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Sample records for acidic growth conditions

  1. Growth Conditions To Reduce Oxalic Acid Content of Spinach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Rutzke, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    A controlled-environment agricultural (CEA) technique to increase the nutritive value of spinach has been developed. This technique makes it possible to reduce the concentration of oxalic acid in spinach leaves. It is desirable to reduce the oxalic acid content because oxalic acid acts as an anti-nutritive calcium-binding component. More than 30 years ago, an enzyme (an oxidase) that breaks down oxalic acid into CO2 and H2O2 was discovered and found to be naturally present in spinach leaves. However, nitrate, which can also be present because of the use of common nitratebased fertilizers, inactivates the enzyme. In the CEA technique, one cuts off the supply of nitrate and keeps the spinach plants cool while providing sufficient oxygen. This technique provides the precise environment that enables the enzyme to naturally break down oxalate. The result of application of this technique is that the oxalate content is reduced by 2/3 in one week.

  2. Adaptive acid tolerance response of Vibrio parahaemolyticus as affected by acid adaptation conditions, growth phase, and bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ming-Lun; Chou, Cheng-Chun; Chen, Hsi-Chia; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Ming-Ju

    2012-08-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain 690 was isolated from gastroenteritis patients. Its thermal and ethanol stress responses have been reported in our previous studies. In this study, we further investigated the effects of various acid adaptation conditions including pH (5.0-6.0) and time (30-90 min) on the acid tolerance in different growth phases of V. parahaemolyticus 690. Additionally, the adaptive acid tolerance among different V. parahaemolyticus strains was compared. Results indicated that the acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus 690 was significantly increased after acid adaptation at pH 5.5 and 6.0 for 30-90 min. Among the various acid adaptation conditions examined, V. parahaemolyticus 690 acid-adapted at pH 5.5 for 90 min exhibited the highest acid tolerance. The acid adaptation also influenced the acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus 690 in different growth phases with late-exponential phase demonstrating the greatest acid tolerance response (ATR) than other phases. Additionally, the results also showed that the induction of adaptive ATR varied with different strains of V. parahaemolyticus. An increase in acid tolerance of V. parahaemolyticus was observed after prior acid adaptation in five strains (556, 690, BCRC 13023, BCRC 13025, and BCRC 12864), but not in strains 405 and BCRC 12863. PMID:22827515

  3. Lipid production on free fatty acids by oleaginous yeasts under non-growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaobing; Jin, Guojie; Wang, Yandan; Shen, Hongwei; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2015-10-01

    Microbial lipids produced by oleaginous yeasts serve as promising alternatives to traditional oils and fats for the production of biodiesel and oleochemicals. To improve its techno-economics, it is pivotal to use wastes and produce high quality lipids of special fatty acid composition. In the present study, four oleaginous yeasts were tested to use free fatty acids for lipid production under non-growth conditions. Microbial lipids of exceptionally high fatty acid relative contents, e.g. those contained over 70% myristic acid or 80% oleic acid, were produced that may be otherwise inaccessible by growing cells on various carbon sources. It was found that Cryptococcus curvatus is a robust strain that can efficiently use oleic acid as well as even-numbered saturated fatty acids with carbon atoms ranging from 10 to 20. Our results provided new opportunity for the production of functional lipids and for the exploitation of organic wastes rich in free fatty acids. PMID:26159379

  4. Effects of culture conditions on growth and docosahexaenoic acid production from Schizochytrium limacinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Luying; Zhang, Xuecheng; Ren, Xueying; Zhu, Qinghua

    2008-02-01

    The effects of temperature, initial pH, salinity of culture medium, and carbon and nitrogen sources on growth and docosahexaenoic acid (C22: 6 n-3, DHA) production from Schizochytrium limacinum OUC88 were investigated in the present study. The results revealed that the optimal temperature, initial pH and salinity level of the medium for DHA production were 23°C, 7.0 and 18, respectively. Glucose was proved the best carbon source for the growth and DHA production from S. limacinum. Among the nitrogen sources tested, soybean cake hydrolysate, a cheap by-product, was found to be effective for the accumulation of DHA in S. limacinum cells. In addition, increasing the concentration of carbon sources in the medium caused a significant increase in cell biomass; however, accumulation of DHA in cells was mainly stimulated by the ratio of C/N in the medium. Under the optimal culture conditions, the maximum DHA yield achieved in flasks was 4.08 g L-1 after 5 d of cultivation.

  5. Changes in the Cytoplasmic Composition of Amino Acids and Proteins Observed in Staphylococcus aureus during Growth under Variable Growth Conditions Representative of the Human Wound Site

    PubMed Central

    Alreshidi, Mousa M.; Dunstan, R. Hugh; Gottfries, Johan; Macdonald, Margaret M.; Crompton, Marcus J.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Roberts, Tim K.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for a high proportion of nosocomial infections. This study was conducted to assess the bacterial responses in the cytoplasmic composition of amino acids and ribosomal proteins under various environmental conditions designed to mimic those on the human skin or within a wound site: pH6-8, temperature 35–37°C, and additional 0–5% NaCl. It was found that each set of environmental conditions elicited substantial adjustments in cytoplasmic levels of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, alanine and glycine (P< 0.05). These alterations generated characteristic amino acid profiles assessed by principle component analysis (PCA). Substantial alterations in cytoplasmic amino acid and protein composition occurred during growth under conditions of higher salinity stress implemented via additional levels of NaCl in the growth medium. The cells responded to additional NaCl at pH 6 by reducing levels of ribosomal proteins, whereas at pH 8 there was an upregulation of ribosomal proteins compared with the reference control. The levels of two ribosomal proteins, L32 and S19, remained constant across all experimental conditions. The data supported the hypothesis that the bacterium was continually responding to the dynamic environment by modifying the proteome and optimising metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27442022

  6. Abscisic acid regulates root growth under osmotic stress conditions via an interacting hormonal network with cytokinin, ethylene and auxin.

    PubMed

    Rowe, James H; Topping, Jennifer F; Liu, Junli; Lindsey, Keith

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms regulating root development under drought conditions is an important question for plant biology and world agriculture. We examine the effect of osmotic stress on abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinin and ethylene responses and how they mediate auxin transport, distribution and root growth through effects on PIN proteins. We integrate experimental data to construct hormonal crosstalk networks to formulate a systems view of root growth regulation by multiple hormones. Experimental analysis shows: that ABA-dependent and ABA-independent stress responses increase under osmotic stress, but cytokinin responses are only slightly reduced; inhibition of root growth under osmotic stress does not require ethylene signalling, but auxin can rescue root growth and meristem size; osmotic stress modulates auxin transporter levels and localization, reducing root auxin concentrations; PIN1 levels are reduced under stress in an ABA-dependent manner, overriding ethylene effects; and the interplay among ABA, ethylene, cytokinin and auxin is tissue-specific, as evidenced by differential responses of PIN1 and PIN2 to osmotic stress. Combining experimental analysis with network construction reveals that ABA regulates root growth under osmotic stress conditions via an interacting hormonal network with cytokinin, ethylene and auxin. PMID:26889752

  7. Indole-3-butyric acid synthesis in ecotypes and mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana under different growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2007-01-01

    Although IBA is a naturally occurring auxin, its role in plant development is still under debate. In this study a set of Arabidopsis mutants was used to analyze the biosynthesis of IBA in vitro. The mutants chosen for this study can be classified as: (1) involvement in auxin metabolism, transport or synthesis (amt1, aux1, ilr1, nit1, rib1, sur1, trp1-100); (2) other hormones possibly involved in the regulation of IBA synthesis (aba1, aba3, eto2, fae1, hls1, jar1); (3) photomorphogenesis (det1, det2, det3); and (4) root architecture (cob1, cob2, scr1). In addition, two transgenic lines overexpressing the IAA glucose synthase (iaglu) gene from maize were analyzed. The ecotypes No-0 and Wassilewskija showed the highest IBA synthetase activity under control conditions, followed by Columbia, Enkheim and Landsberg erecta. In the mutant lines IBA synthetase activity differed in most cases from the wild type, however no particular pattern of up- or down-regulation, which could be correlated to their possible function, was found. For rib1 mutant seedlings it was tested whether reduced IBA synthetase activity correlates with the endogenous IBA levels. Free IBA differed only depending on the culture conditions, but gave no clear correlation with IBA synthetase activity compared to the wild type. Since drought and osmotic stress as well as abscisic acid (ABA) application enhanced IBA synthesis in maize, it was tested whether IBA synthetase from Arabidopsis is also inducible by drought stress conditions. This was confirmed for the two ecotypes Col and Ler which showed different IBA synthetase activity when cultivated with various degrees of drought stress. IBA synthetase was also determined in photomorphogenic mutants under different light regimes. Induction of IBA synthetase in det1 and det3 plants was found under short day plus a red light pulse or in the dark, respectively. The results are discussed with respect to the functions of the mutated genes. PMID:16325963

  8. Modelling the growth/no growth boundary of Zygosaccharomyces bailii in acidic conditions: a contribution to the alternative method to preserve foods without using chemical preservatives.

    PubMed

    Dang, T D T; Mertens, L; Vermeulen, A; Geeraerd, A H; Van Impe, J F; Debevere, J; Devlieghere, F

    2010-01-31

    The aim of the study was to develop mathematical models describing growth/no growth (G/NG) boundaries of the highly resistant food spoilage yeast-Zygosaccharomyces bailii-in different environmental conditions, taking acidified sauces as the target product. By applying these models, the stability of products with characteristics within the investigated pH, a(w) and acetic acid ranges can be evaluated. Besides, the well-defined no growth regions can be used in the development of guidelines regarding formulation of new shelf-stable foods without using chemical preservatives, which would facilitate the innovation of additive-free products. Experiments were performed at different temperatures and periods (22 degrees C for 45 and 60days, 30 degrees C for 45days) in 150 modified Sabouraud media characterized by high amount of sugars (glucose and fructose, 15% (w/v)), acetic acid (0.0-2.5% (v/v), 6 levels), pH (3.0-5.0, 5 levels) and a(w) (0.93-0.97, 5 levels). These time and temperature combinations were chosen as they are commonly applied for shelf-stable foods. The media were inoculated with ca. 4.5 log CFU/ml and yeast growth was monitored daily using optical density measurements. Every condition was examined in 20 replicates in order to yield accurate growth probabilities. Three separate ordinary logistic regression models were developed for different tested temperatures and incubation time. The total acetic acid concentration was considered as variable for all models. In general, when one intrinsic inhibitory factor became more stringent, the G/NG boundary shifted to less stressful conditions of the other two factors, resulting in enlarged no growth zones. Abrupt changes of growth probability often occurred around the transition zones (between growth and no growth regions), which indicates that minor variations in environmental conditions near the G/NG boundaries can cause a significant impact on the growth probability. When comparing growth after 45days between the

  9. Influence of abscisic acid on growth, biomass and lipid yield of Scenedesmus quadricauda under nitrogen starved condition.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, Sujitha Balakrishnan; Arumugam, Muthu

    2016-08-01

    Scenedesmus quadricauda, accumulated more lipid but with a drastic reduction in biomass yield during nitrogen starvation. Abscisic acid (ABA) being a stress responsible hormone, its effect on growth and biomass with sustainable lipid yield during nitrogen depletion was studied. The result revealed that the ABA level shoots up at 24h (27.21pmol/L) during the onset of nitrogen starvation followed by a sharp decline. The external supplemented ABA showed a positive effect on growth pattern (38×10(6)cells/ml) at a lower concentration. The dry biomass yield is also increasing up to 2.1 fold compared to nitrogen deficient S. quadricauda. The lipid content sustains in 1 and 2μM concentration of ABA under nitrogen-deficient condition. The fatty acid composition of ABA treated S. quadricauda cultures with respect to nitrogen-starved cells showed 11.17% increment in saturated fatty acid content, the desired lipid composition for biofuel application. PMID:26949054

  10. On the growth of nitric and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1988-01-01

    A theory for the formation of frozen aerosol particles in the Antarctic stratosphere was developed and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The theory suggests that the condensed ice particles are composed primarily of nitric acid and water, with small admixtures of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in solid solution. The proposed particle formation mechanism is in agreement with the magnitude and seasonal behavior of the optical extinction observed in the winter polar stratosphere.

  11. Effect of culture conditions on growth, lipid content, and fatty acid composition of Aurantiochytrium mangrovei strain BL10

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the influence of various culture conditions on the biomass, lipid content, production of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and fatty acid composition of Aurantiochytrium mangrovei strain BL10. The variables examined in this study include the species and concentration of salt, the concentrations of the two substrates glucose and yeast extract, the level of dissolved oxygen, the cerulenin treatment, and the stages of BL10 growth. Our results demonstrate that BL10 culture produces maximum biomass when salinity levels are between 0.2 and 3.0%. Decreasing salinity to 0.1% resulted in a considerable decrease in the biomass, lipid content, DHA production, and DHA to palmitic acid (PA) (DHA/PA) ratio, signifying deterioration in the quality of the oil produced. The addition of 0.9% sodium sulfate to replenish salinity from 0.1% to 1.0% successfully recovered biomass, lipid content and DHA production levels; however, this also led to a decrease in DHA/PA ratio. An increase in oxygen and cerulenin levels resulted in a concomitant decrease in the DHA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (DHA/DPA) ratio in BL10 oil. Furthermore, the DHA/DPA and DHA/PA ratios varied considerably before and after the termination of cell division, which occurred around the 24 hour mark. These results could serve as a foundation for elucidating the biochemistry underlying the accumulation of lipids, and a definition of the extrinsic (environmental or nutritional) and intrinsic (cell growth stage) factors that influence lipid quality and the production of DHA by BL10. PMID:22883641

  12. Modifications in membrane fatty acid composition of Salmonella typhimurium in response to growth conditions and their effect on heat resistance.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; López, Mercedes; Arenas, Ricardo; Bernardo, Ana

    2008-04-30

    The effects of growth temperature (in the range 10-45 degrees C) and acidification up to pH 4.5 of the culture medium (Brain Heart Infusion, BHI) with different organic acids (acetic, citric and lactic) and hydrochloric acid on membrane fatty acid composition and heat resistance of Salmonella typhimurium CECT 443 were studied. The heat resistance was maximal in cells grown at 45 degrees C (cells grown in non-acidified BHI showed a D58-value of 0.90 min) and decreased with decreasing growth temperature up to 10 degrees C (D58-value of 0.09 min). The growth of cells in acidified media caused an increase in their heat resistance. In general, acid adapted cells showed D-values of between 1.5 and 2 times higher than the corresponding for non-acid adapted control cells. This cross-protection response, which has important implications in food processing, was not dependent on the pH value and the acid used to acidify the growth medium. A membrane adaptation corresponding to an increase in the unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (UFA/SFA) and membrane fluidity was observed at low growth temperature. Moreover, the acidification of the growth medium caused a decrease in UFA/SFA ratio and in the C18:1 relative concentration, and an increase in cyclopropane fatty acids (CFA) content mainly due to the increase in cyc19 relative concentration. Thus, acid adapted cells showed CFA levels 1.5 times higher than non-acid adapted control cells. A significant proportion of unsaturated fatty acids were converted to their cyclopropane derivatives during acid adaptation. These changes in membrane fatty acid composition result in cells with decreased membrane fluidity. A clear relation between membrane fatty acid composition and heat resistance was observed. In general, D-values were maximum for cells with low UFA/SFA ratio, and, consequently, with low membrane fluidity. Moreover, CFA formation played a major role in protecting acid adapted cells from heat inactivation. However

  13. Influence of propionic acid on growth and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus in liquid submerged and solid substrate conditions.

    PubMed

    al-Hilli, A L; Smith, J E

    1992-01-01

    The present experiments demonstrate that sublethal concentrations of propionic acid stimulated aflatoxin production considerably in submerged shaken culture and solid substrate culture of Aspergillus flavus. In liquid conditions aflatoxin formation was significantly influenced by the time of addition of propionic acid. The spores initially swelled into large spherical cells, and the resultant hyphae developed into a swollen, stunted, and excessively branched mycelium. PMID:1573566

  14. High-quality green tea leaf production by artificial cultivation under growth chamber conditions considering amino acids profile.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Shunsuke; Yuki, Takayuki; Fuji, Hiroshi; Kojima, Kunio; Yonetani, Tsutomu; Tomio, Ayako; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2014-12-01

    The current study focused on the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) as a target for artificial cultivation because of the variation in its components in response to light conditions. We analyzed its sensory quality by multi-marker profiling using multicomponent data based on metabolomics to optimize the conditions of light and the environment during cultivation. From the analysis of high-quality tea samples ranked in a tea contest, the ranking predictive model was created by the partial least squares (PLS) regression analysis to examine the correlation between the amino-acid content (X variables) and the ranking in the tea contest (Y variables). The predictive model revealed that glutamine, arginine, and theanine were the predominant amino acids present in high-ranking teas. Based on this result, we established a cover-culture condition (i.e., a low-light intensity condition) during the later stage of the culture process and obtained artificially cultured tea samples, which were predicted to be high-quality teas. The aim of the current study was to optimize the light conditions for the cultivation of tea plants by performing data analysis of their sensory qualities through multi-marker profiling in order to facilitate the development of high-quality teas by plant factories. PMID:24915994

  15. Assessing the potential of amino acid 13C patterns as a carbon source tracer in marine sediments: effects of algal growth conditions and sedimentary diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Bach, L. T.; Salvatteci, R.; Wang, Y. V.; Andersen, N.; Ventura, M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2015-08-01

    Burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has a profound influence in marine biogeochemical cycles and provides a sink for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. However, tracing organic carbon from primary production sources as well as its transformations in the sediment record remains challenging. Here we examine a novel but growing tool for tracing the biosynthetic origin of amino acid carbon skeletons, based on naturally occurring stable carbon isotope patterns in individual amino acids (δ13CAA). We focus on two important aspects for δ13CAA utility in sedimentary paleoarchives: first, the fidelity of source diagnostic of algal δ13CAA patterns across different oceanographic growth conditions, and second, the ability of δ13CAA patterns to record the degree of subsequent microbial amino acid synthesis after sedimentary burial. Using the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, we tested under controlled conditions how δ13CAA patterns respond to changing environmental conditions, including light, salinity, temperature, and pH. Our findings show that while differing oceanic growth conditions can change macromolecular cellular composition, δ13CAA isotopic patterns remain largely invariant. These results emphasize that δ13CAA patterns should accurately record biosynthetic sources across widely disparate oceanographic conditions. We also explored how δ13CAA patterns change as a function of age, total nitrogen and organic carbon content after burial, in a marine sediment core from a coastal upwelling area off Peru. Based on the four most informative amino acids for distinguishing between diatom and bacterial sources (i.e., isoleucine, lysine, leucine and tyrosine), bacterially derived amino acids ranged from 10 to 15 % in the sediment layers from the last 5000 years, and up to 35 % during the last glacial period. The greater bacterial contributions in older sediments indicate that bacterial activity and amino acid resynthesis progressed, approximately as a

  16. Assessing the potential of amino acid δ13C patterns as a carbon source tracer in marine sediments: effects of algal growth conditions and sedimentary diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Bach, L. T.; Salvatteci, R.; Wang, Y. V.; Andersen, N.; Ventura, M.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has a profound influence in marine biogeochemical cycles, and provides a sink for greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. However, tracing organic carbon from primary production sources as well as its transformations in the sediment record remains challenging. Here we examine a novel but growing tool for tracing biosynthetic origin of amino acid carbon skeletons, based on natural occurring stable carbon isotope patterns in individual amino acids (δ13CAA). We focus on two important aspects for δ13CAA utility in sedimentary paleoarchives: first, the fidelity of source diagnostic of algal δ13CAA patterns across different oceanographic growth conditions; and second, the ability of δ13CAA patterns to record the degree of subsequent microbial amino acid synthesis after sedimentary burial. Using the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii, we tested under controlled conditions how δ13CAA patterns respond to changing environmental conditions, including light, salinity, temperature, and pH. Our findings show that while differing oceanic growth conditions can change macromolecular cellular composition, δ13CAA isotopic patterns remain largely invariant. These results underscore that δ13CAA patterns should accurately record biosynthetic sources across widely disparate oceanographic conditions. We also explored how δ13CAA patterns change as a function of age, total nitrogen and organic carbon content after burial, in a marine sediment core from a coastal upwelling area off Peru. Based on the four most informative amino acids for distinguishing between diatom and bacterial sources (i.e. isoleucine, lysine, leucine and tyrosine), bacterial derived amino acids ranged from 10-15% in the sediment layers from the last 5000 years to 35% during the last glacial period. The larger bacterial fractions in older sediments indicate that bacterial activity and amino acid resynthesis progressed, approximately as a function of sediment age, to

  17. The Effect of Oxygen Supply on the Dual Growth Kinetics of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans under Acidic Conditions for Biogas Desulfurization

    PubMed Central

    Namgung, Hyeong-Kyu; Song, JiHyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, to simulate a biogas desulfurization process, a modified Monod-Gompertz kinetic model incorporating a dissolved oxygen (DO) effect was proposed for a sulfur-oxidizing bacterial (SOB) strain, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, under extremely acidic conditions of pH 2. The kinetic model was calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained from a bubble-column bioreactor. The SOB strain was effective for H2S degradation, but the H2S removal efficiency dropped rapidly at DO concentrations less than 2.0 mg/L. A low H2S loading was effectively treated with oxygen supplied in a range of 2%–6%, but a H2S guideline of 10 ppm could not be met, even with an oxygen supply greater than 6%, when the H2S loading was high at a short gas retention time of 1 min and a H2S inlet concentration of 5000 ppm. The oxygen supply should be increased in the aerobic desulfurization to meet the H2S guideline; however, the excess oxygen above the optimum was not effective because of the decline in oxygen efficiency. The model estimation indicated that the maximum H2S removal rate was approximately 400 ppm/%-O2 at the influent oxygen concentration of 4.9% under the given condition. The kinetic model with a low DO threshold for the interacting substrates was a useful tool to simulate the effect of the oxygen supply on the H2S removal and to determine the optimal oxygen concentration. PMID:25633028

  18. The effect of oxygen supply on the dual growth kinetics of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans under acidic conditions for biogas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Namgung, Hyeong-Kyu; Song, JiHyeon

    2015-02-01

    In this study, to simulate a biogas desulfurization process, a modified Monod-Gompertz kinetic model incorporating a dissolved oxygen (DO) effect was proposed for a sulfur-oxidizing bacterial (SOB) strain, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, under extremely acidic conditions of pH 2. The kinetic model was calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained from a bubble-column bioreactor. The SOB strain was effective for H2S degradation, but the H2S removal efficiency dropped rapidly at DO concentrations less than 2.0 mg/L. A low H2S loading was effectively treated with oxygen supplied in a range of 2%-6%, but a H2S guideline of 10 ppm could not be met, even with an oxygen supply greater than 6%, when the H2S loading was high at a short gas retention time of 1 min and a H2S inlet concentration of 5000 ppm. The oxygen supply should be increased in the aerobic desulfurization to meet the H2S guideline; however, the excess oxygen above the optimum was not effective because of the decline in oxygen efficiency. The model estimation indicated that the maximum H2S removal rate was approximately 400 ppm/%-O2 at the influent oxygen concentration of 4.9% under the given condition. The kinetic model with a low DO threshold for the interacting substrates was a useful tool to simulate the effect of the oxygen supply on the H2S removal and to determine the optimal oxygen concentration. PMID:25633028

  19. 2′-Deoxymugineic acid promotes growth of rice (Oryza sativa L.) by orchestrating iron and nitrate uptake processes under high pH conditions

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Ryoichi; Kousaka, Kayoko; Namba, Kosuke; Murata, Yoshiko; Murata, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Poaceae plants release 2′-deoxymugineic acid (DMA) and related phytosiderophores to chelate iron (Fe), which often exists as insoluble Fe(III) in the rhizosphere, especially under high pH conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms behind the biosynthesis and secretion of DMA have been studied extensively, little information is known about whether DMA has biological roles other than chelating Fe in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that hydroponic cultures of rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings show almost complete restoration in shoot height and soil-plant analysis development (SPAD) values after treatment with 3–30 μm DMA at high pH (pH 8.0), compared with untreated control seedlings at normal pH (pH 5.8). These changes were accompanied by selective accumulation of Fe over other metals. While this enhanced growth was evident under high pH conditions, DMA application also enhanced seedling growth under normal pH conditions in which Fe was fairly accessible. Microarray and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that exogenous DMA application attenuated the increased expression levels of various genes related to Fe transport and accumulation. Surprisingly, despite the preferential utilization of ammonium over nitrate as a nitrogen source by rice, DMA application also increased nitrate reductase activity and the expression of genes encoding high-affinity nitrate transporters and nitrate reductases, all of which were otherwise considerably lower under high pH conditions. These data suggest that exogenous DMA not only plays an important role in facilitating the uptake of environmental Fe, but also orchestrates Fe and nitrate assimilation for optimal growth under high pH conditions. PMID:25393516

  20. Plasmid load adversely affects growth and gluconic acid secretion ability of mineral phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium Enterobacter asburiae PSI3 under P limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Archana, G; Naresh Kumar, G

    2011-01-20

    Effect of the metabolic load caused by the presence of plasmids on mineral phosphate-solubilizing (MPS) Enterobacter asburiae PSI3, was monitored with four plasmid cloning vectors and one native plasmid, varying in size, nature of the replicon, copy number and antibiotic resistance genes. Except for one plasmid, the presence of all other plasmids in E. asburiae PSI3 resulted in the loss of the MPS phenotype as reflected by the failure to bring about a drop in pH and release soluble P when grown in media containing rock phosphate (RP) as the sole P source. When 100 μM soluble P was supplemented along with RP, the adverse effects of plasmids on MPS phenotype and on growth parameters was reduced for some plasmid bearing derivatives, as monitored in terms of specific growth rates, glucose consumed, gluconic acids yields and P released. When 10 mM of soluble P as the only P source, was added to the medium all transformants showed growth and pH drop comparable with native strain. It may be concluded that different plasmids impose, to varying extents, a metabolic load in the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium E. asburiae PSI3 and results in diminishing its growth and P-solubilizing ability in P deficient conditions. PMID:20171856

  1. Studies of the effect of gibberellic acid on algal growth.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, W. K.; Sorokin, C.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of gibberellic acid on exponential growth rate of four strains of Chlorella was investigated under variety of experimental conditions. In concentrations from 10 ppm to 100 ppm, gibberellic acid was shown to have no effect on Chlorella growth. In concentration of 200 ppm, gibberellic acid exerted some unfavorable effect on algal growth.

  2. OsNIP3;1, a rice boric acid channel, regulates boron distribution and is essential for growth under boron-deficient conditions.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Hideki; Uraguchi, Shimpei; Takano, Junpei; Tanaka, Mayuki; Fujiwara, Toru

    2014-06-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for higher plants. Boron deficiency is an important agricultural issue because it results in loss of yield quality and/or quantity in cereals and other crops. To understand boron transport mechanisms in cereals, we characterized OsNIP3;1, a member of the major intrinsic protein family in rice (Oryza sativa L.), because OsNIP3;1 is the most similar rice gene to the Arabidopsis thaliana boric acid channel genes AtNIP5;1 and AtNIP6;1. Yeast cells expressing OsNIP3;1 imported more boric acid than control cells. GFP-tagged OsNIP3;1 expressed in tobacco BY2 cells was localized to the plasma membrane. The accumulation of OsNIP3;1 transcript increased fivefold in roots within 6 h of the onset of boron starvation, but not in shoots. Promoter-GUS analysis suggested that OsNIP3;1 is expressed mainly in exodermal cells and steles in roots, as well as in cells around the vascular bundles in leaf sheaths and pericycle cells around the xylem in leaf blades. The growth of OsNIP3;1 RNAi plants was impaired under boron limitation. These results indicate that OsNIP3;1 functions as a boric acid channel, and is required for acclimation to boron limitation. Boron distribution among shoot tissues was altered in OsNIP3;1 knockdown plants, especially under boron-deficient conditions. This result demonstrates that OsNIP3;1 regulates boron distribution among shoot tissues, and that the correct boron distribution is crucial for plant growth. PMID:24654769

  3. Conditioning biomass for microbial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Bodie, Elizabeth A; England, George

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for improving the yield of microbial processes that use lignocellulose biomass as a nutrient source. The methods comprise conditioning a composition comprising lignocellulose biomass with an enzyme composition that comprises a phenol oxidizing enzyme. The conditioned composition can support a higher rate of growth of microorganisms in a process. In one embodiment, a laccase composition is used to condition lignocellulose biomass derived from non-woody plants, such as corn and sugar cane. The invention also encompasses methods for culturing microorganisms that are sensitive to inhibitory compounds in lignocellulose biomass. The invention further provides methods of making a product by culturing the production microorganisms in conditioned lignocellulose biomass.

  4. Effects of dietary chlorogenic acid on growth performance, antioxidant capacity of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei under normal condition and combined stress of low-salinity and nitrite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Li, Zheng; Li, Jian; Duan, Ya-Fei; Niu, Jin; Wang, Jun; Huang, Zhong; Lin, Hei-Zhao

    2015-04-01

    An eight-week feeding trial followed by an acute combined stress test of low-salinity and nitrite were performed to evaluate effects of chlorogenic acid (CGA) on growth performance and antioxidant capacity of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. Shrimp were randomly allocated in 12 tanks (30 shrimp per tank) and triplicate tanks were fed with a control diet or diets containing different levels of CGA (100, 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) feed) as treatment groups. Growth performance including weight gain (WG), biomass gain (BG), feed conversion ratio (FCR), and feed intake were determined after feeding for 56 days. Antioxidant capacity were evaluated by determining the activity of total antioxidant status (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT) as well as the gene expression of GSH-Px and CAT in the hepatopancreas of shrimp at the end of feeding trial and again at the end of the combined stress test. The results indicated that supplemention of CGA had no significant effects on the growth performance and the activities of TAS, SOD, GSH-Px and CAT in hepatopancreas of shrimp cultured under normal conditions for 56 days. However, compared with the control group, CGA (200, 400 mg kg(-1) feed) significantly improved the resistance of L. vannamei against the combined stress of low-salinity and nitrite, as indicated by the significant (P < 0.05) higher survival, higher activities of TAS, GSH-Px and CAT, as well as higher transcript levels of GPx and CAT gene in shrimp treated with CGA in the combined tress test. Our findings suggested that CGA possessed dual-modulatory effects on antioxidant capacity of L. vannamei and could be a potential feed additive that can enhance shrimp resistance against environmental stresses. The recommended application dosage is 200 mg kg(-1) and further studies are needed to clarify the action model of CGA efficiency. PMID:25600509

  5. Effect of application rate of commercial lignite-derived amendments on early-stage growth of Medicago sativa and soil health, in acidic soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patti, Antonio; Little, Karen; Rose, Michael; Jackson, Roy; Cavagnaro, Tim

    2013-04-01

    Commercially available lignite-derived amendments, sold mainly as humate preparations, have been promoted as plant growth stimulants leading to higher crop yields. These products are also claimed to improve soil properties such as pH. This study investigated the effect of application rate of three lignite-derived amendments on the early-stage growth of a pasture legume, lucerne (Medicago sativa), and soil health in a soil type common to south eastern Australia, in a glasshouse setting. An organic-mineral humate product and 'run of mine' lignite coal did not improve shoot or root growth despite application at a range of rates at, and in excess of, the manufacturers recommendation. Application of soluble K-humate product at 20 kg/ha (9.5 kg/ha C equivalent) produced an observable positive effect in shoot growth. At this application rate, a significant delay in the appearance of chlorotic symptoms was observed along with an increase in soil pH concurrent with decreased availability of soil Mn and Al. Higher root dry weight was associated with lower microbial biomass carbon which may indicate an effect on allocation of resources between the microbial community and the plant. An assessment of the effectiveness of lignite-derived amendments on plant growth, as well as their potential to improve the health of an acidic soil will assist farmers in making decisions regarding the use of these products.

  6. Modeling the Growth of Epiphytic Bacteria on Kale Treated by Thermosonication Combined with Slightly Acidic Electrolyzed Water and Stored under Dynamic Temperature Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Ahmad Rois; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2016-08-01

    The growth of epiphytic bacteria (aerobic mesophilic bacteria or Pseudomonas spp.) on kale was modeled isothermally and validated under dynamic storage temperatures. Each bacterial count on kale stored at isothermal conditions (4 to 25 °C) was recorded. The results show that maximum growth rate (μmax ) of both epiphytic bacteria increased and lag time (λ) decreased with increasing temperature (P < 0.05). The maximum population density (Nmax ) of Pseudomonas spp. was significantly greater than that of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, particularly in treated samples and/or at 4 and 10 °C (P < 0.05). The relationship between μmax of both epiphytic bacteria and temperature was linear (R(2) > 0.97), whereas lower R(2) > 0.86 and R(2) > 0.87 was observed for the λ and Nmax , respectively. The overall predictions of both epiphytic bacterial growths under nonisothermal conditions with temperature abuse of 15 °C agreed with the observed data, whereas those with temperature abuse of 25 °C were greatly overestimated. The appropriate parameter q0 (physiological state of cells), therefore, was adjusted by a trial and error to fit the model. This study demonstrates that the developed model was able to predict accurately epiphytic bacterial growth on kale stored under nonisothermal conditions particularly those with low temperature abuse of 15 °C. PMID:27387251

  7. Growth Conditions and Rifampin Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Arthur L.; Gross, Gayle H.

    1979-01-01

    The susceptibility of Escherichia coli to rifampin was measured during unlimited growth in rich and poor media and during chemostat growth limited by the carbon source. During batch growth at low turbidities, the susceptibility of the bacteria increased as the growth rate decreased, consistent with the longer time available for drug penetration in the poorer media. During chemostat culture, the bacteria remained highly susceptible or became genetically resistant, dependent on the manner in which the bacteria were exposed to the antibiotic. If the concentration of rifampin was abruptly raised, susceptible cells were replaced by genetically resistant cells. However, if the concentration of antibiotic was raised slowly, the genetically susceptible cells continued to grow. This difference in response of chemostat cultures according to mode of drug administration was attributed to an inducible detoxification of the drug by the bacteria, because the susceptible genotype is maintained only when the concentration of rifampin is increased gradually and when a high population of cells is maintained. Direct evidence for the inactivation of the rifampin from the bioassay of culture supernatants is presented. PMID:371543

  8. An energy balance from absorbed photons to new biomass for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlamydomonas acidophila under neutral and extremely acidic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Langner, Uwe; Jakob, Torsten; Stehfest, Katja; Wilhelm, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Chlamydomonas is one of the most well-studied photosynthetic organisms that had important biotechnological potential for future bioproductions of biofuels. However, an energy balance from incident photons to the energy stored in the new biomass is still lacking. In this study, we applied a recently developed system to measure the energy balance for steady state growth of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii grown at pH 6.5, and C. acidophila that was grown at pH 6.5 and 2.6. Energy use efficiency was quantified on the basis of light absorption, photosynthetic quantum yield, photosynthetic and respiratory quotient, and electron partitioning into proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. The results showed that lower growth rates of C. acidophila under both pH conditions were not caused by the differences in the photosynthetic quantum yield or in alternative electron cycling, but rather by differences in the efficiency of light absorption and increased dark respiration. Analysis of the macromolecular composition of the cells during the light phase showed that C. acidophila uses biosynthetic electrons preferentially for carbohydrate synthesis but not for synthesis of lipids. This led to a strong diurnal cycle of the C/N ratio and could explain the higher dark respiration of C. acidophila compared with C. reinhardtii. PMID:19054351

  9. Anaerobic growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum via mixed-acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Michel, Andrea; Koch-Koerfges, Abigail; Krumbach, Karin; Brocker, Melanie; Bott, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a model organism in microbial biotechnology, is known to metabolize glucose under oxygen-deprived conditions to l-lactate, succinate, and acetate without significant growth. This property is exploited for efficient production of lactate and succinate. Our detailed analysis revealed that marginal growth takes place under anaerobic conditions with glucose, fructose, sucrose, or ribose as a carbon and energy source but not with gluconate, pyruvate, lactate, propionate, or acetate. Supplementation of glucose minimal medium with tryptone strongly enhanced growth up to a final optical density at 600 nm (OD600) of 12, whereas tryptone alone did not allow growth. Amino acids with a high ATP demand for biosynthesis and amino acids of the glutamate family were particularly important for growth stimulation, indicating ATP limitation and a restricted carbon flux into the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle toward 2-oxoglutarate. Anaerobic cultivation in a bioreactor with constant nitrogen flushing disclosed that CO2 is required to achieve maximal growth and that the pH tolerance is reduced compared to that under aerobic conditions, reflecting a decreased capability for pH homeostasis. Continued growth under anaerobic conditions indicated the absence of an oxygen-requiring reaction that is essential for biomass formation. The results provide an improved understanding of the physiology of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions. PMID:26276118

  10. Anaerobic Growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum via Mixed-Acid Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Andrea; Koch-Koerfges, Abigail; Krumbach, Karin; Brocker, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a model organism in microbial biotechnology, is known to metabolize glucose under oxygen-deprived conditions to l-lactate, succinate, and acetate without significant growth. This property is exploited for efficient production of lactate and succinate. Our detailed analysis revealed that marginal growth takes place under anaerobic conditions with glucose, fructose, sucrose, or ribose as a carbon and energy source but not with gluconate, pyruvate, lactate, propionate, or acetate. Supplementation of glucose minimal medium with tryptone strongly enhanced growth up to a final optical density at 600 nm (OD600) of 12, whereas tryptone alone did not allow growth. Amino acids with a high ATP demand for biosynthesis and amino acids of the glutamate family were particularly important for growth stimulation, indicating ATP limitation and a restricted carbon flux into the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle toward 2-oxoglutarate. Anaerobic cultivation in a bioreactor with constant nitrogen flushing disclosed that CO2 is required to achieve maximal growth and that the pH tolerance is reduced compared to that under aerobic conditions, reflecting a decreased capability for pH homeostasis. Continued growth under anaerobic conditions indicated the absence of an oxygen-requiring reaction that is essential for biomass formation. The results provide an improved understanding of the physiology of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions. PMID:26276118

  11. Rural population growth and living conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, N; Zhu, C

    1991-01-01

    The problem of the effect of population growth on subsistence conditions is addressed by developing generalized premises, principles, and methods for quantifying standards or conditions for growth. This method is applied to 1989 data for Nanzheng Country, China. Background information is provided on an experiment made public in 1985 and implemented in 1986 by the Family Planning (FP) Department of Nanzheng County of Shaanxi Province in Hongmiao District in which the following conditions were placed on bearing a second child: 1) income must be 20% higher than the average village income level, and breeders must have an average income of not 400 yuan/year, crop planters not 300 yuan/year, textile weavers not 200 yuan/year, and industrial and subsidiary production workers not 400 yuan/year (generally 4 pigs or 100 chickens or ducks) or 2) 100 income-producing trees must be planted around he residential area/family plot or stony fields must be transformed into arable land under the contract responsibility system, or groves, orchards, or tea plantations must be planted. These conditions must be met one year prior to proposing to have a second child. The approval rate in 1986-88 was 88.7%, and the second parity rate was 78.4%. Deteriorated conditions had not yet occurred in this country when this proposal was made. The premises considered important in preparing assistance conditions were determined. 1) Conditions for population growth should be resolved within the area. 2) Subsistence conditions should be taken care of by the family. 3) There should be a centralized standard, not a family standard, such that living conditions/capita should not decrease because of population growth. Quantification is made expressing the relationship between subsistence and growth. The application of these conditions for households in Hongmiao District is that the average subsistence conditions need to be higher than other households by 12.3% for new population growth. The assumption is

  12. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O and 1-2.5 x 10(exp -6) Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  13. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-05-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1 - 3 × 10-4 Torr H2O and 1 - 2.5 × 10-6 Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. FTIR spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  14. Minimal conditions for protocell stationary growth.

    PubMed

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We show that self-replication of a chemical system encapsulated within a membrane growing from within is possible without any explicit feature such as autocatalysis or metabolic closure, and without the need for their emergence through complexity. We use a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, and we investigate the protocell's capability for self-replication, for various numbers of reactions in the network. We elucidate the underlying mechanisms in terms of simple minimal conditions pertaining only to the topology of the embedded chemical reaction network. A necessary condition is that each moiety must be fed, and a sufficient condition is that each siphon is fed. Although these minimal conditions are purely topological, by further endowing conservative chemical reaction networks with thermodynamically consistent kinetics, we show that the growth rate tends to increase on increasing the Gibbs energy per unit molecular weight of the nutrient and on decreasing that of the membrane precursor. PMID:25951201

  15. Effects of growth conditions on the production of neurotoxin 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) in Microcystis aeruginosa and its universal presence in diverse cyanobacteria isolated from freshwater in China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hua; Qiu, Jiangbing; Fan, Lin; Li, Aifeng

    2015-04-01

    Neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) and its isomer 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) have been reported previously in diverse strains of cyanobacteria. In this study, BMAA and DAB were analyzed for two strains of Microcystis aeruginosa incubated with four different levels of phosphate, nitrate, illumination, and temperature, respectively, in order to explore the effects of growth factors on toxin-producing ability of cyanobacteria. Both toxins were also screened in 17 cyanobacterial strains cultured with BG-11 medium and conventional illumination and temperature conditions, and in three field phytoplankton samples collected from different lakes in China. All samples were analyzed using a liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system coupled with a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) column. Results showed that no BMAA was detected in any of the cyanobacterial strains grown under our laboratory culture conditions, or in any of the field samples. Production of DAB in M. aeruginosa was significantly enhanced by extreme concentrations of nutrient and physical factors. Various concentrations of DAB were also present in most cultured samples (13 of 17) of cyanobacteria and were not species specific. This is the first time to report the production of DAB in M. aeruginosa cultured under alterative conditions in laboratory. Occurrence of DAB in most of the strains examined here means that consideration should be given to the presence of this compound in freshwater environment in China. PMID:25354443

  16. THIAMINE AND NICOTINIC ACID: ANAEROBIC GROWTH FACTORS FOR MUCOR ROUXII

    PubMed Central

    Bartnicki-Garcia, S.; Nickerson, Walter J.

    1961-01-01

    Bartnicki-Garcia, S. (Rutgers, the State University, New Brunswick, N. J.), and Walter J. Nickerson. Thiamine and nicotinic acid: Anaerobic growth factors for Mucor rouxii. J. Bacteriol. 82:142–148. 1961.—Mucor rouxii requires preformed thiamine and nicotinic acid for anaerobic growth. Such requirements are not manifested during aerobic incubation. Aerobically, the fungus was shown to be able to synthesize both vitamins. The yeastlike form and the filamentous form of anaerobically grown M. rouxii exhibit the same vitamin requirements. Thiamine can be substituted by its thiazole moiety. Under certain conditions, nicotinic acid was partly substituted by tryptophan, kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid. Anaerobically. the fungus (thiamine requiring) was about ten times more susceptible to pyrithiamine antagonism than the same organism grown aerobically (thiamine independent). PMID:16561911

  17. Shoot-derived abscisic acid promotes root growth.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J; Ross, John J

    2016-03-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in regulating root growth. Most work to date has investigated the influence of root-sourced ABA on root growth during water stress. Here, we tested whether foliage-derived ABA could be transported to the roots, and whether this foliage-derived ABA had an influence on root growth under well-watered conditions. Using both application studies of deuterium-labelled ABA and reciprocal grafting between wild-type and ABA-biosynthetic mutant plants, we show that both ABA levels in the roots and root growth in representative angiosperms are controlled by ABA synthesized in the leaves rather than sourced from the roots. Foliage-derived ABA was found to promote root growth relative to shoot growth but to inhibit the development of lateral roots. Increased root auxin (IAA) levels in plants with ABA-deficient scions suggest that foliage-derived ABA inhibits root growth through the root growth-inhibitor IAA. These results highlight the physiological and morphological importance, beyond the control of stomata, of foliage-derived ABA. The use of foliar ABA as a signal for root growth has important implications for regulating root to shoot growth under normal conditions and suggests that leaf rather than root hydration is the main signal for regulating plant responses to moisture. PMID:26514625

  18. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester reduces the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor through the inhibition of the ROS, PI3K and HIF-1α signaling pathways in human retinal pigment epithelial cells under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Paeng, Sung Hwa; Jung, Won-Kyo; Park, Won Sun; Lee, Dae-Sung; Kim, Gi-Young; Choi, Yung Hyun; Seo, Su-Kil; Jang, Won Hee; Choi, Jung Sik; Lee, Young-Min; Park, Saegwang; Choi, Il-Whan

    2015-05-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) can lead to progressive and severe visual loss. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes the development of CNV. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a biologically active component of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) propolis, has been demonstrated to have several interesting biological regulatory properties. The objective of this study was to determine whether treatment with CAPE results in the inhibition of the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE cells) under hypoxic conditions and to explore the possible underlying mechanisms. An in vitro experimental model of hypoxia was used to mimic an ischemic microenvironment for the RPE cells. Human RPE cells (ARPE-19) were exposed to hypoxia with or without CAPE pre-treatment. ARPE-19 cells were used to investigate the pathway involved in the regulation of VEGF production under hypoxic conditions, based on western blot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The amount of VEGF released from the hypoxia-exposed cells was significantly higher than that of the normoxic controls. Pre-treatment with CAPE suppressed the hypoxia-induced production of VEGF in the ARPE-19 cells, and this effect was inhibited through the attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression. These in vitro findings suggest that CAPE may prove to be a novel anti-angiogenic agent for the treatment of diseases associated with CNV. PMID:25738890

  19. Modeling Hematite Bioreduction under Growth Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Chen, C.; Yeh, G.; Burgos, W. D.; Mynyard, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    The focus of this work is on simulating and analyzing bioreduction kinetics of natural hematite-coated sand by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, under growth conditions with lactate as the electron donor. A reaction-based biogeochemical model was used. A series of batch experiments with different initial conditions were performed to determine the rate formulations/parameters for hematite bioreduction and related reactions. Three different kinetic reaction rate formations were used to model hematite bioreduction. The consistency of mass conservation equations was assessed. Assumptions regarding equilibrium reactions were also assessed. Column experiments focused on transient reactive transport were conducted under otherwise identical conditions, except that the flow rate was systematically varied. The determined rate formulations/parameters were systematically tested with these column experiments using a reactive biogeochemical transport model that coupled hydrologic transport and reactive biogeochemistry. The model simulated the hematite bioreduction of hematite-coated sand in column experiments reasonably well using rate formulation/parameters determined from batch experiments. This study supports the hypothesis that mechanistic-based reaction rates of batch experiments can be scaled up and ported to column experiments.

  20. Media and growth conditions for induction of secondary metabolite production.

    PubMed

    Frisvad, Jens C

    2012-01-01

    Growth media and incubation conditions have a very strong influence of secondary metabolite production. There is no consensus on which media are the optimal for metabolite production, but a series of useful and effective media and incubation conditions have been listed here. Chemically well-defined media are suited for biochemical studies, but in order to get chemical diversity expressed in filamentous fungi, sources rich in amino acids, vitamins, and trace metals have to be added, such as yeast extract and oatmeal. A battery of solid agar media is recommended for exploration of chemical diversity as agar plug samples are easily analyzed to get an optimal representation of the qualitative secondary metabolome. Standard incubation for a week at 25°C in darkness is recommended, but optimal conditions have to be modified depending on the ecology and physiology of different filamentous fungi. PMID:23065607

  1. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  2. Mechanisms of lactone hydrolysis in acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2013-07-19

    The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of linear esters and lactones was studied using a hybrid supermolecule-polarizable continuum model (PCM) approach including up to six water molecules. The compounds studied included two linear esters, four β-lactones, two γ-lactones, and one δ-lactone: ethyl acetate, methyl formate, β-propiolactone, β-butyrolactone, β-isovalerolactone, diketene (4-methyleneoxetan-2-one), γ-butyrolactone, 2(5H)-furanone, and δ-valerolactone. The theoretical results are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements reported in the literature and also in excellent qualitative agreement with long-held views regarding the nature of the hydrolysis mechanisms at molecular level. The present results help to understand the balance between the unimolecular (A(AC)1) and bimolecular (A(AC)2) reaction pathways. In contrast to the experimental setting, where one of the two branches is often occluded by the requirement of rather extreme experimental conditions, we have been able to estimate both contributions for all the compounds studied and found that a transition from A(AC)2 to A(AC)1 hydrolysis takes place as acidity increases. A parallel work addresses the neutral and base-catalyzed hydrolysis of lactones. PMID:23731203

  3. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Kimberley L.; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Sanchez, Jessica; Potma, Eric O.; Santos, Guaciara M.

    2015-01-01

    Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate, and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM) that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin, and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a “glass wastebasket.” Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins, and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction. PMID:26442066

  4. Plant growth conditions alter phytolith carbon.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kimberley L; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Sanchez, Jessica; Potma, Eric O; Santos, Guaciara M

    2015-01-01

    Many plants, including grasses and some important human food sources, accumulate, and precipitate silica in their cells to form opaline phytoliths. These phytoliths contain small amounts of organic matter (OM) that are trapped during the process of silicification. Previous work has suggested that plant silica is associated with compounds such as proteins, lipids, lignin, and carbohydrate complexes. It is not known whether these compounds are cellular components passively encapsulated as the cell silicifies, polymers actively involved in the precipitation process or random compounds assimilated by the plant and discarded into a "glass wastebasket." Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to map the distribution of OM in phytoliths, and to analyze individual phytoliths isolated from Sorghum bicolor plants grown under different laboratory treatments. Using mapping, we showed that OM in phytoliths is distributed throughout the silica and is not related to dark spots visible in light microscopy, previously assumed to be the repository for phytolith OM. The Raman spectra exhibited common bands indicative of C-H stretching modes of general OM, and further more diagnostic bands consistent with carbohydrates, lignins, and other OM. These Raman spectra exhibited variability of spectral signatures and of relative intensities between sample treatments indicating that differing growth conditions altered the phytolith carbon. This may have strong implications for understanding the mechanism of phytolith formation, and for use of phytolith carbon isotope values in dating or paleoclimate reconstruction. PMID:26442066

  5. How does Listeria monocytogenes combat acid conditions?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a major foodborne pathogen, possesses a number of mechanisms which enable it to combat the challenges posed by acidic environments such as acidic foods and the acidity in the gastrointestinal tract. These mechanisms include the acid tolerance response, a two-component regula...

  6. Transcriptional profile of maize roots under acid soil growth

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aluminum (Al) toxicity is one of the most important yield-limiting factors of many crops worldwide. The primary symptom of Al toxicity syndrome is the inhibition of root growth leading to poor water and nutrient absorption. Al tolerance has been extensively studied using hydroponic experiments. However, unlike soil conditions, this method does not address all of the components that are necessary for proper root growth and development. In the present study, we grew two maize genotypes with contrasting tolerance to Al in soil containing toxic levels of Al and then compared their transcriptomic responses. Results When grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al, the Al-sensitive genotype (S1587-17) showed greater root growth inhibition, more Al accumulation and more callose deposition in root tips than did the tolerant genotype (Cat100-6). Transcriptome profiling showed a higher number of genes differentially expressed in S1587-17 grown in acid soil, probably due to secondary effects of Al toxicity. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of organic acids, which are frequently associated with an Al tolerance response, were not differentially regulated in both genotypes after acid soil exposure. However, genes related to the biosynthesis of auxin, ethylene and lignin were up-regulated in the Al-sensitive genotype, indicating that these pathways might be associated with root growth inhibition. By comparing the two maize lines, we were able to discover genes up-regulated only in the Al-tolerant line that also presented higher absolute levels than those observed in the Al-sensitive line. These genes encoded a lipase hydrolase, a retinol dehydrogenase, a glycine-rich protein, a member of the WRKY transcriptional family and two unknown proteins. Conclusions This work provides the first characterization of the physiological and transcriptional responses of maize roots when grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al. The transcriptome profiles highlighted

  7. Solidification under microgravity conditions - Dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Hahn, R. C.; Lograsso, T. A.; Rubinstein, E. R.; Winsa, E.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental approach and apparatus of a zero-gravity active crystal growth experiment to test dendritic growth theory at low supercoolings are discussed. The experiment consists of 20 experimental cycles. Estimates have been made as to how low gravitational accelerations would have to be reduced to observe convection-free dendritic growth at supercoolings from 0.01-1.0 K. The experiment requires temperature control of + or - 2 mK and photographic resolution of a few microns with a depth of field of + or - 6 mm. The thermostatic bath and temperature control system, photographic system, growth chamber, and dendrite detection system are described in detail.

  8. Growth/no growth models for Zygosaccharomyces rouxii associated with acidic, sweet intermediate moisture food products.

    PubMed

    Marvig, C L; Kristiansen, R M; Nielsen, D S

    2015-01-01

    The most notorious spoilage organism of sweet intermediate moisture foods (IMFs) is Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, which can grow at low water activity, low pH and in the presence of organic acids. Together with an increased consumer demand for preservative free and healthier food products with less sugar and fat and a traditionally long self-life of sweet IMFs, the presence of Z. rouxii in the raw materials for IMFs has made assessment of the microbiological stability a significant hurdle in product development. Therefore, knowledge on growth/no growth boundaries of Z. rouxii in sweet IMFs is important to ensure microbiological stability and aid product development. Several models have been developed for fat based, sweet IMFs. However, fruit/sugar based IMFs, such as fruit based chocolate fillings and jams, have lower pH and aw than what is accounted for in previously developed models. In the present study growth/no growth models for acidified sweet IMFs were developed with the variables aw (0.65-0.80), pH (2.5-4.0), ethanol (0-14.5% (w/w) in water phase) and time (0-90 days). Two different strains of Z. rouxii previously found to show pronounced resistance to the investigated variables were included in model development, to account for strain differences. For both strains data sets with and without the presence of sorbic acid (250 ppm on product basis) were built. Incorporation of time as an exploratory variable in the models gave the possibility to predict the growth/no growth boundaries at each time between 0 and 90 days without decreasing the predictive power of the models. The influence of ethanol and aw on the growth/no growth boundary of Z. rouxii was most pronounced in the first 30 days and 60 days of incubation, respectively. The effect of pH was almost negligible in the range of 2.5-4.0. The presence of low levels of sorbic acid (250 ppm) eliminated growth of both strains at all conditions tested. The two strains tested have previously been shown to have

  9. Fatty acid patterns in Chlamydomonas sp. as a marker for nutritional regimes and temperature under extremely acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Spijkerman, E; Langer, U

    2004-07-01

    Fatty acid profiles were used to characterize nutritional pathways in Chlamydomonas sp. isolated from an acidic mining lake (pH 2.7). Surprisingly, profiles of Chlamydomonas sp. grown in the lab under photoautotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions at in situ deep strata lake water temperatures (8 degrees C) were very similar, polyunsaturated fatty acids including alpha-linolenic acid (18:3omega3) and 16:4omega3 along with palmitic acid (16:0) being most abundant. Therefore, heterotrophic growth of Chlamydomonas sp. at low temperatures can result in high concentrations of polyunsaturated fatty acids, as previously only described for some psychrophilic bacteria. By contrast, the cultivation of isolated Chlamydomonas sp. at 20 degrees C, reflecting surface water temperatures, provided fatty acid patterns characteristic of the nutrition strategy applied: the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased when the growth pathway changed from photoautotrophic via mixotrophic to heterotrophic. Total fatty acid concentration also diminished in this order. Principal component analysis confirmed the significance of FA profiling to mirror nutritional pathways. Lake-water analysis revealed low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, mainly consisting of polymeric fulvic acids that are unable to support heterotrophic growth of Chlamydomonas sp. Polymeric fulvic acids present in the deeper strata of the lake turned out to be formed in situ on the basis of organic monomers including reduced sulfur-containing ones, as revealed by thermochemolysis and pyrolysis. Growth of Chlamydomonas sp. in the deep chlorophyll maximum is therefore assumed to mainly result from photosynthesis, despite very low photon densities. Phytol-including metabolites proved to be significant biomarkers to indicate the nutritional pathway of Chlamydomonas sp. alpha, omega-Dicarboxylic acids-light-induced degradation products of unsaturated fatty acids-appeared to be good indicators

  10. [Inhibition of growth of microscopic fungi with organic acids].

    PubMed

    Conková, E; Para, L; Kocisová, A

    1993-01-01

    Fungicidal effects of five selected organic acids (lactic, acetic, formic, oxalic, and propionic) in concentrations 3, 5, 10, 20 and 50 ml/l on nine selected species of moulds were tested. Lactic and oxalic acids did not prove the satisfactory fungicidal activity in any of the chosen concentrations. The antifungal effect of the other three acids, manifested by the growth inhibition of the tested moulds is shown in Tab. I and it can be expressed by sequence: propionic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid. These acids also had effects only in concentrations 20 ml/l and 50 ml/l. Propionic acid in concentration 20 ml/l inhibited the growth of five moulds (Penicillium glabrum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium moniliforme, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum). In testing of concentration 50 ml/l, the lower fungicidal ability was ascertained only in growth suppression of Aspergillus flavus. The fungicidal activity of formic acid was registered in concentration 20 ml/l in two cases and in concentration 50 ml/l in six cases. Acetic acid inhibited the growth in concentration 50 ml/l only in two cases. Tab. II shows the percentual evaluation of propionic acid and formic acid with regard to their inhibition abilities. The fungicidal efficiency of propionic acid resulting from the experiment is 88.9%. PMID:8122343

  11. Effects of varying media, temperature, and growth rates on the intracellular concentrations of yeast amino acids.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Force, E; Benítez, T

    1995-01-01

    Variations of the yeast free amino acid pool under different culture conditions were studied in two Saccharomyces strains, the laboratory haploid strain S288C and the industrial fermentative yeast IFI256. The internal amino acid pool of both strains was measured when grown in laboratory (minimal and complete) versus semiindustrial (molasses with or without added biotin and/or diammonium phosphate) media, in fermentable (glucose, fructose, sucrose) versus respirable (glycerol) carbon sources, in different temperatures (22, 30, and 37 degrees C), pHs (2.0-4.75), and growth rates (0.018-0.24 h-1) in continuous culture, and at different phases of the growth curve in batch culture (lag, exponential, early and late stationary). Results indicated that environmental conditions, particularly the presence of amino acids in the media, enormously influenced the intracellular amino acid concentration. Higher values were detected in molasses than in laboratory media and in fermentable carbon sources (glucose, fructose, sucrose) than in glycerol. Variations in the amino acid pool along the growth curve were greater at 37 degrees C than at other temperatures; in all cases, the highest values were measured at the beginning of the exponential phase. In continuous culture and at different growth rates, intracellular free amino acid concentrations increased by 3-10-fold when the growth rate was lower than 0.05 h-1, representing 20-35% of the total (free plus protein) amino acid content and indicating that amino acid yield was a partly growth-linked parameter. PMID:7654310

  12. Culture Conditions stimulating high γ-Linolenic Acid accumulation by Spirulina platensis

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy; Lele, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) production by Spirulina platensis under different stress-inducing conditions was studied. Submerged culture studies showed that low temperature (25°C), strong light intensity (6 klux) and primrose oil supplement (0.8%w/v) induced 13.2 mg/g, 14.6 mg/g and 13.5 mg linolenic acid per gram dry cell weight respectively. A careful observation of fatty acid profile of the cyanobacteria shows that, oleic acid and linoleic acid, in experiments with varying growth temperature and oil supplements respectively, helped in accumulating excess γ-linolenic acid. In addition, cultures grown at increasing light regimes maintained the γ-linolenic acid to the total fatty acid ratio(GLA/TFA) constant, despite any change in γ-linolenic acid content of the cyanobacteria. PMID:24031291

  13. Eutectic growth under acoustic levitation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. J.; Cao, C. D.; Lü, Y. J.; Wei, B.

    2002-12-01

    Samples of Pb-Sn eutectic alloy with a high density of 8.5×103 kg/m3 are levitated with a single-axis acoustic levitator, and containerlessly melted and then solidified in argon atmosphere. High undercoolings up to 38 K are obtained, which results in a microstructural transition of ``lamellas-broken lamellas-dendrites.'' This transition is further investigated in the light of the coupled zone for eutectic growth and the effects of ultrasound. The breaking of regular eutectic lamellas and suppression of gravity-induced macrosegregation of (Pb) and (Sn) dendrites are explained by the complicated internal flow inside the levitated drop, which is jointly induced by the shape oscillation, bulk vibration and rotation of the levitated drop. The ultrasonic field is also found to drive forced surface vibration, which subsequently excites capillary ripples and catalyzes nucleation on the sample surface.

  14. Eutectic growth under acoustic levitation conditions.

    PubMed

    Xie, W J; Cao, C D; Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2002-12-01

    Samples of Pb-Sn eutectic alloy with a high density of 8.5 x 10(3) kg/m(3) are levitated with a single-axis acoustic levitator, and containerlessly melted and then solidified in argon atmosphere. High undercoolings up to 38 K are obtained, which results in a microstructural transition of "lamellas-broken lamellas-dendrites." This transition is further investigated in the light of the coupled zone for eutectic growth and the effects of ultrasound. The breaking of regular eutectic lamellas and suppression of gravity-induced macrosegregation of (Pb) and (Sn) dendrites are explained by the complicated internal flow inside the levitated drop, which is jointly induced by the shape oscillation, bulk vibration and rotation of the levitated drop. The ultrasonic field is also found to drive forced surface vibration, which subsequently excites capillary ripples and catalyzes nucleation on the sample surface. PMID:12513291

  15. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  16. Ion-exchange properties of strontium hydroxyapatite under acidic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Nishioka, Hitoshi; Moriga, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Hiromu; Moffat, J.B.

    1998-09-01

    The ion exchange of strontium hydroxyapatite (SrHAp) with Pb{sup 2+} has been investigated under acidic conditions at 293 K. The addition of various acids to the exchanging solution enhanced the exchange capacity in the order HCl > HBr > HF > HNO{sub 3} > no acid, corresponding to the formation of halogen apatites with the former three acids or hydrogen phosphate with HNO{sub 3}. Since the ion-exchange capacity of SrHAp under nonacidic conditions is higher than that of chlorapatite, the aforementioned observations can be attributed to the participation of the protons introduced by the acids.z

  17. Polymorphic transformation of antibiotic clarithromycin under acidic condition.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shuji; Takiyama, Kei; Fujiki, Sadahiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Miura, Keiko; Itai, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Clarithromycin (CAM) is a 14-membered semisynthetic macrolide antibiotic used to treat the infection of various bacteria including Helicobacter pylori. The polymorphic transformation of CAM form II crystals under acidic conditions is, however, still unclear, and was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction method. Gel of CAM, which was immediately formed by mixing form II crystals with the hydrochloric acid solution, transformed at first to unstable form A crystals and then to form B crystals. Both forms A and B crystals are hydrochloride salts. Analyses using Hancock-Sharp equation revealed that the mechanism of form B formation was three-dimensional growth of nuclei. The rate constant of the transformation indicated that the times for 95% of form A transforming to form B at 37 °C are 0.69, 1.90, and 3.79 h at pH 1.5, 2.5, and 3.4, respectively. These suggest that the transformation from form II to form B via gel and form A could occur on the surface of form II formulation of prolonged gastric residence time, in the case that the pH in stomach stays low. PMID:24375227

  18. Amino acids and insulin in neonatal growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rate of growth during the neonatal period is greater than at any other stage of postnatal life, and a majority of the mass increase is skeletal muscle. The rapid growth of skeletal muscle in the neonate is driven by an elevated rate of protein synthesis. Neonates are very efficient at utilizin...

  19. Effect of boundary conditions on thermal plume growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, A.; Sboev, I.; Rybkin, K.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the influence of boundary conditions on the growth rate of convective plumes. Temperature and rate fields were studied in a rectangular convective cell heated by a spot heater. The results of the full-scale test were compared with the numerical data calculated using the ANSYS CFX software package. The relationship between the heat plume growth rate and heat boundary conditions, the width and height of the cell, size of heater for different kinds of liquid was established.

  20. Controlled growth of filamentous fatty acid vesicles under flow.

    PubMed

    Hentrich, Christian; Szostak, Jack W

    2014-12-16

    The earliest forms of cellular life would have required a membrane compartment capable of growth and division. Fatty acid vesicles are an attractive model of protocell membranes, as they can grow into filamentous vesicles that readily divide while retaining their contents. In order to study vesicle growth, we have developed a method for immobilizing multilamellar fatty acid vesicles on modified glass surfaces and inducing filamentous membrane growth under flow. Filament formation strictly depended on the presence of freshly neutralized fatty acid micelles in the flow chamber. Using light microscopy, we observed a strong dependence of initial growth velocity on initial vesicle size, suggesting that new fatty acid molecules were incorporated into the membrane over the entire external surface of the vesicle. We examined the influences of flow rate, fatty acid concentration, and salt concentration on filamentous growth and observed drastic shape changes, including membrane pearling, of preexisting membrane tubules in response to osmotic stress. These results illustrate the versatility of flow studies for exploring the process of fatty acid vesicle growth following exposure to free fatty acids. PMID:25402759

  1. Controlled Growth of Filamentous Fatty Acid Vesicles under Flow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The earliest forms of cellular life would have required a membrane compartment capable of growth and division. Fatty acid vesicles are an attractive model of protocell membranes, as they can grow into filamentous vesicles that readily divide while retaining their contents. In order to study vesicle growth, we have developed a method for immobilizing multilamellar fatty acid vesicles on modified glass surfaces and inducing filamentous membrane growth under flow. Filament formation strictly depended on the presence of freshly neutralized fatty acid micelles in the flow chamber. Using light microscopy, we observed a strong dependence of initial growth velocity on initial vesicle size, suggesting that new fatty acid molecules were incorporated into the membrane over the entire external surface of the vesicle. We examined the influences of flow rate, fatty acid concentration, and salt concentration on filamentous growth and observed drastic shape changes, including membrane pearling, of preexisting membrane tubules in response to osmotic stress. These results illustrate the versatility of flow studies for exploring the process of fatty acid vesicle growth following exposure to free fatty acids. PMID:25402759

  2. Terminal acidic shock inhibits sour beer bottle conditioning by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Cody M; Veatch, Devon; Covey, Adam; Staton, Caleb; Bochman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    During beer fermentation, the brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae experiences a variety of shifting growth conditions, culminating in a low-oxygen, low-nutrient, high-ethanol, acidic environment. In beers that are bottle conditioned (i.e., carbonated in the bottle by supplying yeast with a small amount of sugar to metabolize into CO2), the S. cerevisiae cells must overcome these stressors to perform the ultimate act in beer production. However, medium shock caused by any of these variables can slow, stall, or even kill the yeast, resulting in production delays and economic losses. Here, we describe a medium shock caused by high lactic acid levels in an American sour beer, which we refer to as "terminal acidic shock". Yeast exposed to this shock failed to bottle condition the beer, though they remained viable. The effects of low pH/high [lactic acid] conditions on the growth of six different brewing strains of S. cerevisiae were characterized, and we developed a method to adapt the yeast to growth in acidic beer, enabling proper bottle conditioning. Our findings will aid in the production of sour-style beers, a trending category in the American craft beer scene. PMID:27052714

  3. Reevaluating the contribution of sulfuric acid and the origin of organic compounds in atmospheric nanoparticle growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakkari, Ville; Tiitta, Petri; Jaars, Kerneels; Croteau, Philip; Beukes, Johan Paul; Josipovic, Miroslav; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku; Venter, Andrew D.; Zyl, Pieter G.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Laakso, Lauri

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol particles formed in the atmosphere are important to the Earth's climate system due to their ability to affect cloud properties. At present, little is known about the atmospheric chemistry responsible for the growth of newly formed aerosol particles to climate-relevant sizes. Here combining detailed aerosol measurements with a theoretical framework we found that depending on the gaseous precursors and size of the newly formed particles, the growth was dominated by either sulfuric acid accompanied by ammonium or organic compounds originating in either biogenic emissions or savannah fires. The contribution of sulfuric acid was larger during the early phases of the growth, but in clean conditions organic compounds dominated the growth from 1.5 nm up to climatically relevant sizes. Furthermore, our analysis indicates that in polluted environments the contribution of sulfuric acid to the growth may have been underestimated by up to a factor of 10.

  4. Ice Crystal Growth Rates Under Upper Troposphere Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Bailey, Matthew; Hallett, John

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions for growth of ice crystals (temperature and ice supersaturation) are often not well constrained and it is necessary to simulate such conditions in the laboratory to investigate such growth under well controlled conditions over many hours. The growth of ice crystals from the vapour in both prism and basal planes was observed at temperatures of -60 C and -70 C under ice supersaturation up to 100% (200% relative humidity) at pressures derived from the standard atmosphere in a static diffusion chamber. Crystals grew outward from a vertical glass filament, thickening in the basal plane by addition of macroscopic layers greater than 2 m, leading to growth in the prism plane by passing of successive layers conveniently viewed by time lapse video.

  5. Ice Particle Growth Under Conditions of the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Bailey, Matthew; Hallett, John

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions for growth of ice crystals (temperature and ice supersaturation) are often not well constrained and it is necessary to simulate such conditions in the laboratory to investigate such growth under well controlled conditions over many hours. The growth of ice crystals from the vapour in both prism and basal planes was observed at temperatures of -60 C and -70 C under ice supersaturation up to 100% (200% relative humidity) at pressures derived from the standard atmosphere in a static diffusion chamber. Crystals grew outward from a vertical glass filament, thickening in the basal plane by addition of macroscopic layers greater than 2 microns, leading to growth in the prism plane by passing of successive layers conveniently viewed by time lapse video.

  6. Ice Particle Growth Rates Under Upper Troposphere Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Harold; Bailey, Matthew; Hallett, John

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions for growth of ice crystals (temperature and ice supersaturation) are often not well constrained and it is necessary to simulate such conditions in the laboratory to investigate such growth under well controlled conditions over many hours. The growth of ice crystals from the vapour in both prism and basal planes was observed at temperatures of -60 C and -70 C under ice supersaturation up to 100% (200% relative humidity) at pressures derived from the standard atmosphere in a static diffusion chamber. Crystals grew outward from a vertical glass filament, thickening in the basal plane by addition of macroscopic layers greater than 2 m, leading to growth in the prism plane by passing of successive layers conveniently viewed by time lapse video.

  7. Changes of nucleic acids of wheat seedlings under spaceflight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytnyk, K. M.; Musatenko, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of space flight on the growth of wheat seedlings and their nucleic acid content were studied. It was shown that both space and ground seedlings have almost the same appearance, dry weight and nucleic acid content in the root, coleoptile and leaves. The only difference found is in the RNA and DNA content, which is twice as much in the ground seedling apices as in the space-grown seedlings.

  8. Indium antimonide crystal growth experiment M562. [Skylab weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Witt, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    It was established that ideal diffusion controlled steady state conditions, never accomplished on earth, were achieved during the growth of Te-doped InSb crystals in Skylab. Surface tension effects led to nonwetting conditions under which free surface solidification took place in confined geometry. It was further found that, under forced contact conditions, surface tension effects led to the formation of surface ridges (not previously observed on earth) which isolated the growth system from its container. In addition, it was possible, for the first time, to identify unambiguously: the origin of segregation discontinuities associated with facet growth, the mode of nucleation and propagation of rotational twin boundaries, and the specific effect of mechanical-shock perturbations on segregation. The results obtained prove the advantageous conditions provided by outer space. Thus, fundamental data on solidification thought to be unattainable because of gravity-induced interference on earth are now within reach.

  9. Growth and physiological condition of black ducks reared on acidified wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Haramis, G.M.; Chu, D.S.; Bunck, C.M.; Scanes, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Acid deposition has been identified as one of several possible factors contributing to the decline of some waterfowl populations in North America. In an effort to examine the effects of acidification on black duck (Anas rubripes) recruitment, growth and physiological condition were monitored in ducklings foraging for a 10-day trial (days 10-20 of life) on acidified (pH 5.0) and : circumneutral (pH 6.8) fish-free emergent wetlands. Acidification of these wetlands suppressed phytoplankton and algal growth, and reduced invertebrate biomass. Ducklings maintained on acidified wetlands grew poorly compared with ducklings reared on circumneutral wetlands, as evidenced by lower final body weight and culmen and tarsus length. Plasma growth hormone concentration was elevated and triiodothyronine levels were lower in stunted ducklings, in part substantiating impairment of growth-regulating processes. Ducklings exhibiting poor growth tended to have lower hematocrit, lower plasma protein, glucose, and cholesterol concentrations, and higher uric acid levels, presumably reflecting alterations in metabolism and development due to inanition. These findings suggest that acid deposition may lower food production in wetlands and ultimately impair duckling growth, condition, and survival.

  10. Optimal Culture Conditions for Mycelial Growth of Lignosus rhinocerus

    PubMed Central

    Siti Murni, M.J.; Fauzi, D.; Abas Mazni, O.; Saleh, N.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lignosus rhinocerus is a macrofungus that belongs to Polyporaceae and is native to tropical regions. This highly priced mushroom has been used as folk medicine to treat diseases by indigenous people. As a preliminary study to develop a culture method for edible mushrooms, the cultural characteristics of L. rhinocerus were investigated in a range of culture media under different environmental conditions. Mycelial growth of this mushroom was compared on culture media composed of various carbon and nitrogen sources in addition to C/N ratios. The optimal conditions for mycelial growth were 30℃ at pH 6 and 7. Rapid mycelial growth of L. rhinocerus was observed on glucose-peptone and yeast extract peptone dextrose media. Carbon and nitrogen sources promoting mycelial growth of L. rhinocerus were glucose and potassium nitrate, respectively. The optimum C/N ratio was approximately 10 : 1 using 2% glucose supplemented as a carbon source in the basal media. PMID:22783083

  11. Cinnamic acid increases lignin production and inhibits soybean root growth.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Victor Hugo; Lima, Rogério Barbosa; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Böhm, Paulo Alfredo Feitoza; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max) roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H) reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth. PMID:23922685

  12. Effects of dissolved CO2 levels on the growth of Mannheimia succiniciproducens and succinic acid production.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyohak; Lee, Jeong Wook; Choi, Sol; You, Jong Kyun; Hong, Won Hi; Lee, Sang Yup

    2007-12-15

    A capnophilic rumen bacterium Mannheimia succiniciproducens produces succinic acid as a major fermentation end product under CO(2)-rich anaerobic condition. Since succinic acid is produced by carboxylation of C3 compounds during the fermentation, intracellular CO(2) availability is important for efficient succinic acid formation. Here, we investigated the metabolic responses of M. succiniciproducens to the different dissolved CO(2) concentrations (0-260 mM). Cell growth was severely suppressed when the dissolved CO(2) concentration was below 8.74 mM. On the other hand, cell growth and succinic acid production increased proportionally as the dissolved CO(2) concentration increased from 8.74 to 141 mM. The yields of biomass and succinic acid on glucose obtained at the dissolved CO(2) concentration of 141 mM were 1.49 and 1.52 times higher, respectively, than those obtained at the dissolved CO(2) concentration of 8.74 mM. It was also found that the additional CO(2) source provided in the form of NaHCO(3), MgCO(3), or CaCO(3) had positive effects on cell growth and succinic acid production. However, growth inhibition was observed when excessive bicarbonate salts were added. By the comparison of the activities of key enzymes, it was found that PEP carboxylation by PEP carboxykinase (PckA) is the most important for succinic acid production as well as the growth of M. succiniciproducens by providing additional ATP. PMID:17570706

  13. Crystal growth of a binary compound semiconductor under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Y.; Ikegami, K.; Maekawa, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Yoda, S.; Kinoshita, K.

    We investigate the possibilities of growing a uniform binary compound crystal in space numerically, proposing a new crystal growth method. We develop a numerical calculation method of the growth of binary crystals. The calculation method is applied to the crystal growth analysis of an InAs-GaAs binary semiconductor and the effect of buoyancy convection induced under microgravity conditions on the crystal growth process is investigated. We find that the concentration field is disturbed and, as a result, the solution—crystal interface is deformed by buoyancy convection even when the gravitational acceleration is as low as 10 -6 g, which is supposed to be the gravity level in the International Space Station. We also find that the direction of residual gravity has a strong effect on the concentration field in the solution and the crystal growth process.

  14. Changes in alpine plant growth under future climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammig, A.; Jonas, T.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Rixen, C.

    2010-06-01

    Alpine shrub- and grasslands are shaped by extreme climatic conditions such as a long-lasting snow cover and a short vegetation period. Such ecosystems are expected to be highly sensitive to global environmental change. Prolonged growing seasons and shifts in temperature and precipitation are likely to affect plant phenology and growth. In a unique experiment, climatology and plant growth was monitored for almost a decade at 17 snow meteorological stations in different alpine regions along the Swiss Alps. Regression analyses revealed highly significant correlations between mean air temperature in May/June and snow melt out, onset of plant growth, and plant height. These correlations were used to project plant growth phenology for future climate conditions based on the gridded output of a set of regional climate models runs. Melt out and onset of growth were projected to occur on average 17 days earlier by the end of the century than in the control period from 1971-2000 under the future climate conditions of the low resolution climate model ensemble. Plant height and biomass production were expected to increase by 77% and 45%, respectively. The earlier melt out and onset of growth will probably cause a considerable shift towards higher growing plants and thus increased biomass. Our results represent the first quantitative and spatially explicit estimates of climate change impacts on future growing season length and the respective productivity of alpine plant communities in the Swiss Alps.

  15. Changes in alpine plant growth under future climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammig, A.; Jonas, T.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Rixen, C.

    2009-11-01

    Alpine shrub- and grasslands are shaped by extreme climatic conditions such as a long-lasting snow cover and a short vegetation period. Such ecosystems are expected to be highly sensitive to global environmental change. Prolonged growing seasons and shifts in temperature and precipitation are likely to affect plant phenology and growth. In a unique experiment, climatology and plant growth was monitored for almost a decade at 17 snow meteorological stations in different alpine regions along the Swiss Alps. Regression analyses revealed highly significant correlations between mean air temperature in May/June and snow melt-out, onset of plant growth, and plant height. These correlations were used to project plant growth phenology for future climate conditions based on the gridded output of a set of regional climate models runs. Melt-out and onset of growth were projected to occur on average 17 days earlier by the end of the century than in the control period from 1971-2000 under the future climate conditions of the low resolution climate model ensemble. Plant height and biomass production were expected to increase by 77% and 45%, respectively. The earlier melt-out and onset of growth will probably cause a considerable shift towards higher growing plants and thus increased biomass. Our results represent the first quantitative and spatially explicit estimates of climate change impacts on future growing season length and the respective productivity of alpine plant communities in the Swiss Alps.

  16. Adaptive growth responses of Listeria monocytogenes to acid and osmotic shifts above and across the growth boundaries.

    PubMed

    Belessi, C-I A; Le Marc, Y; Merkouri, S I; Gounadaki, A S; Schvartzman, S; Jordan, K; Drosinos, E H; Skandamis, P N

    2011-01-01

    The effect of acid and osmotic shifts on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated at 10°C. Two types of shifts were tested: (i) within the range of pH and water activity (a(w)) levels that allow growth of L. monocytogenes and (ii) after habituation at no-growth conditions back to growth-permitting conditions. A L. monocytogenes cheese isolate, with high survival capacity during cheesemaking, was inoculated (10(2) CFU/ml) in tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract at six pH levels (5.1 to 7.2; adjusted with lactic acid) and 0.5% NaCl (a(w) 0.995), or four a(w) levels (0.995 to 0.93, adjusted with 0.5 to 10.5% NaCl) at pH 7.2 and grown to early stationary phase. L. monocytogenes was then shifted (at 10(2) CFU/ml) to each of the aforementioned growth-permitting pH and a(w) levels and incubated at 10°C. Shifts from no-growth to growth-permitting conditions were carried out by transferring L. monocytogenes habituated at pH 4.9 or a(w) 0.90 (12.5% NaCl) for 1, 5, and 10 days to all pH and a(w) levels permitting growth. Reducing a(w) or pH at different levels in the range of 0.995 to 0.93 and 7.2 to 5.1, respectively, decreased the maximum specific growth rate of L. monocytogenes. The lag time of the organism increased with all osmotic downshifts, as well as by the reduction of pH to 5.1. Conversely, any type of shift within pH 5.5 to 7.2 did not markedly affect the lag times of L. monocytogenes. The longer the cells were incubated at no-growth a(w) (0.90), the faster they initiated growth subsequently, suggesting adaptation to osmotic stress. Conversely, extended habituation at pH 4.9 had the opposite effect on subsequent growth of L. monocytogenes, possibly due to cell injury. These results suggest that there is an adaptation or injury rate induced at conditions inhibiting the growth of the pathogen. Thus, quantifying adaptation phenomena under growth-limiting environments, such as in fermented dairy and meat products or products preserved in

  17. Controlling Disulfide Bond Formation and Crystal Growth from 2-Mercaptobenzoic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Clare E.; Cantos, P. M.; Toby, B. H.; Frisch, M.; Deschamps, J. R.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2011-03-02

    We report disulfide bond formation from 2-mercaptobenzoic acid (2-MBA) under hydrothermal conditions as a function of pH. Under acidic conditions, 2-MBA remains unchanged. Upon increasing pH, however, we observe 50% oxidation to 2,2'-disulfanediyldibenzoic acid (2,2'-DSBA), which is isolated as a cocrystal of both the thiol and disulfide molecules. At neutral pH, we observe complete oxidation and concurrent crystal growth. The pH sensitivity of this system allows targeting crystals of specific composition from simple building units through a straightforward pH manipulation.

  18. Growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans on formic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pronk, J.T.; Meijer, W.M.; Hazeu, W.; vanDijken, J.P.; Bos, P.; Kuenen, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    A variety of acidophilic microorganisms were shown to be capable of oxidizing formate. These included Thiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 21834, which, however, could not grow on formate in normal batch cultures. However, the organism could be grown on formate when the substrate supply was growth limiting, e.g., in formate-limited chemostat cultures. The cell densities achieved by the use of the latter cultivation method were higher than cell densities reported for growth of T. ferrooxidans on ferrous iron or reduced sulfur compounds. Inhibition of formate oxidation by cell suspensions, but not cell extracts, of formate-grown T. ferrooxidans occurred at formate concentrations above 100 {mu}M. This observation explains the inability of the organism to grow on formate in batch cultures. Cells grown in formate-limited chemostat cultures retained the ability to oxidize ferrous iron at high rates. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activities in cell extracts indicated that T. ferrooxidans employs the Calvin cycle for carbon assimilation during growth on formate. Oxidation of formate by cell extracts was NAD(P) independent.

  19. Effect of Amino Acids on Steady-State Growth of a Group A Hemolytic Streptococcus1

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Helen C.; Karush, Fred; Rudd, Joanne H.

    1965-01-01

    Davies, Helen C. (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia), Fred Karush, and Joanne H. Rudd. Effect of amino acids on steady-state growth of a group A hemolytic streptococcus. J. Bacteriol. 89:421–427. 1965.—A study has been made of amino acid utilization by a strain of type 4, group A streptococcus growing under steady-state conditions in a continuous-culture device and supplied with a completely synthetic medium. At a fixed growth rate, corresponding to a generation of time of 84 min, and with the pH maintained constant at 7.4, the bacterial turbidity was made dependent on the concentration of one of the amino acids of the defined medium. Under these conditions, the extracellular concentration of the limiting amino acid is fixed by the preset growth rate. The steady-state concentration of each of 14 essential l-amino acids was measured by means of C14-labeled amino acids in such limited cultures. At approximately equal turbidities, these concentrations ranged from 1.6 × 10−6m for methionine to 4.3 × 10−4m for glutamic acid. The rates of utilization of the amino acids ranged from 26 mμmoles per mg (dry weight) of bacteria per hr for histidine to 310 mμmoles per mg (dry weight) of bacteria per hr for glutamic acid. The percentage of the limiting amino acid used varied from 95% for threonine and methionine to 43% for gluamic acid. The rate of utilization of the limiting amino acid at unit concentration (tmoles per gram per hour per m) differed by a factor of 27 between extremes. These observations reflect the variation in the capacity of this streptococcal cell to take up and use different amino acids. PMID:14255710

  20. Partitioning the Relative Importance of Phylogeny and Environmental Conditions on Phytoplankton Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Aaron W E; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA), which are primarily generated by phytoplankton, limit growth and reproduction in diverse heterotrophs. The biochemical composition of phytoplankton is well-known to be governed both by phylogeny and environmental conditions. Nutrients, light, salinity, and temperature all affect both phytoplankton growth and fatty acid composition. However, the relative importance of taxonomy and environment on algal fatty acid content has yet to be comparatively quantified, thus inhibiting predictions of changes to phytoplankton food quality in response to global environmental change. We compiled 1145 published marine and freshwater phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, consisting of 208 species from six major taxonomic groups, cultured in a wide range of environmental conditions, and used a multivariate distance-based linear model to quantify the total variation explained by each variable. Our results show that taxonomic group accounts for 3-4 times more variation in phytoplankton fatty acids than the most important growth condition variables. The results underscore that environmental conditions clearly affect phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, but also show that conditions account for relatively low variation compared to phylogeny. This suggests that the underlying mechanism determining basal food quality in aquatic habitats is primarily phytoplankton community composition, and allows for prediction of environmental-scale EFA dynamics based on phytoplankton community data. We used the compiled dataset to calculate seasonal dynamics of long-chain EFA (LCEFA; ≥C20 ɷ-3 and ɷ-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid) concentrations and ɷ-3:ɷ-6 EFA ratios in Lake Washington using a multi-decadal phytoplankton community time series. These analyses quantify temporal dynamics of algal-derived LCEFA and food quality in a freshwater ecosystem that has undergone large community changes as a result of shifting resource management practices, highlighting diatoms

  1. Partitioning the Relative Importance of Phylogeny and Environmental Conditions on Phytoplankton Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Aaron W. E.; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA), which are primarily generated by phytoplankton, limit growth and reproduction in diverse heterotrophs. The biochemical composition of phytoplankton is well-known to be governed both by phylogeny and environmental conditions. Nutrients, light, salinity, and temperature all affect both phytoplankton growth and fatty acid composition. However, the relative importance of taxonomy and environment on algal fatty acid content has yet to be comparatively quantified, thus inhibiting predictions of changes to phytoplankton food quality in response to global environmental change. We compiled 1145 published marine and freshwater phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, consisting of 208 species from six major taxonomic groups, cultured in a wide range of environmental conditions, and used a multivariate distance-based linear model to quantify the total variation explained by each variable. Our results show that taxonomic group accounts for 3-4 times more variation in phytoplankton fatty acids than the most important growth condition variables. The results underscore that environmental conditions clearly affect phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, but also show that conditions account for relatively low variation compared to phylogeny. This suggests that the underlying mechanism determining basal food quality in aquatic habitats is primarily phytoplankton community composition, and allows for prediction of environmental-scale EFA dynamics based on phytoplankton community data. We used the compiled dataset to calculate seasonal dynamics of long-chain EFA (LCEFA; ≥C20 ɷ-3 and ɷ-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid) concentrations and ɷ-3:ɷ-6 EFA ratios in Lake Washington using a multi-decadal phytoplankton community time series. These analyses quantify temporal dynamics of algal-derived LCEFA and food quality in a freshwater ecosystem that has undergone large community changes as a result of shifting resource management practices, highlighting diatoms

  2. Growth, morphology, spectral and thermal studies of gel grown diclofenac acid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, E.; Ramukutty, S.

    2014-03-01

    The crystal growth of diclofenac acid in silica gel is the first to be reported in literature. The growth parameters were varied to optimize the suitable growth condition. Single crystal X-ray diffraction method was used for the conformation of the crystal structure. Morphology studies showed that the growth is prominent along the b-axis and the prominent face is {002}. Fourier transform infrared spectral study was performed to identify the functional groups present in the crystal. Thermal stability and decomposition of the material were analyzed using thermo calorimetry in the temperature range 30-500 °C.

  3. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  4. Selective oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions using gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Veith, Gabriel M; Prati, Laura

    2010-01-01

    H-mordenite-supported PtAu nanoparticles are highly active and selective in the oxidation of glycerol under acidic conditions, which allows the direct preparation of free acids (see picture). The high selectivity for C{sub 3} compounds results from the negligible formation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in contrast to PtAu nanoparticles supported on activated carbon.

  5. Improved growth, productivity and quality of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants through application of shikimic acid

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amri, Salem M.

    2013-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of seed presoaking of shikimic acid (30, 60 and 120 ppm) on growth parameters, fruit productivity and quality, transpiration rate, photosynthetic pigments and some mineral nutrition contents of tomato plants. Shikimic acid at all concentrations significantly increased fresh and dry weights, fruit number, average fresh and dry fruit yield, vitamin C, lycopene, carotenoid contents, total acidity and fruit total soluble sugars of tomato plants when compared to control plants. Seed pretreatment with shikimic acid at various doses induces a significant increase in total leaf conductivity, transpiration rate and photosynthetic pigments (Chl. a, chl. b and carotenoids) of tomato plants. Furthermore, shikimic acid at various doses applied significantly increased the concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in tomato leaves as compared to control non-treated tomato plants. Among all doses of shikimic acid treatment, it was found that 60 ppm treatment caused a marked increase in growth, fruit productivity and quality and most studied parameters of tomato plants when compared to other treatments. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in total photosynthetic pigments, concentrations of nitrogen and potassium in leaves of tomato plants treated with 30 ppm of shikimic acid and control plants. According to these results, it could be suggested that shikimic acid used for seed soaking could be used for increasing growth, fruit productivity and quality of tomato plants growing under field conditions. PMID:24235870

  6. A mechanistic model of wormhole growth in carbonate matrix acidizing and acid fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.; Hill, A.D.; Sepehrnoorl, K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during ann acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation was developed. The model is initialized with the distribution of largest pores. Wormhole characteristics (size, length, and distribution) were found too be controlled by acid-injection, diffusion, and fluid-loss rates.

  7. Degenerate nonlinear programming with a quadratic growth condition.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2000-01-01

    We show that the quadratic growth condition and the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification (MFCQ) imply that local minima of nonlinear programs are isolated stationary points. As a result, when started sufficiently close to such points, an L1 exact penalty sequential quadratic programming algorithm will induce at least R-linear convergence of the iterates to such a local minimum. We construct an example of a degenerate nonlinear program with a unique local minimum satisfying the quadratic growth and the MFCQ but for which no positive semidefinite augmented Lagrangian exists. We present numerical results obtained using several nonlinear programming packages on this example and discuss its implications for some algorithms.

  8. Effects of humic acids on the growth of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, V. V.; Yakushev, A. V.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Byzov, B. A.; Demin, V. V.

    2010-03-01

    The influence of humic acids of different origins on the growth of bacterial cultures of different taxa isolated from the soil and the digestive tracts of earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa)—habitats with contrasting conditions—was studied. More than half of the soil and intestinal isolates from the 170 tested strains grew on the humic acid of brown coal as the only carbon source. The specific growth rate of the bacteria isolated from the intestines of the earthworms was higher than that of the soil bacteria. The use of humic acids by intestinal bacteria confirms the possibility of symbiotic digestion by earthworms with the participation of bacterial symbionts. Humic acids at a concentration of 0.1 g/l stimulated the growth of the soil and intestinal bacteria strains (66 strains out of 161) on Czapek’s medium with glucose (1 g/l), probably, acting as a regulator of the cell metabolism. On the medium with the humic acid, the intestinal bacteria grew faster than the soil isolates did. The most active growth of the intestinal isolates was observed by Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas putida, Delftia acidovorans, Microbacterium terregens, and Aeromonas sp.; among the soil ones were the representatives of the Pseudomonas genus. A response of the bacteria to the influence of humic acids was shown at the strain level using the example of Pseudomonas representatives. The Flexom humin preparation stimulated the growth of the hydrocarbon-oxidizing Acinetobacter sp. bacteria. This effect can be used for creating a new compound with the elevated activity of bacteria that are destroyers of oil and oil products.

  9. Multiphase Chemistry of Pyruvic Acid Under Atmospherically Relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaida, V.; Monod, A.; Doussin, J. F.; Reed Harris, A. E.; Griffith, E. C.; Kroll, J. A.; Rapf, R.

    2014-12-01

    Chemistry in the natural environment proceeds in multiple phases and is subject to effects from atmospheric constituents and conditions. This presentation will use pyruvic acid as a case study to demonstrate the complexity of atmospheric multiphase chemistry. The photophysics and photochemistry of pyruvic acid proceeds on different potential energy surfaces with different reaction mechanisms, rates, and products in gas versus the aqueous phase. While the gas phase reaction generally decreases the complexity of products, the aqueous chemistry creates higher molecular weight, surface-active compounds. The studies presented involve a combination of laboratory studies that focus on the photochemistry of pyruvic acid in both the gas and aqueous phases. Further, experiments in an environmental simulation chamber (CESAM) that follow the photochemistry chemistry of pyruvic acid under atmospherically relevant conditions will be presented to highlight the effect of pressure, oxygen, relative humidity, and phase on the photochemistry of pyruvic acid. The results provide new input for atmospheric chemistry models that is required to better describe the behavior of α-keto acids in the environment.

  10. Amyloid Aggregates Arise from Amino Acid Condensations under Prebiotic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Jason; Friedmann, Michael P; Riek, Roland

    2016-09-12

    Current theories on the origin of life reveal significant gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms that allowed simple chemical precursors to coalesce into the complex polymers that are needed to sustain life. The volcanic gas carbonyl sulfide (COS) is known to catalyze the condensation of amino acids under aqueous conditions, but the reported di-, tri-, and tetra-peptides are too short to support a regular tertiary structure. Here, we demonstrate that alanine and valine, two of the proteinogenic amino acids believed to have been among the most abundant on a prebiotic earth, can polymerize into peptides and subsequently assemble into ordered amyloid fibers comprising a cross-β-sheet quaternary structure following COS-activated continuous polymerization of as little as 1 mm amino acid. Furthermore, this spontaneous assembly is not limited to pure amino acids, since mixtures of glycine, alanine, aspartate, and valine yield similar structures. PMID:27511635

  11. Degradation rates of glycerol polyesters at acidic and basic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyesters prepared from glycerol with mixtures of adipic and citric acids were evaluated in the laboratory to estimate degradation rates over a range of pH conditions. These renewable polymers provide a market for glycerol that is generated during biodiesel production. The polyesters were prepared...

  12. Mechanisms of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid inhibition of mammary cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Said, Thenaa K; Moraes, Ricardo CB; Sinha, Raghu; Medina, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in cell growth inhibition involved induction of pRb-2/p130 interaction and nuclear translocation with E2F-4, followed by significant repression in E2F-1 and PCNA nuclear levels, which led to inhibition in DNA synthesis in mammary epithelial cell lines. PMID:11250759

  13. Antimicrobial Treatment Improves Mycobacterial Survival in Nonpermissive Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Turapov, Obolbek; Waddell, Simon J.; Burke, Bernard; Glenn, Sarah; Sarybaeva, Asel A.; Tudo, Griselda; Labesse, Gilles; Young, Danielle I.; Young, Michael; Andrew, Peter W.; Butcher, Philip D.; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobials targeting cell wall biosynthesis are generally considered inactive against nonreplicating bacteria. Paradoxically, we found that under nonpermissive growth conditions, exposure of Mycobacterium bovis BCG bacilli to such antimicrobials enhanced their survival. We identified a transcriptional regulator, RaaS (for regulator of antimicrobial-assisted survival), encoded by bcg1279 (rv1219c) as being responsible for the observed phenomenon. Induction of this transcriptional regulator resulted in reduced expression of specific ATP-dependent efflux pumps and promoted long-term survival of mycobacteria, while its deletion accelerated bacterial death under nonpermissive growth conditions in vitro and during macrophage or mouse infection. These findings have implications for the design of antimicrobial drug combination therapies for persistent infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. PMID:24590482

  14. Growth behavior of anodic oxide formed by aluminum anodizing in glutaric and its derivative acid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Daiki; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Natsui, Shungo; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2014-12-01

    The growth behavior of anodic oxide films formed via anodizing in glutaric and its derivative acid solutions was investigated based on the acid dissociation constants of electrolytes. High-purity aluminum foils were anodized in glutaric, ketoglutaric, and acetonedicarboxylic acid solutions under various electrochemical conditions. A thin barrier anodic oxide film grew uniformly on the aluminum substrate by glutaric acid anodizing, and further anodizing caused the film to breakdown due to a high electric field. In contrast, an anodic porous alumina film with a submicrometer-scale cell diameter was successfully formed by ketoglutaric acid anodizing at 293 K. However, the increase and decrease in the temperature of the ketoglutaric acid resulted in non-uniform oxide growth and localized pitting corrosion of the aluminum substrate. An anodic porous alumina film could also be fabricated by acetonedicarboxylic acid anodizing due to the relatively low dissociation constants associated with the acid. Acid dissociation constants are an important factor for the fabrication of anodic porous alumina films.

  15. Crystal growth under microgravity conditions with using of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feonychev, A.; Bondareva, N.

    The peculiarities of melt flows and crystal growth by the Bridgman and floating zone methods aboard spacecrafts under the action of steady axial or rotating magnetic field are considered. Steady magnetic field can minimize adverse effect of residual accelerations and vibrations on dopant segregation in crystals growing by the Bridgman method but it requires using strong magnetic fields, which induces specific oscillations. Under strong convection in terrestrial conditions steady magnetic field gives positive effect. Under growth of small-sized crystals by the floating zone method in microgravity conditions an use of steady magnetic field brings into dramatic increase of radial segregation due to convective vortex to free fluid surface. The flows being created by rotating magnetic field and resultant under combination of Marangoni convection with rotating magnetic field were studied for wide range of parameters including the regimes of oscillatory (turbulent) convection. Mathematical model and computer program was tested by published results of two experiments. The dependence of transition from laminar to oscillatory flow was obtained for different boundary conditions, geometric parameters of fluid and intensity of magnetic field. Specific oscillations with very low frequency and oscillations of the beating type had been discovered under the action rotating magnetic field on Marangoni convection. The mutual influence of rotating magnetic field and thermocapillary convection on flow stability was noted. Use of rotating magnetic field under crystal growth by floating zone method leads to reduction of azimuth velocity which is responsible for origin of oscillatory convection and striation of crystals. It was shown on concrete examples that there is a possibility to reduce radial segregation under optimization of rotating velocity and intensity of magnetic field. For the Bridgman method (in general for ampoule methods of crystal growth), the use of rotating magnetic

  16. Synthesis and chirality of amino acids under interstellar conditions.

    PubMed

    Giri, Chaitanya; Goesmann, Fred; Meinert, Cornelia; Evans, Amanda C; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are the fundamental building blocks of proteins, the biomolecules that provide cellular structure and function in all living organisms. A majority of amino acids utilized within living systems possess pre-specified orientation geometry (chirality); however the original source for this specific orientation remains uncertain. In order to trace the chemical evolution of life, an appreciation of the synthetic and evolutional origins of the first chiral amino acids must first be gained. Given that the amino acids in our universe are likely to have been synthesized in molecular clouds in interstellar space, it is necessary to understand where and how the first synthesis might have occurred. The asymmetry of the original amino acid synthesis was probably the result of exposure to chiral photons in the form of circularly polarized light (CPL), which has been detected in interstellar molecular clouds. This chirality transfer event, from photons to amino acids, has been successfully recreated experimentally and is likely a combination of both asymmetric synthesis and enantioselective photolysis. A series of innovative studies have reported successful simulation of these environments and afforded production of chiral amino acids under realistic circumstellar and interstellar conditions: irradiation of interstellar ice analogues (CO, CO2, NH3, CH3OH, and H2O) with circularly polarized ultraviolet photons at low temperatures does result in enantiomer enriched amino acid structures (up to 1.3% ee). This topical review summarizes current knowledge and recent discoveries about the simulated interstellar environments within which amino acids were probably formed. A synopsis of the COSAC experiment onboard the ESA cometary mission ROSETTA concludes this review: the ROSETTA mission will soft-land on the nucleus of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014, anticipating the first in situ detection of asymmetric organic molecules in cometary ices. PMID:22976459

  17. Accelerated aging of outdoor insulation under acid rain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Nancy Ellen

    2000-11-01

    Outdoor insulation has evolved from glass to ceramics to epoxy in the past decades, and more recently into the area of polymer composites. Accelerated aging must be performed to examine the effectiveness of materials prior to use under actual service conditions. Traditionally this aging has been performed with sodium chloride as the conductive component in the high humidity and wet tests. This approach does not necessarily represent actual service conditions, as globally the precipitation is acidic in nature and contains many constituents in addition to sodium and chloride. The main focus of this work was to examine the effect of acid precipitation on materials used in outdoor insulation applications. This was achieved through the use of a rotating tracking wheel and a controlled high humidity chamber with the application of a synthetic acid rain solution. The analysis techniques utilized to examine the results of the accelerated aging were leakage current monitoring, evaluation of changes in dielectric properties as well as electron microscopy. In addition, changes in hydrophobicity were quantified. Based on experimental observations, a first order life prediction model was developed to investigate the usefulness of the acid rain aging technique. This model was founded on the results of a series of tests conducted with varying solution conductivity, while maintaining constant acid content. This model permits the prediction of the life of a material at normal precipitation conductivity levels.

  18. Modeling of matrix acidizing process under reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turegeldieva, Karlygash; Assilbekov, Bakhytzhan; Zhapbasbayev, Uzak; Zolotukhin, Anatoly; Bekibaev, Timur; Kenzhebekov, Nurlan; Gubkin Russian State University of oil; gas Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Effectiveness of the process depends on the parameters: well choice, geological structure of the reservoir, definition of physical and chemical properties of rocks and fluids, agent choice. There are different mathematical models of the matrix acidizing, including the two scale model. These models describe the process in the core scale and Darcy scale, i.e. in an area with dimensions of several centimeters. It leads to the main problem - how to use these models to the near wellbore scale under reservoir conditions. Some authors have increased the dimensions of the cores in numerical simulations and investigated the influence of the core dimensions to acidizing process. In this paper effort to indirectly solve this problem made. It based on boundary conditions alteration and simultaneous solution of matrix acidizing in damaged zone and reservoir fluid flow models. Furthermore in this work the criterion of the acid injection shut down for optimal breakthrough volume calculation was modified. Influence of boundary conditions on near well-bore zone treatment process was investigated. Science Committee of Ministry of Education and Science of Republic of Kazakhstan.

  19. Polymerization of amino acids under primitive earth conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J. J.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1972-01-01

    Small amounts of peptides were obtained when equal amounts of methane and ammonia were reacted with vaporized aqueous solutions of C14-labeled glycine, L-alanine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid and L-threonine in the presence of a continuous spark discharge in a 24-hr cyclic process. The experiment was designed to demonstrate the possibility of peptide synthesis under simulated primeval earth conditions. It is theorized that some dehydration-condensation processes may have taken place, with ammonium cyanide, the hydrogencyanide tetramer or aminonitriles as intermediate products, during the early chemical evolution of the earth.

  20. Hydrolysis of aceto-hydroxamic acid under UREX+ conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alyapyshev, M.; Paulenova, A.; Tkac, P.; Cleveland, M.A.; Bruso, J.E.

    2007-07-01

    Aceto-hydroxamic acid (AHA) is used as a stripping agent In the UREX process. While extraction yields of uranium remain high upon addition of AHA, hexavalent plutonium and neptunium are rapidly reduced to the pentavalent state while the tetravalent species and removed from the product stream. However, under acidic conditions, aceto-hydroxamic acid undergoes hydrolytic degradation. In this study, the kinetics of the hydrolysis of aceto-hydroxamic acid in nitric and perchloric acid media was investigated at several temperatures. The decrease of the concentration of AHA was determined via its ferric complex using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The data obtained were analyzed using the method of initial rates. The data follow the pseudo-first order reaction model. Gamma irradiation of AHA/HNO{sub 3} solutions with 33 kGy/s caused two-fold faster degradation of AHA. The rate equation and thermodynamic data will be presented for the hydrolysis reaction with respect to the concentrations of aceto-hydroxamic acid, nitrate and hydronium ions, and radiation dose. (authors)

  1. Phospholipase Dε and Phosphatidic Acid Enhance Arabidopsis Growth

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yueyun; Devaiah, Shivakumar P.; Bahn, SungChul; Thamasandra, Bharath N.; Li, Maoyin; Welti, Ruth; Wang, Xuemin

    2014-01-01

    Summary The activation of phospholipase D (PLD) produces phosphatidic acid (PA), a new lipid messenger implicated in cell growth and proliferation, but direct evidence for PLD and PA promotion of growth at an organismal level is lacking. Here we characterized a new PLD, PLDε, and show that PLDε plays a role in promoting Arabidopsis growth. PLDε is mainly associated with the plasma membrane and is the most permissive of all PLDs tested in activity requirements. Knockout (KO) of PLDε decreases, whereas overexpression (OE) of PLDε enhances root growth and biomass accumulation. The level of PA was higher in OE, but lower in KO than in wild-type plants, and suppression of PLD-mediated PA formation by alcohol alleviated the growth-promoting effect of PLDε. OE and KO of PLDε had the opposite effect on lateral root elongation in response to nitrogen (N). Increased expression of PLDε also promoted root hair elongation and primary root growth at severe N deprivation. The results suggest that PLDε and PA promote organismal growth and play a role in N response. The lipid signaling process may play a role in translating the membrane sensing of nutrient status to increasing plant growth and biomass production. PMID:19143999

  2. Effect of lighting conditions on zebrafish growth and development.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Natalia; Vera, Luisa María; Foulkes, Nicholas Simon; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2014-04-01

    In the underwater environment, the properties of light (intensity and spectrum) change rapidly with depth and water quality. In this article, we have described how and to what extent lighting conditions can influence the development, growth, and survival of zebrafish. Fertilized eggs and the corresponding larvae were exposed to different visible light wavelengths (violet, blue, green, yellow, red, and white) in a 12-h light-12-h dark (LD) cycle until 30 days posthatching (dph), when the expression of morphometric parameters and growth (igf1a, igf2a)- and stress-related (crh and pomca) genes were examined. Another group of larvae was raised under constant darkness (DD) until 5 or 10 dph, after which they were transferred to a LD of white light. A third group remained under DD to investigate the effects of light deprivation upon zebrafish development. The results revealed that the hatching rate was highest under blue and violet light, while total length at 30 dph was greatest under blue, white, and violet light. Red light led to reduced feeding activity and poor survival (100% mortality). Larvae raised under constant white light (LL) showed a higher proportion of malformations, as did larvae raised under LD violet light. The expression of growth and stress factors was upregulated in the violet (igf1a, igf2a, pomca, and chr) and blue (igf2a) groups, which is consistent with the higher growth recorded and the higher proportion of malformations detected under the violet light. All larvae kept under DD died before 18 dph, but the survival rates improved in larvae transferred to LD at 5 dph and at 10 dph. In summary, these findings revealed that lighting conditions are crucial factors influencing zebrafish larval development and growth. PMID:24367902

  3. Role of Arachidonic Acid in Promoting Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Munkhbayar, Semchin; Jang, Sunhyae; Cho, A-Ri; Choi, Soon-Jin; Shin, Chang Yup; Eun, Hee Chul; Kim, Kyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid (AA) is an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid present in all mammalian cell membranes, and involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including cell survival, angiogenesis, and mitogenesis. The dermal papilla, composed of specialized fibroblasts located in the bulb of the hair follicle, contributes to the control of hair growth and the hair cycle. Objective This study investigated the effect of AA on hair growth by using in vivo and in vitro models. Methods The effect of AA on human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) and hair shaft elongation was evaluated by MTT assay and hair follicle organ culture, respectively. The expression of various growth and survival factors in hDPCs were investigated by western blot or immunohistochemistry. The ability of AA to induce and prolong anagen phase in C57BL/6 mice was analyzed. Results AA was found to enhance the viability of hDPCs and promote the expression of several factors responsible for hair growth, including fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7) and FGF-10. Western blotting identified the role of AA in the phosphorylation of various transcription factors (ERK, CREB, and AKT) and increased expression of Bcl-2 in hDPCs. In addition, AA significantly promoted hair shaft elongation, with increased proliferation of matrix keratinocytes, during ex vivo hair follicle culture. It was also found to promote hair growth by induction and prolongation of anagen phase in telogen-stage C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion This study concludes that AA plays a role in promoting hair growth by increasing the expression of growth factors in hDPCs and enhancing follicle proliferation and survival. PMID:26848219

  4. Evaluation of viability and growth of Acetobacter senegalensis under different stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Rasoul; Delvigne, Frank; Babanezhad, Manoochehr; Thonart, Philippe

    2013-05-15

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are used in production of vinegars. During acetic acid fermentation, AAB encounter various aggressive conditions which may lead to a variety of cellular disorders. Previous researches mainly studied the influences of different carbon sources on tolerance of AAB to ethanol and acetic acid. In this study, different techniques were used comparatively to investigate the effects of preadaptation on the ability of A. senegalensis to tolerate ethanol and acetic acid. In general, the carbon sources used for preadaptation of A. senegalensis exhibited significant effects on the tolerance of cells to stressors. Flow-cytometric assessments of preadapted cells in ethanol showed that 87.3% of the cells perform respiration after exposure to a stress medium containing 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid. However, 58.4% of these preadapted cells could keep their envelope integrity under the stress condition. They could also grow rapidly (μmax=0.39/h) in the stress medium (E5A3) with a high yield (>80%). A. senegalensis grown in glucose exhibited a low tolerance to acetic acid. Analysis of their respiration capacity, membrane integrity and culturability revealed that almost all the population were dead after exposure to 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid. In contrast, exposure of A. senegalensis preadapted in a mixture of glucose and acetic acid to a stress medium containing 5% (v/v) ethanol and 3% (w/v) acetic acid, exhibited an intact respiration system and cellular membrane integrity in 80.3% and 50.01% of cells, respectively. Moreover, just 24% of these cells could keep their culturability under that stress condition. In summary, cell envelope integrity, growth and culturability are more susceptible to pH and acetic acid stresses whereas respiration system is less subjected to damages under stress condition. In addition, preadaptation of A. senegalensis in a mixture of glucose and acetic acid enables it to tolerate and grow in ethanol and

  5. Effects of acidity on tree pollen germination and tube growth

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.S.; Van Rye, D.M.; Lassoie, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that pollen germination and tube growth are adversely affected by air pollutants. Pollutants may inhibit the function of pollen by reducing the number of pollen grains which germinate, by reducing the maximum length to which the pollen tubes grow, or by interfering with the formation of the generative cell. The paper reports on studies that are attempting to determine the effects acid rain may have on these crucial stages in the life histories of northeastern tree species. The first stage of this work assessed the effects of acidity in the growth medium on in vitro pollen germination for four deciduous forest species common to central New York State, Betula lutea (yellow birch), B. lenta (black birch), Acer saccharum (sugar maple), and Cornus florida (flowering dogwood). Measurements were taken at the end of the growth period to determine the percentage of grains which had germinated, and to estimate the average tube length. To determine the effects of pollen on the growth medium, the pH of the germination drop was measured at the end of the growth period.

  6. Optimal conditions of mycelia growth of Laetiporus sulphureus sensu lato

    PubMed Central

    Luangharn, Thatsanee; Karunarathna, Samantha C.; Hyde, Kevin D.; Chukeatirote, Ekachai

    2014-01-01

    Laetiporus sulphureus is an edible wood-rotting basidiomycete, growing on decaying logs, stumps, and trunks of many deciduous and coniferous tree species. This fungus produces relatively large striking yellowish or orange-coloured bracket-like fruitbodies. L. sulphureus is widely consumed as a nutritional food because of its fragrance and texture. In this study, two L. sulphureus strains, MFLUCC 12-0546 and MFLUCC 12-0547, isolated from Chiang Rai, Thailand, were investigated for optimal conditions of mycelia growth. Potato dextrose agar and malt extract agar were observed as the favourable medium for mycelia growth. The optimum pH and temperature for the mushroom mycelia were 6–8 and 25–30°C, respectively. PMID:25544934

  7. Lower fetal status of docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid and essential fatty acids is associated with less favorable neonatal neurological condition.

    PubMed

    Dijck-Brouwer, D A Janneke; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Bouwstra, Hylco; Decsi, Tamás; Boehm, Günther; Martini, Ingrid A; Boersma, E Rudy; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2005-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, notably arachidonic (AA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are abundant in brain and may be conditionally essential in fetal life. We investigated umbilical artery (UA) and vein (UV) fatty acid compositions and early neonatal neurological condition in 317 term infants. Neurological condition was summarized as a clinical classification and a 'neurological optimality score' (NOS). Neurologically abnormal infants (n=27) had lower UV DHA and essential fatty acid (EFA) status. NOS correlated positively with AA (UV), and EFA (UV) and DHA status (UV and UA) and negatively with 18:2omega6 and omega9 (UV), and 20:3omega9, omega7 and C18 trans fatty acids (UV and UA). UV DHA, AA, saturated fatty acids, gestational age and obstetrical optimality score explained 16.2% of the NOS variance. Early postnatal neurological condition seems negatively influenced by lower fetal DHA, AA and EFA status. C18 trans fatty acids and 18:2omega6 may exert negative effects by impairment of LCP status. PMID:15589396

  8. Acid rain stimulation of Lake Michigan phytoplankton growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Fahnenstiel, G.L.; Gardner, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    Three laboratory experiments demonstrated that additions of rainwater to epilimnetic lake water collected in southeastern Lake Michigan stimulated chlorophyll a production more than did additions of reagent-grade water during incubations of 12 to 20 d. Chlorophyll a production did not begin until 3–5 d after the rain and lake water were mixed. The stimulation caused by additions of rain acidified to pH 3.0 was greater than that caused by additions of untreated rain (pH 4.0–4.5). Our results support the following hypotheses: (1) Acid rain stimulates the growth of phytoplankton in lake water; (2) phosphorus in rain appears to be the factor causing this stimulation. We conclude that acid rain may accelerate the growth of epilimnetic phytoplankton in Lake Michigan (and other similar lakes) during stratification when other sources of bioavailable phosphorus to the epilimnion are limited

  9. Smectite Formation from Basaltic Glass Under Acidic Conditions on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretyazhko, T. S.; Sutter, B.; Morris, R. V.; Agresti, D. G.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Massive deposits of phyllosilicates of the smectite group, including Mg/Fe-smectite, have been identified in Mars's ancient Noachian terrain. The observed smectite is hypothesized to form through aqueous alteration of basaltic crust under neutral to alkaline pH conditions. These pH conditions and the presence of a CO2-rich atmosphere suggested for ancient Mars were favorable for the formation of large carbonate deposits. However, the detection of large-scale carbonate deposits is limited on Mars. We hypothesized that smectite deposits may have formed under acidic conditions that prevented carbonate precipitation. In this work we investigated formation of saponite at a pH of approximately 4 from Mars-analogue synthetic Adirondack basaltic glass of composition similar to Adirondack class rocks located at Gusev crater. Hydrothermal (200º Centigrade) 14 day experiments were performed with and without 10 millimoles Fe(II) or Mg under anoxic condition [hereafter denoted as anoxic_Fe, anoxic_Mg and anoxic (no addition of Fe(II) or Mg)] and under oxic condition [hereafter denoted as oxic (no addition of Fe(II) or Mg)]. Characterization and formation conditions of the synthesized saponite provided insight into the possible geochemical conditions required for saponite formation on Mars.

  10. In vitro inhibition of struvite crystal growth by acetohydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Downey, J A; Nickel, J C; Clapham, L; McLean, R J

    1992-10-01

    Struvite (MgNH4PO46H2O) crystals were produced by Proteus mirabilis growth in artificial urine, in the presence and absence of the urease inhibitor, acetohydroxamic acid (AHA). In the absence of AHA, struvite crystals assumed an "X-shaped" or dendritic crystal habit due to rapid growth along their 100 axis. When AHA was present, crystal growth, as monitored by phase contrast light microscopy, was greatly slowed, and the crystals assumed an octahedral crystal habit. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that crystals grown in the presence of AHA were pitted on their surface. This pitting was absent in control samples. While most of this inhibition by AHA was due to lowered urease activity, some crystal growth inhibition occurred in struvite produced in the absence of urease activity through NH4OH titration of artificial urine. We conclude that while AHA is primarily a urease inhibitor, it may also disrupt struvite growth and formation directly through interference with the molecular growth processes on crystal surfaces. PMID:1450840

  11. Influence of cell growth conditions and medium composition on EGFP photostability in live cells.

    PubMed

    Mamontova, Anastasia V; Bogdanov, Alexey M; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2015-05-01

    Photostability is a key characteristic of fluorescent proteins. It was recently demonstrated that green fluorescent protein (GFP) photobleaching in live cells can be suppressed by changes in medium composition. Here we show that Ham's F12 medium provides very high enhanced GFP (EGFP) photostability during fluorescence microscopy of live cells. This property of Ham's F12 medium is associated with decreased concentrations of riboflavin and pyridoxine, and increased concentrations of FeSO4, cyanocobalamine, lipoic acid, hypoxanthine, and thymidine compared with DMEM. We also found that the rate of EGFP photobleaching strongly depends on cell growth conditions such as cell density and the concentration of serum. We conclude that both imaging medium composition and the physiological state of the cells can strongly affect the photostability of fluorescent proteins. Thus, accurate comparison of the photostabilities of fluorescent proteins should be performed only in side-by-side analysis in identical cell growth conditions and media. PMID:25967905

  12. Arsenate precipitation using ferric iron in acidic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cadena, F.; Kirk, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Arsenates (i.e., As(V)) can be removed from aqueous solution by precipitation with ferric iron (i.e., Fe(III)). The chemistry of arsenic acid describes the main properties of arsenates. This triprotic acid resembles the phosphoric acid system. For example, free arsenate ions (i.e., AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}), like free phosphates, are present in significant concentration at pH values above pK{sub a,3}. On the other hand, the concentration of free ferric iron in solution, Fe{sup 3+}, is limited by ferric hydroxide precipitation and hydroxy complexation under neutral or basic conditions. Fe{sup 3+} is the predominant iron form only under very acidic conditions. Therefore, the absence of either ferric ions or arsenate ligands prevents ferric arsenate (FeAsO{sub 4}) precipitation in extreme pH conditions. Precipitation studies using ferric chloride show that the formation of ferric arsenate in water containing 0.667 mM/L (50 mg/L as As) is favored in the pH range between 3 and 4. Ferric iron dose required to remove arsenic from solution increases with pH in the range of 3 to 10. Sludge production also increases with increasing pH conditions. Optimum ferric iron doses at pH 3 and 4 are 4.8 and 10.0 mM/L, respectively, where the arsenate is removed from solution by 98.72 and 99.68 percent. Corresponding iron requirement to arsenate ratios at these two pH conditions are 7.2 and 15.0. Adverse effects on arsenic removal are observed at pH = 3, where the concentration of applied ferric iron exceeds the optimal dose. This effect is probably due to charge reversal on the surface of the precipitates. Overdosing above the optimal iron concentration at pH = 4 does not reduce treatment efficiency significantly. Presence of sodium chloride in solution at a concentration of 171 mM/L (10,000 mg/L as NaCl) does not impair system performance. However, sodium sulfate at a concentration of 104 mM/L (10,000 mg/L) affects adversely treatment performance.

  13. Effect of environmental conditions on the fatty acid fingerprint of microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, Mikhail; Dippold, Michaela; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Lipid biomarkers, especially phospholipids, are routinely used to characterize microbial community structure in environmental samples. Interpretations of these fingerprints mainly depend on rare results of pure cultures which were cultivated under standardized batch conditions. However, membrane lipids (e.g. phopholipid biomarker) build up the interface between microorganisms and their environment and consequently are prone to be adapted according to the environmental conditions. We cultivated several bacteria, isolated from soil (gram-positive and gram-negative) under various conditions e.g. C supply and temperature regimes. Effect of growth conditions on phospholipids fatty acid (PLFA) as well as neutral lipid fatty acids (NLFA) and glycolipid fatty acids (GLFA) was investigated by conventional method of extraction and derivatization, followed by assessments with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, phospholipids were measured as intact molecules by ultra high performance liquid chromatography - quadrupole - time of flight mass spectrometer (UHPLC-Q-ToF) to further assess the composition of headgroups with fatty acids residues and their response on changing environmental conditions. PLFA fingerprints revealed a strong effect of growth stage, C supply and temperature e.g. decrease of temperature increased the amount of branched and/or unsaturated fatty acids to maintain the membrane fluidity. This strongly changes the ratio of specific to unspecific fatty acids depending on environmental conditions. Therefore, amounts of specific fatty acids cannot be used to assess biomass of a functional microbial group in soil. Intracellular neutral lipids depended less on environmental conditions reflecting a more stable biomarker group but also showed less specific fatty acids then PLFA. Therefore, combination of several lipid classes is suggested as more powerful tool to assess amounts and functionality of environmental microbial communities. Further

  14. Effect of carbon sources on growth and lipid accumulation of newly isolated microalgae cultured under mixotrophic condition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tse-Shih; Wu, Jane-Yii

    2015-05-01

    In order to produce microalgal lipids that can be transformed to biodiesel fuel, one isolate with high lipid content was identified as Chlorella sp. Y8-1. The growth and lipid productivity of an isolated microalga Chlorella sp. Y8-1 were investigated under different cultivation conditions, including autotrophic growth (CO2, with light), heterotrophic growth (sucrose, without light) and mixotrophic growth (organic carbon sources and CO2, with light). Mixotrophic Chlorella sp. Y8-1 showed higher lipid content (35.5±4.2%) and higher lipid productivity (0.01 g/L/d) than Chlorella sp. Y8-1 cultivated under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions on modified Walne medium. Fatty acid analysis of Chlorella sp. Y8-1 showed the major presence of palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic acid (C18:1), linoleic acid (C18:2) and linolenic acids (C18:3). The main fatty acid compositions of the Chlorella sp. Y8-1 are appropriate for biodiesel production. PMID:25443671

  15. Modelling the unexpected effect of acetic and lactic acid in combination with pH and aw on the growth/no growth interface of Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A; Dang, T D T; Geeraerd, A H; Bernaerts, K; Debevere, J; Van Impe, J; Devlieghere, F

    2008-05-10

    Microbial spoilage of shelf-stable acidified sauces is predominantly caused by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. A specific spoilage yeast in these products is Zygosaccharomyces bailii, as this fructophilic, osmotolerant, and weak acid resistant yeast is difficult to control. A growth/no growth model was developed describing the influence of (i) pH in a range from pH 3.0 to pH 5.0 (5 levels), (ii) acetic acid in a range from 0 to 3.5% (w/v), and (iii) lactic acid in a range from 0 to 3.0% (w/v). aw was fixed at a level of 0.95 which is representative for acidified sauces with high sugar content. Modified Sabouraud medium was inoculated at +/- 10(4) CFU/ml, incubated at 30 degrees C and growth was assessed by optical density measurements. All combinations of environmental conditions were tested in at least twelve replicates, yielding precise values for the probability of growth. Results showed that replacing acetic acid by lactic acid, which has a milder taste, may imply some risks on food spoilage because, under some conditions, stimulation of growth by lactic acid was observed. This stimulation had also consequences on the model development: (i) only ordinary logistic regression models were able to describe this phenomenon due to their flexible behaviour, (ii) it was necessary to split up the data set into two subsets to have the best description of the obtained data. Two different ordinary logistic regression models were fitted on these data sets taking either the total acid concentration as one of the explanatory variables or differentiating between the undissociated and dissociated acid concentrations. The obtained models were compared with the CIMSCEE code [CIMSCEE, 1992. Code for the production of microbiologically safe and stable emulsified and non-emulsified sauces containing acetic acid. Comité des Industries des Mayonnaise et Sauces Condimentaires, de la Communauté Economique Européenne, Brussels, Belgium], a formula which is nowadays often used by the

  16. Growth management of vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides) under Mediterranean conditions.

    PubMed

    Dudai, N; Putievsky, E; Chaimovitch, D; Ben-Hur, M

    2006-10-01

    In spite of the advantages of Vetiver grass in light of environmental aspects, this plant is not used in the Mediterranean region. The objectives of the present study were: (i) to elucidate growth parameters and establishment of Vetiver under Mediterranean conditions suitable for its various environmental applications; and (ii) to develop management practices for growing vetiver under Mediterranean conditions. In greenhouse experiments conducted under controlled conditions it was found that, in general, increasing the minimum/maximum temperatures to 21-29 degrees C significantly increased plant height. In the Mediterranean region, this range of air temperatures is obtained mainly during the summer, from June to September. For air temperatures up to 15-23 degrees C the effect of day length on plant height was insignificant, whereas in air temperature >15-23 degrees C, the plant heights under long day conditions were significantly higher than under short day. The number of sprouts per plant increased exponentially with increasing air temperature, and was not significantly affected by the day length at any air temperature range. In open fields, the heights of irrigated vetiver plants were significantly higher than those of rain-fed plants. It was concluded that, once they were established, vetiver plants could survive the dry summer of the Mediterranean region under rain-fed conditions, but they would be shorter than under irrigation. Cutting or burning of the plant foliage during the spring did not improve the survival of vetiver during the dry summer. In order to obtain fast growth of vetiver and to increase the possibility of its using the rainwater, the plants should be planted in the winter, during February and March. However, under this regime, the vetiver plant cannot be used as a soil stabilizer during the first winter, because the plant is still small. In contrast, under irrigation it is advantageous to plant vetiver at the beginning of the summer; the plant

  17. Condition of chromic acid anodized aluminum clamps flown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plagemann, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of the condition of the chromic acid anodized (CAA) coating on selected LDEF tray clamps was carried out. Measurements of solar absorptance and thermal emittance were carried out at multiple locations on both the space exposed and spacecraft facing sides of the clamps. Multiple clamps from each available angle relative to the ram direction were examined. The diffuse component of the reflectance spectrum was measured for a selected subset of the clamps. The thickness of the CAA was determined for a small set of clamps. Examples of variation in integrity of the coatings from leading to trailing edge will be shown.

  18. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes. PMID:27052717

  19. Anaerobic conditions improve germination of a gibberellic acid deficient rice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frantz, Jonathan M.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Dwarf plants are useful in research because multiple plants can be grown in a small area. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is especially important since its relatively simple genome has recently been sequenced. We are characterizing a gibberellic acid (GA) mutant of rice (japonica cv 'Shiokari,' line N-71) that is extremely dwarf (20 cm tall). Unfortunately, this GA mutation is associated with poor germination (70%) under aerobic conditions. Neither exogenous GA nor a dormancy-breaking heat treatment improved germination. However, 95% germination was achieved by germinating the seeds anaerobically, either in a pure N2 environment or submerged in unstirred tap water. The anaerobic conditions appear to break a mild post-harvest dormancy in this rice cultivar. Copyright 2002 Crop Science Society of America.

  20. Growth of immature Chironomus calligraphus in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Canteiro, Rita de Cássia S A; Albertoni, Edélti F

    2011-12-01

    Chironomidae larvae are important macroinvertebrates in limnic environments, but little knowledge exists about their biometrics development characteristics. This study aims to describe the immature Chironomus calligraphus Goeldi, 1905 under laboratory conditions by the accomplishment of thirteen egg masses from eggs eclosion to adults emergency, at controlled room temperature (25ºC) and photoperiod (12-12h). Larvae were feed ad libitum with "Alcon Basic - MEP 200 Complex" fish food and commercial dehydrated Spirulina. The postures had a mean length of 9 ± 1 mm (n = 13) and 348 ± 66 eggs. The brownish colored eggs with elliptical shape had length of 160.3 ± 17.7 µm (n = 130), being arranged as an organized string in a pseudo spiral form. The time duration from the first to the four instars were three, four, four and eight days, and the average length of a cephalic capsule to each one of the instars (66.3 ± 12.3 µm, 102.9 ± 22.1 µm, 159 ± 24.6 µm, 249.2 ± 29.7 µm, n = 456) were significantly different (ANOVA, p < 0.001). The Dyar’s Rule showed a constant growth rate, r = 1.5. Our results demonstrated that C. calligraphus is a species with short life cycle, low mortality rate, food adaptability, fast larval growth and easily maintained at laboratory, factors that allowed the use of this native species as a tool for ecotoxicological tests. PMID:21971596

  1. Keratinocyte growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor are heparin-binding growth factors for alveolar type II cells in fibroblast-conditioned medium.

    PubMed Central

    Panos, R J; Rubin, J S; Csaky, K G; Aaronson, S A; Mason, R J

    1993-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mediate aspects of normal lung growth and development and are important in the restoration of normal alveolar architecture after lung injury. To determine if fibroblasts are a source of soluble growth factors for alveolar type II cells, we investigated the effect of fibroblast-conditioned medium (CM) on alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. Serum-free CM from confluent adult human lung fibroblasts was concentrated fivefold by lyophilization. Type II cells were isolated from adult rats by elastase dissociation and incubated with [3H]thymidine and varying dilutions of concentrated CM and serum from day 1 to 3 of culture. Stimulation of type II cell DNA synthesis by fibroblast-CM was maximal after 48 h of conditioning and required the presence of serum. The activity of the CM was eliminated by boiling and by treatment with trypsin, pepsin, or dithiothreitol and was additive with saturating concentrations of acidic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and insulin. The growth factor activity bound to heparin-Sepharose and was eluted with 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl. Neutralizing antibody studies demonstrated that the primary mitogens isolated in the 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl fractions were keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, fibroblast growth factor 7) and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), respectively. HGF/SF was demonstrated in the crude CM and KGF was detected in the 0.6 M NaCl eluent by immunoblotting. Northern blot analysis confirmed that the lung fibroblasts expressed both KGF and HGF/SF transcripts. Human recombinant KGF and HGF/SF induced a concentration- and serum-dependent increase in rat alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. We conclude that adult human lung fibroblasts produce at least two soluble heparin-binding growth factors, KGF and HGF/SF, which promote DNA synthesis and proliferation of rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. KGF and HGF/SF may be important stimuli for alveolar type II cell

  2. Gallic Acid Promotes Wound Healing in Normal and Hyperglucidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong Joo; Moh, Sang Hyun; Son, Dong Hwee; You, Seunghoon; Kinyua, Ann W; Ko, Chang Mann; Song, Miyoung; Yeo, Jinhee; Choi, Yun-Hee; Kim, Ki Woo

    2016-01-01

    Skin is the outermost layer of the human body that is constantly exposed to environmental stressors, such as UV radiation and toxic chemicals, and is susceptible to mechanical wounding and injury. The ability of the skin to repair injuries is paramount for survival and it is disrupted in a spectrum of disorders leading to skin pathologies. Diabetic patients often suffer from chronic, impaired wound healing, which facilitate bacterial infections and necessitate amputation. Here, we studied the effects of gallic acid (GA, 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid; a plant-derived polyphenolic compound) on would healing in normal and hyperglucidic conditions, to mimic diabetes, in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Our study reveals that GA is a potential antioxidant that directly upregulates the expression of antioxidant genes. In addition, GA accelerated cell migration of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in both normal and hyperglucidic conditions. Further, GA treatment activated factors known to be hallmarks of wound healing, such as focal adhesion kinases (FAK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk), underpinning the beneficial role of GA in wound repair. Therefore, our results demonstrate that GA might be a viable wound healing agent and a potential intervention to treat wounds resulting from metabolic complications. PMID:27399667

  3. Growth and characterization of ammonium acid phthalate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, A.; Ramasamy, P.

    2013-04-01

    Ammonium acid phthalate (AAP) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The unit cell parameters were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and it belongs to orthorhombic system with the space group of Pcab. The high resolution X-ray diffraction studies revealed the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal. The various functional groups of AAP were identified by FT-IR and Raman spectral analyses. Thermal stability of the grown crystals was studied by TGA/DTA. The optical properties of the grown crystals were analyzed by UV-Vis-NIR and photoluminescence spectral studies. The mechanical property of the grown crystal was studied by Vickers microhardness measurement. The growth features of AAP were analyzed by chemical etching.

  4. Fibroblast Growth Factors and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Promote Cardiac Reprogramming under Defined Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Muraoka, Naoto; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Sadahiro, Taketaro; Isomi, Mari; Haginiwa, Sho; Kojima, Hidenori; Umei, Tomohiko; Akiyama, Mizuha; Kuishi, Yuki; Kurokawa, Junko; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ieda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) by overexpression of cardiac transcription factors, including Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5; however, this process is inefficient under serum-based culture conditions, in which conversion of partially reprogrammed cells into fully reprogrammed functional iCMs has been a major hurdle. Here, we report that a combination of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2, FGF10, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), termed FFV, promoted cardiac reprogramming under defined serum-free conditions, increasing spontaneously beating iCMs by 100-fold compared with those under conventional serum-based conditions. Mechanistically, FFV activated multiple cardiac transcriptional regulators and converted partially reprogrammed cells into functional iCMs through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathways. Moreover, FFV enabled cardiac reprogramming with only Mef2c and Tbx5 through the induction of cardiac reprogramming factors, including Gata4. Thus, defined culture conditions promoted the quality of cardiac reprogramming, and this finding provides new insight into the mechanism of cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26626177

  5. Growth patterns for etiolated soybeans germinated under spaceflight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Howard G.; Piastuch, William C.

    In the GENEX (GENe EXpression) spaceflight experiment (flown on STS-87), six surface sterilized soybean seeds ( Glycine max cv McCall) were inserted into each of 32 autoclaved plastic seed growth pouches containing an inner germination paper sleeve (for a total of 192 seeds). The pouches were stowed within a mid-deck locker until Mission Flight Day 10, at which time an astronaut added water to initiate the process of seed germination on-orbit and subsequently transferred them to four light-tight aluminum canisters called BRIC-60s (Biological Research In Canisters). We report here on the morphological characteristics of: (1) the recovered flight plants ( N = 177), (2) the corresponding ground control population ( N = 183), plus (3) additional controls grown on the ground under clinostat conditions ( N = 93). No significant morphological differences were found between the flight, ground control and clinorotated treatments for either the cotyledons or hypocotyls. There were, however, significantly longer primary roots produced in the flight population relative to the ground control population, which in turn had significantly longer primary roots than the clinorotated population. This same pattern was observed relative to the production of lateral roots (flight > control > clinorotated). Taken together with previous literature reports, we believe that there is now sufficient evidence to conclude that plants grown under conditions of microgravity will generally exhibit enhanced root production relative to their ground control counterparts. Some causes underlying this phenomenon are speculated on.

  6. Differential Carbohydrate Recognition by Campylobacter jejuni Strain 11168: Influences of Temperature and Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Day, Christopher J.; Tiralongo, Joe; Hartnell, Regan D.; Logue, Carie-Anne; Wilson, Jennifer C.; von Itzstein, Mark; Korolik, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenic clinical strain NCTC11168 was the first Campylobacter jejuni strain to be sequenced and has been a widely used laboratory model for studying C. jejuni pathogenesis. However, continuous passaging of C. jejuni NCTC11168 has been shown to dramatically affect its colonisation potential. Glycan array analysis was performed on C. jejuni NCTC11168 using the frequently passaged, non-colonising, genome sequenced (11168-GS) and the infrequently passaged, original, virulent (11168-O) isolates grown or maintained under various conditions. Glycan structures recognised and bound by C. jejuni included terminal mannose, N-acetylneuraminic acid, galactose and fucose. Significantly, it was found that only when challenged with normal oxygen at room temperature did 11168-O consistently bind to sialic acid or terminal mannose structures, while 11168-GS bound these structures regardless of growth/maintenance conditions. Further, binding of un-capped galactose and fucosylated structures was significantly reduced when C. jejuni was maintained at 25°C under atmospheric oxygen conditions. These binding differences identified through glycan array analysis were confirmed by the ability of specific lectins to competitively inhibit the adherence of C. jejuni to a Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Our data suggests that the binding of mannose and/or N-acetylneuraminic acid may provide the initial interactions important for colonisation following environmental exposure. PMID:19290056

  7. Controlled growth of CNT in mesoporous AAO through optimized conditions for membrane preparation and CVD operation.

    PubMed

    Ciambelli, P; Arurault, L; Sarno, M; Fontorbes, S; Leone, C; Datas, L; Sannino, D; Lenormand, P; Du Plouy, S Le Blond

    2011-07-01

    Anodic aluminium oxide (RAAO) membranes with a mesoporous structure were prepared under strictly controlling experimental process conditions, and physically and chemically characterized by a wide range of experimental techniques. Commercial anodic aluminium oxide (CAAO) membranes were also investigated for comparison. We demonstrated that RAAO membranes have lower content of both water and phosphorus and showed better porosity shape than CAAO. The RAAO membranes were used for template growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) inside its pores by ethylene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in the absence of a catalyst. A composite material, containing one nanotube for each channel, having the same length as the membrane thickness and an external diameter close to the diameter of the membrane holes, was obtained. Yield, selectivity and quality of CNTs in terms of diameter, length and arrangement (i.e. number of tubes for each channel) were optimized by investigating the effect of changing the experimental conditions for the CVD process. We showed that upon thermal treatment RAAO membranes were made up of crystallized allotropic alumina phases, which govern the subsequent CNT growth, because of their catalytic activity, likely due to their Lewis acidity. The strict control of experimental conditions for membrane preparation and CNT growth allowed us to enhance the carbon structural order, which is a critical requisite for CNT application as a substitute for copper in novel nano-interconnects. PMID:21576783

  8. Controlled growth of CNT in mesoporous AAO through optimized conditions for membrane preparation and CVD operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambelli, P.; Arurault, L.; Sarno, M.; Fontorbes, S.; Leone, C.; Datas, L.; Sannino, D.; Lenormand, P.; Le Blond Du Plouy, S.

    2011-07-01

    Anodic aluminium oxide (RAAO) membranes with a mesoporous structure were prepared under strictly controlling experimental process conditions, and physically and chemically characterized by a wide range of experimental techniques. Commercial anodic aluminium oxide (CAAO) membranes were also investigated for comparison. We demonstrated that RAAO membranes have lower content of both water and phosphorus and showed better porosity shape than CAAO. The RAAO membranes were used for template growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) inside its pores by ethylene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in the absence of a catalyst. A composite material, containing one nanotube for each channel, having the same length as the membrane thickness and an external diameter close to the diameter of the membrane holes, was obtained. Yield, selectivity and quality of CNTs in terms of diameter, length and arrangement (i.e. number of tubes for each channel) were optimized by investigating the effect of changing the experimental conditions for the CVD process. We showed that upon thermal treatment RAAO membranes were made up of crystallized allotropic alumina phases, which govern the subsequent CNT growth, because of their catalytic activity, likely due to their Lewis acidity. The strict control of experimental conditions for membrane preparation and CNT growth allowed us to enhance the carbon structural order, which is a critical requisite for CNT application as a substitute for copper in novel nano-interconnects.

  9. Batch salicylic acid nitration by nitric acid/acetic acid mixture under isothermal, isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, R; Canterino, M; Caprio, V; Di Somma, I; Sanchirico, R

    2006-12-01

    Runaway phenomena and thermal explosions can originate during the nitration of salicylic acid by means of a nitric acid/acetic acid mixture when the thermal control is lost, mainly as a result of the formation and thermal decomposition of picric acid. The prediction of the behaviour of this system is thus of great importance in view of possible industrial applications and the need to avoid the occurrence of unwanted dangerous events. During a previous investigation a model was developed to simulate its behaviour when the starting concentration of the substrate is too low, thus, preventing the precipitation of poor soluble intermediates. In this work this model is extended to deal with more concentrated systems even in case of a solid phase separating during the process. To this purpose the previously assessed dependence of the solubility of 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids upon temperature and nitric acid concentration is included in the model. It is assumed that when 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids are partially suspended in the reacting medium a kinetic regime of "dissolution with reaction" is established; that is, the redissolution of these species is a fast process compared to the successive nitration to give dinitroderivatives. Good results are obtained in the comparison of the experimental data with those calculated both in isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions when the revised model is used. PMID:16842908

  10. Modification of the Technical Properties of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 by Supplementing the Growth Medium with Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Sybesma, W. F. H.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of supplementing growth medium with unsaturated fatty acids on the technical properties of the probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533, such as heat and acid tolerance, and inhibition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. Our results showed that the membrane composition and morphology of L. johnsonii NCC 533 were significantly changed by supplementing a minimal Lactobacillus medium with oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids. The ratio of saturated to unsaturated plus cyclic fatty acids in the bacterial membrane decreased by almost 2-fold when minimal medium was supplemented with unsaturated fatty acids (10 μg/ml). The subsequent acid and heat tolerance of L. johnsonii decreased by 6- and 20-fold when the strain was grown in the presence of linoleic and linolenic acids, respectively, compared with growth in oleic acid (all at 10 μg/ml). Following acid exposure, significantly higher (P < 0.05) oleic acid content was detected in the membrane when growth medium was supplemented with linoleic or linolenic acid, indicating that saturation of the membrane fatty acids occurred during acid stress. Cell integrity was determined in real time during stressed conditions using a fluorescent viability kit in combination with flow cytometric analysis. Following heat shock (at 62.5°C for 5 min), L. johnsonii was unable to form colonies; however, 60% of the bacteria showed no cell integrity loss, which could indicate that the elevated heat inactivated vital processes within the cell, rendering it incapable of replication. Furthermore, L. johnsonii grown in fatty acid-enriched minimal medium had different adhesion properties and caused a 2-fold decrease in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium UK1-lux invasion of HT-29 epithelial cells compared with bacteria grown in minimal medium alone. This could be related to changes in the hydrophobicity and fluidity of the membrane. Our study shows that technical

  11. Acid-sensing ion channels in pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xiang-Ping; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2013-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a novel family of proton-gated amiloride-sensitive cation channels, are expressed primarily in neurons of peripheral sensory and central nervous systems. Recent studies have shown that activation of ASICs, particularly the ASIC1a channels, plays a critical role in neuronal injury associated with neurological disorders such as brain ischemia, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injury, etc. In normal conditions in vitro, ASIC1a channels desensitize rapidly in the presence of a continuous acidosis or following a pre-exposure to minor pH drop, raising doubt for their contributions to the acidosis-mediated neuronal injury. It is now known that the properties of ASICs can be dramatically modulated by signaling molecules or biochemical changes associated with pathological conditions. Modulation of ASICs by these molecules can lead to dramatically enhanced and/or prolonged activities of these channels thus promoting their pathological functions. Understanding of how ASICs behave in pathological conditions may help define new strategies for the treatment and/or prevention of neuronal injury associated with various neurological disorders. PMID:23224900

  12. Lactic acid bacterial extract as a biogenic mineral growth modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Ballav M.; Singh, Atul K.; Ramesh, Aiyagari; Das, Gopal

    2009-04-01

    The formation of minerals and mechanisms by which bacteria could control their formation in natural habitats is now of current interest for material scientists to have an insight of the mechanism of in vivo mineralization, as well as to seek industrial and technological applications. Crystalline uniform structures of calcium and barium minerals formed micron-sized building blocks when synthesized in the presence of an organic matrix consisting of secreted protein extracts from three different lactic acid bacteria (LAB) viz.: Lactobacillus plantarum MTCC 1325, Lactobacillus acidophilus NRRL B4495 and Pediococcus acidilactici CFR K7. LABs are not known to form organic matrix in biological materialization processes. The influence of these bacterial extracts on the crystallization behavior was investigated in details to test the basic coordination behavior of the acidic protein. In this report, varied architecture of the mineral crystals obtained in presence of high molecular weight protein extracts of three different LAB strains has been discussed. The role of native form of high molecular weight bacterial protein extracts in the generation of nucleation centers for crystal growth was clearly established. A model for the formation of organic matrix-cation complex and the subsequent events leading to crystal growth is proposed.

  13. Screening of phenylpyruvic acid producers and optimization of culture conditions in bench scale bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Coban, Hasan B; Demirci, Ali; Patterson, Paul H; Elias, Ryan J

    2014-11-01

    Alpha keto acids are deaminated forms of amino acids that have received significant attention as feed and food additives in the agriculture and medical industries. To date, their production has been commonly performed at shake-flask scale with low product concentrations. In this study, production of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), which is the alpha keto acid of phenylalanine was investigated. First, various microorganisms were screened to select the most efficient producer. Thereafter, growth parameters (temperature, pH, and aeration) were optimized in bench scale bioreactors to maximize both PPA and biomass concentration in bench scale bioreactors, using response surface methodology. Among the four different microorganisms evaluated, Proteus vulgaris was the most productive strain for PPA production. Optimum temperature, pH, and aeration conditions were determined as 34.5 °C, 5.12, and 0.5 vvm for PPA production, whereas 36.9 °C, pH 6.87, and 0.96 vvm for the biomass production. Under these optimum conditions, PPA concentration was enhanced to 1,054 mg/L, which was almost three times higher than shake-flask fermentation concentrations. Moreover, P. vulgaris biomass was produced at 3.25 g/L under optimum conditions. Overall, this study demonstrated that optimization of growth parameters improved PPA production in 1-L working volume bench-scale bioreactors compared to previous studies in the literature and was a first step to scale up the production to industrial production. PMID:24861313

  14. Involvement of Intermediate Sulfur Species in Biological Reduction of Elemental Sulfur under Acidic, Hydrothermal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Druschel, Gregory K.

    2013-01-01

    The thermoacidophile and obligate elemental sulfur (S80)-reducing anaerobe Acidilobus sulfurireducens 18D70 does not associate with bulk solid-phase sulfur during S80-dependent batch culture growth. Cyclic voltammetry indicated the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as well as polysulfides after 1 day of batch growth of the organism at pH 3.0 and 81°C. The production of polysulfide is likely due to the abiotic reaction between S80 and the biologically produced H2S, as evinced by a rapid cessation of polysulfide formation when the growth temperature was decreased, inhibiting the biological production of sulfide. After an additional 5 days of growth, nanoparticulate S80 was detected in the cultivation medium, a result of the hydrolysis of polysulfides in acidic medium. To examine whether soluble polysulfides and/or nanoparticulate S80 can serve as terminal electron acceptors (TEA) supporting the growth of A. sulfurireducens, total sulfide concentration and cell density were monitored in batch cultures with S80 provided as a solid phase in the medium or with S80 sequestered in dialysis tubing. The rates of sulfide production in 7-day-old cultures with S80 sequestered in dialysis tubing with pore sizes of 12 to 14 kDa and 6 to 8 kDa were 55% and 22%, respectively, of that of cultures with S80 provided as a solid phase in the medium. These results indicate that the TEA existed in a range of particle sizes that affected its ability to diffuse through dialysis tubing of different pore sizes. Dynamic light scattering revealed that S80 particles generated through polysulfide rapidly grew in size, a rate which was influenced by the pH of the medium and the presence of organic carbon. Thus, S80 particles formed through abiological hydrolysis of polysulfide under acidic conditions appeared to serve as a growth-promoting TEA for A. sulfurireducens. PMID:23335768

  15. Dissolution of sulfuric acid tetrahydrate at low temperatures and subsequent growth of nitric acid trihydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Fortin, Tara J.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1998-04-01

    Crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) has been observed to change phase at temperatures below its melting point, in agreement with recent theoretical predictions of deliquescence. Dissolution of SAT was observed in 63% of experiments expected to show a phase change, leading to formation of a ternary HNO3/H2SO4/H2O solution. This solution, which still contained a portion of the original solid SAT, crystallized to form nitric acid trihydrate (NAT). NAT then continued to grow by condensation of additional nitric acid and water at temperatures several degrees above the ice frost point. This process of SAT dissolution followed by NAT crystallization and growth may offer a mechanism for the formation of type Ia polar stratospheric clouds on frozen sulfate aerosols when SNAT>15.

  16. Impact of growth conditions on transport behavior of E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this investigation is to determine the effect that growth solution has on cell surface properties and transport behavior of eleven E. coli isolates through saturated porous media. The two growth solutions used were a standard laboratory growth medium (LB) and a dairy manure extract soluti...

  17. Functional Amino Acids in Growth, Reproduction, and Health12

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guoyao

    2010-01-01

    Amino acids (AA) were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for animals and humans based on nitrogen balance or growth. A key element of this classification is that all nonessential AA (NEAA) were assumed to be synthesized adequately in the body as substrates to meet the needs for protein synthesis. Unfortunately, regulatory roles for AA in nutrition and metabolism have long been ignored. Such conceptual limitations were not recognized until recent seminal findings that dietary glutamine is necessary for intestinal mucosal integrity and dietary arginine is required for maximum neonatal growth and embryonic survival. Some of the traditionally classified NEAA (e.g. glutamine, glutamate, and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine and they, along with glycine, regulate neurological function. Among essential AA (EAA), much emphasis has been placed on leucine (which activates mammalian target of rapamycin to stimulate protein synthesis and inhibit proteolysis) and tryptophan (which modulates neurological and immunological functions through multiple metabolites, including serotonin and melatonin). A growing body of literature leads to a new concept of functional AA, which are defined as those AA that regulate key metabolic pathways to improve health, survival, growth, development, lactation, and reproduction of organisms. Both NEAA and EAA should be considered in the classic “ideal protein” concept or formulation of balanced diets to maximize protein accretion and optimize health in animals and humans. PMID:22043449

  18. Effects of mechanical stress or abscisic acid on growth, water status and leaf abscisic acid content of eggplant seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latimer, J. G.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Container-grown eggplant (Solanum melongena L. var esculentum Nees. 'Burpee's Black Beauty') seedlings were conditioned with brief, periodic mechanical stress or abscisic acid (ABA) in a greenhouse prior to outdoor exposure. Mechanical stress consisted of seismic (shaking) or thigmic (stem flexing) treatment. Exogenous ABA (10(-3) or 10(-4)M) was applied as a soil drench 3 days prior to outdoor transfer. During conditioning, only thigmic stress reduced stem elongation and only 10(-3) M ABA reduced relative growth rate (RGR). Both conditioning treatments increased leaf specific chlorophyll content, but mechanical stress did not affect leaf ABA content. Outdoor exposure of unconditioned eggplant seedlings decreased RGR and leaf-specific chlorophyll content, but tended to increase leaf ABA content relative to that of plants maintained in the greenhouse. Conditioning did not affect RGR of plants subsequently transferred outdoors, but did reduce stem growth. Seismic stress applied in the greenhouse reduced dry weight gain by plants subsequently transferred outdoors. Mechanical stress treatments increased leaf water potential by 18-25% relative to that of untreated plants.

  19. Bile acids influence the growth, oestrogen receptor and oestrogen-regulated proteins of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, P. R.; Wilton, J. C.; Jones, C. E.; Stenzel, D. J.; Watson, N.; Smith, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the major human serum bile acid, glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDC), as well as unconjugated chenodeoxycholic acid (CDC), on the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line have been studied in vitro under oestrogen and bile acid deprived culture conditions. GCDC increased the growth of the breast cancer cells over the range 10-300 microM. At concentrations in excess of the bile acid binding capacity of the medium cell growth was prevented. In contrast 10 microM CDC tended to reduce cell growth. Oestrogen (ER) and progesterone (PgR) receptors, pS2 and total cathepsin D were quantified by monoclonal antibody based immunoassays. Ten to 100 microM GCDC and 10 microM CDC down-regulated ER protein and this was accompanied by induction of the oestrogen-regulated proteins PgR, pS2 and possibly cathepsin D, including increased secretion of the latter two proteins into the culture medium. All these changes were quantitatively similar to those observed with 10 nM oestradiol. The bile acid effects on ER and PgR were not due to interference with the assay procedures. Cells incubated with 50 microM GCDC or 10 microM CDC had higher pmolar concentrations of the bile acids than controls. This study suggests that naturally occurring bile acids influence the growth and steroid receptor function of human breast cancer cells. PMID:1562465

  20. Pseudomonas putida response in membrane bioreactors under salicylic acid-induced stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Collado, Sergio; Rosas, Irene; González, Elena; Gutierrez-Lavin, Antonio; Diaz, Mario

    2014-02-28

    Starvation and changing feeding conditions are frequently characteristics of wastewater treatment plants. They are typical causes of unsteady-state operation of biological systems and provoke cellular stress. The response of a membrane bioreactor functioning under feed-induced stress conditions is studied here. In order to simplify and considerably amplify the response to stress and to obtain a reference model, a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida was selected instead of an activated sludge and a sole substrate (salicylic acid) was employed. The system degraded salicylic acid at 100-1100mg/L with a high level of efficiency, showed rapid acclimation without substrate or product inhibition phenomena and good stability in response to unsteady states caused by feed variations. Under starvation conditions, specific degradation rates of around 15mg/gh were achieved during the adaptation of the biomass to the new conditions and no biofilm formation was observed during the first days of experimentation using an initial substrate to microorganisms ratio lower than 0.1. When substrate was added to the reactor as pulses resulting in rapidly changing concentrations, P. putida growth was observed only for substrate to microorganism ratios higher than 0.6, with a maximum YX/S of 0.5g/g. Biofilm development under changing feeding conditions was fast, biomass detachment only being significant for biomass concentrations on the membrane surface that were higher than 16g/m(2). PMID:24413046

  1. Growth parameter and yield component response of field corn to simulated acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Banwart, W.L.; Porter, P.M.; Ziegler, E.L.; Hassett, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain occurs in the midwest. Studies to date have suggested minimal yield response of field corn to acid rain. However, small but significant reductions in yield have been shown for some cultivars under extreme conditions. To define further these yield changes the study examined the effect of simulated acid rain on parameters associated with corn yield. Cultivars B73 x Mo17 and Pioneer 3377 were shielded from ambient rain by two movable rain exclusion shelters. Six simulated rain treatments were applied biweekly within these shelters through the use of a nozzle distribution system. For the most part, growth and yield parameters were unaffected by simulated rain treatment. While the only significant yield reduction was a contrast of pH 3.0 and the average of all other treatments for B73 x Mo17, the reduction appears to be the result both of slightly fewer ears and slightly less successful ear fill.

  2. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits Insulin-Like Growth Factor Signaling, Growth, and Survival in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gary E.; Chesler, Louis; Liu, Dandan; Gable, Karissa; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldenberg, David D.; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Weiss, William A.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Rosenthal, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric malignancy that metastasizes to the liver, bone, and other organs. Children with metastatic disease have a less than 50% chance of survival with current treatments. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate neuroblastoma growth, survival, and motility, and are expressed by neuroblastoma cells and the tissues they invade. Thus, therapies that disrupt the effects of IGFs on neuroblastoma tumorigenesis may slow disease progression. We show that NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), potently inhibits neuroblastoma growth in vitro. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush (Larrea divaricata), has anti-tumor properties against a number of malignancies, has been shown to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of the IGF-IR in breast cancer cells, and is currently in Phase I trials for prostate cancer. In the present study in neuroblastoma, NDGA inhibits IGF-I-mediated activation of the IGF-IR and disrupts activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways induced by IGF-I. NDGA inhibits growth of neuroblastoma cells and induces apoptosis at higher doses, causing IGF-I-resistant activation of caspase-3 and a large increase in the fraction of sub-G0 cells. In addition, NDGA inhibits the growth of xenografted human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that NDGA may be useful in the treatment of neuroblastoma and may function in part via disruption of IGF-IR signaling. PMID:17486636

  3. The effect of undissociated lactic acid on Staphylococcus aureus growth and enterotoxin A production.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Asa; Lindblad, Mats; Lindqvist, Roland

    2013-03-15

    The potential of Staphylococcus aureus cheese isolates to grow and produce staphylococcal enterotoxin A under conditions typical for cheese making was investigated in three broth experiments. The effect of the concentration of undissociated lactic acid (HLac) in conjunction with specific pH values was studied by adjusting pH at a single concentration of lactic acid. First, the time-to-growth of S. aureus was modelled by using survival analysis and absorbance data obtained from an automated turbidity reader. The fitted model describes the time to growth and indicates the growth ⁄ no growth boundary of S. aureus as a function of HLac concentration, temperature and water activity. Second, growth rates and lag times of S. aureus were estimated after two different pre-treatments in skim milk at three HLac concentrations and two temperatures based on optical detection times of serial dilutions of bacterial solutions. Growth rates differed between strains, and increased with increasing temperature and decreasing HLac concentration. Preliminary results indicate that lag times were dependent on pre-treatment suggesting that the growth potential of S. aureus in cheese curd may be greater if milk is used immediately after milking compared to holding at 4°C after milking. Third, growth, inactivation, and enterotoxin A production of S. aureus strains were investigated at twelve combinations of HLac concentration and temperature. Concentrations of enterotoxin A increased linearly during the first four days, with a production rate increasing with increasing temperature and decreasing HLac concentration. Significant amounts of enterotoxin A were produced during extended incubation, up to 14days, but then initial pH had changed. This highlights a potential limitation of modelling based on the initial environmental conditions in batch experiments. In summary, ranges of time-to-growth, growth rates, lag times and enterotoxin A production rates of S. aureus in the presence of HLac

  4. A Comparison of Three Conditional Growth Percentile Methods: Student Growth Percentiles, Percentile Rank Residuals, and a Matching Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Seo, Dong Gi

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview and comparison of three conditional growth percentile methods; student growth percentiles, percentile rank residuals, and a nonparametric matching method. These approaches seek to describe student growth in terms of the relative percentile ranking of a student in relationship to students that had the same…

  5. Volatile organic compounds associated with microbial growth in automobile air conditioning systems.

    PubMed

    Rose, L J; Simmons, R B; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    2000-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds from Penicillium viridicatum and Methylobacterium mesophilicum growing on laboratory media and on component materials of automobile air conditioners were analyzed with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. P. viridicatum produced compounds such as 4-methyl thiazole, terpenes and alcohols, whereas M. mesophilicum produced dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, and chlorophenol with growth on laboratory media. In comparison with laboratory media, fewer volatiles were detected from colonized foam insulation materials. Biofilms of M. mesophilicum on aluminum evaporator components produced mainly dimethyl disulfide. These biofilms, after inoculation with P. viridicatum, produced offensive smelling alcohols and esters such as 2-methyl propanol, 3-penten-2-ol, and the ethyl ester of butanoic acid. The moisture and substrates innate to the automobile air conditioning systems provided an environment suitable for microbial biofilm development and odor production. Reduction of retained moisture in the air conditioning system coupled with use of less susceptible or antimicrobial substrates are advised for remediation of the noxious odors. PMID:10915209

  6. Growth of oil accumulating microalga Neochloris oleoabundans under alkaline-saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Santos, A M; Janssen, M; Lamers, P P; Evers, W A C; Wijffels, R H

    2012-01-01

    The effect of elevated pH and salt concentration on the growth of the freshwater microalga Neochloris oleoabundans was investigated. A study was conducted in 24-well plates on the design of a growth medium and subsequently applied in a photobioreactor. An artificial seawater medium with reduced Ca(2+) and PO(4)(3-) could prevent mineral precipitation at high pH levels. Growth was characterized in this new medium at pH 8.1 and at pH 10.0, with 420 mM of total salts. Specific growth rates of 0.08 h(-1) at pH 8.1 and 0.04 h(-1) at pH 10.0 were obtained under controlled turbidostat cultivation. The effect of nitrogen starvation on lipid accumulation was also investigated. Fatty acids content increased not only with nitrogen limitation but also with a pH increase (up to 35% in the dry biomass). Fluorescence microscopy gave visual proof that N. oleoabundans accumulates oil bodies when growing in saline conditions at high pH. PMID:22115529

  7. Enterotoxigenic intestinal bacteria in tropical sprue. IV. Effect of linoleic acid on growth interrelationships of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, M J; Klipstein, F A

    1975-11-01

    The factors responsible for colonization of the small intestine by enterotoxigenic coliform bacteria in Puerto Ricans with tropical sprue are unknown, but epidemiological observations have suggested that they may be related to an increased dietary intake of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, particularly linoleic acid, which is known to exert an inhibitory effect on the growth of gram-positive organisms that normally comprise the flora of the small intestine. We have examined, by using a glucose-limited continuous-culture system, what effect this fatty acid exerts on the growth relationships of enteric gram-positive and coliform bacteria. In this system, colonization by an invading strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae was prevented by the presence of an established culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus, principally by virtue of a lowered pH of the medium that was incompatible with Klebsiella growth. However, when the population density of L. acidophilus was reduced by the presence of a sufficient concentration of linoleic acid, the invading K. pneumoniae successfully colonized the system and, once established, suppressed the growth of L. acidophilus. These observations indicate that, under the conditions of our chemostat, gram-positive enteric bacteria suppress coliform growth and that this effect is reversible by the presence of linoleic acid. It remains to be established, however, what pertinence these in vitro observations have to conditions within the intestinal tract of persons living in the tropics. PMID:811564

  8. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C-50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO₄(-)• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO₄(-)•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF₂-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn-1F2n-1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  9. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C–50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO4−• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO4−•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF2-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn−1F2n−1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  10. Formation of diphenylthioarsinic acid from diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Shihoko; Guan, Ling; Nakajima, Mami; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a toxic phenylarsenical compound often found around sites contaminated with phenylarsenic chemical warfare agents, diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, which were buried in soil after the World Wars. This research concerns the elucidation of the chemical structure of an arsenic metabolite transformed from DPAA under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions. In LC/ICP-MS analysis, the retention time of the metabolite was identical to that of a major phenylarsenical compound synthesized by chemical reaction of DPAA and hydrogen sulfide. Moreover the mass spectra for the two compounds measured using LC/TOF-MS were similar. Subsequent high resolution mass spectral analysis indicated that two major ions at m/z 261 and 279, observed on both mass spectra, were attributable to C12H10AsS and C12H12AsSO, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that the latter ion is the molecular-related ion ([M+H](+)) of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTA; (C6H5)2AsS(OH)) and the former ion is its dehydrated fragment. Thus, our results reveal that DPAA can be transformed to DPTA, as a major metabolite, under sulfate-reducing soil conditions. Moreover, formation of diphenyldithioarsinic acid and subsequent dimerization were predicted by the chemical reaction analysis of DPAA with hydrogen sulfide. This is the first report to elucidate the occurrence of DPAA-thionation in an anaerobic soil. PMID:24007995

  11. Oligotrophic Bacteria Enhance Algal Growth under Iron-Deficient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Keshtacher-Liebso..., E.; Hadar, Y.; Chen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A Halomonas sp., a marine halophilic and oligotrophic bacterium, was grown on exudates of Dunaliella bardawil. The bacteria increased the solubility of Fe, thereby enhancing its availability to the algae. As a result, the algal growth rate increased. Because of these syntrophic relations, growth of the marine alga D. bardawil was facilitated at Fe levels that would otherwise induce Fe deficiency and inhibit algal growth. PMID:16535058

  12. Specific growth rate determines the sensitivity of Escherichia coli to lactic acid stress: implications for predictive microbiology.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Roland; Barmark, Gunilla

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that sensitivity of Escherichia coli to lactic acid at concentrations relevant for fermented sausages (pH 4.6, 150 mM lactic acid, aw = 0.92, temperature = 20 or 27°C) increases with increasing growth rate. For E. coli strain 683 cultured in TSB in chemostat or batch, subsequent inactivation rates when exposed to lactic acid stress increased with increasing growth rate at harvest. A linear relationship between growth rate at harvest and inactivation rate was found to describe both batch and chemostat cultures. The maximum difference in T90, the estimated times for a one-log reduction, was 10 hours between bacteria harvested during the first 3 hours of batch culture, that is, at different growth rates. A 10-hour difference in T90 would correspond to measuring inactivation at 33°C or 45°C instead of 37°C based on relationships between temperature and inactivation. At similar harvest growth rates, inactivation rates were lower for bacteria cultured at 37°C than at 15-20°C. As demonstrated for E. coli 683, culture conditions leading to variable growth rates may contribute to variable lactic acid inactivation rates. Findings emphasize the use and reporting of standardised culture conditions and can have implications for the interpretation of data when developing inactivation models. PMID:25110680

  13. Specific Growth Rate Determines the Sensitivity of Escherichia coli to Lactic Acid Stress: Implications for Predictive Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that sensitivity of Escherichia coli to lactic acid at concentrations relevant for fermented sausages (pH 4.6, 150 mM lactic acid, aw = 0.92, temperature = 20 or 27°C) increases with increasing growth rate. For E. coli strain 683 cultured in TSB in chemostat or batch, subsequent inactivation rates when exposed to lactic acid stress increased with increasing growth rate at harvest. A linear relationship between growth rate at harvest and inactivation rate was found to describe both batch and chemostat cultures. The maximum difference in T90, the estimated times for a one-log reduction, was 10 hours between bacteria harvested during the first 3 hours of batch culture, that is, at different growth rates. A 10-hour difference in T90 would correspond to measuring inactivation at 33°C or 45°C instead of 37°C based on relationships between temperature and inactivation. At similar harvest growth rates, inactivation rates were lower for bacteria cultured at 37°C than at 15–20°C. As demonstrated for E. coli 683, culture conditions leading to variable growth rates may contribute to variable lactic acid inactivation rates. Findings emphasize the use and reporting of standardised culture conditions and can have implications for the interpretation of data when developing inactivation models. PMID:25110680

  14. Spherulitic Growth of Hematite Under Hydrothermal Conditions: Insights into the Growth Mechanism of Hematite Spherules at Meridiani Planum Mars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.

    2010-01-01

    Hematite-rich spherules were discovered embedded in sulfate-rich outcrop rock and as lag deposits of whole and broken spherules by the Opportunity rover at Meridiani Planem [1-6]. The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), which has a wider spectral range compared to the Mars Exploration Rover Mini-TES, provided an important constraint that hematite-rich spherules are dominated by emission along the crystallographic c-axis [7-10]. We have previously synthesized hematite spherules whose mineralogic, chemical, and crystallographic properties are strikingly similar to those for the hematite-rich spherules at Meridiani Planum [11]. The spherules were synthesized in the laboratory along with hydronium jarosite and minor hydronium alunite from Fe-Al-Mg-S-Cl acid sulfate solutions under hydrothermal conditions. The reaction sequence was (1) precipitation of hydronium jarosite, (2) jarosite dissolution and precipitation of hematite spherules, and (3) precipitation of hydronium alunite upon depletion of hydronium jarosite. The spherules exhibit a radial growth texture with the crystallographic c-axis aligned along the radial direction, so that thermal emission spectra have no hematite emissivity minimum at approx.390/cm similar to the emission spectra returned by MGS TES. The objective of this paper is to expand on our initial studies [11] to examine the morphological evolution during growth of spherules starting from sub-micrometer crystals to spherules many orders of magnitude in size.

  15. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  16. Growth conditions, elemental accumulation and induced physiological changes in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Diego A; Víllora, Gemma; Ruiz, Juan M; Romero, Luis

    2003-08-01

    Soils contaminated with low levels of heavy metals and other trace elements are now frequently used for vegetable growing. In this situation, heavy metals and trace elements from these polluted soils may accumulate in the agricultural plants being grown in them and thereby enter the human food chain. The objectives of this study are to elucidate the effects of growth conditions, manipulated by the crop covers, on the phytoaccumulation of elements, and to investigate the conceivable influences of these conditions on the plant biochemistry. In three consecutive years of field experiments, open air (T(0)), and floating rowcover treatments (T(1): perforated polyethylene 50 micrometers; T(2): polypropylene 17 gm(-2)) were used to produce different environmental conditions for the growth of Chinese cabbage [Brassica rapa L. (Pekinensis group) cv. 'Nagaoka 50']. Five samplings (whole tops) were carried out from transplanting to harvest and measurements of B, Al, Ag, Si and Ca concentration as well as phenolics (orto-diphenols, total phenols and anthocyanins), pectic fractions, amino acids (histidine, phenylalanine and tyrosine) and polyphenol oxidase activity, were carried out in samples. The T(1) (perforated polyethylene sheet) gave greater B, Al, Ag and Si concentration and phytoextraction (in weight units) than the open-air control. These findings can help to develop new cost-effective techniques for phytoremediation as the application of plastic covers in the field. The build-up of heavy metals in those crops would make the product less suitable for human consumption. PMID:12781236

  17. Modelling and predicting the simultaneous growth of Escherichia coli and lactic acid bacteria in milk.

    PubMed

    Ačai, P; Valík, L'; Medved'ová, A; Rosskopf, F

    2016-09-01

    Modelling and predicting the simultaneous competitive growth of Escherichia coli and starter culture of lactic acid bacteria (Fresco 1010, Chr. Hansen, Hørsholm, Denmark) was studied in milk at different temperatures and Fresco inoculum concentrations. The lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were able to induce an early stationary state in E. coli The developed model described and tested the growth inhibition of E. coli (with initial inoculum concentration 10(3) CFU/mL) when LAB have reached maximum density in different conditions of temperature (ranging from 12 ℃ to 30 ℃) and for various inoculum sizes of LAB (ranging from approximately 10(3) to 10(7) CFU/mL). The prediction ability of the microbial competition model (the Baranyi and Roberts model coupled with the Gimenez and Dalgaard model) was first performed only with parameters estimated from individual growth of E. coli and the LAB and then with the introduced competition coefficients evaluated from co-culture growth of E. coli and LAB in milk. Both the results and their statistical indices showed that the model with incorporated average values of competition coefficients improved the prediction of E. coli behaviour in co-culture with LAB. PMID:26683482

  18. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere. PMID:27197574

  19. Effects of acetic acid and lactic acid on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a minimal medium.

    PubMed

    Narendranath, N V; Thomas, K C; Ingledew, W M

    2001-03-01

    Specific growth rates (mu) of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae decreased exponentially (R2 > 0.9) as the concentrations of acetic acid or lactic acid were increased in minimal media at 30 degrees C. Moreover, the length of the lag phase of each growth curve (h) increased exponentially as increasing concentrations of acetic or lactic acid were added to the media. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of acetic acid for yeast growth was 0.6% w/v (100 mM) and that of lactic acid was 2.5% w/v (278 mM) for both strains of yeast. However, acetic acid at concentrations as low as 0.05-0.1% w/v and lactic acid at concentrations of 0.2-0.8% w/v begin to stress the yeasts as seen by reduced growth rates and decreased rates of glucose consumption and ethanol production as the concentration of acetic or lactic acid in the media was raised. In the presence of increasing acetic acid, all the glucose in the medium was eventually consumed even though the rates of consumption differed. However, this was not observed in the presence of increasing lactic acid where glucose consumption was extremely protracted even at a concentration of 0.6% w/v (66 mM). A response surface central composite design was used to evaluate the interaction between acetic and lactic acids on the specific growth rate of both yeast strains at 30 degrees C. The data were analysed using the General Linear Models (GLM) procedure. From the analysis, the interaction between acetic acid and lactic acid was statistically significant (P < or = 0.001), i.e., the inhibitory effect of the two acids present together in a medium is highly synergistic. PMID:11420658

  20. A gene homologous to beta-type carbonic anhydrase is essential for the growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, S; Ohnishi, J; Hayashi, M; Ikeda, M

    2004-02-01

    Carbonic anhydrase catalyzes the interconversion of CO(2) and bicarbonate. We focused on this enzyme in the amino acid-producing organism Corynebacterium glutamicum in order to assess the availability of bicarbonate for carboxylation reactions essential to growth and for those required for L-lysine overproduction. A whole-genome sequence revealed two genes encoding putative beta-type and gamma-type carbonic anhydrases in C. glutamicum. These genes encode polypeptides containing zinc ligands strictly conserved in each type of carbonic anhydrase and were designated bca and gca, respectively. Internal deletion of the chromosomal bca gene resulted in a phenotype showing severely reduced growth under atmospheric conditions (0.04% CO(2)) on both complete and minimal media. The growth defect of the Delta bca strain was restored under elevated CO(2) conditions (5% CO(2)). Introduction of the red alga Porphyridium purpureum carbonic anhydrase gene ( pca) could compensate for the bca deletion, allowing normal growth under an atmospheric level of CO(2). In contrast, the Delta gca strain behaved identically to the wild-type strain with respect to growth, irrespective of the CO(2) conditions. Attempts to increase the dosage of bca, gca, and pca in the defined L-lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum AHD-2 led to no discernable effects on growth and production. Northern blot analysis indicated that the bca transcript in strain AHD-2 and another L-lysine producer, C. glutamicum B-6, was present at a much higher level than in the wild-type strain, particularly during exponential growth phases. These results indicate that: (1) the bca product is essential to achieving normal growth under ordinary atmospheric conditions, and this effect is most likely due to the bca product's ability to maintain favorable intracellular bicarbonate/CO(2) levels, and (2) the expression of bca is induced during exponential growth phases and also in the case of L-lysine overproduction, both of which are

  1. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium’s growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports. PMID:26684737

  2. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity of wheatgrass (Triticum aestivum L.) as a function of growth under different conditions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sunil D; Tilak, Jai C; Acharya, R; Rajurkar, Nilima S; Devasagayam, T P A; Reddy, A V R

    2006-03-01

    The antioxidant activity of wheatgrass, which is consumed as a dietary supplement, was estimated at different levels. The methods employed include FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power), ABTS (2,2'-azobis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and DPPH (1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) assays. Aqueous and ethanol extracts of wheatgrass grown under different conditions over a period of 6, 7, 8, 10 and 15 days were used. Lipid peroxidation and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) were determined and utilized to check the potency of a few selected extracts. Different conditions used for growth were (1) tap water, (2) tap water with nutrients, (3) soil and tap water, and (4) soil with nutrients. For comparison, a commercially available wheatgrass tablet was analysed. To explain the reasons behind the observed differences, the total phenolic and flavonoid contents of the extracts were measured. These contents increased with growth under all the conditions. The ethanol extracts were found to have a higher phenolic and flavonoid content than the aqueous extracts. The highest FRAP values occurred on day 15 of growth under condition 4, the values being 0.463 and 0.573 mmol of ascorbic acid and Trolox equivalents/100 g fresh wheatgrass for aqueous and ethanol extracts, respectively. In the aqueous extracts no specific trend was observed with the DPPH assay for the different conditions nor for the growth period. In the case of ethanol extracts, however, it increased with the growth period and the wheatgrass grown in condition 4 was found to be the most effective. These extracts were also found to inhibit significantly ascorbate-Fe2+ induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver mitochondria. The ORAC values of aqueous and ethanol extracts of day 10 with condition 4 were found to be 39.9 and 48.2, respectively, being higher than those reported for many natural extracts or vegetables. PMID:16521113

  3. OPTIMAL GROWTH CONDITIONS AND ANTIOXIDATIVE ACTIVITIES OF CYLINDROTHECA CLOSTERIUM (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE)(1).

    PubMed

    Affan, Abu; Heo, Soo-Jin; Jeon, You-Jin; Lee, Joon-Baek

    2009-12-01

    We isolated the unialgal strain of Cylindotheca closterium (Ehrenb.) Reimann et J. C. Lewin and produced an axenic strain using an antibiotic cocktail of enriched f/2 artificial seawater medium. The optimal growth conditions were estimated under 27 different combinations of temperature, salinity, and nutrients, and mass culture was performed based on the best specific growth conditions. Its antioxidant activities were determined from the extracts of methanol, water, and enzymes (proteases and carbohydrases). The maximum specific growth rate (μmax ) varied from 0.63 to 0.97 · d(-1) . The maximum cell density was 7.20 × 10(4) cells · mL(-1) , while the μmax was 0.82 · d(-1) in culture conditions of 20°C, 30 psu (practical salinity unit), and "F" nutrient concentrations on day 10 of the culture period. The scavenging rates for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical were 72.5% and 69.4% from Viscozyme and methanol extracts, respectively. The enzymatic extracts of C. closterium prepared by the hydrolyses of Amyloglucosidase (AMG) and Viscozyme showed 45.8% and 45.5% nitric-oxide-scavenging rates, slightly lower than the activity of alpha-tocopherol (α-tocopherol) but similar to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The extract from methanol and water showed 44.8% and 44.4% scavenging rates, statistically similar with BHT. The metal-chelating activities of the Kojizyme, Alcalase, methanol, Viscozyme, and Neutrase extracts were 67.1, 53.9, 53.2, 52.1, and 50.2 %, respectively, five to six times higher than the commercial antioxidants. The AMG, Viscozyme, and Neutrase extracts showed a remarkable linoleic acid peroxidation inhibition, which was higher than BHT and statistically similar with α-tocopherol. PMID:27032598

  4. Screening and characterization of Isochrysis strains and optimization of culture conditions for docosahexaenoic acid production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2013-06-01

    Isochrysis is a genus of marine unicellular microalgae that produces docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6), a very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) of significant health and nutritional value. Mass cultivation of Isochrysis for DHA production for human consumption has not been established due to disappointing low DHA productivity obtained from commonly used Isochrysis strains. In this study, 19 natural Isochrysis strains were screened for DHA yields and the results showed that the cellular DHA content ranged from 6.8 to 17.0 % of total fatty acids with the highest DHA content occurring in the exponential growth phase. Isochrysis galbana #153180 exhibited the greatest DHA production potential and was selected for further investigation. The effects of different light intensities, forms, and concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and salinity on growth and DHA production of I. galbana #153180 were studied in a bubble column photobioreactor (PBR). Under favorable culture conditions, I. galbana #153180 contained DHA up to 17.5 % of total fatty acids or 1.7 % of cell dry weight. I. galbana #153180 was further tested in outdoor flat-plate PBRs varying in light path length, starting cell density (SCD), and culture mode (batch versus semicontinuous). When optimized, record high biomass and DHA productivity of I. galbana #153180 of 0.72 g L(-1) day(-1) and 13.6 mg L(-1) day(-1), or 26.4 g m(-2) day(-1) and 547.7 mg m(-2) day(-1), respectively, were obtained, suggesting that I. galbana #153180 may be a desirable strain for commercial production of DHA. PMID:23423326

  5. Growth Hormone Enhances Arachidonic Acid Metabolites in a Growth Hormone Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Oberbauer, A. M.; German, J. B.; Murray, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    In a transgenic growth hormone (GH) mouse model, highly elevated GH increases overall growth and decreases adipose depots while low or moderate circulating GH enhances adipose deposition with differential effects on body growth. Using this model, the effects of low, moderate, and high chronic GH on fatty acid composition were determined for adipose and hepatic tissue and the metabolites of 20:4n-6 (arachidonic acid) were characterized to identify metabolic targets of action of elevated GH. The products of Δ-9 desaturase in hepatic, but not adipose, tissue were reduced in response to elevated GH. Proportional to the level of circulating GH, the products of Δ-5 and Δ-6 were increased in both adipose and hepatic tissue for the omega-6 lipids (e.g., 20:4n-6), while only the hepatic tissues showed an increase for omega-3 lipids (e.g., 22:6n-3). The eicosanoids, PGE2 and 12-HETE, were elevated with high GH but circulating thromboxane was not. Hepatic PTGS1 and 2 (COX1 and COX 2), SOD1, and FADS2 (Δ-6 desaturase) mRNAs were increased with elevated GH while FAS mRNA was reduced; SCD1 (ste-aroyl-coenzyme A desaturase) and SCD2 mRNA did not significantly differ. The present study showed that GH influences the net flux through various aspects of lipid metabolism and especially the desaturase metabolic processes. The combination of altered metabolism and tissue specificity suggest that the regulation of membrane composition and its effects on signaling pathways, including the production and actions of eicosanoids, can be mediated by the GH regulatory axis. PMID:21442273

  6. Growth effects and assimilation of organic acids in Chemostat and Batch Cultures of Acidithiobacillus caldus

    SciTech Connect

    John E. Aston; William A. Apel; Brady D. Lee; Brent M. Peyton

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Acidithiobacillus caldus to grow aerobically using pyruvate, acetate, citrate, 2-ketoglutarate, succinate, and malate as either an electron donor and carbon source (heterotrophic growth), or as a carbon source when potassium tetrathionate was added as an electron donor (mixotrophic growth), was tested in chemostat cultures. Under both heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions, organic acids were added to a sub-lethal concentration (50 M). Under mixotrophic conditions, potassium tetrathionate was added to an excess concentration (10 mM). No cell growth was observed under heterotrophic conditions; however effluent cell concentrations increased over three-fold when pyruvate was coupled with potassium tetrathionate. Under these conditions, the effluent pyruvate concentration was reduced to below the detection limit (2 M), and oxygen consumption increased by approximately 100%. Although pyruvate provided a carbon source in these experiments, ambient carbon dioxide was also available to the cells. To test whether At. caldus could grow mixotrophically using pyruvate as a sole carbon source and potassium tetrathionate as an electron donor, cells were batch cultured in a medium free of dissolved inorganic carbon, and with no carbon dioxide in the headspace. These experiments showed that At. caldus was able to convert pyruvate between 65 ± 8 and 82 ± 15% of the pyruvate carbon to cellular biomass, depending on the initial pyruvate concentrations. This work is the first to identify a defined organic-carbon source, other than glucose, that At. caldus can assimilate. This has important implications, as mixotrophic and heterotrophic activity has been shown to increase mineral leaching in acidic systems.

  7. Growth and condition of bluegills in Wisconsin lakes: effects of population density and lake pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, J.G.; Hanneman, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Growth and condition of bluegills epomis macrochirusfrom five acidic lakes (pH 5.1-6.0) and six circumneutral lakes (pH 6.7-7.5) in northern Wisconsin were compared. Although mean condition factors and mean back-calculated total lengths at ages 1 to 4 varied significantly among lakes, the differences were not related to lake pH. Rather, the ranks of mean condition factors and back-calculated lengths at ages 2, 3, and 4 were negatively correlated with relative density of bluegills among the lakes. Because of the dominating effect of density, growth rates and condition factors are not useful as indicators of chronic, pH-related stress on bluegill populations.

  8. A comparative study of thermal and acid inactivation kinetics in fruit juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg grown at acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2009-11-01

    Acid and heat inactivation in orange and apple juices of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (i.e., Spanish Type Culture Collection) 443 (CECT 443) (Salmonella Typhimurium) and S. enterica serovar Senftenberg CECT 4384 (Salmonella Senftenberg) grown in buffered brain heart infusion (pH 7.0) and acidified brain heart infusion up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic, and hydrochloric acids was evaluated. Acid adaptation induced an adaptive response that increased the subsequent resistance to extreme pH conditions (pH 2.5) and to heat, although the magnitude of these responses differed between the two isolates and fruit juices. The acid resistance in orange juice for acid-adapted cells (D-values of 28.3-34.5 min for Salmonella Senftenberg and 30.0-39.2 min for Salmonella Typhimurium) resulted to be about two to three times higher than that corresponding to non-acid-adapted cells. In apple juice, acid-adapted Salmonella Senftenberg cells survived better than those of Salmonella Typhimurium, obtaining mean D-values of 114.8 +/- 12.3 and 41.9 +/- 2.5 min, respectively. The thermotolerance of non-acid-adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in orange (D(58)-value: 0.028 min) and apple juices (D(58)-value: 0.10 min) was approximately double for acid-adapted cells. This cross-protection to heat was more strongly expressed in Salmonella Senftenberg. D(58)-values obtained for non-acid-adapted cells in orange (0.11 min) and apple juices (0.19 min) increased approximately 10 and 5 times, respectively, after their growth in acidified media. The conditions prevailing during bacterial growth and heat treatment did not significantly influence the z-values observed (6.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Typhimurium and 7.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C for Salmonella Senftenberg). The enhanced acid resistance found for both isolates could enable them to survive for prolonged time periods in the gastrointestinal tract, increasing the risk of illness. Further, it

  9. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  10. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-28

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (E(p), 1.10 ≤ E(p) ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (t(p), 10(0) ≤ t(p) ≤ 10(4) s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (d(ox)). Because X1 > d(ox) for the entire range of E(p), t(p), and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Pt(δ+)-O(δ-) surface dipole (μ(PtO)), and the potential drop (V(ox)) and electric field (E(ox)) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide. PMID:25362330

  11. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (Ep, 1.10 ≤ Ep ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (tp, 100 ≤ tp ≤ 104 s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (dox). Because X1 > dox for the entire range of Ep, tp, and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Ptδ+-Oδ- surface dipole (μPtO), and the potential drop (Vox) and electric field (Eox) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide.

  12. Impact of Microbial Growth on Subsurface Perfluoroalkyl Acid Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weathers, T. S.; Higgins, C. P.; Sharp, J.

    2014-12-01

    The fate and transport of poly and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the presence of active microbial communities has not been widely investigated. These emerging contaminants are commonly utilized in aqueous film-forming foams (AFFF) and have often been detected in groundwater. This study explores the transport of a suite of perfluorocarboxylic acids and perfluoroalkylsulfonates, including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), in microbially active settings. Single point organic carbon normalized sorption coefficients derived by exposing inactive cellular material to PFASs result in more than an order of magnitude increase in sorption compared to soil organic carbon sorption coefficients found in literature. For example, the sorption coefficients for PFOS are 4.05±0.07 L/kg and 2.80±0.08 L/kg for cellular organic carbon and soil organic carbon respectively. This increase in sorption, coupled with enhanced extracellular polymeric substance production observed during growth of a common hydrocarbon degrading soil microbe exposed to source-level concentrations of PFASs (10 mg/L of 11 analytes, 110 mg/L total) may result in PFAS retardation in situ. To address the upscaling of this phenomenon, flow-through columns packed with low-organic carbon sediment and biostimulated with 10 mg/L glucose were exposed to PFAS concentrations from 15 μg/L to 10 mg/L of each 11 analytes. Breakthrough and tailing of each analyte was measured and modeled with Hydrus-1D to explore sorption coefficients over time for microbially active columns.

  13. Nucleation and growth of crystals under cirrus and polar stratospheric cloud conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, John; Queen, Brian; Teets, Edward; Fahey, James

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory studies examine phase changes of hygroscopic substances which occur as aerosol in stratosphere and troposphere (sodium chloride, ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, nitric acid, sulfuric acid), under controlled conditions, in samples volume 1 to 10(exp -4) ml. Crystallization of salts from supersaturated solutions is examined by slowly evaporating a solution drop on a substrate, under controlled relative humidity, until self nucleation occurs; controlled nucleation of ice in a mm capillary U-tube gives a measured ice crystallization velocity at known supercooling. Two states of crystallization occur for regions where hydrates exist. It is inferred that all of the materials readily exist as supersaturated/supercooled solutions; the degree of metastability appears to be slightly enhanced by inclusion of aircraft produced soot. The crystallization velocity is taken as a measure of viscosity. Results suggest an approach to a glass transition at high molality, supersaturation and/or supercooling within the range of atmospheric interest. It is hypothesized that surface reactions occur more readily on solidified particles - either crystalline or glass, whereas volume reactions are more important on droplets with sufficiently low viscosity and volume diffusivity. Implications are examined for optical properties of such particles in the atmosphere. In a separate experiment, crystal growth was examined in a modified thermal vapor diffusion chamber over the range of cirrus temperature (-30 to -70 C) and under controlled supersaturation and air pressure. The crystals grew at a velocity of 1-2 microns/s, thickness 60-70 micron, in the form of thin column crystals. Design criteria are given for a system to investigate particle growth down to -100 C, (PSC temperatures) where nitric acid particles can be grown under similar control and in the form of hydrate crystals.

  14. EFFECTIVE ACIDITY CONSTANT BEHAVIOR NEAR ZERO CHARGE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface site (>SOH group) acidity reactions require expressions of the form: Ka = [>SOHn-1(z-1)]aH+EXP(-DG/RT)/[>SOHnz] (where all variables have their usual meaning). One can rearrange this expression to generate an effective acidity constant historically defined as: Qa = Ka...

  15. Deformation and crack growth response under cyclic creep conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    To increase energy efficiency, new plants must operate at higher and higher temperatures. Moreover, power generation equipment continues to age and is being used far beyond its intended original design life. Some recent failures which unfortunately occurred with serious consequences have clearly illustrated that current methods for insuring safety and reliability of high temperature equipment is inadequate. Because of these concerns, an understanding of the high-temperature crack growth process is very important and has led to the following studies of the high temperature failure process. This effort summarizes the results of some recent studies which investigate the phenomenon of high temperature creep fatigue crack growth. Experimental results which detail the process of creep fatigue, analytical studies which investigate why current methods are ineffective, and finally, a new approach which is based on the T{sup *}-integral and its ability to characterize the creep-fatigue crack growth process are discussed. The potential validity of this new predictive methodology is illustrated.

  16. Plasma amino acid coatings for a conformal growth of titania nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kyle D; Marczewski, Kamil; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Slocik, Joseph M; Jakubiak, Rachel; Naik, Rajesh R; Bunning, Timothy J; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2010-08-01

    We report on the conformal synthesis of ultrathin films from the amino acid histidine on flat silicon substrates and 3D periodic polymer structures via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We demonstrate the efficient utilization of this functional amino acid nanocoating for the formation of individual titania nanoparticles with dimensions from 2 to 15 nm depending upon reduction conditions. The titania nanoparticles were grown directly on histidine-functionalized planar and 3D polymer substrates by a wet-chemistry method that showed uniform surface coverage that reached approximately 75%. This approach demonstrates the potential for modifying the optical properties of periodic porous polymeric structures via direct conformal growth of titania nanoparticles. PMID:20735097

  17. Correlating electrical resistance to growth conditions for multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Chun; Amama, Placidus B.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Reifenberger, Ronald G.

    2007-08-27

    A correlation between growth temperature and electrical resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) has been established by measuring the resistance of individual MWNTs grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 800, 900, and 950 deg. C. The lowest resistances were obtained mainly from MWNTs grown at 900 deg. C. The MWNT resistance is larger on average at lower (800 deg. C) and higher (950 deg. C) growth temperatures. The resistance of MWNTs correlated well with other MWNT quality indices obtained from Raman spectra. This study identifies a temperature window for growing higher-quality MWNTs with fewer defects and lower resistance by PECVD.

  18. Correlating electrical resistance to growth conditions for multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chun; Amama, Placidus B.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Reifenberger, Ronald G.

    2007-08-01

    A correlation between growth temperature and electrical resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) has been established by measuring the resistance of individual MWNTs grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 800, 900, and 950°C. The lowest resistances were obtained mainly from MWNTs grown at 900°C. The MWNT resistance is larger on average at lower (800°C) and higher (950°C) growth temperatures. The resistance of MWNTs correlated well with other MWNT quality indices obtained from Raman spectra. This study identifies a temperature window for growing higher-quality MWNTs with fewer defects and lower resistance by PECVD.

  19. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) deficiency improves insulin resistance and glucose metabolism under diet-induced obesity conditions.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongfei; Zhang, Jun; Gong, Yan; Gupte, Jamila; Ye, Jay; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Samayoa, Kim; Coberly, Suzanne; Gardner, Jonitha; Wang, Huilan; Corbin, Tim; Chui, Danny; Baribault, Helene; Li, Yang

    2014-10-31

    The role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in regulating bile acid synthesis has been well defined; however, its reported role on glucose and energy metabolism remains unresolved. Here, we show that FGFR4 deficiency in mice leads to improvement in glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and reduction in body weight under high fat conditions. Mechanism of action studies in FGFR4-deficient mice suggest that the effects are mediated in part by increased plasma levels of adiponectin and the endocrine FGF factors FGF21 and FGF15, the latter of which increase in response to an elevated bile acid pool. Direct actions of increased bile acids on bile acid receptors, and other potential indirect mechanisms, may also contribute to the observed metabolic changes. The results described herein suggest that FGFR4 antagonists alone, or in combination with other agents, could serve as a novel treatment for diabetes. PMID:25204652

  20. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics. PMID:27083372

  1. Nitric acid uptake by sulfuric acid solutions under stratospheric conditions - Determination of Henry's Law solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reihs, Christa M.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1990-01-01

    The uptake of nitric acid by sulfuric acid solutions representative of stratospheric particulate at low temperatures was measured to determine the solubility of nitric acid in sulfuric acid solutions as a function of H2SO4 concentration and solution temperature. Solubilities are reported for sulfuric acid solutions ranging from 58 to 87 wt pct H2SO4 over a temperature range from 188 to 240 K, showing that, in general, the solubility of nitric acid increases with decreasing sulfuric acid concentration and with decreasing temperature. The measured solubilities indicate that nitric acid in the global stratosphere will be found predominantly in the gas phase.

  2. Effects of various amino acids as organic nitrogen sources on the growth and biochemical composition of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Zhang, Zhenhua; Yan, Shaohua

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of eighteen l-amino acids on the growth and biochemical composition of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. Under the nitrate deficiency condition, ten l-amino acids were found to exert stronger stimulative effects on the algal growth than the other amino acids. After 10-day culture, addition of 0.5gL(-1) the above mentioned ten amino acids significantly increased the cellular protein contents by 441.3-110.8%, respectively, and significantly decreased the carbohydrate contents by 60.7-16.2%, respectively. Under the normal nitrate condition, the cellular biochemical composition was not significantly affected by addition of serine, leucine, proline, aspartic acid, asparagine, and glycine, whereas addition of aspartic acid and arginine increased the algal biomass by 110.2% and 62.8% compared with the control. Finally, the significance of this work in the biotechnological application of culturing C. pyrenoidosa in organic wastewater rich in amino acids was further discussed. PMID:26356118

  3. Manipulation of culture conditions alters lipid content and fatty acid profiles of a wide variety of known and new oleaginous yeasts species

    PubMed Central

    Sitepu, Irnayuli R.; Sestric, Ryan; Ignatia, Laura; Levin, David; German, J. Bruce; Gillies, Laura A.; Almada, Luis A.G.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2013-01-01

    Oleaginous yeasts have been studied for oleochemical production for over 80 years. Only a few species have been studied intensely. To expand the diversity of oleaginous yeasts available for lipid research, we surveyed a broad diversity of yeasts with indicators of oleaginicity including known oleaginous clades, and buoyancy. Sixty-nine strains representing 17 genera and 50 species were screened for lipid production. Yeasts belonged to Ascomycota families, Basidiomycota orders, and the yeast-like algal genus Prototheca. Total intracellular lipids and fatty acid composition were determined under different incubation times and nitrogen availability. Thirteen new oleaginous yeast species were discovered, representing multiple ascomycete and basidiomycete clades. Nitrogen starvation generally increased intracellular lipid content. The fatty acid profiles varied with the growth conditions regardless of taxonomic affiliation. The dominant fatty acids were oleic acid, palmitic acid, linoleic acid, and stearic acid. Yeasts and culture conditions that produced fatty acids appropriate for biodiesel were identified. PMID:23891835

  4. Effect of fusaric acid and phytoanticipins on growth of rhizobacteria and Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Landa, Blanca B; Cachinero-Díaz, Juana M; Lemanceau, Philippe; Jiménez-Díaz, Rafael M; Alabouvette, Claude

    2002-11-01

    Suppression of soilborne diseases by biocontrol agents involves complex interactions among biocontrol agents and the pathogen and between these microorganisms and the plant. In general, these interactions are not well characterized. In this work, we studied (i) the diversity among strains of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., and Paenibacillus sp. for their sensitivity to fusaric acid (FAc) and phytoanticipins from different host plants, (ii) the diversity of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Fusarium oxysporum isolates for their sensitivity to phytoanticipins, and (iii) the influence of FAc on the production of pyoverdine by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. tolerant to this compound. There was a great diversity in the response of the bacterial strains to FAc; however, as a group, Bacillus spp. and Paenibacillus macerans were much more sensitive to FAc than Pseudomonas spp. FAc also affected production of pyoverdine by FAc-tolerant Pseudomonas spp. strains. Phytoanticipins differed in their effects on microbial growth, and sensitivity to a phytoanticipin varied among bacterial and fungal strains. Biochanin A did not affect growth of bacteria, but coumarin inhibited growth of Pseudomonas spp. strains and had no effect on Bacillus circulans and P. macerans. Conversely, tomatine inhibited growth of B. circulans and P. macerans. Biochanin A and tomatine inhibited growth of three pathogenic isolates of F. oxysporum but increased growth of three nonpathogenic F. oxysporum isolates. Coumarin inhibited growth of all pathogenic and nonpathogenic F. oxysporum isolates. These results are indicative of the complex interactions that can occur among plants, pathogens, and biological control agents in the rhizosphere and on the root surface. Also, these results may help to explain the low efficacy of some combinations of biocontrol agents, as well as the inconsistency in achieving disease suppression under field conditions. PMID:12556125

  5. cap alpha. -transforming growth factor secreted by untransformed bovine anterior pituitary cells in culture. I. Purification from conditioned medium

    SciTech Connect

    Samsoondar, J.; Kobrin, M.S.; Kudlow, J.E.

    1986-11-05

    A 6-kDa ..cap alpha..-transforming growth factor (TGF) was purified 100,000-fold to homogeneity from the culture fluid conditioned by normal bovine anterior pituitary-derived cells. Initial purification of the acid-soluble TGF from concentrated conditioned medium was achieved by Bio-Gel P-60 gel filtration (apparent molecular mass of 9 kDa). After the Bio-Gel step, three different steps of reverse-phase fast-protein liquid chromatography on the same Pharmacia C/sub 18/ column, using linear acetonitrile gradients, gave complete purification. The ion-pairing agents used in the three consecutive steps were: 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid, 0.13% heptafluorobutyric acid, and again, 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid at a shallower gradient. Homogeneity was confirmed by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography, and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, where TGF visualization was facilitated by autoradiography of /sup 125/I-TGF. The /sup 125/I-TGF bound to epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors and after elution ran identically to the starting material. The molecular mass of TGF is 6 kDa by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 6.6 kDa by amino acid analysis. The amino acid composition of bovine TGF is similar to that of rat or human ..cap alpha..TGF and distinct from epidermal growth factor. Colony-stimulating activity was lost after purification, but the TGF retained its ability to stimulate thymidine uptake by quiescent cells. This mitogenic activity could be blocked completely by anti-EGF-receptor monoclonal antibodies, indicating that the activity was mediated through the EGF-receptor.

  6. Conditions for super-adiabatic droplet growth after entrainment mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Shaw, Raymond; Xue, Huiwen

    2016-07-01

    Cloud droplet response to entrainment and mixing between a cloud and its environment is considered, accounting for subsequent droplet growth during adiabatic ascent following a mixing event. The vertical profile for liquid water mixing ratio after a mixing event is derived analytically, allowing the reduction to be predicted from the mixing fraction and from the temperature and humidity for both the cloud and environment. It is derived for the limit of homogeneous mixing. The expression leads to a critical height above the mixing level: at the critical height the cloud droplet radius is the same for both mixed and unmixed parcels, and the critical height is independent of the updraft velocity and mixing fraction. Cloud droplets in a mixed parcel are larger than in an unmixed parcel above the critical height, which we refer to as the "super-adiabatic" growth region. Analytical results are confirmed with a bin microphysics cloud model. Using the model, we explore the effects of updraft velocity, aerosol source in the environmental air, and polydisperse cloud droplets. Results show that the mixed parcel is more likely to reach the super-adiabatic growth region when the environmental air is humid and clean. It is also confirmed that the analytical predictions are matched by the volume-mean cloud droplet radius for polydisperse size distributions. The findings have implications for the origin of large cloud droplets that may contribute to onset of collision-coalescence in warm clouds.

  7. Conditions for super-adiabatic droplet growth after entrainment mixing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Fan; Shaw, Raymond; Xue, Huiwen

    2016-07-29

    Cloud droplet response to entrainment and mixing between a cloud and its environment is considered, accounting for subsequent droplet growth during adiabatic ascent following a mixing event. The vertical profile for liquid water mixing ratio after a mixing event is derived analytically, allowing the reduction to be predicted from the mixing fraction and from the temperature and humidity for both the cloud and environment. It is derived for the limit of homogeneous mixing. The expression leads to a critical height above the mixing level: at the critical height the cloud droplet radius is the same for both mixed and unmixedmore » parcels, and the critical height is independent of the updraft velocity and mixing fraction. Cloud droplets in a mixed parcel are larger than in an unmixed parcel above the critical height, which we refer to as the “super-adiabatic” growth region. Analytical results are confirmed with a bin microphysics cloud model. Using the model, we explore the effects of updraft velocity, aerosol source in the environmental air, and polydisperse cloud droplets. Results show that the mixed parcel is more likely to reach the super-adiabatic growth region when the environmental air is humid and clean. It is also confirmed that the analytical predictions are matched by the volume-mean cloud droplet radius for polydisperse size distributions. The findings have implications for the origin of large cloud droplets that may contribute to onset of collision–coalescence in warm clouds.« less

  8. Profiling of lipid and glycogen accumulations under different growth conditions in the sulfothermophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Aoki, Motohide; Ju, Xiaohui; Ueda, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujiwara, Shoko; Umemura, Tomonari; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Minoda, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular red alga Galdieria sulphuraria grows efficiently and produces a large amount of biomass in acidic conditions at high temperatures. It has great potential to produce biofuels and other beneficial compounds without becoming contaminated with other organisms. In G. sulphuraria, biomass measurements and glycogen and lipid analyses demonstrated that the amounts and compositions of glycogen and lipids differed when cells were grown under autotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions. Maximum biomass production was obtained in the mixotrophic culture. High amounts of glycogen were obtained in the mixotrophic cultures, while the amounts of neutral lipids were similar between mixotrophic and heterotrophic cultures. The amounts of neutral lipids were highest in red algae, including thermophiles. Glycogen structure and fatty acids compositions largely depended on the growth conditions. PMID:26595665

  9. Promoters maintain their relative activity levels under different growth conditions

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Leeat; Zackay, Ora; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Barenholz, Uri; Dekel, Erez; Sasson, Vered; Aidelberg, Guy; Bren, Anat; Zeevi, Danny; Weinberger, Adina; Alon, Uri; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Most genes change expression levels across conditions, but it is unclear which of these changes represents specific regulation and what determines their quantitative degree. Here, we accurately measured activities of ∼900 S. cerevisiae and ∼1800 E. coli promoters using fluorescent reporters. We show that in both organisms 60–90% of promoters change their expression between conditions by a constant global scaling factor that depends only on the conditions and not on the promoter's identity. Quantifying such global effects allows precise characterization of specific regulation—promoters deviating from the global scale line. These are organized into few functionally related groups that also adhere to scale lines and preserve their relative activities across conditions. Thus, only several scaling factors suffice to accurately describe genome-wide expression profiles across conditions. We present a parameter-free passive resource allocation model that quantitatively accounts for the global scaling factors. It suggests that many changes in expression across conditions result from global effects and not specific regulation, and provides means for quantitative interpretation of expression profiles. PMID:24169404

  10. Promoters maintain their relative activity levels under different growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Keren, Leeat; Zackay, Ora; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Barenholz, Uri; Dekel, Erez; Sasson, Vered; Aidelberg, Guy; Bren, Anat; Zeevi, Danny; Weinberger, Adina; Alon, Uri; Milo, Ron; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Most genes change expression levels across conditions, but it is unclear which of these changes represents specific regulation and what determines their quantitative degree. Here, we accurately measured activities of ~900 S. cerevisiae and ~1800 E. coli promoters using fluorescent reporters. We show that in both organisms 60-90% of promoters change their expression between conditions by a constant global scaling factor that depends only on the conditions and not on the promoter's identity. Quantifying such global effects allows precise characterization of specific regulation-promoters deviating from the global scale line. These are organized into few functionally related groups that also adhere to scale lines and preserve their relative activities across conditions. Thus, only several scaling factors suffice to accurately describe genome-wide expression profiles across conditions. We present a parameter-free passive resource allocation model that quantitatively accounts for the global scaling factors. It suggests that many changes in expression across conditions result from global effects and not specific regulation, and provides means for quantitative interpretation of expression profiles. PMID:24169404

  11. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism during Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian J.; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes to virulence in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Furthermore, analyses of omics data in the context of the metabolic model indicated rewiring of the metabolic network to support pathways associated with virulence. For example, cellular concentrations of polyamines were perturbed, as well as the predicted capacity for secretion and uptake. PMID:23559334

  12. Salmonella Modulates Metabolism During Growth under Conditions that Induce Expression of Virulence Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mo; Schmidt, Brian; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott N.; Ansong, Charles; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2013-04-05

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative pathogen that uses complex mechanisms to invade and proliferate within mammalian host cells. To investigate possible contributions of metabolic processes in S. Typhimurium grown under conditions known to induce expression of virulence genes, we used a metabolomics-driven systems biology approach coupled with genome scale modeling. First, we identified distinct metabolite profiles associated with bacteria grown in either rich or virulence-inducing media and report the most comprehensive coverage of the S. Typhimurium metabolome to date. Second, we applied an omics-informed genome scale modeling analysis of the functional consequences of adaptive alterations in S. Typhimurium metabolism during growth under our conditions. Excitingly, we observed possible sequestration of metabolites recently suggested to have immune modulating roles. Modeling efforts highlighted a decreased cellular capability to both produce and utilize intracellular amino acids during stationary phase culture in virulence conditions, despite significant abundance increases for these molecules as observed by our metabolomics measurements. Model-guided analysis suggested that alterations in metabolism prioritized other activities necessary for pathogenesis instead, such as lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

  13. Studies on Scenedesmus actus growth. I. Effect of autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions on the growth of scenedesmus acutus

    SciTech Connect

    Shamala, T.R.; Drawert, F.; Leupold, G.

    1982-06-01

    Among sugars, glucose and mannose were found to be the most suitable substrates for mixotrophic growth, uptake of galactose and its influence on growth was negligible, and sucrose and fructose occupied intermediary positions. The optimum temperature for sugar uptake was 30 degrees C both under light and in darkness. Enhancement in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolution rate, based on the utilization of substrates, was foremost in the presence of glucose, followed by mannose, sucrose, and fructose. Industrial by-products such as sugarcane molasses also were utilized to increase the algal growth under mixotrophic conditions. A maximum yield in biomass was obtained subsequent to the combined supply of sugarcane molasses with carbon dioxide to indoor as well as outdoor mixotrophic cultures. Doubling the carbon dioxide supply alone above a certain level, under autotrophic and mixotrophic outdoor conditions, did not produce a pronounced increase in the algal growth rate. The results on autotrophic and mixotrophic growth variations are discussed in this article. (Refs. 36).

  14. The growth of fractal humic acids: cluster correlation and gel formation.

    PubMed

    Osterberg, R; Mortensen, K

    1994-01-01

    The growth of humic acids, prepared by a gentle method from two different kinds of soils (I and II), has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering at an acidity corresponding to pH 5.0 and 0.10 M ionic strength (NaCl). Humic acids aggregate either to large clusters with a fractal dimension of 2.3 and an average diameter of 1720 A (I) or to clusters with an average diameter of 700 A (II). After storage for 2 days at 4 degrees C, the latter aggregates (II) formed a gel. In a step toward gelation, we observed cluster-cluster interaction from the neutron-scattering data in the form of a correlation peak. These differences in size can be explained by assuming that the smaller particles (II) are trapped into a nonequilibrium state characterized by the temperature-solvent condition. The importance of a humic acid gel network for the conservation of water and nutrients in the environment is discussed. PMID:7809372

  15. Methoxyacetic acid suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab R; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Patel, Neil K; Lu, Hua; Zeng, Shelya X; Wang, Guangdi; Zhang, Changde; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Methoxyacetic acid (MAA) is a primary metabolite of ester phthalates that are used in production of consumer products and pharmaceutical products. MAA causes embryo malformation and spermatocyte death through inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Little is known about MAA’s effects on cancer cells. In this study, two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines (RWPE-1 and pRNS-1-1) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2B, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with MAA at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis were performed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR, Western blot, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. We found that MAA dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. MAA-induced apoptosis was due to down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic gene baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat containing 2 (BIRC2, also named cIAP1), leading to activation of caspases 7 and 3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. MAA-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK2 expression at the late time. MAA up-regulated p21 expression through inhibition of HDAC activities, independently of p53/p63/p73. These findings demonstrate that MAA suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which suggests that MAA could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:25606576

  16. Proboscis conditioning experiments with honeybees, Apis mellifera caucasica, with butyric acid and DEET mixture as conditioned and unconditioned stimuli.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Charles I; Giray, Tugrul; Mixson, T Andrew; Nolf, Sondra L; Wells, Harrington; Kence, Aykut; Kence, Meral

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments are described investigating whether olfactory repellents DEET and butyric acid can support the classical conditioning of proboscis extension in the honeybee, Apis mellifera caucasica (Hymenoptera: Apidae). In the first experiment DEET and butyric acid readily led to standard acquisition and extinction effects, which are comparable to the use of cinnamon as a conditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that the odor of DEET or butyric acid is not intrinsically repellent to honey bees. In a second experiment, with DEET and butyric acid mixed with sucrose as an unconditioned stimulus, proboscis conditioning was not established. After several trials, few animals responded to the unconditioned stimulus. These results demonstrate that these chemicals are gustatory repellents when in direct contact. In the last experiment a conditioned suppression paradigm was used. Exposing animals to butyric acid or DEET when the proboscis was extended by direct sucrose stimulation or by learning revealed that retraction of the proboscis was similar to another novel odor, lavender, and in all cases greatest when the animal was not permitted to feed. These results again demonstrate that DEET or butyric acid are not olfactory repellents, and in addition, conditioned suppression is influenced by feeding state of the bee. PMID:20879917

  17. Conditions associated with Clostridium sporogenes growth as a surrogate for Clostridium botulinum in nonthermally processed canned butter.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R H; Dunn, M L; Ogden, L V; Jefferies, L K; Eggett, D L; Steele, F M

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to better understand the effect of butter composition and emulsion structure on growth and survival of Clostridium sporogenes, used as a surrogate for C. botulinum in canned butter. The lack of a thermal process step in commercially available canned butter raises questions of potential safety, because it is hermetically sealed and generally exhibits anaerobic growth conditions, which are optimal for Clostridium botulinum growth. Without thermal processing, low-acid canned foods must have inhibitory factors present to prevent C. botulinum growth. Some potential intrinsic inhibitory factors, or hurdles, within butter include: reduced water activity, acidity in cultured products, elevated salt content, and the micro-droplet nature of the aqueous phase in the butter emulsion. It was hypothesized that a normal, intact butter emulsion would have sufficient hurdles to prevent C. botulinum growth, whereas a broken butter emulsion would result in a coalesced aqueous phase that would allow for C. botulinum growth. Batch-churned butter was inoculated with C. sporogenes; butter samples with varying salt contents (0, 0.8, 1.6, and 2.4% wt/wt NaCl) were prepared and stored in coated steel cans for varying times (1 or 2 wk) and temperatures (22 or 41°C) to determine temperature and emulsion structure effects on C. sporogenes growth. Samples stored at 41°C showed a significant increase in C. sporogenes growth compared with those stored at 22°C. Furthermore, NaCl addition was found to have a significant effect on C. sporogenes growth, with 0.8% NaCl promoting more growth than 0%, but with decreases in growth observed at 1.6 and 2.4%. Uninoculated control plates were also found to have bacterial growth; this growth was attributed to other anaerobic bacteria present within the cream. It was concluded that removal of the hurdle created by the micro-droplet size of the emulsion aqueous phase could result in C. botulinum growth even at elevated salt

  18. Plant Growth and Morphogenesis under Different Gravity Conditions: Relevance to Plant Life in Space.

    PubMed

    Hoson, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The growth and morphogenesis of plants are entirely dependent on the gravitational acceleration of earth. Under microgravity conditions in space, these processes are greatly modified. Recent space experiments, in combination with ground-based studies, have shown that elongation growth is stimulated and lateral expansion suppressed in various shoot organs and roots under microgravity conditions. Plant organs also show automorphogenesis in space, which consists of altered growth direction and spontaneous curvature in the dorsiventral (back and front) directions. Changes in cell wall properties are responsible for these modifications of growth and morphogenesis under microgravity conditions. Plants live in space with interesting new sizes and forms. PMID:25370193

  19. Automated Diagnosis Of Conditions In A Plant-Growth Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinger, Barry R.; Damiano, Alfred L.

    1995-01-01

    Biomass Production Chamber Operations Assistant software and hardware constitute expert system that diagnoses mechanical failures in controlled-environment hydroponic plant-growth chamber and recommends corrective actions to be taken by technicians. Subjects of continuing research directed toward development of highly automated closed life-support systems aboard spacecraft to process animal (including human) and plant wastes into food and oxygen. Uses Microsoft Windows interface to give technicians intuitive, efficient access to critical data. In diagnostic mode, system prompts technician for information. When expert system has enough information, it generates recovery plan.

  20. Effects of acetic acid and arginine on pH elevation and growth of Bacillus licheniformis in an acidified cucumber juice medium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenquan; Meng, Xia; Breidt, Frederick; Dean, Lisa L; Arritt, Fletcher M

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus licheniformis has been shown to cause pH elevation in tomato products having an initial pH below 4.6 and metabiotic effects that can lead to the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Because of this, the organism poses a potential risk to acidified vegetable products; however, little is known about the growth and metabolism of this organism in these products. To clarify the mechanisms of pH change and growth of B. licheniformis in vegetable broth under acidic conditions, a cucumber juice medium representative of a noninhibitory vegetable broth was used to monitor changes in pH, cell growth, and catabolism of sugars and amino acids. For initial pH values between pH 4.1 to 6.0, pH changes resulted from both fermentation of sugar (lowering pH) and ammonia production (raising pH). An initial pH elevation occurred, with starting pH values of pH 4.1 to 4.9 under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and was apparently mediated by the arginine deiminase reaction of B. licheniformis. This initial pH elevation was prevented if 5 mM or greater acetic acid was present in the brine at the same pH. In laboratory media, under favorable conditions for growth, data indicated that growth of the organism was inhibited at pH 4.6 with protonated acetic acid concentrations of 10 to 20 mM, corresponding to 25 to 50 mM total acetic acid; however, growth inhibition required greater than 300 mM citric acid (10-fold excess of the amount in processed tomato products) products under similar conditions. The data indicate that growth and pH increase by B. licheniformis may be inhibited by the acetic acid present in most commercial acidified vegetable products but not by the citric acid in many tomato products. PMID:25836398

  1. Investigation of acyl migration in mono- and dicaffeoylquinic acids under aqueous basic, aqueous acidic, and dry roasting conditions.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sagar; Jaiswal, Rakesh; Matei, Marius Febi; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2014-09-17

    Acyl migration in chlorogenic acids describes the process of migration of cinnamoyl moieties from one quinic acid alcohol group to another, thus interconverting chlorogenic acid regioisomers. It therefore constitutes a special case of transesterification reaction. Acyl migration constitutes an important reaction pathway in both coffee roasting and brewing, altering the structure of chlorogenic acid initially present in the green coffee bean. In this contribution we describe detailed and comprehensive mechanistic studies comparing inter- and intramolecular acyl migration involving the seven most common chlorogenic acids in coffee. We employe aqueous acidic and basic conditions mimicking the brewing of coffee along with dry roasting conditions. We show that under aqueous basic conditions intramolecular acyl migration is fully reversible with basic hydrolysis competing with acyl migration. 3-Caffeoylquinic acid was shown to be most labile to basic hydrolysis. We additionally show that the acyl migration process is strongly pH dependent with increased transesterification taking place at basic pH. Under dry roasting conditions acyl migration competes with dehydration to form lactones. We argue that acyl migration precedes lactonization, with 3-caffeoylquinic acid lactone being the predominant product. PMID:25116442

  2. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L; Hill, Richard P; Jones, Russell G; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O; Thompson, Craig B; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W

    2011-05-15

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  3. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C promotes cell survival and tumor growth under conditions of metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Zaugg, Kathrin; Yao, Yi; Reilly, Patrick T.; Kannan, Karuppiah; Kiarash, Reza; Mason, Jacqueline; Huang, Ping; Sawyer, Suzanne K.; Fuerth, Benjamin; Faubert, Brandon; Kalliomäki, Tuula; Elia, Andrew; Luo, Xunyi; Nadeem, Vincent; Bungard, David; Yalavarthi, Sireesha; Growney, Joseph D.; Wakeham, Andrew; Moolani, Yasmin; Silvester, Jennifer; Ten, Annick You; Bakker, Walbert; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Berger, Shelley L.; Hill, Richard P.; Jones, Russell G.; Tsao, Ming; Robinson, Murray O.; Thompson, Craig B.; Pan, Guohua; Mak, Tak W.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells gain a survival/growth advantage by adapting their metabolism to respond to environmental stress, a process known as metabolic transformation. The best-known aspect of metabolic transformation is the Warburg effect, whereby cancer cells up-regulate glycolysis under aerobic conditions. However, other mechanisms mediating metabolic transformation remain undefined. Here we report that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific metabolic enzyme, may participate in metabolic transformation. CPT1C expression correlates inversely with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation, contributes to rapamycin resistance in murine primary tumors, and is frequently up-regulated in human lung tumors. Tumor cells constitutively expressing CPT1C show increased fatty acid (FA) oxidation, ATP production, and resistance to glucose deprivation or hypoxia. Conversely, cancer cells lacking CPT1C produce less ATP and are more sensitive to metabolic stress. CPT1C depletion via siRNA suppresses xenograft tumor growth and metformin responsiveness in vivo. CPT1C can be induced by hypoxia or glucose deprivation and is regulated by AMPKα. Cpt1c-deficient murine embryonic stem (ES) cells show sensitivity to hypoxia and glucose deprivation and altered FA homeostasis. Our results indicate that cells can use a novel mechanism involving CPT1C and FA metabolism to protect against metabolic stress. CPT1C may thus be a new therapeutic target for the treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:21576264

  4. Effect of formic acid formulations on honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies and influence of colony and ambient conditions on formic acid concentration in the hive.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, David J; Currie, Robert W

    2004-10-01

    The interaction between the effects of varroa, Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman, and formic acid treatments on colonies of honey bees, Apis mellifera L., were examined in two field experiments. In experiment 1, colonies with low varroa levels were exposed to two different slow-release formulations and compared with untreated colonies. In experiment 2, colonies inoculated with varroa and uninoculated colonies were exposed to a slow-release formulation, a pour-on formulation, or were left untreated. The effects of treatments, hive temperature, and hive relative humidity on formic acid concentration in hive air also were examined. Slow-release formic acid application improved colony development in colonies that had been inoculated with varroa. However, in uninoculated colonies where the mean abundance of varroa was low, slow-release formic acid application suppressed colony development. The pour-on application did not have a negative impact on worker population growth in uninoculated colonies, but also it was not as effective as the slow-release treatment in improving population growth in varroa-inoculated colonies. Equivalent volumes of acid applied in pour-on and slow-release formulations provided the same cumulative dose in hive air but differed in the daily pattern of formic acid release. Colonies that were not inoculated with varroa had higher concentrations of formic acid in hive air than colonies that were inoculated with varroa on three of the five pour-on application dates. The data suggest that reductions in worker population and/or activity caused by varroa can interact with ambient conditions to affect the volatilization or sorption of formic acid in the hive. PMID:15568335

  5. Formation of Organic Tracers for Isoprene SOA under Acidic Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical compositions of a series of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples, formed by irradiating mixtures of isoprene and NO in a smog chamber in the absence or presence of acidic aerosols, were analyzed using derivatization-based GC-MS methods. In addition to the known is...

  6. Evaluation of Culture Conditions to Obtain Fatty Acids from Saline Microalgae Species: Dunaliella salina, Sinecosyfis sp., and Chroomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Castilla Casadiego, D. A.; Albis Arrieta, A. R.; Angulo Mercado, E. R.; Cervera Cahuana, S. J.; Baquero Noriega, K. S.; Suárez Escobar, A. F.; Morales Avendaño, E. D.

    2016-01-01

    The use of the saline microalgae, Dunaliella salina, Sinecosyfis sp., and Chroomonas sp., was explored as an alternative source for the production of fatty acids using fertilizer and glycerol as culture media. The nutrient medium used contained “Nutrifoliar,” a commercial fertilizer, and/or glycerol, in natural sea water. The microalgae were placed in cultures with different conditions. The parameters that favored the largest production of fatty acids were 24 hours of agitation and illumination, 1620 L/day of air supply, 2.25 L of air/min, and a temperature of 32°C using “Nutrifoliar” as the culture media. Results indicated that, from 3 g of microalgae in wet base of Chroomonas sp., 54.43 mg of oil was produced. The chromatographic characterization of oil obtained revealed the presence of essential fatty acids such as 9,12,15-octadecatrienoic acid (omega-3) and 4,7,10-hexadecatrienoic acid (omega-6) from the species Dunaliella salina. On the other hand, 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (omega-6) and cis-11-eicosenoic acid (omega-9) were identified from the species Chroomonas sp. The temperature variations played an important role in the velocity of growth or the production of the algae biomass, the amount of oil, and the ability to produce fatty acids. PMID:27376085

  7. Graphene growth on SiC(000-1): optimization of surface preparation and growth conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Zachary R.; Jernigan, Glenn G.; Bussmann, Konrad M.; Nyakiti, Luke O.; Garces, Nelson Y.; Nath, Anindya; Wheeler, Virginia D.; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Gaskill, D. K.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2015-09-01

    Graphene growth of high crystal quality and single-layer thickness can be achieved by low pressure sublimation (LPS) on SiC(0001). On SiC(0001), which is the C-terminated polar surface, there has been much less success growing uniform, single-layer films. In this work, a systematic study of surface preparation by hydrogen etching followed by LPS in an argon ambient was performed. Hydrogen etching is an important first step in the graphene growth process because it removes damage caused by polishing the substrate surface. However, for SiC(0001), etching at too high of a temperature or for too long has been found to result in pit formation due to the preferential etching of screw dislocations that intersect the surface. It was found that temperatures above 1450°C in 200mbar of hydrogen result in pitting of the surface, whereas etch temperatures at and below 1450°C can result in atomically at terraces of ~ 1 µm width. Following the hydrogen etch optimization, argon-mediated graphene growth was carried out at several different temperatures. For the growth experiments, pressure and growth time were both fixed. Regardless of growth temperature, all of the films were found to have non-uniform thickness. Further, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction measurements reveal that trace amounts of oxygen, which may be present during growth, significantly affects the graphene growth process on this polar surface.

  8. Relative efficacy of organic acids and antibiotics as growth promoters in broiler chicken

    PubMed Central

    Bagal, Vikrant Laxman; Khatta, Vinod Kumar; Tewatia, Bachu Singh; Sangwan, Sandeep Kumar; Raut, Subhash Shamrao

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of organic acids as replacer to antibiotics in their various combinations on feed consumption, body weight gain, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) in broiler chicks during different phases of growth. Materials and Methods: Antibiotics and organic acids were incorporated into boiler feed in different combinations to form 10 maize based test diets (T1 to T10). Each test diet was offered to four replicates of 10 birds each constituting a total of 400 birds kept for 45 days. Results: Significantly better effect in terms of body weight gain from supplementation of 1% citric acid and 1% citric acid along with antibiotic was observed throughout the entire study, whereas the effect of tartaric acid supplementation was similar to control group. Citric acid (1%) along with antibiotic supplementation showed highest feed intake during the experimental period. Significantly better FCR was observed in groups supplemented with 1% citric acid and 1% citric acid along with antibiotic followed by antibiotic along with organic acids supplemented group. Conclusion: Growth performance of birds in terms of body weight, body weight gain, and FCR improved significantly in 1% citric acid which was significantly higher than antibiotic supplemented group. 1% citric acid can effectively replace antibiotic growth promoter (chlortetracycline) without affecting growth performance of birds. PMID:27182133

  9. Performing Comparative Peptidomics Analyses of Salmonella from Different Growth Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Joshua N.; Mottaz, Heather; Metz, Thomas O.; Ansong, Charles K.; Manes, Nathan P.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred

    2010-01-08

    Host–pathogen interactions are complex competitions during which both the host and the pathogen adapt rapidly to each other in order for one or the other to survive. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a pathogen with a broad host range that causes a typhoid fever-like disease in mice and severe food poisoning in humans. The murine typhoid fever is a systemic infection in which S.typhimurium evades part of the immune system by replicating inside macrophages and other cells. The transition from a foodborne contaminant to an intracellular pathogen must occur rapidly in multiple,ordered steps in order for S. typhimurium to thrive within its host environment. Using S. typhimurium isolated from rich culture conditions and from conditions that mimic the hostile intracellular environment of the host cell, a native low molecular weight protein fraction, or peptidome, was enriched from cell lysates by precipitation with organic solvents. The enriched peptidome was analyzed by both LC–MS/MS and LC–MS-based methods, although several other methods are possible. Pre-fractionation of peptides allowed identification of small proteins and protein degradation products that would normally be overlooked. Comparison of peptides present in lysates prepared from Salmonella grown under different conditions provided a unique insight into cellular degradation processes as well as identification of novel peptides encoded in the genome but not annotated. The overall approach is detailed here as applied to Salmonella and is adaptable to a broad range of biological systems.

  10. The effect of some non-protein amino acids on pollen germination and pollen-tube growth in five species of the Vicieae.

    PubMed

    Simola, L K

    1967-12-01

    The effects of canavanine, α,γ-diaminobutyric acid, homoarginine and lathyrine on the germination of pollen and on in-vitro growth of pollen tubes were studied in the following species: Lathyrus niger, L. silvestris, Vicia unijuga, Pisum sativum and Cicer arietinum.The effects of these non-protein amino acids depended on their quantity and on the plant species. Every amino acid had a promoting effect on germination and growth at some concentration in some species. Inhibition or promotion of pollen germination and pollen-tube growth were usually parallel. The stronger influence of some amino acid on growth than on germination may be due to slow penetration of the acid into the cell.Homoarginine and lathyrine had a promoting effect at all concentrations in L. niger, a species in which these amino acids occur naturally. In most other species they had, if anything, a very slight inhibitory effect, α,γ-Diaminobutyric acid and canavanine had the strongest inhibitory effects on the species studied. It seems possible that these amino acids are antimetabolites of common amino acids.It is obvious that non-protein amino acids can form effective hybridization barries, although the conditions in nature are more complex than in vitro. The ability to synthesize a new amino acid may therefore be of evolutionary significance in the isolation of new species and genera. PMID:24522605

  11. [Cardioprotective properties of new glutamic acid derivative under stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Perfilova, V N; Sadikova, N V; Berestovitskaia, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2014-01-01

    The effect of new glutamic acid derivative on the cardiac ino- and chronotropic functions has been studied in experiments on rats exposed to 24-hour immobilization-and-pain stress. It is established that glutamic acid derivative RGPU-238 (glufimet) at a dose of 28.7 mg/kg increases the increment of myocardial contractility and relaxation rates and left ventricular pressure in stress-tested animals by 13 1,1, 72.4, and 118.6%, respectively, as compared to the control group during the test for adrenoreactivity. Compound RGPU-238 increases the increment of the maximum intensity of myocardium functioning by 196.5 % at 30 sec of isometric workload as compared to the control group. The cardioprotective effect of compound RGPU-238 is 1.5 - 2 times higher than that of the reference drug phenibut. PMID:25365864

  12. Carboxylic Acids as Indicators of Parent Body Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner N. R.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Alpha-hydroxy and alpha-amino carboxylic acids found on the Murchison meteorite are deuterium enriched. It is postulated that they arose from a common interstellar scurce: the reaction of carbonyl compounds in an aqueous mixture containing HCN and NH3. Carbonyl compounds react with HCN to form alpha-hydroxy nitriles, RR'CO + HCN right and left arrow RR'C(OH)CN. If ammonia is also present, the alpha-hydroxy nitriles will exist in equilibrium with the alpha-amino nitriles, RR'C(OH)CN + NH3 right and left arrow - RRCNH2CN + H2O. Both nitrites are hydrolyzed by water to form carboxylic acids: RR'C(OH)CN + H2O yields RR'C(OH)CO2H and RR'C(NH2)CN + H2O yields RR'C(NH2)CO2H.

  13. Evaluation of condition indices for estimation of growth of largemouth bass and white crappie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, Steve; Childress, W. Michael

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of three condition indices-condition factor (K), relative condition (Kn), and relative weight (Wr)-to estimate annual growth rates of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and white crappies Pomoxis annularis collected during standardized autumn electrofishing and trap-net surveys of Texas reservoirs. Multiple-regression models for estimation of length increments from initial length (at the start of the growing season) and condition indices had R2 values of 0.63-0.76 for largemouth bass and 0.46-0.83 for white crappie. However, these models are not useful for indirect estimation ofgrowth rates because growth must be known (initial length equals length at capture minus estimated annual growth). Models based on length at capture and condition indices had R2 values of 0.22-0.68 for largemouth bass and less than 0.45 for white crappie. The low precision of models based on length at capture indicates that condition provides a weak basis for indirect estimation of growth rates from Texas reservoirs sampled during autumn and, therefore, is unreliable for detection of size-related growth phenomena such as "stockpiling" (size specific, density-dependent growth depression). Direct estimates of growth rates based on back-calculations or tagging data seem necessary for reliable detection of size-related growth patterns for largemouth bass and white crappies from Texas reservoirs.

  14. Growth of samarskite crystal under microgravity conditions (M-20)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takekawa, S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the experiment was to grow single crystals of samarskite under microgravity conditions by the traveling solvent float zone (TSFZ) method, and to study the phase relations in the samarskite-related systems involving liquid phases by the slow cooling float zone (SCFZ) method. Samarskite is one of the minerals in a metamict state and is composed of Ca, Fe, Y, U, Th, Nb, Ta, O, etc. Alpha-particles radiating from uranium and/or thorium in the samarskite itself has destroyed its original structure without damaging its chemical composition and its external form. Consequently its structure was converted into a vitreous structure.

  15. Solution conditions determine the relative importance of nucleation and growth processes in α-synuclein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Alexander K.; Galvagnion, Céline; Gaspar, Ricardo; Sparr, Emma; Vendruscolo, Michele; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Linse, Sara; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of amyloid fibrils by the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein is a hallmark of Parkinson disease. To characterize the microscopic steps in the mechanism of aggregation of this protein we have used in vitro aggregation assays in the presence of preformed seed fibrils to determine the molecular rate constant of fibril elongation under a range of different conditions. We show that α-synuclein amyloid fibrils grow by monomer and not oligomer addition and are subject to higher-order assembly processes that decrease their capacity to grow. We also find that at neutral pH under quiescent conditions homogeneous primary nucleation and secondary processes, such as fragmentation and surface-assisted nucleation, which can lead to proliferation of the total number of aggregates, are undetectable. At pH values below 6, however, the rate of secondary nucleation increases dramatically, leading to a completely different balance between the nucleation and growth of aggregates. Thus, at mildly acidic pH values, such as those, for example, that are present in some intracellular locations, including endosomes and lysosomes, multiplication of aggregates is much faster than at normal physiological pH values, largely as a consequence of much more rapid secondary nucleation. These findings provide new insights into possible mechanisms of α-synuclein aggregation and aggregate spreading in the context of Parkinson disease. PMID:24817693

  16. Carbon Nanotubes Growth by CVD in Various Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C. H.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Gorti, S.; Muntele, I.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT could be used in numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been engaged in synthesizing particular structural or dimensional MWCNT. This presentation will illustrate MWCNT synthesized on silicon substrates by thermal CVD. On the substrate, an array of catalysts is coated using sputtering deposition. A thin Ti buffer layer is also coated on some Si substrates prior to depositing catalyst particles. Nickel, cobalt or iron transition metals are used as catalysts for the MWCNT growth. Since the diameter of MWCNT depends on the size of catalyst particles, the catalyst particle size is investigated after annealed at various temperatures. MWCNT are grown on the substrate in the temperature range of 700 to 1000 C and the pressure range of 100 torr to one atmosphere. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the MWCNT synthesis. Morphology, length and diameter of these MWCNT are determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of syntheses and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  17. Identification of self-growth-inhibiting compounds lauric acid and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinpei; Igarashi, Masayuki; Hayashi, Chigusa; Shitara, Tetsuo; Nomoto, Akio; Mizote, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori growth medium is usually supplemented with horse serum (HS) or FCS. However, cyclodextrin derivatives or activated charcoal can replace serum. In this study, we purified self-growth-inhibiting (SGI) compounds from H. pylori growth medium. The compounds were recovered from porous resin, Diaion HP-20, which was added to the H. pylori growth medium instead of known supplements. These SGI compounds were also identified from 2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which was supplemented in a pleuropneumonia-like organisms broth. The growth-inhibiting compounds were identified as lauric acid (LA) and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid [7-(Z)-TDA]. Although several fatty acids had been identified in H. pylori, these specific compounds were not previously found in this species. However, we confirmed that these fatty acids were universally present in the cultivation medium of the H. pylori strains examined in this study. A live/dead assay carried out without HS indicated that these compounds were bacteriostatic; however, no significant growth-inhibiting effect was observed against other tested bacterial species that constituted the indigenous bacterial flora. These findings suggested that LA and 7-(Z)-TDA might play important roles in the survival of H. pylori in human stomach epithelial cells. PMID:25767109

  18. Carotenoid and fatty acid compositions of an indigenous Ettlia texensis isolate (Chlorophyceae) under phototrophic and mixotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Arzu; Demirel, Zeliha; İşleten-Hoşoğlu, Müge; Akgün, İsmail Hakkı; Hatipoğlu-Uslu, Sevde; Conk-Dalay, Meltem

    2014-02-01

    Ettlia oleoabundance (formerly known as Neochloris oleoabundance) is an attractive candidate for biodiesel production because of its high lipid accumulation, and it's taking the majority of the attention among the strains of Ettlia genus; however, potential of the other genus members is unknown. An indigenous strain from Salda Lake (South West Turkey) identified by 18S rDNA sequencing as Ettlia texensis (GenBank accession no: JQ038221), and its fatty acid and carotenoid compositions under phototrophic and mixotrophic conditions was investigated to evaluate the potential of the strain for commercial uses. A threefold increase was observed in total lipid content (total fatty acids; from 13% to 37%) in mixotrophic culture respect to the phototrophic growth conditions. The oleic acid (C18:1) and alpha-linolenic acid (18:3) were the major unsaturated fatty acids accounting for 40% and 13.2% of total fatty acids in mixotrophic culture, respectively. Carotenoid analyses of the mixotrophic culture revealed the metabolite canthaxanthin, a commercially valuable carotenoid used mainly for food coloring, was the major constituent among other pigments. The possible use of E. texensis in biotechnological applications is discussed. PMID:24166102

  19. Crystal growth and physical characterization of picolinic acid cocrystallized with dicarboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somphon, Weenawan; Haller, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical cocrystals are multicomponent materials containing an active pharmaceutical ingredient with another component in well-defined stoichiometry within the same unit cell. Such cocrystals are important in drug design, particularly for improving physicochemical properties such as solubility, bioavailability, or chemical stability. Picolinic acid is an endogenous metabolite of tryptophan and is widely used for neuroprotective, immunological, and anti-proliferative effects within the body. In this paper we present cocrystallization experiments of a series of dicarboxylic acids, oxalic acid, succinic acid, DL-tartaric acid, pimelic acid, and phthalic acid, with picolinic acid. Characterization by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, DSC and TG/DTG analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction show that new compounds are formed, including a 1:1 picolinium tartrate monohydrate, a 2:1 monohydrate adduct of picolinic acid and oxalic acid, and a 2:1 picolinic acid-succinic acid monohydrate cocrystal.

  20. Growth and acid production of Candida species in human saliva supplemented with glucose.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, L P; Hughes, A; Weetman, D A; MacFarlane, T W

    1986-05-01

    Growth characteristic and acid production of oral isolates of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata in glucose supplemented and glucose-free, pooled, human whole saliva were examined. Both Candida species exhibited sigmoidal growth curves in batch cultures of mixed saliva, supplemented with glucose. The growth of Candida in saliva was accompanied by a rapid decline in pH from 7.5 to 3.2 over 48 h and the major acidic components initiating and sustaining this pH drop were pyruvates and acetates. These acidic metabolites may play an important role in the pathogenesis of oral Candida infections. PMID:3091791

  1. Sputtered magnesium diboride thin films: Growth conditions and surface morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, April; Villegas, Brendon; Gu, J. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB 2) thin films were deposited on C-plane sapphire substrates by sputtering pure B and Mg targets at different substrate temperatures, and were followed by in situ annealing. A systematic study about the effects of the various growth and annealing parameters on the physical properties of MgB 2 thin films showed that the substrate temperature is the most critical factor that determines the superconducting transition temperature ( Tc), while annealing plays a minor role. There was no superconducting transition in the thin films grown at room temperature without post-annealing. The highest Tc of the samples grown at room temperature after the optimized annealing was 22 K. As the temperature of the substrate ( Ts) increased, Tc rose. However, the maximum Ts was limited due to the low magnesium sticking coefficient and thus the Tc value was limited as well. The highest Tc, 29 K, was obtained for the sample deposited at 180 °C, annealed at 620 °C, and was subsequently annealed a second time at 800 °C. Three-dimensional (3D) AFM images clearly demonstrated that the thin films with no transition, or very low Tc, did not have the well-developed MgB 2 grains while the films with higher Tc displayed the well-developed grains and smooth surface. Although the Tc of sputtered MgB 2 films in the current work is lower than that for the bulk and ex situ annealed thin films, this work presents an important step towards the fabrication of MgB 2 heterostructures using rather simple physical vapor deposition method such as sputtering.

  2. Influence of fatty acid-free diet on mammary tumor development and growth rate in HER-2/Neu transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Anna; Zanobbio, Laura; Sfondrini, Lucia; Cavalleri, Adalberto; Secreto, Giorgio; Morelli, Daniele; Palazzo, Marco; Sommariva, Michele; Tagliabue, Elda; Rumio, Cristiano; Balsari, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Numerous investigations have found a relationship between higher risk of cancer and increased intake of fats, while results of clinical studies of fat reduction and breast cancer recurrence have been mixed. A diet completely free of fats cannot be easily administered to humans, but experimental studies in mice can be done to determine whether this extreme condition influences tumor development. Here, we examined the effects of a FA-free diet on mammary tumor development and growth rate in female FVB-neu proto-oncogene transgenic mice that develop spontaneous multifocal mammary tumors after a long latency period. Mice were fed a fatty acid-free diet beginning at 112, 35, and 30 days of age. In all these experiments, tumor appearance was delayed, tumor incidence was reduced and the mean number of palpable mammary tumors per mouse was lower, as compared to standard diet-fed mice. By contrast, tumor growth rate was unaffected in mice fed the fatty acid-free diet. Plasma of mice fed the fatty acid-free diet revealed significantly higher contents of oleic, palmitoleic and 20:3ω9 acids and lower contents of linoleic and palmitic acids. In conclusion, these findings indicate that a FA-free diet reduces tumor incidence and latency but not tumor growth rate, suggesting that a reduction in dietary FAs in humans may have a protective effect on tumorigenesis but not on tumors once they appear. PMID:22689438

  3. Efficient lactobionic acid production from whey by Pseudomonas taetrolens under pH-shift conditions.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Saúl; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2011-10-01

    Lactobionic acid finds applications in the fields of pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and medicine. The production of lactobionic acid from whey by Pseudomonas taetrolens was studied in shake-flasks and in a bioreactor. Shake-flask experiments showed that lactobionic acid was a non-growth associated product. A two-stage pH-shift bioconversion strategy with a pH-uncontrolled above 6.5 during the growth phase and maintained at 6.5 during cumulative production was adopted in bioreactor batch cultures. An inoculation level of 30% promoted high cell culture densities that triggered lactobionic acid production at a rate of 1.12 g/Lh. This methodology displayed efficient bioconversion with cheese whey as an inexpensive substrate for lactobionic acid production. PMID:21862326

  4. Growth of the acidophilic iron-sulfur bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans under Mars-like geochemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauermeister, Anja; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2014-08-01

    The question of life on Mars has been in focus of astrobiological research for several decades, and recent missions in orbit or on the surface of the planet are constantly expanding our knowledge on Martian geochemistry. For example, massive stratified deposits have been identified on Mars containing sulfate minerals and iron oxides, which suggest the existence of acidic aqueous conditions in the past, similar to acidic iron- and sulfur-rich environments on Earth. Acidophilic organisms thriving in such habitats could have been an integral part of a possibly widely extinct Martian ecosystem, but remains might possibly even exist today in protected subsurface niches. The chemolithoautotrophic strain Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was selected as a model organism to study the metabolic capacities of acidophilic iron-sulfur bacteria, especially regarding their ability to grow with in situ resources that could be expected on Mars. The experiments were not designed to accurately simulate Martian physical conditions (except when certain single parameters such as oxygen partial pressure were considered), but rather the geochemical environment that can be found on Mars. A. ferrooxidans could grow solely on the minerals contained in synthetic Mars regolith mixtures with no added nutrients, using either O2 as an external electron acceptor for iron oxidation, or H2 as an external electron donor for iron reduction, and thus might play important roles in the redox cycling of iron on Mars. Though the oxygen partial pressure of the Martian atmosphere at the surface was not sufficient for detectable iron oxidation and growth of A. ferrooxidans during short-term incubation (7 days), alternative chemical O2-generating processes in the subsurface might yield microhabitats enriched in oxygen, which principally are possible under such conditions. The bacteria might also contribute to the reductive dissolution of Fe3+-containing minerals like goethite and hematite, which are

  5. The Regularities of Fatigue Crack Growth in Airframes Elements at Real Operation Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelko, Igors; Pavelko, Vitalijs

    The results of analytical and experimental researches concerning predicting of fatigue crack growth in the operating conditions are presented. First of all the main factors causing a fatigue damage initiation and growth are analyzed and divided to two groups. Common conditions of fatigue damage precise predicting are established. The problem of fatigue crack growth at the stresses of variable amplitude was analyzed and an approach of description of this process is performed. Two examples present the efficiency of this approach. Theory of fatigue crack growth indication and the crack growth indicator (CGI) are developed. There is planned and executed a flight experiment using CGI located on two aircraft An-24 and An-26. Results of crack growth in CGI at operational load allowed to evaluate the parameters of generalized Paris-Erdogan law and statistical properties of crack increment per flight.

  6. Selection of acid compositions in well construction in difficult geological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, M. V.; Kamartdinov, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    Within the scope of the current work we have presented an approach towards selecting and substantiation of acid composition in accordance with petrophysical characteristics of formations for acid treatment of bottom-hole formation zones. Article presents the results of lab tests of selected acid compositions, in conditions, which model thermobaric conditions of a payzone, combined with an evaluation of hydraulic permeability change, and this, in its turn, should allow us to evaluate the quality of impact of the acid composition recipe on the reservoir formation.

  7. Selenium (Se) seed priming induced growth and biochemical changes in wheat under water deficit conditions.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Fahim; Ashraf, M Yasin; Ahmad, Rashid; Waraich, Ejaz Ahmad

    2013-02-01

    Insufficient stand establishment at early growth stages in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) due to drought stress is a major problem that limits overall efficiency and yield of crop. Priming of seed is an effective method for raising seed performance and improving tolerance of crops to abiotic stresses especially drought. The seeds of two local wheat cultivars (Kohistan-97 and Pasban-90) were soaked in distilled water or sodium selenate solutions of 25, 50, 75, and 100 μM for 1/2 or 1 h at 25 °C and later re-dried to their original moisture levels before sowing. One-hour priming significantly increased root length stress tolerance index, dry matter stress tolerance index, and total biomass of seedlings; however, no significant effect of changing duration of Se seed priming was observed on plant height stress tolerance index and shoot/root ratio. Among cultivars, Kohistan-97 was found to be more responsive to Se seed treatment as 1 h priming at 100 μM significantly increased its total biomass by 43 % as compared to control treatment. Although biomass of seedlings was not affected with Se seed priming under normal conditions, but it increased significantly with increase in rates of Se under drought stress conditions. One-hour priming at 75 μM increased the total sugar content and total free amino acids in both wheat cultivars. A more significant decrease in soluble proteins of seedlings was observed by 1 h priming than 1/2 h priming under drought stress conditions. PMID:23197374

  8. Enhancement of metastable zone width for solution growth of potassium acid phthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, K.; Meera, K.; Ramasamy, P.

    1999-09-01

    A new method has been developed in which the addition of a small amount of ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), a well-known chelating agent, enhances the metastable zone width significantly. Also, it has been found that this addition reduces the rate of nucleation and increases the growth rate of the crystal. This method has been employed for solution growth of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KC 8H 5O 4), which is also known as potassium acid phthalate (KAP).

  9. Numerical Studies of Fluid Flow in Microgravity Conditions for Confined Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Xavier; Ramírez-Piscina, Laureano; Casademunt, Jaume

    2001-03-01

    We study the convective flow induced by residual accelerations in microgravity conditions for different geometric arrangements which are relevant to crystal growth experiments. We consider both constant and oscillating acceleration and focus mostly on the transient relaxation dynamics. Results are relevant to estimate impact of more realistic residual accelerations in crystal growth experiments.

  10. Bacillus spp. from rainforest soil promote plant growth under limited nitrogen conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) isolated from rainforest on different plants under limited nitrogen conditions. Methods and Results: Bacterial isolates from a Peruvian rainforest soil were screened for plant growth promoting effects...

  11. De Novo Amino Acid Biosynthesis Contributes to Salmonella enterica Growth in Alfalfa Seedling Exudates

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Grace; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a member of the plant microbiome. Growth of S. enterica in sprouting-seed exudates is rapid; however, the active metabolic networks essential in this environment are unknown. To examine the metabolic requirements of S. enterica during growth in sprouting-seed exudates, we inoculated alfalfa seeds and identified 305 S. enterica proteins extracted 24 h postinoculation from planktonic cells. Over half the proteins had known metabolic functions, and they are involved in over one-quarter of the known metabolic reactions. Ion and metabolite transport accounted for the majority of detected reactions. Proteins involved in amino acid transport and metabolism were highly represented, suggesting that amino acid metabolic networks may be important for S. enterica growth in association with roots. Amino acid auxotroph growth phenotypes agreed with the proteomic data; auxotrophs in amino acid-biosynthetic pathways that were detected in our screen developed growth defects by 48 h. When the perceived sufficiency of each amino acid was expressed as a ratio of the calculated biomass requirement to the available concentration and compared to growth of each amino acid auxotroph, a correlation between nutrient availability and bacterial growth was found. Furthermore, glutamate transport acted as a fitness factor during S. enterica growth in association with roots. Collectively, these data suggest that S. enterica metabolism is robust in the germinating-alfalfa environment; that single-amino-acid metabolic pathways are important but not essential; and that targeting central metabolic networks, rather than dedicated pathways, may be necessary to achieve dramatic impacts on bacterial growth. PMID:25416761

  12. Photosynthetic and growth responses of Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric and nitric acid depositions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fang-Fang; Ding, Hui-Ming; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Jing-Jing; Yang, Song-Yu; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A continuing rise in acid deposition can cause forest degradation. In China, acid deposition has converted gradually from sulfuric acid deposition (SAD) to nitric acid deposition (NAD). However, the differing responses of photosynthesis and growth to depositions of sulfuric vs. nitric acid have not been well studied. In this study, 1-year-old seedlings of Schima superba, a dominant species in subtropical forests, were treated with two types of acid deposition SO4 (2-)/NO3 (-) ratios (8:1 and 0.7:1) with two applications (foliar spraying and soil drenching) at two pH levels (pH 3.5 and pH 2.5) over a period of 18 months. The results showed that the intensity, acid deposition type, and spraying method had significant effects on the physiological characteristics and growth performance of seedlings. Acid deposition at pH 2.5 via foliar application reduced photosynthesis and growth of S. superba, especially in the first year. Unlike SAD, NAD with high acidity potentially alleviated the negative effects of acidity on physiological properties and growth, probably due to a fertilization effect that improved foliar nitrogen and chlorophyll contents. Our results suggest that trees were damaged mainly by direct acid stress in the short term, whereas in the long term, soil acidification was also likely to be a major risk to forest ecosystems. Our data suggest that the shift in acid deposition type may complicate the ongoing challenge of anthropogenic acid deposition to ecosystem stability. PMID:26797956

  13. Effect of organic acids on the growth and fermentation of ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY01

    SciTech Connect

    Zaldivar, J.; Ingram, L.O.

    1999-07-01

    Hemicellulose residues can be hydrolyzed into a sugar syrup using dilute mineral acids. Although this syrup represents a potential feedstock for biofuel production, toxic compounds generated during hydrolysis limit microbial metabolism. Escherichia coli LY01, an ethanologenic biocatalyst engineered to ferment the mixed sugars in hemicellulose syrups, has been tested for resistance to selected organic acids that re present in hemicellulose hydrolysates. Compounds tested include aromatic acids derived from lignin (ferulic, gallic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, syringic, and vanillic acids), acetic acid from the hydrolysis of acetylxylan, and others derived from sugar destruction (furoic, formic, levulinic, and caproic acids). Toxicity was related to hydrophobicity. Combinations of acids were roughly additive as inhibitors of cell growth. When tested at concentrations that inhibited growth by 80%, none appeared to strongly inhibit glycolysis and energy generation, or to disrupt membrane integrity. Toxicity was not markedly affected by inoculum size or incubation temperature. The toxicity of all acids except gallic acid was reduced by an increase in initial pH (from pH 6.0 to pH 7.0 to pH 8.0). Together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that both aliphatic and mononuclear organic acids inhibit growth and ethanol production in LY01 by collapsing ion gradients and increasing internal anion concentrations.

  14. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Evaluation of toxic effects of several carboxylic acids on bacterial growth by toxicodynamic modelling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effects of organic acids on microbial fermentation are commonly tested in investigations about metabolic behaviour of bacteria. However, they typically provide only descriptive information without modelling the influence of acid concentrations on bacterial kinetics. Results We developed and applied a mathematical model (secondary model) to capture the toxicological effects of those chemicals on kinetic parameters that define the growth of bacteria in batch cultures. Thus, dose-response kinetics were performed with different bacteria (Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Carnobacterium pisicola, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Listonella anguillarum) exposed at increasing concentrations of individual carboxylic acids (formic, acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic). In all bioassays the acids affected the maximum bacterial load (Xm) and the maximum growth rate (vm) but only in specific cases the lag phase (λ) was modified. Significance of the parameters was always high and in all fermentations the toxicodynamic equation was statistically consistent and had good predictability. The differences between D and L-lactic acid effects were significant for the growth of E. coli, L. mesenteroides and C. piscicola. In addition, a global parameter (EC50,τ) was used to compare toxic effects and provided a realistic characterization of antimicrobial agents using a single value. Conclusions The effect of several organic acids on the growth of different bacteria was accurately studied and perfectly characterized by a bivariate equation which combines the basis of dose-response theory with microbial growth kinetics (secondary model). The toxicity of carboxylic acids was lower with the increase of the molecular weight of these chemicals. PMID:22118421

  16. Direct production of organic acids from starch by cell surface-engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum in anaerobic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We produced organic acids, including lactate and succinate, directly from soluble starch under anaerobic conditions using high cell-density cultures of Corynebacterium glutamicum displaying α-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 on the cell surface. Notably, reactions performed under anaerobic conditions at 35 and 40°C, which are higher than the optimal growth temperature of 30°C, showed 32% and 19%, respectively, higher productivity of the organic acids lactate, succinate, and acetate compared to that at 30°C. However, α-amylase was not stably anchored and released into the medium from the cell surface during reactions at these higher temperatures, as demonstrated by the 61% and 85% decreases in activity, respectively, from baseline, compared to the only 8% decrease at 30°C. The AmyA-displaying C. glutamicum cells retained their starch-degrading capacity during five 10 h reaction cycles at 30°C, producing 107.8 g/l of total organic acids, including 88.9 g/l lactate and 14.0 g/l succinate. The applicability of cell surface-engineering technology for the production of organic acids from biomass by high cell-density cultures of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions was demonstrated. PMID:24342107

  17. Direct production of organic acids from starch by cell surface-engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum in anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Yota; Tateno, Toshihiro; Sasaki, Kengo; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    We produced organic acids, including lactate and succinate, directly from soluble starch under anaerobic conditions using high cell-density cultures of Corynebacterium glutamicum displaying α-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 on the cell surface. Notably, reactions performed under anaerobic conditions at 35 and 40°C, which are higher than the optimal growth temperature of 30°C, showed 32% and 19%, respectively, higher productivity of the organic acids lactate, succinate, and acetate compared to that at 30°C. However, α-amylase was not stably anchored and released into the medium from the cell surface during reactions at these higher temperatures, as demonstrated by the 61% and 85% decreases in activity, respectively, from baseline, compared to the only 8% decrease at 30°C. The AmyA-displaying C. glutamicum cells retained their starch-degrading capacity during five 10 h reaction cycles at 30°C, producing 107.8 g/l of total organic acids, including 88.9 g/l lactate and 14.0 g/l succinate. The applicability of cell surface-engineering technology for the production of organic acids from biomass by high cell-density cultures of C. glutamicum under anaerobic conditions was demonstrated. PMID:24342107

  18. Mutualistic fungal endophytes produce phytohormones and organic acids that promote japonica rice plant growth under prolonged heat stress*

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Latif; Shahzad, Raheem; Ullah, Ihsan; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Lee, In-Jung

    2015-01-01

    This study identifies the potential role in heat-stress mitigation of phytohormones and other secondary metabolites produced by the endophytic fungus Paecilomyces formosus LWL1 in japonica rice cultivar Dongjin. The japonica rice was grown in controlled chamber conditions with and without P. formosus LWL1 under no stress (NS) and prolonged heat stress (HS) conditions. Endophytic association under NS and HS conditions significantly improved plant growth attributes, such as plant height, fresh weight, dry weight, and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, P. formosus LWL1 protected the rice plants from HS compared with controls, indicated by the lower endogenous level of stress-signaling compounds such as abscisic acid (25.71%) and jasmonic acid (34.57%) and the increase in total protein content (18.76%–33.22%). Such fungal endophytes may be helpful for sustainable crop production under high environmental temperatures. PMID:26642184

  19. Changes in Esters of Fatty Acids of Rhizopus arrhizus During Germination and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Hess, S. L.; Weber, D. J.; Gunasekaran, M.

    1972-01-01

    Natural esters of fatty acids of Rhizopus arrhizus Fischer increased during the first 48 hr of growth. During the 48- to 72-hr period, there was a shift in concentration from the methyl esters to the ethyl esters of fatty acids. PMID:5079078

  20. Impact of metabolism and growth phase on the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann, Sandra M.; Villanueva, Laura; Sinke-Schoen, Danielle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are involved in all elemental cycles and therefore it is important to study their metabolism in the natural environment. A recent technique to investigate this is the hydrogen isotopic composition of microbial fatty acids, i.e., heterotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids enriched in deuterium (D) while photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids depleted in D compared to the water in the culture medium (growth water). However, the impact of factors other than metabolism have not been investigated. Here, we evaluate the impact of growth phase compared to metabolism on the hydrogen isotopic composition of fatty acids of different environmentally relevant microorganisms with heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and chemoautotrophic metabolisms. Fatty acids produced by heterotrophs are enriched in D compared to growth water with εlipid/water between 82 and 359‰ when grown on glucose or acetate, respectively. Photoautotrophs (εlipid/water between −149 and −264‰) and chemoautotrophs (εlipid/water between −217 and −275‰) produce fatty acids depleted in D. Fatty acids become, in general, enriched by between 4 and 46‰ with growth phase which is minor compared to the influence of metabolisms. Therefore, the D/H ratio of fatty acids is a promising tool to investigate community metabolisms in nature. PMID:26005437

  1. The influence of nalidixic acid on Escherichia coli growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Tyczyńska, B; Bassalik-Chabielska, L

    1987-01-01

    The high antibacterial activity of nalidixic acid against Escherichia coli, cultivated in raw and pasteurized milk has been shown. The low oxygen reduction potential had no influence on the antibacterial activity of this drug. The natural antibacterial agents in active milk from an inflamed udder have reduced the efficacy of nalidixic acid inhibition of the growth of E. coli. PMID:2447751

  2. [Effects of sodium naphthalene acetate on growth and physiological characteristics of tomato seedlings under suboptimal temperature and light condition].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yun-na; Li, Yan-su; He, Chao-xing; Yu, Xian-chang

    2015-10-01

    Taking tomato 'Zhongza 105' as test material, the influences of sodium naphthalene acetate (SNA) on growth and physiological characteristics of tomato seedlings under suboptimal temperature and light condition were investigated. The results showed that the dry mass, vigorous seedling index, root activity, total nitrogen content, net photosynthesis rate (Pn) of tomato seedlings were significantly decreased by suboptimum temperature and light treatment. In addition, the catalase activity and zeatin riboside (ZR) concentration were also reduced. However, the superoxide dismutase, peroxidase activity and the content of abscisic acid (ABA) were increased. Compared with treatment of the same volume distilled water on tomato seedlings under suboptimum temperature and light condition, the dry mass of whole plant and vigorous seedling index of tomato seedlings were significantly increased by 16.4% and 22.9%, as the total N contents in roots and leaves and Pn were also increased by 8.5%, 28.5%and 37.0%, respectively, with the treatment of root application of 10 mg . L-1 SNA. Besides protective enzyme activity and the root activity were improved, the indole acetic acid (IAA) and ZR concentration of tomato were raised, and ABA concentration was reduced. The results indicated that root application of certain concentration of SNA could promote the growth of tomato seedlings by increasing the tomato root activity, protective enzymes activity, Pn and regulating endogenous hormone concentration under suboptimum temperature and light condition. PMID:26995913

  3. Performance of a growth-no growth model for Listeria monocytogenes developed for mayonnaise-based salads: influence of strain variability, food matrix, inoculation level, and presence of sorbic and benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A; Smigic, N; Rajkovic, A; Gysemans, K; Bernaerts, K; Geeraerd, A; Van Impe, J; Debevere, J; Devlieghere, F

    2007-09-01

    A previously developed growth-no growth model for Listeria monocytogenes, based on nutrient broth data and describing the influence of water activity (a(w)), pH, and acetic acid concentrations, was validated (i) for a variety of L. monocytogenes strains and (ii) in a laboratory-made, mayonnaise-based surimi salad (as an example of a mayonnaise-based salad). In these challenge tests, the influence of the inoculation level was tested as well. Also, the influence of chemical preservatives on the growth probability of L. monocytogenes in mayonnaise-based salads was determined. To evaluate the growth-no growth model performance on the validation data, four quantitative criteria are determined: concordance index, % correct predictions, % fail-dangerous, and % fail-safe. First, the growth probability of 11 L. monocytogenes strains, not used for model development, was assessed in nutrient broth under conditions within the interpolation region. Experimental results were compared with model predictions. Second, the growth-no growth model was assessed in a laboratory-made, sterile, mayonnaise-based surimi salad to identify a possible model completeness error related to the food matrix, making use of the above-mentioned validation criteria. Finally, the effect on L. monocytogenes of common chemical preservatives (sorbic and benzoic acid) at different concentrations under conditions typical of mayonnaise-based salads was determined. The study showed that the growth-no growth zone was properly predicted and consistent for all L. monocytogenes strains. A larger prediction error was observed under conditions within the transition zone between growth-no growth. However, in all cases, the classification between no growth (P = 0) and any growth (P > 0) occurred properly, which is most important for the food industry, where outgrowth needs to be prevented in all instances. The results in the sterile mayonnaise-based salad showed again that the growth-no growth zone was well predicted

  4. Phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles containing humic acid and mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, C. L.; George, I.; Griffiths, P. T.; Braban, C. F.; Cox, R. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2006-03-01

    The phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of two humic acid aerosols (Aldrich sodium salt and Leonardite Standard (IHSS)) and their mixtures with ammonium sulphate have been investigated using a combination of two techniques, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA). A growth factor of 1.16 at 85% relative humidity (RH) was found for the Aldrich humic acid which can be regarded as an upper limit for growth factors of humic-like substances (HULIS) found in atmospheric aerosol and is significantly smaller than that of typical atmospheric inorganics. We find that the humic acid aerosols exhibit water uptake over all relative humidities with no apparent phase changes, suggesting that these aerosols readily form supersaturated droplets. In the mixed particles, the humic acid component decreases the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and increases the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of the ammonium sulphate component, and there is some degree of water uptake prior to ammonium sulphate deliquescence. In addition, at low RH, the FTIR spectra show that the ammonium is present in a different chemical environment in the mixed aerosols than in crystalline ammonium sulphate, perhaps existing as a complex with the humic materials. The growth factors of the mixed aerosols are intermediate between those of the single-component aerosols and can be predicted assuming that the inorganic and organic fractions take up water independently.

  5. Phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles containing humic acid and mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, C. L.; George, I.; Griffiths, P. T.; Braban, C. F.; Cox, R. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2005-10-01

    The phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of two humic acid aerosols (Aldrich sodium salt and Leonardite Standard (IHSS)) and their mixtures with ammonium sulphate have been investigated using a combination of two techniques, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA). A growth factor of 1.16 at 85% relative humdity (RH) was found for the Aldrich humic acid which can be regarded as an upper limit for growth factors of humic-like substances (HULIS) found in atmospheric aerosol and is significantly smaller than that of typical atmospheric inorganics. We find that the humic acid aerosols exhibit water uptake over all relative humidites with no apparent phase changes, suggesting that these aerosols readily form supersaturated droplets. In the mixed particles, the humic acid component decreases the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and increases the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of the ammonium sulphate component, and there is some degree of water uptake prior to ammonium sulphate deliquescence. In addition, at low RH, the FTIR spectra show that the ammonium is present in a different chemical environment in the mixed aerosols than in crystalline ammonium sulphate, perhaps existing as a complex with the humic materials. The growth factors of the mixed aerosols are intermediate between those of the single component aerosols and can be predicted assuming that the inorganic and organic fractions take up water independently.

  6. A comparative study of serum protein-bound sialic acid in benign and malignant prostatic growth: possible role of oxidative stress in sialic acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Goswami, K; Nandeesha, H; Koner, B C; Nandakumar, D N

    2007-01-01

    Benign and malignant prostatic growths are associated with an increase in sialoconjugates (e.g. prostate-specific antigen (PSA)) in blood. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in pathogenesis of various malignancies. The objective of this study was to evaluate oxidative stress parameters and protein-bound sialic acid level in sera of prostatic tumor cases and to asses for any association between them. Sera samples were collected and estimated for carbonylation of proteins, lipid peroxidation products, PSA and protein-bound sialic acid from 10 patients in each group with prostatic carcinoma (Ca prostate) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) along with 10 healthy male subjects of similar age group as control. In carcinoma prostate cases, lipid peroxides, protein carbonyls, protein-bound sialic acid and PSA were significantly increased compared to BPH and controls. There was significant association between oxidative stress parameters (lipid peroxide and protein carbonyl) and sialoconjugates (PSA and protein-bound sialic acid). In BPH cases, serum lipid peroxides and protein-bound sialic acid were significantly higher in comparison to controls and protein carbonyls were correlated with protein-bound sialic acid. ROC curve for sialic acid showed that it can be used as a marker to differentiate carcinoma prostate from benign growth of prostate at a cutoff level of 11.38 mug/mg protein with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 80%. We conclude that oxidative stress might be associated with the degree of sialylation of protein and graded changes in these parameters possibly unveil the pathogenic demarcation from benign to malignant condition of prostate. PMID:17404581

  7. A water use and growth model for Eucalyptus plantation in water-limited conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, I.R.

    1992-12-31

    To investigate the environmental impact of plantation forestry using fast-growing tree species in southern India, a program of field studies was initiated in 1987 specifically to measure the water use, nutrient uptake and growth rates of the plantations. A water use and growth (WAG) model is proposed for calculating transpiration and growth of Eucalyptus plantation in water-limited conditions. The model is based on the measured relationships between transpiration rate and basal cross-sectional area and soil moisture availability. The volume growth rate (in water-limited conditions) is assumed to be proportional to the volume of water transpired. The model is calibrated using (deuterium tracing) measurements of transpiration and measurements of growth recorded at the Puradal experimental plantation, Karnataka, southern India.

  8. Synthesis of graphene by chemical vapor deposition: effect of growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Su, Dan; Ren, Mingwei; Li, Xing'ao; Huang, Wei

    2013-10-01

    Graphene has attracted a great deal of attention due to its extraordinary physical and chemical properties. But the control of growth of high-quality, large-area and inexpensive graphene is still the bottleneck for practical applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has become the most common method for graphene growth due to its high production and large area of product. However, it generally suffers from an uncontrollable carbon precipitation effect that leads to inhomogeneous growth and strongly dependent on to the growth conditions. Until now, scientists have struggled to synthesize higher quality, larger area graphene through changing the experimental conditions. In this review, the progress made in the last few years concerning the exploration of preparation graphene by CVD is summarized in three aspects (catalysts, precursors and experimental parameters) that influence graphene growth. PMID:24245104

  9. Macronutrient requirement for growth: Protein/amino acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current recommendations by the Institute of Medicine on amino acid requirements in healthy children older than 6 months and for children and adolescents have been established using the factorial approach, which takes into account: i) maintenance for obligatory losses, which is estimated by regressio...

  10. Conditions optimising on the yield of biomass, total lipid, and valuable fatty acids in two strains of Skeletonema menzelii.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiamin; Han, Qingxi; Gao, Xiuzhi; Gao, Guang

    2016-03-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are essential for the health of aquaculture organisms and human beings. A total of 9 species of diatoms were screened and two strains of Skeletonema menzelii were selected for further study due to their high growth rates, PUFA and EPA contents. The culture conditions for the yield of biomass, total lipid, EPA and PUFA were optimised. The quickest growth rates (0.28-0.41d(-1)) were achieved with moderate supplement of nitrogen, phosphorus, iron and silicon. The accumulation of total lipid (17.85-22.70% of dry weight) benefitted from deprivation of nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon, but a moderate iron supplement. Highest PUFA (38.26-50.48% of total fatty acids) or EPA (14.26-18.39% of total fatty acids) contents were observed under high nitrogen and phosphorus supplement, moderate available iron but deprivation of silicon. These findings make tangible contributions to culture S. menzelii for commercial production of PUFA or EPA. PMID:26471612

  11. Formation of phenol under conditions of the reaction of oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinovsky, I.O.; Leshcheva, A.N.; Pogorelov, V.V.; Gelbshtein, A.I.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes conditions for the oxidation of benzene to phenol. It is shown that a reaction mixture of water, carbon monoxide, and oxygen are essential to the oxidation. The oxidation is a side reaction found to occur during the oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid in a medium of trifluoroacetic acid.

  12. Polysaccharides isolated from sugar beet pulp by quaternization under acidic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugar beet pulp was extracted and chemically modified under acidic conditions using glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride in the presence of trifuoroacetic (TFA), HCl or H3PO4. The goal was to find out how the type of acid used and quaternization could affect the yield of soluble polysaccharide, its mo...

  13. Chemoselective O-acylation of hydroxyamino acids and amino alcohols under acidic reaction conditions: History, scope and applications.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Tor E

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids, whether natural, semisynthetic or synthetic, are among the most important and useful chiral building blocks available for organic chemical synthesis. In principle, they can function as inexpensive, chiral and densely functionalized starting materials. On the other hand, the use of amino acid starting materials routinely necessitates protective group chemistry, and in reality, large-scale preparations of even the simplest side-chain derivatives of many amino acids often become annoyingly strenuous due to the necessity of employing protecting groups, on one or more of the amino acid functionalities, during the synthetic sequence. However, in the case of hydroxyamino acids such as hydroxyproline, serine, threonine, tyrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), many O-acyl side-chain derivatives are directly accessible via a particularly expedient and scalable method not commonly applied until recently. Direct acylation of unprotected hydroxyamino acids with acyl halides or carboxylic anhydrides under appropriately acidic reaction conditions renders possible chemoselective O-acylation, furnishing the corresponding side-chain esters directly, on multigram-scale, in a single step, and without chromatographic purification. Assuming a certain degree of stability under acidic reaction conditions, the method is also applicable for a number of related compounds, such as various amino alcohols and the thiol-functional amino acid cysteine. While the basic methodology underlying this approach has been known for decades, it has evolved through recent developments connected to amino acid-derived chiral organocatalysts to become a more widely recognized procedure for large-scale preparation of many useful side-chain derivatives of hydroxyamino acids and related compounds. Such derivatives are useful in peptide chemistry and drug development, as amino acid amphiphiles for asymmetric catalysis, and as amino acid acrylic precursors for preparation of catalytically

  14. Chemoselective O-acylation of hydroxyamino acids and amino alcohols under acidic reaction conditions: History, scope and applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amino acids, whether natural, semisynthetic or synthetic, are among the most important and useful chiral building blocks available for organic chemical synthesis. In principle, they can function as inexpensive, chiral and densely functionalized starting materials. On the other hand, the use of amino acid starting materials routinely necessitates protective group chemistry, and in reality, large-scale preparations of even the simplest side-chain derivatives of many amino acids often become annoyingly strenuous due to the necessity of employing protecting groups, on one or more of the amino acid functionalities, during the synthetic sequence. However, in the case of hydroxyamino acids such as hydroxyproline, serine, threonine, tyrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), many O-acyl side-chain derivatives are directly accessible via a particularly expedient and scalable method not commonly applied until recently. Direct acylation of unprotected hydroxyamino acids with acyl halides or carboxylic anhydrides under appropriately acidic reaction conditions renders possible chemoselective O-acylation, furnishing the corresponding side-chain esters directly, on multigram-scale, in a single step, and without chromatographic purification. Assuming a certain degree of stability under acidic reaction conditions, the method is also applicable for a number of related compounds, such as various amino alcohols and the thiol-functional amino acid cysteine. While the basic methodology underlying this approach has been known for decades, it has evolved through recent developments connected to amino acid-derived chiral organocatalysts to become a more widely recognized procedure for large-scale preparation of many useful side-chain derivatives of hydroxyamino acids and related compounds. Such derivatives are useful in peptide chemistry and drug development, as amino acid amphiphiles for asymmetric catalysis, and as amino acid acrylic precursors for preparation of

  15. Role of Volatile Fatty Acids in Development of the Cecal Microflora in Broiler Chickens during Growth

    PubMed Central

    van der Wielen, Paul W. J. J.; Biesterveld, Steef; Notermans, Servé; Hofstra, Harm; Urlings, Bert A. P.; van Knapen, Frans

    2000-01-01

    It is known that volatile fatty acids can inhibit growth of species of the family Enterobacteriaceae in vitro. However, whether these volatile fatty acids affect bacterial populations in the ceca of chickens is unknown. Therefore, a study was conducted to investigate if changes in volatile fatty acids in ceca of broiler chickens during growth affect bacterial populations. Results showed that members of the Enterobacteriaceae and enterococci are present in large numbers in 3-day-old broilers and start to decrease when broilers grow older. Lactobacilli are present in large numbers as well in 3-day-old broilers, but they remain stable during the growth of broilers. Acetate, butyrate, and propionate increase from undetectable levels in 1-day-old broilers to high concentrations in 15-day-old broilers, after which they stabilize. Significant negative correlations could be calculated between numbers of Enterobacteriaceae and concentrations of undissociated acetate, propionate, and butyrate. Furthermore, pure cultures of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the ceca were grown in the presence of volatile fatty acids. Growth rates and maximal optical density decreased when these strains grew in the presence of increasing volatile fatty acid concentrations. It is concluded that volatile fatty acids are responsible for the reduction in numbers of Enterobacteriaceae in the ceca of broiler chickens during growth. PMID:10831435

  16. Fatty acid esters produced by Lasiodiplodia theobromae function as growth regulators in tobacco seedlings.

    PubMed

    Uranga, Carla C; Beld, Joris; Mrse, Anthony; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Burkart, Michael D; Hernández-Martínez, Rufina

    2016-04-01

    The Botryosphaeriaceae are a family of trunk disease fungi that cause dieback and death of various plant hosts. This work sought to characterize fatty acid derivatives in a highly virulent member of this family, Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of an isolated compound revealed (Z, Z)-9,12-ethyl octadecadienoate, (trivial name ethyl linoleate), as one of the most abundant fatty acid esters produced by L. theobromae. A variety of naturally produced esters of fatty acids were identified in Botryosphaeriaceae. In comparison, the production of fatty acid esters in the soil-borne tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, and the non-phytopathogenic fungus Trichoderma asperellum was found to be limited. Ethyl linoleate, ethyl hexadecanoate (trivial name ethyl palmitate), and ethyl octadecanoate, (trivial name ethyl stearate), significantly inhibited tobacco seed germination and altered seedling leaf growth patterns and morphology at the highest concentration (0.2 mg/mL) tested, while ethyl linoleate and ethyl stearate significantly enhanced growth at low concentrations, with both still inducing growth at 98 ng/mL. This work provides new insights into the role of naturally esterified fatty acids from L. theobromae as plant growth regulators with similar activity to the well-known plant growth regulator gibberellic acid. PMID:26926564

  17. Listeria monocytogenes Scott A: Cell Surface Charge, Hydrophobicity, and Electron Donor and Acceptor Characteristics under Different Environmental Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Briandet, Romain; Meylheuc, Thierry; Maher, Catherine; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie Noëlle

    1999-01-01

    We determined the variations in the surface physicochemical properties of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A cells that occurred under various environmental conditions. The surface charges, the hydrophobicities, and the electron donor and acceptor characteristics of L. monocytogenes Scott A cells were compared after the organism was grown in different growth media and at different temperatures; to do this, we used microelectrophoresis and the microbial adhesion to solvents method. Supplementing the growth media with glucose or lactic acid affected the electrical, hydrophobic, and electron donor and acceptor properties of the cells, whereas the growth temperature (37, 20, 15, or 8°C) primarily affected the electrical and electron donor and acceptor properties. The nonlinear effects of the growth temperature on the physicochemical properties of the cells were similar for cells cultivated in two different growth media, but bacteria cultivated in Trypticase soy broth supplemented with 6 g of yeast extract per liter (TSYE) were slightly more hydrophobic than cells cultivated in brain heart infusion medium (P < 0.05). Adhesion experiments conducted with L. monocytogenes Scott A cells cultivated in TSYE at 37, 20, 15, and 8°C and then suspended in a sodium chloride solution (1.5 × 10−1 or 1.5 × 10−3 M NaCl) confirmed that the cell surface charge and the electron donor and acceptor properties of the cells had an influence on their attachment to stainless steel. PMID:10583984

  18. Selection method of pH conditions to establish Pseudomonas taetrolens physiological states and lactobionic acid production.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Saúl; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2013-05-01

    Microbial physiological responses resulting from inappropriate bioprocessing conditions may have a marked impact on process performance within any fermentation system. The influence of different pH-control strategies on physiological status, microbial growth and lactobionic acid production from whey by Pseudomonas taetrolens during bioreactor cultivations has been investigated for the first time in this work. Both cellular behaviour and bioconversion efficiency from P. taetrolens were found to be negatively influenced by pH-control modes carried out at values lower than 6.0 and higher than 7.0. Production schemes were also influenced by the operational pH employed, with asynchronous production from damaged and metabolically active subpopulations at pH values lower than 6.0. Moreover, P. taetrolens showed reduced cellular proliferation and a subsequent delay in the onset of the production phase under acidic conditions (pH < 6.0). Unlike cultivations performed at 6.5, both pH-shift and pH-stat cultivation strategies performed at pH values lower than 6.0 resulted in decreased lactobionic acid production. Whereas the cellular response showed a stress-induced physiological response under acidic conditions, healthy functional cells were predominant at medium operational pH values (6.5-7.0). P. taetrolens thus displayed a robust physiological status at initial pH value of 6.5, resulting in an enhanced bioconversion yield and lactobionic acid productivity (7- and 4-fold higher compared to those attained at initial pH values of 4.5 and 5.0, respectively). These results have shown that pH-control modes strongly affected both the physiological response of cells and the biological performance of P. taetrolens, providing key information for bio-production of lactobionic acid on an industrial scale. PMID:23254761

  19. Growth Characteristics of Carbon Nanotubes on Oxidized Catalyst under Low-Pressure Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawaguchi, Daiki; Sato, Hideki; Hata, Koichi; Miyake, Hideto; Iida, Kazuo; Hiramatsu, Kazumasa

    2012-01-01

    Low-pressure alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition (LP-ACCVD), which is an ACCVD method at a lower pressure (<1 Pa) than that in the conventional method, has been attracting much interest because it enables the low-temperature growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, the growth rate of CNTs by LP-ACCVD is markedly low owing to its low growth pressure. To alleviate this problem, we have examined the influence of the catalyst preparation and CVD conditions on the properties of CNTs grown by LP-ACCVD. It has been found that the oxidation of catalyst enhances the growth of CNTs by LP-ACCVD. Furthermore, the low flow rate of the ethanol enhances the growth yield of CNTs at lower growth temperature, which is understood to be the result of sufficient gas heating on the substrate.

  20. Transcriptome-based identification of new anti-anti-inflammatory and vasodilating properties of the n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid in vascular endothelial cell under proinflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gatta, Valentina; Scoditti, Egeria; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata; Calabriso, Nadia; Buonomo, Tonia; Stuppia, Liborio; Storelli, Carlo; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Scope High intakes of n-3 fatty acids exert anti-inflammatory effects and cardiovascular protection, but the underlying molecular basis is incompletely defined. By genome-wide analysis we searched for novel effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on gene expression and pathways in human vascular endothelium under pro-inflammatory conditions. Methods and Results Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were treated with DHA and then stimulated with interleukin(IL)-1β. Total RNA was extracted, and gene expression examined by DNA microarray. DHA alone altered the expression of 188 genes, decreasing 92 and increasing 96. IL-1β changed the expression of 2031 genes, decreasing 997 and increasing 1034. Treatment with DHA before stimulation significantly affected the expression of 116 IL-1β-deregulated genes, counter-regulating the expression of 55 genes among those decreased and of 61 among those increased. Functional and network analyses identified immunological, inflammatory and metabolic pathways as the most affected. Newly identified DHA-regulated genes are involved in stemness, cellular growth, cardiovascular system function and cancer, and included cytochrome p450 4F2(CYP4F2), transforming growth factor(TGF)-β2, Cluster of Differentiation (CD)47, caspase recruitment domain(CARD)11 and phosphodiesterase(PDE)5α. Conclusions Endothelial exposure to DHA regulates novel genes and related pathways. Such unbiased identification should increase our understanding of mechanisms by which n-3 fatty acids affect human diseases. PMID:26114549

  1. The Weak Acid Preservative Sorbic Acid Inhibits Conidial Germination and Mycelial Growth of Aspergillus niger through Intracellular Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Plumridge, Andrew; Hesse, Stephan J. A.; Watson, Adrian J.; Lowe, Kenneth C.; Stratford, Malcolm; Archer, David B.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, a common food spoilage organism, is inhibited by the weak acid preservative sorbic acid (trans-trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid). Conidia inoculated at 105/ml of medium showed a sorbic acid MIC of 4.5 mM at pH 4.0, whereas the MIC for the amount of mycelia at 24 h developed from the same spore inoculum was threefold lower. The MIC for conidia and, to a lesser extent, mycelia was shown to be dependent on the inoculum size. A. niger is capable of degrading sorbic acid, and this ability has consequences for food preservation strategies. The mechanism of action of sorbic acid was investigated using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We show that a rapid decline in cytosolic pH (pHcyt) by more than 1 pH unit and a depression of vacuolar pH (pHvac) in A. niger occurs in the presence of sorbic acid. The pH gradient over the vacuole completely collapsed as a result of the decline in pHcyt. NMR spectra also revealed that sorbic acid (3.0 mM at pH 4.0) caused intracellular ATP pools and levels of sugar-phosphomonoesters and -phosphodiesters of A. niger mycelia to decrease dramatically, and they did not recover. The disruption of pH homeostasis by sorbic acid at concentrations below the MIC could account for the delay in spore germination and retardation of the onset of subsequent mycelial growth. PMID:15184150

  2. Prediction of acid lactic-bacteria growth in turkey ham processed by high hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, S.P.; Rosenthal, A.; Gaspar, A.; Aragão, G.M.F.; Slongo-Marcusi, A.

    2013-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been investigated and industrially applied to extend shelf life of meat-based products. Traditional ham packaged under microaerophilic conditions may sometimes present high lactic acid bacteria population during refrigerated storage, which limits shelf life due to development of unpleasant odor and greenish and sticky appearance. This study aimed at evaluating the shelf life of turkey ham pressurized at 400 MPa for 15 min and stored at 4, 8 and 12 °C, in comparison to the non pressurized product. The lactic acid bacteria population up to 107 CFU/g of product was set as the criteria to determine the limiting shelf life According to such parameter the pressurized sample achieved a commercial viability within 75 days when stored at 4 °C while the control lasted only 45 days. Predictive microbiology using Gompertz and Baranyi and Roberts models fitted well both for the pressurized and control samples. The results indicated that the high hydrostatic pressure treatment greatly increased the turkey ham commercial viability in comparison to the usual length, by slowing down the growth of microorganisms in the product. PMID:24159279

  3. Radiative defects in GaN nanocolumns: Correlation with growth conditions and sample morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, P.; Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Grandal, J.; Ristic, J.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.-A.; Calleja, E.

    2011-02-21

    Low-temperature photoluminescence is studied in detail in GaN nanocolumns (NCs) grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under various conditions (substrate temperature and impinging Ga/N flux ratio). The relative intensities of the different emission lines, in particular those related to structural defects, appear to be correlated with the growth conditions, and clearly linked to the NC sample morphology. We demonstrate, in particular, that all lines comprised between 3.10 and 3.42 eV rapidly lose intensity when the growth conditions are such that the NC coalescence is reduced. The well-known line around 3.45 eV, characteristic of GaN NC samples, shows, however, a behavior that is exactly the opposite of the other lines, namely, for growth conditions leading to reduced NC coalescence, this line tends to become more prominent, thus proving to be intrinsic to individual GaN NCs.

  4. Aqueous Growth of Gold Clusters with Tunable Fluorescence Using Photochemically Modified Lipoic Acid-Based Ligands.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Dinesh; Aldeek, Fadi; Lochner, Eric; Palui, Goutam; Zeng, Birong; Mackowski, Sebastian; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2016-06-28

    We report a one-phase aqueous growth of fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) with tunable emission in the visible spectrum, using a ligand scaffold that is made of poly(ethylene glycol) segment appended with a metal coordinating lipoic acid at one end and a functional group at the other end. This synthetic scheme exploits the ability of the UV-induced photochemical transformation of LA-based ligands to provide DHLA and other thiol byproducts that exhibit great affinity to metal nanoparticles, obviating the need for chemical reduction of the dithiolane ring using classical reducing agents. The influence of various experimental conditions, including the photoirradiation time, gold precursor-to-ligand molar ratios, time of reaction, temperature, and the medium pH, on the growth of AuNCs has been systematically investigated. The photophysical properties, size, and structural characterization were carried out using UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, TEM, DOSY-NMR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The hydrodynamic size (RH) obtained by DOSY-NMR indicates that the size of these clusters follows the trend anticipated from the absorption and PL data, with RH(red) > RH(yellow) > RH(blue). The tunable emission and size of these gold nanoclusters combined with their high biocompatibility would make them greatly promising for potential use in imaging and sensing applications. PMID:27254320

  5. Seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) Improves Growth, Immunity, Fatty Acid Profile and Reduces Cholesterol in Hanwoo Steers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J A; Islam, M M; Ahmed, S T; Mun, H S; Kim, G M; Kim, Y J; Yang, C J

    2014-08-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the effect of 2% seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product (SW) on growth performance, immunity, carcass characteristics, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile in Hanwoo steers. A total of 20 Hanwoo steers (ave. 22 months old; 619 kg body weight) were randomly assigned to control (basal diet) and 2% SW supplemented diet. Dietary SW supplementation significantly (p<0.05) improved average daily gain and gain:feed ratio as well as serum immunoglobulin G concentration. Chemical composition and quality grade of meat and carcass yield grades evaluated at the end of the trial were found to be unaffected by SW supplementation. Dietary SW significantly reduced meat cholesterol concentration (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation significantly reduced the myristic acid (C14:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:ln-7) concentration, while SW increased the concentration of stearic acid (C18:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) compared to control (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation had no effect on saturated fatty acids (SFA), unsaturated fatty acids, poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or mono unsaturated fatty acid content in muscles. A reduced ratio of PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 were found in SW supplemented group (p<0.05). In conclusion, 2% SW supplementation was found to improve growth, immunity and fatty acid profile with significantly reduced cholesterol of beef. PMID:25083105

  6. L-Ascorbic Acid: A Multifunctional Molecule Supporting Plant Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    L-Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is as essential to plants as it is to animals. Ascorbic acid functions as a major redox buffer and as a cofactor for enzymes involved in regulating photosynthesis, hormone biosynthesis, and regenerating other antioxidants. Ascorbic acid regulates cell division and growth and is involved in signal transduction. In contrast to the single pathway responsible for ascorbic acid biosynthesis in animals, plants use multiple pathways to synthesize ascorbic acid, perhaps reflecting the importance of this molecule to plant health. Given the importance of ascorbic acid to human nutrition, several technologies have been developed to increase the ascorbic acid content of plants through the manipulation of biosynthetic or recycling pathways. This paper provides an overview of these approaches as well as the consequences that changes in ascorbic acid content have on plant growth and function. Discussed is the capacity of plants to tolerate changes in ascorbic acid content. The many functions that ascorbic acid serves in plants, however, will require highly targeted approaches to improve their nutritional quality without compromising their health. PMID:24278786

  7. Seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) Improves Growth, Immunity, Fatty Acid Profile and Reduces Cholesterol in Hanwoo Steers

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, J. A.; Islam, M. M.; Ahmed, S. T.; Mun, H. S.; Kim, G. M.; Kim, Y. J.; Yang, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the effect of 2% seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida) by-product (SW) on growth performance, immunity, carcass characteristics, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile in Hanwoo steers. A total of 20 Hanwoo steers (ave. 22 months old; 619 kg body weight) were randomly assigned to control (basal diet) and 2% SW supplemented diet. Dietary SW supplementation significantly (p<0.05) improved average daily gain and gain:feed ratio as well as serum immunoglobulin G concentration. Chemical composition and quality grade of meat and carcass yield grades evaluated at the end of the trial were found to be unaffected by SW supplementation. Dietary SW significantly reduced meat cholesterol concentration (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation significantly reduced the myristic acid (C14:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:ln-7) concentration, while SW increased the concentration of stearic acid (C18:0) and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) compared to control (p<0.05). Dietary SW supplementation had no effect on saturated fatty acids (SFA), unsaturated fatty acids, poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) or mono unsaturated fatty acid content in muscles. A reduced ratio of PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 were found in SW supplemented group (p<0.05). In conclusion, 2% SW supplementation was found to improve growth, immunity and fatty acid profile with significantly reduced cholesterol of beef. PMID:25083105

  8. The allelopathic effects of invasive plant Solidago canadensis on seed germination and growth of Lactuca sativa enhanced by different types of acid deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyan; Xiao, Hongguang; Zhao, Lulu; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Fei; Shi, Yanchun; Du, Daolin

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species can exhibit allelopathic effects on native species. Meanwhile, the types of acid deposition are gradually changing. Thus, the allelopathic effects of invasive species on seed germination and growth of native species may be altered or even enhanced under conditions with diversified acid deposition. This study aims to assess the allelopathic effects (using leaves extracts) of invasive plant Solidago canadensis on seed germination and growth of native species Lactuca sativa treated with five types of acid deposition with different SO4(2-) to NO3(-) ratios (1:0, sulfuric acid; 5:1, sulfuric-rich acid; 1:1, mixed acid; 1:5, nitric-rich acid; 0:1, nitric acid). Solidago canadensis leaf extracts exhibited significantly allelopathic effects on germination index, vigor index, and germination rate index of L. sativa. High concentration of S. canadensis leaf extracts also similarly exhibited significantly allelopathic effects on root length of L. sativa. This may be due to that S. canadensis could release allelochemicals and then trigger allelopathic effects on seed germination and growth of L. sativa. Acid deposition exhibited significantly negative effects on seedling biomass, root length, seedling height, germination index, vigor index, and germination rate index of L. sativa. This may be ascribed to the decreased soil pH values mediated by acid deposition which could produce toxic effects on seedling growth. Sulfuric acid deposition triggered more toxic effects on seedling biomass and vigor index of L. sativa than nitric acid deposition. This may be attributing to the difference in exchange capacity with hydroxyl groups (OH(-)) between SO4(2-) and NO3(-) as well as the fertilizing effects mediated by nitric deposition. All types of acid deposition significantly enhanced the allelopathic effects of S. canadensis on root length, germination index, vigor index, and germination rate index of L. sativa. This may be due to the negatively synergistic effects of

  9. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  10. Effect of plant growth regulators on fatty acids composition in Jatropha curcas L. callus culture.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ludwi Rodríguez; Mendiola, Martha A Rodríguez; Castro, Carlos Arias; Gutiérrez-Miceli, Federico A

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Naphtaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) on callus formation, its morphology and fatty acids profile were examined from Jatropha curcas L. Embryo from seeds of J. curcas L. were sown in Murashige and skoog (MS) medium with NAA and BAP. All treatments induced callus formation, however callus morphology was different in most of the treatments. Higher callus biomass was presented with 1.0 NAA + 0.5 BAP mg/L. Plant growth regulators modifies the fatty acids profile in callus of J. curcas L. BAP was induced linoleic and linolenic acids. PMID:25757437

  11. Local weather conditions have complex effects on the growth of blue tit nestlings.

    PubMed

    Mainwaring, Mark C; Hartley, Ian R

    2016-08-01

    Adverse weather conditions are expected to result in impaired nestling development in birds, but empirical studies have provided equivocal support for such a relationship. This may be because the negative effects of adverse weather conditions are masked by parental effects. Globally, ambient temperatures, rainfall levels and wind speeds are all expected to increase in a changing climate and so there is a need for a better understanding of the relationship between weather conditions and nestling growth. Here, we describe a correlative study that examined the relationships between local temperatures, rainfall levels and wind speeds and the growth of individual blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) nestlings in relation to their hatching order and sex. We found that changes in a range of morphological characters were negatively related to both temperature and wind speed, but positively related to rainfall. These patterns were further influenced by the hatching order of the nestlings but not by nestling sex. This suggests that the predicted changes in local weather conditions may have complex effects on nestling growth, but that parents may be able to mitigate the adverse effects via adaptive parental effects. We therefore conclude that local weather conditions have complex effects on avian growth and the implications for patterns of avian growth in a changing climate are discussed. PMID:27503711

  12. Carboxymethylcellulose Obtained by Ethanol/Water Organosolv Process Under Acid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzene, Denise S.; Gonçalves, Adilson R.; Teixeira, José A.; Pessoa de Amorim, Maria T.

    Sugar cane bagasse pulps were obtained by ethanol/water organosolv process under acid and alkaline conditions. The best condition of acid pulping for the sugarcane bagasse was 0.02 mol/L sulfuric acid at 160°C, for 1h, whereas the best condition for alkaline pulping was 5% sodium hydroxide (base pulp) at 160°C, for 3h. For the residual lignin removal, the acid and alkaline pulps were submitted to a chemical bleaching using sodium chlorite. Pulps under acid and alkaline conditions bleached with sodium chlorite presented viscosities of 3.6 and 7.8 mPas, respectively, and μ-kappa numbers of 1.1 and 2.4, respectively. The pulp under acid condition, bleached with sodium chlorite was used to obtain carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). CMC yield was 35% (pulp based), showing mass gain after the carboxymethylation reaction corresponding to 23.6% of substitution or 0.70 groups-CH2COONa per unit of glucose residue. The infrared spectra showed the CMC characteristic bands and by the infrared technique it was possible to obtain a substitution degree (0.63), similar to the substitution degree calculated by mass gain (0.70).

  13. Extent of fungal growth on fiberglass duct liners with and without biocides under challenging environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Samimi, Behzad S; Ross, Kristen

    2003-03-01

    Eight brands of fiberglass duct liners, including three that contained biocides, were exposed to challenging environmental conditions that would promote fungal growth. Twenty-four rectangular sheet metal ducts in three groups of eight ducts per group were lined with the eight selected liners. Each group of ducts was exposed to one of the three test conditions within an environmental chamber for a period of 15 days. These conditions were a) 75 percent RH, b) 75 percent RH plus water spray, c) 75 percent RH plus dry nutrient, and d) 75 percent RH plus water plus nutrient. Viable spores of Aspergillus niger were aerosolized into each duct as seed. On the 16th day, air and surface samples for fungal spores were collected from inside ducts. The results of air sampling using N6 sampler and visual inspection indicated that two out of three biocide-containing liners, Permacote and Toughgard, inhibited fungal growth but only under condition A. The third biocide-containing liner, Aeroflex Plus, was effective even when it was wet (conditions A and B). All three biocide-containing liners failed to inhibit fungal growth under conditions C and D. Among the five other types of liners that did not contain biocides, ATCO Flex with a smooth Mylar coating was more preferable, exhibiting lower fungal activity during conditions A, B, and C. All liners failed under condition D when nutrient and water were added together. Surface sampling using adhesive tape failed to produce representative results, apparently due to rough/porous surface of duct liners. It was concluded that duct liners with biocide treatment could be less promoting to microbial growth under high humidity as long as their surfaces remain clean and water-free. A liner with an impermeable and smooth surface seems to be less subject to microbial growth under most conditions than biocide-containing liners having porous and/or rough surfaces. PMID:12573965

  14. Disruption of the lower food web in Lake Ontario: Did it affect alewife growth or condition?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Gorman, R.; Prindle, S.E.; Lantry, J.R.; Lantry, B.F.

    2008-01-01

    From the early 1980s to the late 1990s, a succession of non-native invertebrates colonized Lake Ontario and the suite of consequences caused by their colonization became known as "food web disruption". For example, the native burrowing amphipod Diporeia spp., a key link in the profundal food web, declined to near absence, exotic predaceous cladocerans with long spines proliferated, altering the zooplankton community, and depth distributions of fishes shifted. These changes had the potential to affect growth and condition of planktivorous alewife Alosa pseudoharengus, the most abundant fish in the lake. To determine if food web disruption affected alewife, we used change-point analysis to examine alewife growth and adult alewife condition during 1976-2006 and analysis-of-variance to determine if values between change points differed significantly. There were no change points in growth during the first year of life. Of three change points in growth during the second year of life, one coincided with the shift in springtime distribution of alewife to deeper water but it was not associated with a significant change in growth. After the second year of life, no change points in growth were evident, although growth in the third year of life spiked in those years when Bythotrephes, the largest of the exotic cladocerans, was abundant suggesting that it was a profitable prey item for age-2 fish. We detected two change points in condition of adult alewife in fall, but the first occurred in 1981, well before disruption began. A second change point occurred in 2003, well after disruption began. After the springtime distribution of alewife shifted deeper during 1992-1994, growth in the first two years of life became more variable, and growth in years of life two and older became correlated (P < 0.05). In conclusion, food web disruption had no negative affect on growth and condition of alewife in Lake Ontario although it appears to have resulted in growth in the first two years of

  15. Auxin-Induced Ethylene Triggers Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis and Growth Inhibition1

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Hauke; Grossmann, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    The growth-inhibiting effects of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) at high concentration and the synthetic auxins 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid (quinmerac), 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid (dicamba), 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid (picloram), and naphthalene acetic acid, were investigated in cleavers (Galium aparine). When plants were root treated with 0.5 mm IAA, shoot epinasty and inhibition of root and shoot growth developed during 24 h. Concomitantly, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase activity, and ACC and ethylene production were transiently stimulated in the shoot tissue within 2 h, followed by increases in immunoreactive (+)-abscisic acid (ABA) and its precursor xanthoxal (xanthoxin) after 5 h. After 24 h of treatment, levels of xanthoxal and ABA were elevated up to 2- and 24-fold, relative to control, respectively. In plants treated with IAA, 7-chloro-3-methyl-8-quinolinecarboxylic acid, naphthalene acetic acid, 2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid, and 4-amino-3,6,6-trichloropicolinic acid, levels of ethylene, ACC, and ABA increased in close correlation with inhibition of shoot growth. Aminoethoxyvinyl-glycine and cobalt ions, which inhibit ethylene synthesis, decreased ABA accumulation and growth inhibition, whereas the ethylene-releasing ethephon promoted ABA levels and growth inhibition. In accordance, tomato mutants defective in ethylene perception (never ripe) did not produce the xanthoxal and ABA increases and growth inhibition induced by auxins in wild-type plants. This suggests that auxin-stimulated ethylene triggers ABA accumulation and the consequent growth inhibition. Reduced catabolism most probably did not contribute to ABA increase, as indicated by immunoanalyses of ABA degradation and conjugation products in shoot tissue and by pulse experiments with [3H]-ABA in cell suspensions of G. aparine. In contrast, studies using inhibitors of ABA biosynthesis (fluridone, naproxen, and tungstate), ABA

  16. Intrauterine Growth Retardation (IUGR) as a Novel Condition of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Martín-Estal, I; de la Garza, R G; Castilla-Cortázar, I

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is an anabolic hormone with several biological activities, such as proliferation, mitochondrial protection, cell survival, tissue growth and development, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antifibrogenic and antiaging. This hormone plays an important role in embryological and postnatal states, being essential for normal foetal and placental growth and differentiation. During gestation, the placenta is one of the major sources of IGF-1, among other hormones. This intrauterine organ expresses IGF-1 receptors and IGF-1 binding proteins (IGFBPs), which control IGF-1 activities. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is the second most frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, defined as the inability to achieve the expected weight for gestational age. Different studies have revealed that IUGR infants have placental dysfunction and low circulating levels of insulin, IGF-1, IGF-2 and IGFBPs. Such data suggest that IGF-1 deficiency in gestational state may be one of the major causes of foetal growth retardation. The aim of this review is to study the epidemiology, physiopathology and possible causes of IUGR. Also, it intends to study the possible role of the placenta as an IGF-1 target organ. The purpose is to establish if IUGR could be considered as a novel condition of IGF-1 deficiency and if its treatment with low doses of IGF-1 could be a suitable therapeutic strategy. PMID:26634242

  17. Probing Phosphorus Efficient Low Phytic Acid Content Soybean Genotypes with Phosphorus Starvation in Hydroponics Growth System.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Varun; Singh, Tiratha Raj; Hada, Alkesh; Jolly, Monica; Ganapathi, Andy; Sachdev, Archana

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient required for soybean growth but is bound in phytic acid which causes negative effects on both the environment as well as the animal nutrition. Lowering of phytic acid levels is associated with reduced agronomic characteristics, and relatively little information is available on the response of soybean plants to phosphorus (P) starvation. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different P starvation concentrations on the phytic acid content, growth, and yield of seven mutant genotypes along with the unirradiated control, JS-335, in a hydroponics growth system. The low phytic acid containing mutant genotypes, IR-JS-101, IR-DS-118, and IR-V-101, showed a relatively high growth rate in low P concentration containing nutrient solution (2 μM), whereas the high P concentration (50 μM) favored the growth of IR-DS-111 and IR-DS-115 mutant genotypes containing moderate phytate levels. The mutant genotypes with high phytic acid content, IR-DS-122, IR-DS-114, and JS-335, responded well under P starvation and did not have any significant effect on the growth and yield of plants. Moreover, the reduction of P concentration in nutrient solution from 50 to 2 μM also reduced the phytic acid content in the seeds of all the soybean genotypes under study. The desirable agronomic performance of low phytic acid containing mutant genotype IR-DS-118 reported in this study suggested it to be a P-efficient genotype which could be considered for agricultural practices under P limiting soils. PMID:26239443

  18. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  19. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induced changes in oil content, fatty acid profiles and expression of four fatty acid biosynthetic genes in Chlorella vulgaris at early stationary growth phase.

    PubMed

    Jusoh, Malinna; Loh, Saw Hong; Chuah, Tse Seng; Aziz, Ahmad; Cha, Thye San

    2015-03-01

    Microalgae lipids and oils are potential candidates for renewable biodiesel. Many microalgae species accumulate a substantial amount of lipids and oils under environmental stresses. However, low growth rate under these adverse conditions account for the decrease in overall biomass productivity which directly influence the oil yield. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of exogenously added auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA) on the oil content, fatty acid compositions, and the expression of fatty acid biosynthetic genes in Chlorella vulgaris (UMT-M1). Auxin has been shown to regulate growth and metabolite production of several microalgae. Results showed that oil accumulation was highest on days after treatment (DAT)-2 with enriched levels of palmitic (C16:0) and stearic (C18:0) acids, while the linoleic (C18:2) and α-linolenic (C18:3n3) acids levels were markedly reduced by IAA. The elevated levels of saturated fatty acids (C16:0 and C18:0) were consistent with high expression of the β-ketoacyl ACP synthase I (KAS I) gene, while low expression of omega-6 fatty acid desaturase (ω-6 FAD) gene was consistent with low production of C18:2. However, the increment of stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD) gene expression upon IAA induction did not coincide with oleic acid (C18:1) production. The expression of omega-3 fatty acid desaturase (ω-3 FAD) gene showed a positive correlation with the synthesis of PUFA and C18:3n3. PMID:25583439

  20. Use of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid to inhibit growth of sugarbeet storage rot pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are endogenous plant hormones that induce native plant defense responses and provide protection against a wide range of diseases. Previously, JA, applied after harvest, was shown to protect sugarbeet roots against the storage pathogens, Botrytis cinerea, P...

  1. Growth inhibition of Erwinia amylovora and related Erwinia species by neutralized short‑chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Konecki, Katrin; Gernold, Marina; Wensing, Annette; Geider, Klaus

    2013-11-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are used to preserve food and could be a tool for control of fire blight caused by Erwinia amylovora on apple, pear and related rosaceous plants. Neutralized acids were added to buffered growth media at 0.5–75 mM and tested at pHs ranging from 6.8 to 5.5. Particularly at low pH, SCFAs with a chain length exceeding that of acetic acid such as propionic acid were effective growth inhibitors of E. amylovora possibly due to uptake of free acid and its intracellular accumulation. We also observed high inhibition with monochloroacetic acid. An E. billingiae strain was as sensitive to the acids as E. amylovora or E. tasmaniensis. Fire blight symptoms on pear slices were reduced when the slices were pretreated with neutralized propionic acid. Propionic acid is well water soluble and could be applied in orchards as a control agent for fire blight. PMID:24077735

  2. Biomass and lipid production of a local isolate Chlorella sorokiniana under mixotrophic growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Juntila, D J; Bautista, M A; Monotilla, W

    2015-09-01

    A local Chlorella sp. isolate with 97% rbcL sequence identity to Chlorella sorokiniana was evaluated in terms of its biomass and lipid production under mixotrophic growth conditions. Glucose-supplemented cultures exhibited increasing growth rate and biomass yield with increasing glucose concentration. Highest growth rate and biomass yield of 1.602 day(-1) and 687.5 mg L(-1), respectively, were achieved under 2 g L(-1) glucose. Nitrogen starvation up to 75% in the 1.0 g L(-1) glucose-supplemented culture was done to induce lipid accumulation and did not significantly affect the growth. Lipid content ranges from 20% to 27% dry weight. Nile Red staining showed more prominent neutral lipid bodies in starved mixotrophic cultures. C. sorokiniana exhibited enhanced biomass production under mixotrophy and more prominent neutral lipid accumulation under nitrogen starvation with no significant decrease in growth; hence, this isolate could be further studied to establish its potential for biodiesel production. PMID:25847795

  3. Investigation of fatty acid accumulation in the engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae under nitrogen limited culture condition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoling; Chen, Wei Ning

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type strain and engineered strain with an overexpressed heterologous ATP-citrate lyase (acl) were cultured in medium with different carbon and nitrogen concentrations, and their fatty acid production levels were investigated. The results showed that when the S. cerevisiae engineered strain was cultivated under nitrogen limited culture condition, the yield of mono-unsaturated fatty acids showed higher than that under non-nitrogen limited condition; with the carbon concentration increased, the accumulation become more apparent, whereas in the wild type strain, no such correlation was found. Besides, the citrate level in the S. cerevisiae under nitrogen limited condition was found to be much higher than that under non-nitrogen limited condition, which indicated a relationship between the diminution of nitrogen and accumulation of citrate in the S. cerevisiae. The accumulated citrate could be further cleaved by acl to provide substrate for fatty acid synthesis. PMID:24755317

  4. Depletion of Ascorbic Acid Restricts Angiogenesis and Retards Tumor Growth in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Telang, Sucheta; Clem, Amy L; Eaton, John W; Chesney, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Angiogenesis requires the deposition of type IV collagen by endothelial cells into the basement membrane of new blood vessels. Stabilization of type IV collagen triple helix depends on the hydroxylation of proline, which is catalyzed by the iron-containing enzyme prolyl hydroxylase. This enzyme, in turn, requires ascorbic acid to maintain the enzyme-bound iron in its reduced state. We hypothesized that dietary ascorbic acid might be required for tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, tumor growth. Here, we show that, not surprisingly, ascorbic acid is necessary for the synthesis of collagen type IV by human endothelial cells and for their effective migration and tube formation on a basement membrane matrix. Furthermore, ascorbic acid depletion in mice incapable of synthesizing ascorbic acid (Gulo-/-) dramatically restricts the in vivo growth of implanted Lewis lung carcinoma tumors. Histopathological analyses of these tumors reveal poorly formed blood vessels, extensive hemorrhagic foci, and decreased collagen and von Willebrand factor expression. Our data indicate that ascorbic acid plays an essential role in tumor angiogenesis and growth, and that restriction of ascorbic acid or pharmacological inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase may prove to be novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of cancer. PMID:17325743

  5. A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Adan, Olaf C G

    2016-05-01

    To remediate indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of common indoor fungi is crucial. Indoor moisture conditions are commonly quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH is a major determinant of the availability of water in porous indoor surfaces that fungi grow on. The influence of steady-state RH on growth is well understood. Typically, however, the indoor RH constantly changes so that fungi have to endure frequent periods of alternating low and high RH. Knowledge of how common indoor fungi survive and are affected by the low-RH periods is limited. In particular, the specific effects of a drop in RH on the growth of the mycelium remain unclear. In this work, video microscopy was used to monitor hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates under controlled dynamic humidity conditions. The effect of a single period of low RH (RH = 50-90%) interrupting favourable conditions (RH = 97%) was tested. It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH. However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered. These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth. PMID:26996401

  6. Evaluation of Cronobacter Growth and Phenotypic Variation Under Modified Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Segars, Katharine; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil; Sulaiman, Irshad M

    2016-02-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen known to cause acute meningitis and necrotizing enterocolitis in neonates and immunocompromised individuals. It has been isolated from a wide range of food and environmental samples, and has been linked to outbreaks associated with powdered infant formula. This study was carried out to assess variations in growth conditions (temperature, pH, and sugar supplement) and to establish how these changes impact phenotypic characteristics for successful recovery and identification of Cronobacter, particularly for routine surveillance purposes. A total of six Cronobacter isolates were tested to evaluate the above growth conditions, including three ATCC Cronobacter reference and three environmental isolates obtained from regulatory sample screening. Although only slight changes in colony-forming units were observed across the pH range and the sugars tested, the morphology was significantly impacted by changes in these growth factors. Incubation between 30 and 50 °C resulted in growth after 24 h, and the growth was slower at ambient temperature and colony formation was most robust at 30 °C. Results of this study suggest that 30 °C may be suitable for recovery of some Cronobacter strains, and minor variations in growth conditions can alter colony morphology and appearance. Expression of unique biological characteristics based on phenotypic observations may be beneficial for differentiating various Cronobacter strains. PMID:26567034

  7. Oceanographic conditions govern shell growth of Arctica islandica (Bivalvia) in surface waters off Northeast Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marali, Soraya; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2015-04-01

    Shells of the long-lived bivalve Arctica islandica provide absolutely dated, highly resolved archives of environmental variability in the extratropical realm. Shell growth rates of contemporaneous A. islandica specimens are synchronized by one or several environmental factor(s), such as seawater temperature, food supply etc. Based on the growth synchrony, increment width records can be combined to composite chronologies. However, according to existing studies, A. islandica specimens from shallow waters do not show synchronous changes in shell growth and may thus not provide information about environmental conditions such as sea surface temperature. Here, we present the first statistically robust composite chronology of A. islandica from unpolluted surface waters (8-23 m) off Northeast Iceland. The complete record spans the time interval of 1835 to 2012. Times of enhanced shell growth coincide with periods of higher temperature and elevated food supply. Instrumental sea surface temperature (SST) during the growing season explains up to 43% of the variation in relative shell growth. However, the correlation strength varies over time. When the environmental conditions at the sampling site were stable over many consecutive years, i.e. one of the two major surface currents (the warm, nutrient-rich Irminger Current or the cold, nutrient-deficient East Icelandic Current) predominated the area over longer time intervals, the growth synchrony among coeval A. islandica weakened and the correlation between shell growth and SSTs was markedly reduced. Conversely, if the habitat was under the alternating influence of both ocean currents, shell growth was stronger correlated to each other and to SST. Thus, environmental variability is required to synchronize shell growth rates within an A. islandica population. This study further enlightens the relationship between bivalve shell growth and environmental variables.

  8. A NEW CONDITION FOR THE TRANSITION FROM RUNAWAY TO OLIGARCHIC GROWTH

    SciTech Connect

    Ormel, C. W.; Dullemond, C. P.; Spaans, M. E-mail: dullemon@mpia.de

    2010-05-01

    Accretion among macroscopic bodies of {approx}km size or larger is enhanced significantly due to gravitational focusing. Two regimes can be distinguished. Initially, the system experiences runaway growth, in which the gravitational focusing factors increase, and bodies at the high-mass tail of the distribution grow fastest. However, at some point, the runaway body dynamically heats its environment, gravitational focusing factors decrease, and runaway growth passes into oligarchic growth. Based on the results of recent simulations, we reconsider the runaway growth-oligarchy transition. In contrast to oligarchy, we find that runaway growth cannot be approximated with a two-component model (of small and large bodies) and that the criterion of Ida and Makino, which is frequently adopted as the start of oligarchy, is not a sufficient condition to signify the transition. Instead, we propose a new criterion based on timescale arguments. We then find a larger value for the runaway growth-oligarchy transition: from several hundreds of km in the inner disk regions up to {approx}10{sup 3} km for the outer disk. These findings are consistent with the view that runaway growth has been responsible for the size distribution of the present-day Kuiper Belt objects. Our finding, furthermore, outlines the proper initial conditions at the start of the oligarchy stage.

  9. Influence of mineralogy on the preservation of amino acids under simulated Mars conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato; Patel, Manish; Cuadros, Javier; Martins, Zita

    2016-10-01

    The detection of organic molecules associated with life on Mars is one of the main goals of future life-searching missions such as the ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars and NASA 2020 mission. In this work we studied the preservation of 25 amino acids that were spiked onto the Mars-relevant minerals augite, enstatite, goethite, gypsum, hematite, jarosite, labradorite, montmorillonite, nontronite, olivine and saponite, and on basaltic lava under simulated Mars conditions. Simulations were performed using the Open University Mars Chamber, which mimicked the main aspects of the martian environment, such as temperature, UV radiation and atmospheric pressure. Quantification and enantiomeric separation of the amino acids were performed using gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results show that no amino acids could be detected on the mineral samples spiked with 1 μM amino acid solution (0.1 μmol of amino acid per gram of mineral) subjected to simulation, possibly due to complete degradation of the amino acids and/or low extractability of the amino acids from the minerals. For higher amino acid concentrations, nontronite had the highest preservation rate in the experiments in which 50 μM spiking solution was used (5 μmol/g), while jarosite and gypsum had a higher preservation rate in the experiments in which 25 and 10 μM spiking solutions were used (2.5 and 1 μmol/g), respectively. Overall, the 3 smectite minerals (montmorillonite, saponite, nontronite) and the two sulfates (gypsum, jarosite) preserved the highest amino acid proportions. Our data suggest that clay minerals preserve amino acids due to their high surface areas and small pore sizes, whereas sulfates protect amino acids likely due to their opacity to UV radiation or by partial dissolution and crystallization and trapping of the amino acids. Minerals containing ferrous iron (such as augite, enstatite and basaltic lava) preserved the lowest amount of amino acids, which is explained by iron (II) catalyzed

  10. Stability of amino acids and their oligomerization under high-pressure conditions: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Otake, Tsubasa; Taniguchi, Takashi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kawamura, Fumio; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    The polymerization of amino acids leading to the formation of peptides and proteins is a significant problem for the origin of life. This problem stems from the instability of amino acids and the difficulty of their oligomerization in aqueous environments, such as seafloor hydrothermal systems. We investigated the stability of amino acids and their oligomerization reactions under high-temperature (180-400°C) and high-pressure (1.0-5.5 GPa) conditions, based on the hypothesis that the polymerization of amino acids occurred in marine sediments during diagenesis and metamorphism, at convergent margins on early Earth. Our results show that the amino acids glycine and alanine are stabilized by high pressure. Oligomers up to pentamers were formed, which has never been reported for alanine in the absence of a catalyst. The yields of peptides at a given temperature and reaction time were higher under higher-pressure conditions. Elemental, infrared, and isotopic analyses of the reaction products indicated that deamination is a key degradation process for amino acids and peptides under high-pressure conditions. A possible NH(3)-rich environment in marine sediments on early Earth may have further stabilized amino acids and peptides by inhibiting their deamination. PMID:21961531

  11. Accumulation of fatty acids in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoAcarboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense [corrected].

    PubMed

    Leyva, Luis A; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae. PMID:25129521

  12. Accumulation fatty acids of in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Luis A.; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  13. Effect of oxalic acid treatment on sediment arsenic concentrations and lability under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Bostick, Benjamin C; Mailloux, Brian J; Ross, James M; Chillrud, Steven N

    2016-07-01

    Oxalic acid enhances arsenic (As) mobilization by dissolving As host minerals and competing for sorption sites. Oxalic acid amendments thus could potentially improve the efficiency of widely used pump-and-treat (P&T) remediation. This study investigates the effectiveness of oxalic acid on As mobilization from contaminated sediments with different As input sources and redox conditions, and examines whether residual sediment As after oxalic acid treatment can still be reductively mobilized. Batch extraction, column, and microcosm experiments were performed in the laboratory using sediments from the Dover Municipal Landfill and the Vineland Chemical Company Superfund sites. Oxalic acid mobilized As from both Dover and Vineland sediments, although the efficiency rates were different. The residual As in both Dover and Vineland sediments after oxalic acid treatment was less vulnerable to microbial reduction than before the treatment. Oxalic acid could thus improve the efficiency of P&T. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis indicated that the Vineland sediment samples still contained reactive Fe(III) minerals after oxalic acid treatment, and thus released more As into solution under reducing conditions than the treated Dover samples. Therefore, the efficacy of enhanced P&T must consider sediment Fe mineralogy when evaluating its overall potential for remediating groundwater As. PMID:26970042

  14. Physiological activities associated with biofilm growth in attached and suspended growth bioreactors under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Naz, Iffat; Seher, Shama; Perveen, Irum; Saroj, Devendra P; Ahmed, Safia

    2015-01-01

    This research work evaluated the biofilm succession on stone media and compared the biochemical changes of sludge in attached and suspended biological reactors operated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Stones incubated (30±2°C) with activated sludge showed a constant increase in biofilm weight up to the fifth and seventh week time under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively, where after reduction (>80%) the most probable number index of pathogen indicators on ninth week was recorded. Reduction in parameters such as biological oxygen demand (BOD) (47.7%), chemical oxygen demand (COD, 41%), nitrites (60.2%), nitrates (105.5%) and phosphates (58.9%) and increase in dissolved oxygen (176.5%) of sludge were higher in aerobic attached growth reactors as compared with other settings. While, considerable reductions in these values were also observed (BOD, 53.8%; COD, 2.8%; nitrites, 28.6%; nitrates, 31.7%; phosphates, 41.4%) in the suspended growth system under anaerobic conditions. However, higher sulphate removal was observed in suspended (40.9% and 54.9%) as compared with biofilm reactors (28.2% and 29.3%). Six weeks biofilm on the stone media showed maximum physiological activities; thus, the operational conditions should be controlled to keep the biofilm structure similar to six-week-old biofilm, and can be used in fixed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment. PMID:25609155

  15. Uniformity of environmental conditions and plant growth in a hydroponic culture system for use in a growth room with aerial CO2 control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessey, J. K.; York, E. K.; Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    A portable system of hydroponic culture was developed that maintained temperature, pH, and nutrient concentrations of circulating nutrient solutions. The hydroponic system is used within a controlled-environment room (CER) for control of aerial environment. The CER was equipped with an auto-calibrating system for atmospheric CO2 control. The control systems for the hydroponic chambers were able to maintain acidity within +/- 0.2 pH units and the temperature with +/- 0.5 degree C. Mixing time for the 200-liter volume of solution within a hydroponic chamber was less than 12 min. The CO2 control system was able to maintain aerial concentrations within +/- 10 ppm CO2 during the light period. The only gradient found to occur within the hydroponic chambers or CER was a slight gradient in aerial temperature along the length of hydroponic chambers. Growth of soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] was characterized during a 3-week period of vegetative development by leaf number and area, plant dry weight, total N content of plants, and N depletion from the nutrient solution. The growth characteristics among populations for three hydroponic chambers within the CER were not significantly different, and the percent standard errors of means of the measurements within populations from each chamber were nearly all less than 10%. Thus, the uniformity of plant growth reflected the uniformity of environmental conditions.

  16. Hypobaric bacteriology: growth, cytoplasmic membrane polarization and total cellular fatty acids in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, N. J.; Boulter-Bitzer, J. I.; Hart, M. M.; Storey, L.; Lee, H.; Trevors, J. T.

    2005-10-01

    Escherichia coli JM109 (Gram-negative) and Bacillus subtilis (Gram-positive) were grown under hypobaric conditions for 19 days at 25 °C to study the effects of 33 and 67 kPa low pressures on selected physiological responses; growth, cytoplasmic membrane polarization (measure of cytoplasmic membrane fluidity) and total cellular fatty acids. In the first experiment, cytoplasmic membrane polarization in B. subtilis increased under both hypobaric conditions, indicating the membrane became more rigid or less fluid. This experiment was repeated and the effect of the hypobaric conditions was not evident as in the first experiment with B. subtilis. In addition, total cellular fatty acids analysis for B. subtilis showed that hypobaric conditions did not alter the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. The cytoplasmic membrane remained in the same fluid state in hypobaric grown E. coli cell cultures as in the 101 kPa ambient control cells in both experiments. However, the saturated to unsaturated ratios were altered in E. coli under hypobaric conditions. It is important to note the ratios for E. coli were less than 1, while the ratios for Bacillus were in the 28 50 range. Growth of both species was also measured by colony forming units at the termination of the 19 day experiment. Both bacterial species were capable of growth under hypobaric conditions and no distinct trend emerged as to the effect of hypobaric pressure on bacterial growth and cytoplasmic membrane fluidity.

  17. Influence of Fatty Acid Precursors, Including Food Preservatives, on the Growth and Fatty Acid Composition of Listeria monocytogenes at 37 and 10°C ▿

    PubMed Central

    Julotok, Mudcharee; Singh, Atul K.; Gatto, Craig; Wilkinson, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that grows at refrigeration temperatures and increases its content of anteiso-C15:0 fatty acid, which is believed to be a homeoviscous adaptation to ensure membrane fluidity, at these temperatures. As a possible novel approach for control of the growth of the organism, the influences of various fatty acid precursors, including branched-chain amino acids and branched- and straight-chain carboxylic acids, some of which are also well-established food preservatives, on the growth and fatty acid composition of the organism at 37°C and 10°C were studied in order to investigate whether the organism could be made to synthesize fatty acids that would result in impaired growth at low temperatures. The results indicate that the fatty acid composition of L. monocytogenes could be modulated by the feeding of branched-chain amino acid, C4, C5, and C6 branched-chain carboxylic acid, and C3 and C4 straight-chain carboxylic acid fatty acid precursors, but the growth-inhibitory effects of several preservatives were independent of effects on fatty acid composition, which were minor in the case of preservatives metabolized via acetyl coenzyme A. The ability of a precursor to modify fatty acid composition was probably a reflection of the substrate specificities of the first enzyme, FabH, in the condensation of primers of fatty acid biosynthesis with malonyl acyl carrier protein. PMID:20048057

  18. Galacturonic Acid Inhibits the Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on Galactose, Xylose, and Arabinose

    PubMed Central

    Huisjes, Eline H.; de Hulster, Erik; van Dam, Jan C.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    The efficient fermentation of mixed substrates is essential for the microbial conversion of second-generation feedstocks, including pectin-rich waste streams such as citrus peel and sugar beet pulp. Galacturonic acid is a major constituent of hydrolysates of these pectin-rich materials. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the main producer of bioethanol, cannot use this sugar acid. The impact of galacturonic acid on alcoholic fermentation by S. cerevisiae was investigated with anaerobic batch cultures grown on mixtures of glucose and galactose at various galacturonic acid concentrations and on a mixture of glucose, xylose, and arabinose. In cultures grown at pH 5.0, which is well above the pKa value of galacturonic acid (3.51), the addition of 10 g · liter−1 galacturonic acid did not affect galactose fermentation kinetics and growth. In cultures grown at pH 3.5, the addition of 10 g · liter−1 galacturonic acid did not significantly affect glucose consumption. However, at this lower pH, galacturonic acid completely inhibited growth on galactose and reduced galactose consumption rates by 87%. Additionally, it was shown that galacturonic acid strongly inhibits the fermentation of xylose and arabinose by the engineered pentose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain IMS0010. The data indicate that inhibition occurs when nondissociated galacturonic acid is present extracellularly and corroborate the hypothesis that a combination of a decreased substrate uptake rate due to competitive inhibition on Gal2p, an increased energy requirement to maintain cellular homeostasis, and/or an accumulation of galacturonic acid 1-phosphate contributes to the inhibition. The role of galacturonic acid as an inhibitor of sugar fermentation should be considered in the design of yeast fermentation processes based on pectin-rich feedstocks. PMID:22582063

  19. Face-selective crystal growth behavior of L-aspartic acid in the presence of L-asparagine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Doki, Norihito; Yoshida, Saki; Yokota, Masaaki; Shimizu, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    The kinetic mechanism of L-asparagine (L-Asn) action on L-aspartic acid (L-Asp) crystal growth, namely the face-selective effect of L-Asn on the L-Asp crystal growth rate in each direction, was examined. In the a-axis direction, the effect of L-Asn on the L-Asp crystal growth rate was small. Enhancement and inhibition of L-Asp crystal growth, and interestingly the dissolution of the L-Asp crystal face, were observed in the b-axis direction, depending on the amount of L-Asn added. In the c-axis direction, the L-Asp crystal growth rate decreased with the increase in the amount of L-Asn added, and the experimental results were well fitted with a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The study showed that there were crystal growth conditions where enhancement and inhibition, as well as inhibition and dissolution, coexisted in the presence of an additive with a structure similar to the growing crystal.

  20. The effect of nutrient enrichment on the growth, nucleic acid concentrations, and elemental stoichiometry of coral reef macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    Reef, Ruth; Pandolfi, John M; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2012-01-01

    The growth rate hypothesis (GRH) links growth rates with organism elemental stoichiometry. Support for the GRH was found for many animal species, but less so for plants. This is the first study to test the GRH in macroalgae. Tropical coral reef macroalgae from three lineages, Caulerpa serrulata (Chlorophyta), Laurencia intricata (Rhodophyta), and Sargassum polyphyllum (Phaeophyceae) were grown enriched with nitrogen or phosphorous and under control conditions at Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Growth rate, photosynthesis, nucleic acid composition, and elemental stoichiometry were measured. Nutrient enrichment had positive effects on photosynthetic rates and on investment in RNA. However, growth rate was not correlated with either photosynthetic rates or RNA content; thus, we did not find support for the GRH in tropical macroalgae. Macroalgae, especially L. intricata, accumulated P to very high levels (>0.6% of dry weight). The growth rate response to tissue P concentrations was unimodal. Above 0.21%, P accumulation had negative effects on growth. Nitrogen was not stored, but evidence of futile cycling was observed. The capacity to store large amounts of P is probably an adaptation to the low and patchy nutrient environment of the tropical oceans. PMID:22957199

  1. Response of Halomonas campisalis to saline stress: changes in growth kinetics, compatible solute production and membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Aston, John E; Peyton, Brent M

    2007-09-01

    The haloalkaliphile Halomonas campisalis, isolated near Soap Lake, Washington, was grown under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions from 0 to 260 g L(-1) NaCl, with optimal growth occurring at 20 and 30 g L(-1) NaCl, respectively. Halomonas campisalis was observed to produce high concentrations of compatible solutes, most notably ectoine (up to 500 mM within the cytoplasm), but hydroxyectoine and glycine betaine were also detected. The types and amounts of compatible solutes produced depended on salinity and specific growth rate, as well as on the terminal electron acceptor available (O(2) or NO(3) (-)). A decrease in ectoine production was observed with NO(3) (-) as compared with O(2) as the terminal electron acceptor. In addition, changes in the phospholipid fatty acid composition were measured with changing salinity. An increase in trans fatty acids was observed in the absence of salinity, and may be a response to membrane instability. Cyclic fatty acids were also observed to increase, both in the absence of salinity, and at very high salinities, indicating cell stress at these conditions. PMID:17651393

  2. The effects of essential fatty acids preparation in the treatment of intrauterine growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L

    1997-10-01

    A treatment of intravenous infusion of glucose, amino acids, and emulsion enriched in essential fatty acids (EFAs), linoleic, and linolenic acids were given to 30 pregnant women with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and 28 non-EFAs treated cases as controls. There was a marked gain in fetal biparietal diameter (BPD) and in the estimated weight of the treated group over the control group. The mean birth weight was significantly different in the two groups. Fetal BPD increased much more in patients treated with EFAs at 28-34 gestational weeks than those at 34 1/7-37 weeks, which indicates that early initiate complement of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids to IUGR mothers may correct pregnancy-induced EFAs deficiency and maternal-fetal malnutrition, which demonstrates a fetal catch-up of growth in the brain and the whole body. PMID:9394162

  3. Combined effects of carbonation with heating and fatty acid esters on inactivation and growth inhibition of various bacillus spores.

    PubMed

    Klangpetch, Wannaporn; Nakai, Tomoe; Noma, Seiji; Igura, Noriyuki; Shimoda, Mitsuya

    2013-09-01

    The effects of carbonation treatment (1 to 5 MPa, 30 min) plus heat treatment (30 to 80°C, 30 min) in the presence of various fatty acid esters (FAEs; 0.05 and 0.1%, wt/vol) on counts of viable Bacillus subtilis spores were investigated. FAEs or carbonation alone had no inactivation or growth inhibition effects on B. subtilis spores. However, carbonation plus heat (CH; 80°C, 5 MPa, 30 min) in the presence of mono- and diglycerol fatty acid esters markedly decreased counts of viable spores, and the spore counts did not change during storage for 30 days. The greatest decrease in viable spore counts occurred in the presence of monoglycerol fatty acid esters. Under CH conditions, inactivation and/or growth inhibition occurred at only 80°C and increased with increasing pressure. The greatest decrease in spore counts (more than 4 log units) occurred with CH (80°C, 5 MPa, 30 min) in the presence of monoglycerol fatty acid esters. However, this treatment was less effective against Bacillus coagulans and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores. PMID:23992501

  4. Assessment of factors limiting algal growth in acidic pit lakes-a case study from Western Australia, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Naresh; McCullough, Clint D; Lund, Mark A; Larranaga, Santiago A

    2016-03-01

    Open-cut mining operations can form pit lakes on mine closure. These new water bodies typically have low nutrient concentrations and may have acidic and metal-contaminated waters from acid mine drainage (AMD) causing low algal biomass and algal biodiversity. A preliminary study was carried out on an acidic coal pit lake, Lake Kepwari, in Western Australia to determine which factors limited algal biomass. Water quality was monitored to obtain baseline data. pH ranged between 3.7 and 4.1, and solute concentrations were slightly elevated to levels of brackish water. Concentrations of N were highly relative to natural lakes, although concentrations of FRP (<0.01 mg/L) and C (total C 0.7-3.7 and DOC 0.7-3.5 mg/L) were very low, and as a result, algal growth was also extremely low. Microcosm experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that nutrient enrichment will be able to stimulate algal growth regardless of water quality. Microcosms of Lake Kepwari water were amended with N, P and C nutrients with and without sediment. Nutrient amendments under microcosm conditions could not show any significant phytoplankton growth but was able to promote benthic algal growth. P amendments without sediment showed a statistically higher mean algal biomass concentration than controls or microcosms amended with phosphorus but with sediment did. Results indicated that algal biomass in acidic pit lake (Lake Kepwari) may be limited primarily by low nutrient concentrations (especially phosphorus) and not by low pH or elevated metal concentrations. Furthermore, sediment processes may also reduce the nutrient availability. PMID:26593729

  5. STUDIES ON THE METABOLIC FUNCTION OF BRANCHED-CHAIN VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS, GROWTH FACTORS FOR RUMINOCOCCI I.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Milton J.; Bryant, Marvin P.; Doetsch, Raymond N.

    1962-01-01

    Allison, Milton J. (Dairy Cattle Research Branch, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, Md.), M. P. Bryant, and R. N. Doetsch. Studies on the metabolic function of branched-chain volatile fatty acids, growth factors for ruminococci. I. Incorporation of isovalerate into leucine. J. Bacteriol. 83:523–532. 1962.—Ruminococcus flavefaciens strain C94, a cellulolytic rumen bacterium, requires either isobutyrate or isovalerate for growth. The organism was grown in the presence of C14-labeled isovalerate, and the metabolic fate of the labeled carbon was studied to obtain information on the functions of this growth factor. Radioactivity from isovalerate-1-C14 and isovalerate-3-C14 was found mainly in the protein and lipid fractions of the cells. The C14 in protein was all in leucine, indicating that a function of isovalerate was to serve as a carbon skeleton for leucine synthesis. As C14 in leucine synthesized from isovalerate-1-C14 was entirely in carbon 2, the intact isovalerate molecule was apparently incorporated into leucine. This is evidence that leucine was synthesized by a mechanism different from that previously demonstrated in other microorganisms. R. flavefaciens has a definite but limited ability to incorporate exogenous amino acids, including leucine. It incorporated 2% of the C14 during growth in uniformly labeled (UL) C14-Chlorella protein hydrolyzate; Escherichia coli incorporated 37% of the label under similar conditions. In another experiment, a limited amount of exogenous leucine-2-C14 was incorporated into protein of R. flavefaciens. The requirement for isovalerate was not replaced by dl-leucine or 2-ketoisocaproate. It is suggested that isovalerate or isobutyrate is required because R. flavefaciens has a limited ability to incorporate exogenous branched-chain amino acids and a limited ability to synthesize the isopropyl group found in these amino acids and in other components of the cell. Images PMID:13860621

  6. Growth responses of 53 open-pollinated loblolly pine families to ozone and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Edwards, N.T.; Hanson, P.J.

    1994-03-01

    Field exposures of 9950 containerized 12-wk-old loblolly pine (Pinustaeda L.) seedlings representing 53 commercially important, open-pollinated families were conducted to evaluate individual and interactive effects of acid rain and O{sub 3} on growth response. A 36-plot field research facility comprised of 33 open-top chambers and three open plots was used to test effects of five O{sub 3} levels that included ambient (A) and seasonally integrated levels that were 0.53, 1.10, 1.58, or 2.15 times ambient. Individual effects of three levels of simulated acid rain (pH 3.3, 4.5, and 5.2) as well as their interaction with O{sub 3} at 0.53A, 1.58A, and 2.15A levels were also included. Exposure to ambient air reduced average growth in height (26%), diameter (5%), and volume (14%) compared with growth of seedlings exposed to a 47% lower dose in charcoal filtered (CF) air. Responses to increasing O{sub 3} above ambient levels varied widely between families, became increasingly inhibitory at the highest O{sub 3} levels, but did not significantly exceed growth reductions found in ambient air. Diameter growth was reduced in most families by all levels of O{sub 3} addition. Acid rain caused a general stimulation of height growth at ambient levels (pH 4.5), while both height and diameter growth were reduced at a mean pH of 3.3. Significant antagonism between rainfall acidity and O{sub 3} effects on height and biomass increment was detected with increasing pollutant concentrations. Ozone reduced root/shoot biomass in most families, while acid rain did not. 51 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Spectroscopic studies of nucleic acid additions during seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Maeling; Sullivan, Rick; Dennis, Patrick; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of adding nucleic acids to gold seeds during the growth stage of either nanospheres or nanorods was investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy to reveal any oligonucleotide base or structure-specific effects on nanoparticle growth kinetics or plasmonic signatures. Spectral data indicate that the presence of DNA duplexes during seed ageing drastically accelerated nanosphere growth while the addition of single-stranded polyadenine at any point during seed ageing induces nanosphere aggregation. For seeds added to a gold nanorod growth solution, single-stranded polythymine induces a modest blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength. Moreover, a particular sequence comprised of 50% thymine bases was found to induce a faster, more dramatic blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength compared to any of the homopolymer incubation cases. Monomeric forms of the nucleic acids, however, do not yield discernable spectral differences in any of the gold suspensions studied. PMID:25960601

  8. Modeling Sucrose Hydrolysis in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solutions at Pretreatment Conditions for Lignocellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, S.; Wickramasinghe, R.; Nagle, N. J.; Schell, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural and herbaceous feedstocks may contain appreciable levels of sucrose. The goal of this study was to evaluate the survivability of sucrose and its hydrolysis products, fructose and glucose, during dilute sulfuric acid processing at conditions typically used to pretreat lignocellulose biomass. Solutions containing 25 g/l sucrose with 0.1-2.0% (w/w) sulfuric acid concentrations were treated at temperatures of 160-200 C for 3-12 min. Sucrose was observed to completely hydrolyze at all treatment conditions. However, appreciable concentrations of fructose and glucose were detected and glucose was found to be significantly more stable than fructose. Different mathematical approaches were used to fit the kinetic parameters for acid-catalyzed thermal degradation of these sugars. Since both sugars may survive dilute acid pretreatment, they could provide an additional carbon source for production of ethanol and other bio-based products.

  9. Competition effects in cation binding to humic acid: Conditional affinity spectra for fixed total metal concentration conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Calin; Mongin, Sandrine; Rey-Castro, Carlos; Galceran, Josep; Companys, Encarnació; Garcés, José Luis; Salvador, José; Puy, Jaume; Cecilia, Joan; Lodeiro, Pablo; Mas, Francesc

    2010-09-01

    Information on the Pb and Cd binding to a purified Aldrich humic acid (HA) is obtained from the influence of different fixed total metal concentrations on the acid-base titrations of this ligand. NICA (Non-Ideal Competitive Adsorption) isotherm has been used for a global quantitative description of the binding, which has then been interpreted by plotting the Conditional Affinity Spectra of the H + binding at fixed total metal concentrations (CAScTM). This new physicochemical tool, here introduced, allows the interpretation of binding results in terms of distributions of proton binding energies. A large increase in the acidity of the phenolic sites as the total metal concentration increases, especially in presence of Pb, is revealed from the shift of the CAScTM towards lower affinities. The variance of the CAScTM distribution, which can be used as a direct measure of the heterogeneity, also shows a significant dependence on the total metal concentration. A discussion of the factors that influence the heterogeneity of the HA under the conditions of each experiment is provided, so that the smoothed pattern exhibited by the titration curves can be justified.

  10. Metabolic and proteomic adaptation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains during growth under cheese-like environmental conditions compared to de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe medium.

    PubMed

    Bove, Claudio Giorgio; De Angelis, Maria; Gatti, Monica; Calasso, Maria; Neviani, Erasmo; Gobbetti, Marco

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the metabolic and proteomic adaptation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, which were isolated at different stages of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese ripening. Compared to de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) broth, cultivation under cheese-like conditions (cheese broth, CB) increased the number of free amino acids used as carbon sources. Compared with growth on MRS or pasteurized and microfiltrated milk, all strains cultivated in CB showed a low synthesis of d,l-lactic acid and elevated levels of acetic acid. The proteomic maps of the five representative strains, showing different metabolic traits, were comparatively determined after growth on MRS and CB media. The amount of intracellular and cell-associated proteins was affected by culture conditions and diversity between strains, depending on their time of isolation. Protein spots showing decreased (62 spots) or increased (59 spot) amounts during growth on CB were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS/MS or LC-nano-ESI-MS/MS. Compared with cultivation on MRS broth, the L. rhamnosus strains cultivated under cheese-like conditions had modified amounts of some proteins responsible for protein biosynthesis, nucleotide, and carbohydrate metabolisms, the glycolysis pathway, proteolytic activity, cell wall, and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, cell regulation, amino acid, and citrate metabolism, oxidation/reduction processes, and stress responses. PMID:22965658

  11. Crystal growth of proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses in gels.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Bernard; Sauter, Claude; Théobald-Dietrich, Anne; Moreno, Abel; Schellenberger, Pascale; Robert, Marie-Claire; Capelle, Bernard; Sanglier, Sarah; Potier, Noëlle; Giegé, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Medium-sized single crystals with perfect habits and no defect producing intense and well-resolved diffraction patterns are the dream of every protein crystallographer. Crystals of biological macromolecules possessing these characteristics can be prepared within a medium in which mass transport is restricted to diffusion. Chemical gels (like polysiloxane) and physical gels (such as agarose) provide such an environment and are therefore suitable for the crystallisation of biological macromolecules. Instructions for the preparation of each type of gel are given to urge crystal growers to apply diffusive media for enhancing crystallographic quality of their crystals. Examples of quality enhancement achieved with silica and agarose gels are given. Results obtained with other substances forming gel-like media (such as lipidic phases and cellulose derivatives) are presented. Finally, the use of gels in combination with capillary tubes for counter-diffusion experiments is discussed. Methods and techniques implemented with proteins can also be applied to nucleic acids and nucleoprotein assemblies such as viruses. PMID:20005247

  12. Impacts of changing food webs in Lake Ontario: Implications of dietary fatty acids on growth of alewives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, R.J.; Demarche, C.J.; Honeyfield, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    Declines in the abundance and condition of Great Lakes Alewives have been reported periodically during the last two decades, and the reasons for these declines remain unclear. To better understand how food web changes may influence Alewife growth and Wisconsin growth model predictions, we fed Alewives isocaloric diets high in omega-6 fatty acids (corn oil) or high in omega-3 fatty acids (fish oil). Alewives were fed the experimental diets at either 1% ("low ration") or 3% ("high ration") of their wet body weight per day. After six weeks, Alewives maintained on the high ration diets were significantly larger than those fed the low ration diets. Moreover, Alewives given the high ration fish oil diet were significantly larger than those maintained on the high ration corn oil diet after six weeks of growth. Body lipid, energy density and total body energy of Alewives on the high ration diets were significantly higher than those fed the low ration diets, and total body energy was significantly higher in Alewives given the high ration fish oil diet compared to those on the high ration corn oil diet. The current Wisconsin bioenergetics model underestimated growth and overestimated food consumption by Alewives in our study. Alewife thiaminase activity was similar among treatment groups. Overall, our results suggest that future food web changes in Lake Ontario, particularly if they involve decreases in the abundance of lipid rich prey items such as Mysis, may reduce Alewife growth rates and total body energy due to reductions in the availability of dietary omega-3 fatty acids. ?? 2011 AEHMS.

  13. Studies on the growth and indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid content of Zea mays seedlings grown in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, A.; Jensen, P. J.; Desrosiers, M.; Buta, J. G.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements were made of the fresh weight, dry weight, dry weight-fresh weight ratio, free and conjugated indole-3-acetic acid, and free and conjugated abscisic acid in seedlings of Zea mays grown in darkness in microgravity and on earth. Imbibition of the dry kernels was 17 h prior to launch. Growth was for 5 d at ambient orbiter temperature and at a chronic accelerational force of the order of 3 x 10(-5) times earth gravity. Weights and hormone content of the microgravity seedlings were, with minor exceptions, not statistically different from seedlings grown in normal gravity. The tissues of the shuttle-grown plants appeared normal and the seedlings differed only in the lack of orientation of roots and shoots. These findings, based upon 5 d of growth in microgravity, cannot be extrapolated to growth in microgravity for weeks, months, and years, as might occur on a space station. Nonetheless, it is encouraging, for prospects of bioregeneration of the atmosphere and food production in a space station, that no pronounced differences in the parameters measured were apparent during the 5 d of plant seedling growth in microgravity.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa facilitates Campylobacter jejuni growth in biofilms under oxic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Culotti, Alessandro; Packman, Aaron I

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the growth of Campylobacter jejuni in biofilms with Pseudomonas aeruginosa under oxic flow conditions. We observed the growth of C. jejuni in mono-culture, deposited on pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms, and co-inoculated with P. aeruginosa. In mono-culture, C. jejuni was unable to form biofilms. However, deposited C. jejuni continuously grew on pre-established P. aeruginosa biofilms for a period of 3 days. The growth of scattered C. jejuni clusters was strictly limited to the P. aeruginosa biofilm surface, and no intergrowth was observed. Co-culturing of C. jejuni and P. aeruginosa also enabled the growth of both organisms in biofilms, with C. jejuni clusters developing on the surface of the P. aeruginosa biofilm. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements in the medium showed that P. aeruginosa biofilms depleted the effluent DO from 9.0 to 0.5 mg L(-1) 24 hours after inoculation. The localized microaerophilic environment generated by P. aeruginosa promoted the persistence and growth of C. jejuni. Our findings show that P. aeruginosa not only prolongs the survival of C. jejuni under oxic conditions, but also enables the growth of C. jejuni on the surface of P. aeruginosa biofilms. PMID:26610432

  15. Climate dependency of tree growth suppressed by acid deposition effects on soils in Northwest Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Lapenis, A.G.; Berggren, D.; Aparin, B.F.; Smith, K.T.; Shortle, W.C.; Bailey, S.W.; Varlyguin, D.L.; Babikov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Increased tree growth in temperate and boreal forests has been proposed as a direct consequence of a warming climate. Acid deposition effects on nutrient availability may influence the climate dependency of tree growth, however. This study presents an analysis of archived soil samples that has enabled changes in soil chemistry to be tracked with patterns of tree growth through the 20th century. Soil samples collected in 1926, 1964, and 2001, near St. Petersburg, Russia, showed that acid deposition was likely to have decreased root-available concentrations of Ca (an essential element) and increased root-available concentrations of Al (an inhibitor of Ca uptake). These soil changes coincided with decreased diameter growth and a suppression of climate-tree growth relationships in Norway spruce. Expected increases in tree growth from climate warming may be limited by decreased soil fertility in regions of northern and eastern Europe, and eastern North America, where Ca availability has been reduced by acidic deposition. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  16. pH-Dependent Uptake of Fumaric Acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jamalzadeh, Elaheh; Verheijen, Peter J. T.; Heijnen, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial production of C4 dicarboxylic acids from renewable resources has gained renewed interest. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known as a robust microorganism and is able to grow at low pH, which makes it a suitable candidate for biological production of organic acids. However, a successful metabolic engineering approach for overproduction of organic acids requires an incorporation of a proper exporter to increase the productivity. Moreover, low-pH fermentations, which are desirable for facilitating the downstream processing, may cause back diffusion of the undissociated acid into the cells with simultaneous active export, thereby creating an ATP-dissipating futile cycle. In this work, we have studied the uptake of fumaric acid in S. cerevisiae in carbon-limited chemostat cultures under anaerobic conditions. The effect of the presence of fumaric acid at different pH values (3 to 5) has been investigated in order to obtain more knowledge about possible uptake mechanisms. The experimental results showed that at a cultivation pH of 5.0 and an external fumaric acid concentration of approximately 0.8 mmol · liter−1, the fumaric acid uptake rate was unexpectedly high and could not be explained by diffusion of the undissociated form across the plasma membrane alone. This could indicate the presence of protein-mediated import. At decreasing pH levels, the fumaric acid uptake rate was found to increase asymptotically to a maximum level. Although this observation is in accordance with protein-mediated import, the presence of a metabolic bottleneck for fumaric acid conversion under anaerobic conditions could not be excluded. PMID:22113915

  17. Jasmonic acid interacts with abscisic acid to regulate plant responses to water stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    de Ollas, Carlos; Arbona, Vicent; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones are key players in signaling environmental stress conditions. Hormone profiling together with proline accumulation were studied in leaves and roots of different mutant lines of Arabidopsis. Regulation of proline accumulation in this system seems complex and JA-deficient (jar1-1) and JA-insensitive (jai1) lines accumulating high levels of proline despite their very low ABA levels seems to discard an ABA-dependent response. However, the pattern of proline accumulation in jai1 seedlings parallels that of ABA. Under stress conditions, there is an opposite pattern of ABA accumulation in roots of jar1-1/coi1-16 (in which ABA only slightly increase) and jai1 (in which ABA increase is even higher than in WT plants). This also makes JA-ABA crosstalk complex and discards any lineal pathway that could explain this hormonal interaction. PMID:26340066

  18. Jasmonic acid interacts with abscisic acid to regulate plant responses to water stress conditions.

    PubMed

    de Ollas, Carlos; Arbona, Vicent; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormones are key players in signaling environmental stress conditions. Hormone profiling together with proline accumulation were studied in leaves and roots of different mutant lines of Arabidopsis. Regulation of proline accumulation in this system seems complex and JA-deficient (jar1-1) and JA-insensitive (jai1) lines accumulating high levels of proline despite their very low ABA levels seems to discard an ABA-dependent response. However, the pattern of proline accumulation in jai1 seedlings parallels that of ABA. Under stress conditions, there is an opposite pattern of ABA accumulation in roots of jar1-1/coi1-16 (in which ABA only slightly increase) and jai1 (in which ABA increase is even higher than in WT plants). This also makes JA-ABA crosstalk complex and discards any lineal pathway that could explain this hormonal interaction. PMID:26340066

  19. Fe/Mg smectite formation under acidic conditions on early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretyazhko, T. S.; Sutter, B.; Morris, R. V.; Agresti, D. G.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Phyllosilicates of the smectite group detected in Noachian and early Hesperian terrains on Mars have been hypothesized to form under neutral to alkaline conditions. These pH conditions would also be favorable for formation of widespread carbonate deposits which have not been detected on Mars. We propose that smectite deposits on Mars formed under moderately acidic conditions inhibiting carbonate formation. We report here the first synthesis of Fe/Mg smectite in an acidic hydrothermal system [200 °C, pHRT ∼ 4 (pH measured at room temperature) buffered with acetic acid] from Mars-analogue, glass-rich, basalt simulant with and without aqueous Mg or Fe(II) addition under N2-purged anoxic and ambient oxic redox conditions. Synthesized Fe/Mg smectite was examined by X-ray-diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, visible and near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe to characterize mineralogy, morphology and chemical composition. Alteration of the glass phase of basalt simulant resulted in formation of the Fe/Mg smectite mineral saponite with some mineralogical and chemical properties similar to the properties reported for Fe/Mg smectite on Mars. Our experiments are evidence that neutral to alkaline conditions on early Mars are not necessary for Fe/Mg smectite formation as previously inferred. Phyllosilicate minerals could instead have formed under mildly acidic pH conditions. Volcanic SO2 emanation and sulfuric acid formation is proposed as the major source of acidity for the alteration of basaltic materials and subsequent formation of Fe/Mg smectite.

  20. Noninvasive Quantitative Measurement of Bacterial Growth in Porous Media under Unsaturated-Flow Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Selker, J. S.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-dependent growth of the luxCDABE reporter bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 was monitored noninvasively in quartz sand under unsaturated-flow conditions within a 45- by 56- by 1-cm two-dimensional light transmission chamber. The spatial and temporal development of growth were mapped daily over 7 days by quantifying salicylate-induced bioluminescence. A nonlinear model relating the rate of increase in light emission after salicylate exposure to microbial density successfully predicted growth over 4 orders of magnitude (r2 = 0.95). Total model-predicted growth agreed with growth calculated from the mass balance of the system by using previously established growth parameters of HK44 (predicted, 1.2 × 1012 cells; calculated, 1.7 × 1012 cells). Colonization expanded in all directions from the inoculation region, including upward migration against the liquid flow. Both the daily rate of expansion of the colonized zone and the population density of the first day's growth in each newly colonized region remained relatively constant throughout the experiment. Nonetheless, substantial growth continued to occur on subsequent days in the older regions of the colonized zone. The proportion of daily potential growth that remained within the chamber declined progressively between days 2 and 7 (from 97 to 13%). A densely populated, anoxic region developed in the interior of the colonized zone even though the sand was unsaturated and fresh growth medium continued to flow through the colonized zone. These data illustrate the potential of a light transmission chamber, bioluminescent bacteria, and sensitive digital camera technology to noninvasively study real-time hydrology-microbiology interactions associated with unsaturated flow in porous media. PMID:12089048

  1. Noninvasive Quantitative Measurement of Bacterial Growth in Porous Media Under Unsaturated-Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yarwood, Rocky; Rockhold, Mark L. ); Niemet, Mike; Selker, John S.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2002-07-01

    Glucose-dependent growth of the luxCDABE reporter bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 was monitored noninvasively in quartz sand under unsaturated-flow conditions within a 45- by 56- by 1-cm two-dimensional light transmission chamber. The spatial and temporal development of growth were mapped daily over 7 days by quantifying salicylate-induced bioluminescence. A nonlinear model relating the rate of increase in light emission after salicylate exposure to microbial density successfully predicted growth over 4 orders of magnitude (r{sup 2}=0.95). Total model-predicted growth agreed with growth calculated from the mass balance of the system by using previously determined growth parameters of HK44 (predicted, 1.2 x 10{sup 12} cells; calculated, 1.7 x 10{sup 12} cells). Colonization expanded in all directions from the inoculation region, including upward migration against the liquid flow. Both the daily rate of expansion of the colonized zone and the population density of the first day's growth in each newly colonized region remained relatively constant throughout the experiment. Nonetheless, substantial growth continued to occur on subsequent days in the older regions of the colonized zone. The proportion of daily potential growth that remained within the chamber declined progressively between days 2 and 7 (from 97 to 13%). A densely populated, anoxic region developed in the interior of the colonized zone even though the sand was unsaturated and fresh growth medium continued to flow through the colonized zone. These data illustrate the potential of a light transmission chamber, bioluminescent bacteria, and sensitive digital camera technology to noninvasively study real-time hydrology-microbiology interactions associated with unsaturated flow in porous media.

  2. Stable condition of dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTAV) and dimethyldithioarsinic acid ( DMDTAV) in landfill leachate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, E.; Yoon, H. O.; Kim, J. A.; Lee, H.; Jung, S.; Kim, Y. T.

    2015-12-01

    When waste containing arsenic (As) are disposed of landfill, such facilities (i.e., landfill) can play an important role in disseminating As to the surrounding environment. These disposal of waste containing As might cause a serious environmental pollution due to potentially As remobilization in landfill. Especially, As species containing sulfur such as DMDTAv and DMMTAv found occasionally high concentration in landfill leachate. These As species (i.e., DMDTAv and DMMTAv) had the higher toxicity to human cells compared to other pentavalent As species. However, there was no chemical standard material of these As species (i.e., DMDTAv and DMMTAv) commercially. In this study, we synthesized DMDTAv and DMMTAv by simulating reaction with the sufficient sulfur condition from DMAv. DMMTAv was quite changeable to DMDTAv due to its short life time from our preliminary study. Thus, it is important to find the stable condition of synthesis process for DMDTAv and DMMTAv under suitable environmental condition. This study can be very significant in quantitative analysis area to detect the various As species in environmental media such as landfill.

  3. Individual Differences in the Expression of Conditioned Fear Are Associated with Endogenous Fibroblast Growth Factor 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Richardson, Rick

    2016-01-01

    These experiments examined the relationship between the neurotrophic factor fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and individual differences in the expression of conditioned fear. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that rats naturally expressing low levels of contextual or cued fear have higher levels of hippocampal FGF2 relative to rats that express…

  4. ASSESSMENT OF FUNGAL GROWTH ON CEILING TILES UNDER ENVIRONMENTALLY CHARACTERIZED CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses investigation of the impact of the building environment on the ability of building materials to support microbial growth, using static chambers with defined relative humidity, temperature, and light conditions. he ability of fungi to grow on materials is well ...

  5. Using time-dependent models to investigate body condition and growth rate of the giant gartersnake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, P.S.; Wylie, G.D.; Halstead, B.J.; Casazza, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Identifying links between phenotypic attributes and fitness is a primary goal of reproductive ecology. Differences in within-year patterns of body condition between sexes of gartersnakes in relation to reproduction and growth are not fully understood. We conducted an 11-year field study of body condition and growth rate of the giant gartersnake Thamnophis gigas across 13 study areas in the Central Valley of California, USA. We developed a priori mixed effects models of body condition index (BCI), which included covariates of time, sex and snout-vent length and reported the best-approximating models using an information theoretic approach. Also, we developed models of growth rate index (GRI) using covariates of sex and periods based on reproductive behavior. The largest difference in BCI between sexes, as predicted by a non-linear (cubic) time model, occurred during the mating period when female body condition (0.014??0.001 se) was substantially greater than males (-0.027??0.002 se). Males likely allocated energy to search for mates, while females likely stored energy for embryonic development. We also provided evidence that males use more body energy reserves than females during hibernation, perhaps because of different body temperatures between sexes. We found GRI of male snakes was substantially lower during the mating period than during a non-mating period, which indicated that a trade-off existed between searching for mates and growth. These findings contribute to our understanding of snake ecology in a Mediterranean climate. ?? 2009 The Zoological Society of London.

  6. The Agony of Choice: How Plants Balance Growth and Survival under Water-Limiting Conditions1

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Hannes; Inzé, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    When confronted with water limitation, plants actively reprogram their metabolism and growth. Recently, it has become clear that growing tissues show specific and highly dynamic responses to drought, which differ from the well-studied responses in mature tissues. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in understanding shoot growth regulation in water-limiting conditions. Of special interest is the balance between maintained growth and competitiveness on the one hand and ensured survival on the other hand. A number of master regulators controlling this balance have been identified, such as DELLAs and APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR-type transcription factors. The possibilities of engineering or breeding crops that maintain growth in periods of mild drought, while still being able to activate protective tolerance mechanisms, are discussed. PMID:23766368

  7. Soil-calcium depletion linked to acid rain and forest growth in the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Huntington, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    Since the discovery of acid rain in the 1970's, scientists have been concerned that deposition of acids could cause depletion of calcium in forest soils. Research in the 1980's showed that the amount of calcium in forest soils is controlled by several factors that are difficult to measure. Further research in the 1990's, including several studies by the U.S. Geological Survey, has shown that (1) calcium in forest soils has decreased at locations in the northeastern and southeastern U.S., and (2) acid rain and forest growth (uptake of calcium from the soil by roots) are both factors contributing to calcium depletion.

  8. Effectiveness of rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase for growth promotion of peas (Pisum sativum) under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Zahir, Z A; Munir, A; Asghar, H N; Shaharoona, B; Arshad, M

    2008-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to assess the effectiveness of rhizobacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane- 1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase for growth promotion of peas under drought conditions. Ten rhizobacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of different crops (peas, wheat, and maize) were screened for their growth promoting ability in peas under axenic condition. Three rhizobacterial isolates, Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G (ACC-5), P. fluorescens (ACC-14), and P. putida biotype A (Q-7), were selected for pot trial on the basis of their source, ACC deaminase activity, root colonization, and growth promoting activity under axenic conditions. Inoculated and uninoculated (control) seeds of pea cultivar 2000 were sown in pots (4 seeds/pot) at different soil moisture levels (25, 50, 75, and 100% of field capacity). Results revealed that decreasing the soil moisture levels from 100 to 25% of field capacity significantly decreased the growth of peas. However, inoculation of peas with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase significantly decreased the "drought stress imposed effects" on growth of peas, although with variable efficacy at different moisture levels. At the lowest soil moisture level (25% field capacity), rhizobacterial isolate Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G (ACC-5) was found to be more promising compared with the other isolates, as it caused maximum increases in fresh weight, dry weight, root length, shoot length, number of leaves per plant, and water use efficiency on fresh and dry weight basis (45, 150, 92, 45, 140, 46, and 147%, respectively) compared with respective uninoculated controls. It is highly likely that rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase might have decreased the drought-stress induced ethylene in inoculated plants, which resulted in better growth of plants even at low moisture levels. Therefore, inoculation with rhizobacteria containing ACC deaminase could be helpful in eliminating the inhibitory effects of drought stress on the

  9. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2011-10-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying nitrogen, respectively argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings lead to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume, that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  10. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-05-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying either nitrogen or argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed at a supersaturation of 1%, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings led to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  11. Unravelling the Ru-Catalyzed Hydrogenolysis of Biomass-Based Polyols under Neutral and Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hausoul, Peter J C; Negahdar, Leila; Schute, Kai; Palkovits, Regina

    2015-10-12

    The aqueous Ru/C-catalyzed hydrogenolysis of biomass-based polyols such as erythritol, xylitol, sorbitol, and cellobitol is studied under neutral and acidic conditions. For the first time, the complete product spectrum of C2 C6 polyols is identified and, based on a thorough analysis of the reaction mixtures, a comprehensive reaction mechanism is proposed, which consists of (de)hydrogenation, epimerization, decarbonylation, and deoxygenation reactions. The data reveal that the Ru-catalyzed deoxygenation reaction is highly selective for the cleavage of terminal hydroxyl groups. Changing from neutral to acidic conditions suppresses decarbonylation, consequently increasing the selectivity towards deoxygenation. PMID:26448526

  12. Growth and survival of various strains of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in hydrochloric and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    McKellar, R C; Knight, K P

    1999-12-01

    Nineteen strains of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli isolated from humans and foods were examined for their ability to grow and survive at low pH in organic (acetic) and mineral (HCl) acids. Strains were subcultured in tryptic soy broth adjusted to various pH values (3.75 to 4.75 for HCl and 4.75 to 5.75 for acetic acid) and incubated for 72 h at 37 degrees C to determine the minimum growth pH value. Minimum pH values for growth of 4.25 and 5.5 were found for HCl and acetic acid, respectively. Strains were also exposed to pH 2.0 (HCl) and pH 4.0 (acetic acid) for up to 24 h at 37 degrees C to assess their ability to survive. HCl was a more effective inhibitor after 6 h of exposure, whereas acetic acid was more effective after 24 h. Outbreak strains survived acid treatment significantly (P < or = 0.05) better than strains isolated from fermented or high-pH foods or animal or human isolates. Significant (P < or = 0.05) differences among serotypes and between O157:H7 and other serotypes were apparent after 3 or 6 h of exposure to acids. PMID:10606153

  13. Antagonists of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are potent growth inhibitors of prostate carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, L A; Krinks, C H Van; Durham, J; Tomkins, S E; Burnett, R D; Jones, E L; Chandraratna, R A S; Brown, G

    2001-01-01

    Novel synthetic antagonists of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) have been developed. To avoid interference by serum retinoids when testing these compounds, we established serum-free grown sub-lines (>3 years) of the prostate carcinoma lines LNCaP, PC3 and DU145. A high affinity pan-RAR antagonist (AGN194310, Kd for binding to RARs = 2–5 nM) inhibited colony formation (by 50%) by all three lines at 16–34 nM, and led to a transient accumulation of flask-cultured cells in G1 followed by apoptosis. AGN194310 is 12–22 fold more potent than all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) against cell lines and also more potent in inhibiting the growth of primary prostate carcinoma cells. PC3 and DU145 cells do not express RARβ, and an antagonist with predominant activity at RARβ and RARγ (AGN194431) inhibited colony formation at concentrations (∼100 nM) commensurate with a Kd value of 70 nM at RARγ. An RARα antagonist (AGN194301) was less potent (IC50 ∼200 nM), but was more active than specific agonists of RARα and of βγ. A component(s) of serum and of LNCaP-conditioned medium diminishes the activity of antagonists: this factor is not the most likely candidates IGF-1 and EGF. In vitro studies of RAR antagonists together with data from RAR-null mice lead to the hypothesis that RARγ-regulated gene transcription is necessary for the survival and maintenance of prostate epithelium. The increased potencies of RAR antagonists, as compared with agonists, suggest that antagonists may be useful in the treatment of prostate carcinoma. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11487280

  14. Change in the plasmid copy number in acetic acid bacteria in response to growth phase and acetic acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Naoki; Astuti, Wiwik; Ishii, Yuri; Hidese, Ryota; Sakoda, Hisao; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2015-06-01

    Plasmids pGE1 (2.5 kb), pGE2 (7.2 kb), and pGE3 (5.5 kb) were isolated from Gluconacetobacter europaeus KGMA0119, and sequence analyses revealed they harbored 3, 8, and 4 genes, respectively. Plasmid copy numbers (PCNs) were determined by real-time quantitative PCR at different stages of bacterial growth. When KGMA0119 was cultured in medium containing 0.4% ethanol and 0.5% acetic acid, PCN of pGE1 increased from 7 copies/genome in the logarithmic phase to a maximum of 12 copies/genome at the beginning of the stationary phase, before decreasing to 4 copies/genome in the late stationary phase. PCNs for pGE2 and pGE3 were maintained at 1-3 copies/genome during all phases of growth. Under a higher concentration of ethanol (3.2%) the PCN for pGE1 was slightly lower in all the growth stages, and those of pGE2 and pGE3 were unchanged. In the presence of 1.0% acetic acid, PCNs were higher for pGE1 (10 copies/genome) and pGE3 (6 copies/genome) during the logarithmic phase. Numbers for pGE2 did not change, indicating that pGE1 and pGE3 increase their PCNs in response to acetic acid. Plasmids pBE2 and pBE3 were constructed by ligating linearized pGE2 and pGE3 into pBR322. Both plasmids were replicable in Escherichia coli, Acetobacter pasteurianus and G. europaeus, highlighting their suitability as vectors for acetic acid bacteria. PMID:25575969

  15. Improvement of the antifungal activity of lactic acid bacteria by addition to the growth medium of phenylpyruvic acid, a precursor of phenyllactic acid.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Francesca; Di Biase, Mariaelena; Lattanzio, Veronica M T; Lavermicocca, Paola

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to improve the antifungal activity of eight lactic acid bacterial (LAB) strains by the addition of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA), a precursor of the antifungal compound phenyllactic acid (PLA), to a defined growth medium (DM). The effect of PPA addition on the LABs antifungal activity related to the production of organic acids (PLA, d-lactic, l-lactic, acetic, citric, formic and 4-hydroxy-phenyllactic acids) and of other phenylpyruvic-derived molecules, was investigated. In the presence of PPA the inhibitory activity (expressed as growth inhibition percentage) against fungal bread contaminants Aspergillus niger and Penicillium roqueforti significantly increased and was, even if not completely, associated to PLA increase (from a mean value of 0.44 to 0.93 mM). While the inhibitory activity against Endomyces fibuliger was mainly correlated to the low pH and to lactic, acetic and p-OH-PLA acids. When the PCA analysis based on data of growth inhibition percentage and organic acid concentrations was performed, strains grown in DM+PPA separated from those grown in DM and the most active strains Lactobacillus plantarum 21B, Lactobacillus fermentum 18B and Lactobacillus brevis 18F grouped together. The antifungal activity resulted to be strain-related, based on a different mechanism of action for filamentous fungi and the yeast and was not exclusively associated to the increase of PLA. Therefore, a further investigation on the unique unidentified peak in HPLC-UV chromatograms, was performed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Actually, full scan mass spectra (negative ion mode) recorded at the retention time of the unknown compound, showed a main peak of m/z 291.0 which was consistent with the nominal mass of the molecular ion [M-H](-) of polyporic acid, a PPA derivative whose antifungal activity has been previously reported (Brewer et al., 1977). In conclusion, the addition of PPA to the growth medium contributed to improve the antifungal activity of LAB

  16. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  17. Parasitostatic effect of maslinic acid. I. Growth arrest of Plasmodium falciparum intraerythrocytic stages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Natural products have played an important role as leads for the development of new drugs against malaria. Recent studies have shown that maslinic acid (MA), a natural triterpene obtained from olive pomace, which displays multiple biological and antimicrobial activities, also exerts inhibitory effects on the development of some Apicomplexan, including Eimeria, Toxoplasma and Neospora. To ascertain if MA displays anti-malarial activity, the main objective of this study was to asses the effect of MA on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in vitro. Methods Synchronized P. falciparum-infected erythrocyte cultures were incubated under different conditions with MA, and compared to chloroquine and atovaquone treated cultures. The effects on parasite growth were determined by monitoring the parasitaemia and the accumulation of the different infective stages visualized in thin blood smears. Results MA inhibits the growth of P. falciparum Dd2 and 3D7 strains in infected erythrocytes in, dose-dependent manner, leading to the accumulation of immature forms at IC50 concentrations, while higher doses produced non-viable parasite cells. MA-treated infected-erythrocyte cultures were compared to those treated with chloroquine or atovaquone, showing significant differences in the pattern of accumulation of parasitic stages. Transient MA treatment at different parasite stages showed that the compound targeted intra-erythrocytic processes from early-ring to schizont stage. These results indicate that MA has a parasitostatic effect, which does not inactivate permanently P. falciparum, as the removal of the compound allowed the infection to continue Conclusions MA displays anti-malarial activity at multiple intraerythrocytic stages of the parasite and, depending on the dose and incubation time, behaves as a plasmodial parasitostatic compound. This novel parasitostatic effect appears to be unrelated to previous mechanisms proposed for current anti-malarial drugs, and

  18. Main and interaction effects of acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on growth and ethanol productivity of yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Palmqvist, E.; Grage, H.; Meinander, N.Q.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B.

    1999-04-05

    The influence of the factors acetic acid, furfural, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid on the ethanol yield (Y{sub EtOH}) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, bakers` yeast, S. cerevisiae ATCC 96581, and Candida shehatae NJ 23 was investigated using a 2{sup 3}-full factorial design with 3 centerpoints. The results indicated that acetic acid inhibited the fermentation by C. shehatae NJ 23 markedly more than by bakers` yeast, whereas no significant difference in tolerance towards the compounds was detected between the S. cerevisiae strains. Furfural and the lignin derived compound p-hydroxybenzoic acid did not affect any of the yeasts at the cell mass concentration used. The results indicated that the linear model was not adequate to describe the experimental data. Based on the results from the 2{sup 3}-full factorial experiment, an extended experiment was designed based on a central composite design to investigate the influence of the factors on the specific growth rate ({mu}), biomass yield (Y{sub x}), volumetric ethanol productivity (Q{sub EtOH}), and Y{sub EtOH}. Bakers` yeast was chosen in the extended experiment due to its better tolerance towards acetic acid, which makes it a more interesting organism for use in industrial fermentations of lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  19. Uptake and Intracellular Transport of Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor: Evidence for Free and Cytoskeleton-anchored Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Citores, Lucía; Wesche, Jørgen; Kolpakova, Elona; Olsnes, Sjur

    1999-01-01

    Endocytic uptake and intracellular transport of acidic FGF was studied in cells transfected with FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4). Acidification of the cytosol to block endocytic uptake from coated pits did not inhibit endocytosis of the growth factor in COS cells transfected with FGFR4, indicating that it is to a large extent taken up by an alternative endocytic pathway. Fractionation of the cells demonstrated that part of the growth factor receptor was present in a low-density, caveolin-containing fraction, but we were unable to demonstrate binding to caveolin in immunoprecipitation studies. Upon treatment of the cells with acidic FGF, the activated receptor, together with the growth factor, moved to a juxtanuclear compartment, which was identified as the recycling endosome compartment. When the cells were lysed with Triton X-100, 3-([3-chloramidopropyl]dimethylammonio)-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate, or 2-octyl glucoside, almost all surface-exposed and endocytosed FGFR4 was solubilized, but only a minor fraction of the total FGFR4 in the cells was found in the soluble fraction. The data indicate that the major part of FGFR4 is anchored to detergent-insoluble structures, presumably cytoskeletal elements associated with the recycling endosome compartment. PMID:10564275

  20. Effects of light and nutrients on periphyton and the fatty acid composition and somatic growth of invertebrate grazers in subtropical streams.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fen; Kainz, Martin J; Sheldon, Fran; Bunn, Stuart E

    2016-06-01

    Algal polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), essential for somatic growth and reproduction of aquatic animals, are influenced by ambient environmental conditions, including light and nutrients. Few studies have addressed the extent to which changes in algal PUFA can influence stream herbivore PUFA profiles and the implications for stream food webs. We manipulated subtropical stream periphyton by applying two light levels (open and shaded canopy) and two nutrient regimes (ambient and enriched) to investigate the response of PUFA and somatic growth in stream herbivores. After 6 weeks, the relative content of periphyton PUFA (%) changed distinctly and differed among treatments. Periphyton in the control treatment with open canopy showed a decline in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) relative to initial conditions, whereas shading increased EPA and total highly unsaturated FA (HUFA), but decreased α-linolenic acid (ALA), linoleic acid and total C18 PUFA. The interaction of open canopy and added nutrients increased periphyton ALA compared with initial conditions, while the combined effects of shading and added nutrients led to greater total HUFA. FA similarity between stream grazers (the mayfly Austrophlebioides and caddisfly Helicopsyche) and periphyton increased with periphyton HUFA content. In addition, the growth of large instars of both grazers also increased in response to increased periphyton HUFA %. Our findings show that environmental changes, associated with riparian canopy and nutrients, can lead to changes in periphyton PUFA composition that in turn affect growth and PUFA composition in stream grazers. PMID:26883960

  1. Carbon stabilization and microbial growth in acidic mine soils after addition of different amendments for soil reclamation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Acosta, Jose; Ángeles Muñoz, María; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Faz, Ángel; Bååth, Erland

    2016-04-01

    The extreme soil conditions in metalliferous mine soils have a negative influence on soil biological activity and therefore on soil carbon estabilization. Therefore, amendments are used to increase organic carbon content and activate microbial communities. In order to elucidate some of the factors controlling soil organic carbon stabilization in reclaimed acidic mine soils and its interrelationship with microbial growth and community structure, we performed an incubation experiment with four amendments: pig slurry (PS), pig manure (PM) and biochar (BC), applied with and without marble waste (MW; CaCO3). Results showed that PM and BC (alone or together with MW) contributed to an important increment in recalcitrant organic C, C/N ratio and aggregate stability. Bacterial and fungal growths were highly dependent on pH and labile organic C. PS supported the highest microbial growth; applied alone it stimulated fungal growth, and applied with MW it stimulated bacterial growth. BC promoted the lowest microbial growth, especially for fungi, with no significant increase in fungal biomass. MW+BC increased bacterial growth up to values similar to PM and MW+PM, suggesting that part of the biochar was degraded, at least in short-term mainly by bacteria rather than fungi. PM, MW+PS and MW+PM supported the highest microbial biomass and a similar community structure, related with the presence of high organic C and high pH, with immobilization of metals and increased soil quality. BC contributed to improved soil structure, increased recalcitrant organic C, and decreased metal mobility, with low stimulation of microbial growth.

  2. Effects of carbon source and light intensity on the growth and total lipid production of three microalgae under different culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Gim, Geun Ho; Ryu, Jaewon; Kim, Moon Jong; Kim, Pyung Il; Kim, Si Wouk

    2016-05-01

    We attempted to enhance the growth and total lipid production of three microalgal species, Isochrysis galbana LB987, Nannochloropsis oculata CCAP849/1, and Dunaliella salina, which are capable of accumulating high content of lipid in cells. Low nitrogen concentration under photoautotrophic conditions stimulated total lipid production, but a decreasing total lipid content and an increasing biomass were observed with increasing nitrogen concentration. Among the different carbon sources tested for heterotrophic cultivation, glucose improved the growth of all three strains. The optimal glucose concentration for growth of I. galbana LB987 and N. oculata CCAP849/1 was 0.02 M, and that of D. salina was 0.05 M. Enhanced growth occurred when they were cultivated under heterotrophic or mixotrophic conditions compared with photoautotrophic conditions. Meanwhile, high total lipid accumulation in cells occurred when they were cultivated under photoautotrophic or mixotrophic conditions. During mixotrophic cultivation, biomass production was not affected significantly by light intensity; however, both chlorophyll concentration and total lipid content increased dramatically with increasing light intensity up to 150 µmol/m(2)/s. The amount and composition ratio of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in cells were different from each other depending on both species and light intensity. The highest accumulation of total fatty acid (C16-C18) among the three strains was found from cells of N. oculata CCAP849/1, which indicates that this species can be used as a source for production of biodiesel. PMID:26856592

  3. Kinetic modeling of growth and lipid body induction in Chlorella pyrenoidosa under heterotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Neha; Kumar, G Dinesh; Gupta, Ravi Prakash; Mathur, Anshu Shankar; Manikandan, B; Basu, Biswajit; Tuli, Deepak Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop a mathematical model to describe the biomass and (total) lipid productivity of Chlorella pyrenoidosa NCIM 2738 under heterotrophic conditions. Biomass growth rate was predicted by Droop's cell quota model, while changes observed in cell quota (utilization) under carbon excess conditions were used for the modeling and predicting the lipid accumulation rate. The model was simulated under non-limiting (excess) carbon and limiting nitrate concentration and validated with experimental data for the culture grown in batch (flask) mode under different nitrate concentrations. The present model incorporated two modes (growth and stressed) for the prediction of endogenous lipid synthesis/induction and aimed to predict the effect and response of the microalgae under nutrient starvation (stressed) conditions. MATLAB and Genetic Algorithm were employed for the prediction and validation of the model parameters. PMID:27450124

  4. Development of a Fatigue Crack Growth Coupon for Highly Plastic Stress Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Aggarwal, Pravin K.; Swanson, Gregory R.

    2003-01-01

    The analytical approach used to develop a novel fatigue crack growth coupon for highly plastic stress field condition is presented in this paper. The flight hardware investigated is a large separation bolt that has a deep notch, which produces a large plastic zone at the notch root when highly loaded. Four test specimen configurations are analyzed in an attempt to match the elastic-plastic stress field and crack constraint conditions present in the separation bolt. Elastic-plastic finite element analysis is used to compare the stress fields and critical fracture parameters. Of the four test specimens analyzed, the modified double-edge notch tension - 3 (MDENT-3) most closely approximates the stress field, J values, and crack constraint conditions found in the flight hardware. The MDENT-3 is also most insensitive to load misalignment and/or load redistribution during crack growth.

  5. Replication of Simian Virus 40 Deoxyribonucleic Acid: Analysis of the One-Step Growth Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Manteuil, Simone; Pages, Jacqueline; Stehelin, Dominique; Girard, Marc

    1973-01-01

    The time course of replication of simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was investigated in growing monolayer cultures of subcloned CV1 cells. At multiplicities of infection of 30 to 60 plaque-forming units (PFU)/cell, first progeny DNA molecules (component 1) were detected by 10 hr after infection. During the following 10 to 12 hr, accumulation of virus DNA proceeded at ever increasing rates, albeit in a non-exponential fashion. The rate of synthesis then remained constant, until approximately the 40th hour postinfection, when DNA replication stopped. Under these conditions, the duration of the virus growth cycle was approximately 50 hr. The time needed for the synthesis of one DNA molecule was found to be approximately 15 min. At multiplicities of infection of 1 or less than 1 PFU/cell, the onset of the linear phase of DNA accumulation was delayed, but the final rate of DNA synthesis was the same, independent of the input multiplicity. This was taken as a proof that templates for the synthesis of viral DNA multiply in the cell during the early phase of replication. However, the probability for every replicated DNA molecule to become in turn replicative decreased constantly during that phase. This could be accounted for by assuming a limited number of replication sites in the infected cell. PMID:4346282

  6. Ellagic Acid Directed Growth of Au-Pt Bimetallic Nanoparticles and Their Catalytic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaby, Stacey N.; Sarker, Nazmul H.; Banerjee, Ipsita A.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we report the facile formation of bimetallic nanoparticles of Au-Pt in the presence of the plant polyphenol ellagic acid (EA). It was found that EA formed micro-fibrillar assemblies, which aggregated into micro-bundles under aqueous conditions. Those micro-bundles acted as templates for the growth of Au nanoparticles, as well as bimetallic Au-Pt nanoparticles biomimetically. At higher concentrations of EA, it was observed that in addition to forming fibrous micro-bundles, columnar assemblies of EA were formed in the presence of the metal nanoparticles. The formation of the assemblies was found to be concentration dependent. It appears that upon binding to metal ions and subsequent formation of the nanoparticles, morphological changes occur in the case of EA assemblies. The morphological changes observed were probed by electron microscopy. Further, the ability of the materials to degrade the toxic aromatic nitro compound 2-methoxy-4-nitroaniline was explored, where 50% degradation was observed within 15 min, indicating that such hybrid materials may have potential applications in environmental remediation.

  7. METABOLIC FUNCTION OF BRANCHED-CHAIN VOLATILE FATTY ACIDS, GROWTH FACTORS FOR RUMINOCOCCI II.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, M. J.; Bryant, M. P.; Katz, I.; Keeney, M.

    1962-01-01

    Allison, M. J. (Dairy Cattle Research Branch, USDA, Beltsville, Md.), M. P. Bryant, I. Katz, and M. Keeney. Metabolic function of branched-chain volatile fatty acids, growth factors for ruminococci. II. Biosynthesis of higher branched-chain fatty acids and aldehydes. J. Bacteriol. 83:1084–1093. 1962.—A number of strains of rumen bacteria require branched-chain volatile fatty acids for growth. A strain of Ruminococcus flavefaciens that requires either isovalerate or isobutyrate incorporates radioactive carbon from isovalerate-1-C14 and isovalerate-3-C14 into leucine and into the lipid fraction of the cells. Evidence obtained by both paper and gas chromatography indicated that most of the label in the lipid of cells grown in isovalerate-1-C14 was in a branched-chain 15-carbon fatty acid, with some in a 17-carbon acid; about 7.5% of the C14 was recovered in a branched-chain 15-carbon aldehyde. The aldehydes were in the phospholipid fraction and were presumably present as plasmalogen. A strain of R. albus was shown to require isobutyrate, 2-methyl-n-butyrate, or 2-ketoisovalerate for growth. This strain did not incorporate appreciable C14 from isovalerate-1-C14 or isovalerate-3-C14. When grown in a medium containing isobutyrate-1-C14, most of the cellular C14 was found in the lipid fraction. Analysis of the lipid demonstrated that the label was present mainly as branched-chain 14-carbon and 16-carbon fatty acids, with 11% of the C14 present in 14- and 16-carbon carbonyl compounds, presumably branched-chain aldehydes. Branched-chain 14-, 15-, and 16-carbon fatty acids are major components of the lipids of these rumen bacteria. The possibility that these acids and aldehydes, which are found in ruminant body and milk lipids, may be of microbial origin is discussed. PMID:13860622

  8. Reduction of in vitro growth in Flavobacterium columnare and Saprolegnia parasitica by products containing peracetic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial products containing peracetic acid (PAA) are strong disinfectants with a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity and have been suggested as potential therapeutic agents in aquaculture. The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro reduction of growth on two fish pathogens, Flavobacte...

  9. Influence of aluminum on growth, mineral nutrition and organic acid exudation of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A randomized complete block design experiment with six aluminum (Al) concentrations was carried out to evaluate the effect of aluminum on nutrient content, plant growth, dry matter production and Al-induced organic acid exudation in rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum). One rambutan cultivar was grown in...

  10. Sulfur amino acid deficiency upregulates intestinal methionine cycle activity and suppresses epithelial growth in neonatal pigs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently showed that the developing gut is a significant site of methionine transmethylation to homocysteine and transsulfuration to cysteine. We hypothesized that sulfur amino acid (SAA) deficiency would preferentially reduce mucosal growth and antioxidant function in neonatal pigs. Neonatal pi...

  11. Soybean root growth in acid subsoils in relation to magnesium additions and soil solution ionic strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydroponic studies with soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] have shown that µM additions of Mg2+ were as effective in ameliorating Al rhizotoxicity as additions of Ca2+ in the mM concentration range. The objectives of this study were to assess ameliorative effects of Mg on soybean root growth in acidic...

  12. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars suggests that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. If early Mars surface geochemical conditions were neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then large carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would preclude the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of the proposed work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions.

  13. Salvaging effect of triacontanol on plant growth, thermotolerance, macro-nutrient content, amino acid concentration and modulation of defense hormonal levels under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad; Shahzad, Raheem; Khan, Abdul Latif; Asaf, Sajjad; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Kang, Sang-Mo; Bilal, Saqib; Hamayun, Muhammad; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-02-01

    In this study, it was hypothesized that application of triacontanol, a ubiquitous saturated primary alcohol, at different times-before (TBHS), mid (TMHS), and after (TAHS) heat stress-will extend heat stress (HS) protection in mungbean. The effect of triacontanol on the levels of defense hormones abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) was investigated along with the plant growth promotion, nutrient and amino acid content with and without heat stress. Heat stress caused a prominent reduction in plant growth attributes, nutrient and amino acid content, which were attributed to the decreased level of ABA and JA. However, application of triacontanol, particularly in the TBHS and TMHS treatments, reversed the deleterious effects of HS by showing increased ABA and JA levels that favored the significant increase in plant growth attributes, enhanced nutrient content, and high amount of amino acid. TAHS, a short-term application of triacontanol, also significantly increased ABA and JA levels and thus revealed important information of its association with hormonal modulation. The growth-promoting effect of triacontanol was also confirmed under normal growth conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate the beneficial effects of triacontanol, with or without heat stress, on mungbean and its interaction with or regulation of the levels of defense hormones. PMID:26744997

  14. Molecular and Physiological Analysis of Al3+ and H+ Rhizotoxicities at Moderately Acidic Conditions1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yasufumi; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Shaff, Jon E.; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Kochian, Leon V.; Wagatsuma, Tadao; Kinraide, Thomas B.; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Al3+ and H+ toxicities predicted to occur at moderately acidic conditions (pH [water] = 5–5.5) in low-Ca soils were characterized by the combined approaches of computational modeling of electrostatic interactions of ions at the root plasma membrane (PM) surface and molecular/physiological analyses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Root growth inhibition in known hypersensitive mutants was correlated with computed {Al3+} at the PM surface ({Al3+}PM); inhibition was alleviated by increased Ca, which also reduced {Al3+}PM and correlated with cellular Al responses based on expression analysis of genes that are markers for Al stress. The Al-inducible Al tolerance genes ALUMINUM-ACTIVATED MALATE TRANSPORTER1 and ALUMINUM SENSITIVE3 were induced by levels of {Al3+}PM too low to inhibit root growth in tolerant genotypes, indicating that protective responses are triggered when {Al3+}PM was below levels that can initiate injury. Modeling of the H+ sensitivity of the SENSITIVE TO PROTON RHIZOTOXICITY1 knockout mutant identified a Ca alleviation mechanism of H+ rhizotoxicity, possibly involving stabilization of the cell wall. The phosphatidate phosphohydrolase1 (pah1) pah2 double mutant showed enhanced Al susceptibility under low-P conditions, where greater levels of negatively charged phospholipids in the PM occur, which increases {Al3+}PM through increased PM surface negativity compared with wild-type plants. Finally, we found that the nonalkalinizing Ca fertilizer gypsum improved the tolerance of the sensitive genotypes in moderately acidic soils. These findings fit our modeling predictions that root toxicity to Al3+ and H+ in moderately acidic soils involves interactions between both toxic ions in relation to Ca alleviation. PMID:23839867

  15. Clinically Relevant Growth Conditions Alter Acinetobacter baumannii Antibiotic Susceptibility and Promote Identification of Novel Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, Jennifer M.; Wozniak, Rachel A. F.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes that govern bacterial proliferation and survival in the host-environment(s) are likely to be vastly different from those that are required for viability in nutrient-rich laboratory media. Consequently, growth-based antimicrobial screens performed in conditions modeling aspects of bacterial disease states have the potential to identify new classes of antimicrobials that would be missed by screens performed in conventional laboratory media. Accordingly, we performed screens of the Selleck library of 853 FDA approved drugs for agents that exhibit antimicrobial activity toward the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii during growth in human serum, lung surfactant, and/or the organism in the biofilm state and compared those results to that of conventional laboratory medium. Results revealed that a total of 90 compounds representing 73 antibiotics and 17 agents that were developed for alternative therapeutic indications displayed antimicrobial properties toward the test strain in at least one screening condition. Of the active library antibiotics only four agents, rifampin, rifaximin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline, exhibited antimicrobial activity toward the organism during all screening conditions, whereas the remainder were inactive in ≥ 1 condition; 56 antibiotics were inactive during serum growth, 25 and 38 were inactive toward lung surfactant grown and biofilm-associated cells, respectively, suggesting that subsets of antibiotics may outperform others in differing infection settings. Moreover, 9 antibiotics that are predominantly used for the treatment Gram-positive pathogens and 10 non-antibiotics lacked detectable antimicrobial activity toward A. baumannii grown in conventional medium but were active during ≥ 1 alternative growth condition(s). Such agents may represent promising anti-Acinetobacter agents that would have likely been overlooked by antimicrobial whole cell screening assays performed in traditional

  16. Effects of salinity and ascorbic acid on growth, water status and antioxidant system in a perennial halophyte

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Abdul; Gulzar, Salman; Aziz, Irfan; Hussain, Tabassum; Gul, Bilquees; Khan, M. Ajmal

    2015-01-01

    Salinity causes oxidative stress in plants by enhancing production of reactive oxygen species, so that an efficient antioxidant system, of which ascorbic acid (AsA) is a key component, is an essential requirement of tolerance. However, antioxidant responses of plants to salinity vary considerably among species. Limonium stocksii is a sub-tropical halophyte found in the coastal marshes from Gujarat (India) to Karachi (Pakistan) but little information exists on its salt resistance. In order to investigate the role of AsA in tolerance, 2-month-old plants were treated with 0 (control), 300 (moderate) and 600 (high) mM NaCl for 30 days with or without exogenous application of AsA (20 mM) or distilled water. Shoot growth of unsprayed plants at moderate salinity was similar to that of controls while at high salinity growth was inhibited substantially. Sap osmolality, AsA concentrations and activities of AsA-dependant antioxidant enzymes increased with increasing salinity. Water spray resulted in some improvement in growth, indicating that the growth promotion by exogenous treatments could partly be attributed to water. However, exogenous application of AsA on plants grown under saline conditions improved growth and AsA dependent antioxidant enzymes more than the water control treatment. Our data show that AsA-dependent antioxidant enzymes play an important role in salinity tolerance of L. stocksii. PMID:25603966

  17. Effects of salinity and ascorbic acid on growth, water status and antioxidant system in a perennial halophyte.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Abdul; Gulzar, Salman; Aziz, Irfan; Hussain, Tabassum; Gul, Bilquees; Khan, M Ajmal

    2015-01-01

    Salinity causes oxidative stress in plants by enhancing production of reactive oxygen species, so that an efficient antioxidant system, of which ascorbic acid (AsA) is a key component, is an essential requirement of tolerance. However, antioxidant responses of plants to salinity vary considerably among species. Limonium stocksii is a sub-tropical halophyte found in the coastal marshes from Gujarat (India) to Karachi (Pakistan) but little information exists on its salt resistance. In order to investigate the role of AsA in tolerance, 2-month-old plants were treated with 0 (control), 300 (moderate) and 600 (high) mM NaCl for 30 days with or without exogenous application of AsA (20 mM) or distilled water. Shoot growth of unsprayed plants at moderate salinity was similar to that of controls while at high salinity growth was inhibited substantially. Sap osmolality, AsA concentrations and activities of AsA-dependant antioxidant enzymes increased with increasing salinity. Water spray resulted in some improvement in growth, indicating that the growth promotion by exogenous treatments could partly be attributed to water. However, exogenous application of AsA on plants grown under saline conditions improved growth and AsA dependent antioxidant enzymes more than the water control treatment. Our data show that AsA-dependent antioxidant enzymes play an important role in salinity tolerance of L. stocksii. PMID:25603966

  18. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  19. Auxin polar transport in arabidopsis under simulated microgravity conditions - relevance to growth and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, K.; Oka, M.; Yamamoto, R.; Masuda, Y.; Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.; Ueda, J.

    1999-01-01

    Activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under simulated microgravity conditions was studied in relation to the growth and development. Seeds were germinated and allowed to grow on an agar medium in test tubes on a horizontal clinostat. Horizontal clinostat rotation substantially reduced the growth of inflorescence axes and the productivity of seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotypes Landsberg erecta and Columbia), although it little affected seed germination, development of rosette leaves and flowering. The activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes decreased when Arabidopsis plants were grown on a horizontal clinostat from germination stage, being ca. 60% of 1 g control. On the other hand, the auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis grown in 1 g conditions was not affected when the segments were exposed to various gravistimuli, including 3-dimensional clinorotation, during transport experiments. Pin-formed mutant of Arabidopsis, having a unique structure of the inflorescence axis with no flower and extremely low levels of the activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes and endogenous auxin, did not continue its vegetative growth under clinostat rotation. These facts suggest that the development of the system of auxin polar transport in Arabidopsis is affected by microgravity, resulting in the inhibition of growth and development, especially during reproductive growth.

  20. High-throughput dental biofilm growth analysis for multiparametric microenvironmental biochemical conditions using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond H W; Cui, Xin; Guo, Weijin; Thorsen, Todd

    2016-04-26

    Dental biofilm formation is not only a precursor to tooth decay, but also induces more serious systematic health problems such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Understanding the conditions promoting colonization and subsequent biofilm development involving complex bacteria coaggregation is particularly important. In this paper, we report a high-throughput microfluidic 'artificial teeth' device offering controls of multiple microenvironmental factors (e.g. nutrients, growth factors, dissolved gases, and seeded cell populations) for quantitative characteristics of long-term dental bacteria growth and biofilm development. This 'artificial teeth' device contains multiple (up to 128) incubation chambers to perform parallel cultivation and analyses (e.g. biofilm thickness, viable-dead cell ratio, and spatial distribution of multiple bacterial species) of bacteria samples under a matrix of different combinations of microenvironmental factors, further revealing possible developmental mechanisms of dental biofilms. Specifically, we applied the 'artificial teeth' to investigate the growth of two key dental bacteria, Streptococci species and Fusobacterium nucleatum, in the biofilm under different dissolved gas conditions and sucrose concentrations. Together, this high-throughput microfluidic platform can provide extended applications for general biofilm research, including screening of the biofilm properties developing under combinations of specified growth parameters such as seeding bacteria populations, growth medium compositions, medium flow rates and dissolved gas levels. PMID:27045372

  1. Measurement of a tree growth condition by the hetero-core optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Hoshito; Akita, Shohei; Nishiyama, Michiko; Kumekawa, Norikazu; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2011-04-01

    Condition and growth of trees are considered to be important in monitoring global circulation with heat and water, additionally growth of trees are affected by CO2 and air pollutants. On the other hand, since growth of plants is affected by surrounding climates, it is expected that real-time monitoring of crop plants growing makes possible quantitative agricultural management. This study proposed methods in measuring tree growth using hetero-core optical fiber sensors which are suitable for long-term, remote and real-time monitoring in wide area due to their features such as independence from temperature fluctuation and weather condition in addition to advantages of an optical fiber. Two types of sensors were used for that purpose. One of them was a dendrometer which measured radial changes of a tree stem and the other was elastic sensor which was to measure growth of smaller tree such as crop plant. In our experiment, it was demonstrated that the dendrometer was capable of measuring the differences of tree growing trend in period of different seasons such as growing rates 2.08 mm between spring and summer and 0.21 mm between autumn and winter, respectively. Additionally, this study had proposed the method of measuring crop plant growing by the elastic sensor because of its compact and light design and monotonious changes in optical loss to the amount of expansion and contraction.

  2. Carbonylative Suzuki Couplings of Aryl Bromides with Boronic Acid Derivatives under Base-Free Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The carbonylative Suzuki–Miyaura reaction between aryl bromides and arylboronic acid equivalents is herein reported, using base-free conditions and a limited excess of carbon monoxide generated ex situ from stable CO-precursors. Under these conditions, unsymmetrical biaryl ketones were obtained in modest to excellent yields. This method was adapted to the synthesis of the triglyceride and cholesterol regulator drug, fenofibrate, and its 13C-labeled derivative in good yields from the appropriate CO-precursor. PMID:24635142

  3. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  4. Growth of Continuous Monolayer Graphene with Millimeter-sized Domains Using Industrially Safe Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xingyi; Zhong, Guofang; D'Arsié, Lorenzo; Sugime, Hisashi; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Robertson, Alex W; Robertson, John

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the growth of continuous monolayer graphene films with millimeter-sized domains on Cu foils under intrinsically safe, atmospheric pressure growth conditions, suitable for application in roll-to-roll reactors. Previous attempts to grow large domains in graphene have been limited to isolated graphene single crystals rather than as part of an industrially useable continuous film. With both appropriate pre-treatment of the Cu and optimization of the CH4 supply, we show that it is possible to grow continuous films of monolayer graphene with millimeter scale domains within 80 min by chemical vapour deposition. The films are grown under industrially safe conditions, i.e., the flammable gases (H2 and CH4) are diluted to well below their lower explosive limit. The high quality, spatial uniformity, and low density of domain boundaries are demonstrated by charge carrier mobility measurements, scanning electron microscope, electron diffraction study, and Raman mapping. The hole mobility reaches as high as ~5,7002 m(2) V(-1) s(-1) in ambient conditions. The growth process of such high-quality graphene with a low H2 concentration and short growth times widens the possibility of industrial mass production. PMID:26883292

  5. Unfolded protein response is required for Aspergillus oryzae growth under conditions inducing secretory hydrolytic enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mizuki; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    Unfolded protein response (UPR) is an intracellular signaling pathway for adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In yeast UPR, Ire1 cleaves the unconventional intron of HAC1 mRNA, and the functional Hac1 protein translated from the spliced HAC1 mRNA induces the expression of ER chaperone genes and ER-associated degradation genes for the refolding or degradation of unfolded proteins. In this study, we constructed an ireA (IRE1 ortholog) conditionally expressing strain of Aspergillus oryzae, a filamentous fungus producing a large amount of amylolytic enzymes, and examined the contribution of UPR to ER stress adaptation under physiological conditions. Repression of ireA completely blocked A. oryzae growth under conditions inducing the production of hydrolytic enzymes, such as amylases and proteases. This growth defect was restored by the introduction of unconventional intronless hacA (hacA-i). Furthermore, UPR was observed to be induced by amylolytic gene expression, and the disruption of the transcriptional activator for amylolytic genes resulted in partial growth restoration of the ireA-repressing strain. In addition, a homokaryotic ireA disruption mutant was successfully generated using the strain harboring hacA-i as a parental host. These results indicated that UPR is required for A. oryzae growth to alleviate ER stress induced by excessive production of hydrolytic enzymes. PMID:26496881

  6. Growth of Continuous Monolayer Graphene with Millimeter-sized Domains Using Industrially Safe Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xingyi; Zhong, Guofang; D'Arsié, Lorenzo; Sugime, Hisashi; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Robertson, Alex W.; Robertson, John

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the growth of continuous monolayer graphene films with millimeter-sized domains on Cu foils under intrinsically safe, atmospheric pressure growth conditions, suitable for application in roll-to-roll reactors. Previous attempts to grow large domains in graphene have been limited to isolated graphene single crystals rather than as part of an industrially useable continuous film. With both appropriate pre-treatment of the Cu and optimization of the CH4 supply, we show that it is possible to grow continuous films of monolayer graphene with millimeter scale domains within 80 min by chemical vapour deposition. The films are grown under industrially safe conditions, i.e., the flammable gases (H2 and CH4) are diluted to well below their lower explosive limit. The high quality, spatial uniformity, and low density of domain boundaries are demonstrated by charge carrier mobility measurements, scanning electron microscope, electron diffraction study, and Raman mapping. The hole mobility reaches as high as ~5,700 cm2 V-1 s-1 in ambient conditions. The growth process of such high-quality graphene with a low H2 concentration and short growth times widens the possibility of industrial mass production.

  7. Growth of Continuous Monolayer Graphene with Millimeter-sized Domains Using Industrially Safe Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xingyi; Zhong, Guofang; D'Arsié, Lorenzo; Sugime, Hisashi; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Robertson, Alex W.; Robertson, John

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the growth of continuous monolayer graphene films with millimeter-sized domains on Cu foils under intrinsically safe, atmospheric pressure growth conditions, suitable for application in roll-to-roll reactors. Previous attempts to grow large domains in graphene have been limited to isolated graphene single crystals rather than as part of an industrially useable continuous film. With both appropriate pre-treatment of the Cu and optimization of the CH4 supply, we show that it is possible to grow continuous films of monolayer graphene with millimeter scale domains within 80 min by chemical vapour deposition. The films are grown under industrially safe conditions, i.e., the flammable gases (H2 and CH4) are diluted to well below their lower explosive limit. The high quality, spatial uniformity, and low density of domain boundaries are demonstrated by charge carrier mobility measurements, scanning electron microscope, electron diffraction study, and Raman mapping. The hole mobility reaches as high as ~5,700 cm2 V−1 s−1 in ambient conditions. The growth process of such high-quality graphene with a low H2 concentration and short growth times widens the possibility of industrial mass production. PMID:26883292

  8. The Effects of Salicylic Acid on Juvenile Zebrafish Danio rerio Under Flow-Through Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zivna, Dana; Blahova, Jana; Siroka, Zuzana; Plhalova, Lucie; Marsalek, Petr; Doubkova, Veronika; Zelinska, Gabriela; Vecerek, Vladimir; Tichy, Frantisek; Sehonova, Pavla; Svobodova, Zdenka

    2016-09-01

    The aquatic environment is becoming increasingly contaminated with pharmaceuticals. Salicylic acid (SA), which can be used individually or appear as a degradation product of the widely used acetylsalicylic acid was chosen for testing. Juvenile zebrafish Danio rerio were subjected to OECD test No. 215 (fish, juvenile growth test) with salicylic acid concentrations of 0.004; 0.04; 0.4; 4 and 40 mg/L. Specific growth rate (SGR), histological changes, and parameters of oxidative stress were evaluated. SA had no effects on histological changes, SGR, glutathione reductase, and lipid peroxidation. Increased catalytic activity of GPx was found at 0.04 mg/L compared to control, increased catalytic activity of catalase was found at 0.04 and 4 mg/L compared to control, and increased catalytic activity of glutathione-S-transferase was found at 0.004 and 0.04 mg/L compared to control (P < 0.05). Juvenile zebrafish turned out to be relatively insensitive to both environmentally relevant (0.004 mg/L) and higher concentrations of salicylic acid. PMID:27385367

  9. Growth and development in higher plants under simulated microgravity conditions on a 3-dimensional clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, T.; Yuda, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Yamashita, M.; Ueda, J.

    Growth and development of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Golden Cross Bantam) seedlings grown under simulated microgravity conditions were intensively studied using a 3-dimensional clinostat as a simulator of weightlessness. Epicotyls of etiolated pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were the most oriented toward the direction far from cotyledons. Mesocotyls of etiolated maize seedlings grew at random and coleoptiles curved slightly during clinostat rotation. Clinostat rotation promoted the emergence of the 3rd internodes in etiolated pea seedlings, while it significantly inhibited the growth of the 1st internodes. In maize seedlings, the growth of coleoptiles was little affected by clinostat rotation, but that of mesocotyls was suppressed, and therefore, the emergence of the leaf out of coleoptile was promoted. Clinostat rotation reduced the osmotic concentration in the 1st internodes of pea seedlings, although it has little effect on the 2nd and the 3rd internodes. Clinostat rotation also reduced the osmotic concentrations in both coleoptiles and mesocotyls of maize seedlings. Cell-wall extensibilities of the 1st and the 3rd internodes of pea seedlings grown on the clinostat were significantly lower and higher as compared with those on 1 g conditions, respectively. Cell-wall extensibility of mesocotyls in seedlings grown on the clinostat also decreased. Changes in cell wall properties seem to be well correlated to the growth of each organ in pea and maize seedlings. These results suggest that the growth and development of plants is controlled under gravity on earth, and that the growth responses of higher plants to microgravity conditions are regulated by both cell-wall mechanical properties and osmotic properties of stem cells.

  10. Growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed in malic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2013-11-01

    The growth behavior of anodic porous alumina formed on aluminum by anodizing in malic acid solutions was investigated. High-purity aluminum plates were electropolished in CH3COOH/HClO4 solutions and then anodized in 0.5 M malic acid solutions at 293 K and constant cell voltages of 200-350 V. The anodic porous alumina grew on the aluminum substrate at voltages of 200-250 V, and a black, burned oxide film was formed at higher voltages. The nanopores of the anodic oxide were only formed at grain boundaries of the aluminum substrate during the initial stage of anodizing, and then the growth region extended to the entire aluminum surface as the anodizing time increased. The anodic porous alumina with several defects was formed by anodizing in malic acid solution at 250 V, and oxide cells were approximately 300-800 nm in diameter.

  11. The molecular characteristics of a human pancreatic acidic phosphoprotein that inhibits calcium carbonate crystal growth.

    PubMed Central

    De Caro, A; Multigner, L; Lafont, H; Lombardo, D; Sarles, H

    1984-01-01

    A CaCO3-crystal-growth inhibitor was isolated from human pancreatic stones by using EDTA demineralization, followed by DEAE-Trisacryl chromatography. The isolated inhibitor was found to be a phosphoglycoprotein with Mr 14017 and having an unusual chemical composition. It is characterized by a high (42%) acidic amino acid content, but lacks methionine and gamma-carboxyglutamic acid. The protein contains 2.65 mol of P/mol of protein, as phosphoserine (2 mol) and phosphothreonine (0.5 mol). Isoelectric focusing of the protein yields one major band corresponding to an isoelectric point of 4.2. Immunochemical quantification of the crystal-growth inhibitor in pure pancreatic juice reveals that it constitutes 14% of the normal exocrine secretion. Our findings demonstrate that this is a novel secretory protein, which has no enzymic activity and which maintains pancreatic juice in a supersaturated state with respect to CaCO3. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6487269

  12. Effects of acidity on tree Pollen germination and tube growth. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ryn, D.M.; Jacobson, J.S.

    1984-08-01

    Most of the northeastern hardwood forests in North America are exposed repeatedly to acidic rainfall at pH values below 5.0. Pollen germination, tube growth and fertilization, important parts of the reproductive process, are sensitive to changes in their chemical environment. Accordingly, the authors investigated the effects of acidity on pollen germination and tube elongation of four northeastern tree species: flowering dogwood, black birch, yellow birch, and sugar maple. Pollen was collected and germinated in a growth medium acidified to pH values ranging from 5.0 to 2.6. Pollen was found to be sensitive to acidification of the germination medium to below pH 4.2. These results suggest that acidic rain that now occurs in eastern North America may influence reproductive processes that are necessary for seed set and regeneration in northern hardwood forests.

  13. Fatty Acid Profiles for Differentiating Growth Medium Formulations Used to Culture Bacillus cereus T-strain Spores.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Murphy, Devonie L; Robertson, James M; Bannan, Jason D

    2015-07-01

    Microbial biomarkers that indicate aspects of an organism's growth conditions are important targets of forensic research. In this study, we examined fatty acid composition as a signature for the types of complex nutrients in the culturing medium. Bacillus cereus T-strain spores were grown in medium formulations supplemented with one of the following: peptone (meat protein), tryptone (casein protein), soy protein, and brain-heart infusion. Cellular biomass was profiled with fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. Results showed peptone cultures produced spores enriched in straight-chained lipids. Tryptone cultures produced spores enriched in branched-odd lipids when compared with peptone, soy, and brain-heart formulations. The observed FAME variation was used to construct a set of discriminant functions that could help identify the nutrients in a culturing recipe for an unknown spore sample. Blinded classification tests were most successful for spores grown on media containing peptone and tryptone, showing 88% and 100% correct identification, respectively. PMID:25854710

  14. Effect of amino acid doping on the growth and ferroelectric properties of triglycine sulphate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, C.M.; Sankar, R.; Mohan Kumar, R.; Jayavel, R.

    2008-02-05

    Effect of amino acids (L-leucine and isoleucine) doping on the growth aspects and ferroelectric properties of triglycine sulphate crystals has been studied. Pure and doped crystals were grown from aqueous solution by low temperature solution growth technique. The cell parameter values were found to significantly vary for doped crystals. Fourier transform infrared analysis confirmed the presence of functional groups in the grown crystal. Morphology study reveals that amino acid doping induces faster growth rate along b-direction leading to a wide b-plane and hence suitable for pyroelectric detector applications. Ferroelectric domain structure has been studied by atomic force microscopy and hysteresis measurements reveal an increase of coercive field due to the formation of single domain pattern.

  15. Growth of Cronobacter spp. under dynamic temperature conditions occurring during cooling of reconstituted powdered infant formula.

    PubMed

    Kandhai, M C; Breeuwer, P; Gorris, L G M; Zwietering, M H; Reij, M W

    2009-12-01

    Reconstituted infant formulae are excellent growth media for Cronobacter spp. (formerly Enterobacter sakazakii) and other microorganisms that may be present in such products. Immediate consumption or rapid cooling and storage at a low temperature are therefore recommended as control measures to prevent microbial growth. Placing a container filled with reconstituted liquid formula in the refrigerator, however, does not mean that the temperature of the liquid is directly the same as the set-point of the refrigerator. This study describes the temperature profiles and methods to predict lag time and possible growth of Cronobacter spp. during the cooling process in three types of containers. The overall heat transfer coefficients (alpha) were determined and were shown to have a very large variability in both household refrigerators and an air-ventilated refrigerator equipped with a fan. A mathematical model was built to predict the growth of Cronobacter spp. under dynamic temperature conditions using three models for the lag time. The various estimations for the lag time had a remarkably strong impact on the predicted growth. The assumption of a constant k-value (k = lag time x specific growth rate = lambda x micro = 2.88) fitted the experimental data best. Predictions taking into account the large variability in heat transfer showed that proliferation of Cronobacter spp. during cooling may be prevented by limiting the volume to be cooled to portion size only, or by reconstituting at temperatures of 25 degrees C or lower. The model may also be used to predict growth in other situations where dynamic temperature conditions exist. PMID:20003730

  16. Microbial stratification in low pH oxic and suboxic macroscopic growths along an acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Méndez-García, Celia; Mesa, Victoria; Sprenger, Richard R; Richter, Michael; Diez, María Suárez; Solano, Jennifer; Bargiela, Rafael; Golyshina, Olga V; Manteca, Ángel; Ramos, Juan Luis; Gallego, José R; Llorente, Irene; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A P; Jensen, Ole N; Peláez, Ana I; Sánchez, Jesús; Ferrer, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    Macroscopic growths at geographically separated acid mine drainages (AMDs) exhibit distinct populations. Yet, local heterogeneities are poorly understood. To gain novel mechanistic insights into this, we used OMICs tools to profile microbial populations coexisting in a single pyrite gallery AMD (pH ∼2) in three distinct compartments: two from a stratified streamer (uppermost oxic and lowermost anoxic sediment-attached strata) and one from a submerged anoxic non-stratified mat biofilm. The communities colonising pyrite and those in the mature formations appear to be populated by the greatest diversity of bacteria and archaea (including 'ARMAN' (archaeal Richmond Mine acidophilic nano-organisms)-related), as compared with the known AMD, with ∼44.9% unclassified sequences. We propose that the thick polymeric matrix may provide a safety shield against the prevailing extreme condition and also a massive carbon source, enabling non-typical acidophiles to develop more easily. Only 1 of 39 species were shared, suggesting a high metabolic heterogeneity in local microenvironments, defined by the O2 concentration, spatial location and biofilm architecture. The suboxic mats, compositionally most similar to each other, are more diverse and active for S, CO2, CH4, fatty acid and lipopolysaccharide metabolism. The oxic stratum of the streamer, displaying a higher diversity of the so-called 'ARMAN'-related Euryarchaeota, shows a higher expression level of proteins involved in signal transduction, cell growth and N, H2, Fe, aromatic amino acids, sphingolipid and peptidoglycan metabolism. Our study is the first to highlight profound taxonomic and functional shifts in single AMD formations, as well as new microbial species and the importance of H2 in acidic suboxic macroscopic growths. PMID:24430486

  17. Microbial stratification in low pH oxic and suboxic macroscopic growths along an acid mine drainage

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-García, Celia; Mesa, Victoria; Sprenger, Richard R; Richter, Michael; Diez, María Suárez; Solano, Jennifer; Bargiela, Rafael; Golyshina, Olga V; Manteca, Ángel; Ramos, Juan Luis; Gallego, José R; Llorente, Irene; Martins dos Santos, Vitor AP; Jensen, Ole N; Peláez, Ana I; Sánchez, Jesús; Ferrer, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic growths at geographically separated acid mine drainages (AMDs) exhibit distinct populations. Yet, local heterogeneities are poorly understood. To gain novel mechanistic insights into this, we used OMICs tools to profile microbial populations coexisting in a single pyrite gallery AMD (pH ∼2) in three distinct compartments: two from a stratified streamer (uppermost oxic and lowermost anoxic sediment-attached strata) and one from a submerged anoxic non-stratified mat biofilm. The communities colonising pyrite and those in the mature formations appear to be populated by the greatest diversity of bacteria and archaea (including ‘ARMAN' (archaeal Richmond Mine acidophilic nano-organisms)-related), as compared with the known AMD, with ∼44.9% unclassified sequences. We propose that the thick polymeric matrix may provide a safety shield against the prevailing extreme condition and also a massive carbon source, enabling non-typical acidophiles to develop more easily. Only 1 of 39 species were shared, suggesting a high metabolic heterogeneity in local microenvironments, defined by the O2 concentration, spatial location and biofilm architecture. The suboxic mats, compositionally most similar to each other, are more diverse and active for S, CO2, CH4, fatty acid and lipopolysaccharide metabolism. The oxic stratum of the streamer, displaying a higher diversity of the so-called ‘ARMAN'-related Euryarchaeota, shows a higher expression level of proteins involved in signal transduction, cell growth and N, H2, Fe, aromatic amino acids, sphingolipid and peptidoglycan metabolism. Our study is the first to highlight profound taxonomic and functional shifts in single AMD formations, as well as new microbial species and the importance of H2 in acidic suboxic macroscopic growths. PMID:24430486

  18. Bacteria obtained from a sequencing batch reactor that are capable of growth on dehydroabietic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, W W

    1995-01-01

    Eleven isolates capable of growth on the resin acid dehydroabietic acid (DhA) were obtained from a sequencing batch reactor designed to treat a high-strength process stream from a paper mill. The isolates belonged to two groups, represented by strains DhA-33 and DhA-35, which were characterized. In the bioreactor, bacteria like DhA-35 were more abundant than those like DhA-33. The population in the bioreactor of organisms capable of growth on DhA was estimated to be 1.1 x 10(6) propagules per ml, based on a most-probable-number determination. Analysis of small-subunit rRNA partial sequences indicated that DhA-33 was most closely related to Sphingomonas yanoikuyae (Sab = 0.875) and that DhA-35 was most closely related to Zoogloea ramigera (Sab = 0.849). Both isolates additionally grew on other abietanes, i.e., abietic and palustric acids, but not on the pimaranes, pimaric and isopimaric acids. For DhA-33 and DhA-35 with DhA as the sole organic substrate, doubling times were 2.7 and 2.2 h, respectively, and growth yields were 0.30 and 0.25 g of protein per g of DhA, respectively. Glucose as a cosubstrate stimulated growth of DhA-33 on DhA and stimulated DhA degradation by the culture. Pyruvate as a cosubstrate did not stimulate growth of DhA-35 on DhA and reduced the specific rate of DhA degradation of the culture. DhA induced DhA and abietic acid degradation activities in both strains, and these activities were heat labile. Cell suspensions of both strains consumed DhA at a rate of 6 mumol mg of protein-1 h-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7793937

  19. Nucleation and growth by diffusion under Ostwald-Freundlich boundary condition

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2014-02-14

    The critical radius of a nucleus grown by diffusion in a solution is studied thermodynamically as well as kinetically. The thermodynamic growth equation called Zeldovich equation of classical nucleation theory and the kinetic diffusional growth equation combined with the Ostwald-Freundlich boundary condition lead to the same critical radius. However, it should be pointed out that the diffusional equation may lead to a kinetic critical radius that is different from the thermodynamic critical radius, thus indicating the possibility of kinetically controlling the critical radius of a nucleus.

  20. Effect of growth conditions on the quality of lead bromide crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mazelsky, R.; Glicksman, M. E.; Coriell, S. R.; Duval, W. M. B.; Santoro, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    Single crystals of pure and doped lead bromide were grown by the Bridgman method in different convective conditions. The convection level was varied by changing the thermal and solutal Rayleigh number. The homogeneity in refractive index, and hence the optical quality, was estimated by examining the optical distortion, birefringence interferograms, and laser scattering through the crystal. The optical quality of the crystal varied significantly with the variation of convection level during the crystal growth. The critical concentration of the solute was estimated for several values of growth velocity by numerical analysis at the thermal gradient of 20 K/cm.

  1. Growth and characterization studies of pure and tartaric acid doped benzilic acid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilda, M. J. Jarald Brigit; Devarajan, Prem Anand

    2016-04-01

    The organic nonlinear optical crystals of pure benzilic acid (PBA) and tartaric acid doped benzilic acid (TADBA) single crystals were grown by using slow evaporation method utilizing dimethyl formamide (DMF) as a solvent. Transparent single crystals of PBA and TADBA of dimensions 9×4×1 mm3 and 7×5×2 mm3 were grown after thirty days. Lattice parameters and space groups of PBA and TADBA were evaluated using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Employing Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis, various functional groups in pure and doped crystals were ascertained. 1H and C13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis suggests the presence of hydrogen- and carbon-bonded network. Optical transparency of PBA and TADBA was investigated using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectral analysis whereas thermal properties of the grown crystals were studied by thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry analyses. Second harmonic generation efficiency of PBA and TADBA was found to be 2.2 and 2.7 times higher than that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate.

  2. Conditions of growth of open corrosion pits in stainless steels -- Electrochemical experiments on model pits

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkarainen, T.J.

    1998-12-31

    The effects of the most important variables on continued growth and repassivation of open macroscopic corrosion pits in stainless steel sheets were investigated using two different artificial pit configurations. The pit growth was activated under anodic polarization either by injecting concentrated chloride solution into the pit or by initially filling the pit with chromic chloride crystals (CrCl{sub 3}-6H{sub 2}O). Experiments were made on sheet specimens of stainless steels of type UNS S31603 (316L) or UNS S312.54 in bulk solutions containing chloride and/or sulfate ions. Various aspects of the test arrangements and pitting of stainless steels are discussed, including the electrolyte composition within the pits, repassivation potentials and the IR-drops associated with pit growth. It is demonstrated that using the artificial pit configurations the effects of the main variables affecting the conditions for growth and repassivation of open corrosion pits can be investigated quantitatively, including electrode potentials, temperature, and composition of the bulk solution. It is concluded that for continued growth of corrosion pits with ``large`` openings to the bulk solution, a strongly oxidizing environment is required, and that sulfate ions in amounts comparable to or in excess of that of chloride ions may stabilize pit growth.

  3. Biphasic kinetics of growth and bacteriocin production with Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 occur under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Neysens, Patricia; Messens, Winy; Gevers, Dirk; Swings, Jean; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-04-01

    Micro-organisms used during the production of fermented foods are subjected to several abiotic stresses. Microbial survival during these processes strongly depends on the ability of the cells to adapt and become more tolerant to the environmental conditions. Cultivation of Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471, a potential strain for use during type II sourdough fermentations, at low temperatures, unfavourable pH and high salt concentrations resulted in biphasic growth patterns. In addition, two separate bacteriocin peaks, as well as a dramatic change in cellular morphology, were observed. In general, an increase of the specific bacteriocin production occurred during the second growth phase. Finally, the observed sugar consumption profiles were affected by the applied fermentation temperature. Moreover, the highest bacteriocin activity occurred during maltose consumption at a low constant temperature of 28 degrees C and a constant pH of 5.4. Plate counts from both growth phases revealed the existence of two colony types. Irregular colonies were found to outnumber smoother colonies during the first growth phase, while the second growth phase was characterized by a greater number of smooth colonies. Electron microscopy was used to investigate the observed morphological switch at the single-cell level. Single, rod-shaped cells changed into elongated cells that grew in chains. Colony and cell morphology changes coincided with the biphasic growth pattern. PMID:12686649

  4. Fracture of Hydrided Zircaloy-4 Sheet under Through-Thickness Crack Growth Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, P.A.; Koss, D.A.; Motta, A.T.; Chan, K.S.

    2007-07-01

    The failure of thin-wall components such as fuel cladding may be caused by crack initiation on the component surface and subsequent crack growth through its thickness. This study has determined the fracture toughness of hydrided cold-worked stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet subject to through-thickness crack growth at 25 deg. C. The experimental approach utilizes a novel procedure in which a narrow linear strip of brittle hydride blister across the specimen width creates a well-defined pre-crack upon initial loading. The subsequent crack growth resistance is then characterized by four-point bending of the specimen and an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. At room temperature, the through-thickness fracture toughness (K{sub Q}) is sensitive to the orientation of the hydride platelets, and K{sub Q} {approx_equal} 25 MPavm for crack growth through a mixed in-plane/out-of-plane hydride field. In contrast, K{sub Q} is much higher ({approx_equal} 75 MPavm) when the hydride platelets are oriented predominantly in the plane of the sheet (and therefore normal to both the crack plane and the crack growth direction). The implication of these fracture toughness values to the fracture strain behavior of hydrided Zircaloy-4 under through-thickness crack growth conditions is illustrated. (authors)

  5. Aldocyanoin microspheres: partial amino acid analysis of the microparticulates formed from simple reactants under various conditions.

    PubMed

    Pollock, G E; Heiderer, R

    1979-10-01

    The work of Kenyon and Nissenbaum on aldocyanoin microspheres was repeated and extended. It was determined that the microspheres contained amino acids and that specific amino acids could be incorporated into the microspheres by adding the requisite aldehyde or ketone precursor to the model mixture. Microsphere formation was found to be dependent on the availability of oxygen. Under anaerobic conditions of synthesis, no microspheres formed in the time allotted and the amino acid composition of the macromolecular material was simple. Microparticulate material synthesized by C. Folsome using a quenched spark technique was analyzed and found to contain amino acids that had a qualitative composition similar to both a Miller-Urey discharge and the Kenyon-Nissenbaum microspheres. PMID:501747

  6. Investigation of malic acid production in Aspergillus oryzae under nitrogen starvation conditions.

    PubMed

    Knuf, Christoph; Nookaew, Intawat; Brown, Stephen H; McCulloch, Michael; Berry, Alan; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-10-01

    Malic acid has great potential for replacing petrochemical building blocks in the future. For this application, high yields, rates, and titers are essential in order to sustain a viable biotechnological production process. Natural high-capacity malic acid producers like the malic acid producer Aspergillus flavus have so far been disqualified because of special growth requirements or the production of mycotoxins. As A. oryzae is a very close relative or even an ecotype of A. flavus, it is likely that its high malic acid production capabilities with a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status may be combined with already existing large-scale fermentation experience. In order to verify the malic acid production potential, two wild-type strains, NRRL3485 and NRRL3488, were compared in shake flasks. As NRRL3488 showed a volumetric production rate twice as high as that of NRRL3485, this strain was selected for further investigation of the influence of two different nitrogen sources on malic acid secretion. The cultivation in lab-scale fermentors resulted in a higher final titer, 30.27 ± 1.05 g liter(-1), using peptone than the one of 22.27 ± 0.46 g liter(-1) obtained when ammonium was used. Through transcriptome analysis, a binding site similar to the one of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast transcription factor Msn2/4 was identified in the upstream regions of glycolytic genes and the cytosolic malic acid production pathway from pyruvate via oxaloacetate to malate, which suggests that malic acid production is a stress response. Furthermore, the pyruvate carboxylase reaction was identified as a target for metabolic engineering, after it was confirmed to be transcriptionally regulated through the correlation of intracellular fluxes and transcriptional changes. PMID:23892740

  7. Investigation of Malic Acid Production in Aspergillus oryzae under Nitrogen Starvation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Knuf, Christoph; Nookaew, Intawat; Brown, Stephen H.; McCulloch, Michael; Berry, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Malic acid has great potential for replacing petrochemical building blocks in the future. For this application, high yields, rates, and titers are essential in order to sustain a viable biotechnological production process. Natural high-capacity malic acid producers like the malic acid producer Aspergillus flavus have so far been disqualified because of special growth requirements or the production of mycotoxins. As A. oryzae is a very close relative or even an ecotype of A. flavus, it is likely that its high malic acid production capabilities with a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status may be combined with already existing large-scale fermentation experience. In order to verify the malic acid production potential, two wild-type strains, NRRL3485 and NRRL3488, were compared in shake flasks. As NRRL3488 showed a volumetric production rate twice as high as that of NRRL3485, this strain was selected for further investigation of the influence of two different nitrogen sources on malic acid secretion. The cultivation in lab-scale fermentors resulted in a higher final titer, 30.27 ± 1.05 g liter−1, using peptone than the one of 22.27 ± 0.46 g liter−1 obtained when ammonium was used. Through transcriptome analysis, a binding site similar to the one of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast transcription factor Msn2/4 was identified in the upstream regions of glycolytic genes and the cytosolic malic acid production pathway from pyruvate via oxaloacetate to malate, which suggests that malic acid production is a stress response. Furthermore, the pyruvate carboxylase reaction was identified as a target for metabolic engineering, after it was confirmed to be transcriptionally regulated through the correlation of intracellular fluxes and transcriptional changes. PMID:23892740

  8. Palladium-Catalyzed Construction of Amidines from Arylboronic Acids under Oxidative Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fengxiang; Li, Yahui; Wang, Zechao; Orru, Romano V A; Maes, Bert U W; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-01

    A valuable palladium-catalyzed three-component coupling reaction for the synthesis of amidines has been developed. Using arylboronic acids, isocyanides, and anilines as the reactants under oxidative conditions, various amidines were isolated in good yields with good functional group tolerances. PMID:27061735

  9. EVALUATING CHANGES IN FOREST CONDITION POTENTIALLY RELATED TO ACIDIC DEPOSITION: AN EXAMPLE USING RED SPRUCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a result of concern about forest decline in Europe and the USA, research has been conducted to investigate changes in forest condition that might be associated with acidic deposition and related pollutants (principally ozone). ymptoms of tree decline observed in the field typi...

  10. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid Enhances Acquisition, Extinction, and Reconsolidation of Conditioned Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredy, Timothy W.; Barad, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Histone modifications contribute to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, a process now recognized to be important for the consolidation of long-term memory. Valproic acid (VPA), used for many years as an anticonvulsant and a mood stabilizer, has effects on learning and memory and enhances the extinction of conditioned fear through its…

  11. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is modulated by oleic acid via an epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent activation of glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Carine; Augé, Nathalie; Frisach, Marie-Françoise; Casteilla, Louis; Salvayre, Robert; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under various pathophysiological conditions. In isolated mitochondria, fatty acids (FA) exhibit an uncoupling effect of the respiratory activity and modulate ROS generation. The effect of FA on intact cultured cells remains to be elucidated. The present study reports that FA (buffered by BSA) decrease the level of cellular ROS generated by the mitochondrial respiratory chain in cultured cells incubated with antimycin A. Both saturated and unsaturated FA are effective. This fatty acid-induced antioxidant effect does not result from a decrease in ROS production, but is subsequent to cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activation and enhanced ROS degradation. This fatty acid-induced GPx activation is mediated through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling, since this response is (i) abrogated by the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 or by a defect in EGFR (in EGFR-deficient B82L fibroblasts), (ii) restored in B82LK+ cells expressing EGFR and (iii) mimicked by epidermal growth factor. These findings indicate that FA contribute to enhance cellular antioxidant defences against mitochondrial oxidative stress through EGFR-dependent GPx activation. PMID:12153397

  12. Aspects of krill growth and condition during late winter-early spring off East Antarctica (110-130°E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, C.; Virtue, P.; Kawaguchi, S.; Nichols, P. D.

    2011-05-01

    Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, is a keystone species in the Southern Ocean. However, information on growth, diet and condition during winter and early spring is limited, hampering our understanding of these fundamental biological parameters at this important period in their lifecycle. Our study assessed diet and condition of larval and postlarval krill collected from open water and below the ice off East Antarctica (110-130ºE) in September/October 2007. Condition was assessed using lipid content, growth rates and digestive gland size; feeding history was assessed using fatty acid profiles and stomach content analysis; and a 207-day starvation study investigated the response of krill to long-term food deprivation. Potential food items ( Calanus propinquus and sea-ice biota) were analysed for lipid and fatty acid composition to compare with krill samples. Krill were found to be in good condition, with mean growth rate of 0.95% per moult for postlarvae and 14.79% for larvae, and mean lipid content of 24.1% for postlarvae and 6.6% for larvae. Fatty acid profiles and stomach content analysis revealed two main feeding strategies - krill below the ice were feeding mostly on sea-ice diatoms, while those in open water were ingesting copepods and detritus. Krill below the ice had larger digestive glands than those in open water. Furciliae fatty acid profiles indicated a diet of heterotrophic flagellates and/or detritus. Postlarval krill survived 207 days of food deprivation by using body protein and lipid reserves for energy. In contrast, krill furciliae were severely depleted after just 5 days of food deprivation, indicating that they must feed continually at this time of year. Krill, copepods and sea-ice biota were all low in polyunsaturated fatty acids, indicating that krill must rely on later spring phytoplankton blooms to obtain these essential nutrients required for reproduction.

  13. 3-D simulations to investigate initial condition effects on the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Malcolm J

    2008-01-01

    The effect of initial conditions on the growth rate of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing has been studied using carefully formulated numerical simulations. An integrated large-eddy simulation (ILES) that uses a finite-volume technique was employed to solve the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations with numerical dissipation. The initial conditions were chosen to test the dependence of the RT growth parameters ({alpha}{sub b}, {alpha}{sub s}) on variations in (a) the spectral bandwidth, (b) the spectral shape, and (c) discrete banded spectra. Our findings support the notion that the overall growth of the RT mixing is strongly dependent on initial conditions. Variation in spectral shapes and bandwidths are found to have a complex effect of the late time development of the RT mixing layer, and raise the question of whether we can design RT transition and turbulence based on our choice of initial conditions. In addition, our results provide a useful database for the initialization and development of closures describing RT transition and turbulence.

  14. Growth of and mineral deposition in young rats fed saturated and unsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, A.; D'Souza, D. John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Male weanling rats were used in 4 week experiments to study effects of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids on growth and mineral deposition in several organs (bone, kidneys, liver, spleen, testes). Minerals evaluated were calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and zinc, and levels of these minerals in tests diets were appropriate for growing rats. Two levels of dietary fat were used, and fatty acids included in the study were butyric/capronic, palmitic/stearic, oleic, and linoleic/linolenic acids. Decreased weight gains were observed in rats fed saturated fatty acids or 10% fat, while increases in weight gains were associated with increases in polyunsaturated/saturated (P/S) ratios. Copper, iron, or zinc levels tended to be higher in organs of rats fed saturated fatty acids. P/S ratios had no effect on copper or zinc deposition, but decreases in liver iron and increases in spleen iron were observed in rats fed the higher P/S ratios. Manganese levels were generally unaffected by fatty acid types, fat level, or P/S ratio, although liver manganese levels were higher in rats fed unsaturated fatty acids. Dietary fatty acids, fat level, or P/S ratios had no apparent effects on calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, or zinc deposition in femurs and tibias of rats.

  15. Growth behavior of gold nanoparticles synthesized in unsaturated fatty acids by vacuum evaporation methods.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Akito; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Mitsuaki; Ryuto, Hiromichi; Takaoka, Gikan H

    2016-02-21

    Physical vapor evaporation of metals on low vapor pressure liquids is a simple and clean method to synthesize nanoparticles and thin films, though only little work has been conducted so far. Here, gold nanoparticles were synthesized by vacuum evaporation (VE) methods in ricinoleic acid and oleic acid, two typical unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs). The two solvents formed black aggregates after deposition and then shrunk and finally disappeared with the progress of time. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, nanoparticles in ricinoleic acids formed aggregates and then dispersed by time, while in oleic acid big aggregates were not observed in all timescales. From TEM images and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, the mean size of the nanoparticles was about 4 nm in both ricinoleic and oleic acids. UV-Vis spectra were also taken as a function of time and the results were consistent with the growth behavior presumed by TEM images. Air exposure had an influence on the behavior of the sample triggering the nanoparticle formation in both solvents. From control experiments, we discovered that oxygen gas triggered the phenomenon and nanoparticles function as a catalyst for the oxidation of the UFAs. It stimulates the phenomenon and in ricinoleic acid, specifically, electrons are transferred from riconleic acid to the gold nanoparticles, enhancing the surface potential of the nanoparticles and the repulsive force between their electronic double layers. PMID:26821883

  16. Seed storage conditions change the germination pattern of clonal growth plants in Mediterranean salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Espinar, José L; García, Luis V; Clemente, Luis

    2005-07-01

    The effect of salinity level and extended exposure to different salinity and flooding conditions on germination patterns of three salt-marsh clonal growth plants (Juncus subulatus, Scirpus litoralis, and S. maritimus) was studied. Seed exposure to extended flooding and saline conditions significantly affected the outcome of the germination process in a different, though predictable, way for each species, after favorable conditions for germination were restored. Tolerance of the germination process was related to the average salinity level measured during the growth/germination season at sites where established individuals of each species dominated the species cover. No relationship was found between salinity tolerance of the germination process and seed response to extended exposure to flooding and salinity conditions. The salinity response was significantly related to the conditions prevailing in the habitats of the respective species during the unfavorable (nongrowth/nongermination) season. Our results indicate that changes in salinity and hydrology while seeds are dormant affect the outcome of the seed-bank response, even when conditions at germination are identical. Because these environmental-history-dependent responses differentially affect seed germination, seedling density, and probably sexual recruitment in the studied and related species, these influences should be considered for wetland restoration and management. PMID:21646131

  17. Seed storage conditions change the germination pattern of clonal growth plants in Mediterranean salt marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espinar, J.L.; Garcia, L.V.; Clemente, L.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of salinity level and extended exposure to different salinity and flooding conditions on germination patterns of three saltmarsh clonal growth plants (Juncus subulatus, Scirpus litoralis, and S. maritimus) was studied. Seed exposure to extended flooding and saline conditions significantly affected the outcome of the germination process in a different, though predictable, way for each species, after favorable conditions for germination were restored. Tolerance of the germination process was related to the average salinity level measured during the growth/germination season at sites where established individuals of each species dominated the species cover. No relationship was found between salinity tolerance of the germination process and seed response to extended exposure to flooding and salinity conditions. The salinity response was significantly related to the conditions prevailing in the habitats of the respective species during the unfavorable (nongrowth/nongermination) season. Our results indicate that changes in salinity and hydrology while seeds are dormant affect the outcome of the seed-bank response, even when conditions at germination are identical. Because these environmental-history-dependent responses differentially affect seed germination, seedling density, and probably sexual recruitment in the studied and related species, these influences should be considered for wetland restoration and management.

  18. Using Acid Number as a Leading Indicator of Refrigeration and Air Conditioning System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Cartlidge; Hans Schellhase

    2003-07-31

    number (TAN), which includes both mineral acids and organic acids, is therefore a useful indicator which can be used to monitor the condition of the system in order to perform remedial maintenance, when required, to prevent system failure. The critical TAN value is the acid level at which remedial action should be taken to prevent the onset of rapid acid formation which can result in system failure. The level of 0.05 mg KOH/g of oil was established for CFC/mineral oil systems based on analysis of 700 used lubricants from operating systems and failed units. There is no consensus within the refrigeration industry as to the critical TAN value for HFC/POE systems, however, the value will be higher than the CFC/mineral oil systems critical TAN value because of the much weaker organic acids produced from POE. A similar study of used POE lubricants should be performed to establish a critical TAN limit for POE systems. Titrimetric analysis per ASTM procedures is the most commonly used method to determine TAN values in lubricants in the refrigeration industry and other industries dealing with lubricating oils. For field measurements, acid test kits are often used since they provide rapid, semi-quantitative TAN results.

  19. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Brad; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars has been used to suggest that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. However, if early Mars was neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then large carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. The critical question is: Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? We suggest that Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would inhibit the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of this work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions. The stability of smectites under mildly acidic conditions is attributed to elevated Fe/Mg activities that inhibit smectite dissolution. Beidelite and saponite have been shown to form from hydrothermal alteration of basaltic glass at pH 3.5-4.0 in seawater solutions. Nontronite is also known to be stable in mildly acidic systems associated with mafic and ultramafic rock. Nontronite was shown to form in acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain, Thailand due to oxidation of Fe-sulfides that transformed saponite to nontronite. Smectite is known to transform to kaolinite in naturally acid soils due to selective leaching of Mg. However, if Mg removal is limited, then based on equilibrium relationships, the dissolution of smectite should be minimized. If Fe and Mg solution activities are sufficiently high, such as might be found in a low water/rock ratio system that is poorly drained, smectite could form and remain stable under mildly acidic conditions on Mars. The sources of mild acidity on early Mars includes elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, Fe-hydrolysis reactions, and the presence of volcanic SO2 aerosols. Equilibrium calculations dictate that water equilibrated with an early Mars CO2 atmosphere at 1 to 4 bar yields a pH of 3.6 to 3

  20. The Formation of Fe/Mg Smectite Under Mildly Acidic Conditions on Early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, B.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D.; Niles, P. B.

    2011-12-01

    The detection of Fe/Mg smectites and carbonate in Noachian and early Hesperian terrain of Mars has been used to suggest that neutral to mildly alkaline conditions prevailed during the early history of Mars. However, if early Mars was neutral to moderately alkaline with a denser CO2 atmosphere than today, then "large" carbonates deposits should be more widely detected in Noachian terrain. The critical question is: Why have so few carbonate deposits been detected compared to Fe/Mg smectites? We suggest that Fe/Mg smectites on early Mars formed under mildly acidic conditions, which would inhibit the extensive formation of carbonate deposits. The goal of this work is to evaluate the formation of Fe/Mg smectites under mildly acidic conditions. The stability of smectites under mildly acidic conditions is attributed to elevated Fe/Mg activities that inhibit smectite dissolution. Beidelite and saponite have been shown to form from hydrothermal alteration of basaltic glass at pH 3.5-4.0 in seawater solutions. Nontronite is also known to be stable in mildly acidic systems associated with mafic and ultramafic rock. Nontronite was shown to form in acid sulfate soils in the Bangkok Plain, Thailand due to oxidation of Fe-sulfides that transformed saponite to nontronite. Smectite is known to transform to kaolinite in naturally acid soils due to selective leaching of Mg. However, if Mg removal is limited, then based on equilibrium relationships, the dissolution of smectite should be minimized. If Fe and Mg solution activities are sufficiently high, such as might be found in a low water/rock ratio system that is poorly drained, smectite could form and remain stable under mildly acidic conditions on Mars. The sources of mild acidity on early Mars includes elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, Fe-hydrolysis reactions, and the presence of volcanic SO2 aerosols. Equilibrium calculations dictate that water equilibrated with an early Mars CO2 atmosphere at 1 to 4 bar yields a pH of 3.6 to 3

  1. Retinoic acid inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth of thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Rockenstein, Andreas; Ramaswamy, Anette; Celik, Ilhan; Wunderlich, Anette; Lingelbach, Susanne; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Zielke, Andreas

    2007-01-29

    The anti-proliferative effect of retinoic acid (RA) has been documented for various tumors. Some 40% of patients with advanced and poorly differentiated thyroid cancer have been shown to respond to RA with increased uptake of radioiodine. It has been suggested that these effects may be caused by redifferentiation. Presently, little is known about the effects of RA on tumor angiogenesis, a prerequisite for growth and metastatic spread. The aim of the current study was to determine, whether tumor-induced angiogenesis of thyroid cancer is affected by RA. In vitro, the effect of 0.1/10 microM 13-cis RA on tumor cell number (MTT assay) and secretion of VEGF (ELISA) was analyzed in three thyroid cancer cell lines (FTC 236, C634 and XTC), as well as in endothelial cells (HUVEC) over several passages. In vivo, tumor growth, VEGF-expression and microvessel density (VSD) of RA treated thyroid cancer cells after xenotransplantation to nude mice was evaluated by morphometric analysis. In vitro, thyroid cancer cell lines responded to RA with reduced proliferation, ranging from 26 to 34% after 2 weeks of treatment and with up to 80% reduced secretion of VEGF. In vivo, tumor volumes of animals receiving RA were reduced by 33% (FTC 236), 27% (C643) and 6% (XTC), respectively. VSD of experimental tumors was diminished in the FTC 236 (25%) and the C643 cell line (15%), and almost unchanged in XTC tumors (7%). In vivo, VEGF-expression and apoptosis were not significantly affected by RA. In vitro, proliferation of HUVEC was inhibited by conditioned medium of C643 cells pretreated with RA (0.1/10 microM), as well as by administration of RA (0.1/10 microM). This study confirms thyroid tumor cell growth to be inhibited by RA. It demonstrates a decrease of in vitro VEGF accumulation and reduction of VSD in experimental undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma, suggesting that reduced angiogenesis may be an important mechanism responsible for the therapeutic effect of RA in thyroid cancer

  2. Condensed tannin biosynthesis and polymerization synergistically condition carbon use, defense, sink strength and growth in Populus.

    PubMed

    Harding, Scott A; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Du, Lei; Nyamdari, Batbayar; Lindroth, Richard L; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark F; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2014-11-01

    The partitioning of carbon for growth, storage and constitutive chemical defenses is widely framed in terms of a hypothetical sink-source differential that varies with nutrient supply. According to this framework, phenolics accrual is passive and occurs in source leaves when normal sink growth is not sustainable due to a nutrient limitation. In assessing this framework, we present gene and metabolite evidence that condensed tannin (CT) accrual is strongest in sink leaves and sequesters carbon in a way that impinges upon foliar sink strength and upon phenolic glycoside (PG) accrual in Populus. The work was based on two Populus fremontii × angustifolia backcross lines with contrasting rates of CT accrual and growth, and equally large foliar PG reserves. However, foliar PG accrual was developmentally delayed in the high-CT, slow-growth line (SG), and nitrogen-limitation led to increased foliar PG accrual only in the low-CT, fast-growth line (FG). Metabolite profiling of developing leaves indicated comparatively carbon-limited amino acid metabolism, depletion of several Krebs cycle intermediates and reduced organ sink strength in SG. Gene profiling indicated that CT synthesis decreased as leaves expanded and PGs increased. A most striking finding was that the nitrogenous monoamine phenylethylamine accumulated only in leaves of SG plants. The potential negative impact of CT hyper-accumulation on foliar sink strength, as well as a mechanism for phenylethylamine involvement in CT polymerization in Populus are discussed. Starch accrual in source leaves and CT accrual in sink leaves of SG may both contribute to the maintenance of a slow-growth phenotype suited to survival in nutrient-poor habitats. PMID:24336515

  3. Endophyte-Mediated Effects on the Growth and Physiology of Achnatherum sibiricum Are Conditional on Both N and P Availability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Ren, Anzhi; Han, Rong; Yin, Lijia; Wei, Maoying; Gao, Yubao

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of endophyte–grass associations are conditional on nitrogen (N) availability, but the reported responses of these associations to N are inconsistent. We hypothesized that this inconsistency is caused, at least in part, by phosphorus (P) availability. In this experiment, we compared the performance of endophyte-infected (EI) and endophyte-free (EF) Achnatherum sibiricum subjected to four treatments comprising a factorial combination of two levels of N (N+ vs. N−, i.e. N supply vs. N deficiency) and two levels of P (P+ vs. P−, i.e. P supply vs. P deficiency) availability. The results showed that A. sibiricum–Neotyphodium associations were conditional on both N and P availability, but more conditional on N than P. Under N+P− conditions, endophyte infection significantly improved acid phosphatase activity of EI plants, such that the biomass of EI plants was not affected by P deficiency (i.e. similar growth to N+P+ conditions), and resulted in more biomass in EI than EF plants. Under N−P+ conditions, biomass of both EI and EF decreased compared with N+P+; however, EI biomass decreased slowly by decreasing leaf N concentration more rapidly but allocating higher fractions of N to photosynthetic machinery compared with EF plants. This change of N allocation not only improved photosynthetic ability of EI plants but also significantly increased their biomass. Under N−P− conditions, EI plants allocated higher fractions of N to photosynthesis and had greater P concentrations in roots, but there was no significant difference in biomass between EI and EF plants. Our results support the hypothesis that endophyte–grass interactions are dependent on both N and P availability. However, we did not find a clear cost of endophyte infection in A. sibiricum. PMID:23185245

  4. Growth and activity of reservoir microorganisms under carbon capture and storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakoczy, Jana; Gniese, Claudia; Krüger, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Carbon capture and storage is a technology to decelerate global warming by reducing CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. To ensure safe long-term storage of CO2 in the underground a number of factors need to be considered. One of them is microbial activity in storage reservoirs, which can lead to the formation of acidic metabolites, H2S or carbonates which then might affect injectivity, permeability, pressure build-up and long-term operability. Our research focused on the effect of high CO2 concentrations on growth and activity of selected thermophilic fermenting and sulphate-reducing bacteria isolated from deep reservoirs. Experiments with supercritical carbon dioxide at 100 bar completely inhibited growth of freshly inoculated cultures and also caused a rapid decrease of growth of a pre-grown culture. This demonstrated that supercritical carbon dioxide had a certain sterilizing effect on cells. This effect was not observed in control cultures with 100 bar of hydrostatic pressure. However, when provided with a surface for attachment, CO2-inhibited cells restarted growth after CO2 release. The same was observed for organisms able to form spores. Further experiments will examine physiological and molecular properties of the model organism allowing for prediction of its sensitivity and/or adaptability to carbon dioxide in potential future storage sites.

  5. The pH profile for acid-induced elongation of coleoptile and epicotyl sections is consistent with the acid-growth theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.; Buckley, G.; Nowbar, S.; Lew, N. M.; Stinemetz, C.; Evans, M. L.; Rayle, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    The acid-growth theory predicts that a solution with a pH identical to that of the apoplast of auxin-treated tissues (4.5.-5.0) should induce elongation at a rate comparable to that of auxin. Different pH profiles for elongation have been obtained, however, depending on the type of pretreatment between harvest of the sections and the start of the pH-incubations. To determine the acid sensitivity under in vivo conditions, oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile, maize (Zea mays L.) coleoptile and pea (Pisum sativum L.) epicotyl sections were abraded so that exogenous buffers could penetrate the free space, and placed in buffered solutions of pH 3.5-6.5 without any preincubation. The extension, without auxin, was measured over the first 3 h. Experiments conducted in three laboratories produced similar results. For all three species, sections placed in buffer without pretreatment elongated at least threefold faster at pH 5.0 than at 6.0 or 6.5, and the rate elongation at pH 5.0 was comparable to that induced by auxin. Pretreatment of abraded sections with pH-6.5 buffer or distilled water adjusted to pH 6.5 or above gave similar results. We conclude that the pH present in the apoplast of auxin-treated coleoptile and stems is sufficiently low to account for the initial growth response to auxin.

  6. Growth and Survival of Some Probiotic Strains in Simulated Ice Cream Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homayouni, A.; Ehsani, M. R.; Azizi, A.; Razavi, S. H.; Yarmand, M. S.

    A Completely Randomized Design (CRD) experiment was applied in triplicates to evaluate the survival of four probiotic strains in simulated ice cream conditions. The growth and survival rate of these probiotic strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium longum) in varying amount of sucrose (10, 15, 20 and 25%), oxygen scavenging components (0.05% L-cysteine and 0.05% L-ascorbate) and temperatures (4 and -20°C) during different periods of time (1, 2 and 3 months) were evaluated in MRS-broth medium. Optical density at 580 nm was used to measure growth. Lactobacilli strains proved to be highly resistant in comparison with Biffidobacteria strains. The viable cell number of Lactobacillus casei in different sucrose concentrations, different oxidoreduction potentials and refrigeration temperature was 1x1010, 2x108 and 5x107 cfu mL-1, respectively. Growth and survival rate of Lactobacillus casei showed to be the highest.

  7. Environmental conditions impacting juvenile Chinook salmon growth off central California: An ecosystem model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, J.; Huff, D. D.; Martin, B. T.; Jackson, D. W.; Edwards, C. A.; Rose, K. A.; Curchitser, E. N.; Hedstrom, K. S.; Lindley, S. T.; Wells, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    A fully coupled ecosystem model is used to identify the effects of environmental conditions and upwelling variability on growth of juvenile Chinook salmon in central California coastal waters. The ecosystem model framework consists of an ocean circulation submodel, a biogeochemical submodel, and an individual-based submodel for salmon. Simulation results indicate that years favorable for juvenile salmon growth off central California are characterized by particularly intense early season upwelling (i.e., March through May), leading to enhanced krill concentrations during summer near the location of ocean entry (i.e., Gulf of the Farallones). Seasonally averaged growth rates in the model are generally consistent with observed values and suggest that juvenile salmon emigrating later in the season (i.e., late May and June) achieve higher weight gains during their first 90 days of ocean residency.

  8. Growth and characterization of urea-oxalic acid crystals by solution growth technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithambaram, V.; Jerome Das, S.; Krishnan, Sivakumar; Basheer Ahamed, M.; Arivudai Nambi, R.

    2013-11-01

    Single crystals of urea-oxalic acid (UOA) have been grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the grown crystals belong to monoclinic system having space group P21/C. The presence of functional groups was confirmed by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Optical absorption studies show very low absorption in entire visible region and the UV cut-off is found to be around 240 nm. Thermal analysis studies were carried out using TG/DTA analysis and the grown crystal is thermally stable up to 180 °C. Dielectric constant studies confirm the ferroelectric property of the materials and very low dielectric loss reveals very high purity of the crystal.

  9. Fermentation Conditions that Affect Clavulanic Acid Production in Streptomyces clavuligerus: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Jacob, Sabrina Anne; Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    The β-lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid is frequently used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics to treat a wide spectrum of infectious diseases. Clavulanic acid prevents drug resistance by pathogens against these β-lactam antibiotics by preventing the degradation of the β-lactam ring, thus ensuring eradication of these harmful microorganisms from the host. This systematic review provides an overview on the fermentation conditions that affect the production of clavulanic acid in the firstly described producer, Streptomyces clavuligerus. A thorough search was conducted using predefined terms in several electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect, EBSCO), from database inception to June 30th 2015. Studies must involve wild-type Streptomyces clavuligerus, and full texts needed to be available. A total of 29 eligible articles were identified. Based on the literature, several factors were identified that could affect the production of clavulanic acid in S. clavuligerus. The addition of glycerol or other vegetable oils (e.g., olive oil, corn oil) could potentially affect clavulanic acid production. Furthermore, some amino acids such as arginine and ornithine, could serve as potential precursors to increase clavulanic acid yield. The comparison of different fermentation systems revealed that fed-batch fermentation yields higher amounts of clavulanic acid as compared to batch fermentation, probably due to the maintenance of substrates and constant monitoring of certain entities (such as pH, oxygen availability, etc.). Overall, these findings provide vital knowledge and insight that could assist media optimization and fermentation design for clavulanic acid production in S. clavuligerus. PMID:27148211

  10. Fermentation Conditions that Affect Clavulanic Acid Production in Streptomyces clavuligerus: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ser, Hooi-Leng; Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Jacob, Sabrina Anne; Palanisamy, Uma Devi; Chan, Kok-Gan; Goh, Bey-Hing; Lee, Learn-Han

    2016-01-01

    The β-lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid is frequently used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics to treat a wide spectrum of infectious diseases. Clavulanic acid prevents drug resistance by pathogens against these β-lactam antibiotics by preventing the degradation of the β-lactam ring, thus ensuring eradication of these harmful microorganisms from the host. This systematic review provides an overview on the fermentation conditions that affect the production of clavulanic acid in the firstly described producer, Streptomyces clavuligerus. A thorough search was conducted using predefined terms in several electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect, EBSCO), from database inception to June 30th 2015. Studies must involve wild-type Streptomyces clavuligerus, and full texts needed to be available. A total of 29 eligible articles were identified. Based on the literature, several factors were identified that could affect the production of clavulanic acid in S. clavuligerus. The addition of glycerol or other vegetable oils (e.g., olive oil, corn oil) could potentially affect clavulanic acid production. Furthermore, some amino acids such as arginine and ornithine, could serve as potential precursors to increase clavulanic acid yield. The comparison of different fermentation systems revealed that fed-batch fermentation yields higher amounts of clavulanic acid as compared to batch fermentation, probably due to the maintenance of substrates and constant monitoring of certain entities (such as pH, oxygen availability, etc.). Overall, these findings provide vital knowledge and insight that could assist media optimization and fermentation design for clavulanic acid production in S. clavuligerus. PMID:27148211

  11. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Under Spectrum Loading in Various Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheevskiy, S.; Glinka, G.; Lee, E.

    2013-03-01

    model. The method can be also used to predict fatigue crack growth under constant amplitude and spectrum loading in various environmental conditions such as vacuum, air, and corrosive environment providing that appropriate limited constant amplitude fatigue crack growth data obtained in the same environment are available. The proposed methodology is equally suitable for fatigue analysis of smooth, notched, and cracked components.

  12. Relations between coenzyme A and presumptive acyl carrier protein in different conditions of streptococcal growth.

    PubMed

    Das, D N; Toennies, G

    1969-06-01

    Exploration of the specific role of cystine in the postexponential growth of Streptococcus faecalis led to an inquiry into the fate of cellular coenzyme A (CoA) and acyl carrier protein (ACP), both of which depend for their biosynthesis on cystine and pantothenate as precursors. In S. faecalis cells labeled by growth in the presence of (14)C-pantothenate, the label could be separated on the basis of solubility at pH 2.1 into two fractions of sharply differing metabolic characteristics. The fractions were not purified, but the soluble (14)C behaved analytically like CoA, and the insoluble (14)C was considered to represent an ACP-like entity on the basis of circumstantial evidence. The fate of these two fractions under various conditions of growth was studied. When the medium contained an excess of the needed precursors, the cellular content of CoA and ACP appeared to remain constant during exponential growth, and in a molar ratio of about 4 CoA to 1 ACP. Cellular ACP, once formed, appeared to be stable under these conditions, but CoA was degraded and replaced at the rate of approximately 20% per division period. With restrictive levels of pantothenate in the medium, initially formed CoA disappeared during growth, as a result, apparently of being converted to ACP. However, when the resulting CoA-depleted cells were returned to a medium containing enough pantothenate, resumption of normal growth was preceded by a lag period, during which rapid conversion of ACP to CoA appeared to take place. PMID:4977991

  13. Influence of bovine lactoferrin on the growth of selected probiotic bacteria under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Wen; Ku, Yu-We; Chu, Fang-Yi

    2014-10-01

    Bovine lactoferrin (bLf) is a natural glycoprotein, and it shows broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. However, reports on the influences of bLf on probiotic bacteria have been mixed. We examined the effects of apo-bLf (between 0.25 and 128 mg/mL) on both aerobic and anaerobic cultures of probiotics. We found that bLf had similar effects on the growth of probiotics under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, and that it actively and significantly (at concentrations of >0.25 mg/mL) retarded the growth rate of Bifidobacterium bifidum (ATCC 29521), B. longum (ATCC 15707), B. lactis (BCRC 17394), B. infantis (ATCC 15697), Lactobacillus reuteri (ATCC 23272), L. rhamnosus (ATCC 53103), and L. coryniformis (ATCC 25602) in a dose-dependent manner. Otherwise, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were 128 or >128 mg/mL against B. bifidum, B. longum, B. lactis, L. reuteri, and L. rhamnosus (ATCC 53103). With regard to MICs, bLf showed at least four-fold lower inhibitory effect on probiotics than on pathogens. Intriguingly, bLf (>0.25 mg/mL) significantly enhanced the growth of Rhamnosus (ATCC 7469) and L. acidophilus (BCRC 14065) by approximately 40-200 %, during their late periods of growth. Supernatants produced from aerobic but not anaerobic cultures of L. acidophilus reduced the growth of Escherichia coli by about 20 %. Thus, bLf displayed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the growth of most probiotic strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. An antibacterial supernatant prepared from the aerobic cultures may have significant practical use. PMID:24916115

  14. Screening of Burkholderia sp. WGB31 producing anisic acid from anethole and optimization of fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Peihong; Song, Zhangyang; Zhang, Zhenyong; Zeng, Huahe; Tang, Xianlai; Jiang, Chengjian; Li, Junfang; Wu, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Anisic acid, the precursor of a variety of food flavors and industrial raw materials, can be bioconversed from anethole which extracted from star anise fruits. WGB31 strain with anisic acid molar production rate of 10.25% was isolated and identified as Burkholderia sp. Three significant influential factors, namely, glucose concentration, initial pH value, and medium volume were selected and their effects were evaluated by Box-Behnken Design (BBD). Regression analysis was performed to determine response surface methodology and the significance was tested to obtain the process model of optimal conditions for producing anisic acid. The fermentation conditions at the stable point of the model were obtained: glucose 6 g L(-1) , pH 6.2, culture medium volume 61 mL in a triangular flask with 250 ml volume. Verification test indicated that the production rate of anisic acid was 30.7%, which was three times of that before optimizing. The results provide a basis and reference for producing anisic acid by microbial transformation. PMID:25100156

  15. Effects of Eimeria acervulina infection severity on growth performance, apparent ileal amino acid digestibility, and plasma concentrations of amino acids, carotenoids, and α1-acid glycoprotein in broilers.

    PubMed

    Rochell, S J; Parsons, C M; Dilger, R N

    2016-07-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate growth performance, apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of amino acids, and plasma concentrations of amino acids, carotenoids, and α1-acid glycoprotein, an acute-phase protein, in broilers inoculated with graded doses of E. acervulina oocysts. Ross 308 male broilers (400 total) were housed in battery cages from 1 to 21 d post-hatch and received common corn-soybean meal-based diets throughout the experiment. At 9 d post-hatch, birds were individually weighed and allotted to 4 treatment groups with 10 replicate cages of 10 birds per cage. At 15 d post-hatch, all birds were inoculated with 1 mL of distilled water that contained 0, 2.5 × 10(5), 5.0 × 10(5), or 1.0 × 10(6) sporulated E. acervulina oocysts. At 21 d, birds were euthanized for collection of blood and ileal digesta. Body weight gain and feed efficiency decreased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing E. acervulina dose. With the exception of Trp and Gly, AID values decreased (P < 0.05) linearly or quadratically for all amino acids by an average of 2.6 percentage units for birds inoculated with 1.0 × 10(6) oocysts compared with uninfected birds. Infection with E. acervulina caused a quadratic decrease (P < 0.05) in plasma carotenoid concentrations. Plasma concentrations of Arg and Tyr decreased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing E. acervulina inoculation dose and plasma Gln and Asn decreased quadratically (P < 0.01). Linear increases (P < 0.05) were observed for plasma Lys, Leu, Ile, Val, Pro, and Orn as E. acervulina inoculation dose increased. Plasma α1-acid glycoprotein of broilers was not influenced (P > 0.05) by E. acervulina infection. In conclusion, E. acervulina challenge adversely impacted growth performance, plasma carotenoids, and AID of amino acids in a dose-dependent manner. However, plasma amino acid responses to graded E. acervulina inoculation doses varied considerably among amino acids. Thus, these results indicated that alterations

  16. Monoraphidium sp. as an algal feedstock for biodiesel: Determining optimal growth conditions in wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Zachary William

    This thesis set out to investigate different conditions for growth of the freshwater algal species Monoraphidium sp. for use as a feedstock for biodiesel. The algae was inoculated into effluent gathered from a local water treatment plant and placed into 50gal mesocosms. Cells were grown at large scale in wastewater, harvested, and run through extractions to collect lipids (26%DW). The lipids were then turned into biodiesel. The algae also removed most of the pollutants in the wastewater, lowering nitrate and phosphate levels usually to less than 1mg/L. Erlenmeyer flask cultures (1L) were used to determine optimal growth conditions for temperature (10°C), light intensity (30microE/m2/sec with a 10 hour photoperiod), and initial inoculation density (1x104cells/mL). The addition of bicarbonate during the initial or exponential growth phase had no effect on growth. It was concluded that Monoraphidium sp. grown in USDA Hardiness Zone 5 is capable of producing biodiesel.

  17. Talc based exopolysaccharides formulation enhancing growth and production of Hellianthus annuus under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Tewari, S; Arora, K

    2014-01-01

    Stress tolerating strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PF07 possessing plant growth promoting activity was screened for the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS). EPS production was monitored in the cell free culture supernatant (CFCS) and extracted EPS was further purified by thin layer chromatography. EPS producing cells were taken to design talc based formulation and its efficacy was checked on oilseed crop sunflower (Hellianthus annuus), under in vivo saline conditions (soil irrigated with 125 mM of saline water). Application of bioformulation significantly enhanced the yield and growth attributes of the plant in comparison to control (untreated seeds) under stress and non—stress conditions. Germination rate, plant length, dry weight and seed weight increased remarkably. The above findings suggest the application and benefits of utilizing EPS formulation in boosting early seedling emergence, enhancing plant growth parameters, increasing seed weight and mitigating stress in saline affected regions. Such bioformulation may enhance RAS/RT (Root Adhering Soil to Root Tissue ratio), texture of the soil, increase porosity, improve uptake of nutrients, and hence may be considered as commercially important formulation for renovation of stressed sites and enhancing plant growth. PMID:25535716

  18. Influence of growth conditions on tin incorporation in GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandre, F.; Raisin, C.; Abdalla, M.I.; Brenac, A.; Masson, J.M.

    1980-08-01

    Intentional perturbations applied to the growth parameters of Sn-doped GaAs layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been performed in order to investigate the tin incorporation mechanism. The start, the interruption, and the end of growth as well as a variation of fluxes or substrate temperature have been studied, using either the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) measurement of tin accumulation on the surface, or C-V derived free-carrier concentration profile versus any of these growth parameters. The theoretical model proposed by Wood and Joyce, based on a time-delayed incorporation mechanism, has been found to fit the observed results, especially for As-rich surface, provided that an incorporation mechanism of second order is assumed. For Ga-rich conditions (T/sub s/>580 /sup 0/C), a new result has been recognized, i.e., a significant reduction of carrier concentration as T/sub s/ is increased. The assumption of a partially acceptor nature of tin incident atoms under these growth conditions does not seem to fully explain this result. On the other hand, this may be better understood assuming a certain amount of tin atoms being re-evaporated in the high substrate temperature range. This behavior induces a temporarily weaker accumulation at the surface, and hence a relatively smaller incorporation rate.

  19. [Growth of the Orinoco Caiman (Crocodylus intermedius, Crocodylia: Crocodylidae) under two captivity conditions].

    PubMed

    Perez, Aldeima T T

    2008-03-01

    Growth of the Orinoco Caiman (Crocodylus intermedius, Crocodylia: Crocodylidae) under two captivity conditions. In order to determine the growth of Caiman of the Orinoco (Crocodylus intermedius) under two conditions of captivity, 40 specimens were raised during 11 months and 15 days in two circular tanks, with 28.3 m2 of surface area and a volume of 62.2 m3 in each tank. The tanks were built with concrete walls and guarded blocks covered internally with sheets of myrrhlike resin, and a roof of galvanized sheets. One tank was covered partially with the galvanized sheets (tank I), the other was totally covered (tank II). Twenty caimans were placed in each tank, and both groups were fed with 85% beef, 10% fresh fish, 5% hen eggs and a mixture of minerals and vitamins. The length and weight differed significantly between the groups (p < 0.001). Mean growth (103.0 +/- 6.81 cm) and weight (3 987 +/- 0.98 g) were higher in tank II, (tank I: 88.9 +/- 7.58 cm; 2 705 +/- 0.69 g). The greater growth in tank II reflects higher air and water temperatures. The survival rate was 97.5%. These results can be used for rearing caimans in captivity for conservation and commercial purposes. PMID:18624249

  20. Optimization of photobioreactor growth conditions for a cyanobacterium expressing mosquitocidal Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins.

    PubMed

    Ketseoglou, Irene; Bouwer, Gustav

    2013-08-10

    An Anabaena strain (PCC 7120#11) that was genetically engineered to express Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis cry genes has shown good larvicidal activity against Anopheles arabiensis, a major vector of malaria in Africa. Response surface methodology was used to evaluate the relationship between key growth factors and the volumetric productivity of PCC 7120#11 in an indoor, flat-plate photobioreactor. The interaction of input CO₂ concentration and airflow rate had a statistically significant effect on the volumetric productivity of PCC 7120#11, as did the interaction of airflow rate and photosynthetic photon flux density. Model-based numerical optimization indicated that the optimal factor level combination for maximizing PCC 7120#11 volumetric productivity was a photosynthetic photon flux density of 154 μmol m⁻² s⁻¹ and air enriched with 3.18% (v/v) CO₂ supplied at a flow rate of 1.02 vessel volumes per minute. At the levels evaluated in the study, none of the growth factors had a significant effect on the median lethal concentration of PCC 7120#11 against An. arabiensis larvae. This finding is important because loss of mosquitocidal activity under growth conditions that maximize volumetric productivity would impact on the feasibility of using PCC 7120#11 in malaria vector control programs. The study showed the usefulness of response surface methodology for determination of the optimal growth conditions for a cyanobacterium that is genetically engineered to have larvicidal activity against malaria vectors. PMID:23732832

  1. β-Amino-n-butyric Acid Regulates Seedling Growth and Disease Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeong Chae; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Lee, Young Hee; Lee, Sang Woo; Chae, Yun-Soek; Kang, Hyun-Kyung; Yun, Byung-Wook; Hong, Jeum Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Non-protein amino acid, β-amino-n-butyric acid (BABA), has been involved in diverse physiological processes including seedling growth, stress tolerance and disease resistance of many plant species. In the current study, treatment of kimchi cabbage seedlings with BABA significantly reduced primary root elongation and cotyledon development in a dose-dependent manner, which adverse effects were similar to the plant response to exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) application. BABA was synergistically contributing ABA-induced growth arrest during the early seedling development. Kimchi cabbage leaves were highly damaged and seedling growth was delayed by foliar spraying with high concentrations of BABA (10 to 20 mM). BABA played roles differentially in in vitro fungal conidial germination, mycelial growth and conidation of necrotroph Alternaria brassicicola causing black spot disease and hemibiotroph Colletotrichum higginsianum causing anthracnose. Pretreatment with BABA conferred induced resistance of the kimchi cabbage against challenges by the two different classes of fungal pathogens in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that BABA is involved in plant development, fungal development as well as induced fungal disease resistance of kimchi cabbage plant. PMID:25288957

  2. The Key to Acetate: Metabolic Fluxes of Acetic Acid Bacteria under Cocoa Pulp Fermentation-Simulating Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Philipp; Frey, Lasse Jannis; Berger, Antje; Bolten, Christoph Josef; Hansen, Carl Erik

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play an important role during cocoa fermentation, as their main product, acetate, is a major driver for the development of the desired cocoa flavors. Here, we investigated the specialized metabolism of these bacteria under cocoa pulp fermentation-simulating conditions. A carefully designed combination of parallel 13C isotope labeling experiments allowed the elucidation of intracellular fluxes in the complex environment of cocoa pulp, when lactate and ethanol were included as primary substrates among undefined ingredients. We demonstrate that AAB exhibit a functionally separated metabolism during coconsumption of two-carbon and three-carbon substrates. Acetate is almost exclusively derived from ethanol, while lactate serves for the formation of acetoin and biomass building blocks. Although this is suboptimal for cellular energetics, this allows maximized growth and conversion rates. The functional separation results from a lack of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and malic enzymes, typically present in bacteria to interconnect metabolism. In fact, gluconeogenesis is driven by pyruvate phosphate dikinase. Consequently, a balanced ratio of lactate and ethanol is important for the optimum performance of AAB. As lactate and ethanol are individually supplied by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts during the initial phase of cocoa fermentation, respectively, this underlines the importance of a well-balanced microbial consortium for a successful fermentation process. Indeed, AAB performed the best and produced the largest amounts of acetate in mixed culture experiments when lactic acid bacteria and yeasts were both present. PMID:24837393

  3. Features of Scots pine radial growth in conditions of provenance trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, S.

    2012-12-01

    Provenance trial of Scots pine in Boguchany forestry of Krasnoyarsk krai is conducted on two different soils - dark-grey loam forest soil and sod-podzol sandy soil. Complex of negative factors for plant growth and development appears in dry conditions of sandy soil. It could results in decrease of resistance to diseases. Sandy soils in different climatic zones have such common traits as low absorbing capacity, poorness of elemental nutrition, low microbiological activity and moisture capacity, very high water permeability. But Scots pine trees growing in such conditions could have certain advantages and perspectives of use. In the scope of climate change (global warming) the study of Scots pine growth on sandy soil become urgent because of more frequent appearance of dry seasons. Purpose of the work is revelation of radial growth features of Scots pine with different origin in dry conditions of sandy soil and assessment of external factors influence. The main feature of radial growth of majority of studied pine provenances in conditions of sandy soil is presence of significant variation of increment with distinct decline in 25-years old with loss of tree rings in a number of cases. The reason of it is complex of factors: deficit of June precipitation and next following outbreak of fungal disease. Found «frost rings» for all trees of studied clymatypes in 1992 are the consequence of temperature decline from May 21 to June 2 - from 23 C degrees up to 2 C. Perspective climatypes with biggest radial increments and least sensitivity to fungal disease were revealed.

  4. Identification of sRNAs expressed by the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae under disparate growth conditions.

    PubMed

    McClure, Ryan; Tjaden, Brian; Genco, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    In the last several years, bacterial gene regulation via small RNAs (sRNAs) has been recognized as an important mechanism controlling expression of essential proteins that are critical to bacterial growth and metabolism. Technologies such as RNA-seq are rapidly expanding the field of sRNAs and are enabling a global view of the "sRNAome" of several bacterial species. While numerous sRNAs have been identified in a variety of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, only a very small number have been fully characterized in the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the etiological agent of the STD gonorrhea. Here we present the first analysis of N. gonorrhoeae specifically focused on the identification of sRNAs through RNA-seq analysis of the organism cultured under different in vitro growth conditions. Using a new computational program, Rockhopper, to analyze prokaryotic RNA-seq data obtained from N. gonorrhoeae we identified several putative sRNAs and confirmed their expression and size through Northern blot analysis. In addition, RNA was collected from four different growth conditions (iron replete and deplete, as well as with and without co-culture with human endocervical cells). Many of the putative sRNAs identified shoed varying expression levels relative to the different growth conditions examine or were detected only under certain conditions but not others. Comparisons of identified sRNAs with the regulatory pattern of putative mRNA targets revealed possible functional roles for these sRNAs. These studies are the first to carry out a global analysis of N. gonorrhoeae specifically focused on sRNAs and show that RNA-mediated regulation may be an important mechanism of gene control in this human pathogen. PMID:25221548

  5. Plant growth inhibition by cis-cinnamoyl glucosides and cis-cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Morita, Sayaka; Furubayashi, Akihiro; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Harada, Jiro

    2005-03-01

    Spiraea thunbergii Sieb. contains 1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (CG) and 6-O-(4'-hydroxy-2'-methylene-butyroyl)-1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (BCG) as major plant growth inhibiting constituents. In the present study, we determined the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG on root elongation of germinated seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa), pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus), red clover (Trifolium pratense), timothy (Phleum pratense), and bok choy (Brassica rapa var chinensis) in comparison with that of two well-known growth inhibitors, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and (+)-2-cis-4-trans-abscisic acid (cis-ABA), as well as two related chemicals of CG and BCG, cis-cinnamic acid (cis-CA) and trans-cinnamic acid (trans-CA). The EC50 values for CG and BCG on lettuce were roughly one-half to one-quarter of the value for cis-ABA. cis-Cinnamic acid, which is a component of CG and BCG, possessed almost the same inhibitory activity of CG and BCG, suggesting that the essential chemical structure responsible for the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG is cis-CA. The cis-stereochemistry of the methylene moiety is apparently needed for high inhibitory activity, as trans-CA had an EC50 value roughly 100 times that of CG, BCG, and cis-CA. Growth inhibition by CG, BCG, and cis-CA was influenced by the nature of the soil in the growing medium: alluvial soil preserved the bioactivity, whereas volcanic ash and calcareous soils inhibited bioactivity. These findings indicate a potential role of cis-CA and its glucosides as allelochemicals for use as plant growth regulators in agricultural fields. PMID:15898503

  6. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:27052215

  7. Conjugated bile acids promote cholangiocarcinoma cell invasive growth through activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runping; Zhao, Renping; Zhou, Xiqiao; Liang, Xiuyin; Campbell, Deanna JW; Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Luyong; Shi, Ruihua; Wang, Guangji; Pandak, William M; Sirica, Alphonse E; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an often fatal primary malignancy of the intra- and extrahepatic biliary tract that is commonly associated with chronic cholestasis and significantly elevated levels of primary and conjugated bile acids (CBAs), which are correlated with bile duct obstruction (BDO). BDO has also recently been shown to promote CCA progression. However, whereas there is increasing evidence linking chronic cholestasis and abnormal bile acid profiles to CCA development and progression, the specific mechanisms by which bile acids may be acting to promote cholangiocarcinogenesis and invasive biliary tumor growth have not been fully established. Recent studies have shown that CBAs, but not free bile acids, stimulate CCA cell growth, and that an imbalance in the ratio of free to CBAs may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of CCA. Also, CBAs are able to activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2- and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B (AKT)-signaling pathways through sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) in rodent hepatocytes. In the current study, we demonstrate S1PR2 to be highly expressed in rat and human CCA cells, as well as in human CCA tissues. We further show that CBAs activate the ERK1/2- and AKT-signaling pathways and significantly stimulate CCA cell growth and invasion in vitro. Taurocholate (TCA)-mediated CCA cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were significantly inhibited by JTE-013, a chemical antagonist of S1PR2, or by lentiviral short hairpin RNA silencing of S1PR2. In a novel organotypic rat CCA coculture model, TCA was further found to significantly increase the growth of CCA cell spheroidal/“duct-like” structures, which was blocked by treatment with JTE-013. Conclusion: Our collective data support the hypothesis that CBAs promote CCA cell-invasive growth through S1PR2. PMID:24700501

  8. Characteristics of bacterial and fungal growth in plastic bottled beverages under a consuming condition model.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Maiko; Ohnishi, Takahiro; Araki, Emiko; Kanda, Takashi; Tomita, Atsuko; Ozawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Keiichi; Sugiyama, Kanji; Konuma, Hirotaka; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    Microbial contamination in unfinished beverages can occur when drinking directly from the bottle. Various microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens, are able to grow in these beverages at room temperature or in a refrigerator. In this study, we elucidated the characteristics of microorganism growth in bottled beverages under consuming condition models. Furthermore, we provide insight into the safety of partially consumed bottled beverages with respect to food hygiene. We inoculated microorganisms, including foodborne pathogens, into various plastic bottled beverages and analysed the dynamic growth of microorganisms as well as bacterial toxin production in the beverages. Eight bottled beverage types were tested in this study, namely green tea, apple juice drink, tomato juice, carbonated drink, sport drink, coffee with milk, isotonic water and mineral water, and in these beverages several microorganism types were used: nine bacteria including three toxin producers, three yeasts, and five moulds. Following inoculation, the bottles were incubated at 35°C for 48 h for bacteria, 25°C for 48 h for yeasts, and 25°C for 28 days for moulds. During the incubation period, the number of bacteria and yeasts and visible changes in mould-growth were determined over time. Our results indicated that combinations of the beverage types and microorganism species correlated with the degree of growth. Regarding factors that affect the growth and toxin-productivity of microorganisms in beverages, it is speculated that the pH, static/shaking culture, temperature, additives, or ingredients, such as carbon dioxide or organic matter (especially of plant origin), may be important for microorganism growth in beverages. Our results suggest that various types of unfinished beverages have microorganism growth and can include food borne pathogens and bacterial toxins. Therefore, our results indicate that in terms of food hygiene it is necessary to consume beverages immediately after opening

  9. Comparative metabolomics analysis of docosahexaenoic acid fermentation processes by Schizochytrium sp. under different oxygen availability conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Ren, Lu-Jing; Sun, Guan-Nan; Qu, Liang; Huang, He

    2013-05-01

    The intracellular metabolic profile characterization of Schizochytrium sp. throughout docosahexaenoic acid fermentation was investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Metabolite profiles originating from Schizochytrium sp. under normal and limited oxygen supply conditions were distinctive and distinguished by principal components analysis (PCA). A total of more than 60 intracellular metabolites were detected and quantified with the levels of some metabolites involved in central carbon metabolism varying throughout both processes. Both fermentation processes were differentiated into three main phases by principal components analysis. Potential biomarkers responsible for distinguishing the different fermentation phases were identified as glutamic acid, proline, glycine, alanine, and glucose. In addition, alanine, glutamic acid, glucose, inositol, ornithine, and galactose were found to make great contribution for dry cell weight and fatty acid composition during normal and limited oxygen supply fermentations. Furthermore, significantly higher levels of succinate and several amino acids in cells of limited oxygen supply fermentation revealed that they might play important roles in resisting oxygen deficiency and increasing DHA synthesis during the lipid accumulation. These findings provide novel insights into the metabolomic characteristics during docosahexaenoic acid fermentation processes by Schizochytrium sp. PMID:23586678

  10. Retinoic acid modulates rat Ito cell proliferation, collagen, and transforming growth factor beta production.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B H; Kramer, R T; Davidson, N O

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that vitamin A plays an inhibitory role with respect to "activation" of the hepatic Ito cell, a likely effector of hepatic fibrogenesis. Ito cell "activation" during fibrogenesis is characterized by a decrease in intracellular vitamin A and an increase in cellular proliferation and collagen production. To explore the hypothesis that retinoids have the capacity to diminish Ito cell activation, cultured Ito cells were exposed to retinoic acid and its effects assessed on three key features: cell proliferation, collagen protein production and mRNA abundance, and transforming growth factor beta protein production. Retinoic acid was 100-1,000X more potent than retinol with respect to inhibition of Ito cell proliferation. Interstitial collagen and transforming growth factor beta production were also reduced by 10(-6) M retinoic acid. The relative abundance of type I collagen mRNA however, was not significantly altered. By contrast, retinoic acid administration to rats caused a marked reduction in the abundance of type I collagen mRNA in both total hepatic and purified Ito cell RNA. The relative abundance of rat hepatic fibronectin or apolipoprotein E mRNA was not significantly altered. These studies demonstrate that retinoic acid can differentially modulate several key features of hepatic fibrogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Images PMID:2254460

  11. Lactobacillus gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, for growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, K; Matsunaga, K; Takihiro, S; Moritoki, A; Ryuto, S; Kawai, Y; Masuda, T; Miyamoto, T

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus gasseri is a widespread commensal lactic acid bacterium inhabiting human mucosal niches and has many beneficial effects as a probiotic. However, L. gasseri is difficult to grow in milk, which hurts usability for the food industry. It had been previously reported that supplementation with yeast extract or proteose peptone, including peptides, enables L. gasseri to grow well in milk. In this study, our objective was to confirm peptide requirement of L. gasseri and evaluate efficacy of peptide release by enzymatic proteolysis on growth of L. gassei in milk. Three strains of L. gasseri did not grow well in modified DeMan, Rogosa, Sharpe broth without any nitrogen sources (MRS-N), but addition of a casein-derived peptide mixture, tryptone, promoted growth. In contrast, little effect was observed after adding casein or a casein-derived amino acid mixture, casamino acids. These results indicate that L. gasseri requires peptides, not proteins or free amino acids, among milk-derived nitrogen sources for growth. Lactobacillus gasseri JCM 1131T hardly had growth capacity in 6 kinds of milk-based media: bovine milk, human milk, skim milk, cheese whey, modified MRS-N (MRSL-N) supplemented with acid whey, and MRSL-N supplemented with casein. Moreover, treatment with digestive proteases, particularly pepsin, to release peptides made it grow well in each milk-based medium. The pepsin treatment was the most effective for growth of strain JCM 1131T in skim milk among the tested food-grade proteases such as trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, calf rennet, ficin, bromelain, and papain. As well as strain JCM 1131T, pepsinolysis of milk improved growth of other L. gasseri strains and some strains of enteric lactobacilli such as Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus gallinarum, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus reuteri. These results suggest that some relatives of L. gasseri also use peptides as desirable nitrogen sources, and that milk may be a good supplier of nutritious

  12. The effect of pantothenic acid deficiency on keratinocyte proliferation and the synthesis of keratinocyte growth factor and collagen in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisaku; Kusama, Miho; Onda, Masaaki; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) and panthenol, an alcohol derivative of pantothenic acid, have beneficial moisturizing effects on the skin. However, few studies have investigated the mechanism of action of pantothenic acid on skin tissues. We tried to clarify the role of pantothenic acid on skin function by using keratinocytes and fibroblasts. The depletion of pantothenic acid from the culture medium suppressed keratinocyte proliferation and promoted differentiation. Moreover, pantothenic acid depletion decreased the synthesis of keratinocyte growth factor and procollagen 4a2 in fibroblasts. These results suggest that pantothenic acid is essential for maintaining keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. PMID:21258175

  13. Nuclear division cycle in Neurospora crassa hyphae under different growth conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Martegani, E; Levi, M; Trezzi, F; Alberghina, L

    1980-01-01

    Treatment with picolinic acid blocked Neurospora crassa nuclei in G1, and recovery from the treatment allowed a synchronous wave of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis to occur. Nuclei, which appeared as compact globular bodies during the period of blockage, assumed a ring shape during the following S phase, which was also maintained in the G2 phase. The proportion of compact globular nuclei was much higher in hyphae growing at lower rates, whereas that of ring nuclei increased when the hyphae were growing at higher rates. Horseshoe nuclei (probably mitotic nuclei) and double ring nuclei were also observed in growing hyphae, but their frequencies were low and fairly independent of the rate of growth. The length of the S phase of the Neurospora nuclear division cycle was determined to be about 30 min. From the frequencies of the phase-specific nuclear shapes, the durations of the G1 phase and the combined S plus G2 phases were calculated. The results showed that variations in the growth rates of the mycelia were mainly coupled with variations in the G1 phase of the nuclear division cycle. For mycelia growing in minimal sucrose, the lengths of all of the phases of the nuclear division cycle were estimated. Images PMID:6445357

  14. Effect of growth phase and acid shock on Helicobacter pylori cagA expression.

    PubMed Central

    Karita, M; Tummuru, M K; Wirth, H P; Blaser, M J

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains possessing cagA are associated with peptic ulceration. To understand the regulation of expression of cagA, picB, associated with interleukin-8 induction, and ureA, encoding the small urease subunit, we created gene fusions of cagA, ureA, and picB of strain 3401, using a promoterless reporter (xylE). Expression of XylE after growth in broth culture revealed that basal levels of expression of cagA and urea in H. pylori were substantially greater than for picB. For cagA expression in stationary-phase cells, brief exposure to acid pH caused a significant increase in xylE expression compared with neutral pH. In contrast, expression of xylE in urea or picB decreased after parallel exposure to acid pH (pH 7 > 6 > 5 > 4), regardless of the growth phase. Expression of the CagA protein varied with growth phase and pH exposure in parallel with the observed transcriptional variation. The concentration of CagA in a cell membrane-enriched fraction after growth at pH 6 was significantly higher than after growth at pH 5 or 7. We conclude that the promoterless reporter xylE is useful for studying the regulation of gene expression in H. pylori and that regulation of CagA production occurs mainly at the transcriptional level. PMID:8890198

  15. Growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Zea mays seedlings deficient in abscisic acid and gibberellic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Dickey, K.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if gibberellic acid (GA) and/or abscisic acid (ABA) are necessary for graviresponsiveness by primary roots of Zea mays. To accomplish this objective we measured the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of seedlings in which the synthesis of ABA and GA was inhibited collectively and individually by genetic and chemical means. Roots of seedlings treated with Fluridone (an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis) and Ancymidol (an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis) were characterized by slower growth rates but not significantly different gravicultures as compared to untreated controls. Gravicurvatures of primary roots of d-5 mutants (having undetectable levels of GA) and vp-9 mutants (having undectable levels of ABA) were not significantly different from those of wild-type seedlings. Roots of seedlings in which the biosynthesis of ABA and GA was collectively inhibited were characterized by gravicurvatures not significantly different for those of controls. These results (1) indicate that drastic reductions in the amount of ABA and GA in Z. mays seedlings do not significantly alter root graviresponsiveness, (2) suggest that neither ABA nor GA is necessary for root gravicurvature, and (3) indicate that root gravicurvature is not necessarily proportional to root elongation.

  16. Isonicotinic acid hydrazide inhibits cell population growth during teratogenesis of chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M V; Shah, V B; Modak, S P

    1991-01-01

    In chick embryos treated with a 4 hr pulse of 7.2 X 10(-5) M isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) the cell population growth is inhibited with an increased population doubling time. Teratogenised blastoderm cells complete their ongoing cell cycle and arrest in G1 phase. A chase with an equimolar concentration of pyridoxal-5-phosphate restores the growth rate after a lag of 4 hr equivalent to the duration of treatment with INH. Presumptive mesoblast cells invaginated through the primitive streak and neuroectoblast cells induced prior to the application of INH differentiate, while the teratogen inhibits morphogenesis and organization of organ primordia. PMID:1864614

  17. Mathematical modeling of growth of Salmonella in raw ground beef under isothermal conditions from 10 to 45 Degree C

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop primary and secondary models to describe the growth of Salmonella in raw ground beef. Primary and secondary models can be integrated into a dynamic model that can predict the microbial growth under varying environmental conditions. Growth data of Salmonel...

  18. Comparative effects of auxin and abscisic acid on growth, hydrogen ion efflux and gravitropism in primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. L.; Mulkey, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to test the idea that auxin action on root growth may be mediated by H(+) movement, the correlation of auxin action on growth and H(+) movement in roots was examined along with changes in H(+) efflux patterns associated with the asymmetric growth which occurs during gravitropism. The effects of indoleacetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (AbA) on growth, H(+) secretion, and gravitropism in roots were compared. Results show a close correlation existent between H(+) efflux and growth in maize roots. In intact roots there is strong H(+) efflux from the elongation zone. Growth-promoting concentrations of IAA stimulate H(+) efflux. During gravitropism the H(+) efflux from the elongation zone becomes asymmetric; the evidence indicates that auxin redistribution contributes to the development of acid efflux asymmetry. That AbA stimulates root growth is reflected in its ability to stimulate H(+) efflux from apical root segments.

  19. Identification of melatonin in Trichoderma spp. and detection of melatonin content under controlled-stress growth conditions from T. asperellum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Zhao, Fengzhou; Liu, Zhen; Zuo, Yuhu; Hou, Jumei; Wang, Yanjie

    2016-07-01

    T. koningii, T. harzianum, T. asperellum, T. longibrachiatum, and T. viride were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to determine whether melatonin is present. Results showed that there were abundant amounts of endogenous melatonin in five Trichoderma species, but no melatonin was found in any of the culture filtrates. T. asperellum had the highest amount of melatonin (27.588 ± 0.326 μg g(-1) dry mass), followed by T. koningii, T. harzianum, T. longibrachiatum, and T. viride. The endogenous melatonin content of T. asperellum in controlled-stress growth conditions was also detected. The data showed that chemical stressors (CdCl2 , CuSO4 , and H2 O2 ) provoked an increase in endogenous melatonin levels. CdCl2 had the highest stimulatory effect on melatonin production, as the product reached reaching up to three times the melatonin content of the control. NaCl stimulated a decrease of melatonin. Acidic conditions (pH 3 and pH 5) as well as slightly alkaline conditions (pH 9) resulted in an increase in the melatonin content, whereas pH11 resulted in a significant decrease in the melatonin content, only 12.276 ± 0.205 μg g(-1) dry mass. The current study is first to report melatonin content and the change of melatonin content under different stress situations in Trichoderma spp. PMID:26367376

  20. A Time-Dependent Numerical Model for Spherically Symmetric Hailstone Growth Thermodynamics under Constant Ambient Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozowski, E. P.; D'Amours, R.

    1980-08-01

    A model of spherical hailstone growth thermodynamics is presented, and used to examine the validity of the continuous growth and heat balance assumptions frequently employed in the `classical' hail growth models. The model is similar to the spherically symmetric model formulated by Macklin and Payne (1969), but solutions to the model equations are obtained by means of finite-difference numerical methods. In the model, we do not try to simulate the discrete accretion process of individual drops. Instead, we attempt to identify the implications of the discrete, time-dependent nature of the icing process, by examining the accretion of a thin uniform layer of supercooled water over the entire surface of the sphere. The heat transfer equations both with the air and within the hailstone axe then solved assuming radial symmetry. By the addition of several such layers, the finite growth of a spherical hailstone can be simulated. In the present paper, only growth in constant ambient conditions is considered. It is shown that there are large internal heat fluxes during the interval between the accretion of successive layers (typically 1 s), which cause the temperatures near the surface to oscillate several degrees above and below their time-mean value. Nevertheless, the time-averaged temperature over an accretion cycle is almost uniform throughout the hailstone and, when the environmental conditions are constant, is approximately equal to the equilibrium surface temperature predicted by the `classical' models. As the hailstone grows under constant environmental conditions, it continually adapts to the classical equilibrium temperature, warming up almost uniformly throughout. The time scale for this adjustment to a quasi-equilibrium state is found to be of the order of the internal diffusive time scale R2/k. It is speculated therefore that if the environmental conditions change slowly (over time scales large compared with R2/k) the hailstone thermodynamics will be adequately

  1. Growth hormone reverses excitotoxic damage induced by kainic acid in the green iguana neuroretina.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Mora, Janeth; Carranza, Martha; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    It is known that growth hormone (GH) is expressed in extrapituitary tissues, including the nervous system and ocular tissues, where it is involved in autocrine/paracrine actions related to cell survival and anti-apoptosis in several vertebrates. Little is known, however, in reptiles, so we analyzed the expression and distribution of GH in the eye of green iguana and its potential neuroprotective role in retinas that were damaged by the intraocular administration of kainic acid (KA). It was found, by Western blotting, that GH-immunoreactivity (GH-IR) was expressed as two isoforms (15 and 26kDa, under reducing conditions) in cornea, vitreous, retina, crystalline, iris and sclera, in varying proportions. Also, two bands for the growth hormone receptor (GHR)-IR were observed (70 and 44kDa, respectively) in the same tissues. By immunofluorescence, GH-IR was found in neurons present in several layers of the neuroretina (inner nuclear [INL], outer nuclear [ONL] and ganglion cell [GCL] layers) as determined by its co-existence with NeuN, but not in glial cells. In addition, GH and GHR co-expression was found in the same cells, suggesting paracrine/autocrine interactions. KA administration induced retinal excitotoxic damage, as determined by a significant reduction of the cell density and an increase in the appearance of apoptotic cells in the INL and GCL. In response to KA injury, both endogenous GH and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) expression were increased by 70±1.8% and 33.3±16%, respectively. The addition of exogenous GH significantly prevented the retinal damage produced by the loss of cytoarchitecture and cell density in the GCL (from 4.9±0.79 in the control, to 1.45±0.2 with KA, to 6.35±0.49cell/mm(2) with KA+GH) and in the INL (19.12±1.6, 10.05±1.9, 21.0±0.8cell/mm(2), respectively) generated by the long-term effect of 1mM KA intraocular administration. The co-incubation with a specific anti-GH antibody, however, blocked the protective effect of GH

  2. Tree growth and forest ecosystem functioning in Eurasia under extreme climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurer, Matthias; Kirdyanov, Alexander; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Bryukhanova, Marina; Knorre, Anastasia; Nasyrov, Muhtor; Frank, David; Treydte, Kerstin; Sidorova, Olga; Siegwolf, Rolf

    2013-04-01

    The main goal of this study is to improve our understanding of the influence of a changing climate on trees in extreme conditions by a detailed analysis of the factors controlling tree-ring growth. We investigated forest ecosystems in regions that are very sensitive to climatic changes and where rapid and dramatic environmental and climatic changes are on-going, namely, the high latitude permafrost region in Central Siberia (Russia), the semi-arid dry areas in Central Asia (Uzbekistan) and high-altitude sites in the Alps (Switzerland). Tree-ring parameters studied were ring-width, density, cell number and structure and the ratio of carbon and oxygen isotopes. An important aspect of the work was the characterization of seasonal growth and water supply of trees. Intra-seasonal dynamics of tree-ring formation was correlated with monitored environmental factors, such as air and soil temperature and moisture, permafrost depth and the isotope composition of soil water, of precipitation, and of stream water. Intra-annual and long-term variability of the main tree-ring parameters were compared for the different regions. The results obtained help us to understand better tree-physiological processes valid under contrasting environmental conditions. For instance, the relationship between the onset of cell division in the cambium and the thermo-hydrological soil regime was used to determine the period of the year with the highest influence on the start of tree-ring formation. Seasonally resolved oxygen isotope depth profiles of soil water and concurrent xylem and leaf water measurements show the importance of time-lags between precipitation, leaf processes and growth. The data obtained are important for improving tree-ring growth models and estimating future tree growth under climate change. Funding: SNF SCOPES IZ73Z0_128035

  3. Rates of Root and Organism Growth, Soil Conditions, and Temporal and Spatial Development of the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    WATT, MICHELLE; SILK, WENDY K.; PASSIOURA, JOHN B.

    2006-01-01

    • Background Roots growing in soil encounter physical, chemical and biological environments that influence their rhizospheres and affect plant growth. Exudates from roots can stimulate or inhibit soil organisms that may release nutrients, infect the root, or modify plant growth via signals. These rhizosphere processes are poorly understood in field conditions. • Scope and Aims We characterize roots and their rhizospheres and rates of growth in units of distance and time so that interactions with soil organisms can be better understood in field conditions. We review: (1) distances between components of the soil, including dead roots remnant from previous plants, and the distances between new roots, their rhizospheres and soil components; (2) characteristic times (distance2/diffusivity) for solutes to travel distances between roots and responsive soil organisms; (3) rates of movement and growth of soil organisms; (4) rates of extension of roots, and how these relate to the rates of anatomical and biochemical ageing of root tissues and the development of the rhizosphere within the soil profile; and (5) numbers of micro-organisms in the rhizosphere and the dependence on the site of attachment to the growing tip. We consider temporal and spatial variation within the rhizosphere to understand the distribution of bacteria and fungi on roots in hard, unploughed soil, and the activities of organisms in the overlapping rhizospheres of living and dead roots clustered in gaps in most field soils. • Conclusions Rhizosphere distances, characteristic times for solute diffusion, and rates of root and organism growth must be considered to understand rhizosphere development. Many values used in our analysis were estimates. The paucity of reliable data underlines the rudimentary state of our knowledge of root–organism interactions in the field. PMID:16551700

  4. Simulating crop growth with Expert-N-GECROS under different site conditions in Southwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyda, Arne; Ingwersen, Joachim; Demyan, Scott; Gayler, Sebastian; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    When feedbacks between the land surface and the atmosphere are investigated by Atmosphere-Land surface-Crop-Models (ALCM) it is fundamental to accurately simulate crop growth dynamics as plants directly influence the energy partitioning at the plant-atmosphere interface. To study both the response and the effect of intensive agricultural crop production systems on regional climate change in Southwest Germany, the crop growth model GECROS (YIN & VAN LAAR, 2005) was calibrated based on multi-year field data from typical crop rotations in the Kraichgau and Swabian Alb regions. Additionally, the SOC (soil organic carbon) model DAISY (MÜLLER et al., 1998) was implemented in the Expert-N model tool (ENGEL & PRIESACK, 1993) and combined with GECROS. The model was calibrated based on a set of plant (BBCH, LAI, plant height, aboveground biomass, N content of biomass) and weather data for the years 2010 - 2013 and validated with the data of 2014. As GECROS adjusts the root-shoot partitioning in response to external conditions (water, nitrogen, CO2), it is suitable to simulate crop growth dynamics under changing climate conditions and potentially more frequent stress situations. As C and N pools and turnover rates in soil as well as preceding crop effects were expected to considerably influence crop growth, the model was run in a multi-year, dynamic way. Crop residues and soil mineral N (nitrate, ammonium) available for the subsequent crop were accounted for. The model simulates growth dynamics of winter wheat, winter rape, silage maize and summer barley at the Kraichgau and Swabian Alb sites well. The Expert-N-GECROS model is currently parameterized for crops with potentially increasing shares in future crop rotations. First results will be shown.

  5. Release and consumption of D-amino acids during growth of marine prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Azúa, Iñigo; Goiriena, Itziar; Baña, Zuriñe; Iriberri, Juan; Unanue, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the composition of the marine-dissolved organic matter has highlighted the importance of D-amino acids, whose origin is attributed mainly to the remains of bacterial peptidoglycan released as a result of grazing or viral lysis. However, very few studies have focused on the active release of D-amino acids by bacteria. With this purpose, we measured the concentration of dissolved amino acids in both enantiomeric forms with two levels of complexity: axenic cultures of Vibrio furnissii and Vibrio alginolyticus and microcosms created from marine microbial assemblages (Biscay Bay, Cantabrian Sea) with and without heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNFs). Axenic cultures showed that only D-Ala was significantly released and accumulated in the medium up to a concentration of 120 nM, probably as a consequence of the rearrangement of peptidoglycan. The marine microbial assemblages showed that only two D-amino acids significantly accumulated in the environment, D-Ala and D-aspartic acid (Asp), in both the absence and presence of HNFs. The D/L ratio increased during the incubation and reached maximum values of 3.0 to 4.3 for Ala and 0.4 to 10.6 for Asp and correlated with prokaryotic and HNF abundance as well as the rate of prokaryotic thymidine and leucine incorporation. Prokaryotes preferentially consumed L-amino acids, but the relative uptake rates of D-Ala significantly increased in the growth phase. These results demonstrate that bacteria can release and consume D-amino acids at high rates during growth, even in the absence of viruses and grazers, highlighting the importance of bacteria as producers of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the sea. PMID:24057323

  6. High-quality and high-purity homoepitaxial diamond (100) film growth under high oxygen concentration condition

    SciTech Connect

    Teraji, Tokuyuki

    2015-09-21

    Defect formation during diamond homoepitaxial growth was sufficiently inhibited by adding oxygen simultaneously in the growth ambient with high concentration of 2%. A 30-μm thick diamond films with surface roughness of <2 nm were homoepitaxially deposited on the (100) diamond single crystal substrates with reasonable growth rate of approximately 3 μm h{sup −1} under the conditions of higher methane concentration of 10%, higher substrate temperature of ∼1000 °C, and higher microwave power density condition of >100 W cm{sup −3}. Surface characteristic patterns moved to an identical direction with growth thickness, indicating that lateral growth was dominant growth mode. High chemical purity represented by low nitrogen concentration of less than 1 ppb and the highest {sup 12}C isotopic ratio of 99.998% of the obtained homoepitaxial diamond (100) films suggest that the proposed growth condition has high ability of impurity control.

  7. Optimization of plant mineral nutrition under growth-limiting conditions in a lunar greenhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaets, I.; Voznyuk, T.; Kovalchuk, M.; Rogutskyy, I.; Lukashov, D.; Mytrokhyn, O.; Mashkovska, S.; Foing, B.; Kozyrovska, N.

    It may be assumed that the first plants in a lunar base will play a main role in forming a protosoil of acceptable fertility needed for purposively growing second generation plants like wheat, rice, tulips, etc. The residues of the first-generation plants could be composted and transformed by microorganisms into a soil-like substrate within a loop of regenerative life support system. The lunar regolith may be used as a substrate for plant growth at the very beginning of a mission to reduce its cost. The use of microbial communities for priming plants will allow one to facilitate adaption to stressful conditions and to support the plant development under growth limiting conditions. Well-defined plant-associated bacteria were used for growing three cultivars to colonize French marigold (Tagetes patula L.) in anorthosite, a substrate of low bioavailability, analogous to a lunar rock. The consortium was composed of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and the bacterium Paenibacillus sp. IMBG156 which stimulated seed germination, better plant development, and finally, the flowering of inoculated tagetes. In contrast, control plants grew poorly in the anorthosite and practically did not survive until flowering. Analysis of bacterial community composition showed that all species colonized plant roots, however, the rate of colonization depended on the allelopatic characteristics of marigold varieties. Bacteria of consortium were able to liberate some elements (Ca, Fe, Mn, Si, Ni, Cu, Zn) from substrate anorthosite. Plant colonization by mixed culture of bacterial strains resulted in the increase of accumulation of K, Mg, Mn by the plant and in the lowering of the level of toxic metal accumulation. It was assumed that a rationally assembled consortium of bacterial strains promoted germination of marygold seeds and supported the plant development under growth limiting conditions by means of bioleaching plant essential nutritional elements and by protecting the plant against

  8. Effect of ocean acidification on growth and otolith condition of juvenile scup, Stenotomus chrysops.

    PubMed

    Perry, Dean M; Redman, Dylan H; Widman, James C; Meseck, Shannon; King, Andrew; Pereira, Jose J

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from human industrial activities are causing changes in global ocean carbonate chemistry, resulting in a reduction in pH, a process termed "ocean acidification." It is important to determine which species are sensitive to elevated levels of CO2 because of potential impacts to ecosystems, marine resources, biodiversity, food webs, populations, and effects on economies. Previous studies with marine fish have documented that exposure to elevated levels of CO2 caused increased growth and larger otoliths in some species. This study was conducted to determine whether the elevated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) would have an effect on growth, otolith (ear bone) condition, survival, or the skeleton of juvenile scup, Stenotomus chrysops, a species that supports both important commercial and recreational fisheries. Elevated levels of pCO2 (1200-2600 μatm) had no statistically significant effect on growth, survival, or otolith condition after 8 weeks of rearing. Field data show that in Long Island Sound, where scup spawn, in situ levels of pCO2 are already at levels ranging from 689 to 1828 μatm due to primary productivity, microbial activity, and anthropogenic inputs. These results demonstrate that ocean acidification is not likely to cause adverse effects on the growth and survivability of every species of marine fish. X-ray analysis of the fish revealed a slightly higher incidence of hyperossification in the vertebrae of a few scup from the highest treatments compared to fish from the control treatments. Our results show that juvenile scup are tolerant to increases in seawater pCO2, possibly due to conditions this species encounters in their naturally variable environment and their well-developed pH control mechanisms. PMID:26442471

  9. Winter feeding, growth and condition of brown trout Salmo trutta in a groundwater-dominated stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, William E.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Ferrington, Leonard C., Jr.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Dieterman, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Winter can be a stressful period for stream-dwelling salmonid populations, often resulting in reduced growth and survival. Stream water temperatures have been identified as a primary mechanism driving reductions in fitness during winter. However, groundwater inputs can moderate water temperature and may reduce winter severity. Additionally, seasonal reductions in prey availability may contribute to decreased growth and survival, although few studies have examined food webs supporting salmonids under winter conditions. This study employed diet, stable isotope, and mark-recapture techniques to examine winter (November through March) feeding, growth, and condition of brown troutSalmo trutta in a groundwater-dominated stream (Badger Creek, Minnesota, USA). Growth was greater for fish ≤ 150 mm (mean = 4.1 mg g−1 day−1) than for those 151–276 mm (mean = 1.0 mg g−1 day−1) during the winter season. Overall condition from early winter to late winter did not vary for fish ≤150 mm (mean relative weight (Wr) = 89.5) and increased for those 151–276 mm (mean Wr = 85.8 early and 89.4 late). Although composition varied both temporally and by individual, brown trout diets were dominated by aquatic invertebrates, primarily Amphipods, Dipterans, and Trichopterans. Stable isotope analysis supported the observations of the dominant prey taxa in stomach contents and indicated the winter food web was supported by a combination of allochthonous inputs and aquatic macrophytes. Brown trout in Badger Creek likely benefited from the thermal regime and increased prey abundance present in this groundwater-dominated stream during winter.

  10. Hypoxia optimises tumour growth by controlling nutrient import and acidic metabolite export.

    PubMed

    Parks, Scott K; Cormerais, Yann; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Pouyssegur, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    In their quest for survival and successful growth, cancer cells optimise their cellular processes to enable them to outcompete normal cells in their microenvironment. In essence cancer cells: (i) enhance uptake of nutrients/metabolites, (ii) utilise nutrients more efficiently via metabolic alterations and (iii) deal with the metabolic waste products in a way that furthers their progression while hampering the survival of normal tissue. Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) act as essential drivers of these adaptations via the promotion of numerous membrane proteins including glucose transporters (GLUTs), monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), amino-acid transporters (LAT1, xCT), and acid-base regulating carbonic anhydrases (CAs). In addition to a competitive growth advantage for tumour cells, these HIF-regulated proteins are implicated in metastasis, cancer 'stemness' and the immune response. Current research indicates that combined targeting of these HIF-regulated membrane proteins in tumour cells will provide promising therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26724171

  11. Toxic effects of Al-based coagulants on Brassica chinensis and Raphanus sativus growing in acid and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaisong; Zhou, Qixing

    2005-04-01

    The ecotoxicological effects of aluminum (Al)-based coagulants are of concern because of their wide-ranging applications in wastewater treatment and water purification. As important Al-based coagulants, AlCl(3) and PAC (polyaluminum-chloride) were selected as examples to examine the toxic effects on representative vegetables including the cabbage Brassica chinensis and the radish Raphanus sativus over a range of exposure concentrations in neutral (pH 7.00) and acidic (pH 4.00) conditions, using seed germination and root elongation in the early-growth stage as indicators of toxicity. The results showed that root elongation of the two vegetables was a more sensitive indicator than was seed germination for evaluating the toxicity of Al. As a single influencing factor, H(+) had no significant direct effects on root elongation of Brassica chinensis and Raphanus sativus under the experimental conditions. The toxicity of Al played the main role in inhibiting root elongation and seed germination and was strongly related to changes in pH. There was a markedly positive relationship between the inhibitory rate of root elongation, seed germination, and the concentration of Al at pH 4.00 (p < 0.01). The toxic effect of AlCl(3) on Brassica chinensis was less with a neutral pH than at pH 4.00, but Raphanus sativus was more susceptible to AlCl(3) toxicity at a neutral pH than at pH 4.00. Both Raphanus sativus and Brassica chinensis had a more toxic response to a low concentration (<64 mg . L(-1)) of PAC in a neutral condition than in an acidic condition. Undoubtedly, the Al toxicity caused by Al-based coagulants at a neutral pH is relevant when treatment solids are used in agriculture. PMID:15793823

  12. Growth, fatty acid profile in major lipid classes and lipid fluidity of Aurantiochytrium mangroveiSK-02 As a function of growth temperature

    PubMed Central

    Chodchoey, Kanokwan; Verduyn, Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    Aurantiochytrium mangrovei Sk-02 was grown in a medium containing glucose (40 g/l), yeast extract (10 g/L) and sea salts (15 g/L) at temperatures ranging from 12 to 35°C. The fastest growth (µmax= 0.15 h-1) and highest fatty acid content of 415 mg/g-dry cell weight were found in the cells grown at 30°C. However, the cells grown at 12°C showed the highest percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) (48.6% of total fatty acid). The percentage of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and pentadecanoic acid (C15:0) decreased with an increase in the growth temperature, whereas, palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0) and DPA (C22:5n6) increased with an increase in the growth temperature. The composition of the major lipid class (%w/w) was slightly affected by the growth temperature. The fluidity of the organelle membrane or intracellular lipid (by DPH measurement) decreased with an increase in the growth temperatures, while the plasma membrane fluidity (by TMA-DPH measurement) could still maintain its fluidity in a wide range of temperatures (15 - 37°C). Furthermore, the distribution of DHA was found to be higher (36 – 54%) in phospholipid (PL) as compared to neutral lipid (NL) (20 - 41%). PMID:24031817

  13. Propionic acid and its esterified derivative suppress the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Dai, A; Huang, S; Kuo, S; Shu, M; Tapia, C P; Yu, J; Two, A; Zhang, H; Gallo, R L; Huang, C-M

    2014-06-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that Propionibacterium acnes, a human skin commensal bacterium, ferments glycerol into short-chain fatty acids, including propionic acid. Propionic acid suppressed the growth of Staphylococcus aureus USA300, a community-acquired methicillin-resistant bacterium, in vitro and in vivo. In this study, it is demonstrated that the anti-USA300 activity of propionic acid persisted after buffering the acid with 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1- piperazineethanesulfonic acid. This suggests that the growth suppression of USA300 mainly resulted from the antimicrobial activity of propionic acid per se and not from the acidity of the medium. In addition, proprionic acid significantly reduced the intracellular pH of USA300 and exhibited broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. P. acnes showed a higher tolerance to propionic acid. Next, an esterified derivative of propionic acid was synthesised. Propionic acid and the esterified derivative were equivalent in their efficacy to suppress the growth of USA300 in vitro. The esterified derivative thus provides an alternative to propionic acid as an antimicrobial agent against S. aureus. PMID:24686580

  14. High Xylose Yields from Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover Under Process-Relevant Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, N. D.; Nagle, N. J.; Tucker, M. P.; Elander, R. T.

    2009-01-01

    Pretreatment experiments were carried out to demonstrate high xylose yields at high solids loadings in two different batch pretreatment reactors under process-relevant conditions. Corn stover was pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid using a 4-l Steam Digester and a 4-l stirred ZipperClave{reg_sign} reactor. Solids were loaded at 45% dry matter (wt/wt) after sulfuric acid catalyst impregnation using nominal particle sizes of either 6 or 18 mm. Pretreatment was carried out at temperatures between 180 and 200 C at residence times of either 90 or 105 s. Results demonstrate an ability to achieve high xylose yields (>80%) over a range of pretreatment conditions, with performance showing little dependence on particle size or pretreatment reactor type. The high xylose yields are attributed to effective catalyst impregnation and rapid rates of heat transfer during pretreatment.

  15. Prebiotic Nitrogen Fixation by FeS Reduction of Nitrite Under Acidic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; Mead, Susan C. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Theories for the origin of life require the availability of reduced nitrogen for the formation of such species as amino acid and nucleic acids. In a strongly reducing atmosphere, compounds essential to the chemical evolution of life, such as amino acids, can form by reactions between HCN, NH3, and carbonyl compounds produced in spark discharges. However, under non-reducing atmospheres, electric discharges produced NO rather than HCN or NH3. This raises the questions of; how ammonia can be formed under a neutral atmosphere, and what conditions are needed such formation to occur? On possibility is the conversion of NO into nitric and nitrous acids (through HNO) and rained into the oceans. The reduction of nitrite by aqueous Fe(II) (6 Fe(+2) + 7 H(+) + NO2(-) yields 6 Fe(III) + 2 H2O + NH3) such as was present on the early Earth could then have produced ammonia. However, this reaction does not proceed at pHs less than 7.3. An alternative is reduction by other forms of Fe(II), such as FeS. We will present results that show that FeS can reduce nitrite to ammonia at pHs as low as pH 5 under a variety of conditions.

  16. Conditional Cooperativity of Toxin - Antitoxin Regulation Can Mediate Bistability between Growth and Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Cataudella, Ilaria; Sneppen, Kim; Gerdes, Kenn; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    Many toxin-antitoxin operons are regulated by the toxin/antitoxin ratio by mechanisms collectively coined “conditional cooperativity”. Toxin and antitoxin form heteromers with different stoichiometric ratios, and the complex with the intermediate ratio works best as a transcription repressor. This allows transcription at low toxin level, strong repression at intermediate toxin level, and then again transcription at high toxin level. Such regulation has two interesting features; firstly, it provides a non-monotonous response to the concentration of one of the proteins, and secondly, it opens for ultra-sensitivity mediated by the sequestration of the functioning heteromers. We explore possible functions of conditional regulation in simple feedback motifs, and show that it can provide bistability for a wide range of parameters. We then demonstrate that the conditional cooperativity in toxin-antitoxin systems combined with the growth-inhibition activity of free toxin can mediate bistability between a growing state and a dormant state. PMID:24009488

  17. Conditional cooperativity of toxin - antitoxin regulation can mediate bistability between growth and dormancy.

    PubMed

    Cataudella, Ilaria; Sneppen, Kim; Gerdes, Kenn; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    Many toxin-antitoxin operons are regulated by the toxin/antitoxin ratio by mechanisms collectively coined "conditional cooperativity". Toxin and antitoxin form heteromers with different stoichiometric ratios, and the complex with the intermediate ratio works best as a transcription repressor. This allows transcription at low toxin level, strong repression at intermediate toxin level, and then again transcription at high toxin level. Such regulation has two interesting features; firstly, it provides a non-monotonous response to the concentration of one of the proteins, and secondly, it opens for ultra-sensitivity mediated by the sequestration of the functioning heteromers. We explore possible functions of conditional regulation in simple feedback motifs, and show that it can provide bistability for a wide range of parameters. We then demonstrate that the conditional cooperativity in toxin-antitoxin systems combined with the growth-inhibition activity of free toxin can mediate bistability between a growing state and a dormant state. PMID:24009488

  18. Modeling of Macroscopic/Microscopic Transport and Growth Phenomena in Zeolite Crystal Solutions Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatsonis, Nikos A.; Alexandrou, Andreas; Shi, Hui; Ongewe, Bernard; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Crystals grown from liquid solutions have important industrial applications. Zeolites, for instance, a class of crystalline aluminosilicate materials, form the backbone of the chemical process industry worldwide, as they are used as adsorbents and catalysts. Many of the phenomena associated with crystal growth processes are not well understood due to complex microscopic and macroscopic interactions. Microgravity could help elucidate these phenomena and allow the control of defect locations, concentration, as well as size of crystals. Microgravity in an orbiting spacecraft could help isolate the possible effects of natural convection (which affects defect formation) and minimize sedimentation. In addition, crystals will stay essentially suspended in the nutrient pool under a diffusion-limited growth condition. This is expected to promote larger crystals by allowing a longer residence time in a high-concentration nutrient field. Among other factors, the crystal size distribution depends on the nucleation rate and crystallization. These two are also related to the "gel" polymerization/depolymerization rate. Macroscopic bulk mass and flow transport and especially gravity, force the crystals down to the bottom of the reactor, thus forming a sedimentation layer. In this layer, the growth rate of the crystals slows down as crystals compete for a limited amount of nutrients. The macroscopic transport phenomena under certain conditions can, however, enhance the nutrient supply and therefore, accelerate crystal growth. Several zeolite experiments have been performed in space with mixed results. The results from our laboratory have indicated an enhancement in size of 30 to 70 percent compared to the best ground based controls, and a reduction of lattice defects in many of the space grown crystals. Such experiments are difficult to interpret, and cannot be easily used to derive empirical or other laws since many physical parameters are simultaneously involved in the process

  19. Biocontrol agents promote growth of potato pathogens, depending on environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Cray, Jonathan A; Connor, Mairéad C; Stevenson, Andrew; Houghton, Jonathan D R; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Cooke, Louise R; Hallsworth, John E

    2016-05-01

    There is a pressing need to understand and optimize biological control so as to avoid over-reliance on the synthetic chemical pesticides that can damage environmental and human health. This study focused on interactions between a novel biocontrol-strain, Bacillus sp. JC12GB43, and potato-pathogenic Phytophthora and Fusarium species. In assays carried out in vitro and on the potato tuber, the bacterium was capable of near-complete inhibition of pathogens. This Bacillus was sufficiently xerotolerant (water activity limit for growth = 0.928) to out-perform Phytophthora infestans (~0.960) and challenge Fusarium coeruleum (~0.847) and Fusarium sambucinum (~0.860) towards the lower limits of their growth windows. Under some conditions, however, strain JC12GB43 stimulated proliferation of the pathogens: for instance, Fusarium coeruleum growth-rate was increased under chaotropic conditions in vitro (132 mM urea) by >100% and on tubers (2-M glycerol) by up to 570%. Culture-based assays involving macromolecule-stabilizing (kosmotropic) compatible solutes provided proof-of-principle that the Bacillus may provide kosmotropic metabolites to the plant pathogen under conditions that destabilize macromolecular systems of the fungal cell. Whilst unprecedented, this finding is consistent with earlier reports that fungi can utilize metabolites derived from bacterial cells. Unless the antimicrobial activities of candidate biocontrol strains are assayed over a full range of field-relevant parameters, biocontrol agents may promote plant pathogen infections and thereby reduce crop yields. These findings indicate that biocontrol activity, therefore, ought to be regarded as a mode-of-behaviour (dependent on prevailing conditions) rather than an inherent property of a bacterial strain. PMID:26880001

  20. Production of dimethylsulfide and acrylic acid from dimethylsulfoniopropionate during growth of three marine microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunying; Gao, Caixia; Zhang, Haibo; Chen, Shuo; Deng, Ping; Yue, Xin'an; Guo, Xiaoyi

    2014-07-01

    We measured the concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS), acrylic acid (AA), and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) during growth of three microalgae: Prorocentrum micans, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, and Platymonas subcordiformis. The DMSP, AA, and DMS concentrations in culture media varied significantly among algal growth stages, with the highest concentrations in the late stationary growth stage or the senescent stage. In the stationary growth stage, the average DMSP concentration per cell in P. mican s (0.066 5 pmol/cell) was 1.3 times that in G. oceanica (0.049 5 pmol/cell) and 20.2 times that in P. subcordiformi s (0.003 29 pmol/cell). The average concentrations of AA were 0.044 6, 0.026 9, and 0.003 05 pmol/cell in P. micans, G. oceanica, and P. subcordiformi s, respectively, higher than the concentrations of DMS (0.272, 0.497, and 0.086 2 fmol/cell, respectively). There were significant positive correlations between cell density and AA, DMSP, and DMS concentrations. The ratios of DMS /AA and AA /(DMSP+AA) in the three algae differed significantly over the growth cycle. In all three microalgae, the DMS/AA ratios were less than 25% during the growth period, suggesting that the enzymatic cleavage pathway, which generates DMS, was not the main DMSP degradation pathway. The changes in the DMS/AA ratio indicated that there was a higher rate of enzymatic breakdown of DMSP in the early growth period and a lower rate during senescence. In all three microalgae, the AA /(DMSP+AA) ratio (degradation ratio of DMSP) decreased during the exponential growth phase, and then increased. The variations in these ratios can approximately indicate the cleavage mechanism of DMSP at different stages of algal growth.

  1. Production of dimethylsulfide and acrylic acid from dimethylsulfoniopropionate during growth of three marine microalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunying; Gao, Caixia; Zhang, Haibo; Chen, Shuo; Deng, Ping; Yue, Xin'an; Guo, Xiaoyi

    2014-11-01

    We measured the concentrations of dimethylsulfide (DMS), acrylic acid (AA), and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) during growth of three microalgae: Prorocentrum micans, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, and Platymonas subcordiformis. The DMSP, AA, and DMS concentrations in culture media varied significantly among algal growth stages, with the highest concentrations in the late stationary growth stage or the senescent stage. In the stationary growth stage, the average DMSP concentration per cell in P. micans (0.066 5 pmol/cell) was 1.3 times that in G. oceanica (0.049 5 pmol/cell) and 20.2 times that in P. subcordiformis (0.003 29 pmol/cell). The average concentrations of AA were 0.044 6, 0.026 9, and 0.003 05 pmol/cell in P. micans, G. oceanica, and P. subcordiformi s, respectively, higher than the concentrations of DMS (0.272, 0.497, and 0.086 2 fmol/cell, respectively). There were significant positive correlations between cell density and AA, DMSP, and DMS concentrations. The ratios of DMS/AA and AA/(DMSP+AA) in the three algae differed significantly over the growth cycle. In all three microalgae, the DMS/AA ratios were less than 25% during the growth period, suggesting that the enzymatic cleavage pathway, which generates DMS, was not the main DMSP degradation pathway. The changes in the DMS/AA ratio indicated that there was a higher rate of enzymatic breakdown of DMSP in the early growth period and a lower rate during senescence. In all three microalgae, the AA/(DMSP+AA) ratio (degradation ratio of DMSP) decreased during the exponential growth phase, and then increased. The variations in these ratios can approximately indicate the cleavage mechanism of DMSP at different stages of algal growth.

  2. Formation Sequences of Iron Minerals in the Acidic Alteration Products and Variation of Hydrothermal Fluid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Iron minerals have important role in