet relatively stable yellow colony variants (YA and YB). As accumulating evidence supports the importance of B. pseudomallei enteric infection and gastric colonization, we tested the response of yellow variants to hypoxia, acidity, and stomach colonization. Yellow variants exhibited a competitive advantage under hypoxic and acidic conditions and alkalized culture media. The YB variant, although highly attenuated in acute virulence, was the only form capable of colonization and persistence in the murine stomach. The accumulation of extracellular DNA (eDNA) was a characteristic of YB as observed by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining of gastric tissues, as well as in an in vitro stomach model where large amounts of eDNA were produced without cell lysis. Transposon mutagenesis identified a transcriptional regulator (BPSL1887, designated YelR) that when overexpressed produced the yellow phenotype. Deletion of yelR blocked a shift from white to the yellow forms. These data demonstrate that YB is a unique B. pseudomallei pathovariant controlled by YelR that is specifically adapted to the harsh gastric environment and necessary for persistent stomach colonization. PMID:25650400

  14. A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiyi; Bellinger, Andrew M; Glettig, Dean L; Barman, Ross; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Zhu, Jiahua; Cleveland, Cody; Montgomery, Veronica A; Gu, Li; Nash, Landon D; Maitland, Duncan J; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Devices resident in the stomach-used for a variety of clinical applications including nutritional modulation for bariatrics, ingestible electronics for diagnosis and monitoring, and gastric-retentive dosage forms for prolonged drug delivery-typically incorporate elastic polymers to compress the devices during delivery through the oesophagus and other narrow orifices in the digestive system. However, in the event of accidental device fracture or migration, the non-degradable nature of these materials risks intestinal obstruction. Here, we show that an elastic, pH-responsive supramolecular gel remains stable and elastic in the acidic environment of the stomach but can be dissolved in the neutral-pH environment of the small and large intestines. In a large animal model, prototype devices with these materials as the key component demonstrated prolonged gastric retention and safe passage. These enteric elastomers should increase the safety profile for a wide range of gastric-retentive devices.

  15. A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiyi; Bellinger, Andrew M; Glettig, Dean L; Barman, Ross; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Zhu, Jiahua; Cleveland, Cody; Montgomery, Veronica A; Gu, Li; Nash, Landon D; Maitland, Duncan J; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Devices resident in the stomach-used for a variety of clinical applications including nutritional modulation for bariatrics, ingestible electronics for diagnosis and monitoring, and gastric-retentive dosage forms for prolonged drug delivery-typically incorporate elastic polymers to compress the devices during delivery through the oesophagus and other narrow orifices in the digestive system. However, in the event of accidental device fracture or migration, the non-degradable nature of these materials risks intestinal obstruction. Here, we show that an elastic, pH-responsive supramolecular gel remains stable and elastic in the acidic environment of the stomach but can be dissolved in the neutral-pH environment of the small and large intestines. In a large animal model, prototype devices with these materials as the key component demonstrated prolonged gastric retention and safe passage. These enteric elastomers should increase the safety profile for a wide range of gastric-retentive devices. PMID:26213897

  16. A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiyi; Bellinger, Andrew M.; Glettig, Dean L.; Barman, Ross; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy; Zhu, Jiahua; Cleveland, Cody; Montgomery, Veronica A.; Gu, Li; Nash, Landon D.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Devices resident in the stomach--used for a variety of clinical applications including nutritional modulation for bariatrics, ingestible electronics for diagnosis and monitoring, and gastric-retentive dosage forms for prolonged drug delivery--typically incorporate elastic polymers to compress the devices during delivery through the oesophagus and other narrow orifices in the digestive system. However, in the event of accidental device fracture or migration, the non-degradable nature of these materials risks intestinal obstruction. Here, we show that an elastic, pH-responsive supramolecular gel remains stable and elastic in the acidic environment of the stomach but can be dissolved in the neutral-pH environment of the small and large intestines. In a large animal model, prototype devices with these materials as the key component demonstrated prolonged gastric retention and safe passage. These enteric elastomers should increase the safety profile for a wide range of gastric-retentive devices.

  17. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer. PMID:27573782

  18. Characterization of modified calcium-silicate cements exposed to acidic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Camilleri, Josette

    2011-01-15

    Portland cement which is used as a binder in concrete in the construction industry has been developed into a biomaterial. It is marketed as mineral trioxide aggregate and is used in dentistry. This material has been reported to be very biocompatible and thus its use has diversified. The extended use of this material has led to developments of newer versions with improved physical properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acidic environments found in the oral cavity on fast setting calcium silicate cements with improved physical properties using a combination of techniques. Two fast setting calcium silicate cements (CSA and CFA) and two cement composites (CSAG and CFAG) were assessed by subjecting the materials to lactic acid/sodium lactate buffer gel for a period of 28 days. At weekly intervals the materials were viewed under the tandem scanning confocal microscope (TSM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The two prototype cements exhibited changes in their internal chemistry with no changes in surface characteristics. Since the changes observed were mostly sub-surface evaluation of surface characteristics of cement may not be sufficient in the determination of chemical changes occurring. - Research Highlights: {yields} An acidic environment affects modified fast setting calcium silicate-based cements. {yields} No surface changes are observed in acidic environment. {yields} An acidic environment causes sub-surface changes in the material chemistry which are only visible in fractured specimens. {yields} A combination of techniques is necessary in order to evaluate the chemical changes occurring.

  19. Current status of proximal gastric vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, B D

    1989-01-01

    Proximal gastric vagotomy is nearing its twentieth year in clinical use as an operation for peptic ulcer disease. No other acid-reducing operation has undergone as much scrutiny or study. At this time, the evidence of such studies and long-term follow-up strongly supports the use of proximal gastric vagotomy as the treatment of choice for chronic duodenal ulcer in patients who have failed medical therapy. Its application in treating the complications of peptic ulcer disease, which recently have come to represent an increasingly greater percentage of all operations done for peptic ulcer disease, is well-tested. However, initial series suggest that it should probably occupy a prominent role in treating some of these complications, particularly in selected patients, in the future. The operation has the well-documented ability to reduce gastric acid production, not inhibit gastric bicarbonate production, and also minimally inhibit gastric motility. The combination of these physiologic results after proximal gastric vagotomy, along with preservation of the normal antropyloroduodenal mechanism of gastrointestinal control, serve to allow patients with proximal gastric vagotomy the improved benefits of significantly fewer severe gastrointestinal side effects than are seen after other operations for peptic ulcer disease. PMID:2644897

  20. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms.

  1. [Semiautomatic potentiometric titration of gastric juice].

    PubMed

    Mnuskina, M M; Meerov, G I; Nadezhina, L S; Semenov, V P; Chekanina, M I; Savchenko, V P; Grinzaĭd, E L

    1990-01-01

    Using commercial equipment manufactured in this country, the authors have assembled a unit for semiautomatic potentiometric titration and developed a method for such titration, permitting a rapid determination of free and bound HCl and the total acidity of the gastric juice. The equipment and method are recommended for wide use at laboratories of therapeutic institutions, of biologic factories manufacturing medicinal commercial gastric juice, and of research institutes.

  2. Guilty as charged: bugs and drugs in gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Sontag, S J

    1997-08-01

    Gastric ulcer disease remains a cause of hemorrhage, perforation, outlet obstruction, and death. Recent advances in the understanding of peptic ulcer disease indicate that infection with Helicobacter pylori and ingestion of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cause of almost all gastric and duodenal ulcers. Our therapy, therefore, is in a state of transition: the old acid-suppressive temporary therapy that allows frequent ulcer recurrences and complications is being replaced by curative therapies. The old therapy, by reducing gastric acid secretion or enhancing gastric mucosal defenses, inhibited the cofactors needed for ulcer development. Acid suppression relieved symptoms and healed ulcers, while defense enhancers, such as prostaglandin analogs healed and prevented acute NSAID-induced gastric ulcers. These benefits were maintained, however, only as long as acid-reducing agents or mucosal defense enhancers were continued. On the other hand, curative therapies (such as eradicating H. pylori infection and/or stopping the use of NSAIDs) eliminate the causes of ulcer. Curative combination regimens consisting of antibiotics, ranitidine bismuth citrate, bismuth, and proton pump inhibitors have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. These new regimens can cure benign gastric ulcer. Unfortunately, we cannot always determine which gastric ulcers are benign, and concern about gastric cancer remains. All gastric ulcers therefore still require biopsy and histological examination. With new treatment regimens, the time may be rapidly approaching when ulcer disease will be "history."

  3. Inhibition of Gastric Lipase as a Mechanism for Body Weight and Plasma Lipids Reduction in Zucker Rats Fed a Rosemary Extract Rich in Carnosic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Romo Vaquero, María; Yáñez-Gascón, María-Josefa; García Villalba, Rocío; Larrosa, Mar; Fromentin, Emilie; Ibarra, Alvin; Roller, Marc; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Espín de Gea, Juan Carlos; García-Conesa, María-Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Background Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extracts (REs) exhibit hepatoprotective, anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory properties and are widely used in the food industry. REs are rich in carnosic acid (CA) and carnosol which may be responsible for some of the biological activities of REs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether inhibition of lipase activity in the gut may be a mechanism by which a RE enriched in CA (40%) modulates body weight and lipids levels in a rat model of metabolic disorders and obesity. Methods and Principal Findings RE was administered for 64 days to lean (fa/+) and obese (fa/fa) female Zucker rats and body weight, food intake, feces weight and blood biochemical parameters were monitored throughout the study. Lipase activity (hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylbutyrate) was measured in the gastrointestinal tract at the end of the study and the contents of CA, carnosol and methyl carnosate were also determined. Sub-chronic administration of RE moderately reduced body weight gain in both lean and obese animals but did not affect food intake. Serum triglycerides, cholesterol and insulin levels were also markedly decreased in the lean animals supplemented with RE. Importantly, lipase activity was significantly inhibited in the stomach of the RE-supplemented animals where the highest content of intact CA and carnosol was detected. Conclusions Our results confirm that long-term administration of RE enriched in CA moderates weight gain and improves the plasma lipids profile, primarily in the lean animals. Our data also suggest that these effects may be caused, at least in part, by a significant inhibition of gastric lipase and subsequent reduction in fat absorption. PMID:22745826

  4. Validation of a Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Method Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Clarithromycin Resistance in Gastric Biopsy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Laura; Fernandes, Ricardo M.; Ferreira, Rui M.; Oleastro, Mónica; Carneiro, Fátima; Brandão, Catarina; Pimentel-Nunes, Pedro; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Figueiredo, Céu; Keevil, Charles W.; Vieira, Maria J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we evaluated a previously established peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method as a new diagnostic test for Helicobacter pylori clarithromycin resistance detection in paraffin-embedded gastric biopsy specimens. Both a retrospective study and a prospective cohort study were conducted to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of a PNA-FISH method to determine H. pylori clarithromycin resistance. In the retrospective study (n = 30 patients), full agreement between PNA-FISH and PCR-sequencing was observed. Compared to the reference method (culture followed by Etest), the specificity and sensitivity of PNA-FISH were 90.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 57.1% to 99.5%) and 84.2% (95% CI, 59.5% to 95.8%), respectively. In the prospective cohort (n = 93 patients), 21 cases were positive by culture. For the patients harboring clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori, the method showed sensitivity of 80.0% (95% CI, 29.9% to 98.9%) and specificity of 93.8% (95% CI, 67.7% to 99.7%). These values likely represent underestimations, as some of the discrepant results corresponded to patients infected by more than one strain. PNA-FISH appears to be a simple, quick, and accurate method for detecting H. pylori clarithromycin resistance in paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens. It is also the only one of the methods assessed here that allows direct and specific visualization of this microorganism within the biopsy specimens, a characteristic that allowed the observation that cells of different H. pylori strains can subsist in very close proximity in the stomach. PMID:23596234

  5. Jejunal linoleic acid infusions require GLP-1 receptor signaling to inhibit food intake: implications for the effectiveness of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Alexander A.; Moran, Timothy H.

    2011-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery results in sustained decreases in food intake and weight loss. A key component is likely the direct delivery of nutrients to the jejunum and resulting changes in levels of gut peptide secretion. Prior work modeling this aspect of the surgery has shown that small-volume, prolonged jejunal infusions of linoleic acid (LA) produce sustained decreases in food intake and weight loss. LA infusions also significantly elevate plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels. To assess a role for the increased circulating GLP-1 in the feeding suppression, we examined the effect of prolonged peripheral minipump administration of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9–39 (Ex 9) on the feeding suppression produced by jejunal LA. Using a 2 × 2 design, we infused either saline or LA in the jejunum (7 h/day, 11.4 kcal) for 5 days with a subset of animals from each group receiving either saline or Ex 9 (25 pmol·kg−1·min−1) continuously via a minipump. The antagonist alone had no effect on food intake. LA reduced daily food intake greatly in excess of the kilocalories infused. Ex 9 completely blocked the feeding suppression produced by the jejunal LA infusion. Ex 9 also attenuated the increase in plasma GLP-1 induced by jejunal LA infusions. These data demonstrate that endogenous GLP-1 receptor signaling is necessary for the reduction in food intake produced by jejunal LA infusions. Whether increased secretion of additional gut peptides is also necessary for such suppressions remains to be determined. PMID:21917638

  6. The Influence of a Collaborative Learning Environment on Primary Students' Conceptions about Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinopoulos, Dimitrios; Stavridou, Heleni

    2002-01-01

    Investigates primary students' conceptions of acid rain formation and its consequences to people and the environment before and after a 10-hour constructivist teaching intervention. Reports improvement in conceptions of physical and chemical phenomena among the experimental group participants. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

  7. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Expression of IL-8 by Suppressing Activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Cho, Soon Ok; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cytokine response, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation. H. pylori induces the production of ROS, which may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and thus, expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial cells. α-lipoic acid, a naturally occurring thiol compound, is a potential antioxidant. It shows beneficial effects in treatment of oxidant-associated diseases including diabetes. The present study is purposed to investigate whether α-lipoic acid inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by suppressing activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Gastric epithelial AGS cells were pretreated with or without α-lipoic acid for 2 h and infected with H. pylori in a Korean isolate (HP99) at a ratio of 300:1. IL-8 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. IL-8 levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB-DNA binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of MAPK and Jak/Stat were assessed by Western blot analysis. ROS levels were determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. As a result, H. pylori induced increases in ROS levels, mRNA, and protein levels of IL-8, as well as the activation of MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38], Jak/Stat (Jak1/2, Stat3), and NF-κB in AGS cells, which was inhibited by α-lipoic acid. In conclusion, α-lipoic acid may be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection-associated gastric inflammation.

  8. α-Lipoic Acid Inhibits Expression of IL-8 by Suppressing Activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-Infected Gastric Epithelial AGS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Cho, Soon Ok

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cytokine response, associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), is important in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced inflammation. H. pylori induces the production of ROS, which may be involved in the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (Jak/Stat), and oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), and thus, expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial cells. α-lipoic acid, a naturally occurring thiol compound, is a potential antioxidant. It shows beneficial effects in treatment of oxidant-associated diseases including diabetes. The present study is purposed to investigate whether α-lipoic acid inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokine IL-8 by suppressing activation of MAPK, Jak/Stat, and NF-κB in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. Gastric epithelial AGS cells were pretreated with or without α-lipoic acid for 2 h and infected with H. pylori in a Korean isolate (HP99) at a ratio of 300:1. IL-8 mRNA expression was analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. IL-8 levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB-DNA binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Phospho-specific and total forms of MAPK and Jak/Stat were assessed by Western blot analysis. ROS levels were determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence. As a result, H. pylori induced increases in ROS levels, mRNA, and protein levels of IL-8, as well as the activation of MAPK [extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38], Jak/Stat (Jak1/2, Stat3), and NF-κB in AGS cells, which was inhibited by α-lipoic acid. In conclusion, α-lipoic acid may be beneficial for prevention and/or treatment of H. pylori infection-associated gastric inflammation. PMID:26632410

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Methanesulfonic Acid-Degrading Bacteria from the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A. S.; Owens, N.; Murrell, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Two methylotrophic bacterial strains, TR3 and PSCH4, capable of growth on methanesulfonic acid as the sole carbon source were isolated from the marine environment. Methanesulfonic acid metabolism in these strains was initiated by an inducible NADH-dependent monooxygenase, which cleaved methanesulfonic acid into formaldehyde and sulfite. The presence of hydroxypyruvate reductase and the absence of ribulose monophosphate-dependent hexulose monophosphate synthase indicated the presence of the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation. Cell suspensions of bacteria grown on methanesulfonic acid completely oxidized methanesulfonic acid to carbon dioxide and sulfite with a methanesulfonic acid/oxygen stoichiometry of 1.0:2.0. Oxygen electrode-substrate studies indicated the dissimilation of formaldehyde to formate and carbon dioxide for energy generation. Carbon dioxide was not fixed by ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. It was shown that methanol is not an intermediate in methanesulfonic acid metabolism, although these strains grew on methanol and other one-carbon compounds, as well as a variety of heterotrophic carbon sources. These two novel marine facultative methylotrophs have the ability to mineralize methanesulfonic acid and may play a role in the cycling of global organic sulfur. PMID:16535055

  10. Muramic Acid Measurements for Bacterial Investigations in Marine Environments by High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Mimura, Toru; Romano, Jean-Claude

    1985-01-01

    Muramic acid, a constituent of procaryotic cell walls, was assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatography in samples from several marine environments (water column, surface microlayer, and sediment) and a bacterial culture. It is used as a microbial biomass indicator. The method gave a good separation of muramic acid from interfering compounds with satisfactory reproducibility. A pseudomonad culture had a muramic acid content of 4.7 × 10−10 to 5.3 × 10−10 μg per cell during growth. In natural water samples, highly significant relationships were found between muramic acid concentrations and bacterial numbers for populations of 108 to 1011 cells per liter. The muramic acid content in natural marine water decreased from 5.3 × 10−10 to 1.6 × 10−10 μg per cell with increasing depth. In coastal sediments exposed to sewage pollution, concentrations of muramic acid, ATP, organic carbon, and total amino acids displayed a parallel decrease with increasing distance from the sewage outlet. Advantages of muramic acid measurement by high-pressure liquid chromatography are its high sensitivity and reduction of preparation steps, allowing a short time analysis. PMID:16346848

  11. Survival and expression of acid resistance genes in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli acid adapted in pineapple juice and exposed to synthetic gastric fluid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this research was to examine relative transcriptional expression of acid resistance (AR) genes, rpoS, gadA and adiA, in O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotypes after adaptation to pineapple juice (PJ) and subsequently to determine survival with e...

  12. Influence of experimental hypokinesia on gastric secretory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, O. O.; Vavryshchuk, V. I.; Rozvodovskyy, V. I.; Proshcheruk, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gastric secretory function of rats was studied in 4, 8, 16 and 30 day hypokinesia. Inhibition of both the gastric juice secretory and acid producing functions was found. The greatest inhibition was observed on day 8 of limited mobility. By days 16 and 30 of the experiment, a tendency of the gastric secretory activity to return to normal was observed, although it remained reduced.

  13. Evolution of water chemistry in natural acidic environments in Yangmingshan, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ezoe, Yuka; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Noto, Masami; Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa

    2002-08-01

    In Yangmingshan National Park, located in the northern part of the Taiwan Island, there is a very rare area where fish (Channa asiatica) live in spite of acid environments. The origin of the acid in local acid ponds and rivers and the evolution of the water chemistry are discussed on the basis of sulfur stable isotope ratios and chemical equilibria. One of the sources of the acid is sulfuric acid, which is derived from the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in volcanic gas gushing out from fumaroles around the area and from acid deposition supplied from Taipei City. It is also derived from the oxidation of pyrite: the sulfur stable isotope ratios of delta 34S of +1@1000 to +4@1000 (relative to CDT) of sulfate in acid pond waters (pH 3-4) could be related to those of hydrogen sulfide in volcanic gas, pyrite in local pond sediments and soils, and sulfate in rain water. One acid source is sulfuric and hydrochloric acids arising in springs from geothermal activity: the delta 34S values were characterised by +13@1000 to +17@1000 sulfate-S, which was provided by a disproportionation reaction of sulfur dioxide in the depths. Another acid source could be the oxidation of iron(II). Under acidic conditions, the water-rock reaction gives rise to high concentrations of aluminium and iron. While flowing down surface streams, iron(II) is oxidised to iron(III) and then hydrolysed to cause further acidification under oxic conditions. The concentrations of iron and aluminium are controlled by redox and dissolution equilibria.

  14. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Stomach Cancer Prevention Stomach Cancer Screening Research Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Key Points Stomach cancer is a ...

  15. Investigation of secondary formation of formic acid: urban environment vs. oil and gas producing region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Roberts, J. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Koss, A.; Edwards, P. M.; Graus, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Li, S.-M.; Wild, R. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dubé, W. P.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Lefer, B.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Zamora, R.; Ervens, B.; Millet, D. B.; Rappenglück, B.; de Gouw, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is one of the most abundant carboxylic acids in the atmosphere. However, current photochemical models cannot fully explain observed concentrations and in particular secondary formation of formic acid across various environments. In this work, formic acid measurements made at an urban receptor site (Pasadena) in June-July 2010 during CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) and a site in an oil and gas producing region (Uintah Basin) in January-February 2013 during UBWOS 2013 (Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Studies) will be discussed. Although the VOC (volatile organic compounds) compositions differed dramatically at the two sites, measured formic acid concentrations were comparable: 2.3 ± 1.3 in UBWOS 2013 and 2.0 ± 1.0 ppb in CalNex. We determine that concentrations of formic acid at both sites were dominated by secondary formation (> 99%). A constrained box model using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) underestimates the measured formic acid concentrations drastically at both sites (by a factor of > 10). Compared to the original MCM model that includes only ozonolysis of unsaturated organic compounds and OH oxidation of acetylene, when we updated yields of ozonolysis of alkenes and included OH oxidation of isoprene, vinyl alcohol chemistry, reaction of formaldehyde with HO2, oxidation of aromatics, and reaction of CH3O2 with OH, the model predictions for formic acid were improved by a factor of 6.4 in UBWOS 2013 and 4.5 in CalNex, respectively. A comparison of measured and modeled HCOOH/acetone ratios is used to evaluate the model performance for formic acid. We conclude that the modified chemical mechanism can explain 19 and 45% of secondary formation of formic acid in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. The contributions from aqueous reactions in aerosol and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surface to formic acid are estimated to be 0-6 and 0-5% in UBWOS 2013 and CalNex, respectively. We observe that

  16. Imaging gastric pennies in children.

    PubMed

    Lane, Joshua E; Boltri, John M

    2005-04-01

    Pennies are among the most common foreign objects ingested by children. This occurrence has traditionally been managed conservatively. However, more recent studies indicate that the higher zinc composition of pennies produced after 1982 may be more dangerous than previously believed. We reported earlier the in situ reaction of such pennies following immersion in hydrochloric acid at gastric pH. The present study examines the utility of radiographic examination of such pennies.

  17. Gastroprotective potentials of the ethanolic extract of Mukia maderaspatana against indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Gomathy, G; Venkatesan, D; Palani, S

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the protective effects of the ethanolic extract of Mukia maderaspatana against indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats. Gastric ulceration was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of indomethacin (30 mg/kg b.wt.). M. maderaspatana extract produced significant reduction in gastric mucosal lesions, malondialdehyde and serum tumour necrosis factor-α associated with a significant increase in gastric juice mucin content and gastric mucosal catalase, nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 levels. The volume and acidity of the gastric juice decreased in pretreated rats. The plant extract was evaluated in the gastric juice of rats, untreated has showed near normal levels in pretreated rats. The M. maderaspatana was able to decrease acidity and increase the mucosal defence in the gastric area, therefore justifying its use as an antiulcerogenic agent. Ranitidine significantly increased pH value and decreased pepsin activity and gastric juice free and total acidity. The anti-ulcer effect was further confirmed histologically.

  18. The stability of the acetic acid dimer in microhydrated environments and in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Pašalić, Hasan; Tunega, Daniel; Aquino, Adélia J A; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H; Lischka, Hans

    2012-03-28

    The thermodynamic stability of the acetic acid dimer conformers in microhydrated environments and in aqueous solution was studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations using the density functional based tight binding (DFTB) method. To confirm the reliability of this method for the system studied, density functional theory (DFT) and second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) calculations were performed for comparison. Classical optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS) force field dynamics was used as well. One focus of this work was laid on the study of the capabilities of water molecules to break the hydrogen bonds of the acetic acid dimer. The barrier for insertion of one water molecule into the most stable cyclic dimer is found to lie between 3.25 and 4.8 kcal mol(-1) for the quantum mechanical methods, but only at 1.2 kcal mol(-1) for OPLS. Starting from different acetic acid dimer structures optimized in gas phase, DFTB dynamics simulations give a different picture of the stability in the microhydrated environment (4 to 12 water molecules) as compared to aqueous solution. In the former case all conformers are converted to the hydrated cyclic dimer, which remains stable over the entire simulation time of 1 ns. These results demonstrate that the considered microhydrated environment is not sufficient to dissociate the acetic acid dimer. In aqueous solution, however, the DFTB dynamics shows dissociation of all dimer structures (or processes leading thereto) starting after about 50 ps, demonstrating the capability of the water environment to break up the relatively strong hydrogen bridges. The OPLS dynamics in the aqueous environment shows--in contrast to the DFTB results--immediate dissociation, but a similar long-term behavior.

  19. Gastric polyposis caused by multifocal histiocytosis X.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, R; Yagihashi, S; Konta, R; Ueda, T; Izumiyama, T

    1992-01-01

    A rare case of gastric polyposis caused by infiltration of Langerhans' cells is reported. A 53 year old Japanese woman complaining of vague abdominal discomfort, was found at endoscopy to have numerous polyps all over the gastric wall. An endoscopic biopsy specimen showed characteristic infiltration of Langerhans' cells in the lamina propria of the mucosa. Functional abnormalities such as impaired gastric acid secretion or malabsorption were not associated with this lesion and the patient was treated conservatively. During follow up over two years, she had a cutaneous eruption with infiltration of histiocytes and osteolytic lesions in the skull. However, no progressive changes occurred in the stomach. This probably benign self-limiting lesion of gastric histiocytosis X may be one of the manifestations of multifocal histiocytosis X, but its aetiology and appropriate treatment have not yet been determined. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1644344

  20. Do calories or osmolality determine gastric emptying

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.B.; Levine, A.S.; Marlette, J.M.; Morley, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Recent animal studies suggest that gastric emptying is dependent on the caloric and osmotic content of the ingested food. These studies have involved intubation with infusion of liquid meals into the stomach. Scintigraphic methods, which are non-invasive and do not alter normal physiology, are now available for precise quantitation of gastric emptying. To study the role of calories and osmolality on gastric emptying, the authors employed a standardized /sup 99m/Tc-scrambled egg meal washed with 50 cc tap water in 10 normal human volunteers. A variety of simple and complex sugars, non-absorbable complex carbohydrate (polycose), medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) and gluten were dissolved in water and ingested with the test meal. Each subject acted as his own control. Coefficient of variation in control tests in each subject 12 weeks apart was 9.9%. Results showed that incremental glucose (25-66 gm) produced a linear increase in gastric emptying (T/2 control 50 +- 3, 25 gm 60 +- 3, 50 gm 79 +- 3 and 66 gm 102 +- 3 minutes). 25 gm fructose (T/2 59 +- 3 minutes) and 25 gm polycose (T/2 59 +- 3 minutes) had similar effects to glucose. 25 gm sucrose and 25 gm gluten did not significantly differ from controls. MCFA had an effect similar to 50 gm glucose - suggesting that calories are important in gastric emptying. However, 25 gm xylose markedly prolonged gastric emptying to 80 +- 5 minutes. The rank order for osmolality for substances tested MCFA = gluten < polycose < polycose < fructose < sucrose = glucose < xylose defined no relationship to gastric emptying. The authors' results suggest that neither calories nor osmolality alone determine gastric emptying. A specific food does not necessarily have the same effect on gastric emptying in different individuals.

  1. Transformation of Monoaromatic hydrocarbons to organic acids in anoxic groundwater environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Eganhouse, R.P.; Baedecker, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    The transformation of benzene and a series of alkylbenzenes was studied in anoxic groundwater of a shallow glacial-outwash aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, U.S.A. Monoaromatic hydrocarbons, the most water-soluble components of crude oil, were transported downgradient of an oil spill, forming a plume of contaminated groundwater. Organic acids that were not original components of the oil were identified in the anoxic groundwater. The highest concentrations of these oxidized organic compounds were found in the anoxic plume where a decrease in concentrations of structurally related alkylbenzenes was observed. These results suggest that biological transformation of benzene and alkylbenzenes to organic acid intermediates may be an important attenuation process in anoxic environments. The transformation of a complex mixture of hydrocarbons to a series of corresponding oxidation products in an anoxic subsurface environment provides new insight into in situ anaerobic degradation processes. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  2. The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is activated by alterations of its membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Axel; Lenzig, Pia; Oslender-Bujotzek, Adrienne; Kusch, Jana; Lucas, Susana Dias; Gründer, Stefan; Wiemuth, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) is a member of the DEG/ENaC family of ion channels. Channels of this family are characterized by a common structure, their physiological functions and modes of activation, however, are diverse. Rat BASIC is expressed in brain, liver and intestinal tract and activated by bile acids. The physiological function of BASIC and its mechanism of bile acid activation remain a puzzle. Here we addressed the question whether amphiphilic bile acids activate BASIC by directly binding to the channel or indirectly by altering the properties of the surrounding membrane. We show that membrane-active substances other than bile acids also affect the activity of BASIC and that activation by bile acids and other membrane-active substances is non-additive, suggesting that BASIC is sensitive for changes in its membrane environment. Furthermore based on results from chimeras between BASIC and ASIC1a, we show that the extracellular and the transmembrane domains are important for membrane sensitivity.

  3. Protist genetic diversity in the acidic hydrothermal environments of Lassen Volcanic National Park, USA.

    PubMed

    Brown, Patricia B; Wolfe, Gordon V

    2006-01-01

    We examined eukaryote genetic diversity in the hydrothermal environments of Lassen Volcanic National Park (LVNP), Northern California. We sampled hydrothermal areas of the Bumpass Hell, Sulfur Works, Devil's Kitchen, and Boiling Springs Lake sites, all of which included diverse acidic pools, mud pots, and streams with visible algal mats and biofilms. Temperatures varied from 15 to 85 degrees C and pH from 1.7 to 5.8. DNA extraction methods compared by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting exhibited similar patterns, and showed limited diversity of eukaryotic small subunit (SSU) rRNA genes compared with prokaryotes. We successfully amplified eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes from most environments up to 68 degrees C. Cloned rDNA sequences reveal acidophilic protists dominate eukaryotes in LVNP hydrothermal environments. Most sites showed phototrophic assemblages dominated by chlorophytes and stramenopiles (diatoms and chrysophytes). Heterotrophic taxa, though less abundant, included diverse alveolates (ciliates), amoebae, and flagellates. Fungi were also found at most sites, and metazoans (hexapods, nematodes, platyhelminths) were sometimes detected in less acidic environments, especially in algal mats. While many cloned rDNA sequences showed 95%-99% identity to known acidophilic isolates or environmental clones from other acidic sites (Rio Tinto), sequence diversity generally declined both with decreasing pH and increasing temperature, and both were controlling physical variables on the abundance and distribution of organisms at our sites. However, a pool at 68 degrees C with pH 1.7 yielded the greatest number of distinct sequences. While some were likely contaminants from nearby cooler sites, we suggest that Lassen's acidic hydrothermal features may harbor novel protists.

  4. The influence of mechanochemical modification on prevention of toxic ability of humic acids towards phenanthrene in aquatic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhovtsova, N. S.; Maltseva, E. V.; Glyzina, T. S.; Ovchinnikova, I. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the research work is to quantify interaction between phenanthrene with modified humic acids in aquatic environment. The changes in the structure and properties of humic acids after modifications were studied with 1H NMR spectroscopy and potentiometric titration methods. Our research demonstrates that the application of thiourea as a modified agent increases the binding capacity of humic acids towards phenanthrene.

  5. Root Environment Acidity as a Regulatory Factor in Ammonium Assimilation by the Bean Plant 1

    PubMed Central

    Barker, A. V.; Volk, R. J.; Jackson, W. A.

    1966-01-01

    Previous experiments have revealed a much greater efficiency of ammonium utilization by bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) when the acidity of the ambient medium was maintained at near-neutral conditions with carbonates or hydroxides. The present investigation, in which 15N-labeled ammonium was used, permitted an assessment of the origin of nitrogen in tissue nitrogen pools with and without acidity control (CaCO3 treated and untreated, respectively) in the root environment. Control of acidity resulted in greater ammonium uptake and greater incorporation into the amino fraction, amide, and ethanol-insoluble nitrogen by the root tissue. These differences were clearly evident by the fifth day after ammonium nitrogen had been applied. Shoots of the untreated plants rapidly accumulated free ammonium and amino nitrogen. A substantial portion of both fractions came from pre-existing nitrogen in the plants, indicating significant protein degradation. No evidence was found for such degradation in the roots of the untreated plants or in either roots or shoots of CaCO3 treated plants. The data indicate that control of ambient acidity in the root environment during ammonium absorption enhanced the conversion of entering ammonium to organic nitrogen compounds in the root tissue thereby restricting movement of free ammonium to shoots. Consequently, the detrimental effects of high ammonium concentrations in the leaves were largely prevented. PMID:16656383

  6. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  7. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  8. Basis of decreased risk of gastric cancer in severe atrophic gastritis with eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tari, Akira; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sumii, Masaharu; Sasaki, Atsunori; Tani, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Sinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induces chronic gastritis and lowers gastric juice ascorbic acid concentrations. We investigated how H. pylori eradication affected multiple variables that could prevent or delay development of new or occult gastric cancer in patients with early gastric cancer treated by endoscopic mucosal resection. Gastric juice pH, nitrite concentrations, and total vitamin C concentrations, serum concentrations of vitamin C and specific H. pylori antibody, and intensity of neutrophil infiltration in gastric mucosa were determined before and after successful H. pylori eradication. Successful eradication increased acid output and ascorbic acid secretion into gastric juice, accompanied by disappearance of polymorphonuclear infiltration from the surface epithelium and decreased gastric juice nitrite concentrations. Our data suggest that H. pylori eradication decreases the nitrosation rate as the ratio of vitamin C to nitrite increases. This decreases reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, eliminating their damaging effect on DNA and reducing cell turnover. PMID:17151803

  9. Basis of decreased risk of gastric cancer in severe atrophic gastritis with eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tari, Akira; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sumii, Masaharu; Sasaki, Atsunori; Tani, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Sinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induces chronic gastritis and lowers gastric juice ascorbic acid concentrations. We investigated how H. pylori eradication affected multiple variables that could prevent or delay development of new or occult gastric cancer in patients with early gastric cancer treated by endoscopic mucosal resection. Gastric juice pH, nitrite concentrations, and total vitamin C concentrations, serum concentrations of vitamin C and specific H. pylori antibody, and intensity of neutrophil infiltration in gastric mucosa were determined before and after successful H. pylori eradication. Successful eradication increased acid output and ascorbic acid secretion into gastric juice, accompanied by disappearance of polymorphonuclear infiltration from the surface epithelium and decreased gastric juice nitrite concentrations. Our data suggest that H. pylori eradication decreases the nitrosation rate as the ratio of vitamin C to nitrite increases. This decreases reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, eliminating their damaging effect on DNA and reducing cell turnover.

  10. Nebivolol prevents indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Nahla E; Khedr, Eman G; El-Bahrawy, Hoda A; Selim, Hend M

    2016-07-01

    Gastric ulcer is a very common gastrointestinal disease that may lead to dangerous complications and even death. This study was conducted to evaluate the prophylactic effect of nebivolol against indomethacin [INDO]-induced gastric ulcer. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: normal control, ulcer control (INDO only), omeprazole before INDO and nebivolol before INDO. Each rat to receive nebivolol and omeprazole was given the agent orally (by gavage) daily for 10 days prior to induction of ulcer by oral dosing with INDO. Four hours after INDO treatment, all rats were euthanized and their stomachs obtained for measures of gastric acidity, oxidative stress and inflammatory markers, as well as cytoprotective mediators. The results showed that a single oral dose of INDO (100 mg/kg) induced gastric acidity, an ulcer index of 2900 and significantly increased levels of gastric tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and malondialdehyde (MDA) and significantly decreased levels of gastric prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO), compared to in normal control counterpart stomachs. Giving nebivolol before INDO corrected the gastric acidity and resulted in a significant increase in GSH, PGE2 and NO and a significant decrease in TNFα and MDA gastric levels, compared to ulcer control values. Results obtained with nebivolol were comparable to those with omeprazole; the preventive index in the nebivolol group was 90.7% compared to 94.5% in rats in the omeprazole group. These studies showed that nebivolol provided a valuable role in preventing gastric ulcers induced by INDO and provided a promise for potentially protecting hypertensive patients from experiencing gastric ulcer. Thus, it is possible that, pending further studies, nebivolol could be used for pre-exposure prophylaxis from gastric ulcer in these patients.

  11. Hydrolysis of milk triglycerides by human gastric lipase.

    PubMed

    Jaśkiewicz, J; Szafran, Z; Popiela, T; Szafran, H

    1980-01-01

    The concentrations of myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic acids were determined in the products of hydrolysis of lipids of cow milk incubated with human gastric juice using thin-layer chromatography for the separation of lipid fractions, and gas liquid chromatography for the determination of fatty acids. It was found that the percentage ratio of the above fatty acids in hydrolysis products was similar to that in milk triglycerides. It was concluded that triglycerides containing higher fatty acids present in milk are hydrolysed by the lipase appearing in human gastric juice, the rate of hydrolysis of the individual acids being roughly proportional to the concentration of these acids in triglyceride substrate.

  12. Gallic acid inhibits gastric cancer cells metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Hsieh-Hsun; Chang, Chi-Sen; Ho, Wei-Chi; Liao, Sheng-You; Lin, Wea-Lung; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2013-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of gallic acid (GA) for controlling tumor metastasis through its inhibitory effect on the motility of AGS cells. A noteworthy finding in our previous experiment was increased RhoB expression in GA-treated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of RhoB expression on the inhibitory effects of GA on AGS cells. By applying the transfection of RhoB siRNA into AGS cells and an animal model, we tested the effect of GA on inhibition of tumor growth and RhoB expression. The results confirmed that RhoB-siRNA transfection induced GA to inhibit AGS cells’ invasive growth involving blocking the AKT/small GTPase signals pathway and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Finally, we evaluated the effect of GA on AGS cell metastasis by colonization of tumor cells in nude mice. It showed GA inhibited tumor cells growth via the expression of RhoB. These data support the inhibitory effect of GA which was shown to inhibit gastric cancer cell metastasis and invasive growth via increased expression of RhoB, downregulation of AKT/small GTPase signals and inhibition of NF-κB activity. Thus, GA might be a potential agent in treating gastric cancer. Highlights: ► GA could downregulate AKT signal via increased expression of RhoB. ► GA inhibits metastasis in vitro in gastric carcinoma. ► GA inhibits tumor growth in nude mice model.

  13. Modern and Ancient Extremely Acid Saline Deposits: Terrestrial Analogs for Martian Environments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benison, Kathleen C.; LaClair, Deidre A.

    2003-11-01

    Extremely acid (pH <1) saline lakes and groundwaters existed in the mid-Permian of the mid-continent of North America. Modern counterparts have been found in acid saline lake systems throughout southern Australia. We compare and contrast the Permian Opeche Shale of North Dakota and Nippewalla Group of Kansas to modern Australian salt lakes in southern Western Australia and in northwest Victoria. With the exception of some minor variations in pH, evaporite mineralogy, and water geochemistry, the Permian and modern systems are similar and characterized by: (1) ephemeral saline continental playas hosted by red siliciclastic sediments, (2) evaporite minerals, including abundant sulfates, (3) Al-Fe-Si-rich waters with low pH values, (4) acidophilic microbes, and (5) paucity of carbonates. The composition of these terrestrial systems is strikingly similar to compositional data returned from the martian surface. Specifically, both Earth and martian systems have high amounts of iron oxides and sulfates, and little, if any, carbonates. We propose that the modern and ancient terrestrial acid saline environments may be good analogs for possible environments on Mars.

  14. Primary gastric tuberculosis mimicking gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eray, İsmail Cem; Rencüzoğulları, Ahmet; Yalav, Orçun; Dalcı, Kubilay; Kakil, Erdem; Bağır, Emine; Parsak, Cem Kaan

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old female patient with no previous known diseases who had complaints of postprandial epigastric pain and weight loss and who could not be diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy, although gastric cancer was suspected radiologically and endoscopically, was diagnosed with primary gastric tuberculosis by laparotomy and frozen section. Following anti-tuberculosis treatment, a complete clinical, radiological, and endoscopic response was achieved. PMID:26504425

  15. Gastric syphilis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Tais Ferreira; Novis, Camila Freitas Lobo; Bottino, Caroline Bertolini; D'Acri, Antonio Macedo; Lima, Ricardo Barbosa; Martins, Carlos José

    2016-01-01

    Gastric syphilis is an uncommon extracutaneous manifestation of syphilis, occurring in less than 1% of patients, presenting nonspecific clinical manifestations. In general, it occurs on secondary stage. The critical point is the recognition of the syphilitic gastric involvement, without which there may be incorrect diagnosis of malignancy of the digestive tract. In this report, a case of secondary syphilis with gastric involvement that had complete remission with benzathine penicillin will be described.

  16. [Gastric cancer in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Wu, M S; Lin, J T; Lee, W J; Yu, S C; Wang, T H

    1994-09-01

    The study of gastric cancer is important in clinical medicine as well as in public health. Environmental factors play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis and thus primary prevention is feasible after improvement of these factors. The 5-year survival rate of resected early gastric cancer is over 90% and this provides an excellent paradigm for secondary prevention. Though its mortality rate has declined since 1970, gastric cancer remains common and carries a high mortality in Taiwan where about 2,000 patients die of gastric cancer annually. The age-adjusted mortality is 16.54 and 8.16/100,000 for male and female, ranking the third and fourth cancer death respectively. Epidemiologic data disclose a positive association between gastric cancer and some dietary factors in Taiwan. However, the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and hereditary susceptibility should be elucidated in the future. Endoscopy with biopsy is an excellent method of the diagnosis of gastric cancer. However, its invasiveness makes it impractical as a screening tool and thus the proportion of early gastric cancer to gastric cancer remains as low as 30% in most reports. The value of lymph node dissection remains controversial although surgery is one of the most effective methods of eradicating gastric cancer. Overall, the 5 year survival rate is 24.5% to 54%. Laser therapy is usually reserved for patients with high operative risk and specific types of gastric cancer. To improve the survival results, development of a simple and economic screening program based on the epidemiologic results and utilization of noninvasive examinations such as serologic markers to diagnose and treat gastric cancer at its earliest stage deserves further study.

  17. Evaluation of boric acid sugar baits against Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in tropical environments.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, Diana P; Qualls, Whitney A; Müller, Gunter C; Samson, Dayana M; Roque, Deborah; Alimi, Temitope; Arheart, Kristopher; Beier, John C; Xue, Rui-De

    2013-04-01

    Attractive toxic sugar bait (active ingredient, 1% boric acid) was evaluated against Aedes albopictus Skuse populations in the laboratory, semi-field trials, and field trials in residential communities in St. Augustine, Florida. Laboratory evaluations of boric acid sugar baits applied to the plant Pentas lanceolata (Rubiaceae) demonstrated 100 and 92% mortality of A. albopictus at day 7 and 14, respectively. A semi-field study evaluating the bait application to the upperside or topside of leaves resulted in no significant difference on mortality (P>0.05). Overall combined top and bottom boric acid sugar bait application mortality at day 7 was 95% based on leaf bioassays. Field application of the boric acid sugar baits significantly (P<0.05) decreased adult A. albopictus populations up to day 21 post-treatment compared to the pre-treatment population numbers. A significant reduction in oviposition was demonstrated both at day 7 and 14 post-application (P=0.001) as monitored by ovitraps. Attractive toxic sugar bait application in tropical environments demonstrated efficacy, persistence, and feasibility in controlling A. albopictus populations.

  18. Enhanced activity of carvacrol against biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis in an acidic environment.

    PubMed

    Nostro, Antonia; Cellini, Luigina; Zimbalatti, Vincenzo; Blanco, Anna Rita; Marino, Andreana; Pizzimenti, Francesco; Di Giulio, Mara; Bisignano, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Carvacrol is an antimicrobial monoterpenic phenol which occurs in many plant essential oils. The aim of this study was to investigate its activity at acidic pH on staphylococcal forming and yet established biofilms, with particular focus to improve its effectiveness on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm. The results showed that the subinhibitory doses (1/2, 1/4 and 1/8 MIC) of carvacrol determined a higher reduction of S. epidermidis biofilm formation than that observed at neutral pH. A potentiated inhibitory effect was also observed on established biofilm, carvacrol caused either a strong reduction of biomass (>50%) and bacteria attached to polystyrene (>7 log units). The images of scanning electron microscopy and the gas-chromatographic analysis support these results. The development of acidic formulations containing carvacrol could be an important tool to control the staphylococcal biofilm in the medical and food environment.

  19. Interactions of amino acid side-chain analogs within membrane environments.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, Vahid; Feig, Michael

    2015-02-19

    The interactions among four amino acid analog pairs (Asn, Ser, Phe, and Val) within the membrane environment were investigated using umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations. The results confirm generally expected qualitative trends of preferential association of polar compounds inside the membrane vs preferential interaction of hydrophobic compounds outside the membrane. Furthermore, correlations between amino acid interactions, membrane insertion, and membrane deformations are discussed and a detailed analysis of pair interaction energies is presented. A comparison of the energetics obtained from explicit lipid simulations with those from implicit membrane models reveals significant deviations and an improved parametrization of the heterogeneous dielectric generalized Born implicit model is provided that partially corrects for deficiencies in the implicit membrane model when compared with the new reference data from this study.

  20. Humic and fluvic acids and organic colloidal materials in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.; Clark, S.B.

    1996-04-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment, occurring in all soils, waters, and sediments of the ecosphere. Humic substances arise from the decomposition of plant and animal tissues yet are more stable than their precursors. Their size, molecular weight, elemental composition, structure, and the number and position of functional groups vary, depending on the origin and age of the material. Humic and fulvic substances have been studied extensively for more than 200 years; however, much remains unknown regarding their structure and properties. Humic substances are those organic compounds found in the environment that cannot be classified as any other chemical class of compounds. They are traditionally defined according to their solubilities. Fulvic acids are those organic materials that are soluble in water at all pH values. Humic acids are those materials that are insoluble at acidic pH values (pH < 2) but are soluble at higher pH values. Humin is the fraction of natural organic materials that is insoluble in water at all pH values. These definitions reflect the traditional methods for separating the different fractions from the original mixture. The humic content of soils varies from 0 to almost 10%. In surface waters, the humic content, expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), varies from 0.1 to 50 ppm in dark-water swamps. In ocean waters, the DOC varies from 0.5 to 1.2 ppm at the surface, and the DOC in samples from deep groundwaters varies from 0.1 to 10 ppm. In addition, about 10% of the DOC in surface waters is found in suspended matter, either as organic or organically coated inorganic particulates. Humic materials function as surfactants, with the ability to bind both hydrophobic and hydrophyllic materials, making numic and fluvic materials effective agents in transporting both organic and inorganic contaminants in the environment.

  1. Bacillus cereus cell response upon exposure to acid environment: toward the identification of potential biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Noémie; Broussolle, Véronique; Postollec, Florence; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Sohier, Danièle; Coroller, Louis; Leguerinel, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to adapt to different environments and evolve rapidly, allowing them to cope with their new environments. Such adaptive response and associated protections toward other lethal stresses, is a crucial survival strategy for a wide spectrum of microorganisms, including food spoilage bacteria, pathogens, and organisms used in functional food applications. The growing demand for minimal processed food yields to an increasing use of combination of hurdles or mild preservation factors in the food industry. A commonly used hurdle is low pH which allows the decrease in bacterial growth rate but also the inactivation of pathogens or spoilage microorganisms. Bacillus cereus is a well-known food-borne pathogen leading to economical and safety issues in food industry. Because survival mechanisms implemented will allow bacteria to cope with environmental changes, it is important to provide understanding of B. cereus stress response. Thus this review deals with the adaptive traits of B. cereus cells facing to acid stress conditions. The acid stress response of B. cereus could be divided into four groups (i) general stress response (ii) pH homeostasis, (iii) metabolic modifications and alkali production and (iv) secondary oxidative stress response. This current knowledge may be useful to understand how B. cereus cells may cope to acid environment such as encountered in food products and thus to find some molecular biomarkers of the bacterial behavior. These biomarkers could be furthermore used to develop new microbial behavior prediction tools which can provide insights into underlying molecular physiological states which govern the behavior of microorganisms and thus opening the avenue toward the detection of stress adaptive behavior at an early stage and the control of stress-induced resistance throughout the food chain. PMID:24106490

  2. Distribution and diversity of Verrucomicrobia methanotrophs in geothermal and acidic environments.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Christine E; Smirnova, Angela V; Graham, Jaime M; Stott, Matthew B; Khadka, Roshan; Moore, Tim R; Grasby, Stephen E; Strack, Maria; Dunfield, Peter F

    2014-06-01

    Recently, methanotrophic members of the phylum Verrucomicrobia have been described, but little is known about their distribution in nature. We surveyed methanotrophic bacteria in geothermal springs and acidic wetlands via pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. Putative methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia were found in samples covering a broad temperature range (22.5-81.6°C), but only in acidic conditions (pH 1.8-5.0) and only in geothermal environments, not in acidic bogs or fens. Phylogenetically, three 16S rRNA gene sequence clusters of putative methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia were observed. Those detected in high-temperature geothermal samples (44.1-81.6°C) grouped with known thermoacidiphilic 'Methylacidiphilum' isolates. A second group dominated in moderate-temperature geothermal samples (22.5-40.1°C) and a representative mesophilic methanotroph from this group was isolated (strain LP2A). Genome sequencing verified that strain LP2A possessed particulate methane monooxygenase, but its 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to 'Methylacidiphilum infernorum' strain V4 was only 90.6%. A third group clustered distantly with known methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia. Using pmoA-gene targeted quantitative polymerase chain reaction, two geothermal soil profiles showed a dominance of LP2A-like pmoA sequences in the cooler surface layers and 'Methylacidiphilum'-like pmoA sequences in deeper, hotter layers. Based on these results, there appears to be a thermophilic group and a mesophilic group of methanotrophic Verrucomicrobia. However, both were detected only in acidic geothermal environments.

  3. Biodiversity and geochemistry of an extremely acidic, low-temperature subterranean environment sustained by chemolithotrophy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Sakurako; Bryan, Christopher G; Hallberg, Kevin B; Johnson, D Barrie

    2011-08-01

    The geochemical dynamics and composition of microbial communities within a low-temperature (≈ 8.5°C), long-abandoned (> 90 years) underground pyrite mine (Cae Coch, located in north Wales) were investigated. Surface water percolating through fractures in the residual pyrite ore body that forms the roof of the mine becomes extremely acidic and iron-enriched due to microbially accelerated oxidative dissolution of the sulfide mineral. Water droplets on the mine roof were found to host a very limited diversity of exclusively autotrophic microorganisms, dominated by the recently described psychrotolerant iron/sulfur-oxidizing acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, and smaller numbers of iron-oxidizing Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. In contrast, flowing water within the mine chamber was colonized with vast macroscopic microbial growths, in the form of acid streamers and microbial stalactites, where the dominant microorganisms were Betaproteobacteria (autotrophic iron oxidizers such as 'Ferrovum myxofaciens' and a bacterium related to Gallionella ferruginea). An isolated pool within the mine showed some similarity (although greater biodiversity) to the roof droplets, and was the only site where archaea were relatively abundant. Bacteria not previously associated with extremely acidic, metal-rich environments (a Sphingomonas sp. and Ralstonia pickettii) were found within the abandoned mine. Data supported the hypothesis that the Cae Coch ecosystem is underpinned by acidophilic, mostly autotrophic, bacteria that use ferrous iron present in the pyrite ore body as their source of energy, with a limited role for sulfur-based autotrophy. Results of this study highlight the importance of novel bacterial species (At. ferrivorans and acidophilic iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria) in mediating mineral oxidation and redox transformations of iron in acidic, low-temperature environments.

  4. Selective gene expression by rat gastric corpus epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, M.; Stengel, A.; Sachs, G.

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is divided into several segments that have distinct functional properties, largely absorptive. The gastric corpus is the only segment thought of as largely secretory. Microarray hybridization of the gastric corpus mucosal epithelial cells was used to compare gene expression with other segments of the columnar GI tract followed by statistical data subtraction to identify genes selectively expressed by the rat gastric corpus mucosa. This provides a means of identifying less obvious specific functions of the corpus in addition to its secretion-related genes. For example, important properties found by this GI tract comparative transcriptome reflect the energy demand of acid secretion, a role in lipid metabolism, the large variety of resident neuroendocrine cells, responses to damaging agents and transcription factors defining differentiation of its epithelium. In terms of overlap of gastric corpus genes with the rest of the GI tract, the distal small bowel appears to express many of the gastric corpus genes in contrast to proximal small and large bowel. This differential map of gene expression by the gastric corpus epithelium will allow a more detailed description of major properties of the gastric corpus and may lead to the discovery of gastric corpus cell differentiation genes and those mis-regulated in gastric carcinomas. PMID:21177383

  5. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  6. Development of a New Environment-conscious Transformer Impregnated with Palm Fatty Acid Ester (PFAE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikosaka, Tomoyuki; Yamazaki, Akina; Hatta, Yasunori; Koide, Hidenobu; Kanoh, Takaaki; Suzuki, Takashi; Yamada, Junichi; Uemura, Shingo

    We have developed a new environment-conscious transformer impregnated with vegetable based insulating oil which called PFAE (Palm Fatty Acid Ester). PFAE has 0.6 times less viscosity and 1.3 times higher dielectric constant compared to mineral oil. This means that a PFAE immersed transformer has better cooling efficiency and better insulating performance in paper-and-oil composite insulation systems, resulting in size reduction in comparison to conventional mineral oil immersed transformers. In this paper, insulating performance of lead to plane electrode models, cooling performance of a PFAE immersed transformer, and the result of analytical study of dissolved gas for abnormal diagnosis are described.

  7. Inhibition of gastric H+,K+-ATPase by 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentylindan-1-on-5-yl)oxybutyric acid (DCPIB), an inhibitor of volume-regulated anion channel.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takuto; Takahashi, Yuji; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Chisato; Shimizu, Takahiro; Takeguchi, Noriaki; Sakai, Hideki

    2015-10-15

    4-(2-Butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentylindan-1-on-5-yl)oxybutyric acid (DCPIB) has been used as an inhibitor of volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC), which is expressed in almost all cells (IC50 is around 4 µM). Here, we found that DCPIB significantly inhibited the activities of gastric proton pump (H+,K+-ATPase) in isolated gastric tubulovesicles and the membrane sample of the H+,K+-ATPase-expressing cells, and their IC50 values were around 9 µM. In the tubulovesicles, no significant expression of leucine rich repeat containing 8 family member A (LRRC8A), an essential component of VRAC, was observed. The inhibitory effect of DCPIB was also found in the membrane sample obtained from the cells in which LRRC8A had been knocked down. On the other hand, DCPIB had no significant effect on the activity of Na+,K+-ATPase or Ca2+-ATPase. In the H+,K+-ATPase-expressing cells, DCPIB inhibited the 86Rb+ transport activity of H+,K+-ATPase but not that of Na+,K+-ATPase. DCPIB had no effect on the activity of Cl- channels other than VRAC in the cells. These results suggest that DCPIB directly inhibits H+,K+-ATPase activity. DCPIB may be a beneficial tool for studying the H+,K+-ATPase function in vitro.

  8. Sensor capsule for diagnosis of gastric disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holen, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    Motility and pH sensor capsule is developed to monitor gastric acidity, pressure, and temperature. Capsule does not interfere with digestion. Sensor is capsule which includes pH electrode, Pitran pressure transducer, and thermistor temperature sensor all potted in epoxy and enclosed in high density polyethylene sheath.

  9. Fatty acid-binding site environments of serum vitamin D-binding protein and albumin are different

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) and albumin (ALB) are abundant serum proteins and both possess high-affinity binding for saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. However, certain differences exist. We surmised that in cases where serum albumin level is low, DBP presumably can act as a transporter of fatty acids. To explore this possibility we synthesized several alkylating derivatives of 14C-palmitic acid to probe the fatty acid binding pockets of DBP and ALB. We observed that N-ethyl-5-phenylisooxazolium-3′-sulfonate-ester (WRK ester) of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled DBP; but p-nitrophenyl- and N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-esters failed to do so. However, p-nitrophenyl ester of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled bovine ALB, indicating that the micro-environment of the fatty acid-binding domains of DBP and ALB may be different; and DBP may not replace ALB as a transporter of fatty acids. PMID:18374965

  10. Corrosion behavior of low alloy steels in a wet-dry acid humid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing-he; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jian-wei; Zhu, Yi-chun; Zhang, Bin-li; Lu, Min-xu

    2016-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of corrosion resistant steel (CRS) in a simulated wet-dry acid humid environment was investigated and compared with carbon steel (CS) using corrosion loss, polarization curves, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA), N2 adsorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the corrosion kinetics of both steels were closely related to the composition and compactness of the rust, and the electrochemical properties of rusted steel. Small amounts of Cu, Cr, and Ni in CRS increased the amount of amorphous phases and decreased the content of γ-FeOOH in the rust, resulting in higher compactness and electrochemical stability of the CRS rust. The elements Cu, Cr, and Ni were uniformly distributed in the CRS rust and formed CuFeO2, Cu2O, CrOOH, NiFe2O4, and Ni2O3, which enhanced the corrosion resistance of CRS in the wet-dry acid humid environment.

  11. Trophic relationships in an estuarine environment: A quantitative fatty acid analysis signature approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnone, Larisa; Bessonart, Martin; Gadea, Juan; Salhi, María

    2015-12-01

    In order to better understand the functioning of aquatic environments, it is necessary to obtain accurate diet estimations in food webs. Their description should incorporate information about energy flow and the relative importance of trophic pathways. Fatty acids have been extensively used in qualitative studies on trophic relationships in food webs. Recently a new method to estimate quantitatively single predator diet has been developed. In this study, a model of aquatic food web through quantitative fatty acid signature analysis was generated to identify the trophic interactions among the species in the Rocha Lagoon. The biological sampling over two consecutive annual periods was comprehensive enough to identify all functional groups in the aquatic food web (except birds and mammals). Heleobia australis seemed to play a central role in this estuarine ecosystem. As both, a grazer and a prey to several other species, probably H. australis is transferring a great amount of energy to upper trophic levels. Most of the species at Rocha Lagoon have a wide range of prey items in their diet reflecting a complex food web, which is characteristic of extremely dynamic environment as estuarine ecosystems. QFASA is a model in tracing and quantitative estimate trophic pathways among species in an estuarine food web. The results obtained in the present work are a valuable contribution in the understanding of trophic relationships in Rocha Lagoon.

  12. Identification of the uranium speciation in an underground acid mine drainage environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Thuro; Baumann, Nils; Krawczyk-Bärsch, Evelyn; Brockmann, Sina; Zimmermann, Udo; Jenk, Ulf; Weiß, Stephan

    2011-04-01

    The subsurface acid mine drainage (AMD) environment of an abandoned underground uranium mine in Königstein/Saxony/Germany, currently in the process of remediation, is characterized by low pH, high sulfate concentrations and elevated concentrations of heavy metals, in particular uranium. Acid streamers thrive in the mine drainage channels and are heavily coated with iron precipitates. These precipitates are biologically mediated iron precipitates and related to the presence of Fe-oxidizing microorganisms forming copious biofilms in and on the Fe-precipitates. Similar biomineralisations were also observed in stalactite-like dripstones, called snottites, growing on the gallery ceilings. The uranium speciation in these solutions of underground AMD waters flowing in mine galleries as well as dripping from the ceiling and forming stalactite-like dripstones were studied by time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The fluorescence lifetime of uranium species in both AMD water environments were best described with a mono-exponential decay, indicating the presence of one major species. The detected positions of the emission bands and by comparing it in a fingerprinting procedure with spectra obtained for acid sulfate reference solutions, in particular Fe(III) - SO 42- - UO 22+ reference solutions, indicated that the uranium speciation in the AMD environment of Königstein is dominated in the pH range of 2.5-3.0 by the highly mobile aquatic uranium sulfate species UO 2SO 4(aq) and formation of uranium precipitates is rather unlikely as is retardation by sorption processes. The presence of iron in the AMD reduces the fluorescence lifetime of the UO 2SO 4(aq) species from 4.3 μs, found in iron-free uranium sulfate reference solutions, to 0.7 μs observed in both AMD waters of Königstein and also in the iron containing uranium sulfate reference solutions. Colloids were not observed in both drainage water and dripping snottite water as photon correlation

  13. Snails from heavy-metal polluted environments have reduced sensitivity to carbon dioxide-induced acidity.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, Hugh; Cleary, David A; Marble, Aaron M; Phillips, Morgan V; Stoddard, Timothy J; Tuthill, Lara M; Winslow, James R

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 reacts with water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3) which increases water acidity. While marine acidification has received recent consideration, less attention has been paid to the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide on freshwater systems-systems that often have low buffering potential. Since many aquatic systems are already impacted by pollutants such as heavy metals, we wondered about the added effect of rising atmospheric CO2 on freshwater organisms. We studied aquatic pulmonate snails (Physella columbiana) from both a heavy-metal polluted watershed and snails from a reference watershed that has not experienced mining pollution. We used gaseous CO2 to increase water acidity and we then measured changes in antipredatory behavior and also survival. We predicted a simple negative additive effect of low pH. We hypothesized that snails from metal-polluted environments would be physiologically stressed and impaired due to defense responses against heavy metals. Instead, snails from populations that acclimated or evolved in the presence of heavy metal mining pollution were more robust to acidic conditions than were snails from reference habitats. Snails from mining polluted sites seemed to be preadapted to a low pH environment. Their short-term survival in acidic conditions was better than snails from reference sites that lacked metal pollution. In fact, the 48 h survival of snails from polluted sites was so high that it did not significantly differ from the 24 h survival of snails from control sites. This suggests that the response of organisms to a world with rising anthropogenic carbon dioxide levels may be complex and difficult to predict. Snails had a weaker behavioral response to stressful stimuli if kept for 1 month at a pH that differed from their lake of origin. We found that snails raised at a pH of 5.5 had a weaker response (less of a decrease in activity) to concentrated heavy metals than did snails raised at their natal pH of

  14. Snails from heavy-metal polluted environments have reduced sensitivity to carbon dioxide-induced acidity.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, Hugh; Cleary, David A; Marble, Aaron M; Phillips, Morgan V; Stoddard, Timothy J; Tuthill, Lara M; Winslow, James R

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 reacts with water to form carbonic acid (H2CO3) which increases water acidity. While marine acidification has received recent consideration, less attention has been paid to the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide on freshwater systems-systems that often have low buffering potential. Since many aquatic systems are already impacted by pollutants such as heavy metals, we wondered about the added effect of rising atmospheric CO2 on freshwater organisms. We studied aquatic pulmonate snails (Physella columbiana) from both a heavy-metal polluted watershed and snails from a reference watershed that has not experienced mining pollution. We used gaseous CO2 to increase water acidity and we then measured changes in antipredatory behavior and also survival. We predicted a simple negative additive effect of low pH. We hypothesized that snails from metal-polluted environments would be physiologically stressed and impaired due to defense responses against heavy metals. Instead, snails from populations that acclimated or evolved in the presence of heavy metal mining pollution were more robust to acidic conditions than were snails from reference habitats. Snails from mining polluted sites seemed to be preadapted to a low pH environment. Their short-term survival in acidic conditions was better than snails from reference sites that lacked metal pollution. In fact, the 48 h survival of snails from polluted sites was so high that it did not significantly differ from the 24 h survival of snails from control sites. This suggests that the response of organisms to a world with rising anthropogenic carbon dioxide levels may be complex and difficult to predict. Snails had a weaker behavioral response to stressful stimuli if kept for 1 month at a pH that differed from their lake of origin. We found that snails raised at a pH of 5.5 had a weaker response (less of a decrease in activity) to concentrated heavy metals than did snails raised at their natal pH of

  15. Antioxidant activity of olive phenols and other dietary phenols in model gastric conditions: Scavenging of the free radical DPPH and inhibition of the haem-induced peroxidation of linoleic acid.

    PubMed

    Achat, Sabiha; Rakotomanomana, Njara; Madani, Khodir; Dangles, Olivier

    2016-12-15

    The antioxidant activity of dietary phenols in humans (direct reduction of radicals and other highly oxidizing species) could be largely restricted to fighting postprandial oxidative stress in the gastric compartment. Hence, the development of chemical tests simply modelling this situation is pertinent. In this work, the antioxidant properties of the olive phenols hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein are investigated in pH 5-6 micellar solutions through the reduction of the DPPH radical and the inhibition of the metmyoglobin-induced peroxidation of linoleic acid. In the first test, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein proved as efficient as common polyphenols and their reactivity was only moderately affected by β-cyclodextrin and bovine serum albumin, taken as models of food macromolecules. In the second test, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein by themselves came up as relatively weak inhibitors, despite their efficiency at reducing hypervalent haem iron. However, hydroxytyrosol was able to act in synergy with the typical chain-breaking antioxidant α-tocopherol. PMID:27451164

  16. Denervation suppresses gastric tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Yosuke; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Westphalen, Christoph B.; Andersen, Gøran T.; Flatberg, Arnar; Johannessen, Helene; Friedman, Richard A.; Renz, Bernhard W.; Sandvik, Arne K.; Beisvag, Vidar; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Quante, Michael; Li, Zhishan; Gershon, Michael D.; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.; Chen, Duan

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of epithelial homeostasis and has also been postulated to play a role in tumorigenesis. We provide evidence that proper innervation is critical at all stages of gastric tumorigenesis. In three separate mouse models of gastric cancer, surgical or pharmacological denervation of the stomach (bilateral or unilateral truncal vagotomy, or local injection of botulinum toxin type A) markedly reduced tumor incidence and progression, but only in the denervated portion of the stomach. Vagotomy or botulinum toxin type A treatment also enhanced the therapeutic effects of systemic chemotherapy and prolonged survival. Denervation-induced suppression of tumorigenesis was associated with inhibition of Wnt signaling and suppression of stem cell expansion. In gastric organoid cultures, neurons stimulated growth in a Wnt-mediated fashion through cholinergic signaling. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockout of the muscarinic acetylcholine M3 receptor suppressed gastric tumorigenesis. In gastric cancer patients, tumor stage correlated with neural density and activated Wnt signaling, whereas vagotomy reduced the risk of gastric cancer. Together, our findings suggest that vagal innervation contributes to gastric tumorigenesis via M3 receptor–mediated Wnt signaling in the stem cells, and that denervation might represent a feasible strategy for the control of gastric cancer. PMID:25143365

  17. Superoxide triggers an acid burst in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to condition the environment of glucose-starved cells.

    PubMed

    Baron, J Allen; Laws, Kaitlin M; Chen, Janice S; Culotta, Valeria C

    2013-02-15

    Although yeast cells grown in abundant glucose tend to acidify their extracellular environment, they raise the pH of the environment when starved for glucose or when grown strictly with non-fermentable carbon sources. Following prolonged periods in this alkaline phase, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells will switch to producing acid. The mechanisms and rationale for this "acid burst" were unknown. Herein we provide strong evidence for the role of mitochondrial superoxide in initiating the acid burst. Yeast mutants lacking the mitochondrial matrix superoxide dismutase (SOD2) enzyme, but not the cytosolic Cu,Zn-SOD1 enzyme, exhibited marked acceleration in production of acid on non-fermentable carbon sources. Acid production is also dramatically enhanced by the superoxide-producing agent, paraquat. Conversely, the acid burst is eliminated by boosting cellular levels of Mn-antioxidant mimics of SOD. We demonstrate that the acid burst is dependent on the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase Ald4p. Our data are consistent with a model in which mitochondrial superoxide damage to Fe-S enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle leads to acetate buildup by Ald4p. The resultant expulsion of acetate into the extracellular environment can provide a new carbon source to glucose-starved cells and enhance growth of yeast. By triggering production of organic acids, mitochondrial superoxide has the potential to promote cell population growth under nutrient depravation stress.

  18. Ramucirumab for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Kohei; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, various molecular target agents have been investigated for gastric cancer. VEGF is one of the most potent angiogenic factors and is a signaling molecule secreted by many solid tumors. High VEGF expression is one of the characteristic features of gastric carcinomas, thus targeting VEGF is considered a promising strategy for gastric cancer. Ramucirumab, an anti-VEGF receptor antibody, has proven to be effective for previously treated advanced gastric cancer. Details of ramucirumab, including two pivotal Phase III studies, will be discussed in this review. Ramucirumab, with or without chemotherapy, improved survival in gastric cancer after previous systemic chemotherapy, thus becoming the standard of care for this patient population. Optimal timing of ramucirumab use and adequate biomarkers for patient selection as well as mechanism of resistance should be explored in future research.

  19. [Intermediate gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Fontán, A N; Marzano, C A; Martínez, M M; Palau, G; Rubio, H H

    1980-01-01

    Gastric Cancer comprises two basic types: Advanced Gastric Cancer (A.G.C.) and Early Gastric Cancer (E.G.C.). A.G.C. extends beyond the proper muscle layer with a 5 to 17%, five years survival rate after surgery. E.G.C. does not extend beyond the submucosa (with or without metastasis to regional lymph nodes) and has a 80 - 95% five years survival rate. Intermediate Gastric Cancer, PM G.C. (Gastric cancer of the proper muscle layer) does not surpass the proper muscle layer and offers a five years life expectance of near 60% after adequate surgical treatment, with peculiar features in radiology, endoscopy and evolutivity. We report a case of PM G.C., "depressed" and "protruded". The proper muscle layer was invaded by the depressed lesion". Both lesions were continguous.

  20. Not all gastric masses are gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Del Rosario, Michael; Tsai, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer metastasising to the gastrointestinal tract normally does not occur. However, as clinicians, we must be aware that lung adenocarcinoma, as in all cancers, can and will metastasise to any part of the body. We describe a case of a patient with a presumed primary gastric adenocarcinoma who presented with shortness of breath due to pleural effusion. Pathology from the pleural effusion was positive for primary lung adenocarcinoma. Further investigation revealed that the patient's gastric mass was misdiagnosed as gastric adenocarcinoma. We correctly diagnosed the mass as metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. This was very significant because the patient was transitioning to palliative care with possible tube feeding. After the correct diagnosis, her management drastically changed and her health improved. Clinical, pathological and medical management of lung cancer metastasis to the stomach are discussed. PMID:26976833

  1. Enantioselective separation of amino acids as biomarkers indicating life in extraterrestrial environments.

    PubMed

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara

    2013-10-01

    Traces of prebiotic amino acids, i.e., the building blocks of proteins, are excellent biomarkers that could provide evidence of extinct or extant life in extra-terrestrial environments. In particular, characterization of the enantiomeric excess of amino acids gives relevant information about the biotic or abiotic origin of molecules, because it is generally assumed that life elsewhere could be based on either L or D amino acids, but not both. The analytical procedures used in in-situ space missions for chiral discrimination of amino acids must meet severe requirements imposed by flight conditions: short analysis time, low energy consumption, robustness, storage for long periods under extreme conditions, high efficiency and sensitivity, automation, and remote-control operation. Such methods are based on gas chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis, usually coupled with mass spectrometry; of these, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is the only such combination yet used in space missions. Preliminary in-situ sample derivatization is required before GC-MS analysis to convert amino acids into volatile and thermally stable compounds. The silylation reagent most commonly used, N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide, is unsuitable for detection of homochirality, and alternative derivatization techniques have been developed that preserve the stereochemical configuration of the original compounds and are compatible with spaceflight conditions. These include the reagent N,N-dimethylformamide dimethylacetal, which has already been used in the Rosetta mission, a mixture of alkyl chloroformate, ethanol, and pyridine, a mixture of perfluorinated anhydrides and perfluoro alcohols, and hexafluoroacetone, the first gaseous derivatizing agent. In all the space instruments, solvent extraction of organic matter and chemical derivatization have been combined in a single automatic and remote-controlled procedure in a

  2. Enantioselective separation of amino acids as biomarkers indicating life in extraterrestrial environments.

    PubMed

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara

    2013-10-01

    Traces of prebiotic amino acids, i.e., the building blocks of proteins, are excellent biomarkers that could provide evidence of extinct or extant life in extra-terrestrial environments. In particular, characterization of the enantiomeric excess of amino acids gives relevant information about the biotic or abiotic origin of molecules, because it is generally assumed that life elsewhere could be based on either L or D amino acids, but not both. The analytical procedures used in in-situ space missions for chiral discrimination of amino acids must meet severe requirements imposed by flight conditions: short analysis time, low energy consumption, robustness, storage for long periods under extreme conditions, high efficiency and sensitivity, automation, and remote-control operation. Such methods are based on gas chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis, usually coupled with mass spectrometry; of these, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is the only such combination yet used in space missions. Preliminary in-situ sample derivatization is required before GC-MS analysis to convert amino acids into volatile and thermally stable compounds. The silylation reagent most commonly used, N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide, is unsuitable for detection of homochirality, and alternative derivatization techniques have been developed that preserve the stereochemical configuration of the original compounds and are compatible with spaceflight conditions. These include the reagent N,N-dimethylformamide dimethylacetal, which has already been used in the Rosetta mission, a mixture of alkyl chloroformate, ethanol, and pyridine, a mixture of perfluorinated anhydrides and perfluoro alcohols, and hexafluoroacetone, the first gaseous derivatizing agent. In all the space instruments, solvent extraction of organic matter and chemical derivatization have been combined in a single automatic and remote-controlled procedure in a

  3. Tests of gastric neuromuscular function.

    PubMed

    Parkman, Henry P; Jones, Michael P

    2009-05-01

    Tests of gastric neuromuscular function are used to evaluate patients with symptoms referable to the upper digestive tract. These symptoms can be associated with alterations in the rates of gastric emptying, impaired accommodation, heightened gastric sensation, or alterations in gastric myoelectrical function and contractility. Management of gastric neuromuscular disorders requires an understanding of pathophysiology and treatment options as well as the appropriate use and interpretation of diagnostic tests. These tests include measures of gastric emptying; contractility; electrical activity; regional gastric motility of the fundus, antrum, and pylorus; and tests of sensation and compliance. Tests are also being developed to improve our understanding of the afferent sensory pathways from the stomach to the central nervous system that mediate gastric sensation in health and gastric disorders. This article reviews tests of gastric function and provides a basic description of the tests, the methodologies behind them, descriptions of the physiology that they assess, and their clinical utility. PMID:19293005

  4. Postprandial gastric, pancreatic, and biliary response to histamine H2-receptor antagonists active duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Longstreth, G F; Go, V L; Malagelada, J R

    1977-01-01

    Histamine H2-receptor antagonists are potentially useful agents in duodenal ulcer and knowledge of their effect on postprandial digestive events will contribute to their clinical application. We studied the effect of 200- and 300-mg doses of cimetidine, an H2-receptor antagonist, taken with an ordinary meal, on gastric, pancreatic, and biliary function. Both doses significantly reduced acid output and its delivery into the duodenum. Gastric secretory volume and pepsin output were less affected. Acid inhibition was related to blood drug levels and was less than that previously found at night in nocturnal fasting studies. As the stomach emptied the food, the gastric pH rose. The fractional gastric emptying rate, pancreatic enzyme, and bile acid outputs were unaltered. Cimetidine taken orally with meals at these doses is a potent gastric antisecretory agent without affecting other postprandial gastric, pancreatic, or biliary functions.

  5. Experimental Gastric Carcinogenesis in Cebus apella Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tanielly Cristina Raiol; Andrade Junior, Edilson Ferreira; Rezende, Alexandre Pingarilho; Carneiro Muniz, José Augusto Pereira; Lacreta Junior, Antonio Carlos Cunha; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Demachki, Samia; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We established two gastric carcinogenesis models in New-World nonhuman primates. In the first model, ACP03 gastric cancer cell line was inoculated in 18 animals. In the second model, we treated 6 animals with N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU). Animals with gastric cancer were also treated with Canova immunomodulator. Clinical, hematologic, and biochemical, including C-reactive protein, folic acid, and homocysteine, analyses were performed in this study. MYC expression and copy number was also evaluated. We observed that all animals inoculated with ACP03 developed gastric cancer on the 9th day though on the 14th day presented total tumor remission. In the second model, all animals developed pre-neoplastic lesions and five died of drug intoxication before the development of cancer. The last surviving MNU-treated animal developed intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma observed by endoscopy on the 940th day. The level of C-reactive protein level and homocysteine concentration increased while the level of folic acid decreased with the presence of tumors in ACP03-inoculated animals and MNU treatment. ACP03 inoculation also led to anemia and leukocytosis. The hematologic and biochemical results corroborate those observed in patients with gastric cancer, supporting that our in vivo models are potentially useful to study this neoplasia. In cell line inoculated animals, we detected MYC immunoreactivity, mRNA overexpression, and amplification, as previously observed in vitro. In MNU-treated animals, mRNA expression and MYC copy number increased during the sequential steps of intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis and immunoreactivity was only observed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. Thus, MYC deregulation supports the gastric carcinogenesis process. Canova immunomodulator restored several hematologic measurements and therefore, can be applied during/after chemotherapy to increase the tolerability and

  6. Esomeprazole immediate release tablets: Gastric mucosa ex vivo permeation, absorption and antisecretory activity in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Camillo; Flammini, Lisa; Vivo, Valentina; Colombo, Paolo; Colombo, Gaia; Elviri, Lisa; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Buttini, Francesca; Bettini, Ruggero; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rossi, Alessandra

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this work was to study the esomeprazole activity on the control of gastric secretion after administration of a novel immediate release tablet. The ex vivo permeation of esomeprazole across porcine gastric mucosa from immediate release tablets, containing sodium carbonate or magnesium oxide as alkalinizing agents, was firstly assessed. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies in conscious rats following the administration of immediate release tablets with sodium carbonate, in comparison with delayed-release tablets having the same formula, were also conducted. The results showed an important effect of sodium carbonate and magnesium oxide on the drug release, on the ex vivo trans-mucosal transport and the stability in acid environment. In particular, the presence of sodium carbonate in esomeprazole tablet formulation provided the maximum increase of the drug in vitro transport across the mucosa. Then, the absorption and the antisecretory activity of this proton pump inhibitor orally administered in rats as immediate release tablets containing Na2CO3, was superior but not significantly different compared to delayed-release tablets having the same formula. In the adopted animal model, an activity of esomeprazole from immediate release alkaline formulation was seen also in presence of partial gastric absorption allowing inhibition of proton pumps reached via systemic circulation. This esomeprazole immediate release formulation could be used for the on-demand treatment of acid-related disorders such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

  7. Esomeprazole immediate release tablets: Gastric mucosa ex vivo permeation, absorption and antisecretory activity in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Camillo; Flammini, Lisa; Vivo, Valentina; Colombo, Paolo; Colombo, Gaia; Elviri, Lisa; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Buttini, Francesca; Bettini, Ruggero; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rossi, Alessandra

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this work was to study the esomeprazole activity on the control of gastric secretion after administration of a novel immediate release tablet. The ex vivo permeation of esomeprazole across porcine gastric mucosa from immediate release tablets, containing sodium carbonate or magnesium oxide as alkalinizing agents, was firstly assessed. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies in conscious rats following the administration of immediate release tablets with sodium carbonate, in comparison with delayed-release tablets having the same formula, were also conducted. The results showed an important effect of sodium carbonate and magnesium oxide on the drug release, on the ex vivo trans-mucosal transport and the stability in acid environment. In particular, the presence of sodium carbonate in esomeprazole tablet formulation provided the maximum increase of the drug in vitro transport across the mucosa. Then, the absorption and the antisecretory activity of this proton pump inhibitor orally administered in rats as immediate release tablets containing Na2CO3, was superior but not significantly different compared to delayed-release tablets having the same formula. In the adopted animal model, an activity of esomeprazole from immediate release alkaline formulation was seen also in presence of partial gastric absorption allowing inhibition of proton pumps reached via systemic circulation. This esomeprazole immediate release formulation could be used for the on-demand treatment of acid-related disorders such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease. PMID:27574989

  8. Comparison of the composition and gas/particle partitioning of organic acids in monoterpene and isoprene dominated environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Gas and particle-phase organic acids measurements from two different regions with different biogenic volatile organic compound emissions are used to understand gas/particle partitioning principles. A Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS), with acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion was used to selectively detect acids. Hundreds of gas and particle-phase organic acids were measured in both locations, a monoterpene and MBO-dominated environment (ponderosa pine forest in Colorado, BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011) and isoprene and terpene-dominated environment (mixed deciduous and pine forest in Alabama, SOAS 2013). Time series of gas/particle partitioning for ions consistent with tracers for isoprene oxidation such as methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) and tracers for α-pinene oxidation such as pinic and pinonic acid will be presented. Gas/particle partitioning, represented as the fraction of each species in the particle-phase, Fp, was calculated for C1-C18 alkanoic acids and biogenic VOC oxidation tracers and compared to an absorptive partitioning model. These results are compared with those of two other instruments that can also quantify gas/particle partitioning with high time resolution: a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG) and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS). Data from both environments were consistent with the values and trends predicted by the absorptive partitioning model for the tracer acids. However, for low carbon number alkanoic acids we report a higher fraction in the particle phase than predicted by the model. The Fp for the bulk-averaged acids and its relationship to the degree of oxidation and carbon number will also be presented. Temporal patterns and correlations with atmospheric conditions and composition will be explored for individual and bulk acids. We will discuss atmospheric implications of the gas/particle partitioning

  9. Corrosion of high-alloy materials in aqueous hydrofluoric acid environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, S.J. . Development Div.)

    1994-12-01

    A series of immersion tests for eight high-alloy materials was performed in a variety of hydrofluoric acid (HF) environments. Solution strengths of 0.05%, 1%, 10%, 24%, and 48% HF were examined at 24 C, 50 C, and 76 C. Coupons of each alloy were exposed fully immersed in solution and partially exposed in the aerated vapor above each solution. In addition, a limited number of U-bend tests were performed to examine susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Comparison of alloy performance (corrosion rate calculated from weight loss, metallographic evaluation of attack) indicated alloys C-22 (UNS N06022) and C-276 (UNS N10276) exhibited overall superior performance. Other alloys showed useful resistance for a limited range of conditions.

  10. Gastric conduit perforation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilesh; Kaushal, Arvind; Jain, Amit; Saluja, Sundeep Singh; Mishra, Pramod Kumar

    2014-08-16

    As patients with carcinoma of the esophagus live longer, complications associated with the use of a gastric conduit are increasing. Ulcers form in the gastric conduit in 6.6% to 19.4% of patients. There are a few reports of perforation of a gastric conduit in the English literature. Almost all of these were associated with serious complications. We report a patient who developed a tension pneumothorax consequent to spontaneous perforation of an ulcer in the gastric conduit 7 years after the index surgery in a patient with carcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction. He responded well to conservative management. Complications related to a gastric conduit can be because of multiple factors. Periodic endoscopic surveillance of gastric conduits should be considered as these are at a higher risk of ulcer formation than a normal stomach. Long term treatment with proton pump inhibitors may decrease complications. There are no guidelines for the treatment of a perforated gastric conduit ulcer and the management should be individualized.

  11. Laparoscopic removal of gastric band after laparoscopic gastric bypass and following placement of adjustable gastric band

    PubMed Central

    Lanaia, Andrea; Zizzo, Maurizio; Cartelli, Concetto M.; Fumagalli, Matteo; Bonilauri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Banded gastric bypass is a bariatric surgical intervention that has been regularly performed in many centers. According to some series, banded gastric bypass is safe and feasible. We describe the case of a 42-year-old woman undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass in 2008. Subsequently, she underwent surgery in order to place adjustable gastric banding on previous bypass because of gastric pouch dilatation. Five months later, patient showed anorexia and signs of malnutrition. For this reason, she underwent laparoscopic removal of gastric banding. In our opinion, placing a device to restrict an already dilated gastric pouch must be avoided. PMID:26232597

  12. Antiulcerogenic effect of Securigera securidaca L. seed extract on various experimental gastric ulcer models in rats.

    PubMed

    Mard, S A; Bahari, Z; Eshaghi, N; Farbood, Y

    2008-12-01

    Securigera securidaca belongs to the family Fabaceae is used in Iranian folk medicine to treat gastric disturbances. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the Securigera securidaca seed hydroalcoholic extract (SSE) and its subfractions for their gastroprotective effect in rat. Acute gastric ulceration in rats was produced by oral administration of ethanol (100%; 1 mL/200 g of body weight) or water immersion restraint-stress (5 h, water immersion restraint stress at 20-22 degrees C). Ranitidine (100 mg kg(-1), p.o.) was used as the reference antiulcer drug. After ethanol administration, the gastric wall mucus was examined. Chronic gastric ulceration was produced by injection of acetic acid in rat gastric subserosa. The antisecretory effect of the extract and its subfractions (ethyl acetate, chloroform and aqueous fractions) were investigated in pylorus-ligated rats. Administration of SSE significantly inhibited gastric mucosa damage induced by ethanol, water immersion restraint-stress and acetic acid in a dose-dependent manner. In pylorus ligature rats, SSE and its subfractions significantly reduced the basal gastric acid secretion and total acidity; moreover, it inhibited the increase in total acidity induced by carbachol. However, the antisecretory effect of the chloroform fraction was more potent than two other fractions. Administration of SSE did not affect the gastric mucus production. The results obtained in the present study indicate that the SSE has gastroprotective and antisecretory effects on gastric mucosa in rats. PMID:19630213

  13. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-11-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality. PMID:26341209

  14. Coexistence of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Potential Spoilage Microbiota in a Dairy Processing Environment.

    PubMed

    Stellato, Giuseppina; De Filippis, Francesca; La Storia, Antonietta; Ercolini, Danilo

    2015-11-01

    Microbial contamination in food processing plants can play a fundamental role in food quality and safety. In this study, the microbiota in a dairy plant was studied by both 16S rRNA- and 26S rRNA-based culture-independent high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Environmental samples from surfaces and tools were studied along with the different types of cheese produced in the same plant. The microbiota of environmental swabs was very complex, including more than 200 operational taxonomic units with extremely variable relative abundances (0.01 to 99%) depending on the species and sample. A core microbiota shared by 70% of the samples indicated a coexistence of lactic acid bacteria with a remarkable level of Streptococcus thermophilus and possible spoilage-associated bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Psychrobacter, with a relative abundance above 50%. The most abundant yeasts were Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yamadazyma triangularis, Trichosporon faecale, and Debaryomyces hansenii. Beta-diversity analyses showed a clear separation of environmental and cheese samples based on both yeast and bacterial community structure. In addition, predicted metagenomes also indicated differential distribution of metabolic pathways between the two categories of samples. Cooccurrence and coexclusion pattern analyses indicated that the occurrence of potential spoilers was excluded by lactic acid bacteria. In addition, their persistence in the environment can be helpful to counter the development of potential spoilers that may contaminate the cheeses, with possible negative effects on their microbiological quality.

  15. Microbial Community Composition and Ecology of an Acidic Aquatic Environment: The Tinto River, Spain.

    PubMed

    López-Archilla, A.I.; Marin, I.; Amils, R.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the correlation between physicochemical and biological characteristics of an acidic river, the Tinto River, in Southwestern Spain. The Tinto River is an extreme environment characterized by its low pH (mean of 2.2) and high concentrations of heavy metals (Fe 2.3 g/L, Zn 0.22 g/L, Cu 0.11 g/L). These extreme conditions are the product of the metabolic activity of chemolithotrophic microorganisms, including iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, that can be found in high concentrations in its waters. The food chain in the river is very constrained and exclusively microbial. Primary productivity in the Tinto River is the sum of photosynthetic and chemolithotrophic activity. Heterotrophic bacteria and fungi are the major decomposers and protists are the major predators. A correlation analysis including the physicochemical and biological variables suggested a close relationship between the acidic pH values and abundance of both chemolithotrophic bacteria and filamentous fungi. Chemolithotrophic bacteria correlated with the heavy metals found in the river. A principal component analysis of the biotic and abiotic variables suggested that the Tinto River ecosystem can be described as a function of three main groups of variables: pH values, metal concentrations, and biological productivity.

  16. Quantitative detection of syntrophic fatty acid-degrading bacterial communities in methanogenic environments.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Prince P; Zitomer, Daniel H; Maki, James S

    2015-06-01

    In methanogenic habitats, volatile fatty acids (VFA), such as propionate and butyrate, are major intermediates in organic matter degradation. VFA are further metabolized to H(2), acetate and CO(2) by syntrophic fatty acid-degrading bacteria (SFAB) in association with methanogenic archaea. Despite their indispensable role in VFA degradation, little is known about SFAB abundance and their environmental distribution. To facilitate ecological studies, we developed four novel genus-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, with primer sets targeting known SFAB: Syntrophobacter, Smithella, Pelotomaculum and Syntrophomonas. Primer set specificity was confirmed using in silico and experimental (target controls, clone libraries and melt-curve analysis) approaches. These qPCR assays were applied to quantify SFAB in a variety of mesophilic methanogenic habitats, including a laboratory propionate enrichment culture, pilot- and full-scale anaerobic reactors, cow rumen, horse faeces, an experimental rice paddy soil, a bog stream and swamp sediments. The highest SFAB 16S rRNA gene copy numbers were found in the propionate enrichment culture and anaerobic reactors, followed by the bog stream and swamp sediment samples. In addition, it was observed that SFAB and methanogen abundance varied with reactor configuration and substrate identity. To our knowledge, this research represents the first comprehensive study to quantify SFAB in methanogenic habitats using qPCR-based methods. These molecular tools will help investigators better understand syntrophic microbial communities in engineered and natural environments.

  17. Thermolysis of fluoropolymers as a potential source of halogenated organic acids in the environment.

    PubMed

    Ellis, D A; Mabury, S A; Martin, J W; Muir, D C

    2001-07-19

    Following the introduction of hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFCs) gases as replacements for the ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), it has been discovered that HCFCs/HFCs can degrade in the atmosphere to produce trifluoroacetic acid, a compound with no known loss mechanisms in the environment, and higher concentrations in natural waters have been shown to be mildly phytotoxic. Present environmental levels of trifluooracetic acid are not accounted by HCFC/HFC degradation alone. Here we report that thermolysis of fluorinated polymers, such as the commercial polymers Teflon and Kel-F, can also produce trifluoroacetate and the similar compound chlorodifluoroacetate. This can occur either directly, or indirectly via products that are known to degrade to these haloacetates in the atmosphere. The environmental significance of these findings is confirmed by modelling, which indicates that the thermolysis of fluoropolymers in industrial and consumer high-temperature applications (ovens, non-stick cooking utensils and combustion engines) is likely to be a significant source of trifluoroacetate in urban rain water ( approximately 25 ng l-1, as estimated for Toronto). Thermolysis also leads to longer chain polyfluoro- and/or polychlorofluoro- (C3-C14) carboxylic acids which may be equally persistent. Some of these products have recently been linked with possible adverse health and environmental impacts and are being phased out of the US market. Furthermore, we detected CFCs and fluorocarbons-groups that can destroy ozone and act as greenhouse gases, respectively-among the other thermal degradation products, suggesting that continued use of fluoropolymers may also exacerbate stratospheric ozone-depletion and global warming.

  18. Gastric cancer detection in gastric ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mountford, R A; Brown, P; Salmon, P R; Alvarenga, C; Neumann, C S; Read, A E

    1980-01-01

    A retrospective study has been performed of all cases of gastric ulcer diagnosed or investigated within the Endoscopy Unit of the Department of Medicine, Bristol, over a three year period (1974-76). The average length of follow-up was two years. Two hundred and sixty five cases of gastric ulcer were studied of which 37 proved to be malignant (14%). Presenting complaints of anorexia, weight loss, nausea and/or vomiting, and multiple (greater than 3) symptoms, were commoner in the malignant ulcer group. Ulcer site and the presence of coexisting duodenal ulceration were largely unhelpful in deciding the status of an ulcer. Malignant ulcers tended to be large (greater than 1 cm diameter). Radiology was highly unreliable in distinguishing benign from malignant ulcers. Visual inspection at endoscopy was more reliable, but associated with a tendency to over-diagnose malignancy. False positive biopsies were uncommon (two cases). Three cases of clinically unsuspected superficial gastric carcinoma were revealed. Repeated endoscopy and biopsy of all gastric ulcers until they are completely healed is advised. Images Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7364322

  19. [Elevated gastric lesions].

    PubMed

    de Careaga, B; Villagómez, G; Pabón, J; Calderón, O; Elío, D; Pérez, J; Martínez, M; Patiño, F; Ponce, R; Lora, J

    1986-01-01

    Elevated gastric lesions, represent an important group among gastric pathology. To establish its incidence in our experience, we studied the endoscopic reports of two important hospitals in La Paz city: Instituto de Gastroenterología Boliviano Japonés and Hospital Obrero No. 1. In order to make a good endoscopic diagnosis among different elevated lesions we use some parameters like: location, shape, size, diameter, surface of the lesion and surrounding mucosa and characteristics of the falls. 10.472 endoscopic reports were reviewed, 497 elevated gastric lesions were found, 475 corresponded to mucosal lesions (352 benign lesions and 123 malignant lesions), 11 to submucosal and 11 extragastric lesions.

  20. Preparation of acetylsalicylic acid-acylated chitosan as a novel polymeric drug for drug controlled release.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changkun; Wu, Yiguang; Zhao, Liyan; Huang, Xinzheng

    2015-01-01

    The acetylsalicylic acid-acylated chitosan (ASACTS) with high degree of substitution (DS) was successfully synthesized, and characterized with FTIR, (1)H NMR and elemental analysis methods. The optimum synthesis conditions were obtained which gave the highest DS (about 60%) for ASACTS. Its drug release experiments were carried out in simulated gastric and intestine fluids. The results show that the drugs in the form of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and salicylic acid (SA) were released in a controlled manner from ASACTS only in simulated gastric fluid. The release profile can be best fitted with logistic and Weibull model. The research results reveal that ASACTS can be a potential polymeric drug for the controlled release of ASA and SA in the targeted gastric environment.

  1. Mineralogy and Organic Geochemistry of Acid Sulfate Environments from Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Habitability, Weathering and Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, M. B.; Des Marais, D. J.; Jahnke, L. L.; Kubo, M.

    2009-12-01

    We report on the mineralogy, organic preservation potential and habitability of sulfate deposits in acid sulfate volcanic settings at Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Fumaroles and acidic springs are potential analogs for aqueous environments on Mars and may offer insights into habitability of sulfate deposits such as those at Meridiani Planum. Sulfates recently detected on Mars are posited to have formed from fluids derived from basaltic weathering and igneous volatile input, ultimately precipitating from acidic brines subjected to desiccation and freeze-thaw cycles (McClennan and Grotzinger, 2008). Key issues concerning martian sulfate deposits are their relationship to aqueous clay deposits, and whether or not specific sulfates deposits represent former habitable environments (see Soderblum and Bell, 2008; Tosca et al., 2008). Modern terrestrial volcanic fumaroles and hot springs precipitate various Ca-, Mg- and Fe- sulfates along with clays, and can help clarify whether certain acid sulfate mineral assemblages reflect habitable environments. Valles caldera is a resurgent caldera last active in the Pleistocene (1.4 - 1.0 Ma) that hosts several active fumaroles and over 40 geothermal exploration wells (see Goff, 2009). Fumaroles and associated mudpots and springs at Valles range from pH < 1 to 3, and affect argillic alteration upon rhylolitic tuffs and sedimentary deposits (Charles et al., 1986). We identified assemblages containing gypsum, quartz, Al-sulfates, elemental sulfur, clays and other minerals using XRD and SEM-EDS. Our previous research has shown that sulfates from different marine depositional environments display textural and morphological traits that are indicative of biological influence, or specific conditions in the depositional environments (Vogel et al., 2009). Gypsum crystals that develop in the presence of microbial biofilms in marine environments may have distorted crystal morphologies, biofilm - associated dissolution features, and accessory

  2. The influence of gastric emptying kinetics on the drug release from enteric coated pellets in fasted state: an in vitro/in vivo correlation.

    PubMed

    Stefanič, M; Locatelli, I; Vrečer, F; Sever, T; Mrhar, A; Bogataj, M

    2012-10-01

    The absorption and bioavailability of drugs can be substantially affected by the transit of dosage forms through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Gastric emptying is one of the most critical parameters contributing to this inter- and intra-individual GI transit variability. It is especially important for the delayed release dosage forms whose release depends on the local environment and begins when the dosage form passes pylorus and comes into contact with higher pH medium in small intestine. The purpose of our research work was to predict the in vivo dissolution from enteric coated pellets for population and establish a good in vitro/in vivo correlation (IVIVC) with mean in vivo absorption profiles, obtained in a pharmacokinetic study under fasting conditions. The dissolution tests were carried out on a USP 4 - flow-through cell with enteric coated pellets containing an acid-labile drug and formulated as orodispersible tablets. Using several residence times in an acidic medium, we simulated the gastric emptying of the pellets and the exposure of different fractions of the pellets to the gastric medium for different periods of time. The amount of drug released decreased with the increasing time of exposure to the acidic medium due to the drug's degradation. The mean in vivo dissolution profiles, which were predicted on the basis of experimentally determined dissolution profiles and mathematical model of pellets' gastric emptying, gave a very good IVIVC with the mean in vivo absorption profiles. PMID:22884655

  3. Effect of environment on the free and peptide amino acids in rice, wheat, and soybeans.

    PubMed

    Ahn, D J; Adeola, O; Nielsen, S S

    2001-01-01

    Controlled environments (CE) in which light, carbon dioxide, and nutrients are regulated are known to affect the chemical composition of plants. Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) environments are required for a Mars or lunar base where food resupply is both impractical and risky. Astronauts in a CELSS would need to grow and process edible biomass into foods. The complete nature of the changes in chemical composition of CE-grown plants is unknown but must be determined to ensure a safe and nutritionally adequate diet. In this article, we report the changes that occur in free and peptide-bound amino acids (AA) of select CELSS crops (rice, wheat, and soybean) grown in the field or in CE. The nonnitrate nonprotein nitrogen fraction was extracted and then analyzed for free and peptide AA. For grain or seeds, AA levels tended to increase from field to CE conditions; however, for vegetative material, AA levels remained the same or decreased from field to CE conditions. As such compositional changes are identified, researchers will be better able to design safe and nutritious diets for astronauts while minimizing needed energy and other resources.

  4. Effect of environment on the free and peptide amino acids in rice, wheat, and soybeans.

    PubMed

    Ahn, D J; Adeola, O; Nielsen, S S

    2001-01-01

    Controlled environments (CE) in which light, carbon dioxide, and nutrients are regulated are known to affect the chemical composition of plants. Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) environments are required for a Mars or lunar base where food resupply is both impractical and risky. Astronauts in a CELSS would need to grow and process edible biomass into foods. The complete nature of the changes in chemical composition of CE-grown plants is unknown but must be determined to ensure a safe and nutritionally adequate diet. In this article, we report the changes that occur in free and peptide-bound amino acids (AA) of select CELSS crops (rice, wheat, and soybean) grown in the field or in CE. The nonnitrate nonprotein nitrogen fraction was extracted and then analyzed for free and peptide AA. For grain or seeds, AA levels tended to increase from field to CE conditions; however, for vegetative material, AA levels remained the same or decreased from field to CE conditions. As such compositional changes are identified, researchers will be better able to design safe and nutritious diets for astronauts while minimizing needed energy and other resources. PMID:11676459

  5. Localized corrosion of high performance metal alloys in an acid/salt environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Ontiveros, C.

    1991-01-01

    Various vacuum jacketed cryogenic supply lines at the Space Shuttle launch site at Kennedy Space Center use convoluted flexible expansion joints. The atmosphere at the launch site has a very high salt content, and during a launch, fuel combustion products include hydrochloric acid. This extremely corrosive environment has caused pitting corrosion failure in the thin walled 304L stainless steel flex hoses. A search was done to find a more corrosion resistant replacement material. The study focussed on 19 metal alloys. Tests which were performed include electrochemical corrosion testing, accelerated corrosion testing in a salt fog chamber, and long term exposure at a beach corrosion testing site. Based on the results of these tests, several nickel based alloys were found to have very high resistance to this corrosive environment. Also, there was excellent agreement between the electrochemical tests and the actual beach exposure tests. This suggests that electrochemical testing may be useful for narrowing the field of potential candidate alloys before subjecting samples to long term beach exposure.

  6. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Amieva, Manuel; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori and its role in causing gastric cancer is one of the richest examples of a complex relationship among human cells, microbes, and their environment. It is also a puzzle of enormous medical importance given the incidence and lethality of gastric cancer worldwide. We review recent findings that have changed how we view these relationships and affected the direction of gastric cancer research. For example, recent data have indicated that subtle mismatches between host and microbe genetic traits greatly affect the risk of gastric cancer. The ability of H pylori and its oncoprotein CagA to reprogram epithelial cells and activate properties of stemness show the sophisticated relationship between H pylori and progenitor cells in the gastric mucosa. The observation that cell-associated H pylori can colonize the gastric glands and directly affect precursor and stem cells supports these observations. The ability to mimic these interactions in human gastric organoid cultures as well as animal models will allow investigators to more fully unravel the extent of H pylori control on the renewing gastric epithelium. Finally, our realization that external environmental factors, such as dietary components and essential micronutrients, as well as the gastrointestinal microbiota, can change the balance between H pylori's activity as a commensal or a pathogen has provided direction to studies aimed at defining the full carcinogenic potential of this organism.

  7. Potential role of probiotics in the management of gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    KHODER, GHALIA; AL-MENHALI, ASMA A.; AL-YASSIR, FARAH; KARAM, SHERIF M.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric ulcer is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases characterized by a significant defect in the mucosal barrier. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and the frequent long-term use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are major factors involved in gastric ulcer development. Acid inhibitors and antibiotics are commonly used to treat gastric ulcer. However, in the last few decades, the accumulating evidence for resistance to antibiotics and the side effects of antibiotics and acid inhibitors have drawn attention to the possible use of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of gastric ulcer. Probiotics are live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts confer health benefits on the host. Currently, the available experimental and clinical studies indicate that probiotics are promising for future applications in the management of gastric ulcers. This review aims to provide an overview of the general health benefits of probiotics on various systemic and gastrointestinal disorders with a special focus on gastric ulcer and the involved cellular and molecular mechanisms: i) Protection of gastric mucosal barrier; ii) upregulation of prostaglandins, mucus, growth factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines; iii) increased cell proliferation to apoptosis ratio; and iv) induction of angiogenesis. Finally, some of the available data on the possible use of probiotics in H. pylori eradication are discussed. PMID:27347010

  8. Osmotic concentration of the gastric juice of dogs

    PubMed Central

    Altamirano, M.; Izaguirre, Elizabeth; Milgram, E.

    1969-01-01

    1. The freezing point of the gastric juice, produced by histamine stimulation in anaesthetized dogs, of the arterial plasma and of the plasma obtained from a gastric vein were measured. 2. The osmolality of the blood that passes through the gastric mucosa increases during secretion of acid juice. 3. The amount of water that should be removed from the arterial plasma to obtain a solution isosmolal to the gastric venous plasma is equivalent to the amount of water required to dilute the secreted H+. From this result it is concluded that the increase of osmolality of the venous plasma is a consequence of the clearance of water free of solute by the gastric mucosa. 4. The gastric juice was hyposmotic to the venous plasma in twenty out of thirty dogs, being isosmotic to that plasma in seven dogs. Even in the last group of animals, the gastric secretion might be considered as slightly hypotonic to the venous blood that passes through the secretory part of the mucosa. 5. Considerations based on available data suggest that the `primary' acid juice is usually hyposmotic to the extracellular fluid in the vicinity of the oxyntic cells. PMID:5784289

  9. [Treatment and prevention of histamine-2 receptor antagonist for elderly gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kamada, Tomoari; Sato, Yumi; Shiotani, Akiko; Haruma, Ken

    2010-11-01

    H. pylori infection and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) are considered the two major causes of gastric mucosal lesions. Chronic administration of NSAIDs is associated with an increased incidence of significant adverse events such as upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage or perforation. The inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, the decrease of gastric mucosal blood flow and the involvement of gastric acid are believed to be the mechanisms of NSAIDs-associated gastric mucosal lesions. In future, the significance of NSAIDs-associated gastric mucosal lesions may increase in Japan. Many studies have reported that proton pump inhibitor, high dosages of histamine-2 receptor antagonist (H2RA), and prostaglandin analogs provide excellent prevention and therapeutic actions for NSAIDs-associated gastric ulcer. Additionally, recent studies have shown that regular dosages of H2RA provide excellent prevention and therapeutic actions for NSAIDs-associated gastric mucosal lesions in Japan.

  10. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    León-Barúa, R; Recavarren-Arce, S; Berendson, R; Gilman, R H

    1995-01-01

    A review is done on the evidence in favor of a link between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer of the intestinal type. In countries at high risk of gastric cancer, like Perú, Hp infection begins early in life and is highly frequent and persistent. When Hp colonizes the gastric mucosa, it causes active chronic gastritis. Initially, the gastritis is of the superficial type. With time, and probably as a result of the concurrent action of nutritional, epidemiologic and immunologic modulating factors, chronic superficial gastritis may give rise to a progressive gastric pathology that leads to gastric premalignant lesions (chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of the gastric mucosa) and increases the predisposition to gastric cancer. The principal modulating factors are described. The epidemiology of gastric premalignant lesions in Perú is also described. Finally, a discussion is done on the effect that eradication of Hp infection might have on the prevalence of gastric cancer.

  11. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the syndrome is recommended. What are the estimated cancer risks associated with HDGC? Not everyone who ... the lifetime risk for diffuse gastric cancer is estimated to be 70% to 80% for men and ...

  12. Gastric Sleeve Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... or "sleeve" out of the rest. The new, banana-shaped stomach is much smaller than the original ... of your stomach, leaving you with a smaller banana-shaped stomach called the gastric sleeve. Because it's ...

  13. Microbial iron management mechanisms in extremely acidic environments: comparative genomics evidence for diversity and versatility

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Héctor; Martínez, Verónica; Nieto, Pamela A; Holmes, David S; Quatrini, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    Background Iron is an essential nutrient but can be toxic at high intracellular concentrations and organisms have evolved tightly regulated mechanisms for iron uptake and homeostasis. Information on iron management mechanisms is available for organisms living at circumneutral pH. However, very little is known about how acidophilic bacteria, especially those used for industrial copper bioleaching, cope with environmental iron loads that can be 1018 times the concentration found in pH neutral environments. This study was motivated by the need to fill this lacuna in knowledge. An understanding of how microorganisms thrive in acidic ecosystems with high iron loads requires a comprehensive investigation of the strategies to acquire iron and to coordinate this acquisition with utilization, storage and oxidation of iron through metal responsive regulation. In silico prediction of iron management genes and Fur regulation was carried out for three Acidithiobacilli: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (iron and sulfur oxidizer) A. thiooxidans and A. caldus (sulfur oxidizers) that can live between pH 1 and pH 5 and for three strict iron oxidizers of the Leptospirillum genus that live at pH 1 or below. Results Acidithiobacilli have predicted FeoB-like Fe(II) and Nramp-like Fe(II)-Mn(II) transporters. They also have 14 different TonB dependent ferri-siderophore transporters of diverse siderophore affinity, although they do not produce classical siderophores. Instead they have predicted novel mechanisms for dicitrate synthesis and possibly also for phosphate-chelation mediated iron uptake. It is hypothesized that the unexpectedly large number and diversity of Fe(III)-uptake systems confers versatility to this group of acidophiles, especially in higher pH environments (pH 4–5) where soluble iron may not be abundant. In contrast, Leptospirilla have only a FtrI-Fet3P-like permease and three TonB dependent ferri-dicitrate siderophore systems. This paucity of iron uptake systems could

  14. Mycogenic Mn(II) oxidation promotes remediation of acid mine drainage and other anthropogenically impacted environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santelli, C. M.; Chaput, D.; Hansel, C. M.; Burgos, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Manganese is a pollutant in worldwide environments contaminated with metals and organics, such as acid mine drainage (AMD), freshwater ponds, and agricultural waste storage sites. Microorganisms contribute to the removal of dissolved Mn compounds in the environment by promoting Mn(II) oxidation reactions. The oxidation of Mn(II) results in the precipitation of sparingly soluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, effectively removing the metal from the aqueous milieu (e.g., groundwater or wastewater streams). In recent years, our research has identified a diversity of Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi inhabiting these polluted environments, however their overall contribution to the remediation process in situ remains poorly understood. Here we present results of culture-based and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) studies in AMD treatment systems actively remediating Mn and other metals where we profile the bacterial, fungal, algal and archaeal communities to determine the overall community diversity and to establish the relative abundance of known Mn(II) oxidizers. A variety of treatment systems with varying Mn-removal efficiencies were sampled to understand the relationship between remediation efficiency and microbial community composition and activity. Targeted-amplicon sequencing of DNA and RNA of the 16S rRNA genes (bacteria and archaea), 23S rRNA genes (algae) and ITS region (fungi) was performed using both 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina platforms. Results showed that only the fungal taxonomic profiles significantly differed between sites that removed the majority of influent Mn and those that did not. Specifically, Ascomycota (which include known Mn(II) oxidizers isolated from these treatment systems) dominated greater efficiency systems whereas less efficient systems were dominated by Basidiomycota. Furthermore, known Mn(II) oxidizers accounted for only a minor proportion of bacterial sequences but a far greater proportion of fungal sequences. These culture-independent studies lend

  15. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls.

  16. Geological record of an acidic environment driven by iron hydrochemistry: The Tinto River system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Rodriguez, Nuria; Gómez, Felipe; Amils, Ricardo

    2003-07-01

    The existence of possible hematitic strata on the surface of Mars demands a search for terrestrial analogues formed in unusual environments. This will help us to recognize and interpret environmental and, perhaps, biological signatures preserved in Mars' hematites. Such an analogue would allow us to establish valid reference systems based on geomicrobial and biogeochemical signatures. Two different aspects place the Tinto River inside the boundaries of a natural extreme system: its high level of biological diversity and the presence of fluvial rocks formed in the same acidic conditions as in the modern system, which could predate the Tertiary. Study of both the modern system and the ancient system is necessary to understand the formation of biosignatures. A chemolithotrophic community that biooxidizes the Iberian Pyritic Belt, acidifying water (pH between 0.9 and 3.0) and favoring high concentrations of ferric iron in solution (up to 20 g.L-1), maintains this iron-driven system. In spite of these extreme conditions, high microbial diversity was found. Its acidic bacteria, archaea, and eukarya constitute a complex community supported by algal biomass in highly stable hydrochemical conditions, which are achieved through iron buffering. The pH is maintained at constant low levels even at very high water dilution. In these conditions, iron minerals as oxyhydroxides, hydroxides, and sulfates are formed. The modern and recent parageneses contrast with the ancient Tinto River terrace mineral associations, which show dehydrated and desulfated iron oxides. If this dehydration process is considered, these Tinto River ironstones may be a key for knowing some aquatic habitats, which may have hosted a part of the early Mars biosphere.

  17. Ghrelin Is an Essential Factor for Motilin-Induced Gastric Contraction in Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kayuri; Hequing, Huang; Mondal, Anupom; Yoshimura, Makoto; Ito, Kazuma; Mikami, Takashi; Takemi, Shota; Jogahara, Takamichi; Sakata, Ichiro; Sakai, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    Motilin was discovered in the 1970s as the most important hormone for stimulating strong gastric contractions; however, the mechanisms by which motilin causes gastric contraction are not clearly understood. Here, we determined the coordinated action of motilin and ghrelin on gastric motility during fasted and postprandial contractions by using house musk shrew (Suncus murinus; order: Insectivora, suncus named as the laboratory strain). Motilin-induced gastric contractions at phases I and II of the migrating motor complex were inhibited by pretreatment with (D-Lys(3))-GHRP-6 (6 mg/kg/h), a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Administration of the motilin receptor antagonist MA-2029 (0.1 mg/kg) and/or (D-Lys(3))-GHRP-6 (0.6 mg/kg) at the peak of phase III abolished the spontaneous gastric phase III contractions in vivo. Motilin did not stimulate gastric contractions in the postprandial state. However, in the presence of a low dose of ghrelin, motilin evoked phase III-like gastric contractions even in the postprandial state, and postprandial gastric emptying was accelerated. In addition, pretreatment with (D-Lys(3))-GHRP-6 blocked the motilin-induced gastric contraction in vitro and in vivo, and a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist reversed this block in gastric contraction. These results indicate that blockade of the GABAergic pathway by ghrelin is essential for motilin-induced gastric contraction. PMID:26441238

  18. Gastric Adenocarcinoma Presenting with Gastric Outlet Obstruction in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; AlGhamdi, Salem; Al-Kasim, Fawaz; Habib, Zakaria; Ourfali, Nouri

    2014-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is extremely rare in children representing only 0.05% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Here, we report the first pediatric case of gastric cancer presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. Upper endoscopy revealed a markedly thickened antral mucosa occluding the pylorus and a clean base ulcer 1.5 cm × 2 cm at the lesser curvature of the stomach. The narrowed antrum and pylorus underwent balloon dilation, and biopsy from the antrum showed evidence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis. The biopsy taken from the edge of the gastric ulcer demonstrated signet-ring-cell type infiltrate consistent with gastric adenocarcinoma. At laparotomy, there were metastases to the liver, head of pancreas, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Therefore, the gastric carcinoma was deemed unresectable. The patient died few months after initiation of chemotherapy due to advanced malignancy. In conclusion, this case report underscores the possibility of gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in children and presenting with gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:24707411

  19. Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gilbert F.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are perspectives on the emergence of environmental problems. Six major trends in scientific thinking are identified including: holistic approaches to examining environments, life support systems, resource management, risk assessment, streamlined methods for monitoring environmental change, and emphasis on the global framework. (Author/SA)

  20. Models of Metabolic Community Structure in Martian Habitable Environments: Constraints from a Terrestrial Analog Acid-Sulfate Fumarole Environment, Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, K. L.; McCollom, T. M.; Hynek, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial habitability in extreme environments on Earth is described by microscale geochemical conditions that constrain metabolic niches in concert with long-term habitat stability that is governed by dynamic geologic processes. Using terrestrial analogs to identify habitable martian environments requires correlating microscale geochemical constraints with reconstructions of past martian environments that are based on global-scale observations. While past martian environments can be characterized by primary parameters (e.g. pH, redox, mineralogy, thermal history), microbial habitability on Earth is a complex function of both primary and derived parameters (e.g. metabolic reaction energetics, chemical & thermal gradients, flow dynamics). In recent years we have been investigating acid-sulfate fumaroles at the Mars analog site, Cerro Negro Volcano, Nicaragua, where habitability is constrained by steep thermal gradients, spatially- and temporally-variable vent dynamics, and limited water and nutrient availability. The most common niche identified thus far is found in fumaroles that host mixed photosynthetic and chemosynthetic endolithic microbial communities. One such endolith is dominated by acidic red algae (Cyanidiales), aerobic bacterial heterotrophs (Ktedonobacteria), and archaeal thermoacidophiles (Hyperthermus, Caldisphaera, and Thermofilum). An analysis of the metabolic structure suggests that primary production by the red algae supports the growth of heterotrophic thermoacidophiles. Diversification among the chemoheterotrophs with respect to temperature and oxygen tolerance suggests community adaptation to environmental gradients or variable venting dynamics. Furthermore, individual cells within the endolith are silica-encrusted, providing the possibility for biosignature formation and preservation. Putative hydrothermal environments on early Mars with similar conditions could have supported endolithic communities with comparable metabolic strategies. Even

  1. Characterisation of acid mine drainage in a high rainfall mountain environment, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Davies, Hugh; Weber, Paul; Lindsay, Phil; Craw, Dave; Pope, James

    2011-07-01

    The Stockton coal mine lies at 700-1100 m above sea level in a mountainous orographic precipitation zone on the West Coast of the South Island of New Zealand. Rainfall exceeds 6000 mm/year and arrives with frequent flood events that can deliver > 200 mm/day. Streams vary in discharges by up to two orders of magnitude over a time scale of hours. Pyritic waste rock at the mine interacts chemically with even the most intense rainfall, and almost all runoff is acidic to some degree. In the most intense rain event recorded in this study (> 10 mm/hour), dilution of acid mine drainage (AMD) occurred and pH rose from 3 to >5 over several hours, with stream discharge at a monitoring point rising from <0.5 to >100 cumecs. However, most rain events of similar magnitude are less intense, longer duration, and only raise AMD pH to ~4 with similar high discharges. Results presented here for Stockton confirm that it is the intensity of rain events on the hourly scale, rather than the total amount of rainwater delivered to the site, that governs the amount and composition of AMD generated during flood events. Stream discharge loads of dissolved iron and aluminium range from ~20 to 1000 kg/hour. Dissolved sulfate and acidity loads are typically ~500 kg/hour but can exceed 20 tonnes/hour in rain events. First flush effects observable elsewhere around the world involving peak metal loads following dry periods or seasonal changes are not obvious at Stockton due to the high and variable rainfall environment. Dissolved Fe concentrations may be limited in runoff waters by precipitation of jarosite and schwertmannite, especially when rainfall is sufficiently intense to raise pH to 4 or higher. These minerals are widespread in the exposed waste rock on site. Likewise, precipitation of alunite may occur as pH rises in rain events, but no field evidence for this has been observed.

  2. Characterisation of acid mine drainage in a high rainfall mountain environment, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Davies, Hugh; Weber, Paul; Lindsay, Phil; Craw, Dave; Pope, James

    2011-07-01

    The Stockton coal mine lies at 700-1100 m above sea level in a mountainous orographic precipitation zone on the West Coast of the South Island of New Zealand. Rainfall exceeds 6000 mm/year and arrives with frequent flood events that can deliver > 200 mm/day. Streams vary in discharges by up to two orders of magnitude over a time scale of hours. Pyritic waste rock at the mine interacts chemically with even the most intense rainfall, and almost all runoff is acidic to some degree. In the most intense rain event recorded in this study (> 10 mm/hour), dilution of acid mine drainage (AMD) occurred and pH rose from 3 to >5 over several hours, with stream discharge at a monitoring point rising from <0.5 to >100 cumecs. However, most rain events of similar magnitude are less intense, longer duration, and only raise AMD pH to ~4 with similar high discharges. Results presented here for Stockton confirm that it is the intensity of rain events on the hourly scale, rather than the total amount of rainwater delivered to the site, that governs the amount and composition of AMD generated during flood events. Stream discharge loads of dissolved iron and aluminium range from ~20 to 1000 kg/hour. Dissolved sulfate and acidity loads are typically ~500 kg/hour but can exceed 20 tonnes/hour in rain events. First flush effects observable elsewhere around the world involving peak metal loads following dry periods or seasonal changes are not obvious at Stockton due to the high and variable rainfall environment. Dissolved Fe concentrations may be limited in runoff waters by precipitation of jarosite and schwertmannite, especially when rainfall is sufficiently intense to raise pH to 4 or higher. These minerals are widespread in the exposed waste rock on site. Likewise, precipitation of alunite may occur as pH rises in rain events, but no field evidence for this has been observed. PMID:21669330

  3. Gastric cancer and trastuzumab: first biologic therapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunturu, Krishna S.; Woo, Yanghee; Beaubier, Nike; Remotti, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains difficult to cure and has a poor overall prognosis. Chemotherapy and multimodality therapy has shown some benefit in the treatment of gastric cancer. Current therapies for gastric cancer have their limitations; thus, we are in need of newer treatment options including targeted therapies. Here, we review the biologic therapy with trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)+ gastric cancer. PMID:23450234

  4. Increased gastric PCO2 during exercise is indicative of gastric ischaemia: a tonometric study

    PubMed Central

    Kolkman, J; Groeneveld, A; van der Berg, F G; Rauwerda, J; Meuwissen, S

    1999-01-01

    Background—Diagnosis of gastric ischaemia is difficult and angiography is an invasive procedure. Angiographic findings may not correlate with clinical importance. 
Aims—To investigate whether tonometric measurement of intragastric PCO2 during exercise can be used to detect clinically important gastric ischaemia. 
Methods—Fourteen patients with unexplained abdominal pain or weight loss were studied. Splanchnic angiography served as the gold standard. Three patients were studied again after a revascularisation procedure. Gastric PCO2 was measured from a nasogastric tonometer, with 10 minute dwell times, and after acid suppression. Gastric and capillary PCO2 were measured before, during, and after submaximal exercise of 10 minutes duration. 
Results—Seven patients had normal angiograms; seven had more than 50% stenosis in the coeliac (n=7) or superior mesenteric artery (n=4). Normal subjects showed no changes in tonometry. In patients with stenoses, the median intragastric PCO2 (PiCO2) at rest was 5.2 kPa (range 4.8-11.2) and rose to 6.4 kPa (range 5.7-15.7) at peak exercise; the median intragastric blood PCO2 gradient increased from 0.0 kPa (range −0.8 to 5.9) to 1.7 kPa (range 0.9 to 10.3; p<0.01). Only two subjects had abnormal tonometry at rest; all had supernormal values at peak exercise. The PCO2 gradient correlated with clinical and gastroscopic severity; in patients reexamined after revascularisation (n=3), exercise tonometry returned to normal. 
Conclusion—Gastric tonometry during exercise is a promising non-invasive tool for diagnosing and grading gastrointestinal ischaemia and evaluating the results of revascularisation surgery for symptomatic gastric ischaemia. 

 Keywords: gastric ischaemia; tonometry; carbon dioxide; exercise test PMID:9895373

  5. Nutritional modulation of mineralocorticoid and prostaglandin production: potential role in prevention and treatment of gastric pathology.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1983-08-01

    Various lines of evidence indicate that aldosterone and prostaglandins may play physiological roles in protecting the gastric mucosa. This would suggest that low-sodium, high-potassium diets, and supplementation with essential fatty acids that are efficient prostaglandin precursors (as in evening primrose oil), may have value in the prevention and treatment of gastric ulcer and gastritis. A low-sodium, high-potassium diet may also reduce the risk of gastric cancer.

  6. Pristine environments harbor a new group of oligotrophic 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Kamagata, Y; Fulthorpe, R R; Tamura, K; Takami, H; Forney, L J; Tiedje, J M

    1997-01-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)-degrading bacteria were isolated from pristine environments which had no history of 2,4-D exposure. By using 2,4-D dye indicator medium or 14C-labeled 2,4-D medium, six strains were isolated from eight enrichment cultures capable of degrading 2,4-D. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing and physiological properties revealed that one isolate from Hawaiian volcanic soil could be classified in the genus Variovorax (a member of the beta subdivision of the class Proteobacteria) and that the other five isolates from Hawaiian volcanic soils, Saskatchewan forest soil, and Chilean forest soil have 16S rDNAs with high degrees of similarity to those of the Bradyrhizobium group (a member of the alpha subdivision of the class Proteobacteria). All the isolates grow slowly on either nutrient media (0.1 x Bacto Peptone-tryptone-yeast extract-glucose [PTYG] or 0.1 x Luria broth [LB] medium) or 2,4-D medium, with mean generation times of 16 to 30 h, which are significantly slower than previously known 2,4-D degraders. Nutrient-rich media such as full-strength PTYG and LB medium did not allow their growth. PCR amplification using internal consensus sequences of tfdA (a gene encoding an enzyme for the first step of 2,4-D mineralization, found in pJP4 of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 and some other 2,4-D-degrading bacteria) as primers and Southern hybridization with pJP4-tfdA as a probe revealed that the isolate belonging to the genus Variovorax carried the tfdA gene. This gene was transmissible to A. eutrophus JMP228 carrying a plasmid with a mutant tfdA gene. The other five isolates did not appear to carry tfdA, and 2,4-D-specific alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase activity could not be detected in cell lysates. These results indicate that 2,4-D-degrading bacteria in pristine environments are slow-growing bacteria and that most of their phylogenies and catabolic genes differ from those of 2,4-D degraders

  7. Assessment of Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acids in gastric but not in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing of pooled Mexican samples.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Arias, Carlos F; Torres, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Gastric (GC) and breast (BrC) cancer are two of the most common and deadly tumours. Different lines of evidence suggest a possible causative role of viral infections for both GC and BrC. Wide genome sequencing (WGS) technologies allow searching for viral agents in tissues of patients with cancer. These technologies have already contributed to establish virus-cancer associations as well as to discovery new tumour viruses. The objective of this study was to document possible associations of viral infection with GC and BrC in Mexican patients. In order to gain idea about cost effective conditions of experimental sequencing, we first carried out an in silico simulation of WGS. The next-generation-platform IlluminaGallx was then used to sequence GC and BrC tumour samples. While we did not find viral sequences in tissues from BrC patients, multiple reads matching Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) sequences were found in GC tissues. An end-point polymerase chain reaction confirmed an enrichment of EBV sequences in one of the GC samples sequenced, validating the next-generation sequencing-bioinformatics pipeline. PMID:26910355

  8. Assessment of Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acids in gastric but not in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing of pooled Mexican samples

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Arias, Carlos F; Torres, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Gastric (GC) and breast (BrC) cancer are two of the most common and deadly tumours. Different lines of evidence suggest a possible causative role of viral infections for both GC and BrC. Wide genome sequencing (WGS) technologies allow searching for viral agents in tissues of patients with cancer. These technologies have already contributed to establish virus-cancer associations as well as to discovery new tumour viruses. The objective of this study was to document possible associations of viral infection with GC and BrC in Mexican patients. In order to gain idea about cost effective conditions of experimental sequencing, we first carried out an in silico simulation of WGS. The next-generation-platform IlluminaGallx was then used to sequence GC and BrC tumour samples. While we did not find viral sequences in tissues from BrC patients, multiple reads matching Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) sequences were found in GC tissues. An end-point polymerase chain reaction confirmed an enrichment of EBV sequences in one of the GC samples sequenced, validating the next-generation sequencing-bioinformatics pipeline. PMID:26910355

  9. Assessment of Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acids in gastric but not in breast cancer by next-generation sequencing of pooled Mexican samples.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Larios-Serrato, Violeta; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Arias, Carlos F; Torres, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Gastric (GC) and breast (BrC) cancer are two of the most common and deadly tumours. Different lines of evidence suggest a possible causative role of viral infections for both GC and BrC. Wide genome sequencing (WGS) technologies allow searching for viral agents in tissues of patients with cancer. These technologies have already contributed to establish virus-cancer associations as well as to discovery new tumour viruses. The objective of this study was to document possible associations of viral infection with GC and BrC in Mexican patients. In order to gain idea about cost effective conditions of experimental sequencing, we first carried out an in silico simulation of WGS. The next-generation-platform IlluminaGallx was then used to sequence GC and BrC tumour samples. While we did not find viral sequences in tissues from BrC patients, multiple reads matching Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) sequences were found in GC tissues. An end-point polymerase chain reaction confirmed an enrichment of EBV sequences in one of the GC samples sequenced, validating the next-generation sequencing-bioinformatics pipeline.

  10. Organic amendments increase soil solution phosphate concentrations in an acid soil: A controlled environment study

    SciTech Connect

    Schefe, C.R.; Patti, A.F.; Clune, T.S.; Jackson, R.

    2008-04-15

    Soil acidification affects at least 4 million hectares of agricultural land in Victoria, Australia. Low soil pH can inhibit plant growth through increased soluble aluminum (Al) concentrations and decreased available phosphorus (P). The addition of organic amendments may increase P availability through competition for P binding sites, solubilization of poorly soluble P pools, and increased solution pH. The effect of two organic amendments (lignite and compost) on P solubility in an acid soil was determined through controlled environment (incubation) studies. Three days after the addition of lignite and compost, both treatments increased orthophosphate and total P measured in soil solution, with the compost treatments having the greatest positive effect. Increased incubation time (26 days) increased soil solution P concentrations in both untreated and amended soils, with the greatest effect seen in total P concentrations. The measured differences in solution P concentrations between the lignite- and compost-amended treatments were likely caused by differences in solution chemistry, predominantly solution pH and cation dynamics. Soil amendment with lignite or compost also increased microbial activity in the incubation systems, as measured by carbon dioxide respiration. Based on the results presented, it is proposed that the measured increase in soil solution P with amendment addition was likely caused by both chemical and biological processes, including biotic and abiotic P solubilization reactions, and the formation of soluble organic-metal complexes.

  11. Alteration of limestone surfaces in an acid rain environment by gas-solid reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Mossotti, V.G.; Lindsay, J.R.; Hochella, M.F. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a study to assess mineralogical alterations in building stone due to acid rain, Salem Limestone was exposed in the form of briquettes for one year in several urban and one rural environment. Samples exposed in the rural location were found to be chemically indistinguishable from the freshly quarried limestone (control material). In marked contrast, all samples collected from urban exposure sites developed gypsum stains on the ground-facing surfaces where the stones were unwashed by precipitation. However, the bulk chemistry of the urban samples (not including the stain) was virtually identical to the that of the control stone. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed the presence of sulfur (in the form of sulfate) disseminated over the calcite grain surfaces to a depth less than 10 nm in the freshly quarried limestone; XPS showed an identical sulfate layer on the calcite grains after the one year exposure period. Mass balance calculations and sulfur isotope patterns indicate that the gypsum stain on the protected surfaces consists of adventitious sulfur. The authors found no evidence of nitrate attack on any of the limestone surfaces.

  12. Role of Butea Frondosa in Ameliorating Gastric Markers in Induced Gastric Lesions of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Banji, D.; Banji, Otilia J. F.; Singh, Meenu; Annamalai, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    The study evaluated the ability of the alcohol extract of Butea frondosa to protect the gastro-duodenal lining from injury inflicted by acetic acid and pyloric ligation in rats. The induced gastric lesions lead to the generation of alkaline phosphatase and pepsin, which serve as important markers of gastric damage. Alcohol extract of Butea frondosa was administered in doses of 10, 100, 300 and 500 mg/kg as a single schedule and for the time dependent studies in a dose of 100 mg/kg for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days, respectively. Our studies reveal a decline in the formation of alkaline phosphatase and pepsin with 300 and 500 mg/kg of the extract and following treatment for 21 and 28 days, respectively. Extract of Butea frondosa produces significant diminution in the formation of gastric markers implying possible gastro-protective action. PMID:22457555

  13. General Information about Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. Self-assembly of folic acid: a chiral-aligning medium for enantiodiscrimination of organic molecules in an aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Lokesh; Suryaprakash, N

    2012-09-10

    Weak orienting medium: Self-assembly of alkaline salt of folic acid yielded a weak liquid-crystalline phase in an aqueous environment. This medium has the ability to discriminate enantiomers. The mesophase exists over a broad range and has the physical parameter dependent tunability of degree of alignment (see scheme).

  15. Gastric tube perforation after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Hideyuki; Nakachi, Takeshi; Tabuchi, Takanobu; Nagata, Hiroyuki; Takemura, Akira; Shimazaki, Jiro; Konishi, Satoru; Tabuchi, Takafumi

    2011-05-01

    We searched for cases of perforation of the gastric tube after esophagectomy for esophageal cancer by reviewing the literature. Only 13 cases were found in the English literature, and serious complications were seen in all cases, especially in cases of posterior mediastinal reconstruction. However, in the Japanese literature serious complications were also frequently seen in retrosternal reconstruction. Gastric tubes are at a higher risk of developing an ulcer than the normal stomach, including an ulcer due to Helicobacter pylori infection, insufficient blood supply, gastric stasis, and bile juice regurgitation. H. pylori eradication and acid-suppressive medications are important preventive therapies for ordinary gastric ulcers, but for gastric tube ulcers the effects of such treatments are still controversial. We tried to determine the most appropriate treatment to avoid serious complications in the gastric tubes, but we could not confirm an optimal route because each had advantages and disadvantages. However, at least in cases with severe atrophic gastritis due to H. pylori infection or a history of frequent peptic ulcer treatment, the antesternal route is clearly the best. Many cases of gastric tube ulcers involve no pain, and vagotomy may be one of the reasons for this absence of pain. Therefore, periodic endoscopic examination may be necessary to rule out the presence of an ulcer.

  16. Active Targeted Nanoparticles for Oral Administration of Gastric Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Zih-Rou; Lai, Chih-Ho; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Feng, Chun-Lung

    2015-09-14

    Gastric carcinogenesis is a commonly diagnosed type of cancer and has a dismal prognosis because of the rate at which it aggressively spreads and because of the lack of effective therapies to stop its progression. This study evaluated a type of oral drug delivery system of a potential target-activated nanosizer comprising a fucose-conjugated chitosan and polyethylene glycol-conjugated chitosan complex with gelatin containing encapsulated green tea polyphenol extract epigallocatechin-3-gallate, allowing oral administration of the drug through a site-specific release in gastric cancer cells. The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles effectively reduced drug release within gastric acids and that a controlled epigallocatechin-3-gallate release inhibited gastric cancer cell growth, induced cell apoptosis, and reduced vascular endothelial growth factor protein expression. Furthermore, in vivo assay results indicated that the prepared epigallocatechin-3-gallate-loaded fucose-chitosan/polyethylene glycol-chitosan/gelatin nanoparticles significantly affected gastric tumor activity and reduced gastric and liver tissue inflammatory reaction in an orthotopic gastric tumor mouse model.

  17. Gastric Antral Vascular Ectasia in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jill; Derk, Chris T.

    2011-01-01

    Gastric antral vascular ectasia is a not so well-understood, and more rare, gastrointestinal manifestation of Systemic Sclerosis which can lead to chronic anemia. A high suspicion and better understanding of this rare manifestation is needed for early detection and treatment. Therapeutic regiments include iron supplementation with acid suppressive therapy, while endoscopic intervention has been shown to be successful in most cases, with gastrectomy or antrectomy rarely needed. PMID:22121374

  18. In vivo expression of Helicobacter pylori virulence genes in patients with gastritis, ulcer, and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Jiménez, Francisco; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Nieto-Patlán, Erik; Hansen, Lori M; Burgueño, Juan; Ramos, Irma P; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Bermúdez, Hector; Blancas, Juan M; Cabrera, Lourdes; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Solnick, Jay V; Torres-López, Javier

    2012-02-01

    The best-studied Helicobacter pylori virulence factor associated with development of peptic ulcer disease or gastric cancer (GC) rather than asymptomatic nonatrophic gastritis (NAG) is the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI), which encodes a type IV secretion system (T4SS) that injects the CagA oncoprotein into host epithelial cells. Here we used real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) to measure the in vivo expression of genes on the cagPAI and of other virulence genes in patients with NAG, duodenal ulcer (DU), or GC. In vivo expression of H. pylori virulence genes was greater overall in gastric biopsy specimens of patients with GC than in those of patients with NAG or DU. However, since in vitro expression of cagA was not greater in H. pylori strains from patients with GC than in those from patients with NAG or DU, increased expression in GC in vivo is likely a result of environmental conditions in the gastric mucosa, though it may in turn cause more severe pathology. Increased expression of virulence genes in GC may represent a stress response to elevated pH or other environmental conditions in the stomach of patients with GC, which may be less hospitable to H. pylori colonization than the acidic environment in patients with NAG or DU.

  19. Growth-Environment Dependent Modulation of Staphylococcus aureus Branched-Chain to Straight-Chain Fatty Acid Ratio and Incorporation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Suranjana; Sirobhushanam, Sirisha; Johnson, Seth R.; Song, Yang; Tefft, Ryan; Gatto, Craig; Wilkinson, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of membrane glycerolipids is a major determinant of Staphylococcus aureus membrane biophysical properties that impacts key factors in cell physiology including susceptibility to membrane active antimicrobials, pathogenesis, and response to environmental stress. The fatty acids of S. aureus are considered to be a mixture of branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs), which increase membrane fluidity, and straight-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that decrease it. The balance of BCFAs and SCFAs in USA300 strain JE2 and strain SH1000 was affected considerably by differences in the conventional laboratory medium in which the strains were grown with media such as Mueller-Hinton broth and Luria broth resulting in high BCFAs and low SCFAs, whereas growth in Tryptic Soy Broth and Brain-Heart Infusion broth led to reduction in BCFAs and an increase in SCFAs. Straight-chain unsaturated fatty acids (SCUFAs) were not detected. However, when S. aureus was grown ex vivo in serum, the fatty acid composition was radically different with SCUFAs, which increase membrane fluidity, making up a substantial proportion of the total (<25%) with SCFAs (>37%) and BCFAs (>36%) making up the rest. Staphyloxanthin, an additional major membrane lipid component unique to S. aureus, tended to be greater in content in cells with high BCFAs or SCUFAs. Cells with high staphyloxanthin content had a lower membrane fluidity that was attributed to increased production of staphyloxanthin. S. aureus saves energy and carbon by utilizing host fatty acids for part of its total fatty acids when growing in serum, which may impact biophysical properties and pathogenesis given the role of SCUFAs in virulence. The nutritional environment in which S. aureus is grown in vitro or in vivo in an infection is likely to be a major determinant of membrane fatty acid composition. PMID:27788193

  20. Invasive mucormycosis in benign gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Al-Rikabi, A C; Al-Dohayan, A D; Al-Boukai, A A

    2000-03-01

    Fungal elements are frequently noted overlying the base of chronic peptic ulcers of the stomach and it has been suggested that the fungi enhance the degree of necrosis and that these cases have protracted disease and deeper ulcers with more perforations. It has also been postulated that the number of fungal elements might be increased in the stomach of patients who are receiving potent medications such as H2-receptor antagonists to reduce gastric acidity, but there have not been adequate control studies, and the deleterious effects from the presence of the fungi in these cases have not been substantiated. We present a very rare case of invasive mucormycosis (phycomycosis) occurring in the base of a chronic gastric ulcer in a 55 years old diabetic male. This case was clinically and radiologically been mistaken for a gastric carcinoma. In addition, the ulcer was complicated by perforation and fungal septicemia with subsequent fatal outcome. The clinical, radiological and histopathological features are described together with a literature review of other reported fungal gastric ulcers.

  1. [Tumor markers in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Hisanao

    2002-04-01

    There are two markers, pepsinogen isoenzymes and antibody against Helicobactor pyroli, for screening of high-risk group for gastric cancer. Most of markers are used in diagnosis, staging, monitoring and differentiating subgroups of gastric cancer. Markers in ascitic fluid are used for diagnosing peritoneal invasion of gastric cancer. PMID:11977555

  2. Involvement of the G-protein-coupled receptor 4 in RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Okito, Asuka; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Akiyama, Masako; Ono, Takashi; Morita, Ikuo

    2015-03-06

    Osteoclast activity is enhanced in acidic environments following systemic or local inflammation. However, the regulatory mechanism of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts under acidic conditions is not fully understood. In the present paper, we detected the mRNA expression of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) proton sensors GPR4 and GPR65 (T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8), in osteoblasts. RANKL expression and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) level in osteoblasts were up-regulated under acidic culture conditions. Acidosis-induced up-regulation of RANKL was abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. To clarify the role of GPR4 in RANKL expression, GPR4 gain and loss of function experiments were performed. Gene knockdown and forced expression of GPR4 caused reduction and induction of RANKL expression, respectively. These results suggested that, at least in part, RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment was mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling resulting from GPR4 activation. A comprehensive microarray analysis of gene expression of osteoblasts revealed that, under acidic conditions, the phenotype of osteoblasts was that of an osteoclast supporting cell rather than that of a mineralizing cell. These findings will contribute to a molecular understanding of bone disruption in an acidic environment. - Highlights: • RANKL expression was increased in osteoblasts under acidosis via cAMP/PKA pathway. • GRP4 knockdown resulted in decrease of RANKL expression. • GRP4 overexpression resulted in increase of RANKL expression. • Osteoblast mineralization was reduced under acidic condition.

  3. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions are altered after subtotal gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ching-Hung; Lin, Jaw-Town; Ho, Hsiu J.; Lai, Zi-Lun; Wang, Chang-Bi; Tang, Sen-Lin; Wu, Chun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Subtotal gastrectomy (i.e., partial removal of the stomach), a surgical treatment for early-stage distal gastric cancer, is usually accompanied by highly selective vagotomy and Billroth II reconstruction, leading to dramatic changes in the gastric environment. Based on accumulating evidence of a strong link between human gut microbiota and host health, a 2-year follow-up study was conducted to characterize the effects of subtotal gastrectomy. Gastric microbiota and predicted gene functions inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequencing were analyzed before and after surgery. The results demonstrated that gastric microbiota is significantly more diverse after surgery. Ralstonia and Helicobacter were the top two genera of discriminant abundance in the cancerous stomach before surgery, while Streptococcus and Prevotella were the two most abundant genera after tumor excision. Furthermore, N-nitrosation genes were prevalent before surgery, whereas bile salt hydrolase, NO and N2O reductase were prevalent afterward. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document changes in gastric microbiota before and after surgical treatment of stomach cancer. PMID:26860194

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in Acidic Geothermal Environments and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesle, M.; Beam, J.; Jay, Z.; Bodle, B.; Bogenschutz, E.; Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be produced in natural waters via photochemical reactions between dissolved oxygen, organic carbon and light. Other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are potentially formed in environments with high concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe(II), ~10-100 μM) by reaction between H2O2 and Fe(II) (i.e., Fenton chemistry). Thermophilic archaea and bacteria inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats have defense mechanisms against both extracellular and intracellular peroxide, such as peroxiredoxins (which can degrade H2O2) and against other ROS, such as superoxide dismutases. Biological cycling of H2O2 is not well understood in geothermal ecosystems, and geochemical measurements combined with molecular investigations will contribute to our understanding of microbial response to oxidative stress. We measured H2O2 and other dissolved compounds (Fe(II), Fe(III), H2S, O2), as well as photon flux, pH and temperature, over time in surface geothermal waters of several acidic springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY (Beowulf Spring and One Hundred Spring Plain). Iron-oxide mats were sampled in Beowulf Spring for on-going analysis of metatranscriptomes and RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response gene transcription (e.g., superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, and peroxidases). In situ analyses show that H2O2 concentrations are lowest in the source waters of sulfidic systems (ca. 1 μM), and increase by two-fold in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III)-oxide mat formation (ca. 2 - 3 μM). Channel transects confirm increases in H2O2 as a function of oxygenation (distance). The temporal dynamics of H2O2, O2, Fe(II), and H2S in Beowulf geothermal waters were also measured during a diel cycle, and increases in H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux. These results suggest that photochemical reactions may contribute to changes in H2O2. We hypothesize that increases in H2O2 and O2

  5. Seasonal variations in microbial populations and environmental conditions in an extreme acid mine drainage environment.

    PubMed

    Edwards, K J; Gihring, T M; Banfield, J F

    1999-08-01

    Microbial populations, their distributions, and their aquatic environments were studied over a year (1997) at an acid mine drainage (AMD) site at Iron Mountain, Calif. Populations were quantified by fluorescence in situ hybridizations with group-specific probes. Probes were used for the domains Eucarya, Bacteria, and Archaea and the two species most widely studied and implicated for their role in AMD production, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. Results show that microbial populations, in relative proportions and absolute numbers, vary spatially and seasonally and correlate with geochemical and physical conditions (pH, temperature, conductivity, and rainfall). Bacterial populations were in the highest proportion (>95%) in January. Conversely, archaeal populations were in the highest proportion in July and September ( approximately 50%) and were virtually absent in the winter. Bacterial and archaeal populations correlated with conductivity and rainfall. High concentrations of dissolved solids, as reflected by high conductivity values (up to 125 mS/cm), occurred in the summer and correlated with high archaeal populations and proportionally lower bacterial populations. Eukaryotes were not detected in January, when total microbial cell numbers were lowest (<10(5) cells/ml), but eukaryotes increased at low-pH sites ( approximately 0.5) during the remainder of the year. This correlated with decreasing water temperatures (50 to 30 degrees C; January to November) and increasing numbers of prokaryotes (10(8) to 10(9) cells/ml). T. ferrooxidans was in highest abundance (>30%) at moderate pHs and temperatures ( approximately 2.5 and 20 degrees C) in sites that were peripheral to primary acid-generating sites and lowest (0 to 5%) at low-pH sites (pH approximately 0.5) that were in contact with the ore body. L. ferrooxidans was more widely distributed with respect to geochemical conditions (pH = 0 to 3; 20 to 50 degrees C) but was more abundant at

  6. Perfluoroalkyl acids in the Canadian environment: multi-media assessment of current status and trends.

    PubMed

    Gewurtz, Sarah B; Backus, Sean M; De Silva, Amila O; Ahrens, Lutz; Armellin, Alain; Evans, Marlene; Fraser, Susan; Gledhill, Melissa; Guerra, Paula; Harner, Tom; Helm, Paul A; Hung, Hayley; Khera, Nav; Kim, Min Gu; King, Martha; Lee, Sum Chi; Letcher, Robert J; Martin, Pamela; Marvin, Chris; McGoldrick, Daryl J; Myers, Anne L; Pelletier, Magella; Pomeroy, Joe; Reiner, Eric J; Rondeau, Myriam; Sauve, Marie-Claude; Sekela, Mark; Shoeib, Mahiba; Smith, Daniel W; Smyth, Shirley Anne; Struger, John; Spry, Doug; Syrgiannis, Jim; Waltho, Jasmine

    2013-09-01

    In Canada, perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been the focus of several monitoring programs and research and surveillance studies. Here, we integrate recent data and perform a multi-media assessment to examine the current status and ongoing trends of PFAAs in Canada. Concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), and other long-chain perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) in air, water, sediment, fish, and birds across Canada are generally related to urbanization, with elevated concentrations observed around cities, especially in southern Ontario. PFOS levels in water, fish tissue, and bird eggs were below their respective Draft Federal Environmental Quality Guidelines, suggesting there is low potential for adverse effects to the environment/organisms examined. However, PFOS in fish and bird eggs tended to exceed guidelines for the protection of mammalian and avian consumers, suggesting a potential risk to their wildlife predators, although wildlife population health assessments are needed to determine whether negative impacts are actually occurring. Long-term temporal trends of PFOS in suspended sediment, sediment cores, Lake Trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) eggs collected from Lake Ontario increased consistently from the start of data collection until the 1990s. However, after this time, the trends varied by media, with concentrations stabilizing in Lake Trout and Herring Gull eggs, and decreasing and increasing in suspended sediment and the sediment cores, respectively. For PFCAs, concentrations in suspended sediment, sediment cores, and Herring Gulls generally increased from the start of data collection until present and concentrations in Lake Trout increased until the late 1990s and subsequently stabilized. A multimedia comparison of PFAA profiles provided evidence that unexpected patterns in biota of some of the lakes were due to unique source patterns rather than internal lake processes. High

  7. Mineral-microorganism interactions in Acid Mine Drainage environments: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Cristina; Zotti, Mirca; Pozzolini, Marina; Giovine, Marco; Di Piazza, Simone; Mariotti, Mauro; Lucchetti, Gabriella

    2014-05-01

    Minerals play a key role in controlling the mobility and distribution of metals and metalloids of environmental concern in supergenic environments. These are involved in a variety of processes, spanning the alteration of primary minerals to the formation of secondary authigenic phases and can represent a source or a trap for Potentially Ecotoxic Elements (PTEs). Soil, sediments, and waters heavily polluted with PTEs through AMD processes are a reservoir of a unusual bacteria and fungi well adapted to these toxic environments. Classical studies of biotic weathering have mainly focused on water-mineral interaction and on the ability of microorganism to influence the soil solution chemical composition. In this work, we analyzed two different representative ochreous and greenish-blue AMD colloidal precipitates in order to i) characterize the biota population present in these colloidal minerals and ii) verify the bioaccumulation of PTEs into the fungi and the potential impact of bacteria in the geochemistry of the system. The samples are composed by nanocrystalline goethite which contains high amounts of Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni and woodwardite that is characterized by Cu, Zn, Ni, Y, and Ce. These precipitates were examined in order to evaluate the presence of fungal strains and to extract bacteria DNA. The preliminary results of fungi characterization show an interesting and selected mycobiota able to survive under unfavourable environmental conditions. A significant number of fungal strains was isolated in pure culture. Most of them belong to the genus Mucor and Penicillium. It is worth noting the presence of Trametes versicolor, a macrofungal lignicolous species already known for heavy metal biosorption capability from aqueous solution (Gülay et al 2003). The same colloidal precipitates have been processed to extract bacteria DNA, using a specific procedure developed for DNA extraction from sediments. The results gave a good yield of nucleic acids and the positive PCR

  8. Gastric Mucormycosis with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raviraj, K Sunil; Miglani, P; Garg, A; Agarwal, P K

    2015-10-01

    Mucormycosis, is an emerging fungal infection in immunocompromised and diabetic individuals, usually affects rhino-orbito-cerebral, cutaneous and pulmonary regions. But mucormycosis in immunocompetent environment is rare and occurrence of gastric mucormycosis is unusual. We report a case of 19 year old female, with no pre-existing co-morbidities, presented with fever, dysentery, vomiting, and melena for 4 days. On evaluation she was found to have pancytopenia, acute kidney injury, hemolytic anemia, coagulopathy and hepatic derangement and treated with hemodialysis, plasmapheresis along with antibiotics and packed cell RBC transfusion. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed presence of extensive esophageal and gastric ulcer. In view of persistent bleeding despite endoscopic sclerotherapy, repetition of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and CT abdomen with oral contrast was done, which revealed perforated gastric ulcer. Exploratory laparotomy and excision of ulcer was done. The biopsy of gastric ulcer had shown the presence of granulomatous necrotic areas positive for mucormycosis. Then she was managed with amphotericin-B, posoconazole with which she improved. PMID:27608699

  9. Photosynthesis and photo-stability of nucleic acids in prebiotic extraterrestrial environments.

    PubMed

    Sandford, Scott A; Bera, Partha P; Lee, Timothy J; Materese, Christopher K; Nuevo, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that the UV photo-irradiation of low-temperature ices of astrophysical interest leads to the formation of organic molecules, including molecules important for biology such as amino acids, quinones, and amphiphiles. When pyrimidine is introduced into these ices, the products of irradiation include the nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine, the informational sub-units of DNA and RNA, as well as some of their isomers. The formation of these compounds, which has been studied both experimentally and theoretically, requires a succession of additions of OH, NH₂, and CH₃groups to pyrimidine. Results show that H₂O ice plays key roles in the formation of the nucleobases, as an oxidant, as a matrix in which reactions can take place, and as a catalyst that assists proton abstraction from intermediate compounds. As H₂O is also the most abundant icy component in most cold astrophysical environments, it probably plays the same roles in space in the formation of biologically relevant compounds. Results also show that although the formation of uracil and cytosine from pyrimidine in ices is fairly straightforward, the formation of thymine is not. This is mostly due to the fact that methylation is a limiting step for its formation, particularly in H₂O-rich ices, where methylation must compete with oxidation. The relative inefficiency of the abiotic formation of thymine to that of uracil and cytosine, together with the fact that thymine has not been detected in meteorites, are not inconsistent with the RNA world hypothesis. Indeed, a lack of abiotically produced thymine delivered to the early Earth may have forced the choice for an RNA world, in which only uracil and cytosine are needed, but not thymine. PMID:24500331

  10. Worldwide surveys of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in water environment in recent years.

    PubMed

    Kunacheva, Chinagarn; Fujii, Shigeo; Tanaka, Shuhei; Seneviratne, S T M L D; Lien, Nguyen Pham Hong; Nozoe, Munehiro; Kimura, Koji; Shivakoti, Binaya Raj; Harada, Hidenori

    2012-01-01

    Recently, perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been noted as causes of some of the important environmental problems in recent years due to their occurrences and properties. The most commonly used PFCs are perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), which have been used in many kinds of products. They have been found in surface water and tap water in both developed and developing countries around the world including in North America, Europe and Asia. In most countries, rivers are the source of tap water, which is one of the important pathways in which PFCs reach humans. It is essential to evaluate PFOS and PFOA contamination in the river basin. The purpose of this field study was to determine the presence of PFOS and PFOA in rivers around the world. The surveys were conducted in 15 countries during 2004 to 2010. In total, 539 samples were collected from the rivers in 41 cities. A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with HPLC-ESI-MS/MS were used for the analysis of these chemicals. PFOS and PFOA were detected in all 41 cities not only in industrialized areas but also in non-industrialized areas, representing that these compounds undergo long-range transportation in the environment. The average concentration of PFOS in each city ranged from not detected to 70.1 ng/L. The average concentration of PFOA in each city was in the range 0.2-1,630.2 ng/L. The industrialized areas show higher contamination in both PFOS and PFOA concentrations than non-industrialized areas. Industrial activities are some of the major sources of PFCs contamination in rivers.

  11. Photosynthesis and photo-stability of nucleic acids in prebiotic extraterrestrial environments.

    PubMed

    Sandford, Scott A; Bera, Partha P; Lee, Timothy J; Materese, Christopher K; Nuevo, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that the UV photo-irradiation of low-temperature ices of astrophysical interest leads to the formation of organic molecules, including molecules important for biology such as amino acids, quinones, and amphiphiles. When pyrimidine is introduced into these ices, the products of irradiation include the nucleobases uracil, cytosine, and thymine, the informational sub-units of DNA and RNA, as well as some of their isomers. The formation of these compounds, which has been studied both experimentally and theoretically, requires a succession of additions of OH, NH₂, and CH₃groups to pyrimidine. Results show that H₂O ice plays key roles in the formation of the nucleobases, as an oxidant, as a matrix in which reactions can take place, and as a catalyst that assists proton abstraction from intermediate compounds. As H₂O is also the most abundant icy component in most cold astrophysical environments, it probably plays the same roles in space in the formation of biologically relevant compounds. Results also show that although the formation of uracil and cytosine from pyrimidine in ices is fairly straightforward, the formation of thymine is not. This is mostly due to the fact that methylation is a limiting step for its formation, particularly in H₂O-rich ices, where methylation must compete with oxidation. The relative inefficiency of the abiotic formation of thymine to that of uracil and cytosine, together with the fact that thymine has not been detected in meteorites, are not inconsistent with the RNA world hypothesis. Indeed, a lack of abiotically produced thymine delivered to the early Earth may have forced the choice for an RNA world, in which only uracil and cytosine are needed, but not thymine.

  12. Potential role of stabilized Criegee radicals in sulfuric acid production in a high biogenic VOC environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Saewung; Guenther, Alex; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James; Griffin, Robert; Rutter, Andrew P; Gong, Longwen; Cevik, Basak Karakurt

    2015-03-17

    We present field observations made in June 2011 downwind of Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, and evaluate the role of stabilized Criegee radicals (sCIs) in gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) production. Zero-dimensional model calculations show that sCI from biogenic volatile organic compounds composed the majority of the sCIs. The main uncertainty associated with an evaluation of H2SO4 production from the sCI reaction channel is the lack of experimentally determined reaction rates for sCIs formed from isoprene ozonolysis with SO2 along with systematic discrepancies in experimentally derived reaction rates between other sCIs and SO2 and water vapor. In general, the maximum of H2SO4 production from the sCI channel is found in the late afternoon as ozone increases toward the late afternoon. The sCI channel, however, contributes minor H2SO4 production compared with the conventional OH channel in the mid-day. Finally, the production and the loss rates of H2SO4 are compared. The application of the recommended mass accommodation coefficient causes significant overestimation of H2SO4 loss rates compared with H2SO4 production rates. However, the application of a lower experimental value for the mass accommodation coefficient provides good agreement between the loss and production rates of H2SO4. The results suggest that the recommended coefficient for the H2O surface may not be suitable for this relatively dry environment. PMID:25700170

  13. Microscale Biosensor for Measurement of Volatile Fatty Acids in Anoxic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Rikke Louise; Larsen, Lars Hauer; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2002-01-01

    A microscale biosensor for acetate, propionate, isobutyrate, and lactate is described. The sensor is based on the bacterial respiration of low-molecular-weight, negatively charged species with a concomitant reduction of NO3− to N2O. A culture of denitrifying bacteria deficient in N2O reductase was immobilized in front of the tip of an electrochemical N2O microsensor. The bacteria were separated from the outside environment by an ion-permeable membrane and supplied with nutrients (except for electron donors) from a medium reservoir behind the N2O sensor. The signal of the sensor, which corresponded to the rate of N2O production, was proportional to the supply of the electron donor to the bacterial mass. The selectivity for volatile fatty acids compared to other organic compounds was increased by selectively enhancing the transport of negatively charged compounds into the sensor by electrophoretic migration (electrophoretic sensitivity control). The sensor was susceptible to interference from O2, N2O, NO2−, H2S, and NO3−. Interference from NO3− was low and could be quantified and accounted for. The detection limit was equivalent to about 1 μM acetate, and the 90% response time was 30 to 90 s. The response of the sensor was not affected by changes in pH between 5.5 and 9 and was also unaffected by changes in salinity in the range of 2 to 32‰. The functioning of the sensor over a temperature span of 7 to 30°C was investigated. The concentration range for a linear response was increased five times by increasing the temperature from 7 to 19.5°C. The life span of the biosensor varied between 1 and 3 weeks after manufacturing. PMID:11872469

  14. Computed tomography of gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Buy, J N; Moss, A A

    1982-05-01

    The CT features in 12 patients with gastric lymphoma, four primary and eight secondary, were analyzed, correlated with other diagnostic studies, surgery, and pathologic features, and compared with the CT findings in 22 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. An abnormally thickened gastric wall (mean, 4.0 cm) was found in all patients with gastric lymphoma. Lymphomas of the stomach often involved more than one region of the stomach (83%). The contour of the outer gastric wall was smooth or lobulated in 42%, perigastric lymph adenopathy was common (58%), extension into adjacent organs was found in 42%, and 42% had lymphadenopathy at or below the renal pedicle.

  15. QTL Mapping Based on Different Genetic Systems for Essential Amino Acid Contents in Cottonseeds in Different Environments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinhong; Li, Jinrong; Huang, Zhuangrong; He, Qiuling; Zhu, Shuijin; Shi, Chunhai

    2013-01-01

    Cottonseeds are rich in various essential amino acids. However, the inheritance of them at molecular level are still not defined across various genetic systems. In the present study, using a newly developed mapping model that can analyze the embryo and maternal main effects as well as QTL × environment interaction effects on quantitative quality trait loci (QTLs) in cottonseeds, a study on QTL located in the tetraploid embryo and tetraploid maternal plant genomes for essential amino acid contents in cottonseeds under different environments was carried out, using the immortal F2 (IF2) populations from a set of 188 recombinant inbred lines derived from an intraspecific hybrid cross of two upland cotton germplasms HS46 and MARKCBUCAG8US-1-88 as experimental materials. The results showed a total of 35 QTLs associated with these quality traits in cottonseeds. Nineteen QTLs were subsequently mapped on chromosome 5, 6 and 8 in sub-A genome and chromosome 15, 18, 22 and 23 in sub-D genome. Eighteen QTLs were also found having QTL × environment (QE) interaction effects. The genetic main effects from QTLs located on chromosomes in the embryo and maternal plant genomes and their QE effects in different environments were all important for these essential amino acids in cottonseeds. The results suggested that the influence of environmental factors on the expression of some QTLs located in different genetic systems should be considered when improving for these amino acids. This study can serve as the foundation for the improvement of these essential amino acids in cottonseeds. PMID:23555562

  16. Oxidative stress disturbs energy metabolism of mitochondria in ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jin-Shui; He, Shao-Zhen; Xu, Hong-Zhi; Zhan, Xiao-Juan; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Xiao, Hong-Min; Shi, Hua-Xiu; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mitochondrial energy disorder in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury. METHODS: Wistar rats were used in this study. A gastric mucosal injury model was established by giving the rats alcohol. Gross and microscopic appearance of gastric mucosa and ultrastructure of mitochondria were evaluated. Malondiadehyde (MDA) in gastric mucosa was measured with thiobarbituric acid. Expression of ATP synthase (ATPase) subunits 6 and 8 in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: The gastric mucosal lesion index was correlated with the MDA content in gastric mucosa. As the concentration of ethanol was elevated and the exposure time to ethanol was extended, the content of MDA in gastric mucosa increased and the extent of damage aggravated. The ultrastructure of mitochondria was positively related to the ethanol concentration and exposure time. The expression of mtDNA ATPase subunits 6 and 8 mRNA declined with the increasing MDA content in gastric mucosa after gavage with ethanol. CONCLUSION: Ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury is related to oxidative stress, which disturbs energy metabolism of mitochondria and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury. PMID:18855985

  17. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: advances and controversies.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wenbo; Bai, Bing; Sheng, Liang; Li, Yan; Yue, Ping; Li, Xun; Qiao, Liang

    2015-11-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers of digestive system globally and Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is believed to be a major risk factor. HP can be classified into different types based on the presence and expression level of CagA and VacA, and, when exposed to adverse environment, HP changes its phenotype from helical type to coccoid type, with each having different pathogenicity. The mechanisms of HP-induced gastric carcinogenesis and progression are complicated, including DNA nitration and oxidation induced by mutagenic factors, HP-induced epigenetic modifications, HP-induced disruption of the balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis, and HP-induced cancer cell invasion and metastasis. HP may also affect the biological function of cancer stem cells and induction of cell autophagy. The lipopolysaccharide produced by HP can act through toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) to induce gastric mucosal inflammation and is thereby linked to the development of gastric cancer.

  18. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  19. pH-Regulated Gene Expression of the Gastric Pathogen Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, D. Scott; Goodrich, Maria L.; Otto, Glen; Tompkins, Lucy S.; Falkow, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Colonization by the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has been shown to be intricately linked to the development of gastritis, ulcers, and gastric malignancy. Little is known about mechanisms employed by the bacterium that help it adapt to the hostile environment of the human stomach. In an effort to extend our knowledge of these mechanisms, we utilized spotted-DNA microarrays to characterize the response of H. pylori to low pH. Expression of approximately 7% of the bacterial genome was reproducibly altered by shift to low pH. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes led to the discovery that acid exposure leads to profound changes in motility of H. pylori, as a larger percentage of acid-exposed bacterial cells displayed motility and moved at significantly higher speeds. In contrast to previous publications, we found that expression of the bacterial virulence gene cagA was strongly repressed by acid exposure. Furthermore, this transcriptional repression was reflected at the level of protein accumulation in the H. pylori cell. PMID:12761138

  20. Efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in treating gastric ulcer: a review.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wei-Ping; Man, Hui-Bin; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2014-12-01

    Gastric ulcer is a common disorder of the digestive system. Current therapeutic regimens largely rely on Western medicine. However, numerous studies have demonstrated that herbal medicines can effectively treat gastric ulcer in humans and various animal models via divergent mechanisms. This review updates the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in treating gastric ulcer, and the mechanisms of their action in humans and animal models. Studies have demonstrated that the efficacy of herbal medicines is comparable or superior to that of drugs such as omeprazole or cimetidine in humans and animal models, and herbal medicines display fewer adverse effects. The mechanisms by which herbal medicines benefit gastric ulcer include stimulation of mucous cell proliferation, anti-oxidation, and inhibition of gastric acid secretion and H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. Some herbal medicines also exhibit antimicrobial properties. Utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative to treat gastric ulcer in humans effectively, with few adverse effects.

  1. Efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in treating gastric ulcer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wei-Ping; Man, Hui-Bin; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Gastric ulcer is a common disorder of the digestive system. Current therapeutic regimens largely rely on Western medicine. However, numerous studies have demonstrated that herbal medicines can effectively treat gastric ulcer in humans and various animal models via divergent mechanisms. This review updates the efficacy and safety of herbal medicines in treating gastric ulcer, and the mechanisms of their action in humans and animal models. Studies have demonstrated that the efficacy of herbal medicines is comparable or superior to that of drugs such as omeprazole or cimetidine in humans and animal models, and herbal medicines display fewer adverse effects. The mechanisms by which herbal medicines benefit gastric ulcer include stimulation of mucous cell proliferation, anti-oxidation, and inhibition of gastric acid secretion and H(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. Some herbal medicines also exhibit antimicrobial properties. Utilization of herbal medicines could be a valuable alternative to treat gastric ulcer in humans effectively, with few adverse effects. PMID:25493014

  2. Subcellular distribution of peptides associated with gastric mucosal healing and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Sarraf, C E; Alison, M R; Ansari, T W; Wright, N A

    1995-06-15

    The trefoil peptides pS2 and human spasmolytic peptide are putative growth factors, particularly associated with mucus-producing cells of the gastrointestinal tract including those of the stomach. The receptor for transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) takes its name from one of its alternative ligands, epidermal growth factor, and is called the epidermal growth factor receptor. Although there is immunoreactive epidermal growth factor in the stomach, it is TGF alpha and the epidermal growth factor receptor that are abundant. Immunolabelling at electron microscope level allows for subcellular localisation of antigens; pS2 and human spasmolytic peptide co-localise to cytomembranes, including the Golgi apparatus, and thecae of surface/pit mucous cells. TGF alpha is abundant on the membranes of tubulovesicles of parietal cells and is also present in chief cells: in mucous producing cells it can be detected but not in association with mucous. The distribution of the epidermal growth factor receptor mimics that of TGF alpha but with preferential clustering on the basolateral membranes of gastric cells. The trefoil peptides are associated with healing and probably act, together with mucus, to protect the gastric mucosa and maintain a viable environment. TGF alpha, transduced via the epidermal growth factor receptor, inhibits gastric acid secretion, thus aids the trefoils in the maintenance of a gastric microenvironment conducive to healing after damage. TGF alpha, however, is also a potent mitogen; while this property plays a vital part in repairing mucosal defects, if this peptide or indeed its receptor are overexpressed, the result can be neoplasia.

  3. Effects of proton pump inhibitors on gastric emptying: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sanaka, Masaki; Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Kuyama, Yasushi

    2010-09-01

    The proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is widely used for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer diseases, and functional dyspepsia. The pathogenesis of these acid-related and/or functional upper gastrointestinal disorders is potentially associated with abnormal gastric emptying. To date, variable effects of PPIs on gastric emptying have been reported. Therefore, it is relevant to gather and analyze published information on this topic. A systematic literature search has been performed, showing that the delaying effect of PPIs on gastric emptying of solid meals is consistent, whereas the effect of PPIs on the emptying of liquids is inconsistent. The underlying mechanisms whereby PPIs may affect gastric emptying have been discussed, most of which still remain hypothetic. Gastric emptying of solids involves a process of peptic hydrolysis. PPIs impair the hydrolytic digestion by inhibiting acid-dependent peptic activity, thereby delaying the solid emptying. Gastric emptying of liquids largely depends on volume and energy density of intragastric contents. PPIs variably modify the volume and the energy density by reducing gastric fluid secretion, thereby modifying the liquid emptying in an unpredictable manner. Hypergastrinemia has been considered to delay gastric emptying, but it seems of minor importance in the regulation of gastric emptying during PPI use. The delayed emptying of solids due to PPI therapy may have clinical implications in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease, functional dyspepsia, as well as diabetes. PMID:20012198

  4. Crystal structure of the open form of dog gastric lipase in complex with a phosphonate inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Alain; Miled, Nabil; Berti-Dupuis, Liliane; Rivière, Mireille; Spinelli, Silvia; Berna, Patrick; Gruber, Véronique; Verger, Robert; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-18

    Fat digestion in humans and some mammals such as dogs requires the successive intervention of two lipases: gastric lipase, which is stable and active despite the highly acidic stomach environment, followed by the classical pancreatic lipase secreted into the duodenum. We previously solved the structure of recombinant human gastric lipase (HGL) at 3.0-A resolution in its closed form; this was the first structure to be described within the mammalian acid lipase family. Here we report on the open structure of the recombinant dog gastric lipase (r-DGL) at 2.7-A resolution in complex with the undecyl-butyl (C11Y4) phosphonate inhibitor. HGL and r-DGL show 85.7% amino acid sequence identity, which makes it relevant to compare the forms from two different species. The open r-DGL structure confirms the previous description of the HGL catalytic triad (Ser(153), His(353), and Asp(324)) with the catalytic serine buried and an oxyanion hole (NH groups of Gln(154) and Leu(67)). In r-DGL, the binding of the C11Y4 phosphonate inhibitor induces part of the cap domain, the lid, to roll over the enzyme surface and to expose a catalytic crevice measuring approximately 20 x 20 x 7 A(3). The C11Y4 phosphonate fits into this crevice, and a molecule of beta-octyl glucoside fills up the crevice. The C11Y4 phosphonate inhibitor and the detergent molecule suggest a possible binding mode for the natural substrates, the triglyceride molecules.

  5. Melanoma with gastric metastases

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W.; Bhatia, Abhijit S.; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  6. Models of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, D F

    1977-01-01

    Some empirical and theoretical models of the emptying behaviour of the stomach are presented. The laws of Laplace, Hooke, and Poisseuille are used to derive a new model of gastric emptying. Published data on humans are used to test the model and evaluate empirical constants. It is shown that for meals with an initial volume of larger than or equal to 300 ml, the reciprocal of the cube root of the volume of meal remaining is proportional to the time the meal is in the stomach.For meals of initial volume of less than 300 ml the equation has to be corrected for the fact that the 'resting volume' of gastric contents is about 28 ml. The more exact formula is given in the text. As this model invokes no neural or hormonal factors, it is suggested that the gastric emptying response to the volume of a meal does not depend on these factors. The gastric emptying response to the composition of the meal does depend on such factors and a recent model of this process is used to evaluate an empirical constant. PMID:856678

  7. Melanoma with gastric metastases.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W; Bhatia, Abhijit S; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  8. Gastric calcifying fibrous tumour

    PubMed Central

    Attila, Tan; Chen, Dean; Gardiner, Geoffrey W; Ptak, Theadore W; Marcon, Norman E

    2006-01-01

    Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours); however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases. PMID:16858502

  9. Fatty acid composition of muscle tissue measured in amphibians living in radiologically contaminated and non-contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Audette-Stuart, M; Ferreri, C; Festarini, A; Carr, J

    2012-09-01

    Fatty acid composition was identified as a potential biological indicator of the effects of environmental exposure to radiological contaminants. This end point was measured in muscle tissues of Mink frogs ( Rana septentrionalis ) obtained from a radiologically contaminated pond and from a non-contaminated pond. It was also measured after the frogs obtained from both ponds were exposed to a 4 Gy (60)Co γ radiation dose delivered in vivo at a dose rate of approximately 8 Gy/min. Statistically significant differences for the increase of a couple of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid residues and the decrease of a polyunsaturated omega-6 fatty acid residue were observed between radiologically contaminated and non-contaminated frogs, indicating a partial remodeling of muscle lipids in response to a chronic low-dose tritium exposure. The effects of an acute high-dose exposure to (60)Co γ radiation, either for the radiologically contaminated or non-contaminated frogs indicated fast post-irradiation fatty acid changes with an increase of polyunsaturated and decrease of saturated fatty acid contents. Fatty acid composition was found to be a sensitive marker that may be useful to study and monitor biota health in environments that are radiologically contaminated, as well as for understanding the differences between low chronic and high acute stress responses.

  10. Effect of centrophenoxine on water-immersion restraint stress- and chemically-induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Al Moutaery, Ahmed R

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies clearly suggest a role of central nervous system in regulation of gastrointestinal function and defense against ulcerogens. In the present study, attempt was made to investigate the effect of centrophenoxine (CPH), a nootropic drug on gastric acid secretion and experimentally induced gastric ulcer in rats. Acid secretion studies were undertaken using pylorus-ligated rats pretreated with CPH (10-100 mg/kg, i.p.). The effect of orally administered CPH on water-immersion restraint (WIR) stress, indomethacin and ethanol-induced gastric ulcers was also examined. The level of myeloperoxidase (MPO), non-protein sulfhydryls (NP-SH) and gastric wall mucus was measured in the glandular stomach of rats following ethanol-induced gastric lesions. There was a dose-dependent inhibition of gastric acid secretion in the CPH treated rats. Pretreatment with CPH significantly protected gastric mucosa against ethanol and indomethacin induced gastric lesion. Only low dose of CPH (30 mg/kg) was found to be effective against stress ulcers. A significant attenuation of ethanol-induced increase in gastric MPO activity, depletion of NP-SH and reduction of gastric wall mucus was also observed in CPH treated rats. These findings clearly suggest the involvement of endogenous pro-inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in mediating the gastroprotective effect of CPH.

  11. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michael S.; Williamson, Katherine K.

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies. PMID:27092307

  12. Gastritis and Gastric Ulcers in Working Dogs.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael S; Williamson, Katherine K

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis and gastric ulcers are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in canine athletes. Although the majority of scientific work on this condition has been performed in ultraendurance racing sled dogs, this condition has been identified in other canine athletes, including sled dogs competing in shorter events and dogs performing off-leash explosive detection duties. The cause of the syndrome is unknown, but current hypotheses propose a link between exercise-induced hyperthermia and loss of gastric mucosal barrier function as an early event in the pathogenesis. Treatment is focused on prevention of clinical disease using acid secretion inhibitors, such as omeprazole, which has excellent efficacy in controlled clinical studies. PMID:27092307

  13. Carbonate-based Janus micromotors moving in ultra-light acidic environment generated by HeLa cells in situ

    PubMed Central

    Guix, Maria; Meyer, Anne K.; Koch, Britta; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    Novel approaches to develop naturally-induced drug delivery in tumor environments in a deterministic and controlled manner have become of growing interest in recent years. Different polymeric-based microstructures and other biocompatible substances have been studied taking advantage of lactic acidosis phenomena in tumor cells, which decrease the tumor extracellular pH down to 6.8. Micromotors have recently demonstrated a high performance in living systems, revealing autonomous movement in the acidic environment of the stomach or moving inside living cells by using acoustic waves, opening the doors for implementation of such smart microengines into living entities. The need to develop biocompatible motors which are driven by natural fuel sources inherently created in biological systems has thus become of crucial importance. As a proof of principle, we here demonstrate calcium carbonate Janus particles moving in extremely light acidic environments (pH 6.5), whose motion is induced in conditioned acidic medium generated by HeLa cells in situ. Our system not only obviates the need for an external fuel, but also presents a selective activation of the micromotors which promotes their motion and consequent dissolution in presence of a quickly propagating cell source (i.e. tumor cells), therefore inspiring new micromotor configurations for potential drug delivery systems. PMID:26905939

  14. Theoretical studies of salt-bridge formation by amino acid side chains in low and medium polarity environments.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Peter I; Erhardt, Paul W

    2010-12-16

    Salt-bridge formation between Asp/Glu···Lys and Asp/Glu···Arg side chains has been studied by model systems including formic and acetic acids as proton donors and methylamine, guanidine, and methylguanidine as proton acceptors. Calculations have been performed up to the CCSD(T)(CBS)//MP2/aug-cc-pvtz level with formic acid proton donors. Complexes formed with acetic acid were studied at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pvdz//MP2/aug-cc-pvdz level. Protein environments of low and moderate polarity were mimicked by a continuum solvent with dielectric constants (ε) set to 5 and 15, respectively. Free energy differences, ΔG(tot), were calculated for the neutral, hydrogen-bonded form and for the tautomeric ion pair. These values predict that a salt bridge is not favored for the Asp/Glu···Lys pair, even in an environment with ε as large as 15. In contrast, the Asp/Glu···Arg salt bridge is feasible even in an environment with ε = 5. Charge transfers for the complexes were calculated on the basis of CHELPG and AIM charges.

  15. Carbonate-based Janus micromotors moving in ultra-light acidic environment generated by HeLa cells in situ.

    PubMed

    Guix, Maria; Meyer, Anne K; Koch, Britta; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-01-01

    Novel approaches to develop naturally-induced drug delivery in tumor environments in a deterministic and controlled manner have become of growing interest in recent years. Different polymeric-based microstructures and other biocompatible substances have been studied taking advantage of lactic acidosis phenomena in tumor cells, which decrease the tumor extracellular pH down to 6.8. Micromotors have recently demonstrated a high performance in living systems, revealing autonomous movement in the acidic environment of the stomach or moving inside living cells by using acoustic waves, opening the doors for implementation of such smart microengines into living entities. The need to develop biocompatible motors which are driven by natural fuel sources inherently created in biological systems has thus become of crucial importance. As a proof of principle, we here demonstrate calcium carbonate Janus particles moving in extremely light acidic environments (pH 6.5), whose motion is induced in conditioned acidic medium generated by HeLa cells in situ. Our system not only obviates the need for an external fuel, but also presents a selective activation of the micromotors which promotes their motion and consequent dissolution in presence of a quickly propagating cell source (i.e. tumor cells), therefore inspiring new micromotor configurations for potential drug delivery systems. PMID:26905939

  16. Methods of chemical analysis for selected species in marble and limestone surfaces exposed to the acidic outdoor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, K.J.; Williams, F.L.; Huff, E.A.; Youngdahl, C.A.

    1986-03-01

    There is concern for marble and limestone exposed to the acidic outdoor environment because they are widely used as the exterior structures of buildings and monuments and because the calcium carbonate stones are especially sensitive to acid. Field tests of these building materials under carefully monitored environmental conditions are being conducted to measure damage rates and ultimately to quantify the individual effects of the important damage mechanisms. The development of further quantitative understanding will provide an improved basis for control strategies. The demonstration, verification, and application of a technique to measure selected surface anionic and cationic species are important contributions to this study. These methods of stone surface chemical analysis, developed for and applied in the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), are appropriate to monitor selected species of program interest and are sufficient to determine surface sulfate and nitrate reaction products.

  17. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... The test is done after you have not eaten for a while so fluid is all that remains in ... injected into your body. This is done to test the ability of the cells in the stomach ...

  18. Gastric cancer and family history

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Identifying individuals at high risk is important for surveillance and prevention of gastric cancer. Having first-degree relatives diagnosed with gastric cancer is a strong and consistent risk factor for gastric cancer, but the pathogenic mechanisms behind this familial aggregation are unclear. Against this background, we reviewed the risk factors for gastric cancer in those with a first-degree relative with gastric cancer, and the possible causes for familial clustering of gastric cancer including bacterial factors, inherited genetic susceptibility, environmental factors or a combination thereof. Among individuals with a family history, current or past Helicobacter pylori infection, having two or more first-degree affected relatives or female gender was associated with an increased risk of developing gastric cancer. To date, no specific single nucleotide polymorphism has been shown to be associated with familial clustering of gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is the most important strategy for preventing gastric cancer in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients, particularly those in their 20s and 30s. Early H. pylori eradication could prevent the progression to intestinal metaplasia and reduce the synergistic effect on gastric carcinogenesis in individuals with both H. pylori infection and a family history. Endoscopic surveillance is also expected to benefit individuals with a family history. Further large-scale, prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and optimal time point for endoscopy in this population. Moreover, genome-wide association studies that incorporate environmental and dietary factors on a ‘big data’ basis will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. PMID:27809451

  19. Adsorption behavior of antimony(III) oxyanions on magnetite surface in aqueous organic acid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Vinit K.; Bera, Santanu; Narasimhan, S. V.; Velmurugan, S.

    2013-02-01

    Antimony(III) adsorption is observed on magnetite (Fe3O4) surface under acidic and reducing condition through surface hydroxyl (SOH) groups bonding on Fe3O4 surface. Desorption of adsorbed Sb(III) is observed from Fe3O4 surface along with iron release in organic acid at 85 °C after 5 h of experiment. Tartaric acid (TA) shows minimum Sb(III) adsorption on Fe3O4 among the organic acid studied. The reason is TA having two sets of adjacent functional groups viz. Odbnd Csbnd OH and Csbnd OH which are responsible for the formation of five-membered bidendate chelate with Sb(III). Other oxyanions, cations or complexing agents along with TA influences the Sb(III) adsorption on Fe3O4. The surface of magnetite is modified by the addition of fatty acids viz. Lauric acid, benzoic acid to bind the Ssbnd OH groups present on the surface. This results in delaying the process of adsorption without changing the quantity of saturation adsorption of Sb(III) on Fe3O4 surface.

  20. [Influence of Helicobacter pylori on gastric secretion. Study on variously associated gastric body, fundus and antrum chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Testino, G; Cheli, R

    1995-10-01

    Among the various themes related to Helicobacter pylori (HP) which is still a subject of discussion, there is the possible influence of this bacterium on gastric secretory physiology. In the present study, an evaluation has been carried out of stimulated gastrinemia, stimulated acid secretion and total peptic activity in gastric juice in the course of a paradigmatic condition, as autonomous chronic gastritis, in order to reveal possible modifications induced by the HP infection. In cases of HP positive chronic superficial antral gastritis associated either with normal body-fundic mucosa or with superficial gastritis, there is a significant increase of stimulated gastrinemia in comparison to HP negative groups and controls. In the course of body-fundic atrophic and preatrophic chronic gastritis associated either with antral superficial chronic gastritis or with antral atrophic gastritis, there are no statistically significant differences between HP positive and HP negative subjects. As regards acid and pepsin secretion no significant differences emerge in any group between HP positive and HP negative subjects. In the HP positive subjects with antral superficial gastritis and higher gastrin values the study of acid and pepsin secretion has yielded no significant variations. From the results of this study it emerges how gastric secretory parameters vary exclusively according to the histologic state of gastric mucosa. Therefore, the lesion action of HP may mainly be attributed to a direct action, rather than to substantial gastric secretory changes.

  1. Acid-sensing ion channel 1a regulates the survival of nucleus pulposus cells in the acidic environment of degenerated intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Feng; Wang, Feng; Hong, Xin; Xie, Xin-Hui; Shi, Rui; Xie, Zhi-Yang; Wu, Xiao-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Activation of acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is responsible for tissue injury caused by acidosis in nervous systems. But its physiological and pathological roles in nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) are unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ASIC1a regulates the survival of NPCs in the acidic environment of degenerated discs. Materials and Methods: NPCs were isolated and cultured followed by immunofluorescent staining and Western-blot analysis for ASIC1a. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) was determined by Ca2+-imaging using Fura-2-AM. Cell necrosis, apoptosis, and senescence following acid exposure were determined using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide dual-staining and cell cycle analysis, respectively, followed by Western-blot analysis for apoptosis-related proteins (Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3) and senescence-related proteins (p53, p21, and p16). Effects of treatment with psalmotoxin-1 (PcTX1, blocker of ASIC1a) on [Ca2+]i and cell survival were investigated. Results: ASIC1a was detected in healthy NPCs, and its expression was significantly higher in degenerated cells. When NPCs were treated with PcTX1, acid-induced increases in [Ca2+]i were significantly inhibited. PcTX1 treatment also resulted in decreased LDH release, cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in acid condition. Acid exposure decreased the expression of Bcl-2 and increased the expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and senescence-related proteins (p53, p21, and p16), which was inhibited by PcTX1. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that further understanding of ASIC1a functionality may provide not only a novel insight into intervertebral disc biology but also a novel therapeutic target for intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:27746861

  2. Influence of thyroid states on stress gastric ulcer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Walker, C.H.; Mason, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that thyroid states may affect the acute development of gastric lesions induced by cold-resistant stress. Normal (euthyroid), hyperthyroid and hypothyroid rats were used. Gastric lesion incidence and severity was significantly increased in hypothyroid rats, whereas in contrast hyperthyroid rats developed significantly less gastric lesions. As anticipated, plasma levels of thyroxin (T/sub 4/) were significantly elevated in hyperthyroid rats, and undetectable in hypothyroid rats. Acute pretreatment with i.p. cimetidine, but not T/sub 4/ 1 h prior to stress completely prevented gastric lesions formation in hypothyroid rats. Finally, binding of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol to ..beta..-adrenergic receptors on brain membranes prepared from frontal cortex was reduced by 20% in hypothyroid rats after 3 h of stress. These and other data contained herein suggest that thyroid hormones contribute to modulate the responsiveness of the gastric mucosa to stress. The increase rate of ulcerogenesis observed in hypothyroid rats appears to be mediated by gastric acid secretion. The central mechanism for this response may involve decreased brain nonadrenergic receptor function.

  3. Inhibition of gastric secretion in guinea pig by relatively low dose ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Batzri, S.; Catravas, G.

    1988-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of a single dose of ionizing radiation on gastric secretion in awake guinea pigs equipped with a permanent gastric cannula. Changes in gastric secretion were measured using a dye dilution technique. Infusion of histamine increased acid and fluid output and there was a positive correlation (r = 0.93) between the two. Total body irradiation with 400 cGy, like cimetidine, suppressed acid and fluid secretion under basal conditions and during histamine stimulation by 50-90%. Recovery from the radiation damage was only partial after one week. Irradiation inhibited the rise in gastric juice volume during histamine stimulation and also reduced the normal gain in body weight of the guinea pig. These results demonstrate that ionizing radiations have an immediate and long lasting effects on the gastric mucosal function of the guinea pig.

  4. "Gastric cytoprotection" is still relevant.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Sandor

    2014-12-01

    Although Andre Robert's historic article on "gastric cytoprotection" in 1979 introduced this new name and concept, gastroprotective drugs (e.g. sofalcone, sucralfate), which prevent and/or accelerate healing of gastric ulcers without inhibiting acid secretion, were known in Japan before or around that time. But since Robert's studies were solely focused on prostaglandins (PG), they became the center of gastrointestinal research for more than 30 years. As endogenous products, PG were implicated in mediating the gastroprotective effect of other drugs such as sofalcone and sucralfate, despite that the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin diminished but never abolished gastroprotection by other drugs. Another group of endogenous substances, that is, sulfhydryls (SH), investigated in parallel with PG, also seem to play a mechanistic role in gastroprotection, especially since SH alkylators like N-ethylmaleimide counteract virtually any form of gastroprotection. In Robert's terms of "prevention of chemically induced acute mucosal lesions," so far no single mechanism could explain the beneficial effects of diverse protective agents, but I argue that these two endogenous substances (i.e. PG, SH), in addition to histamine, are the main mechanistic mediators of acute gastroprotection: PG and histamine, because as mediators of acute inflammation, they increase vascular permeability (VP), and SH scavenge free radicals. This is contrary to the search for a single mechanism of action, long focused on enhanced secretion of mucus and/or bicarbonate that may contribute but cannot explain all forms of gastroprotection. Nevertheless, based on research work of the last 30 years, in part from our lab, a new mechanistic explanation of gastroprotection may be formulated: it's a complex but orderly and evolution-based physiologic response of the gastric mucosa under pathologic conditions. Namely, one of the first physiologic defense responses of any organ is inflammation that starts with

  5. Measurement of gastric secretion as a student teaching exercise.

    PubMed

    Nicol, S C; MacPherson, R D; McLeod, L J

    1991-12-01

    Teaching gastrointestinal physiology to preclinical medical students presents problems in finding suitable practical exercises to demonstrate the physiology of gastric acid secretion. In our course, students measure their own gastric secretory activity by the use of nasogastric tubes. Gastric secretion can be stimulated by insulin-induced hypoglycemia or by pentagastrin, a synthetic gastrin analogue. The time course of the secretory responses, i.e., volume, acid output, and pH, are followed by collecting control and poststimulatory secretions into 15-min samples. The effect of antiulcer drugs, such as cimetidine, can be easily studied in such experiments. The results of these experiments are very reproducible, allowing year-to-year comparisons of treatments. Examples of results of various experimental protocols are shown. We believe this to be a useful class exercise not only because of the excellent results it yields but because of the experience and insights it produces.

  6. Effect of cimetidine on gastric secretion and duodenogastric reflux.

    PubMed Central

    Melville, R J; Suleiman, S I; Whitfield, P F; Parkin, J V; Nwabunike, T O; Hobsley, M

    1985-01-01

    In 19 subjects (four controls, one gastric ulcer and 14 duodenal ulcer) maximal gastric secretion was evoked with histamine 0.13 mumol/kg/h (0.04 mg/kg/h) for two to two and a half hours. A slow intravenous bolus dose of 200 mg cimetidine was given at the beginning of the last hour. Gastric secretion was measured before and after cimetidine administration and expressed both as mean acid output (mmol H+/h) and 'pyloric loss and duodenogastric reflux corrected' volume (Vg, ml/h). Mean reduction by acid output was 86%; mean reduction by corrected volume (Vg) was only 64%. The discrepancy, which is significant (p less than 0.01), is caused by a marked increase in duodenogastric reflux after cimetidine. PMID:4018640

  7. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer This page lists ... stomach (gastric) cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Cyramza (Ramucirumab) Docetaxel ...

  8. Prolapsing Gastric Polyp Causing Intermittent Gastric Outlet Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kosai, Nik Ritza; Gendeh, Hardip Singh; Norfaezan, Abdul Rashid; Razman, Jamin; Sutton, Paul Anthony; Das, Srijit

    2015-06-01

    Gastric polyps are often an incidental finding on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, with an incidence up to 5%. The majority of gastric polyps are asymptomatic, occurring secondary to inflammation. Prior reviews discussed Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-associated singular gastric polyposis; however, we present a rare and unusual case of recurrent multiple benign gastric polyposis post H pylori eradication resulting in intermittent gastric outlet obstruction. A 70-year-old independent male, Chinese in ethnicity, with a background of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and a simple renal cyst presented with a combination of melena, anemia, and intermittent vomiting of partially digested food after meals. Initial gastroscopy was positive for H pylori; thus he was treated with H pylori eradication and proton pump inhibitors. Serial gastroscopy demonstrated multiple sessile gastric antral polyps, the largest measuring 4 cm. Histopathologic examination confirmed a benign hyperplastic lesion. Computed tomography identified a pyloric mass with absent surrounding infiltration or metastasis. A distal gastrectomy was performed, whereby multiple small pyloric polyps were found, the largest prolapsing into the pyloric opening, thus explaining the intermittent nature of gastric outlet obstruction. Such polyps often develop from gastric ulcers and, if left untreated, may undergo neoplasia to form malignant cells. A distal gastrectomy was an effective choice of treatment, taking into account the polyp size, quantity, and potential for malignancy as opposed to an endoscopic approach, which may not guarantee a complete removal of safer margins and depth. Therefore, surgical excision is favorable for multiple large gastric polyps with risk of malignancy.

  9. [Gastric emptying and functional dyspepsia].

    PubMed

    Delgado-Aros, S

    2006-01-01

    Dyspeptic syndrome includes symptoms such as upper abdominal pain, nausea and/or vomiting. These symptoms are common to highly diverse processes such as duodenal ulcer, pancreatitis and even intestinal ischemia, among many others. However, most patients who consult for this syndrome do not have any of these well known processes. New mechanisms have been proposed that could explain the symptoms presented by these patients. Among these mechanisms are those relating to an alteration of normal gastroduodenal motor function, such as alterations of gastric compliance, antral distension, gastric accommodation to anomalous ingestion, and alterations of gastric emptying. The present review evaluates the role of gastric emptying in producing dyspeptic symptoms according to the evidence available to date. We discuss gastric emptying in patients with functional or idiopathic dyspepsia compared with that in the healthy population, the correlation between gastric emptying and dyspeptic symptoms, and the response of dyspeptic symptoms to the prokinetic therapies carried out to date.

  10. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Tiing Leong; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality and the fourth most common cancer globally. There are, however, distinct differences in incidence rates in different geographic regions. While the incidence rate of gastric cancer has been falling, that of gastric cardia cancers is reportedly on the rise in some regions. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor of non-cardia gastric cancer, and data has emerged concerning the role of H. pylori eradication for primary prevention of gastric cancer. Dietary, lifestyle and metabolic factors have also been implicated. Although addressing these other factors may contribute to health, the actual impact in terms of cancer prevention is unclear. Once irreversible histological changes have occurred, endoscopic surveillance would be necessary. A molecular classification system offers hope for molecularly tailored, personalised therapies for gastric cancer, which may improve the prognosis for patients. PMID:25630323

  11. NMDA Receptors of Gastric-Projecting Neurons in the Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus Mediate the Regulation of Gastric Emptying by EA at Weishu (BL21).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Cheng, Bin; Jing, Xianghong; Qiao, Yongfa; Gao, Xinyan; Yu, Huijuan; Zhu, Bing; Qiao, Haifa

    2012-01-01

    A large number of studies have been conducted to explore the efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility. While several lines of evidence addressed the basic mechanism of EA on gastrointestinal motility regarding effects of limb and abdomen points, the mechanism for effects of the back points on gastric motility still remains unclear. Here we report that the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist kynurenic acid inhibited the gastric emptying increase induced by high-intensity EA at BL21 and agonist NMDA enhanced the effect of the same treatment. EA at BL21 enhanced NMDAR, but not AMPA receptor (AMPAR) component of miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) in gastric-projecting neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). In sum, our data demonstrate an important role of NMDAR-mediated synaptic transmission of gastric-projecting DMV neurons in mediating EA at BL21-induced enhancement of gastric emptying. PMID:22654955

  12. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE CHEMICAL STABILITY OF ARSENOSUGARS IN SIMULATED GASTRIC JUICE AND ACIDIC ENVIRONMENTS USING IC-ICP-MS AND IC-ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A more quantitative extraction of arsenic-containing compounds from seafood matrices is essential in developing better dietary exposure estimates. More quantitative extraction often implies a more chemically aggressive set of extraction conditions. However, these conditions may...

  13. Ammonia activates pacC and patulin accumulation in an acidic environment during apple colonization by Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Barad, Shiri; Espeso, Eduardo A; Sherman, Amir; Prusky, Dov

    2016-06-01

    Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of blue mould rot, causes severe post-harvest fruit maceration simultaneously with the secretion of d-gluconic acid (GLA) and the mycotoxin patulin in colonized tissue. The factor(s) inducing patulin biosynthesis during colonization of the host acidic environment is unclear. During the colonization of apple fruit in vivo and growth in culture, P. expansum secretes pH-modulating GLA and ammonia. Although patulin and its possible opportunistic precursor GLA accumulate together during fungal development, ammonia is detected on the colonized tissue's leading edge and after extended culture, close to patulin accumulation. Here, we demonstrate ammonia-induced transcript activation of the global pH modulator PacC and patulin accumulation in the presence of GLA by: (i) direct exogenous treatment of P. expansum growing on solid medium; (ii) direct exogenous treatment on colonized apple tissue; (iii) growth under self-ammonia production conditions with limited carbon; and (iv) analysis of the transcriptional response to ammonia of the patulin biosynthesis cluster. Ammonia induced patulin accumulation concurrently with the transcript activation of pacC and patulin biosynthesis cluster genes, indicating the regulatory effect of ammonia on pacC transcript expression under acidic conditions. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using P. expansum PacC and antibodies to the different cleaved proteins showed that PacC is not protected against proteolytic signalling at pH 4.5 relative to pH 7.0, but NH4 addition did not further enhance its proteolytic cleavage. Ammonia enhanced the activation of palF transcript in the Pal pathway under acidic conditions. Ammonia accumulation in the host environment by the pathogen under acidic pH may be a regulatory cue for pacC activation, towards the accumulation of secondary metabolites, such as patulin.

  14. Ammonia activates pacC and patulin accumulation in an acidic environment during apple colonization by Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Barad, Shiri; Espeso, Eduardo A; Sherman, Amir; Prusky, Dov

    2016-06-01

    Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of blue mould rot, causes severe post-harvest fruit maceration simultaneously with the secretion of d-gluconic acid (GLA) and the mycotoxin patulin in colonized tissue. The factor(s) inducing patulin biosynthesis during colonization of the host acidic environment is unclear. During the colonization of apple fruit in vivo and growth in culture, P. expansum secretes pH-modulating GLA and ammonia. Although patulin and its possible opportunistic precursor GLA accumulate together during fungal development, ammonia is detected on the colonized tissue's leading edge and after extended culture, close to patulin accumulation. Here, we demonstrate ammonia-induced transcript activation of the global pH modulator PacC and patulin accumulation in the presence of GLA by: (i) direct exogenous treatment of P. expansum growing on solid medium; (ii) direct exogenous treatment on colonized apple tissue; (iii) growth under self-ammonia production conditions with limited carbon; and (iv) analysis of the transcriptional response to ammonia of the patulin biosynthesis cluster. Ammonia induced patulin accumulation concurrently with the transcript activation of pacC and patulin biosynthesis cluster genes, indicating the regulatory effect of ammonia on pacC transcript expression under acidic conditions. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using P. expansum PacC and antibodies to the different cleaved proteins showed that PacC is not protected against proteolytic signalling at pH 4.5 relative to pH 7.0, but NH4 addition did not further enhance its proteolytic cleavage. Ammonia enhanced the activation of palF transcript in the Pal pathway under acidic conditions. Ammonia accumulation in the host environment by the pathogen under acidic pH may be a regulatory cue for pacC activation, towards the accumulation of secondary metabolites, such as patulin. PMID:26420024

  15. Comparison of haloacetic acids in the environment of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Scott, B F; Spencer, C; Martin, J W; Barra, R; Bootsma, H A; Jones, K C; Johnston, A E; Muir, D C G

    2005-11-15

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are a family of compounds whose environmental concentrations have been extensively studied, primarily in Europe. Depending on the compound, their sources are believed to be both natural and anthropogenic. To better understand possible sources and contribute to the knowledge of the global distribution of these compounds, especially between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, samples of precipitation, soils, and conifer needles were collected from Canada, Malawi, Chile, and the U.K. Precipitation samples exhibited highest HAA concentrations in collections from Canada, and lowest in those from Malawi. Malawi samples contained measurable levels of monobromoacetic acid (MBA) (56 ng/ L) unlike those from most other locations (< 9 ng/L). Soil HAA concentration levels were highest in the U.K. (e.g., 7.3 ng/g average TCA) and lowest in Malawi (0.8 ng/g average TCA), with Chile having higher levels (4.8 ng/g average TCA) than Canada (3 ng/g average TCA). Malawi soils contained small amounts of MBA (2 ng/g), in common with the two most southern of the 11 Chilean sites. Analysis of soil cores (10-cm depth sliced at 1 cm) from sites in Malawi and Chile showed that trichloroacetic acid (TCA) generally declined with depth while mono- and dichloroacetic acid (MCA and DCA) showed no trend. MCA, DCA, and TCA concentrations in archived U.K. soil samples increased by factors of 2, 4, and 5-fold over 75 years while TFA showed no consistent trend. Monochloroacetic acid (MCA) was detected in pine needles collected from Malawi. U.K. needle samples had the highest concentrations of all chloroacetic acids (CAAs): MCA, 2-18 ng/g; dichloroacetic acid (DCA), 2-38 ng/g; and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), 28-190 ng/g. Conifer needles from Canada and Chile contained CAAs at levels ranging from < 2 to 16 ng/g wet wt. Trifluoroacetic acid concentrations generally declined with increasing elevation in the samples from the Rocky Mountains in western Canada. The results

  16. Lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium and yttrium in waters in an upland acidic and acid sensitive environment, mid-Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nea, C.

    2005-12-01

    The less than 0.45 mm filterable lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr) and yttrium (Y) concentrations in rainfall, cloud water, stream and groundwater in the upper River Severn catchments of mid-Wales are presented, based on up to ten years of weekly data. Results show that for rainfall, there is enrichment in the rare earth (RE) elements, especially under conditions of small volume of catch. However, within the correlations, there is a 'forked' relationship, with one line of high La, Ce and Pr with low Y, corresponding to clear pollutant events and the other with relatively low La, Ce and Pr and higher Y to background conditions. Cloud water and stream waters show a simpler relationship indicating two types of source. Cloud, stream and ground water show no split in pattern, with singular linear relationships between the rare La, Ce, Pr and Y. However, in many cases the monitoring of the streams and groundwaters post-dates the rainfall period with high pollutant Ce inputs. RE element concentrations vary systematically, in general decreasing with increasing volume of catch for cloud-water. For the streams, occasionally, there are relatively high Ce and La concentrations (up to about a tenth the maximum in rainfall), which occur in the same year as the corresponding high values in rainfall. Apart from these anomalous periods, RE element concentrations increase with decreasing pH and increasing aluminium concentrations; RE elements are mobilised under acidic conditions. The river waters are particularly enriched in Y relative to La, Ce and Pr, both in terms of average concentrations and values normalised to standard continental shales. The RE element level in the streams is variable and seems to be linked to the main soil types within the catchment; gleys in particular show higher concentrations than their peat and podzolic counterparts. On average, groundwaters are enriched in the RE elements relative to the stream but the link with pH and aluminium observed

  17. Gastric cancer review

    PubMed Central

    Carcas, Lauren Peirce

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is an aggressive disease that continues to have a daunting impact on global health. Despite an overall decline in incidence over the last several decades, gastric cancer remains the fourth most common type of cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. This review aims to discuss the global distribution of the disease and the trend of decreasing incidence of disease, delineate the different pathologic subtypes and their immunohistochemical (IHC) staining patterns and molecular signatures and mutations, explore the role of the pathogen H. pylori in tumorgenesis, discuss the increasing incidence of the disease in the young, western populations and define the role of biologic agents in the treatment of the disease. PMID:25589897

  18. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-12-15

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  19. The role of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Alén, Begoña O; Leal-López, Saúl; Alén, María Otero; Viaño, Patricia; García-Castro, Victoria; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Beiras, Andrés; Casanueva, Felipe F; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Camiña, Jesús P; Pazos, Yolanda

    2016-02-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, and the GPR39 receptor were reported to be involved in the control of mitogenesis of gastric cancer cell lines; however, the relationship between the obestatin/GPR39 system and gastric cancer progression remains unknown. In the present study, we determined the expression levels of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas and explored their potential functional roles. Twenty-eight patients with gastric adenocarcinomas were retrospectively studied, and clinical data were obtained. The role of obestatin/GPR39 in gastric cancer progression was studied in vitro using the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Obestatin exogenous administration in these GPR39-bearing cells deregulated the expression of several hallmarks of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, obestatin signaling promoted phenotypic changes via GPR39, increasingly impacting on the cell morphology, proliferation, migration and invasion of these cells. In healthy human stomachs, obestatin expression was observed in the neuroendocrine cells and GPR39 expression was localized mainly in the chief cells of the oxyntic glands. In human gastric adenocarcinomas, no obestatin expression was found; however, an aberrant pattern of GPR39 expression was discovered, correlating to the dedifferentiation of the tumor. Altogether, our data strongly suggest the involvement of the obestatin/GPR39 system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of human gastric adenocarcinomas and highlight the potential usefulness of GPR39 as a prognostic marker in gastric cancer.

  20. The role of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Alén, Begoña O.; Leal-López, Saúl; Alén, María Otero; Viaño, Patricia; García-Castro, Victoria; Mosteiro, Carlos S.; Beiras, Andrés; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Gallego, Rosalía; García-Caballero, Tomás; Camiña, Jesús P.; Pazos, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide encoded by the ghrelin gene, and the GPR39 receptor were reported to be involved in the control of mitogenesis of gastric cancer cell lines; however, the relationship between the obestatin/GPR39 system and gastric cancer progression remains unknown. In the present study, we determined the expression levels of the obestatin/GPR39 system in human gastric adenocarcinomas and explored their potential functional roles. Twenty-eight patients with gastric adenocarcinomas were retrospectively studied, and clinical data were obtained. The role of obestatin/GPR39 in gastric cancer progression was studied in vitro using the human gastric adenocarcinoma AGS cell line. Obestatin exogenous administration in these GPR39-bearing cells deregulated the expression of several hallmarks of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, obestatin signaling promoted phenotypic changes via GPR39, increasingly impacting on the cell morphology, proliferation, migration and invasion of these cells. In healthy human stomachs, obestatin expression was observed in the neuroendocrine cells and GPR39 expression was localized mainly in the chief cells of the oxyntic glands. In human gastric adenocarcinomas, no obestatin expression was found; however, an aberrant pattern of GPR39 expression was discovered, correlating to the dedifferentiation of the tumor. Altogether, our data strongly suggest the involvement of the obestatin/GPR39 system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of human gastric adenocarcinomas and highlight the potential usefulness of GPR39 as a prognostic marker in gastric cancer. PMID:26716511

  1. Laparoscopic Gastric Banding

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Michel; Giusti, Vittorio; Worreth, Marc; Héraief, Eric; Calmes, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of laparoscopic gastric banding using 2 different bands (the Lapband [Bioenterics, Carpinteria, CA] and the SAGB [Swedish Adjustable Gastric Band; Obtech Medical, 6310 Zug, Switzerland]) in terms of weight loss and correction of comorbidities, short-and long-term complications, and improvement of quality of life in morbidly obese patients Summary Background Data: During the past 10 years, gastric banding has become 1 of the most common bariatric procedures, at least in Europe and Australia. Weight loss can be excellent, but it is not sufficient in a significant proportion of patients, and a number of long-term complications can develop. We hypothesized that the type of band could be of importance in the outcome. Methods: One hundred eighty morbidly obese patients were randomly assigned to receive the Lapband or the SAGB. All the procedures were performed by the same surgeon. The primary end point was weight loss, and secondary end points were correction of comorbidities, early- and long-term complications, importance of food restriction, and improvement of quality of life. Results: Initial weight loss was faster in the Lapband group, but weight loss was eventually identical in the 2 groups. There was a trend toward more early band-related complications and more band infections with the SAGB, but the study had limited power in that respect. Correction of comorbidities, food restriction, long-term complications, and improvement of quality of life were identical. Only 55% to 60% of the patients achieved an excess weight loss of at least 50% in both groups. There was no difference in the incidence of long-term complications. Conclusions: Gastric banding can be performed safely with the Lapband or the SAGB with similar short- and midterm results with respect to weight loss and morbidity. Only 50% to 60% of the patients will achieve sufficient weight loss, and close to 10% at least will develop severe

  2. TESTING OF 304L STAINLESS STEEL IN NITRIC ACID ENVIRONMENTS WITH FLUORIDES AND CHLORIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2010-10-04

    Impure radioactive material processed in nitric acid solutions resulted in the presence of chlorides in a dissolver fabricated from 304L stainless steel. An experimental program was conducted to study the effects of chloride in nitric acid/fluoride solutions on the corrosion of 304L stainless steel. The test variables included temperature (80, 95, and 110 C) and the concentrations of nitric acid (6, 12, and 14 M), fluoride (0.01, 0.1, and 0.2 M) and chloride (100, 350, 1000, and 2000 ppm). The impact of welding was also investigated. Results showed that the chloride concentration alone was not a dominant variable affecting the corrosion, but rather the interaction of chloride with fluoride significantly affected corrosion.

  3. A New Green Ionic Liquid-Based Corrosion Inhibitor for Steel in Acidic Environments.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; El-Mahdy, Gamal A; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Ezzat, Abdel Rahman O

    2015-06-17

    This work examines the use of new hydrophobic ionic liquid derivatives, namely octadecylammonium tosylate (ODA-TS) and oleylammonium tosylate (OA-TS) for corrosion protection of steel in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution. Their chemical structures were determined from NMR analyses. The surface activity characteristics of the prepared ODA-TS and OA-TS were evaluated from conductance, surface tension and contact angle measurements. The data indicate the presence of a double bond in the chemical structure of OA-TS modified its surface activity parameters. Potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), Energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) analysis and contact angle measurements were utilized to investigate the corrosion protection performance of ODA-TS and OA-TS on steel in acidic solution. The OA-TS and ODA-TS compounds showed good protection performance in acidic chloride solution due to formation of an inhibitive film on the steel surface.

  4. Structure of the proton-gated urea channel from the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Strugatsky, David; McNulty, Reginald; Munson, Keith; Chen, Chiung-Kuang; Soltis, S Michael; Sachs, George; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-01-10

    Half the world's population is chronically infected with Helicobacter pylori, causing gastritis, gastric ulcers and an increased incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its proton-gated inner-membrane urea channel, HpUreI, is essential for survival in the acidic environment of the stomach. The channel is closed at neutral pH and opens at acidic pH to allow the rapid access of urea to cytoplasmic urease. Urease produces NH(3) and CO(2), neutralizing entering protons and thus buffering the periplasm to a pH of roughly 6.1 even in gastric juice at a pH below 2.0. Here we report the structure of HpUreI, revealing six protomers assembled in a hexameric ring surrounding a central bilayer plug of ordered lipids. Each protomer encloses a channel formed by a twisted bundle of six transmembrane helices. The bundle defines a previously unobserved fold comprising a two-helix hairpin motif repeated three times around the central axis of the channel, without the inverted repeat of mammalian-type urea transporters. Both the channel and the protomer interface contain residues conserved in the AmiS/UreI superfamily, suggesting the preservation of channel architecture and oligomeric state in this superfamily. Predominantly aromatic or aliphatic side chains line the entire channel and define two consecutive constriction sites in the middle of the channel. Mutation of Trp 153 in the cytoplasmic constriction site to Ala or Phe decreases the selectivity for urea in comparison with thiourea, suggesting that solute interaction with Trp 153 contributes specificity. The previously unobserved hexameric channel structure described here provides a new model for the permeation of urea and other small amide solutes in prokaryotes and archaea.

  5. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide against cold restraint stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Aboubakr, Esam M; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Hassan, Magdy K

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous mediator plays a potential role in modulating gastric inflammatory responses. However, its putative protective role remains to be defined. The present study aimed to evaluate role of the exogenously released and endogenously synthesized H2S in cold restraint stress (CRS)-induced oxidative gastric damage in rats. Rats were restrained, and maintained at 4 °C for 3 h. The H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (60 μmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) before CRS. Our results revealed that NaHS pretreatment significantly attenuated ulcer index, free and total acid output, and pepsin activity in gastric juice along with decreased gastric mucosal carbonyl content and reactive oxygen species production. This was accompanied by increased gastric juice pH and mucin concentration in addition to restoring the deficits in the gastric reduced glutathione, catalase as well as superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. NaHS pretreatment markedly reduced the serum level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase activity compared to CRS-non-treated. Moreover, NaHS preadministration significantly abrogated the inflammatory and the deleterious responses of gastric mucosa in CRS. The protective effects of H2S were confirmed by gastric histopathological examination. However, pretreatment with the H2S-synthesizing enzyme, cystathionine-gamma-lyase inhibitor, beta-cyano-L-alanine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the gastroprotection afforded by the endogenous H2S. Collectively, our results suggest that H2S can protect rat gastric mucosa against CRS-induced gastric ulceration possibly through mechanisms that involve anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions alongside enhancement of gastric mucosal barrier and reduction in acid secretory parameters. PMID:23812778

  6. Secondary sulfate minerals associated with acid drainage in the eastern US: Recycling of metals and acidity in surficial environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Seal, R.R.; Meier, A.L.; Kornfeld, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    spells. Despite the relatively humid climate of the eastern United States, where precipitation typically exceeds evaporation, salts form intermittently in open areas, persist in protected areas when temperature and relative humidity are appropriate, and contribute to metal loadings and acidity in surface waters upon dissolution, thereby causing short-term perturbations in water quality.

  7. Adsorption of Amino Acids and Peptides on Metal and Oxide Surfaces in Water Environment: A Synthetic and Prospective Review.

    PubMed

    Costa, D; Savio, L; Pradier, C-M

    2016-07-28

    Amino acids and peptides are often used as "model" segments of proteins for studying their behavior in various types of environments, and/or elaborating functional surfaces. Indeed, though the protein behavior is much more complex than that of their isolated segments, knowledge of the binding mode as well as of the chemical structure of peptides on metal or oxide surfaces is a significant step toward the control of materials in a biological environment. Such knowledge has considerably increased in the past few years, thanks to the combination of advanced characterization techniques and of modeling methods. Investigations of biomolecule-surface interactions in water/solvent environments are quite numerous, but only in a few cases is it possible to reach an understanding of the molecule-(water)-surface interaction with a level of detail comparable to that of the UHV studies. This contribution aims at reviewing the recent data describing the amino acid and peptide interaction with metal or oxide surfaces in the presence of water.

  8. JB-9322, a new selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with potent gastric mucosal protective properties.

    PubMed

    Palacios, B; Montero, M J; Sevilla, M A; Román, L S

    1995-05-01

    1. JB-9322 is a selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with gastric antisecretory activity and mucosal protective properties. 2. The affinity of JB-9322 for the guinea-pig atria histamine H2-receptor was approximately 2 times greater than that of ranitidine. 3. In vivo, the ID50 value for the inhibition of gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats was 5.28 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally. JB-9322 also dose-dependently inhibited gastric juice volume and pepsin secretion. In gastric lumen-perfused rats, intravenous injection of JB-9322 dose-dependently reduced histamine-, pentagastrin- and carbachol-stimulated gastric acid secretion. 4. JB-9322 showed antiulcer activity against aspirin and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and was more potent than ranitidine. 5. JB-9322 effectively inhibited macroscopic gastric haemorrhagic lesions induced by ethanol. Intraperitoneal injection was effective in preventing the lesions as well as oral treatment. The oral ID50 value for these lesions was 1.33 mg kg-1. By contrast, ranitidine (50 mg kg-1) failed to reduce these lesions. In addition, the protective effect of JB-9322 was independent of prostaglandin synthesis. 6. These results indicate that JB-9322 is a new antiulcer drug that exerts a potent cytoprotective effect in addition to its gastric antisecretory activity.

  9. JB-9322, a new selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with potent gastric mucosal protective properties.

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, B.; Montero, M. J.; Sevilla, M. A.; Román, L. S.

    1995-01-01

    1. JB-9322 is a selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with gastric antisecretory activity and mucosal protective properties. 2. The affinity of JB-9322 for the guinea-pig atria histamine H2-receptor was approximately 2 times greater than that of ranitidine. 3. In vivo, the ID50 value for the inhibition of gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats was 5.28 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally. JB-9322 also dose-dependently inhibited gastric juice volume and pepsin secretion. In gastric lumen-perfused rats, intravenous injection of JB-9322 dose-dependently reduced histamine-, pentagastrin- and carbachol-stimulated gastric acid secretion. 4. JB-9322 showed antiulcer activity against aspirin and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and was more potent than ranitidine. 5. JB-9322 effectively inhibited macroscopic gastric haemorrhagic lesions induced by ethanol. Intraperitoneal injection was effective in preventing the lesions as well as oral treatment. The oral ID50 value for these lesions was 1.33 mg kg-1. By contrast, ranitidine (50 mg kg-1) failed to reduce these lesions. In addition, the protective effect of JB-9322 was independent of prostaglandin synthesis. 6. These results indicate that JB-9322 is a new antiulcer drug that exerts a potent cytoprotective effect in addition to its gastric antisecretory activity. PMID:7647984

  10. Intrathoracic gastric perforation secondary to corrosive ingestion: a rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Varma Gunturi, Surya Ramachandra; Arora, Abhishek; Parmar, Abhijot

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a rare and serious case of acid ingestion in a 50-year-old man who developed necrosis and perforation of gastric fundus and diaphragm with extension of air and fluid collection in the thorax. To the best of our knowledge, this complication has not been described so far in the literature. PMID:27190774

  11. Relationship of ECL cells and gastric neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, H. L.; Brenna, E.; Sandvik, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    The enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell in the oxyntic mucosa has a key role in the regulation of gastric secretion since it synthesizes and releases the histamine regulating the acid secretion from the parietal cell. Gastrin is the main regulator of the ECL cell function and growth. Long-term hypergastrinemia induces ECL cell hyperplasia, and if continued, neoplasia. ECL cell carcinoids occur in man after long-term hypergastrinemia in conditions like pernicious anemia and gastrinoma. There is also accumulating evidence that a proportion of gastric carcinomas of the diffuse type is derived from the ECL cell. Furthermore, the ECL cell may, by producing substances with angiogenic effects (histamine and basic fibroblast growth factor), be particularly prone to develop malignant tumors. Although the general opinion is that gastrin itself has a direct effect on the oxyntic mucosal stem cell, it cannot be excluded that the general trophic effect of gastrin on the oxyntic mucosa is mediated by histamine or other substances from the ECL cell, and that the ECL cell, therefore, could play a role also in the tumorigenesis/carcinogenesis of gastric carcinomas of intestinal type. PMID:10461363

  12. Acidic Alteration Environments at Valles Marineris, Noctis Labyrinthus and Mawrth Vallis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Weitz, Catherine M.; Flahaut, Jessica; Gross, Christoph; Horgan, Briony

    2015-04-01

    Unique surface materials have been discovered at Valles Marineris, Noctis Labyrinthus, Mawrth Vallis, and elsewhere that have CRISM features distinct from those of any known minerals. Typically these unusual sites are found in light-toned outcrops or interior layered deposits associated with phyllosilicates and/or sulfates. We term these units "doublet" materials because they exhibit a doublet absorption in CRISM spectra between 2.2 and 2.3 µm. We are investigating the spectral signatures of these outcrops compared to lab spectra of minerals, mixtures and alteration products. We're also evaluating the stratigraphy of these unique alteration phases compared with neighboring phyllosilicate and sulfate units. A similar 2.2-2.3 µm doublet has been observed in spectra taken of acid altered clays produced in the laboratory. The band centers and relative intensities of these Martian doublet features vary greatly suggesting that a process such as acid weathering could be acting on OH-bearing minerals to produce altered phases that differ depending on the type of substrate, water/rock ratio, solution chemistry, and duration of aqueous processes. Because these unique materials occur in many regions across a range of times on Mars, acidic alteration may have been a key process at local and regional scales throughout Martian geologic history. Constraining the types of acidic alteration that have taken place on Mars will assist in defining the aqueous geochemistry at these sites.

  13. Gastric distention exacerbates ischemia in a rodent model of partial gastric devascularization.

    PubMed

    Urschel, J D; Antkowiak, J G; Takita, H

    1997-11-01

    Occult ischemia of the mobilized gastric fundus is an important etiologic factor for esophagogastric anastomotic leaks after esophagectomy. Postoperative gastric distention is another possible predisposing factor for anastomotic leakage. We hypothesized that gastric distention could worsen gastric ischemia. To test this hypothesis, gastric tissue perfusion was studied in 20 Sprague-Dawley rats. Baseline serosal gastric tissue perfusion was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry at a point 10 mm distal to the gastroesophageal junction. Perfusion was measured after left gastric artery occlusion, gastric distention to 20 cm water pressure, and combined left gastric artery occlusion and gastric distention. Gastric tissue perfusion (in tissue perfusion units, TPU) was 64.2 +/- 9.1 TPU at baseline measurement, 18.6 +/- 4.3 TPU after left gastric artery occlusion, 22.0 +/- 4.1 TPU after gastric distention, and 7.8 +/- 1.8 TPU after combined left gastric artery occlusion and gastric distention. Distention (P < 0.0001) and arterial occlusion (P < 0.0001) both reduced gastric tissue perfusion; of the two, arterial occlusion produced the greatest reduction in perfusion (P < 0.021). The combination of distention and arterial occlusion caused greater reduction in gastric perfusion than either factor alone (P < 0.0001). In this model, gastric distention exacerbated the ischemia produced by partial gastric devascularization. In clinical esophageal surgery, postoperative gastric distention may similarly potentiate the ischemic effects of gastric transposition for esophageal reconstruction.

  14. Metal Interactions with Microbial Biofilms in Acidic and Neutral pH Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, F. G.; Schultze, S.; Witten, T. C.; Fyfe, W. S.; Beveridge, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Microbial biofilms were grown on strips of epoxy-impregnated filter paper submerged at four sites in water contaminated with metals from mine wastes. At two sample stations, the water was acidic (pH 3.1); the other sites were in a lake restored to a near neutral pH level by application of a crushed limestone slurry. During a 17-week study period, planktonic bacterial counts increased from 101 to 103 CFU/ml at all sites. Biofilm counts increased rapidly over the first 5 weeks and then leveled to 104 CFU/cm2 in the neutral pH system and 103 CFU/cm2 at the acidic sites. In each case, the biofilms bound Mn, Fe, Ni, and Cu in excess of the amounts adsorbed by control strips covered with nylon filters (pore size, 0.22 μm) to exclude microbial growth; Co bound under neutral conditions but not under acidic conditions. Conditional adsorption capacity constants, obtained graphically from the data, showed that biofilm metal uptake at a neutral pH level was enhanced by up to 12 orders of magnitude over acidic conditions. Similarly, adsorption strength values were usually higher at elevated pH levels. In thin sections of the biofilms, encapsulated bacterial cells were commonly found enmeshed together in microcolonies. The extracellular polymers often contained iron oxide precipitates which generated weak electron diffraction patterns with characteristic reflections for ferrihydrite (Fe2O3 · H2O) at d equaling 0.15 and 0.25 nm. At neutral pH levels, these deposits incorporated trace amounts of Si and exhibited a granular morphology, whereas acicular crystalloids containing S developed under acidic conditions. Images PMID:16347914

  15. Structural resistance of chemically modified 1-D nanostructured titanates in inorganic acid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Fredholm, Yann C.; Morgado, Edisson

    2010-10-15

    Sodium containing one-dimensional nanostructured layered titanates (1-D NSLT) were produced both from commercial anatase powder and Brazilian natural rutile mineral sands by alkali hydrothermal process. The 1-D NSLT were chemically modified with proton, cobalt or iron via ionic exchange and all products were additionally submitted to intensive inorganic acid aging (pH = 0.5) for 28 days. The morphology and crystal structure transformations of chemically modified 1-D NSLT were followed by transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. It was found that the original sodium rich 1-D NSLT and cobalt substituted 1-D NSLT were completely converted to rutile nanoparticles, while the protonated form was transformed in a 70%-30% (by weight) anatase-rutile nanoparticles mixture, very similar to that of the well-known TiO{sub 2}-photocatalyst P25 (Degussa). The iron substituted 1-D NSLT presented better acid resistance as 13% of the original structure and morphology remained, the rest being converted in rutile. A significant amount of remaining 1-D NSLT was also observed after the acid treatment of the product obtained from rutile sand. The results showed that phase transformation of NSLT into titanium dioxide polymorph in inorganic acid conditions were controllable by varying the exchanged cations. Finally, the possibility to transform, through acid aging, 1-D NSLT obtained from Brazilian natural rutile sand into TiO{sub 2}-polymorphs was demonstrated for the first time to the best of authors' knowledge, opening path for producing TiO{sub 2}-nanoproducts with different morphologies through a simple process and from a low cost precursor.

  16. Biological and chemical characteristics of the coral gastric cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Casareto, B. E.; Yoshinaga, K.; Nakano, Y.; Fujimura, H.

    2012-03-01

    All corals have a common structure: two tissue layers enclose a lumen, which forms the gastric cavity. Few studies have described the processes occurring inside the gastric cavity and its chemical and biological characteristics. Here, we show that the coral gastric cavity has distinct chemical characteristics with respect to dissolved O2, pH, alkalinity, and nutrients (vitamin B12, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and phosphate) and also harbors a distinct bacterial community. From these results, the gastric cavity can be described as a semi-closed sub-environment within the coral. Dissolved O2 shows very low constant concentrations in the deepest parts of the cavity, creating a compartmentalized, anoxic environment. The pH is lower in the cavity than in the surrounding water and, like alkalinity, shows day/night variations different from those of the surrounding water. Nutrient concentrations in the cavity are greater than the concentrations found in reef waters, especially for phosphate and vitamin B12. The source of these nutrients may be internal production by symbiotic bacteria and/or the remineralization of organic matter ingested or produced by the corals. The importance of the bacteria inhabiting the gastric cavity is supported by the finding of a high bacterial abundance and a specific bacterial community with affiliation to bacteria found in other corals and in the guts of other organisms. The findings presented here open a new area of research that may help us to understand the processes that maintain coral health.

  17. The Role of Sonic Hedgehog Reemergence During Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jason; Donnelly, Jessica M.; Houghton, JeanMarie

    2016-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling has been extensively studied for its role in developmental biology and cancer biology. The association between Shh and cancer development in general is well established but the functional role of Shh in the development and progression of gastric cancer specifically is largely unknown. Bone marrow-derived stem cells, specifically mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) infiltrate and engraft into the gastric mucosa in response to the chronic inflammatory environment of Helicobacter infection. In this review, MSC infiltration and changes in the cytokine and cellular profiles of later-stage chronic environments will be tied into their interactions with the Shh pathway. We will discuss how these changes shape tumorigenesis and tumor progression in the gastric mucosa. The current review focuses on the Shh signaling pathway and its role in the development of gastric cancer, specifically in response to Helicobacter pylori infection. We follow with an in-depth discussion of the regulation of the Hedgehog pathway during acute and chronic gastric inflammation with a focus on signaling within the MSC compartment. PMID:20437100

  18. Variation in Resistance of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis to Acid Environments as a Function of Culture Medium

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nackmoon; Collins, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Acid resistance of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was examined as a function of growth conditions (i.e., in vitro growth medium and pH). M. paratuberculosis was cultured in either fatty acid-containing medium (7H9-OADC) or glycerol-containing medium (WR-GD or 7H9-GD) at two culture pHs (pHs 6.0 and 6.8). Organisms produced in these six medium and pH conditions were then tested for resistance to acetate buffer at pHs 3, 4, 5, and 6 at 20°C. A radiometric culture method (BACTEC) was used to quantify viable M. paratuberculosis cell data at various acid exposure times, and D values (decimal reduction times, or the times required to kill a 1-log10 concentration of bacteria) were determined. Soluble proteins of M. paratuberculosis grown under all six conditions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to identify proteins that may be associated with acid resistance or susceptibility. The culture medium affected growth rate and morphology: thin floating sheets of cells were observed in 7H9-OADC versus confluent, thick, waxy, and wrinkled pellicles in WR-GD. Culture medium pH affected growth rate (which was highest at pH 6.0), but it had little or no effect on D values for M. paratuberculosis at any test pH. When grown in 7H9-OADC, M. paratuberculosis was more acid resistant at all test pHs (higher D values) than when grown in WR-GD. Glycerol appeared to be the culture medium component most responsible for lower levels of M. paratuberculosis acid resistance. When glycerol was substituted for OADC in the 7H9 medium, D values were significantly lower than those of 7H9-OADC-grown M. paratuberculosis and were approximately the same as those for M. paratuberculosis grown in WR-GD medium. Comparison of the SDS-PAGE protein profiles for M. paratuberculosis cultures grown in 7H9-OADC, WR-GD, or 7H9-GD medium revealed that increased expression of 34.2- and 14.0-kDa proteins was associated with higher levels of acid resistance of M

  19. Detection of trace amino acid biomarkers in ice from extreme environments with the Mars Organic Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayarajah, Christine; Jayarajah, Christine; Botta, Oliver; Aubrey, Andrew; Parker, Eric; Bada, Jeffrey; Mathies, Richard

    A portable microfabricated capillary electrophoresis (CE) system named the Mars Organic Analyzer (MOA) has been developed to analyze fluorescently-labeled biomarkers including amino acids, amines, nucleobases, and amino sugars with the goal of life detection on Mars (1,2). This system consists of a multilayer microfabricated glass wafer containing electrophoresis channels as well as microfluidic valves and pumps for sample manipulation, a confocal laser excitation and fluorescence detection system, and integrated CE power supplies. The MOA has been successfully field tested in the Panoche Valley, CA and in the Atacama Desert, Chile, detecting amino acids at the ppb levels (3). In addition, this technology has been shown to be effective in screening the formation of biogenic amines during fermentation (4). The MOA is a part of the Urey instrument package that has been selected for the 2013 European ExoMars mission by ESA. The identification of recent gully erosion sites, observations of ice on and beneath the surface of Mars, and the discovery of large reservoirs of sub-surface ice on Mars point to water-ice as an important target for astrobiological analyses (5). In addition, the ice moons Europa and Enceladus are of astrobiological interest due to the possibility that they may contain liquid water under their ice crusts. Consequently, we explore here the use of the MOA instrument for the analysis of amino acids in polar ice samples. Soil extracts as well as concentrated icecore samples tend to be highly saline and inhomogeneous. Furthermore, brine pockets in ice form potential refugia for extant extra-terrestrial life, rendering near surface ice a key target for the search for a record of past life on the planet (6). Therefore, we have determined the effect of salinity on sample injection parameters in ice-core samples retrieved from Greenland. The amino acids valine, alanine/serine, glycine, glutamic acid, and aspartic acid were found in the parts

  20. Linoleic acid permeabilizes gastric epithelial cells by increasing connexin 43 levels in the cell membrane via a GPR40- and Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A; Salas, Daniela P; Delgado-López, Fernando; Lampe, Paul D; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-05-01

    Linoleic acid (LA) is known to activate G-protein coupled receptors and connexin hemichannels (Cx HCs) but possible interlinks between these two responses remain unexplored. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of action of LA on the membrane permeability mediated by Cx HCs in MKN28 cells. These cells were found to express connexins, GPR40, GPR120, and CD36 receptors. The Cx HC activity of these cells increased after 5 min of treatment with LA or GW9508, an agonist of GPR40/GPR120; or exposure to extracellular divalent cation-free solution (DCFS), known to increase the open probability of Cx HCs, yields an immediate increase in Cx HC activity of similar intensity and additive with LA-induced change. Treatment with a CD36 blocker or transfection with siRNA-GPR120 maintains the LA-induced Cx HC activity. However, cells transfected with siRNA-GPR40 did not show LA-induced Cx HC activity but activity was increased upon exposure to DCFS, confirming the presence of activatable Cx HCs in the cell membrane. Treatment with AKTi (Akt inhibitor) abrogated the LA-induced Cx HC activity. In HeLa cells transfected with Cx43 (HeLa-Cx43), LA induced phosphorylation of surface Cx43 at serine 373 (S373), site for Akt phosphorylation. HeLa-Cx43 but not HeLa-Cx43 cells with a S373A mutation showed a LA-induced Cx HC activity directly related to an increase in cell surface Cx43 levels. Thus, the increase in membrane permeability induced by LA is mediated by an intracellular signaling pathway activated by GPR40 that leads to an increase in membrane levels of Cx43 phosphorylated at serine 373 via Akt.

  1. [Hydrofluoric acid burns of the hands in the home environment: correct therapeutic approach].

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Giovanni; Pellegatta, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    The broad market penetration of products with components used primarily in the industrial sector requires the precise knowledge of their mechanism of action in order to perform a correct therapeutic approach. The article reports on three cases of domestic hydrofluoric acid burn that came to our Plastic Surgery Unit over the last three years. The treatment options are discussed in detail with emphasis on the importance of a constant update about such emerging diseases.

  2. Geochemical characterization of acid mine lakes in northwest Turkey and their effect on the environment.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Deniz Sanliyuksel; Baba, Alper

    2013-04-01

    Mining activity generates a large quantity of mine waste. The potential hazard of mine waste depends on the host mineral. The tendency of mine waste to produce acid mine drainage (AMD) containing potentially toxic metals depends on the amounts of sulfide, carbonate minerals, and trace-element concentrations found in ore deposits. The acid mine process is one of the most significant environmental challenges and a major source of water pollution worldwide. AMD and its effects were studied in northwest Turkey where there are several sedimentary and hydrothermal mineral deposits that have been economically extracted. The study area is located in Can county of Canakkale province. Canakkale contains marine, lagoon, and lake sediments precipitated with volcanoclastics that occurred as a result of volcanism, which was active during various periods from the Upper Eocene to Plio-Quaternary. Can county is rich in coal with a total lignite reserve >100 million tons and contains numerous mines that were operated by private companies and later abandoned without any remediation. As a result, human intervention in the natural structure and topography has resulted in large open pits and deterioration in these areas. Abandoned open pit mines typically fill with water from runoff and groundwater discharge, producing artificial lakes. Acid drainage waters from these mines have resulted in the degradation of surface-water quality around Can County. The average pH and electrical conductivity of acid mine lakes (AMLs) in this study were found to be 3.03 and 3831.33 μS cm(-1), respectively. Total iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) levels were also found to be high (329.77 and 360.67 mg L(-1), respectively). The results show that the concentration of most elements, such as Fe and Al in particular, exceed national and international water-quality standards.

  3. Geochemical characterization of acid mine lakes in northwest Turkey and their effect on the environment.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Deniz Sanliyuksel; Baba, Alper

    2013-04-01

    Mining activity generates a large quantity of mine waste. The potential hazard of mine waste depends on the host mineral. The tendency of mine waste to produce acid mine drainage (AMD) containing potentially toxic metals depends on the amounts of sulfide, carbonate minerals, and trace-element concentrations found in ore deposits. The acid mine process is one of the most significant environmental challenges and a major source of water pollution worldwide. AMD and its effects were studied in northwest Turkey where there are several sedimentary and hydrothermal mineral deposits that have been economically extracted. The study area is located in Can county of Canakkale province. Canakkale contains marine, lagoon, and lake sediments precipitated with volcanoclastics that occurred as a result of volcanism, which was active during various periods from the Upper Eocene to Plio-Quaternary. Can county is rich in coal with a total lignite reserve >100 million tons and contains numerous mines that were operated by private companies and later abandoned without any remediation. As a result, human intervention in the natural structure and topography has resulted in large open pits and deterioration in these areas. Abandoned open pit mines typically fill with water from runoff and groundwater discharge, producing artificial lakes. Acid drainage waters from these mines have resulted in the degradation of surface-water quality around Can County. The average pH and electrical conductivity of acid mine lakes (AMLs) in this study were found to be 3.03 and 3831.33 μS cm(-1), respectively. Total iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) levels were also found to be high (329.77 and 360.67 mg L(-1), respectively). The results show that the concentration of most elements, such as Fe and Al in particular, exceed national and international water-quality standards. PMID:23223936

  4. Oral administration of γ-aminobutyric acid affects heat production in a hot environment in resting humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Central administration of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) induces lower body temperature in animals in hot ambient air. However, it is still unknown whether oral GABA administration affects temperature regulation at rest in a hot environment in humans. Therefore, in the present study, we specifically hypothesized that systemic administration of GABA in humans would induce hypothermia in a hot environment and that this response would be observed in association with decreased heat production. Methods Eight male participants drank a 200-ml sports drink with 1 g of GABA (trial G) or without GABA (trial C), then rested for 30 minutes in a sitting position in a hot environment (ambient air temperature 33°C, relative humidity 50%). Results We found that changes in esophageal temperature from before drinking the sports drink were lower in trial G than in trial C (-0.046 ± 0.079°C vs 0.001 ± 0.063°C; P < 0.05), with lower heat production calculated by oxygen consumption (41 ± 5 W/m2 vs 47 ± 8 W/m2; P < 0.05). Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated that a single oral administration of GABA induced a larger decrease in body core temperature compared to a control condition during rest in a hot environment and that this response was concomitant with a decrease in total heat production. PMID:22738209

  5. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  6. [Helicobacter pylori and gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Maaroos, H I

    1994-01-01

    In connection with longitudinal ulcer studies and the demonstration of Helicobacter pylori as the main cause of chronic gastritis, new aspects of gastric ulcer recurrences and healing become evident. This extends the possibilities to prognosticate the course of gastric ulcer and to use more effective treatment. PMID:7937016

  7. Gastric hyalinization as a possible consequence of corrosive injury.

    PubMed

    Kazsuba, A; Vitéz, A; Gáll, J; Máthé, L; Ludmány, E; Krasznai, G

    2000-04-01

    We report a case of gastric obstruction due to hyalinization of the antrum. The endoscopic appearance of the lesion was suggestive of Crohn's disease or gastric neoplasm. Biopsy showed pseudopolypous gastritis with ulceration and fibroid granulation. Surgery was carried out to relieve the obstruction. Examination of the resected specimen showed massive hyalinization of all layers of the antral wall with circular collagenous infiltration and a normal duodenal bulb. The question of hyaloid gastritis as a unique entity is raised. Subsequently, information from the patient revealed the cause: voluntary acid ingestion causing corrosive injury. PMID:10774977

  8. Epigenetic mechanisms in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Arruda Cardoso

    2012-06-01

    Cancer is considered one of the major health issues worldwide, and gastric cancer accounted for 8% of total cases and 10% of total deaths in 2008. Gastric cancer is considered an age-related disease, and the total number of newly diagnosed cases has been increasing as a result of the higher life expectancy. Therefore, the basic mechanisms underlying gastric tumorigenesis is worth investigation. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling complex and miRNA, involved in gastric cancer. As the studies in gastric cancer continue, the mapping of an epigenome code is not far for this disease. In conclusion, an epigenetic therapy might appear in the not too distant future.

  9. The phenotype of gastric mucosa coexisting with Barrett's oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Rugge, M; Russo, V; Busatto, G; Genta, R; Di, M; Farinati, F; Graham, D

    2001-01-01

    Background/Aims—Barrett's oesophagus complicates the gastro-oesophageal acid reflux. Helicobacter pylori infection, particularly with cagA positive strains, induces inflammatory/atrophic lesions of the gastric mucosa, which may impair acid output. No systematic study has investigated the phenotype of the gastric mucosa coexisting with Barrett's oesophagus. This study was designed to identify the phenotype of gastric mucosa associated with Barrett's oesophagus. Methods—In this retrospective case control study, the phenotype of the gastric mucosa was histologically characterised in 53 consecutive patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 53 (sex and age matched) non-ulcer dyspeptic controls. Both patients and controls underwent extensive sampling of the gastric mucosa (two antral, one incisural, and two oxyntic biopsies). Intestinal metaplasia (IM) was categorised (type I, complete IM; types II and III, incomplete IM) by the high iron diamine stain; cagA status was ascertained by genotyping. Results—Helicobacter pylori was present in 19 of the 53 patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 30 of the 53 controls (p < 0.02); eight of the 19 patients with Barrett's oesophagus and 28 of the 35 controls harboured cagA positive H pylori (p < 0.03). The histological severity of non-atrophic gastritis detected in the controls was significantly higher than that detected in the patients with Barrett's oesophagus (p < 0.0001). Multifocal atrophic gastritis was present in 4% of the patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 23% of controls (p < 0.01). The odds ratio for the association between multifocal atrophic gastritis and Barrett's oesophagus was 0.20 (95% confidence interval, 0.006 to 0.60). Gastric IM was detected in 13.2% of the patients with Barrett's oesophagus and in 30.1% of the controls (p < 0.03). Type III IM at the gastric mucosa was only detected among controls. Conclusions—Barrett's oesophagus is associated with a low prevalence of H pylori cagA positive

  10. Gastric band migration following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB): two cases of endoscopic management using a gastric band cutter.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, Pawel; Hady, Hady Razak; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Kaminski, Fabian; Dadan, Jacek

    2012-06-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is one of the most frequently used minimally invasive and reversible procedures for the treatment of morbid obesity. Migration of the gastric band into the gastric lumen is a rare late complication of LAGB. Previous attempts at endoscopic removal of migrated bands have included the use of endoscopic scissors, laser ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). We report two cases of successful endoscopic management of gastric band migration using a gastric band cutter. PMID:23256012

  11. Insights from the Metagenome of an Acid Salt Lake: The Role of Biology in an Extreme Depositional Environment

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Chevrette, Marc Gerard; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Benison, Kathleen Counter

    2015-01-01

    The extremely acidic brine lakes of the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia are home to some of the most biologically challenging waters on Earth. In this study, we employed metagenomic shotgun sequencing to generate a microbial profile of the depositional environment associated with the sulfur-rich sediments of one such lake. Of the 1.5 M high-quality reads generated, 0.25 M were mapped to protein features, which in turn provide new insights into the metabolic function of this community. In particular, 45 diverse genes associated with sulfur metabolism were identified, the majority of which were linked to either the conversion of sulfate to adenylylsulfate and the subsequent production of sulfide from sulfite or the oxidation of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate via the sulfur oxidation (Sox) system. This is the first metagenomic study of an acidic, hypersaline depositional environment, and we present evidence for a surprisingly high level of microbial diversity. Our findings also illuminate the possibility that we may be meaningfully underestimating the effects of biology on the chemistry of these sulfur-rich sediments, thereby influencing our understanding of past geobiological conditions that may have been present on Earth as well as early Mars. PMID:25923206

  12. Insights from the metagenome of an acid salt lake: the role of biology in an extreme depositional environment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Chevrette, Marc Gerard; Ehlmann, Bethany L; Benison, Kathleen Counter

    2015-01-01

    The extremely acidic brine lakes of the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia are home to some of the most biologically challenging waters on Earth. In this study, we employed metagenomic shotgun sequencing to generate a microbial profile of the depositional environment associated with the sulfur-rich sediments of one such lake. Of the 1.5 M high-quality reads generated, 0.25 M were mapped to protein features, which in turn provide new insights into the metabolic function of this community. In particular, 45 diverse genes associated with sulfur metabolism were identified, the majority of which were linked to either the conversion of sulfate to adenylylsulfate and the subsequent production of sulfide from sulfite or the oxidation of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate via the sulfur oxidation (Sox) system. This is the first metagenomic study of an acidic, hypersaline depositional environment, and we present evidence for a surprisingly high level of microbial diversity. Our findings also illuminate the possibility that we may be meaningfully underestimating the effects of biology on the chemistry of these sulfur-rich sediments, thereby influencing our understanding of past geobiological conditions that may have been present on Earth as well as early Mars.

  13. Fossilization potential of iron-bearing minerals in acidic environments of Rio Tinto, Spain: Implications for Mars exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Remolar, David C.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2008-03-01

    Acidic waters of the Rio Tinto, southwestern Spain, evaporate seasonally, precipitating a variety of iron sulfide and oxide minerals. Schwertmannite and nanophase goethite form thin laminae on biological and detrital grain surfaces, replicating, among other things, the morphologies of insect cuticle, plant tissues, fungi, algae, and bacteria. Intergrain cements also incorporate bacterial cells and filaments. Other sulfate minerals precipitated in Rio Tinto environments are transient and contribute little to short-term preservation. Because the Rio Tinto has been cutting its current valley for several million years, terrace deposits provide a window on longer term fossil preservation. Early and later diagenesis are recorded in terrace deposits formed about one thousand and two million years ago, respectively. The sedimentary structures and mineralogies of these deposits suggest that they formed under physical and chemical conditions comparable to those of modern Rio Tinto sediments. The terrace deposits show quantitative loss of sulfate minerals, increasing crystallinity of goethite and, in the older terrace, replacement of goethite by hematite. Fossils formed originally by schwertmannite and nanophase goethite replication persist through diagenesis, preserving a long term record of local biological diversity. Fossil preservation by iron oxides in the acidic environment of Rio Tinto suggests that if life was present when sedimentary rocks formed at Meridiani Planum, Mars, precipitated minerals could record their presence.

  14. The guggulsterone derivative GG-52 inhibits NF-κB signaling in gastric epithelial cells and ameliorates ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Mogg; Kim, Su Hyun; Ko, Su Hyuk; Jung, Jireh; Chun, Jaeyoung; Kim, Nayoung; Jung, Hyun Chae; Kim, Joo Sung

    2013-01-15

    Gastric mucosal inflammation can develop after challenge with noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Specially, alcohol stimulates the release of inflammatory cytokines but does not increase gastric acid secretion, leading to gastric mucosal damage. The plant sterol guggulsterone and its novel derivative GG-52 have been reported to inhibit nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and experimental colitis. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of GG-52 on gastric epithelial cells and on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal inflammation in mice. GG-52 inhibited the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in gastric epithelial AGS and MKN-45 cell lines stimulated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with GG-52 suppressed TNF-α-induced activation of IκB kinase (IKK) and NF-κB signaling in MKN-45 cells. In contrast, the inactive analog GG-46 did not produce significant changes in IL-8 expression or NF-κB activation. In a model of ethanol-induced murine gastritis, administration of GG-52 significantly reduced the severity of gastritis, as assessed by macroscopic and histological evaluation of gastric mucosal damage. In addition, the ethanol-induced upregulation of chemokine KC, a mouse homolog of IL-8, and phosphorylated p65 NF-κB signals were significantly inhibited in murine gastric mucosa pretreated with GG-52. These results indicate that GG-52 suppresses NF-κB activation in gastric epithelial cells and ameliorates ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in mice, suggesting that GG-52 may be a potential gastroprotective agent.

  15. Endothelin-1, an ulcer inducer, promotes gastric ulcer healing via mobilizing gastric myofibroblasts and stimulates production of stroma-derived factors.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Tsutomu; Tsuji, Shingo; Kimura, Arata; Tsujii, Masahiko; Ishii, Syuji; Yoshio, Toshiyuki; Shinzaki, Shinichiro; Egawa, Satoshi; Irie, Takanobu; Yasumaru, Masakazu; Iijima, Hideki; Murata, Hiroaki; Kawano, Sunao; Hayashi, Norio

    2006-05-01

    Endothelin (ET)-1 is a potent inducer of peptic ulcers. The roles of ET-1 in ulcer healing, however, have remained unclear, and these were investigated in mice. Gastric ulcers were induced in mice by serosal application of acetic acid. Three days later, mice were given a neutralizing ET-1 antibody or nonimmunized serum. The ulcer size, amount of fibrosis and myofibroblasts, and localization of ET-1 and ET(A/B) receptors were analyzed. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the effects of ET-1, we examined the proliferation, migration, and release of growth and angiogenic factors in gastric myofibroblasts with or without ET-1. The expression of prepro-ET-1 (an ET-1 precursor) and ET-converting enzyme-1 was examined in gastric myofibroblasts using RT-PCR. Immunoneutralization of ET-1 delayed gastric ulcer healing. The areas of fibrosis and myofibroblasts were smaller in the anti-ET-1 antibody group than in the control. ET-1 was expressed in the gastric epithelium, myofibroblasts, and other cell types. ET(A) receptors, but not ET(B) receptors, were present in myofibroblasts. ET-1 increased proliferation and migration of gastric myofibroblasts. ET-1 stimulated the release of hepatocyte growth factor, VEGF, PGE(2), and IL-6 from gastric myofibroblasts. mRNA for prepro-ET-1 and ET-converting enzyme-1 was also expressed. ET-1 promotes the accumulation of gastric myofibroblasts and collagen fibrils at gastric ulcers. ET-1 also stimulates migration and proliferation of gastric myofibroblasts and enhances the release of growth factors, angiogenic factors, and PGE(2). Thus ET-1 has important roles not only in ulcer formation but also in ulcer healing via mobilizing myofibroblasts and inducing production of stroma-derived factors.

  16. Update on gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is an uncommon entity that can often present like classic adenocarcinoma. The most common organ site involved is the stomach. Important prognostic indicators include location of lymph node involvement, histologic subtype, lymphocyte lineage, gross size, and location of the tumor. Surgical resection is the mainstay of curative therapy. Combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy may have a role either separately or as part of a multimodality treatment program. Clinicians are encouraged to enter patients with primary gastric lymphoma into multi-institutional, cooperative group clinical trials to more clearly define the best treatment strategy. PMID:1956083

  17. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A; Al Kharusi, Suad S; Al Bahrani, Bassim J; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-09-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  18. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A.; Al Kharusi, Suad S.; Al Bahrani, Bassim J.; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  19. Gastric lipase: localization of the enzyme in the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    DeNigris, S.J.; Hamosh, M.; Hamosh, P.; Kasbekar, D.K.

    1986-03-05

    Isolated gastric glands prepared from human and rabbit stomach secrete lipase in response to secretagogues. They have investigated the localization of this enzyme in three species (rabbit, baboon, guinea pig). Gastric mucosa was sampled from the cardia (C), fundus-smooth (FS), fundus-ruggae (FR) and the antral area (A). Lipase activity was measured in mucosal homogenates using /sup 3/H-triolein as substrate and is expressed in units (U) = nmols free fatty acid released/min/mg wet weight. The localization of lipase is compared with that of pepsin (measured by hydrolysis of 2% hemoglobin at pH 1.8 and expressed in I.U.). Lipase is localized in a well defined area in the rabbit and is diffusely distributed in both guinea pig and baboon. The distribution of lipase and pepsin containing cells differs in all three species. The cellular origin of gastric lipase remains to be determined.

  20. TolC is important for bacterial survival and oxidative stress response in Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis in an acidic environment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jen-Jie; Wu, Ying-Chen; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chen, Ter-Hsin

    2016-09-25

    The outer membrane protein TolC, which is one of the key components of several multidrug efflux pumps, is thought to be involved in various independent systems in Enterobacteriaceae. Since the acidic environment of the stomach is an important protection barrier against foodborne pathogen infections in hosts, we evaluated whether TolC played a role in the acid tolerance of Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis. Comparison of the acid tolerance of the tolC mutant and the parental wild-type strain showed that the absence of TolC limits the ability of Salmonella to sustain life under extreme acidic conditions. Additionally, the mutant exhibited morphological changes during growth in an acidic medium, leading to the conflicting results of cell viability measured by spectrophotometry and colony-forming unit counting. Reverse-transcriptional-PCR analysis indicated that acid-related molecules, apparatus, or enzymes and oxidation-induced factors were significantly affected by the acidic environment in the null-tolC mutant. The elongated cellular morphology was restored by adding antioxidants to the culture medium. Furthermore, we found that increased cellular antioxidative activity provides an overlapping protection against acid killing, demonstrating the complexity of the bacterial acid stress response. Our findings reinforce the multifunctional characteristics of TolC in acid tolerance or oxidative stress resistance and support the correlative protection mechanism between oxygen- and acid-mediated stress responses in Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis. PMID:27599929

  1. Photochemistry and proton transfer reaction chemistry of selected cinnamic acid derivatives in hydrogen bonded environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Russell, David H.

    1998-05-01

    Proton transfer reactions between cinnamic acid derivatives (MH) and ammonia are studied using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with a supersonic nozzle to entrain neutral species formed by 337 nm laser desorption. The supersonic nozzle is used to form clusters of the type MH(NH3)n where n ranges to numbers greater than 20. Multimeric clusters of MH, e.g. MH2(NH3)n are not detected in this experiment or are of low abundance. Photoexcitation of MH(NH3)n clusters by using 355 nm photons yields ionic species that correspond to direct multiphoton ionization, e.g. MH+[middle dot](NH3)n, and proton transfer reactions, e.g. H+(NH3)n. Analogous product ions are formed by photoexcitation of the methylamine, MH(CH3NH2)n, and ammonia/methanol, MH(NH3)(CH3OH)n, clusters. Detailed analysis of energetics data suggests that proton transfer occurs through neutral excited stare species, and a mechanism analogous to one proposed previously is used to rationalize the data. The energetics of proton transfer via a radical cation form of the cinnarnic acid dimer is also consistent with the data. The relevance of this work to fundamental studies of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is discussed. In particular, the role of excited state proton transfer (ESPT) in MALDI is discussed.

  2. Solid state fermentation: acid protease production in controlled CO2 and O2 environments.

    PubMed

    Villegas, E; Aubague, S; Alcantara, L; Auria, R; Revah, S

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the partial pressure of O(2) and CO(2) on the acid protease production in solid state fermentation by Aspergillus niger on wheat bran was studied. A fermentation system was used, which allowed on-line reactor measurements and continuous data acquisition of pH, temperature, gas flow, pressure drop and CO(2) production. Six paired combinations of CO(2) and O(2) concentrations were studied. The results showed a direct relationship between pressure drop, production of CO(2) and temperature increase. The pH evolution patterns were similar in all cases but different if the measurements were made on-line or on a liquid homogenate of the fermented substrate. Acid protease production was increased when the gas had 4% CO(2), (vol/vol), and it reached its highest level, a 43% increase over air, with a mixture of 4% CO(2) and 21% O(2). The protease production was strongly related to the mold metabolic activity as represented by the total CO(2) evolved.

  3. Evaluation of a Porcine Gastric Mucin and RNase A Assay for the Discrimination of Infectious and Non-infectious GI.1 and GII.4 Norovirus Following Thermal, Ethanol, or Levulinic Acid Plus Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Treatments.

    PubMed

    Afolayan, Olamide T; Webb, Cathy C; Cannon, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    Human noroviruses (NoVs) are a major source of foodborne illnesses worldwide. Since human NoVs cannot be cultured in vitro, methods that discriminate infectious from non-infectious NoVs are needed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate binding of NoV genotypes GI.1 and GII.4 to histo-blood group antigens expressed in porcine gastric mucin (PGM) as a surrogate for detecting infectious virus following thermal (99 °C/5 min), 70% ethanol or 0.5% levulinic acid (LV) plus 0.01 or 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) sanitizer treatments and to determine the limit of detection of GI.1 and GII.4 binding to PGM. Treated and control virus samples were applied to 96-well plates coated with 1 µg/ml PGM followed by RNase A (5 ng/µl) treatment for degradation of exposed RNA. Average log genome copies per ml (gc/ml) reductions and relative differences (RD) in quantification cycle (Cq) values after thermal treatment were 1.77/5.62 and 1.71/7.25 (RNase A) and 1.73/5.50 and 1.56/6.58 (no RNase A) for GI.1 and GII.4, respectively. Treatment of NoVs with 70% EtOH resulted in 0.05/0.16 (GI.1) and 3.54/10.19 (GII.4) log reductions in gc/ml and average RD in Cq value, respectively. LV (0.5%) combined with 0.1 % SDS provided a greater decrease of GI.1 and GII.4 NoVs with 8.97 and 8.13 average RD in Cq values obtained, respectively than 0.5% LV/0.01 % SDS. Virus recovery after PGM binding was variable with GII.4 > GI.1. PGM binding is a promising surrogate for identifying infectious and non-infectious NoVs after capsid destruction, however, results vary depending on virus strain and inactivation method.

  4. pH-Sensitive Polymeric Micelle-based pH Probe for Detecting and Imaging Acidic Biological Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Ju; Kang, Han Chang; Hu, Jun; Nichols, Joseph W.; Jeon, Yong Sun; Bae, You Han

    2012-01-01

    To overcome the limitations of monomeric pH probes for acidic tumor environments, this study designed a mixed micelle pH probe composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-b- poly(L-histidine) (PHis) and PEG-b-poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA), which is well-known as an effective antitumor drug carrier. Unlike monomeric histidine and PHis derivatives, the mixed micelles can be structurally destabilized by changes in pH, leading to a better pH sensing system in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The acidic pH-induced transformation of the mixed micelles allowed pH detection and pH mapping of 0.2–0.3 pH unit differences by pH-induced “on/off”-like sensing of NMR and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). The micellar pH probes sensed pH differences in non-biological phosphate buffer and biological buffers such as cell culture medium and rat whole blood. In addition, the pH-sensing ability of the mixed micelles was not compromised by loaded doxorubicin. In conclusion, PHis-based micelles could have potential as a tool to simultaneously treat and map the pH of solid tumors in vivo. PMID:22861824

  5. Remodeling of the Vibrio cholerae membrane by incorporation of exogenous fatty acids from host and aquatic environments

    PubMed Central

    Giles, David K.; Hankins, Jessica V.; Guan, Ziqiang; Trent, M. Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio cholerae poses significant public health concerns by causing an acute intestinal infection afflicting millions of people each year. V. cholerae motility, as well as virulence factor expression and outer membrane protein production, have been shown to be affected by bile (Childers & Klose, 2007). The current study examines the effects of bile on V. cholerae phospholipids. Bile exposure caused significant alterations to the phospholipid profile of V. cholerae but not of other enteric pathogens. These changes consisted of a quantitative increase and migratory difference in cardiolipin, decreases in phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine, and the dramatic appearance of an unknown phospholipid determined to be lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine. Major components of bile were not responsible for the observed changes, but long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are minor components of bile, were shown to be incorporated into phospholipids of V. cholerae. Although the bile-induced phospholipid profile was independent of the V. cholerae virulence cascade, we identified another relevant environment in which V. cholerae assimilates unique fatty acids into its membrane phospholipids—marine sediment. Our results suggest that Vibrio species possess unique machinery conferring the ability to take up a wider range of exogenous fatty acids than other enteric bacteria. PMID:21255114

  6. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic) contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1) Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage. (2) Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3) Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4) Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective. PMID:27803929

  7. Is caseinomacropeptide from milk proteins, an inhibitor of gastric secretion?

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, Paul; Romé, Véronique; Delaby, Luc; Mendy, François; Roger, Loic; Chayvialle, Jean Alain

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study, in vivo, the effect of the ingestion of not glycosylated caseinomacropeptide (CMP) on gastric secretion. In Experiments #1 and #2, 7 calves fitted with a gastric pouch received either a diet without CMP (C diet) or C diet in which CMP was introduced (equal to and 5 folds that of CMP quantity contained in cow milk, diets CMP1 and CMP5, respectively). In Experiment #3, 2 calves (with gastric pouch) were fed C diet followed by an "iv perfusion" of CMP. In Experiment #4, 25 calves fed either C, CMP1 or CMP5 diets were fitted with a blood catheter for sample collections. The quantities of daily gastric secretions seemed few modified by CMP ingestion but the profile of these secretions was changed along the day. The most important result is that CMP can inhibit gastric secretions (mainly hydrochloric acid) stimulated by the meal, but there was no dose-dependent response. No similar observations were obtained after perfusion of CMP in jugular vein. CMP was not detected in blood. Results obtained in our experiments are not in favor of its significant intestinal absorption. Gastrin, somatostatin and VIP could be implicated in the mechanisms of regulation.

  8. [Role of animal gastric Helicobacter species in human gastric pathology].

    PubMed

    Pozdeev, O K; Pozdeeva, A O; Pozdnyak, A O; Saifutdinov, R G

    2015-01-01

    Animal Helicobacter species other than Helicobacter pylori are also able to cause human gastritis, gastric ulcers, and MALT lymphomas. Animal Helicobacter species are presented with typical spiral fastidious microorganisms colonizing the gastric mucosa of different animals. Bacteria initially received their provisional name Helicobacter heilmannii, and out of them at least five species colonizing the gastric mucosa of pigs, cats, and dogs were isolated later on. A high proportion of these diseases are shown to be zoonotic. Transmission of pathogens occurs by contact. The factors of bacterial pathogenicity remain little studied.

  9. Protective Effect of Flos Lonicerae against Experimental Gastric Ulcers in Rats: Mechanisms of Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Action

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Yun, Nari; Han, Hae-Jung; Kim, Jeom-Yong; Kim, Joo-Young; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2014-01-01

    Flos Lonicerae is one of the oldest and most commonly prescribed herbs in Eastern traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ethyl acetate fraction of Flos Lonicerae (GC-7101) on experimental gastric ulcer models and its mechanisms of action in gastric ulcer healing. The pharmacological activity of GC-7101 was investigated in rats on HCl/EtOH, indomethacin, water immersion restraint stress induced acute gastric ulcer, and acetic-acid-induced subchronic gastric ulcer. To determine its gastroprotective mechanisms, gastric wall mucus secretion, mucosal PGE2, mucosal NO content, nuclear translocation of NF-κB, mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, lipid peroxidation and glutathione content, and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were measured. GC-7101 significantly attenuated development of acute gastric ulcer and accelerated the healing of acetic-acid-induced subchronic gastric ulcer. In HCl/EtOH-induced gastric ulcer, GC-7101 markedly enhanced gastric wall mucus content which was accompanied by increased mucosal PGE2 and NO production. Furthermore, treatment of GC-7101 exhibited anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities as evidenced by decreased myeloperoxidase activity, NF-κB translocation, inflammatory cytokines mRNA expression, and lipid peroxidation and increased glutathione content and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. These results demonstrated that GC-7101 possesses strong antiulcerogenic effect by modulating oxidative stress and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:25610477

  10. Development of a Supported Emulsion Liquid Membrane System for Propionic Acid Separation in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jin; Hu, Shih-Yao B.; Wiencek, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Perstractive fermentation is a good way to increase the productivity of bioreactors. Using Propionibacteria as the model system, the feasibility of using supported emulsion liquid membrane (SELM) for perstractive fermentation is assessed in this study. Five industrial solvents were considered as the solvent for preparing the SELM. The more polar a solvent is, the higher the partition coefficient. However, toxicity of a solvent also increases with its polarity. CO-1055 (industrial decanol/octanol blend) has the highest partition coefficient toward propionic acid among the solvents that has no molecular toxicity toward Propionibacteria. A preliminary extraction study was conducted using tetradecane as solvent in a hydrophobic hollow fiber contactor. The result confirmed that SELM eliminates the equilibrium limitation of conventional liquid-liquid extraction, and allows the use of a non-toxic solvent with low partition coefficient.

  11. Evidence that Resorption of Bone by Rat Peritoneal Macrophages Occurs in an Acidic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    Skeletal loss in space, like any form of osteoporosis, reflects a relative imbalance of the activities of cells resorbing (degrading) or forming bone. Consequently, prevention of weightlessness induced bone loss may theoretically be accomplished by (1) stimulating bone formation or (2) inhibiting bone resorption. This approach, however, requires fundamental understanding of the mechanisms by which cells form or degrade bone, information not yet at hand. An issue central to bone resorption is the pH at which resorption takes place. The pH dependent spectral shift of a fluorescent dye (fluorescein isothiocyanate) conjugated to bone matrix was used to determine the pH at the resorptive cell bone matrix interface. Devitalized rat bone was used as the substrate, and rat peritoneal macrophages were used as the bone resorbing cells. The results suggest that bone resorption is the result of generation of an acidic microenvironment at the cell matrix junction.

  12. Nitric acid photolysis on surfaces in low-NOx environments: Significant atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianliang; Gao, Honglian; He, Yi; Huang, Gu; Bertman, Steven B.; Civerolo, Kevin; Schwab, James

    2003-12-01

    Nitric acid (HNO3) is the dominant end product of NOx (= NO + NO2) oxidation in the troposphere, and its dry deposition is considered to be a major removal pathway for the atmospheric reactive nitrogen. Here we present both field and laboratory results to demonstrate that HNO3 deposited on ground and vegetation surfaces may undergo effective photolysis to form HONO and NOx, 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than in the gas phase and aqueous phase. With this enhanced rate, HNO3 photolysis on surfaces may significantly impact the chemistry of the overlying atmospheric boundary layer in remote low-NOx regions via the emission of HONO as a radical precursor and the recycling of HNO3 deposited on ground surfaces back to NOx.

  13. Proximal gastric vagotomy. Comparison between open and laparoscopic methods in the canine model.

    PubMed Central

    Kollmorgen, C F; Gunes, S; Donohue, J H; Thompson, G B; Sarr, M G

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The authors compared open and laparoscopic proximal gastric vagotomies for efficacy of acid reduction and preservation of gastric emptying. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA. Laparoscopic methods have been used to perform vagotomy in patients with duodenal ulcer; however, no direct comparisons are available of laparoscopic and open surgical procedures regarding acid reduction and gastric emptying. METHODS. Thirty-one consecutive dogs were randomized to open proximal gastric vagotomy (OPGV; n = 11), laparoscopic anterior seromyotomy and posterior truncal vagotomy (ASPTV; n = 10), or laparoscopic proximal gastric vagotomy (LPGV; n = 10). Intraoperative endoscopic Congo red testing assured complete vagotomy. Basal acid output (BAO) and maximal acid output (MAO) during pentagastrin and insulin-induced hypoglycemia were measured with marker dilution techniques, and gastric emptying was assessed with radionuclide-labelled solid and liquid markers before and 5 weeks after operation. RESULTS. Operative time (mean +/- standard error of the mean) for OPGV was shorter compared with ASPTV and LPGV (86 +/- 7 minutes vs. 124 +/- 7 minutes and 115 +/- 7 minutes; p < 0.002). Postoperative BAO did not decrease in any group. Open proximal gastric vagotomy and LPGV, but not ASPTV, decreased MAO (p < 0.05); (after pentagastrin, OPGV from 26.4 +/- 1.7 mEq/hour to 11.3 +/- 0.1 mEq/hour, LPGV from 21.4 +/- 1.0 mEq/hour to 6.4 +/- 0.5 mEq/hour; after insulin-induced hypoglycemia, OPGV from 9.9 +/- 0.5 mEq/hour to 2.2 +/- 0.3 mEq/hour, LPGV from 7.9 +/- 0.5 mEq/hour to 1.9 +/- 0.4 mEq/hour). Gastric emptying of liquids and solids, as quantitated by the time for one half of the marker to empty (T 1/2) and the shape of the emptying curve, were similar before and after all three surgical procedures. CONCLUSIONS. Laparoscopic proximal gastric vagotomy was comparable to OPGV in decreasing stimulated gastric acid production without significantly altering gastric emptying. Anterior seromyotomy

  14. Ability of crassulacean acid metabolism plants to overcome interacting stresses in tropical environments

    PubMed Central

    Lüttge, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Single stressors such as scarcity of water and extreme temperatures dominate the struggle for life in sever