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Sample records for acidic nitrate media

  1. An improved extraction chromatographic resin for the separation of uranium from acidic nitrate media.

    PubMed

    Dietz, M L; Horwitz, E P; Sajdak, L R; Chiarizia, R

    2001-07-01

    The preparation and characterization of a new extraction chromatographic resin exhibiting extraordinarily strong retention of hexavalent uranyl ion over a wide range of nitric acid concentrations and very high selectivity for U(VI) over Fe(III) and numerous other cations is described. This new material (designated U/TEVA-2) comprises a novel liquid stationary phase consisting of an equimolar mixture of diamyl amylphosphonate (DA[AP]) and Cyanex 923((R)) (a commercially available trialkyl-phosphine oxide, TRPO) sorbed on silanized silica or Amberchrom CG-71. Cyanex 923 is shown to be preferable to a related TRPO, Cyanex 925((R)), due to its lower viscosity and higher selectivity for U(VI) over Fe(III). The retention of uranyl nitrate by the U/TEVA-2 resin, as measured by the k' values (number of free column values to peak maximum) is >5000 from approximately 0.1 to 8 M HNO(3). The ability of the new resin to strongly and selectively retain U(VI) from such a wide range of acid concentrations, along with its favorable physical properties, make it a good candidate for application in the separation and preconcentration of U(VI) from complex environmental, biological, and nuclear waste samples for subsequent determination.

  2. Nitrate removal using natural clays modified by acid thermoactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena-Duran, C. J.; Sun Kou, M. R.; Lopez, T.; Azamar-Barrios, J. A.; Aguilar, D. H.; Domínguez, M. I.; Odriozola, J. A.; Quintana, P.

    2007-04-01

    Groundwater pollution by nitrates is a widespread problem in many locations in the world. The underground aquatic mantle of the Peninsula of Yucatan is highly vulnerable due to its karstic nature. Adsorption methods are a good choice for nitrate elimination. In this work, a natural calcium bentonite was modified by acid thermoactivation with HCl and H 2SO 4, and tested as a media for nitrate removal in an aqueous solution. The nitrate concentration in the solution was measured by FT-IR, using the Lambert-Beer law. Clay characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy; surface area was measured by the BET method.

  3. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Nitric Acid, Nitrates, and Nitro Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the potential hazards associated with nitric acid, inorganic and organic nitrate salts, alkyl nitrates, acyl nitrates, aliphatic nitro compounds, aromatic nitro compounds, and nitration reactions. (CW)

  4. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  5. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  6. Toluene nitration in irradiated nitric acid and nitrite solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; Bruce J. Mincher; Stephen P. Mezyk; Jim Muller; Leigh R. Martin

    2011-04-01

    The kinetics, mechanisms, and stable products produced for the aryl alkyl mild ortho-para director - toluene, in irradiated nitric acid and neutral nitrite solutions were investigated using ?, and pulse radiolysis. Electron pulse radiolysis was used to determine the bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of toluene with different transient species produced by irradiation. HPLC with UV detection was primarily used to assess the stable reaction products. GC-MS and LC-MS were used to confirm the results from HPLC. Free-radical nitration reaction products were found in irradiated acidic and neutral media. In acidic medium, the ring substitution and side chain substitution and oxidation produced different nitro products. In ring substitution, nitrogen oxide radicals were added mainly to hydroxyl radical-produced cyclohexadienyl radical, and in side chain substitution they were added to the carbon-centered benzyl radical produced by H-atom abstraction. In neutral nitrite toluene solution, radiolytic ring nitration products approached a statistically random distribution, suggesting a free-radical reaction involving addition of the •NO2 radical.

  7. Heterogeneous Interaction of Peroxyacetyl Nitrate on Liquid Sulfuric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1996-01-01

    The uptake of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on liquid sulfuric acid surfaces has been investigated using a fast-flow reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. PAN was observed to be reversibly adsorbed on sulfuric acid.

  8. Evaluation of Perrhenate Spectrophotometric Methods in Bicarbonate and Nitrate Media.

    PubMed

    Lenell, Brian A; Arai, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    2-pyridyl thiourea and methyl-2-pyridyl ketoxime based perrhenate, Re(VII), UV-vis spectrophotometric methods were evaluated in nitrate and bicarbonate solutions ranging from 0.001 M to 0.5 M. Standard curves at [Re]=2.5-50 mg L(-1) for the Re(IV)-thiourea and the Re ketoxime complexes were constructed at 405 nm and 490 nm, respectively. Detection of limits for N-(2-pyridyl) thiourea and methyl-2-pyridyl ketoxime methods in ultrapure water are 3.06 mg/L and 4.03 mg/L, respectively. Influences of NaHCO3 and NaNO3 concentration on absorbance spectra, absorptivity, and linearity were documented. For both methods, samples in ultrapure water and NaHCO3 have an R(2) value>0.99, indicating strong linear relationships. Statistical analysis supports that NaHCO3 does not affect linearity between standards for either method. NaNO3 causes major interference with the ketoxime method above 0.001 M NaNO3. Data provides information for practical use of Re spectrophotometric methods in environmental media that is high in bicarbonate and nitrate. PMID:26838460

  9. Molecular recognition of nitrated fatty acids by PPAR[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Jifeng; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Martynowski, Dariusz; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Baker, Paul R.S.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Y. Eugene; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation, and it is activated by oxidized and nitrated fatty acids. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPAR{gamma} ligand binding domain bound to nitrated linoleic acid, a potent endogenous ligand of PPAR{gamma}. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis of PPAR{gamma} discrimination of various naturally occurring fatty acid derivatives.

  10. Deep ocean biogeochemistry of silicic acid and nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, J. L.; Simeon, J.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Gruber, N.; Key, R. M.; Schlitzer, R.

    2007-03-01

    Observations of silicic acid and nitrate along the lower branch of the global conveyor belt circulation show that silicic acid accumulation by diatom opal dissolution occurs at 6.4 times the rate of nitrate addition by organic matter remineralization. The export of opal and organic matter from the surface ocean occurs at a Si:N mole ratio that is much smaller than this almost everywhere (cf. Sarmiento et al., 2004). The preferential increase of silicic acid over nitrate as the deep circulation progresses from the North Atlantic to the North Pacific is generally interpreted as requiring deep dissolution of opal together with shallow remineralization of organic matter (Broecker, 1991). However, Sarmiento et al. (2004) showed that the primary reason for the low silicic acid concentration of the upper ocean is that the waters feeding the main thermocline from the surface Southern Ocean are depleted in silicic acid relative to nitrate. By implication, the same Southern Ocean processes that deplete the silicic acid in the surface Southern Ocean must also be responsible for the enhanced silicic acid concentration of the deep ocean. We use observations and results from an updated version of the adjoint model of Schlitzer (2000) to confirm that this indeed the case.

  11. Nonaqueous purification of mixed nitrate heat transfer media

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1983-12-20

    A nonaqueous, in-line method for removing carbonate and hydroxide contamination from a molten mixed sodium nitrate/potassium nitrate heat transfer salt. The method comprises dissolving a stoichiometric quantity of anhydrous Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2 in the melt whereby an insoluble CaCO.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2 precipitate is formed. The precipitate can be removed by settling, filtration or floatation techniques.

  12. Nitric acid recycling and copper nitrate recovery from effluent.

    PubMed

    Jô, L F; Marcus, R; Marcelin, O

    2014-01-01

    The recycling of nitric acid and copper nitrate contained in an industrial effluent was studied. The experiments conducted on such a medium showed that the presence of copper nitrate significantly improves nitric acid-water separation during distillation in an azeotropic medium. At the temperature of the azeotrope, however, this metal salt starts to precipitate, making the medium pasty, thus inhibiting the nitric acid extraction process. The optimisation of parameters such as column efficiency and adding water to the boiler at the azeotrope temperature are recommended in this protocol in order to collect the various components while avoiding the formation of by-products: NOx compounds. Thus, the absence of column, along with the addition of a small volume of water at a temperature of 118 °C, significantly increases the yield, allowing 94 % nitric acid to be recovered at the end of the process, along with the residual copper nitrate. The resulting distillate, however, is sufficiently dilute to not be used as is. Rectification is required to obtain concentrated nitric acid at 15 mol·l(-1), along with a weakly acidic distillate from the distillation front. This latter is quenched using potassium hydroxide and is used as a fertiliser solution for horticulture or sheltered market gardening. This process thus allows complete recycling of all the medium's components, including that of the distillate resulting from the nitric acid rectification operation. PMID:24627202

  13. Nitrate and phosphate removal through enhanced bioretention media: mesocosm study.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Eric T; Poor, Cara J; Hinman, Curtis; Stark, John D

    2013-09-01

    Bioretention is an evolving type of Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) designed to attenuate peak flows, reduce stormwater volume, and treat stormwater. This article examines the capabilities of a bioretention soil mixture of sand and compost enhanced with aluminum-based drinking water treatment residuals to reduce nutrients from stormwater runoff. Columns with and without a saturation zone and vegetation were compared to examine their role in removing nitrate and ortho-phosphate from stormwater. Results show that utilization of a saturation zone can significantly reduce nitrate in effluent water (71% compared to 33% without a saturated zone), even in a newly constructed system. However, ortho-phosphate reduction was significantly better in the columns without a saturated zone (80%) compared to columns with (67%). Plants did not significantly improve removal. This suggests amendments such as aluminum-based water treatment residuals for phosphorus removal and a saturation zone for nitrogen removal are needed during the initial establishment period. PMID:24175412

  14. Nitrate and phosphate removal through enhanced bioretention media: mesocosm study.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Eric T; Poor, Cara J; Hinman, Curtis; Stark, John D

    2013-09-01

    Bioretention is an evolving type of Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) designed to attenuate peak flows, reduce stormwater volume, and treat stormwater. This article examines the capabilities of a bioretention soil mixture of sand and compost enhanced with aluminum-based drinking water treatment residuals to reduce nutrients from stormwater runoff. Columns with and without a saturation zone and vegetation were compared to examine their role in removing nitrate and ortho-phosphate from stormwater. Results show that utilization of a saturation zone can significantly reduce nitrate in effluent water (71% compared to 33% without a saturated zone), even in a newly constructed system. However, ortho-phosphate reduction was significantly better in the columns without a saturated zone (80%) compared to columns with (67%). Plants did not significantly improve removal. This suggests amendments such as aluminum-based water treatment residuals for phosphorus removal and a saturation zone for nitrogen removal are needed during the initial establishment period.

  15. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  16. NITRATE REDUCTION AND TRANSFORMATION IN ORGANIC COMPOST MEDIA: LABORATORY BATCH STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We studied the effectiveness of three organic solid reactive media (cotton burr compost, mulch compost, and Canadian sphagnum peat) that may be potentially used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater nitrate removal. We aimed at answering the question about the na...

  17. Heterocyclics as corrosion inhibitors for acid media

    SciTech Connect

    Ajmal, M.; Khan, M.A.W.; Ahmad, S.; Quraishi, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    The available literature on the use of heterocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors in acid media has been reviewed. It has been noted that the workers in this field have either used sulfur or nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds for studying inhibition action. The authors have synthesized compounds containing sulfur and nitrogen both in the same ring and studied their inhibition action in acid media. These compounds were found to be better inhibitors than those containing either atoms alone.

  18. Nitrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrate ; CASRN 14797 - 55 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  19. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  20. Recovery of high purity sulfuric acid from the waste acid in toluene nitration process by rectification.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Meng, Qingqiang; Shu, Fan; Ye, Zhengfang

    2013-01-01

    Waste sulfuric acid is a byproduct generated from numerous industrial chemical processes. It is essential to remove the impurities and recover the sulfuric acid from the waste acid. In this study the rectification method was introduced to recover high purity sulfuric acid from the waste acid generated in toluene nitration process by using rectification column. The waste acid quality before and after rectification were evaluated using UV-Vis spectroscopy, GC/MS, HPLC and other physical and chemical analysis. It was shown that five nitro aromatic compounds in the waste acid were substantially removed and high purity sulfuric acid was also recovered in the rectification process at the same time. The COD was removed by 94% and the chrominance was reduced from 1000° to 1°. The recovered sulfuric acid with the concentration reaching 98.2 wt% had a comparable quality with commercial sulfuric acid and could be recycled back into the toluene nitration process, which could avoid waste of resources and reduce the environmental impact and pollution.

  1. Anaerobic growth and potential for amino acid production by nitrate respiration in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Seiki; Ohnishi, Junko; Komatsu, Tomoha; Masaki, Tatsuya; Sen, Kikuo; Ikeda, Masato

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen limitation is a crucial problem in amino acid fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum. Toward this subject, our study was initiated by analysis of the oxygen-requiring properties of C. glutamicum, generally regarded as a strict aerobe. This organism formed colonies on agar plates up to relatively low oxygen concentrations (0.5% O(2)), while no visible colonies were formed in the absence of O(2). However, in the presence of nitrate (NO3-), the organism exhibited limited growth anaerobically with production of nitrite (NO2-), indicating that C. glutamicum can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor. Assays of cell extracts from aerobic and hypoxic cultures yielded comparable nitrate reductase activities, irrespective of nitrate levels. Genome analysis revealed a narK2GHJI cluster potentially relevant to nitrate reductase and transport. Disruptions of narG and narJ abolished the nitrate-dependent anaerobic growth with the loss of nitrate reductase activity. Disruption of the putative nitrate/nitrite antiporter gene narK2 did not affect the enzyme activity but impaired the anaerobic growth. These indicate that this locus is responsible for nitrate respiration. Agar piece assays using L-lysine- and L-arginine-producing strains showed that production of both amino acids occurred anaerobically by nitrate respiration, indicating the potential of C. glutamicum for anaerobic amino acid production.

  2. Ab Initio Calculations of Singlet and Triplet Excited States of Chlorine Nitrate and Nitric Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, Ana M.; Lee, Timothy J.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of vertical excitations to singlet and triplet excited states of chlorine nitrate and nitric acid are reported. The nature of the electronic transitions are examined by decomposing the difference density into the sum of detachment and attachment densities. Counterparts for the three lowest singlet excited states of nitric acid survive relatively unperturbed in chlorine nitrate, while other low-lying singlet states of chlorine nitrate appear to be directly dissociative in the ClO chromophore. These results suggest an assignment of the two main peaks in the experimental chlorine nitrate absorption spectrum. In addition, triplet vertical excitations and the lowest optimized triplet geometries of both molecules are studied.

  3. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples. PMID:27175784

  4. Nitrosation and nitration of fulvic acid, peat and coal with nitric acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  5. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Kevin A; Cox, Larry G

    2016-01-01

    Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM) in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  6. PROCESS FOR EXTRACTING NEPTUNIUM AND PLUTONIUM FROM NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS OF SAME CONTAINING URANYL NITRATE WITH A TERTIARY AMINE

    DOEpatents

    Sheppard, J.C.

    1962-07-31

    A process of selectively extracting plutonium nitrate and neptunium nitrate with an organic solution of a tertiary amine, away from uranyl nitrate present in an aqueous solution in a maximum concentration of 1M is described. The nitric acid concentration is adjusted to about 4M and nitrous acid is added prior to extraction. (AEC)

  7. Nitrate Acts as a Signal to Induce Organic Acid Metabolism and Repress Starch Metabolism in Tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Scheible, W. R.; Gonzalez-Fontes, A.; Lauerer, M.; Muller-Rober, B.; Caboche, M.; Stitt, M.

    1997-01-01

    Nia30(145) transformants with very low nitrate reductase activity provide an in vivo screen to identify processes that are regulated by nitrate. Nia30(145) resembles nitrate-limited wild-type plants with respect to growth rate and protein and amino acid content but accumulates large amounts of nitrate when it is grown on high nitrate. The transcripts for nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase, cytosolic glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase increased; NR and nitrite reductase activity increased in leaves and roots; and glutamine synthetase activity increased in roots. The transcripts for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, cytosolic pyruvate kinase, citrate synthase, and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase increased; phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity increased; and malate, citrate, isocitrate, and [alpha]-oxoglutarate accumulated in leaves and roots. There was a decrease of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase transcript and activity, and starch decreased in the leaves and roots. After adding 12 mM nitrate to nitrate-limited Nia30(145), the transcripts for NR and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase increased, and the transcripts for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase decreased within 2 and 4 hr, respectively. Starch was remobilized at almost the same rate as in wild-type plants, even though growth was not stimulated in Nia30(145). It is proposed that nitrate acts as a signal to initiate coordinated changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:12237366

  8. Photolysis of Nitric Acid and Nitrate on Natural and Artificial Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunxiang; Gao, Honglian; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Xianliang

    2016-04-01

    Photolysis of nitric acid and nitrate (HNO3/nitrate) was investigated on the surfaces of natural and artificial materials, including plant leaves, metal sheets, and construction materials. The surfaces were conditioned in the outdoor air prior to experiments to receive natural depositions of ambient HNO3/nitrate and other atmospheric constituents. The photolysis rate constant (JHNO3(s)) of the surface HNO3/nitrate was measured based on the production rates of nitrous acid (HONO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). The JHNO3(s) values, from 6.0 × 10(-6) s(-1) to 3.7 × 10(-4) s(-1), are 1 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of gaseous HNO3. The HONO was the major product from photolysis of HNO3/nitrate on most plant leaves, whereas NOx was the major product on most artificial surfaces. The JHNO3(s) values decreased with HNO3/nitrate surface density and could be described by a simple analytical equation. Within a typical range of HNO3/nitrate surface density in the low-NOx forested areas, photolysis of HNO3/nitrate on the forest canopy can be a significant source for HONO and NOx for the overlying atmosphere. PMID:26936001

  9. Proton affinity of methyl nitrate - Less than proton affinity of nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Rice, Julia E.

    1992-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art ab initio quantum mechanical methods were used to investigate the equilibrium structure, dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and IR intensities of methyl nitrate, methanol, and several structures of protonated methyl nitrate, using the same theoretical methods as in an earlier study (Lee and Rice, 1992) of nitric acid. The ab initio results for methyl nitrate and methanol were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The proton affinity (PA) of methyl nitrate was calculated to be 176.9 +/-5 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with the experimental value 176 kcal/mol obtained by Attina et al. (1987) and less than the PA value of nitric acid. An explanation of the discrepancy of the present results with those of an earlier study on protonated nitric acid is proposed.

  10. Mechanistic studies of nitrations and oxidations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Willmer, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanisms of nitrations in solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide in nitric acid of 1,2,4-trichloro-5-nitrobenzene and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene have been proposed. The kinetics and products of the nitration, in the title medium, of substantially deactivated benzoic acids and benzaldehydes have been investigated. Kinetics of nitration of some substituted benzoic acids in nitric acid solutions containing dinitrogen pentaoxide or nitronium trifluoro-methanesulphonate (nitronium triflate) have been compared. Rate coefficients for reactions in dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions were generally similar to those from nitronium triflate solutions of the same estimated nitronium ion concentration. Yields of aromatic products of nitration of some benzoic acid derivatives in the nitric acid solutions have been determined. Nitrodecarboxylation of 4-fluorobenzoic acid occurs as a result of nitronium ion attach at C(1). The competition between oxidation to the corresponding benzoic acid and nitration in the aromatic ring of some substituted benzaldehydes has been probed by kinetic and product studies. 4-Carboxybenzaldehyde is nitrated but more deactivated substrates are predominantly oxidized. Rapid reversible gem-dinitrate formation occurs in concentrated dinitrogen pentaoxide solutions. The equilibrium extent of formation of [alpha]-deuterio-(4-nitropheny)-dinitratomethane from [alpha]-deuterio-4-nitrobenzaldehyde is reported. 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and the gem-dinitrate are oxidized in processes in which [alpha]-hydrogen loss is at least partially rate determining. The relative rates of oxidation in nitronium triflate solutions suggest that the [alpha]-hydrogen is removed as a hydride ion in that medium. There is evidence for the intrusion of a radical mechanism of nitration in concentrated solutions of dinitrogen pentaoxide. (4-Nitrophenyl)dinitratomethane was produced on the addition of 4-nitrobenzaldehyde to a solution of dinitrogen pentaoxide in dichloromethane.

  11. Batch salicylic acid nitration by nitric acid/acetic acid mixture under isothermal, isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, R; Canterino, M; Caprio, V; Di Somma, I; Sanchirico, R

    2006-12-01

    Runaway phenomena and thermal explosions can originate during the nitration of salicylic acid by means of a nitric acid/acetic acid mixture when the thermal control is lost, mainly as a result of the formation and thermal decomposition of picric acid. The prediction of the behaviour of this system is thus of great importance in view of possible industrial applications and the need to avoid the occurrence of unwanted dangerous events. During a previous investigation a model was developed to simulate its behaviour when the starting concentration of the substrate is too low, thus, preventing the precipitation of poor soluble intermediates. In this work this model is extended to deal with more concentrated systems even in case of a solid phase separating during the process. To this purpose the previously assessed dependence of the solubility of 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids upon temperature and nitric acid concentration is included in the model. It is assumed that when 3-nitro and 5-nitrosalicylic acids are partially suspended in the reacting medium a kinetic regime of "dissolution with reaction" is established; that is, the redissolution of these species is a fast process compared to the successive nitration to give dinitroderivatives. Good results are obtained in the comparison of the experimental data with those calculated both in isoperibolic and adiabatic conditions when the revised model is used.

  12. Influence of Acidity on Uranyl Nitrate Association in Aqueous Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    de Almeida, Valmor F; Cui, Shengting; Khomami, Bamin; Ye, Xianggui; Smith, Rodney Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Uranyl ion complexation with water and nitrate is a key aspect of the uranium/plutonium extraction process. We have carried out a molecular dynamics simulation study to investigate this complexation process, including the molecular composition of the various complex species, the corresponding structure, and the equilibrium distribution of the complexes. The observed structures of the complexes suggest that in aqueous solution, uranyls are generally hydrated by 5 water molecules in the equatorial plane. When associating with nitrate ions, a water molecule is replaced by a nitrate ion, preserving the five-fold coordination and planar symmetry. Analysis of the pair correlation function between uranyl and nitrate suggests that nitrates bind to uranyl in aqueous solution mainly in a monodentate mode, although a small portion of bidentates occur. Dynamic association and dissociation between uranyls and nitrates take place in aqueous solution with a substantial amount of fluctuation in the number of various uranyl nitrate species. The average number of the uranyl mononitrate complexes shows a dependence on acid concentration consistent with equilibrium-constant analysis, namely, the concentration of [UO2NO3]+ increases with nitric acid concentration.

  13. [Nitrate nitrogen leaching and residue of humic acid fertilizer in field soil].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang-chun; Xing, Shang-jun; Duan, Chun-hua; Du, Zhen-yu; Ma, Hai-lin; Ma, Bing-yao

    2010-07-01

    To elucidate the potential influence of humic acidfertilizer on groundwater and soil quality in clay soil (CS) and sandy soil (SS), nitrate nitrogen leaching and residue of different fertilizers in field soil were studied using a self-made leaching field device. Nitrate nitrogen concentration in leaching water of fertilizer treatments was 28.1%-222.2% higher than that of non-nitrogen treatment in different times, but humic acid fertilizer could prevent nitrate nitrogen leaching both in CS and SS, especially in CS. Nitrate nitrogen concentration of leaching water in CS was 41.2%-59.1% less than that in SS and the inhibiting effect in CS was greater than that in SS. Nitrate nitrogen could be accumulated in soil profile by fertilizer application. The residue of nitrate nitrogen retained in 0-40 cm soil layer of humic acid fertilizer treatment was 59.8% and 54.4% respectively, higher than that of urea and compound fertilizer treatments. Nitrate nitrogen amount of humic acid, urea and compound fertilizer treatments in SS was significantly less than that in CS, being 81.7%, 81.1% and 47.6% respectively. Compared with the conventional fertilizer, humic acid fertilizer treatment improved the contents of organic matter, available nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium of upper layer soil as well as cation exchange capacity. Besides, total amount of water-soluble salts in humic acid fertilizer treatment was decreased by 24.8% and 22.5% in comparison to urea and compound fertilizer treatments in CS, respectively. In summary, the application of humic acid fertilizer could improve physical and chemical properties of upper layer soil and reduce the risk of potential pollution to groundwater.

  14. Nitrate reduction pathway in an anaerobic acidification reactor and its effect on acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Ji, Chi; Wang, Rui; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of a reactor in which denitrification was integrated into the anaerobic acidogenic process. Industrial wastewater cassava stillage was used as the carbon source, and the nitrate reduction pathway and its effects on acid fermentation were examined. Results from batch and semi-continuous tests showed that the presence of nitrate did not inhibit anaerobic acidification but altered the distribution of volatile fatty acid (VFA) species. Nitrate reduction was attributable to denitrification and to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). The ratio of DNRA to denitrification was proportional to the ratio of [Formula: see text] . After 130 days of semi-continuous operation, denitrification removal efficiency accounted for about 60% at a [Formula: see text] of 50. The proportional distribution of VFAs was acetate, followed by propionate and then butyrate. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis results confirmed the contributions of denitrification and DNRA in the nitrate-amended reactor and showed that the addition of nitrate enriched the structure of the bacterial community, but did not suppress the activity of acid-producing bacteria. PMID:24986524

  15. Nitrate reduction pathway in an anaerobic acidification reactor and its effect on acid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Ji, Chi; Wang, Rui; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of a reactor in which denitrification was integrated into the anaerobic acidogenic process. Industrial wastewater cassava stillage was used as the carbon source, and the nitrate reduction pathway and its effects on acid fermentation were examined. Results from batch and semi-continuous tests showed that the presence of nitrate did not inhibit anaerobic acidification but altered the distribution of volatile fatty acid (VFA) species. Nitrate reduction was attributable to denitrification and to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). The ratio of DNRA to denitrification was proportional to the ratio of [Formula: see text] . After 130 days of semi-continuous operation, denitrification removal efficiency accounted for about 60% at a [Formula: see text] of 50. The proportional distribution of VFAs was acetate, followed by propionate and then butyrate. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis results confirmed the contributions of denitrification and DNRA in the nitrate-amended reactor and showed that the addition of nitrate enriched the structure of the bacterial community, but did not suppress the activity of acid-producing bacteria.

  16. A More Challenging Interpretative Nitration Experiment Employing Substituted Benzoic Acids and Acetanilides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treadwell, Edward M.; Lin, Tung-Yin

    2008-01-01

    An experiment is described involving the nitration of ortho or meta monosubstituted benzoic acids (XC[subscript 6]H[subscript 4]CO[subscript 2]H, X = Halogen, Me, OH, or OMe) and monochlorinated acetanilides with nitric acid to determine the regioselectivity of addition by [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Students were…

  17. Surface Nanobubbles in Nonaqueous Media: Looking for Nanobubbles in DMSO, Formamide, Propylene Carbonate, Ethylammonium Nitrate, and Propylammonium Nitrate.

    PubMed

    An, Hongjie; Liu, Guangming; Atkin, Rob; Craig, Vincent S J

    2015-07-28

    Surface nanobubbles produced by supersaturation during the exchange of ethanol for water are routinely observed on hydrophobic surfaces, are stable for days, and have contact angles that are very much greater than observed macroscopically. Here, we test the hypothesis that nanobubbles can also be observed in nonaqueous solvents in order to ascertain if their anomalous lifetimes and contact angles are related to properties of the solvent. Nanobubbles were seen in the protic solvents formamide, ethylammonium nitrate, and propylammonium nitrate, but not in propylene carbonate or dimethyl sulfoxide. Solvents in which nanobubbles were observed exhibit a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network. Like in aqueous systems, the nanobubbles were stable for days and exhibited high contact angles (∼165°). PMID:26153620

  18. Application of light-weight filtration media in an anoxic biofilter for nitrate removal from micro-polluted surface water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Fei, Xiang; He, Shengbing; Huang, Jungchen; Zhou, Weili

    2016-01-01

    The research investigated nitrate removal from micro-polluted surface water by the single-stage process of anoxic biofilter using light-weight polystyrene beads as filtration media. In this study, sodium acetate was used as an external carbon source and the nitrate removal efficiency under different regimes of hydraulic loading rate (HLR), water temperature, and C/N ratio was studied. In addition, the effect of backwash on denitrification efficiency was investigated. The results show that the biofilter achieved a high nitrate removal efficiency in 2 weeks at water temperatures ranging between 22 and 25 °C at a C/N ratio (COD:NO3(-)-N) of 6:1. Besides, the average removal efficiency of nitrate at HLRs of 5.66, 7.07 and 8.49 m(3) m(-2) h(-1) were 87.5, 87.3 and 87.1%, respectively. The average removal efficiency of nitrate nitrogen was 13.9% at a HLR of 5.66 m(3) m(-2) h(-1) at water temperatures of 12-14 °C, then it increased to 93.7% when the C/N ratio increased to 10. It suggests that the optimal hydraulic retention time is at water temperatures of 8-10 °C. The water consumption rate of backwash was about 0.2-0.3%, and denitrification efficiency returned to the normal level in 12 h after backwash. PMID:27533875

  19. Application of light-weight filtration media in an anoxic biofilter for nitrate removal from micro-polluted surface water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Fei, Xiang; He, Shengbing; Huang, Jungchen; Zhou, Weili

    2016-01-01

    The research investigated nitrate removal from micro-polluted surface water by the single-stage process of anoxic biofilter using light-weight polystyrene beads as filtration media. In this study, sodium acetate was used as an external carbon source and the nitrate removal efficiency under different regimes of hydraulic loading rate (HLR), water temperature, and C/N ratio was studied. In addition, the effect of backwash on denitrification efficiency was investigated. The results show that the biofilter achieved a high nitrate removal efficiency in 2 weeks at water temperatures ranging between 22 and 25 °C at a C/N ratio (COD:NO3(-)-N) of 6:1. Besides, the average removal efficiency of nitrate at HLRs of 5.66, 7.07 and 8.49 m(3) m(-2) h(-1) were 87.5, 87.3 and 87.1%, respectively. The average removal efficiency of nitrate nitrogen was 13.9% at a HLR of 5.66 m(3) m(-2) h(-1) at water temperatures of 12-14 °C, then it increased to 93.7% when the C/N ratio increased to 10. It suggests that the optimal hydraulic retention time is at water temperatures of 8-10 °C. The water consumption rate of backwash was about 0.2-0.3%, and denitrification efficiency returned to the normal level in 12 h after backwash.

  20. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  1. Humic Acid-Oxidizing, Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria in Agricultural Soils

    PubMed Central

    Van Trump, J. Ian; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Thrash, J. Cameron; Weber, Karrie A.; Andersen, Gary L.; Coates, John D.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study demonstrates the prevalence, phylogenetic diversity, and physiology of nitrate-reducing microorganisms capable of utilizing reduced humic acids (HA) as electron donors in agricultural soils. Most probable number (MPN) enumeration of agricultural soils revealed large populations (104 to 106 cells g−1 soil) of microorganisms capable of reducing nitrate while oxidizing the reduced HA analog 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AH2DS) to its corresponding quinone. Nitrate-dependent HA-oxidizing organisms isolated from agricultural soils were phylogenetically diverse and included members of the Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria. Advective up-flow columns inoculated with corn plot soil and amended with reduced HA and nitrate supported both HA oxidation and enhanced nitrate reduction relative to no-donor or oxidized HA controls. The additional electron donating capacity of reduced HA could reasonably be attributed to the oxidation of reduced functional groups. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene-based high-density oligonucleotide microarray (PhyloChip) indicated that reduced HA columns supported the development of a bacterial community enriched with members of the Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, and Betaproteobacteria relative to the no-donor control and initial inoculum. This study identifies a previously unrecognized role for HA in stimulating denitrification processes in saturated soil systems. Furthermore, this study indicates that reduced humic acids impact soil geochemistry and the indigenous bacterial community composition. PMID:21750120

  2. Release of nitrous acid and nitrogen dioxide from nitrate photolysis in acidic aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Scharko, Nicole K; Berke, Andrew E; Raff, Jonathan D

    2014-10-21

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) is an abundant component of aerosols, boundary layer surface films, and surface water. Photolysis of NO3(-) leads to NO2 and HONO, both of which play important roles in tropospheric ozone and OH production. Field and laboratory studies suggest that NO3¯ photochemistry is a more important source of HONO than once thought, although a mechanistic understanding of the variables controlling this process is lacking. We present results of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy measurements of NO2 and HONO emitted during photodegradation of aqueous NO3(-) under acidic conditions. Nitrous acid is formed in higher quantities at pH 2-4 than expected based on consideration of primary photochemical channels alone. Both experimental and modeled results indicate that the additional HONO is not due to enhanced NO3(-) absorption cross sections or effective quantum yields, but rather to secondary reactions of NO2 in solution. We find that NO2 is more efficiently hydrolyzed in solution when it is generated in situ during NO3(-) photolysis than for the heterogeneous system where mass transfer of gaseous NO2 into bulk solution is prohibitively slow. The presence of nonchromophoric OH scavengers that are naturally present in the environment increases HONO production 4-fold, and therefore play an important role in enhancing daytime HONO formation from NO3(-) photochemistry.

  3. Effect of simulated acid rain on nitrate and ammonium production in soils from three ecosystems of Camels Hump Mountain, Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Like, D.E.; Klein, R.M.

    1985-11-01

    The authors removed intact soil columns from the Harwood (550 to 790 m), Transition (790 to 1050 m), and Conifer (1050 to 1160 m) ecological zones of Camels Hump Mountain, Vermont, treated them with simulated acid rain (pH 4.0) or nonacidic (pH 5.6) rain, and examined the percolates for ammonium and nitrate ions. Nitrification in soils from all three ecosystems was unaffected by acidic treatments, but mineralization was stimulated by acidic treatment of soil from the Transition Zone. Irrespective of treatment, Conifer Zone soils released less nitrate than did either Transition or Hardwood Zone soils. Soil columns from the Hardwood Zone were treated with acidic or nonacidic simulated rainfall supplemented with nitrate, ammonium, or both N sources. NO3-N in percolates increased when acidic simulated rain was supplemented with ammonium ion or both ammonium and nitrate ions. Efflux of NH4-N was unaffected by supplementing precipitation with either ammonium or nitrate ions.

  4. Electrochemistry of nitrated N-confused free-base tetraaryl-porphyrins in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lina; Ou, Zhongping; Fang, Yuanyuan; Xue, Songlin; Chen, Xueyan; Lu, Guifen; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Kadish, Karl M

    2015-10-01

    Four nitrated N-confused free-base tetraarylporphyrins were synthesized and characterized by electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry in nonaqueous media. The examined compounds are represented as NO2 (Ar)4 NcpH2 , where NO2 (Ar)4 Ncp is the dianion of a tetraaryl N-confused porphyrin with an inner carbon bound NO2 group and Ar is a p-CH3 OPh, p-CH3 Ph, Ph or p-ClPh substituent on each meso-position of the macrocycle. UV/Vis spectra and NMR spectroscopy data indicate that the same form of the porphyrin exists in CH2 Cl2 and DMF which is unlike the case of non-NO2 N-confused porphyrins. The Soret band of NO2 (Ar)4 NcpH2 exhibits a 30-36 nm red-shift in CH2 Cl2 and DMF as compared to the spectrum of the non-NO2 N-confused porphyrins. The first two reductions and first oxidation of NO2 (Ar)4 NcpH2 are reversible in CH2 Cl2 containing 0.1 M TBAP. The measured HOMO-LUMO gap averages 1.65 V in CH2 Cl2 and 1.53 V in DMF, with both values being similar to those of the non-NO2 substituted compounds. The nitro group on the inverted pyrrole is itself not reduced within the negative potential limit of CH2 Cl2 or DMF, but its presence significantly affects both the UV/Vis spectra and redox potentials.

  5. Influence of nitric acid treatment in different media on X-ray structural parameters of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sudip Maity; Ashim Choudhury

    2008-11-15

    The treatment of coal with nitric acid in aqueous and non-aqueous media introduces changes in the chemical and spatial structure of the organic mass. Four coals of different rank have been treated with nitric acid in aqueous and glacial acetic acid media for assessing the changes in the structural parameters by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Slow-scan XRD has been performed for the raw and treated coals, and X-ray structural parameters (d002, Lc, and Nc) and aromaticity (fa) have been determined by profile-fitting software. Considerable variation of the structural parameters has been observed with respect to the raw coals. The d002 values have decreased in aqueous medium but increased in acetic acid medium; however, Lc, Nc, and fa values have increased in aqueous medium but decreased in acetic acid medium. It is also observed that considerable oxidation takes place during nitric acid treatment in aqueous medium, but nitration is the predominant phenomenon in acetic acid medium. Disordering of the coal structure increases in acetic acid medium, but a reverse trend is observed in the aqueous medium. As a result, structurally modified coals (SMCs) are derived as new coal-derived substances. 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Treatment of Selenium and Nitrate in Acid Mine Drainage: A Column Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, H.; Jeen, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Treatment efficiency of selenium and nitrate in acid mine drainage (AMD) by two types of reactive mixtures, i.e., organic carbon-limestone (OC-LS) and organic carbon-zero valent iron (OC-ZVI), was evaluated through column experiments. The influent AMD, collected at an abandoned metal mine site in Korea, had pH of 2.9 and contained 1600 mg/ L of SO42- and elevated concentrations of metals (e.g., Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Zn). Selenium (40 mg/L) and nitrate (100 mg/L as NO3-N initially and 10 mg/L as NO3-N after 55 days) were spiked into the AMD. The columns were operated for a total of 90 days. The results showed the increase of pH from 2.9 to 7.0 and the decreases in concentrations of most of major ions including selenium and nitrate in both the OC-LS and OC-ZVI columns. The OC-ZVI column had higher removal rates of selenium and nitrate and created a more reduced environment than the OC-LS column due to the abiotic reactions of ZVI. However, a notable amount of ammonia was produced as a reaction product in the OC-ZVI column, while the OC-LS produced a minimum amount of ammonia, suggesting formation of N2 by denitrification. In both columns, removal rates of selenium were substantially increased when the influent NO3-N concentration was changed from 100 mg/L to 10 mg/L. Sulfate was reduced as much as 390 mg/L, as indicated by detection of hydrogen sulfide. The reduction of most metals is considered to be due to precipitation of metal-containing secondary minerals (e.g., sulfides, hydroxides, carbonates). This study shows that treatment of selenium and nitrate in AMD can be achievable using organic carbon-based reactive mixtures through reduction of selenium and nitrate. However, the use of ZVI is not recommended when selenium and nitrate coexist in AMD because of production of ammonia by abiotic reaction between ZVI and nitrate. This study also shows that concentration of nitrate in AMD is an important factor to determine the rate of selenium removal.

  7. Nitrogen isotopes in ice core nitrate linked to anthropogenic atmospheric acidity change.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lei; Alexander, Becky; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Steig, Eric J; Savarino, Joël; Sofen, Eric D; Schauer, Andrew J

    2014-04-22

    Nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ(15)N) in Greenland snow nitrate and in North American remote lake sediments has decreased gradually beginning as early as ∼1850 Christian Era. This decrease was attributed to increasing atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic nitrate, reflecting an anthropogenic impact on the global nitrogen cycle, and the impact was thought to be amplified ∼1970. However, our subannually resolved ice core records of δ(15)N and major ions (e.g., NO3(-), SO4(2-)) over the last ∼200 y show that the decrease in δ(15)N is not always associated with increasing NO3(-) concentrations, and the decreasing trend actually leveled off ∼1970. Correlation of δ(15)N with H(+), NO3(-), and HNO3 concentrations, combined with nitrogen isotope fractionation models, suggests that the δ(15)N decrease from ∼1850-1970 was mainly caused by an anthropogenic-driven increase in atmospheric acidity through alteration of the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric nitrate. The concentrations of NO3(-) and SO4(2-) also leveled off ∼1970, reflecting the effect of air pollution mitigation strategies in North America on anthropogenic NO(x) and SO2 emissions. The consequent atmospheric acidity change, as reflected in the ice core record of H(+) concentrations, is likely responsible for the leveling off of δ(15)N ∼1970, which, together with the leveling off of NO3(-) concentrations, suggests a regional mitigation of anthropogenic impact on the nitrogen cycle. Our results highlight the importance of atmospheric processes in controlling δ(15)N of nitrate and should be considered when using δ(15)N as a source indicator to study atmospheric flux of nitrate to land surface/ecosystems. PMID:24711383

  8. Nitrogen isotopes in ice core nitrate linked to anthropogenic atmospheric acidity change

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lei; Alexander, Becky; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Steig, Eric J.; Savarino, Joël; Sofen, Eric D.; Schauer, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) in Greenland snow nitrate and in North American remote lake sediments has decreased gradually beginning as early as ∼1850 Christian Era. This decrease was attributed to increasing atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic nitrate, reflecting an anthropogenic impact on the global nitrogen cycle, and the impact was thought to be amplified ∼1970. However, our subannually resolved ice core records of δ15N and major ions (e.g., , ) over the last ∼200 y show that the decrease in δ15N is not always associated with increasing concentrations, and the decreasing trend actually leveled off ∼1970. Correlation of δ15N with H+, , and HNO3 concentrations, combined with nitrogen isotope fractionation models, suggests that the δ15N decrease from ∼1850–1970 was mainly caused by an anthropogenic-driven increase in atmospheric acidity through alteration of the gas−particle partitioning of atmospheric nitrate. The concentrations of and also leveled off ∼1970, reflecting the effect of air pollution mitigation strategies in North America on anthropogenic NOx and SO2 emissions. The consequent atmospheric acidity change, as reflected in the ice core record of H+ concentrations, is likely responsible for the leveling off of δ15N ∼1970, which, together with the leveling off of concentrations, suggests a regional mitigation of anthropogenic impact on the nitrogen cycle. Our results highlight the importance of atmospheric processes in controlling δ15N of nitrate and should be considered when using δ15N as a source indicator to study atmospheric flux of nitrate to land surface/ecosystems. PMID:24711383

  9. Nitrogen isotopes in ice core nitrate linked to anthropogenic atmospheric acidity change.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lei; Alexander, Becky; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Steig, Eric J; Savarino, Joël; Sofen, Eric D; Schauer, Andrew J

    2014-04-22

    Nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ(15)N) in Greenland snow nitrate and in North American remote lake sediments has decreased gradually beginning as early as ∼1850 Christian Era. This decrease was attributed to increasing atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic nitrate, reflecting an anthropogenic impact on the global nitrogen cycle, and the impact was thought to be amplified ∼1970. However, our subannually resolved ice core records of δ(15)N and major ions (e.g., NO3(-), SO4(2-)) over the last ∼200 y show that the decrease in δ(15)N is not always associated with increasing NO3(-) concentrations, and the decreasing trend actually leveled off ∼1970. Correlation of δ(15)N with H(+), NO3(-), and HNO3 concentrations, combined with nitrogen isotope fractionation models, suggests that the δ(15)N decrease from ∼1850-1970 was mainly caused by an anthropogenic-driven increase in atmospheric acidity through alteration of the gas-particle partitioning of atmospheric nitrate. The concentrations of NO3(-) and SO4(2-) also leveled off ∼1970, reflecting the effect of air pollution mitigation strategies in North America on anthropogenic NO(x) and SO2 emissions. The consequent atmospheric acidity change, as reflected in the ice core record of H(+) concentrations, is likely responsible for the leveling off of δ(15)N ∼1970, which, together with the leveling off of NO3(-) concentrations, suggests a regional mitigation of anthropogenic impact on the nitrogen cycle. Our results highlight the importance of atmospheric processes in controlling δ(15)N of nitrate and should be considered when using δ(15)N as a source indicator to study atmospheric flux of nitrate to land surface/ecosystems.

  10. Culture media optimization of Porphyridium purpureum: production potential of biomass, total lipids, arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Mysore Doddaiah; Kathiresan, Shanmugam; Bhattacharya, Sila; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    Porphyridium purpureum a red marine microalga is known for phycobiliproteins (PB), polyunsaturated fatty acids and sulphated exopolysaccharides. In the present study, effects of media constituents for the production of different polyunsaturated fatty acids from P. purpureum were considered using a response surface methodology (RSM). A second order polynomial was used to predict the response functions in terms of the independent variables such as the concentrations of sodium chloride, magnesium sulphate, sodium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The response functions were production of biomass yield, total lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acids like arachidonic acid (AA 20:4) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5). Results corroborated that maximum Biomass (0.95 gL(-1)) yield was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (14.89 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (3.93 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (0.96 gL(-1)) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (0.09 gL(-1)). Optimum total lipid (17.9 % w/w) and EPA (34.6 % w/w) content was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (29.98 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (9.34 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (1.86 gL(-1)). Variation in concentration of potassium dihydrogen phosphate for both lipid (0.01gL(-1)) and EPA content (0.20 gL(-1)) was observed. The optimum conditions for biomass, total lipid, AA and EPA varied indicating their batch mode of growth and interaction effect of the salt.

  11. Culture media optimization of Porphyridium purpureum: production potential of biomass, total lipids, arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Mysore Doddaiah; Kathiresan, Shanmugam; Bhattacharya, Sila; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    Porphyridium purpureum a red marine microalga is known for phycobiliproteins (PB), polyunsaturated fatty acids and sulphated exopolysaccharides. In the present study, effects of media constituents for the production of different polyunsaturated fatty acids from P. purpureum were considered using a response surface methodology (RSM). A second order polynomial was used to predict the response functions in terms of the independent variables such as the concentrations of sodium chloride, magnesium sulphate, sodium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The response functions were production of biomass yield, total lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acids like arachidonic acid (AA 20:4) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5). Results corroborated that maximum Biomass (0.95 gL(-1)) yield was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (14.89 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (3.93 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (0.96 gL(-1)) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (0.09 gL(-1)). Optimum total lipid (17.9 % w/w) and EPA (34.6 % w/w) content was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (29.98 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (9.34 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (1.86 gL(-1)). Variation in concentration of potassium dihydrogen phosphate for both lipid (0.01gL(-1)) and EPA content (0.20 gL(-1)) was observed. The optimum conditions for biomass, total lipid, AA and EPA varied indicating their batch mode of growth and interaction effect of the salt. PMID:27407193

  12. Correlation between citric acid and nitrate metabolisms during CAM cycle in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana.

    PubMed

    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Tiné, Marco Aurélio Silva; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-12-15

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) confers crucial adaptations for plants living under frequent environmental stresses. A wide metabolic plasticity can be found among CAM species regarding the type of storage carbohydrate, organic acid accumulated at night and decarboxylating system. Consequently, many aspects of the CAM pathway control are still elusive while the impact of this photosynthetic adaptation on nitrogen metabolism has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated a possible link between the CAM cycle and the nitrogen assimilation in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana by simultaneously characterizing the diel changes in key enzyme activities and metabolite levels of both organic acid and nitrate metabolisms. The results revealed that T. pohliana performed a typical CAM cycle in which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase phosphorylation seemed to play a crucial role to avoid futile cycles of carboxylation and decarboxylation. Unlike all other bromeliads previously investigated, almost equimolar concentrations of malate and citrate were accumulated at night. Moreover, a marked nocturnal depletion in the starch reservoirs and an atypical pattern of nitrate reduction restricted to the nighttime were also observed. Since reduction and assimilation of nitrate requires a massive supply of reducing power and energy and considering that T. pohliana lives overexposed to the sunlight, we hypothesize that citrate decarboxylation might be an accessory mechanism to increase internal CO₂ concentration during the day while its biosynthesis could provide NADH and ATP for nocturnal assimilation of nitrate. Therefore, besides delivering photoprotection during the day, citrate might represent a key component connecting both CAM pathway and nitrogen metabolism in T. pohliana; a scenario that certainly deserves further study not only in this species but also in other CAM plants that nocturnally accumulate citrate.

  13. Ultrasound promoted regioselective nitration of phenols using dilute nitric acid in the presence of phase transfer catalyst.

    PubMed

    Nandurkar, Nitin S; Bhanushali, Mayur J; Jagtap, Sachin R; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2007-01-01

    Phenols are selectively nitrated to o-nitrophenol along with rate enhancement using dilute nitric acid (6 wt%)/tetra butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) under sonication. The selectivity can also be reversed to p-nitrophenol using NaBr as a catalyst. Kinetic analysis of nitration of phenol both with and without sonication has been investigated by variation of reaction parameters such as catalyst, nitric acid and substrate concentration. PMID:16563845

  14. Enhancing rain garden design to promote nitrate removal: testing a media carbon amendment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens effectively remove some stressors from stormwater, in particular heavy metals, phosphorus, and oil and grease, but in most cases they show much smaller removal rates of nitrate. This is likely due to the high sand and low organic matter content specified for rain ga...

  15. Enhancing Rain Garden Design to Promote Nitrate Removal: Testing a media carbon amendment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rain gardens effectively remove some stressors from stormwater, in particular heavy metals, phosphorus, and oil and grease, but in most cases they show much smaller removal rates of nitrate. This is likely due to the high sand and low organic matter content specified for rain ga...

  16. Nitrate and the Origin of Saliva Influence Composition and Short Chain Fatty Acid Production of Oral Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Jessica E; Buijs, Mark J; Brandt, Bernd W; Keijser, Bart J F; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate is emerging as a possible health benefactor. Especially the microbial conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the oral cavity and the subsequent conversion to nitric oxide in the stomach are of interest in this regard. Yet, how nitrate influences the composition and biochemistry of the oral ecosystem is not fully understood. To investigate the effect of nitrate on oral ecology, we performed a 4-week experiment using the multiplaque artificial mouth (MAM) biofilm model. This model was inoculated with stimulated saliva of two healthy donors. Half of the microcosms (n = 4) received a constant supply of nitrate, while the other half functioned as control (n = 4). Additionally, all microcosms received a nitrate and sucrose pulse, each week, on separate days to measure nitrate reduction and acid formation. The bacterial composition of the microcosms was determined by 16S rDNA sequencing. The origin of the saliva (i.e., donor) showed to be the strongest determinant for the development of the microcosms. The supplementation of nitrate was related to a relatively high abundance of Neisseria in the microcosms of both donors, while Veillonella was highly abundant in the nitrate-supplemented microcosms of only one of the donors. The lactate concentration after sucrose addition was similarly high in all microcosms, irrespective of treatment or donor, while the concentration of butyrate was lower after nitrate addition in the nitrate-receiving microcosms. In conclusion, nitrate influences the composition and biochemistry of oral microcosms, although the result is strongly dependent on the inoculum.

  17. Nitrate and the Origin of Saliva Influence Composition and Short Chain Fatty Acid Production of Oral Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Jessica E; Buijs, Mark J; Brandt, Bernd W; Keijser, Bart J F; Crielaard, Wim; Zaura, Egija

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate is emerging as a possible health benefactor. Especially the microbial conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the oral cavity and the subsequent conversion to nitric oxide in the stomach are of interest in this regard. Yet, how nitrate influences the composition and biochemistry of the oral ecosystem is not fully understood. To investigate the effect of nitrate on oral ecology, we performed a 4-week experiment using the multiplaque artificial mouth (MAM) biofilm model. This model was inoculated with stimulated saliva of two healthy donors. Half of the microcosms (n = 4) received a constant supply of nitrate, while the other half functioned as control (n = 4). Additionally, all microcosms received a nitrate and sucrose pulse, each week, on separate days to measure nitrate reduction and acid formation. The bacterial composition of the microcosms was determined by 16S rDNA sequencing. The origin of the saliva (i.e., donor) showed to be the strongest determinant for the development of the microcosms. The supplementation of nitrate was related to a relatively high abundance of Neisseria in the microcosms of both donors, while Veillonella was highly abundant in the nitrate-supplemented microcosms of only one of the donors. The lactate concentration after sucrose addition was similarly high in all microcosms, irrespective of treatment or donor, while the concentration of butyrate was lower after nitrate addition in the nitrate-receiving microcosms. In conclusion, nitrate influences the composition and biochemistry of oral microcosms, although the result is strongly dependent on the inoculum. PMID:27155967

  18. Solvent extraction study of the thorium nitrate, nitric acid, and tributyl phosphate-dodecane system: density and acidity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, A.J.; Marley, J.L.; Costanzo, D.A.

    1980-05-01

    A solvent extraction study to determine equilibrium conditions of thorium nitrate-nitric acid with 30% tributyl phosphate in normal dodecane has been completed. Experimental conditions studied were 30 to 60{sup 0}C, 0.05 to 1.5 M Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, and 0.0 to 3.0 M HNO{sub 3}. The extractant concentration was constant at 30% tributyl phosphate. The equilibrium experiments have produced data which demonstrate that thorium nitrate concentration, free acid, and density are related in equilibrium behavior between the aqueous and organic phases from 30 to 60{sup 0}C in the 30% tributyl phosphate-dodecane solvent extraction system. The concentration interactions apply to both the two- and three-phase regions. A linear correlation was observed for the density (D) of the aqueous or organic phase and the concentration of thorium and free acid. The general form of the equation is D = a(C/sub Th/ + bC/sub H/) + c, where a is the slope, b is the constant, c is the intercept, and C/sub Th/ and C/sub H/ are the molar concentrations of thorium and free acid respectively. The relationship of temperature, thorium nitrate, and free acid makes possible the definitions of the boundaries between the two- and three-phase regions. This dependence, in turn, permits operational control or simulation studies of the system within the two-phase region. The data demonstrate the interactions of the components of the Thorex system and can be used to improve the mathematical description of equilibrium in the SEPHIS-Thorex computer program.

  19. A Solution-Based Approach for Mo-99 Production: Considerations for Nitrate versus Sulfate Media

    DOE PAGES

    Youker, Amanda J.; Chemerisov, Sergey D.; Kalensky, Michael; Tkac, Peter; Bowers, Delbert L.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum-99 is the parent of Technetium-99m, which is used in nearly 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. The medical community has been plagued by Mo-99 shortages due to aging reactors, such as the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor in Canada. There are currently no US producers of Mo-99, and NRU is scheduled for shutdown in 2016, which means that another Mo-99 shortage is imminent unless a potential domestic Mo-99 producer fills the void. Argonne National Laboratory is assisting two potential domestic suppliers of Mo-99 by examining the effects of a uranyl nitrate versus a uranyl sulfate target solution configuration onmore » Mo-99 production. Uranyl nitrate solutions are easier to prepare and do not generate detectable amounts of peroxide upon irradiation, but a high radiation field can lead to a large increase in pH, which can lead to the precipitation of fission products and uranyl hydroxides. Uranyl sulfate solutions are more difficult to prepare, and enough peroxide is generated during irradiation to cause precipitation of uranyl peroxide, but this can be prevented by adding a catalyst to the solution. A titania sorbent can be used to recover Mo-99 from a highly concentrated uranyl nitrate or uranyl sulfate solution; however, different approaches must be taken to prevent precipitation during Mo-99 production.« less

  20. Glyphosate detection with ammonium nitrate and humic acids as potential interfering substances by pulsed voltammetry technique.

    PubMed

    Martínez Gil, Pablo; Laguarda-Miro, Nicolas; Camino, Juan Soto; Peris, Rafael Masot

    2013-10-15

    Pulsed voltammetry has been used to detect and quantify glyphosate on buffered water in presence of ammonium nitrate and humic substances. Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide active ingredient in the world. It is a non-selective broad spectrum herbicide but some of its health and environmental effects are still being discussed. Nowadays, glyphosate pollution in water is being monitored but quantification techniques are slow and expensive. Glyphosate wastes are often detected in countryside water bodies where organic substances and fertilizers (commonly based on ammonium nitrate) may also be present. Glyphosate also forms complexes with humic acids so these compounds have also been taken into consideration. The objective of this research is to study the interference of these common pollutants in glyphosate measurements by pulsed voltammetry. The statistical treatment of the voltammetric data obtained lets us discriminate glyphosate from the other studied compounds and a mathematical model has been built to quantify glyphosate concentrations in a buffer despite the presence of humic substances and ammonium nitrate. In this model, the coefficient of determination (R(2)) is 0.977 and the RMSEP value is 2.96 × 10(-5) so the model is considered statistically valid.

  1. Amino Acids Profiles in Biological Media

    SciTech Connect

    Iordache, A.; Horj, E.; Morar, S.; Cozar, O.; Culea, M.; Ani, A. R.; Mesaros, C.

    2010-08-04

    An accurate analytical method was developed to determine amino acids in some biological specimens by GC/MS technique. Stable isotopes provide useful tools for a variety of studies, offering ideal internal standards in quantitative information. Isotopic dilution gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (ID-GC/MS) is the techniques used for quantitative analysis of compounds labeled with stable isotopes. A Trace DSQ Thermo Finnigan quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a Trace GC was used. Amino acids were separated on a Rtx-5 MS capillary column, 30 mx0.25 mm, 0.25 {mu}m film thickness, using a temperature program from 50 deg. C, 1 min, 6 deg. C/min at 100 deg. C, 4 deg. C/min at 200 deg. C, 20 deg. C/min at 300 deg. C, (3 min). The transfer line temperature was 250 deg. C, the injector temperature 200 deg. C and ion source temperature 250 deg. C; splitter: 10:1. Electron energy was 70 eV and emission current, 100 {mu}A. The amino acids were purified on a Dowex 50W-W8 exchange resin and were derivatized in a procedure following two steps to obtain trifluoroacetyl butyl esters. The identification of amino acids was obtained by using NIST library but also by using amino acid standards.

  2. Amino Acids Profiles in Biological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordache, A.; Horj, E.; Ani, A. R.; Mesaros, C.; Morar, S.; Cozar, O.; Culea, M.

    2010-08-01

    An accurate analytical method was developed to determine amino acids in some biological specimens by GC/MS technique. Stable isotopes provide useful tools for a variety of studies, offering ideal internal standards in quantitative information. Isotopic dilution gas chromatography—mass spectrometry (ID-GC/MS) is the techniques used for quantitative analysis of compounds labeled with stable isotopes. A Trace DSQ Thermo Finnigan quadrupole mass spectrometer coupled with a Trace GC was used. Amino acids were separated on a Rtx-5 MS capillary column, 30 m×0.25 mm, 0.25 μm film thickness, using a temperature program from 50 °C, 1 min, 6 °C/min at 100 °C, 4 °C/min at 200 °C, 20 °C/min at 300 °C, (3 min). The transfer line temperature was 250 °C, the injector temperature 200 °C and ion source temperature 250 °C; splitter: 10:1. Electron energy was 70 eV and emission current, 100 μA. The amino acids were purified on a Dowex 50W-W8 exchange resin and were derivatized in a procedure following two steps to obtain trifluoroacetyl butyl esters. The identification of amino acids was obtained by using NIST library but also by using amino acid standards.

  3. Evaluation of sustainable electron donors for nitrate removal in different water media.

    PubMed

    Fowdar, Harsha S; Hatt, Belinda E; Breen, Peter; Cook, Perran L M; Deletic, Ana

    2015-11-15

    An external electron donor is usually included in wastewater and groundwater treatment systems to enhance nitrate removal through denitrification. The choice of electron donor is critical for both satisfactory denitrification rates and sustainable long-term performance. Electron donors that are waste products are preferred to pure organic chemicals. Different electron donors have been used to treat different water types and little is known as to whether there are any electron donors that are suitable for multiple applications. Seven different carbon rich waste products, including liquid and solid electron donors, were studied in comparison to pure acetate. Batch-scale tests were used to measure their ability to reduce nitrate concentrations in a pure nutrient solution, light greywater, secondary-treated wastewater and tertiary-treated wastewater. The tested electron donors removed oxidised nitrogen (NOx) at varying rates, ranging from 48 mg N/L/d (acetate) to 0.3 mg N/L/d (hardwood). The concentrations of transient nitrite accumulation also varied across the electron donors. The different water types had an influence on NOx removal rates, the extent of which was dependent on the type of electron donor. Overall, the highest rates were recorded in light greywater, followed by the pure nutrient solution and the two partially treated wastewaters. Cotton wool and rice hulls were found to be promising electron donors with good NOx removal rates, lower leachable nutrients and had the least variation in performance across water types.

  4. Nitrated fatty acids reverse pulmonary fibrosis by dedifferentiating myofibroblasts and promoting collagen uptake by alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aravind T.; Lakshmi, Sowmya P.; Zhang, Yingze; Reddy, Raju C.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, fatal disease, thought to be largely transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) driven, for which there is no effective therapy. We assessed the potential benefits in IPF of nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), which are unique endogenous agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a nuclear hormone receptor that exhibits wound-healing and antifibrotic properties potentially useful for IPF therapy. We found that pulmonary PPARγ is down-regulated in patients with IPF. In vitro, knockdown or knockout of PPARγ expression in isolated human and mouse lung fibroblasts induced a profibrotic phenotype, whereas treating human fibroblasts with NFAs up-regulated PPARγ and blocked TGFβ signaling and actions. NFAs also converted TGFβ to inactive monomers in cell-free solution, suggesting an additional mechanism through which they may inhibit TGFβ. In vivo, treating mice bearing experimental pulmonary fibrosis with NFAs reduced disease severity. Also, NFAs up-regulated the collagen-targeting factor milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8), stimulated collagen uptake and degradation by alveolar macrophages, and promoted myofibroblast dedifferentiation. Moreover, treating mice with established pulmonary fibrosis using NFAs reversed their existing myofibroblast differentiation and collagen deposition. These findings raise the prospect of treating IPF with NFAs to halt and perhaps even reverse the progress of IPF.—Reddy, A. T., Lakshmi, S. P., Zhang, Y., Reddy, R. C. Nitrated fatty acids reverse pulmonary fibrosis by dedifferentiating myofibroblasts and promoting collagen uptake by alveolar macrophages. PMID:25252739

  5. Heterogeneous reactions of epoxides in acidic media.

    PubMed

    Lal, Vinita; Khalizov, Alexei F; Lin, Yun; Galvan, Maria D; Connell, Brian T; Zhang, Renyi

    2012-06-21

    Epoxides have recently been identified as important intermediates in the gas phase oxidation of hydrocarbons, and their hydrolysis products have been observed in ambient aerosols. To evaluate the role of epoxides in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), the kinetics and mechanism of heterogeneous reactions of two model epoxides, isoprene oxide and α-pinene oxide, with sulfuric acid, ammonium bisulfate, and ammonium sulfate have been investigated using complementary experimental techniques. Kinetic experiments using a fast flow reactor coupled to an ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ID-CIMS) show a fast irreversible loss of the epoxides with the uptake coefficients (γ) of (1.7 ± 0.1) × 10(-2) and (4.6 ± 0.3) × 10(-2) for isoprene oxide and α-pinene oxide, respectively, for 90 wt % H(2)SO(4) and at room temperature. Experiments using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) reveal that diols are the major products in ammonium bisulfate and dilute H(2)SO(4) (<25 wt %) solutions for both epoxides. In concentrated H(2)SO(4) (>65 wt %), acetals are formed from isoprene oxide, whereas organosulfates are produced from α-pinene oxide. The reaction of the epoxides with ammonium sulfate is slow and no products are observed. The epoxide reactions using bulk samples and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy reveal the presence of diols as the major products for isoprene oxide, accompanied by aldehyde formation. For α-pinene oxide, organosulfate formation is observed with a yield increasing with the acidity. Large yields of organosulfates in all NMR experiments with α-pinene oxide are attributed to the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) from the use of deuterated sulfuric acid and water. Our results suggest that acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of epoxides results in the formation of a wide range of products, and some of the products have low volatility and contribute to SOA growth under ambient conditions

  6. Lactic acid conversion to 2,3-pentanedione and acrylic acid over silica-supported sodium nitrate: Reaction optimization and identification of sodium lactate as the active catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Wadley, D.C.; Tam, M.S.; Miller, D.J.

    1997-01-15

    Lactic acid is converted to 2,3-pentanedione, acrylic acid, and other products in vapor-phase reactions over silica-supported sodium lactate formed from sodium nitrate. Multiparameter optimization of reaction conditions using a Box-Benkhen experimental design shows that the highest yield and selectivity to 2,3-pentanedione are achieved at low temperature, elevated pressure, and long contact time, while yield and selectivity to acrylic acid are most favorable at high temperature, low pressure, and short contact time. Post-reaction Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses of the catalyst indicate that sodium nitrate as the initial catalyst material is transformed to sodium lactate at the onset of reaction via proton transfer from lactic acid to nitrate. The resultant nitric acid vaporizes as it is formed, leaving sodium lactate as the sole sodium-bearing species on the catalyst during reaction. 19 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Heterogeneous interactions of chlorine nitrate, hydrogen chloride, and nitric acid with sulfuric acid surfaces at stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Golden, David M.

    1988-01-01

    The heterogeneous interactions of ClONO2, HCl, and HNO3 with sulfuric acid surfaces were studied using a Knudsen cell flow reactor. The surfaces studied, chosen to simulate global stratospheric particulate, were composed of 65-75 percent H2SO4 solutions at temperatures in the range -63 to -43 C. Heterogeneous loss, but not reaction, of HNO3 and HCl occurred on these surfaces; the measured sticking coefficients are reported. Chlorine nitrate reacted on the cold sulfuric acid surfaces, producing gas-phase HOCl and condensed HNO3. CLONO2 also reacted with HCl dissolved in the 65-percent H2SO4 solution at -63 C, forming gaseous Cl2. In all cases studied, the sticking and/or reaction coefficients were much larger for the 65-percent H2SO4 solution at -63 C than for the 75-percent solution at -43 C.

  8. Safe conditions for contacting nitric acid or nitrates with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L

    1994-01-01

    In response to a request from DOE-SR, the current state of knowledge of the reactions between TBP and aqueous nitrate solutions is critically reviewed, and recommendations are made for the safe operation of SRS separations equipment in which this combination of chemicals may be present. The existing limits for evaporation are validated. Guidelines are presented for cases in which general limits do not apply. The rate of reaction between nitric acid and TBP appears to be controlled by the rate of TBP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction produces dibutyl phosphate and n-butanol. The hydrolysis rate is a strong function of temperature, and becomes very fast at temperatures in the range 130{degrees} to 150{degrees}C. The resulting n-butanol is volatile at high temperatures, boiling at 117.5{degrees}C, but is also subject to exothermic oxidation by nitric acid or nitrates. If oxidation occurs before the n-butanol evaporates, the heat of oxidation may exceed local cooling by convection. The resulting heating will further accelerate the reaction, leading to an energetic runaway and possibly (in confined systems) an explosion. Extensive experiments and practice have shown that in a well-mixed and well-vented aqueous system such as an evaporator, at moderate acidities and temperatures below 130{degrees}C, the heat of reaction is adequately removed by vaporization of steam. In general, the heating will be so slow that natural processes provide adequate cooling at temperatures below 80{degrees}C. Above this temperature, care should be taken to ensure that adequate cooling is available for the amount of TBP that may be present. Experiments suggest that in well-ventilated systems n-butanol evaporation and convective cooling are sufficient to control the reaction at temperatures up to 120{degrees}C.

  9. Acid tolerance of rhizobium trifolii in culture media

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, F.C.; Davey, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Tolerance to acidity (pH 4.2 to 4.6), low P (1 to 6 ..mu..M) and high Al (15 to 40..mu..M) for 100 strains of Rhizobium trifolii was assessed in liquid culture media in the laboratory. Response to acidity and Al varied among strains as evidenced by lower maximum cell densities and reduced growth rates, most preceded by a lag phase. Tolerance to acidity did not imply tolerance to Al in all cases. Strains were capable of tolerating higher levels of Al if acidity was reduced. Limitations in rhizobial growth due to low P concentrations were not as severe a stress as high acidity or high Al concentration.

  10. Gradient Measurements of NO, NO2, Total Peroxy Nitrates, Total Alkyl Nitrates, and Nitric Acid during BEARPEX-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusede, S. E.; Lafranchi, B. W.; Min, K.; Browne, E. C.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Cohen, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    The Biosphere Effects on AeRosols and Photochemistry EXperiment (BEARPEX) provides a unique opportunity to examine biosphere-atmosphere exchange between the Sacramento urban plume and the low NOx high VOC conditions within a forest canopy. Within-canopy concentration gradients of nitrogen oxides evidence local forest-atmosphere interactions including chemical production and loss. Recent observations of NO2, total peroxy nitrates (ΣRO2NO2), total alkyl nitrates (ΣRONO2), and HNO3 fluxes suggest fast within-canopy photochemistry (Farmer and Cohen, 2008). During the BEARPEX-2009 campaign (June 18 - July 30), NO2, ΣRO2NO2, ΣRONO2, and HNO3 gradients were observed using thermal dissociation - laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF) and collocated with NO chemiluminescence measurements within and above a ponderosa pine plantation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. We report negative daytime gradients (lower concentrations near the surface) of ΣRONO2 and HNO3. At night, negative gradients of ΣRO2NO2 correspond to positive gradients in NO/NO2.

  11. Oxygen and nitrogen isotopic composition of nitrate in commercial fertilizers, nitric acid, and reagent salts.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Greg; Kolanowski, Michelle; Riha, Krystin M

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate is a key component of synthetic fertilizers that can be beneficial to crop production in agro-ecosystems, but can also cause damage to natural ecosystems if it is exported in large amounts. Stable isotopes, both oxygen and nitrogen, have been used to trace the sources and fate of nitrate in various ecosystems. However, the oxygen isotope composition of synthetic and organic nitrates is poorly constrained. Here, we present a study on the N and O isotope composition of nitrate-based fertilizers. The δ(15)N values of synthetic and natural nitrates were 0 ± 2 ‰ similar to the air N2 from which they are derived. The δ(18)O values of synthetic nitrates were 23 ± 3 ‰, similar to air O2, and natural nitrate fertilizer δ(18)O values (55 ± 5 ‰) were similar to those observed in atmospheric nitrate. The Δ(17)O values of synthetic fertilizer nitrate were approximately zero following a mass-dependent isotope relationship, while natural nitrate fertilizers had Δ(17)O values of 18 ± 2 ‰ similar to nitrate produced photochemically in the atmosphere. These narrow ranges of values can be used to assess the amount of nitrate arising from fertilizers in mixed systems where more than one nitrate source exists (soil, rivers, and lakes) using simple isotope mixing models. PMID:26181213

  12. Oxygen and nitrogen isotopic composition of nitrate in commercial fertilizers, nitric acid, and reagent salts.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Greg; Kolanowski, Michelle; Riha, Krystin M

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate is a key component of synthetic fertilizers that can be beneficial to crop production in agro-ecosystems, but can also cause damage to natural ecosystems if it is exported in large amounts. Stable isotopes, both oxygen and nitrogen, have been used to trace the sources and fate of nitrate in various ecosystems. However, the oxygen isotope composition of synthetic and organic nitrates is poorly constrained. Here, we present a study on the N and O isotope composition of nitrate-based fertilizers. The δ(15)N values of synthetic and natural nitrates were 0 ± 2 ‰ similar to the air N2 from which they are derived. The δ(18)O values of synthetic nitrates were 23 ± 3 ‰, similar to air O2, and natural nitrate fertilizer δ(18)O values (55 ± 5 ‰) were similar to those observed in atmospheric nitrate. The Δ(17)O values of synthetic fertilizer nitrate were approximately zero following a mass-dependent isotope relationship, while natural nitrate fertilizers had Δ(17)O values of 18 ± 2 ‰ similar to nitrate produced photochemically in the atmosphere. These narrow ranges of values can be used to assess the amount of nitrate arising from fertilizers in mixed systems where more than one nitrate source exists (soil, rivers, and lakes) using simple isotope mixing models.

  13. Effect of fertilizer on the growth of radish plants exposed to simulated acidic rain containing different sulfate to nitrate ratios.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J S; Troiano, J J; Heller, L I; Osmeloski, L

    1987-01-01

    Two successive experiments were performed in the greenhouse to test the hypothesis that plant response to the amounts and ratios of sulfuric and nitric acids in rain is affected by the amount of fertilizer added to the growing medium. Radish plants, grown with different levels of N?P?K fertilizer, were given ten 1-h exposures over a 3-week period to simulate acidic rain at pH values from 2.6 to 5.0 and sulfate to nitrate mass ratios from 0.3 to 7.5. Increased acidity of simulated rain reduced plant growth, with a greater depression of hypocotyl mass than shoot mass. The reverse growth response occurred with increased supply of fertilizer: plant biomass rose with a larger increase in shoot mass than hypocotyl mass. In one experiment, plants that received a greater supply of fertilizer exhibited more obvious reductions in growth of hoots at the higher levels of acidity of simulated rain. There were no significant effects of sulfate to nitrate ratios in simulated rain on plant growth, nor any effect of this ratio on the response of shoots and hypocotyls to acidity of simulated rain. Addition of fertilizer had no effect on plant response to sulfate to nitrate ratios. These results do not support the hypothesis that nutrient-deficient plants are either more or less responsive to sulfate and nitrate in rain than plants grown with optimal supplies of nutrients. They support previous results indicating no effects of sulfate to nitrate ratio in simulated acidic rain on plant growth. The results also suggest that the greatest risk of harmful effects on vegetation may come from the combination of high sulfate and high acidity in rainfall.

  14. Plutonium scrap waste processing based on aqueous nitrate and chloride media

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, J D

    1985-05-13

    A brief review of plutonium scrap aqueous waste processing technology at Rocky Flats is given. Nitric acid unit operations include dissolution and leaching, anion exchange purification and precipitation. Chloride waste processing consists of cation exchange and carbonate precipitation. Ferrite and carrier precipitation waste treatment processes are also described. 3 figs.

  15. Water vapor absorption in porous media polluted by calcium nitrate studied by time domain nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gombia, Mirko; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J S; Camaiti, Mara; Cavallero, Luisa; Fantazzini, Paola

    2009-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis of liquid water (1)H nuclei in real porous media, selected for their similar composition (carbonate rocks) and different pore space architecture, polluted with calcium nitrate, is presented to study the kinetics of water condensation and salt deliquescence inside the pore space. These phenomena are responsible for deterioration of porous materials when exposed to environmental injury by pollution in a humid atmosphere. The theory is well described for simple pore geometries, but it is not yet well understood in real porous media with wide distributions of pore sizes and connections. The experiment is performed by following in time the formation of liquid water inside the pore space by T(1) and T(2) relaxation time distributions. The distributions allow one to see the effects of both the salt concentration and the pore space structure on the amount of water vapor condensed and its kinetics. It is shown that, for a given lithotype, even with different amounts of pollutant, the rate-average relaxation time T(1ra) tends to increase monotonically with NMR signal, proportional to the amount of liquid water. T(1ra) is often inversely associated with surface-to-volume ratio. This suggests a trend toward the filling of larger pores as amounts of liquid water increase, but it does not indicate a strict sequential filling of pores in order of size and starting with the smallest; in fact, relaxation time distributions show clearly that this is not the case. Increased amounts of salt lead to both markedly increased rates and markedly increased amounts of water absorption. NMR measurements of amounts of water, together with relaxation time distributions, give the possibility of information on the effect of pollution in porous materials exposed to humid atmospheres but sheltered from liquid water, even before the absorption of large amounts of moisture and subsequent damage. These phenomena are of importance also in other fields

  16. Water vapor absorption in porous media polluted by calcium nitrate studied by time domain nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gombia, Mirko; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J S; Camaiti, Mara; Cavallero, Luisa; Fantazzini, Paola

    2009-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis of liquid water (1)H nuclei in real porous media, selected for their similar composition (carbonate rocks) and different pore space architecture, polluted with calcium nitrate, is presented to study the kinetics of water condensation and salt deliquescence inside the pore space. These phenomena are responsible for deterioration of porous materials when exposed to environmental injury by pollution in a humid atmosphere. The theory is well described for simple pore geometries, but it is not yet well understood in real porous media with wide distributions of pore sizes and connections. The experiment is performed by following in time the formation of liquid water inside the pore space by T(1) and T(2) relaxation time distributions. The distributions allow one to see the effects of both the salt concentration and the pore space structure on the amount of water vapor condensed and its kinetics. It is shown that, for a given lithotype, even with different amounts of pollutant, the rate-average relaxation time T(1ra) tends to increase monotonically with NMR signal, proportional to the amount of liquid water. T(1ra) is often inversely associated with surface-to-volume ratio. This suggests a trend toward the filling of larger pores as amounts of liquid water increase, but it does not indicate a strict sequential filling of pores in order of size and starting with the smallest; in fact, relaxation time distributions show clearly that this is not the case. Increased amounts of salt lead to both markedly increased rates and markedly increased amounts of water absorption. NMR measurements of amounts of water, together with relaxation time distributions, give the possibility of information on the effect of pollution in porous materials exposed to humid atmospheres but sheltered from liquid water, even before the absorption of large amounts of moisture and subsequent damage. These phenomena are of importance also in other fields

  17. Simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Tokumura, Masahiro; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The zero-valent iron (ZVI) wastewater treatment has been applied to simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewaters. The simultaneous removal occurs by the reactions performed due to the sequential transformation of ZVI under the acidic condition. Fortunately the solution pH of semiconductor acidic wastewaters is low which is effective for the sequential transformation of ZVI. Firstly the reduction of nitrate is taken place by electrons generated by the corrosion of ZVI under acidic conditions. Secondly the ferrous ion generated by the corrosion of ZVI reacts with hydrogen peroxide and generates ·OH radical (Fenton reaction). The Fenton reaction consists of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and the generation of ferric ion. Finally phosphate precipitates out with iron ions. In the simultaneous removal process, 1.6 mM nitrate, 9.0 mM hydrogen peroxide and 1.0 mM phosphate were completely removed by ZVI within 100, 15 and 15 min, respectively. The synergy among the reactions for the removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate was found. In the individual pollutant removal experiment, the removal of phosphate by ZVI was limited to 80% after 300 min. Its removal rate was considerably improved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and the complete removal of phosphate was achieved after 15 min.

  18. Characterization of prominent nitrate-reducing and amino acid-utilizing bacteria from nitrotoxin-enriched equine cecal populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present study, populations of equine cecal microbes enriched for enhanced rates of 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA) or nitrate metabolism were diluted and cultured for NPA-metabolizing bacteria on a basal enrichment medium (BEM) or tryptose soy agar (TSA) medium supplemented with either 5 mM NP...

  19. Manifestation of Preferential Flow and Nitrate Transport in Central European Soils on Acid Crystalline Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolezal, F.; Cislerova, M.; Vogel, T.; Zavadil, J.; Vacek, J.; Kvitek, T.; Prazak, P.; Nechvatal, M.; Bayer, T.

    2006-12-01

    Large areas of Central Europe are occupied by highlands and peneplains of medium altitudes, built by acid crystalline rocks. The soils overlying them are typically of medium textures. They are neither markedly water- repellent nor greatly swelling and shrinking. These landscapes are characterized by high vulnerability of water bodies, both surface and subsurface. The existing methodologies of vulnerability assessment regard the heavier among these soils as little vulnerable to diffuse pollution, while in reality they may be virtually equally vulnerable, because of the short-circuiting effect of preferential flow and transport. Our experiment site was Valeèov (49° 38' 40" N, 14° 30' 25" E, 461 m a.s.l.) in the Bohemo-Moravian highland, with average annual precipitation 660 mm and average annual air temperature 7.2 ° C. The field trials, starting from 2001, were focused on growing potato under different conditions. Soil moisture content was measured by Theta- probe capacitance sensors, soil water suction by Watermark sensors and tensiometers. Nitrate leaching was monitored by soil solution sampling with ceramic suction cups and zero-tension lysimeters. The hydraulic conductivity of the soil was measured on small cores and by suction and pressure infiltrometers. The following preferential flow manifestations are analyzed and quantified: a) the spatial variability of soil moisture content and suction after rainstorms, b) the spatial and temporal variability of soil's hydraulic conductivity and its dependence on soil moisture content, c) the spatial variability of percolation volumes in parallel lysimeters, d) the variability of nitrate concentrations in the lysimeter leachate, e) the apparent absence of correlation between leachate volumes and leachate concentrations in lysimeters, f) the lower mean and higher variance of leachate concentrations in lysimeters, in comparison with those in suction cups.

  20. Solidification of Acidic, High Nitrate Nuclear Wastes by Grouting or Absorption on Silica Gel

    SciTech Connect

    A. K. Herbst; S. V. Raman; R. J. Kirkham

    2004-01-01

    The use of grout and silica gel were explored for the solidification of four types of acidic, high nitrate radioactive wastes. Two methods of grouting were tested: direct grouting and pre-neutralization. Two methods of absorption on silica gel were also tested: direct absorption and rotary spray drying. The waste simulant acidity varied between 1 N and 12 N. The waste simulant was neutralized by pre-blending calcium hydroxide with Portland cement and blast furnace slag powders prior to mixing with the simulant for grout solidification. Liquid sodium hydroxide was used to partially neutralize the simulant to a pH above 2 and then it was absorbed for silica gel solidification. Formulations for each of these methods are presented along with waste form characteristics and properties. Compositional variation maps for grout formulations are presented which help determine the optimum "recipe" for a particular waste stream. These maps provide a method to determine the proportions of waste, calcium hydroxide, Portland cement, and blast furnace slag that provide a waste form that meets the disposal acceptance criteria. The maps guide researchers in selecting areas to study and provide an operational envelop that produces acceptable waste forms. The grouts both solidify and stabilize the wastes, while absorption on silica gel produces a solid waste that will not pass standard leaching procedures (TCLP) if required. Silica gel wastes can be made to pass most leach tests if heated to 600ºC.

  1. Electrodialytic removal of nitrate from pineapple juice: effect on selected physicochemical properties, amino acids, and aroma components of the juice.

    PubMed

    Ackarabanpojoue, Yuwadee; Chindapan, Nathamol; Yoovidhya, Tipaporn; Devahastin, Sakamon

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of nitrate removal from pineapple juice by electrodialysis (ED) on selected properties of the ED-treated juice. Single-strength pineapple juice with reduced pulp content was treated by ED to reduce the nitrate concentration to 15, 10, or 5 ppm. After ED, the removed pulp was added to the ED-treated juice and its properties, including electrical conductivity, acidity, pH, total soluble solids (TSS), color, amino acids, and selected aroma compounds, were determined and compared with those of the untreated juice. ED could reduce the nitrate content of 1 L of pineapple juice from an initial value of 50 ppm to less than 5 ppm within 30 min. A significant decrease in the electrical conductivity, acidity, pH, TSS, and yellowness, but a significant increase in the lightness, of the juice was observed upon ED. Concentrations of almost all amino acids of the ED-treated juice significantly decreased. The concentrations of 8 major compound contributors to the pineapple aroma also significantly decreased. Adding the pulp back to the ED-treated juice increased the amino acids concentrations; however, it led to a significant decrease in the concentrations of the aroma compounds.

  2. Thermophysical properties of sodium nitrate and sodium chloride solutions and their effects on fluid flow in unsaturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-10-01

    Understanding movement of saline sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}) waste solutions is important for assessing the contaminant migration near leaking waste storage tanks in the unsaturated zone at the Hanford site (Washington, USA). The purpose of this study is to contribute a basic understanding of effects of the thermophysical behavior of NaNO{sub 3} solutions on fluid flow in unsaturated media. We first present mathematical expressions for the dependence of density, viscosity, solubility and vapor pressure of NaNO{sub 3} solutions on both salt concentration and temperature, which were determined by fitting from published measured data. Because the previous studies of thermophysical behavior of sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions can provide a basis for those of NaNO{sub 3} solutions, we also present a comparison of thermophysical properties of both salt solutions. We have implemented the functional thermophysical properties of NaNO{sub 3} solutions into a new TOUGH2 equation-of-state module EWASG-NaNO{sub 3}, which is modified from a previous TOUGH2 equation-of-state module EWASG for NaCl. Using the simulation tool, we have investigated effects of the thermophysical properties on fluid flow in unsaturated media. The effect of density and viscosity of saline solutions has been long recognized. Here we focus our attention on the effect of vapor pressure lowering due to salinity. We present simulations of a one-dimensional problem to study this salinity-driven fluid flow. A number of simulations were performed using different values of thermal conductivity, permeability, and temperature, to illustrate conditions and parameters controlling these processes. Results indicate that heat conduction plays a very important role in this salinity-driven vapor diffusion by maintaining a nearly constant temperature. The smaller the permeability, the more water is transferred into the saline environment. Effects of permeability on water flow are also complicated by effects of capillary

  3. Re-cultivation of Neochloris oleoabundans in exhausted autotrophic and mixotrophic media: the potential role of polyamines and free fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Sabia, Alessandra; Baldisserotto, Costanza; Biondi, Stefania; Marchesini, Roberta; Tedeschi, Paola; Maietti, Annalisa; Giovanardi, Martina; Ferroni, Lorenzo; Pancaldi, Simonetta

    2015-12-01

    Neochloris oleoabundans (Chlorophyta) is widely considered one of the most promising microalgae for biotechnological applications. However, the large-scale production of microalgae requires large amounts of water. In this perspective, the possibility of using exhausted growth media for the re-cultivation of N. oleoabundans was investigated in order to simultaneously make the cultivation more economically feasible and environmentally sustainable. Experiments were performed by testing the following media: autotrophic exhausted medium (E+) and mixotrophic exhausted medium after cultivation with glucose (EG+) of N. oleoabundans cells grown in a 20-L photobioreactor (PBR). Both exhausted media were replenished with the same amounts of nitrate and phosphate as the control brackish medium (C). Growth kinetics, nitrate and phosphate consumption, photosynthetic pigments content, photosynthetic efficiency, cell morphology, and lipid production were evaluated. Moreover, the free fatty acid (FFA) composition of exhausted media and the polyamine (PA) concentrations of both algae and media were analyzed in order to test if some molecules, released into the medium, could influence algal growth and metabolism. Results showed that N. oleoabundans can efficiently grow in both exhausted media, if appropriately replenished with the main nutrients (E+ and EG+), especially in E+ and to the same extent as in C medium. Growth promotion of N. oleoabundans was attributed to PAs and alteration of the photosynthetic apparatus to FFAs. Taken together, results show that recycling growth medium is a suitable solution to obtain good N. oleoabundans biomass concentrations, while providing a more sustainable ecological impact on water resources.

  4. Competitive oxidation of volatile fatty acids by sulfate- and nitrate-reducing bacteria from an oil field in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Aleksandr A; Cornish, Sabrina L; Buziak, Brenton; Lin, Shiping; Cavallaro, Adriana; Arensdorf, Joseph J; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2008-07-01

    Acetate, propionate, and butyrate, collectively referred to as volatile fatty acids (VFA), are considered among the most important electron donors for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (hNRB) in oil fields. Samples obtained from a field in the Neuquén Basin, western Argentina, had significant activity of mesophilic SRB, hNRB, and nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB). In microcosms, containing VFA (3 mM each) and excess sulfate, SRB first used propionate and butyrate for the production of acetate, which reached concentrations of up to 12 mM prior to being used as an electron donor for sulfate reduction. In contrast, hNRB used all three organic acids with similar kinetics, while reducing nitrate to nitrite and nitrogen. Transient inhibition of VFA-utilizing SRB was observed with 0.5 mM nitrite and permanent inhibition with concentrations of 1 mM or more. The addition of nitrate to medium flowing into an upflow, packed-bed bioreactor with an established VFA-oxidizing SRB consortium led to a spike of nitrite up to 3 mM. The nitrite-mediated inhibition of SRB led, in turn, to the transient accumulation of up to 13 mM of acetate. The complete utilization of nitrate and the incomplete utilization of VFA, especially propionate, and sulfate indicated that SRB remained partially inhibited. Hence, in addition to lower sulfide concentrations, an increase in the concentration of acetate in the presence of sulfate in waters produced from an oil field subjected to nitrate injection may indicate whether the treatment is successful. The microbial community composition in the bioreactor, as determined by culturing and culture-independent techniques, indicated shifts with an increasing fraction of nitrate. With VFA and sulfate, the SRB genera Desulfobotulus, Desulfotignum, and Desulfobacter as well as the sulfur-reducing Desulfuromonas and the NR-SOB Arcobacter were detected. With VFA and nitrate, Pseudomonas spp. were

  5. The Roles of Four Conserved Basic Amino Acids in a Ferredoxin-Dependent Cyanobacterial Nitrate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anurag P.; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Bhalla, Megha; Chung, Jung-Sung; Allen, James P.; Johnson, Michael K.; Tripathy, Jatindra N.; Rubio, Luis M.; Vaccaro, Brian; Subramanian, Sowmya; Flores, Enrique; Zabet-Moghaddam, Masoud; Stitle, Kyle; Knaff, David B.

    2013-01-01

    The roles of four conserved basic amino acids in the reaction catalyzed by the ferredoxin-dependent nitrate reductase from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 have been investigated using site-directed mutagenesis in combination with measurements of steady-state kinetics, substrate-binding affinities and spectroscopic properties of the enzyme’s two prosthetic groups. Replacement of either Lys58 or Arg70 by glutamine leads to a complete loss of activity, with both the physiological electron donor, reduced ferredoxin and with a non-physiological electron donor, reduced methyl viologen. More conservative, charge-maintaining K58R and R70K variants were also completely inactive. Replacement of Lys130 by glutamine produced a variant that retained 26% of the wild-type activity with methyl viologen as the electron donor and 22% of the wild-type activity with ferredoxin as the electron donor, while replacement by arginine produces a variant that retains a significantly higher percentage of the wild-type activity with both electron donors. In contrast, replacement of Arg146 by glutamine had minimal effect on the activity of the enzyme. These results, along with substrate-binding and spectroscopic measurements, are discussed in terms of an in silico structural model for the enzyme. PMID:23692082

  6. Differential Inhibition by Ferulic Acid of Nitrate and Ammonium Uptake in Zea mays L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Bergmark, Christine L.; Jackson, William A.; Volk, Richard J.; Blum, Udo

    1992-01-01

    The influence of the allelopathic compound ferulic acid (FA) on nitrogen uptake from solutions containing both NO3− and NH4+ was examined in 8-day-old nitrogen-depleted corn (Zea mays L.) seedlings. Concurrent effects on uptake of Cl− and K+ also were assessed. The presence of 250 micromolar FA inhibited the initial (0-1 hours) rate of NO3− uptake and also prevented development of the NO3−-inducible accelerated rate. The pattern of recovery when FA was removed was interpreted as indicating a rapid relief of FA-restricted NO3− uptake activity, followed by a reinitiation of the induction of that activity. No inhibition of NO3− reduction was detected. Ammonium uptake was less sensitive than NO3− uptake to inhibition by FA. An inhibition of Cl− uptake occurred as induction of the NO3− transport system developed in the absence of FA. Alterations of Cl− uptake in the presence of FA were, therefore, a result of a beneficial effect, because NO3− uptake was restricted, and a direct inhibitory effect. The presence of FA increased the initial net K+ loss from the roots during exposure to the low K, ammonium nitrate uptake solution and delayed the recovery to positive net uptake, but it did not alter the general pattern of the response. The implications of the observations are discussed for growth of plants under natural conditions and cultural practices that foster periodic accumulation of allelopathic substances. PMID:16668689

  7. Ammonium nitrate evaporation and nitric acid condensation in DMT CCN counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, S.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Nenes, A.; Raatikainen, T.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of inorganic semivolatile aerosol compounds on the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of aerosol particles was studied by using a computational model for a DMT-CCN counter, a cloud parcel model for condensation kinetics and experiments to quantify the modelled results. Concentrations of water vapour and semivolatiles as well as aerosol trajectories in the CCN column were calculated by a computational fluid dynamics model. These trajectories and vapour concentrations were then used as an input for the cloud parcel model to simulate mass transfer kinetics of water and semivolatiles between aerosol particles and the gas phase. Two different questions were studied: (1) how big a fraction of semivolatiles is evaporated from particles after entering but before particle activation in the DMT-CCN counter? (2) How much can the CCN activity be increased due to condensation of semivolatiles prior to the maximum water supersaturation in the case of high semivolatile concentration in the gas phase? Both experimental and modelling results show that the evaporation of ammonia and nitric acid from ammonium nitrate particles causes a 10 to 15 nm decrease to the critical particle size in supersaturations between 0.1% and 0.7%. On the other hand, the modelling results also show that condensation of nitric acid or similar vapour can increase the CCN activity of nonvolatile aerosol particles, but a very high gas phase concentration (as compared to typical ambient conditions) would be needed. Overall, it is more likely that the CCN activity of semivolatile aerosol is underestimated than overestimated in the measurements conducted in ambient conditions.

  8. EVAPORATION OF Pd, Mo, Te, AND Sb FROM NITRIC ACID AND SODIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS AT ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    ITO, K.; KAMIYA, M.; TAKADA, T.

    2003-02-27

    In order to reduce low-level radioactive liquid waste, evaporation at atmospheric pressure was carried out for aqueous solutions containing a sub-volatile fission product in both nitric acid and sodium nitrate solutions. Decontamination factors of the distillates for Pd, Mo, Te, and Sb were the order of 10,000, and the percentages per square meters adhering to the condenser and the inside of the evaporator lid were between 0.001 and 0.0001.

  9. Kinetic study of the oxidation and nitration of catechols in the presence of nitrous acid ionization equilibria.

    PubMed

    Khalafi, Lida; Rafiee, Mohammad

    2010-02-15

    Conversion of catechols to corresponding nitro derivatives in the presence of nitrous acid dissociation is studied using voltammetry and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The results indicate that the quinones derived from oxidation of catechols by nitrous acid participate in Michael addition reaction with nitrite ion in very mild acidic solutions. Rank annihilation factor analysis RAFA is applied to resolve the two-way kinetic spectra data measured from spectroscopic reactions. The rank of the original data matrix is reduced by one by annihilating the information of each component. It is shown that both reactions are drastically depends on pH and nitrous acid or nitrite ion percentage. The rate constants of oxidation and nitration reactions of catechol derivatives are obtained at the pHs around pK(a) of nitrous acid.

  10. The Aerobic Oxidation of Bromide to Dibromine Catalyzed by Homogeneous Oxidation Catalysts and Initiated by Nitrate in Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Partenheimer, Walt; Fulton, John L.; Sorensen, Christina M.; Pham, Van Thai; Chen, Yongsheng

    2014-06-01

    A small amount of nitrate, ~0.002 molal, initiates the Co/Mn catalyzed aerobic oxidation of bromide compounds (HBr,NaBr,LiBr) to dibromine in acetic acid at room temperature. At temperatures 40oC or less , the reaction is autocatalytic. Co(II) and Mn(II) themselves and mixed with ionic bromide are known homogeneous oxidation catalysts. The reaction was discovered serendipitously when a Co/Br and Co/Mn/Br catalyst solution was prepared for the aerobic oxidation of methyaromatic compounds and the Co acetate contained a small amount of impurity i.e. nitrate. The reaction was characterized by IR, UV-VIS, MALDI and EXAFS spectroscopies and the coordination chemistry is described. The reaction is inhibited by water and its rate changed by pH. The change in these variables, as well as others, are identical to those observed during homogeneous, aerobic oxidation of akylaromatics. A mechanism is proposed. Accidental addition of a small amount of nitrate compound into a Co/Mn/Br/acetic acid mixture in a large, commercial feedtank is potentially dangerous.

  11. Degradation of CYANEX 301 in Contact with Nitric Acid Media

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe Marc; Radu Custelcean; Gary S. Groenewold; John R. Klaehn; Dean R. Peterman; Laetitia H. Delmau

    2012-10-01

    The nature of the degradation product obtained upon contacting CYANEX 301 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid) with nitric acid has been elucidated and found to be a disulfide derivative. The first step to the degradation of CYANEX 301 in toluene has been studied using 31P{1H} NMR after being contacted with nitric acid media. The spectrum of the degradation product exhibits a complex multiplet around dP = 80 ppm. A succession of purifications of CYANEX 301 has resulted in single crystals of the acidic form and the corresponding ammonium salt. Unlike the original CYANEX 301, which consists of a complex diastereomeric mixture displaying all possible combinations of chiral orientations at the 2-methyl positions, the purified crystals were shown by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to be racemates, containing 50:50 mixtures of the [R;R] and [S;S] diastereomers. The comparison between the 31P {1H} NMR spectra of the degradation products resulting from the diastereomerically pure CYANEX 301 and the original diastereomeric mixture has elucidated the influence of the isomeric composition on the multiplicity of the 31P {1H} NMR peak. These NMR data indicate the initial degradation leads to a disulfide-bridged condensation product displaying multiple resonances due to phosphorus–phosphorus coupling, which is caused by the inequivalence of the two P atoms as a result of their different chirality. A total of nine different NMR resonances, six of which display phosphorus–phosphorus coupling, could be assigned, and the identity of the peaks corresponding to phosphorus atoms coupled to each other was confirmed by 31P {1H} homodecoupled NMR analysis.

  12. Efficient secretion of (R)-3-hydroxybutyric acid from Halomonas sp. KM-1 by nitrate fed-batch cultivation with glucose under microaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoshikazu; Ando, Hitoshi; Matsushita, Isao; Tsubota, Jun

    2014-03-01

    To establish a sustainable society, commodity chemicals need to be developed from biomass resources. Recently, (R)-3-hydroxybutyric acid ((R)-3-HB), a monomer of bioplastic poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB), has attracted attention for its possible use in the chemical industry. Halophilic bacteria have been considered for bioprocess applications due to certain characteristics such as the ability to grow in media containing high levels of the starting carbon source and the ability to be rarely contaminated. A halophilic bacterium Halomonas sp. KM-1 stores PHB intracellularly under aerobic conditions and secretes (R)-3-HB under microaerobic conditions. In this study, we optimized culture conditions to maximize (R)-3-HB secretion by KM-1 cells. By a simple nitrate fed-batch cultivation, Halomonas sp. KM-1 secreted 40.3g/L (R)-3-HB with a productivity of 0.48g L(-1)h(-1) with 20% (w/v) glucose. This level is one of the highest recorded productivity of (R)-3-HB to date. PMID:24503050

  13. Heterogeneous chemical reaction of chlorine nitrate and water on sulfuric-acid surfaces at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-01-01

    The use of H2SO4 as a catalyst for aerosol production of chlorine compounds in the chemistry of the antarctic stratosphere was investigated in laboratory trials. The experiments involved the gas surface collision rate of a molecule on a given surface during its residence time in a Knudsen cell in molecular flow conditions. Chlorine nitrate gas was made to flow through a chamber exposed to a container holding a 95.6 pct H2SO4 solution. Gas leaving the cell was scanned with a mass spectrometer. A sticking coefficient of 0.00032 was found for the chlorine nitrate, a value five times that previously reported.

  14. High-performance nitrate-selective electrodes containing immobilized amino acid betaines as sensors.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Thierry; Braven, Jim; Ebdon, Les; Scholefield, David

    2002-06-01

    Ten nitrate-selective electrodes based upon rubbery membranes containing various betaine salts as sensors covalently bound to a cross-linked polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS) polymer have been produced. The membranes were robust, highly selective, and effective over a pH range of 2-8. The best nitrate-selective electrode fabricated contained 10% m/m dicumyl peroxide, 40% 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether, 6.5% triallyl leucine betaine chloride and 43.5% SBS. The characteristics of this electrode were a linear Nernstian range of 1 x 10(-1) to 5 x 10(-6) mol dm(-3) NO3-, a limit of detection of 3.4 x 10(-7) mol dm(-3) NO3-, and a selectivity coefficient for nitrate against chloride, K(NO3-,Cl-)pot, of 3.4 x 10(-3). These figures represent a significant improvement on current commercial nitrate sensors. Response times were 1 min or less; stability of response and electrode lifetime in continuous use was also very satisfactory. PMID:12069243

  15. Environmental Nitrate Stimulates Abscisic Acid Accumulation in Arabidopsis Root Tips by Releasing It from Inactive Stores[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) signaling plays a major role in root system development, regulating growth and root architecture. However, the precise localization of ABA remains undetermined. Here, we present a mechanism in which nitrate signaling stimulates the release of bioactive ABA from the inactive storage form, ABA-glucose ester (ABA-GE). We found that ABA accumulated in the endodermis and quiescent center of Arabidopsis thaliana root tips, mimicking the pattern of SCARECROW expression, and (to lower levels) in the vascular cylinder. Nitrate treatment increased ABA levels in root tips; this stimulation requires the activity of the endoplasmic reticulum-localized, ABA-GE-deconjugating enzyme β-GLUCOSIDASE1, but not de novo ABA biosynthesis. Immunogold labeling demonstrated that ABA is associated with cytoplasmic structures near, but not within, the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings demonstrate a mechanism for nitrate-regulated root growth via regulation of ABA accumulation in the root tip, providing insight into the environmental regulation of root growth. PMID:26887919

  16. Yeast Extract and Silver Nitrate Induce the Expression of Phenylpropanoid Biosynthetic Genes and Induce the Accumulation of Rosmarinic Acid in Agastache rugosa Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo Tae; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yeo, Sun Kyung; Jeon, Jin; Park, Jong Seok; Lee, Sook Young; Park, Sang Un

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of yeast extract and silver nitrate on the enhancement of phenylpropanoid pathway genes and accumulation of rosmarinic acid in Agastache rugosa cell cultures. The treatment of cell cultures with yeast extract (500 mg/L) and silver nitrate (30 mg/L) for varying times enhanced the expression of genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway and the production of rosmarinic acid. The results indicated that the expression of RAS and HPPR was proportional to the amount of yeast extract and silver nitrate. The transcript levels of HPPR under yeast extract treatment were 1.84-, 1.97-, and 2.86-fold higher than the control treatments after 3, 6, and 12 h, respectively, whereas PAL expression under silver nitrate treatment was 52.31-fold higher than in the non-treated controls after 24 h of elicitation. The concentration of rosmarinic acid was directly proportional to the concentration of the applied elicitors. Yeast extract supplementation documented the highest amount of rosmarinic acid at 4.98 mg/g, whereas silver nitrate addition resulted in a comparatively lower amount of rosmarinic acid at 0.65 mg/g. In conclusion, addition of yeast extract to the cell cultures enhanced the accumulation of rosmarinic acid, which was evidenced by the expression levels of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway genes in A. rugosa.

  17. Selective extraction of U(VI) and some other metals from nitric acid media by poly-phosphine poly-oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Nogami, M.; Sugiyama, Y.; Ikeda, Y.; Maruyama, K.

    2008-07-01

    For the selective extraction of radionuclides from nitrate media, the extractabilities of organo-poly-phosphine poly-oxides were examined in the form of impregnated resins. It was found that the extractability of 1,1,3,5,5-pentaphenyl-1,3,5-tri-phospha-pentane trioxide (PPTPT) for U(VI) is quite unusual with very high values at both low and high concentrations of nitric acid, which is not observed for other types of extractants. Thus, this extractant might be promising for the selective extraction of U(VI) in very high concentrations of HNO{sub 3}. (authors)

  18. Effect of the cathode material on the removal of nitrates by electrolysis in non-chloride media.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Engracia; Cañizares, Pablo; Llanos, Javier; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2012-04-30

    In this work, the effect of the cathode material (conductive diamond, stainless steel, silicon carbide, graphite or lead) and the current density (150-1400 A m(-2)) on the removal of nitrates from aqueous solutions is studied by electrolysis in non-divided electrochemical cells equipped with conductive diamond anodes, using sodium sulphate as the electrolyte. The results show that the cathode material very strongly influences both the process performance and the product distribution. The main products obtained are gaseous nitrogen (NO, N(2)O and NO(2)) and ammonium ions. Nitrate removal follows first order kinetics, which indicates that the electrolysis process is controlled by mass transfer. Furthermore, the stainless steel and graphite cathodes show a great selectivity towards the production of ammonium ions, whereas the silicon carbide cathode leads to the highest formation of gaseous nitrogen, which production is promoted at low current densities.

  19. Activation of Carbonyl-Containing Molecules with Solid Lewis Acids in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Leshkov, Yuriy; Davis, Mark E.

    2011-09-28

    Current interest in reacting carbonyl-containing molecules in aqueous media is primarily due to the growing emphasis on conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Recently, solid Lewis acids have been shown to perform catalytic reactions with carbonyl-containing molecules such as sugars in aqueous media. Here, catalysis mediated by Lewis acids is briefly discussed, Lewis acid solids that perform catalysis in aqueous media are then described, and the review is concluded with a few comments on the outlook for the future.

  20. Effects of Ozone and Peroxyacetyl Nitrate on Polar Lipids and Fatty Acids in Leaves of Morning Glory and Kidney Bean

    PubMed Central

    Nouchi, Isamu; Toyama, Susumu

    1988-01-01

    To compare the effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on leaf lipids, fatty acids and malondialdehyde (MDA), morning glory (Pharbitis nil Choisy cv Scarlet O'Hara) and kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Gintebo) plants were exposed to either ozone (0.15 microliter per liter for 8 hours) or PAN (0.10 microliter per liter for up to 8 hours). Ozone increased phospholipids in morning glory and decreased in kidney bean at the initial stage (2-4 hours) of exposure, while it scarcely changed glycolipids, the unsaturated fatty acids, and MDA in both plants. A large reduction of glycolipids occurred 1 day after ozone exposure in both plants. PAN caused marked drops in phospholipids and glycolipids in kidney bean at relatively late stage (6-8 hours) of exposure, while it increased phosphatidic acid and decreased the unsaturated fatty acids, an increase which was accompanied by a large increase in MDA. These results suggest that ozone may not directly oxidize unsaturated fatty acids at the initial stage of exposure, but may alter polar lipid metabolism, particularly phospholipids. On the other hand, PAN may abruptly and considerably degrade phospholipids and glycolipids by peroxidation or hydrolysis at the late stage of exposure. The present study shows that ozone and PAN affect polar lipids in different manners. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16666199

  1. Novel insights in Al-MCM-41 precursor as adsorbent for regulated haloacetic acids and nitrate from water.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; De Carlo, Rosa Maria; Sarzanini, Corrado; Caldarola, Dario; Onida, Barbara

    2012-11-01

    High concentration of NO (3) (-) in groundwater has raised concern over possible contamination of drinking water supplies. In addition, the formation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) as by-products during disinfection with chlorine-based agents is still a relevant issue, since HAAs pose serious health hazard. In this work, we investigated the affinity of a precursor of Al-MCM-41 (a mesostructured hexagonal aluminosilicate containing the template surfactant) towards nitrate and HAAs, for its possible application in the removal of these pollutants from natural and drinking waters. Additionally, adsorption kinetics and isotherms were studied. The adsorbent was synthesized using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as surfactant and characterized by physico-chemical techniques. Simulated drinking water was spiked with the EPA-regulated HAAs (monochloroacetic (MCAA), monobromoacetic (MBAA), dichloroacetic (DCAA), dibromoacetic (DBAA), and trichloroacetic (TCAA) acids) and placed in contact with the adsorbent. The effect of matrix composition was studied. Adsorption kinetic studies were performed testing three kinetics models. For the adsorption studies, three adsorption isotherm approaches have been tested to experimental data. The pollutant recoveries were evaluated by suppressed ion chromatography. The affinity of the adsorbent was TCAA = DBAA = DCAA > MBAA > MCAA with DCAA, DBAA, and TCAA completely removed. A removal as high as 77 % was achieved for 13 mg/L nitrate. The adsorption isotherms of NO (3) (-) and monochloroacetic acid can be modeled by the Freundlich equation, while their adsorption kinetics follow a pseudo-second-order rate mechanism. The adsorbent exhibited high affinity towards HAAs in simulated drinking water even at relevant matrix concentrations, suggesting its potential application for water remediation technologies.

  2. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area. PMID:22358115

  3. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area.

  4. Nitrate removal properties of solid-phase denitrification processes using acid-blended poly(L-lactic acid) as the sole substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Matsuoka, H.; Sun, J.; Yoshikawa, S.; Tsuji, H.; Hiraishi, A.

    2013-04-01

    The large amount of waste that is discharged along with the diffusion of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) articles in use is persistent concern. Previously, we studied solid-phase denitrification (SPD) processes using PLLA to establish an effective re-use of PLLA waste. We found that PLLA with a weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of approximately 10,000 was suitable for SPD processes; however, the recycling of PLLA waste consumes a high energy. A new PLLA plastic including 5% poly(ethylene oxalate) (PEOxPLLA) as a blend material has attracted attention because recycling of PEOxPLLA consumes less electricity than that of PLLA. In this study, our main objectives were to evaluate whether PEOxPLLA can be used for SPD processes by changing its Mw and to investigate the bioavailability for denitrification of hydrolysates released from PEOxPLLA. The predicted hydrolysates, including oxalic acid, ethylene glycol, and lactate, are abiotically released, leading to different biological nitrate removal rates. Consequently, the nitrate removal rate of PEOxPLLA ranged from 0.9-4.1 mg-NO3--N·g-MLSS·h-1 by changing the Mw in the range of 8,500-238,000. In culture-dependent approaches, denitrifying bacteria using each substrate as an electron donor are found in activated sludge, suggesting that all hydrolysates functioned in the SPD processes using PEOxPLLA.

  5. Nitrate, ascorbic acid, mineral and antioxidant activities of Cosmos caudatus in response to organic and mineral-based fertilizer rates.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Siti Aishah; Mijin, Salumiah; Yusoff, Umi Kalsom; Ding, Phebe; Wahab, Puteri Edaroyati Megat

    2012-06-28

    The source and quantity of nutrients available to plants can affect the quality of leafy herbs. A study was conducted to compare quality of Cosmos caudatus in response to rates of organic and mineral-based fertilizers. Organic based fertilizer GOBI (8% N:8% P₂O₅:8% K₂O) and inorganic fertilizer (15% N, 15% P₂O₅, 15% K₂O) were evaluated based on N element rates at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120 kg h⁻¹. Application of organic based fertilizer reduced nitrate, improved vitamin C, antioxidant activity as well as nitrogen and calcium nutrients content. Antioxidant activity and chlorophyll content were significantly higher with increased fertilizer application. Fertilization appeared to enhance vitamin C content, however for the maximum ascorbic acid content, regardless of fertilizer sources, plants did not require high amounts of fertilizer.

  6. Nitrate and amino acid availability affects glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine in response to changes of salinity in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Kageyama, Hakuto; Fukaya, Minoru; Rai, Vandna; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-12-01

    A halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica thrives in extreme salinity with accumulation of a potent osmoprotectant glycine betaine. Recently, this cyanobacterium was shown to accumulate sunscreen molecule mycosporine-2-glycine significantly at high salinity. In this study, we investigated effects of nitrate and amino acid provision on the accumulation of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine. With elevated nitrate concentrations at high salinity, intracellular levels of both metabolites were enhanced. Six-fold high nitrate concentration increased the relative amounts of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine to be 1.5 and 2.0 folds compared with control condition : Increased levels were time- and dose-dependent manner. Exogenous supply of glycine/serine at high salinity resulted in the similar trends as observed in excess nitrate experiment. Intracellular level of glycine betaine increased ∼1.6 folds with glycine/serine supplementation. These supplementations also caused the increased level of mycosporine-2-glycine, namely 1.4 and 2 folds by glycine and serine, respectively. The transcription of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine biosynthetic genes was strongly induced under high-nitrate-salt condition. These results suggest the dependence of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine productions on substrate availability, and the effect of nitrate was possibly associated with stimulation of osmoprotectant increment in this extremophile. PMID:26474598

  7. Nitrate and amino acid availability affects glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine in response to changes of salinity in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica.

    PubMed

    Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Kageyama, Hakuto; Fukaya, Minoru; Rai, Vandna; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-12-01

    A halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica thrives in extreme salinity with accumulation of a potent osmoprotectant glycine betaine. Recently, this cyanobacterium was shown to accumulate sunscreen molecule mycosporine-2-glycine significantly at high salinity. In this study, we investigated effects of nitrate and amino acid provision on the accumulation of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine. With elevated nitrate concentrations at high salinity, intracellular levels of both metabolites were enhanced. Six-fold high nitrate concentration increased the relative amounts of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine to be 1.5 and 2.0 folds compared with control condition : Increased levels were time- and dose-dependent manner. Exogenous supply of glycine/serine at high salinity resulted in the similar trends as observed in excess nitrate experiment. Intracellular level of glycine betaine increased ∼1.6 folds with glycine/serine supplementation. These supplementations also caused the increased level of mycosporine-2-glycine, namely 1.4 and 2 folds by glycine and serine, respectively. The transcription of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine biosynthetic genes was strongly induced under high-nitrate-salt condition. These results suggest the dependence of glycine betaine and mycosporine-2-glycine productions on substrate availability, and the effect of nitrate was possibly associated with stimulation of osmoprotectant increment in this extremophile.

  8. Adhesive Properties and Acid-Forming Activity of Lactobacilli and Streptococci Under Inhibitory Substances, Such as Nitrates.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, L; Harutyunyan, K; Harutyunyan, N; Melik-Andreasyan, G; Trchounian, A

    2016-06-01

    One of the main requirements for probiotics is their ability to survive during passage through gastrointestinal tract and to maintain their activity at different adverse conditions. The aim of the study was to look for the strains of lactobacilli and streptococci with high adhesive properties even affected by inhibitory substances, such as nitrates (NO3 (-)). To study the adhesion properties hemagglutination reaction of bacterial cells with red blood cells of different animals and humans was used. The acid formation ability of bacteria was determined by the method of titration after 7 days of incubation in the sterile milk. These properties were investigated at different concentrations of NO3 (-). The high concentration (mostly ≥2.0 %) NO3 (-) inhibited the growth of both lactobacilli and streptococci, but compared with streptococcal cultures lactobacilli, especially Lactobacillus acidophilus Ep 317/402, have shown more stability and higher adhesive properties. In addition, the concentrations of NO3 (-) of 0.5-2.0 % decreased the acid-forming activity of the strains, but even under these conditions they coagulated milk and, in comparison to control, formed low acidity in milk. Thus, the L. acidophilus Ep 317/402 with high adhesive properties has demonstrated a higher activity of NO3 (-) transformation.

  9. Dry deposition of ammonia, nitric acid, ammonium, and nitrate to alpine tundra at Niwot Ridge, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattray, G.; Sievering, H.

    2001-01-01

    Micrometeorological measurements and ambient air samples, analyzed for concentrations of NH3, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3-, were collected at an alpine tundra site on Niwot Ridge, Colorado. The measured concentrations were extremely low and ranged between 5 and 70ngNm-3. Dry deposition fluxes of these atmospheric species were calculated using the micrometeorological gradient method. The calculated mean flux for NH3 indicates a net deposition to the surface and indicates that NH3 contributed significantly to the total N deposition to the tundra during the August-September measurement period. Our pre-measurement estimate of the compensation point for NH3 in air above the tundra was 100-200ngNm-3; thus, a net emission of NH3 was expected given the low ambient concentrations of NH3 observed. Based on our results, however, the NH3 compensation point at this alpine tundra site appears to have been at or below about 20ngNm-3. Large deposition velocities (>2cms-1) were determined for nitrate and ammonium and may result from reactions with surface-derived aerosols. Copyright (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.Micrometeorological measurements and ambient air samples, analyzed for concentrations of NH3, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3-, were collected at an alpine tundra site on Niwot Ridge, Colorado. The measured concentrations were extremely low and ranged between 5 and 70 ng N m-3. Dry deposition fluxes of these atmospheric species were calculated using the micrometeorological gradient method. The calculated mean flux for NH3 indicates a net deposition to the surface and indicates that NH3 contributed significantly to the total N deposition to the tundra during the August-September measurement period. Our pre-measurement estimate of the compensation point for NH3 in air above the tundra was 100-200 ng N m-3; thus, a net emission of NH3 was expected given the low ambient concentrations of NH3 observed. Based on our results, however, the NH3 compensation point at this alpine tundra site appears to

  10. Effect of organic and conventional cropping systems on ascorbic acid, vitamin C, flavonoids, nitrate, and oxalate in 27 varieties of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.).

    PubMed

    Koh, Eunmi; Charoenprasert, Suthawan; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2012-03-28

    This study was undertaken to compare the levels of ascorbic acid, vitamin C, flavonoids, nitrate, and oxalate in 27 spinach varieties grown in certified organic and conventional cropping systems. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI)MS/MS) of methanolic extracts of spinach demonstrated 17 flavonoids, including glucuronides and acylated di- and triglycosides of methylated and methylenedioxyderivatives of 6-oxygenated flavonoids. The mean levels of ascorbic acid and flavonoids were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in the organically grown [40.48 ± 6.16 and 2.83 ± 0.03 mg/kg of fresh weight (FW)] spinach compared to the conventionally grown spinach (25.75 ± 6.12 and 2.27 ± 0.02 mg/kg of FW). Conversely, the mean levels of nitrate were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in the conventionally grown spinach compared to the organically grown spinach. No significant effects were observed in the oxalate content of spinach from either production system. The levels of nitrate correlated negatively with those of ascorbic acid, vitamin C, and total flavonoids and showed a positive correlation with the oxalate content. These results suggest that organic cropping systems result in spinach with lower levels of nitrates and higher levels of flavonoids and ascorbic acid.

  11. Acidity decline in Antarctic ice cores during the Little Ice Age linked to changes in atmospheric nitrate and sea salt concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasteris, Daniel; McConnell, Joseph R.; Edwards, Ross; Isaksson, Elizabeth; Albert, Mary R.

    2014-05-01

    Acidity is an important chemical variable that impacts atmospheric and snowpack chemistry. Here we describe composite time series and the spatial pattern of acidity concentration (Acy = H+ - HCO3-) during the last 2000 years across the Dronning Maud Land region of the East Antarctic Plateau using measurements in seven ice cores. Coregistered measurements of the major ion species show that sulfuric acid (H2SO4), nitric acid (HNO3), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) determine greater than 98% of the acidity value. The latter, also described as excess chloride (ExCl-), is shown mostly to be derived from postdepositional diffusion of chloride with little net gain or loss from the snowpack. A strong inverse linear relationship between nitrate concentration and inverse accumulation rate provides evidence of spatially homogenous fresh snow concentrations and reemission rates of nitrate from the snowpack across the study area. A decline in acidity during the Little Ice Age (LIA, 1500-1900 Common Era) is observed and is linked to declines in HNO3 and ExCl- during that time. The nitrate decline is found to correlate well with published methane isotope data from Antarctica (δ13CH4), indicating that it is caused by a decline in biomass burning. The decrease in ExCl- concentration during the LIA is well correlated to published sea surface temperature reconstructions in the Atlantic Ocean, which suggests increased sea salt aerosol production associated with greater sea ice extent.

  12. Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Lee E., Ed.

    1974-01-01

    Intended for secondary English teachers, the materials and ideas presented here suggest ways to use media in the classroom in teaching visual and auditory discrimination while enlivening classes and motivating students. Contents include "Media Specialists Need Not Apply," which discusses the need for preparation of media educators with…

  13. Effect of acidity on the glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis of nanocrystalline alumina powder

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Tianyou . E-mail: typeng@whu.edu.cn; Liu Xun; Dai Ke; Xiao Jiangrong; Song Haibo

    2006-09-14

    Nanocrystalline alumina powders were prepared by combustion synthesis using glycine as fuel and nitrate as an oxidizer. The effect of the pH values in the precursor solutions on crystallite sizes, surface areas and morphologies of the synthesized alumina powder has been investigated by X-ray diffractometry, thermal analysis, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and transmission electron microscopy. With decreasing the pH values in the precursor solutions, the obtained materials could be modified from segregated nanoparticles (pH 10.5) to aggregates of nanoparticles (pH 6.0), and finally to a flaky morphology (pH 2.5). The rates of decomposition, the interaction of coordination as well as the hydrogen bonding of the glycine and the Al-hydroxides species at different pH values were found to be responsible for the generation of flake and/or segregated nanoparticles during auto-ignition reactions. The as-prepared combustion ashes were converted into pure nanocrystalline alumina after calcination at elevated temperatures. The specific surface areas of the products calcined at 800 deg. C ranged from 96 to 39 m{sup 2}/g with the pH decreased from 10.5 to 2.5.

  14. Suitability of peracetic acid for sterilization of media for mycoplasma cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Wutzler, P; Sprössig, M; Peterseim, H

    1975-01-01

    The utility of peracetic acid for sterilization of serum and yeast extract additions to mycoplasma medium was studied by culturing six Mycoplasma species. Culture media containing additions that had been sterilized with peracetic acid proved to be as good as filtered components. The use of 0.05 to 0.1% peracetic acid is recommended to sterilize the serum and yeast extract additions since savings in time and equipment can be accomplished. PMID:1100656

  15. Identification and Isolation of a Castellaniella Species Important during Biostimulation of an Acidic Nitrate- and Uranium-Contaminated Aquifer▿

    PubMed Central

    Spain, Anne M.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.; Najar, Fares Z.; Roe, Bruce A.; White, David C.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2007-01-01

    Immobilization of uranium in groundwater can be achieved through microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) upon electron donor addition. Microbial community structure was analyzed in ethanol-biostimulated and control sediments from a high-nitrate (>130 mM), low-pH, uranium-contaminated site in Oak Ridge, TN. Analysis of small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene clone libraries and polar lipid fatty acids from sediments revealed that biostimulation resulted in a general decrease in bacterial diversity. Specifically, biostimulation resulted in an increase in the proportion of Betaproteobacteria (10% of total clones in the control sediment versus 50 and 79% in biostimulated sediments) and a decrease in the proportion of Gammaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Clone libraries derived from dissimilatory nitrite reductase genes (nirK and nirS) were also dominated by clones related to Betaproteobacteria (98% and 85% of total nirK and nirS clones, respectively). Within the nirK libraries, one clone sequence made up 59 and 76% of sequences from biostimulated sediments but only made up 10% of the control nirK library. Phylogenetic analysis of SSU rRNA and nirK gene sequences from denitrifying pure cultures isolated from the site indicate that all belong to a Castellaniella species; nearly identical sequences also constituted the majority of biostimulated SSU rRNA and nirK clone libraries. Thus, by combining culture-independent with culture-dependent techniques, we were able to link SSU rRNA clone library information with nirK sequence data and conclude that a potentially novel Castellaniella species is important for in situ nitrate removal at this site. PMID:17557842

  16. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aravind T.; Lakshmi, Sowmya P.; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R.; Reddy, Raju C.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs’ electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease. PMID:27119365

  17. Metal-Free Oxidative Nitration of α-Carbon of Carbonyls Leads to One-Pot Synthesis of Thiohydroximic Acids from Acetophenones.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Shashikant U; Mukhopadhyay, Sushobhan; Priyanka, Kumari; Batra, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    A metal-free nitration of the α-C-H to carbonyl in propiophenones was achieved with I2/NaNO2 in the presence of an oxidant in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the medium. Conversely under similar conditions, reaction of acetophenones produced thiohydroximic acids via a radical-based cascade event which involves oxidative nitration of the α-carbon to a carbonyl followed by Michael addition of the thiomethyl group from DMSO and subsequent rearrangement. Besides DMSO, the scope of the reaction encompasses other symmetrical and unsymmetrical dialkylsulfoxides. PMID:27541178

  18. Humic acid transport in saturated porous media: influence of flow velocity and influent concentration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaorong; Shao, Mingan; Du, Lina; Horton, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transport of humic acids (HAs) in porous media can provide important and practical evidence needed for accurate prediction of organic/inorganic contaminant transport in different environmental media and interfaces. A series of column transport experiments was conducted to evaluate the transport of HA in different porous media at different flow velocities and influent HA concentrations. Low flow velocity and influent concentration were found to favor the adsorption and deposition of HA onto sand grains packed into columns and to give higher equilibrium distribution coefficients and deposition rate coefficients, which resulted in an increased fraction of HA being retained in columns. Consequently, retardation factors were increased and the transport of HA through the columns was delayed. These results suggest that the transport of HA in porous media is primarily controlled by the attachment of HA to the solid matrix. Accordingly, this attachment should be considered in studies of HA behavior in porous media.

  19. Nitrate Transport System in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Schloemer, Robert H.; Garrett, Reginald H.

    1974-01-01

    Nitrate uptake in Neurospora crassa has been investigated under various conditions of nitrogen nutrition by measuring the rate of disappearance of nitrate from the medium and by determining mycelial nitrate accumulation. The nitrate transport system is induced by either nitrate or nitrite, but is not present in mycelia grown on ammonia or Casamino Acids. The appearance of nitrate uptake activity is prevented by cycloheximide, puromycin, or 6-methyl purine. The induced nitrate transport system displays a Km for nitrate of 0.25 mM. Nitrate uptake is inhibited by metabolic poisons such as 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyanide, and antimycin A. Furthermore, mycelia can concentrate nitrate 50-fold. Ammonia and nitrite are non-competitive inhibitors with respect to nitrate, with Ki values of 0.13 and 0.17 mM, respectively. Ammonia does not repress the formation of the nitrate transport system. In contrast, the nitrate uptake system is repressed by Casamino Acids. All amino acids individually prevent nitrate accumulation, with the exception of methionine, glutamine, and alanine. The influence of nitrate reduction and the nitrate reductase protein on nitrate transport was investigated in wild-type Neurospora lacking a functional nitrate reductase and in nitrate non-utilizing mutants, nit-1, nit-2, and nit-3. These mycelia contain an inducible nitrate transport system which displays the same characteristics as those found in the wild-type mycelia having the functional nitrate reductase. These findings suggest that nitrate transport is not dependent upon nitrate reduction and that these two processes are separate events in the assimilation of nitrate. PMID:4274457

  20. Effects of root-zone acidity on utilization of nitrate and ammonium in tobacco plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cv. 'Coker 319') plants were grown for 28 days in flowing nutrient culture containing either 1.0 mM NO3- or 1.0 mM NH4+ as the nitrogen source in a complete nutrient solution. Acidities of the solutions were controlled at pH 6.0 or 4.0 for each nitrogen source. Plants were sampled at intervals of 6 to 8 days for determination of dry matter and nitrogen accumulation. Specific rates of NO3- or NH4+ uptake (rate of uptake per unit root mass) were calculated from these data. Net photosynthetic rates per unit leaf area were measured on attached leaves by infrared gas analysis. When NO3- [correction of NO-] was the sole nitrogen source, root growth and nitrogen uptake rate were unaffected by pH of the solution, and photosynthetic activity of leaves and accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen in the whole plant were similar. When NH4+ was the nitrogen source, photosynthetic rate of leaves and accumulation of dry matter and nitrogen in the whole plant were not statistically different from NO3(-) -fed plants when acidity of the solution was controlled at pH 6.0. When acidity for NH4(+) -fed plants was increased to pH 4.0, however, specific rate of NH4+ uptake decreased by about 50% within the first 6 days of treatment. The effect of acidity on root function was associated with a decreased rate of accumulation of nitrogen in shoots that was accompanied by a rapid cessation of leaf development between days 6 and 13. The decline in leaf growth rate of NH4(+) -fed plants at pH 4.0 was followed by reductions in photosynthetic rate per unit leaf area. These responses of NH4(+) -fed plants to increased root-zone acidity are characteristic of the sequence of responses that occur during onset of nitrogen stress.

  1. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W. T.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-08-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2.

  2. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W. T.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2. PMID:27498694

  3. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W T; Koper, Marc T M

    2016-01-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2. PMID:27498694

  4. Enzyme catalytic nitration of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kong, Mingming; Wang, Kun; Dong, Runan; Gao, Haijun

    2015-06-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds are important intermediates in organic synthesis. The classic method used to synthesize them is chemical nitration, which involves the use of nitric acid diluted in water or acetic acid, both harmful to the environment. With the development of green chemistry, environmental friendly enzyme catalysis is increasingly employed in chemical processes. In this work, we adopted a non-aqueous horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/NaNO2/H2O2 reaction system to study the structural characteristics of aromatic compounds potentially nitrated by enzyme catalysis, as well as the relationship between the charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring and the nitro product distribution. Investigation of various reaction parameters showed that mild reaction conditions (ambient temperature and neutral pH), plus appropriate use of H2O2 and NaNO2 could prevent inactivation of HRP and polymerization of the substrates. Compared to aqueous-organic co-solvent reaction media, the aqueous-organic two-liquid phase system had great advantages in increasing the dissolved concentration of substrate and alleviating substrate inhibition. Analysis of the aromatic compounds' structural characteristics indicated that substrates containing substituents of NH2 or OH were readily catalyzed. Furthermore, analysis of the relationship between natural bond orbital (NBO) charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring, as calculated by the density functional method, and the nitro product distribution characteristics, demonstrated that the favored nitration sites were the ortho and para positions of substituents in benzene ring, similar to the selectivity of chemical nitration. PMID:26002502

  5. Enzyme catalytic nitration of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kong, Mingming; Wang, Kun; Dong, Runan; Gao, Haijun

    2015-06-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds are important intermediates in organic synthesis. The classic method used to synthesize them is chemical nitration, which involves the use of nitric acid diluted in water or acetic acid, both harmful to the environment. With the development of green chemistry, environmental friendly enzyme catalysis is increasingly employed in chemical processes. In this work, we adopted a non-aqueous horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/NaNO2/H2O2 reaction system to study the structural characteristics of aromatic compounds potentially nitrated by enzyme catalysis, as well as the relationship between the charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring and the nitro product distribution. Investigation of various reaction parameters showed that mild reaction conditions (ambient temperature and neutral pH), plus appropriate use of H2O2 and NaNO2 could prevent inactivation of HRP and polymerization of the substrates. Compared to aqueous-organic co-solvent reaction media, the aqueous-organic two-liquid phase system had great advantages in increasing the dissolved concentration of substrate and alleviating substrate inhibition. Analysis of the aromatic compounds' structural characteristics indicated that substrates containing substituents of NH2 or OH were readily catalyzed. Furthermore, analysis of the relationship between natural bond orbital (NBO) charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring, as calculated by the density functional method, and the nitro product distribution characteristics, demonstrated that the favored nitration sites were the ortho and para positions of substituents in benzene ring, similar to the selectivity of chemical nitration.

  6. Solubility and reactivity of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) in dilute aqueous salt solutions and in sulphuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, A.; Kutsuna, S.; Takeuchi, K.; Ibusuki, T.

    The loss rates of PAN in several dilute aqueous salt solutions (NaBr, Na 2SO 3, KI, NaNO 2, FeCl 3, and FeSO 4) and in sulphuric acid were measured at 279 K with a simple bubbler experiment. They are little different from that in pure water. For 5 M sulphuric acid hydrolysis and solubility were determined in the temperature range of 243-293 K. The hydrolysis rate kh=3.2×10 -4 s -1 at 293 K is close to that in water. The observed temperature dependence of the Henry's Law constant H=10- 6.6±0.6exp((4780±420)/T) M atm -1 leads to enthalpy and entropy of solvation Δ Hsolv=-39.7±3.5 kJ mol -1 and Δ Ssolv=-126±11 J mol -1 K -1, respectively.

  7. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  8. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Denitrification beds are being promoted to reduce nitrate concentrations in agricultural drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution in surface water. In this system, water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transfor...

  9. Field Observation of Heterogeneous Formation of Dicarboxylic acids, Keto-carboxylic acids, α-Dicarbonyls and Nitrate in Xi'an, China during Asian dust storm periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Wang, J.; Ren, Y.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the formation mechanism of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) on dust surfaces, this study investigated the concentrations and compositions of dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11), keto-carboxylic acids (C3-C7), α-dicarbonyls and inorganic ions in size-segregated aerosols (9-stages) collected in Xi'an, China during the nondust storm and dust storm periods of 2009 and 2011. During the events the ambient particulate dicarboxylic acids were 932-2240 ng m-3, which are comparable and even higher than those in nondust periods. Molecular compositions of the above SOA are similar to those in nondust periods with oxalic acid being the leading species. In the presence of the dust storms, all the above mentioned SOA species in Xi'an were predominantly enriched on the coarse particles (>2.1μm), and oxalic acid well correlated with NO3- (R2=0.72, p<0.001) rather than SO42-.This phenomenon differs greatly from the SOA in any other nondust period that is characterized by an enrichment of oxalic acid in fine particles and a strong correlation of oxalic acid with SO42-. Our results further demonstrate that NO3- in the dust periods in Xi'an was mostly derived from secondary oxidation, whereas SO42- during the events was largely derived from surface soil of Gobi deserts. We propose a formation pathway to explain these observations, in which nitric acid and/or nitrogen oxides react with dust to produce Ca(NO3)2 and form a liquid phase on the surface of dust aerosols via water vapor-absorption of Ca(NO3)2, followed by a partitioning of the gas-phase water-soluble organic precursors (e.g.,glyoxal and methylglyoxal) into the aqueous-phase and a subsequent oxidation into oxalic acid. To the best of our knowledge, we found for the first time the enrichment of glyoxal and methylglyoxal on dust surface. Our data suggest an important role of nitrate in the heterogeneous formation process of SOA on the surface of Asian dust.

  10. Extraction of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Muscatello, A.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

    1981-05-01

    The extraction behavior of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions from nitrate solution was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data obtained for Am(III) and Eu(III) using DHDECMP were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)) and in certain cases with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP). It was found that both the nitrate and extractant concentration dependencies were third power. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) and for Eu(III) measured from low acid LiNO/sub 3/ solutions were similar for DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP), thus giving no evidence for any significant chelation effect for DHDECMP. Significant differences among DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP) are found for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP (and to a lesser extent, DHDECEP) to buffer itself against HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) through Fm(III) and for La(III) through Lu(III) measured from LiNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3/ using DHDECMP show a definite tetrad effect when plotted as a function of Z. The K/sub d/'s for the lanthanides generally decrease with Z whereas the K/sub d/'s for the transplutonium elements change very little with Z.

  11. Citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica cultivated on olive-mill wastewater-based media.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Galiotou-Panayotou, Maria; Fakas, Stylianos; Komaitis, Michael; Aggelis, George

    2008-05-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica ACA-DC 50109 cultivated on olive-mill wastewater (O.M.W.)-based media, enriched with commercial-industrial glucose, presented an efficient cell growth. Parameters of growth were unaffected by the presence of O.M.Ws in the growth medium. In diluted O.M.Ws enriched with high glucose amounts (initial sugar concentration, 65 g l(-1)), a notable quantity of total citric acid was produced (28.9 g l(-1)). O.M.W.-based media had a noteworthy stimulating effect on the production of citric acid, since both final citric acid concentration and conversion yield of citric acid produced per unit of sugar consumed were higher when compared with the respective parameters obtained from trials without added O.M.W. Adaptation of the strain in O.M.W.-based media favoured the biosynthesis of cellular unsaturated fatty acids (principally of oleic and palmitoleic acids). Additionally, a non-negligible decrease of the phenolic compounds in the growth medium [up to 15% (wt/wt)], a slight decrease of the phyto-toxicity, and a remarkable decolourisation of the O.M.W. were observed. All these results suggest the potentiality of O.M.Ws utilisation in the fermentation process of citric acid production.

  12. Extraction of protactinium from mineral acid-alcohol media.

    PubMed

    Alian, A; Sanad, W; Shabana, R

    1968-07-01

    The extraction of protactinium with organic solvents has been investigated in the presence of water-miscible alcohols and acetone. These additives were found to increase considerably the extraction of protactinium in the cases of trilaurylamine, tributyl phosphate and isobutyl methyl ketone. The influence was less in the case of thenoyltrifluoroacetone. In mixtures of an acid with various alcohols, the influence depended on the alcohol concentration, the acidity and on the chain lengths and dielectric constants of the alcohol introduced into the extraction system.

  13. Extraction of protactinium from mineral acid-alcohol media.

    PubMed

    Alian, A; Sanad, W; Shabana, R

    1968-07-01

    The extraction of protactinium with organic solvents has been investigated in the presence of water-miscible alcohols and acetone. These additives were found to increase considerably the extraction of protactinium in the cases of trilaurylamine, tributyl phosphate and isobutyl methyl ketone. The influence was less in the case of thenoyltrifluoroacetone. In mixtures of an acid with various alcohols, the influence depended on the alcohol concentration, the acidity and on the chain lengths and dielectric constants of the alcohol introduced into the extraction system. PMID:18960346

  14. Protein tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress. PMID:19826215

  15. Photolysis of light-transforming polymer materials on the basis of europium(III) nitrate with 1,10-phenanthroline and anthranilic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinovskaya, I. V.; Zadorozhnaya, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    Light-transforming polymer materials on the basis of europium(III) nitrate with 1,10-phenanthroline and anthranilic acid, having an intense luminescence in the 400-650 nm spectral range, were obtained. It is shown that the photostability of the polymer materials on the basis of the obtained compositions is higher than of polymer materials activated by europium(III) compounds. Luminescent and photochemical characteristics of the obtained polymer compositions are determined by the molar ratio of the dopants: the maximum luminescence intensity and photostability is characteristic for the polymeric material containing europium(III) nitrate with 1,10-phenanthroline and anthranilic acid at a molar ratio of 1: 2.

  16. Development and validation of dissolution testings in acidic media for rabeprazole sodium delayed-release capsules.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yinhe; Si, Xiaoqing; Zhong, Lulu; Feng, Xin; Yang, Xinmin; Huang, Min; Wu, Chuanbin

    2016-10-01

    Rabeprazole sodium (RAB) dissolved in acidic media is accompanied by its degradation in the course of dissolution testing. To develop and establish the accumulative release profiles of ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle (RAB) delayed-release capsules (ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle) in acidic media using USP apparatus 2 (paddle apparatus) as a dissolution tester, the issues of determination of accumulative release amount of RAB in these acidic media and interference of hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose phthalate were solved by adding appropriate hydrochloric acid (HCl) into dissolution samples coupled with centrifugation so as to remove the interference and form a solution of degradation products of RAB, which is of a considerably stable ultraviolet (UV) absorbance at the wavelength of 298 nm within 2.0 h. Therefore, the accumulative release amount of RAB in dissolution samples at each sample time points could be determined by UV-spectrophotometry, and the accumulative release profiles of ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle in the media of pH 1.0, pH 6.0, and pH 6.8 could be established. The method was validated per as the ICH Q2 (R1) guidelines and demonstrated to be adequate for quality control of ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle and the accumulative release profiles can be used as a tool to guide the formulation development and quality control of a generic drug for ACIPHEX(®) Sprinkle. PMID:27066697

  17. Using acid-washed waste tire rubber in soilless media for tomato production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Cerasiforne’ tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was grown in soilless potting media contained different substrate formulas including 25:25:50 volume ratio of acid-washed (AWR) or non-washed shredded rubber (NAWR): vermiculite or zeolite: perlite. Additionally, plants were grown in a peat: perli...

  18. Aerobic growth of campylobacter in media supplemented with a-ketoglutaric, lactic, and/or fumaric acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to examine the ability of Campylobacter spp. to grow aerobically in media supplemented with selected organic acids. Basal broth media composed of tryptose, yeast extract, and a mineral-vitamin solution was supplemented with a-ketoglutaric, lactic, and/or fumaric acids. The fina...

  19. Monitoring of the fermentation media of citric acid by the trimethylsilyl derivatives of the organic acids formed.

    PubMed

    Ghassempour, Alireza; Nojavan, Saeed; Talebpour, Zahra; Amiri, Ali Asghar; Najafi, Nahid Mashkouri

    2004-10-20

    In this approach, a derivatization method is described for monitoring of organic acids in fermentation media without any separation step. The aqueous phase of fermentation media was evaporated and heated in a silylation reagent to form trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives. The silylated compounds are analyzed by 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). 29Si NMR can qualitatively monitor the components produced in the Krebs cycle. Quantification of these compounds is investigated by using selected ion monitoring mode of mass spectrometry. In this mode, mass to charge (m/z) values of their [M - 15]+ ions, which are 465, 275, 247, 221, 335, 251, and 313 of TMS derivatives of citric, alpha-ketoglutaric, succinic, fumaric, l-malic, oxaloacetic, and palmitic (as an internal standard), acids, respectively, are used. The limit of detection and the linear working range for derivatized citric acid were found to be 0.1 mg L(-1) and 10-3 x 10(4) mg L(-1). The relative standard deviation of the method for five replicates was 2.1%. The average recovery efficiency for citric acid added to culture media was approximately 97.2%. Quantitative results of GC-MS are compared with those obtained by an ultraviolet-visible method.

  20. Root-zone acidity affects relative uptake of nitrate and ammonium from mixed nitrogen sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessey, J. K.; Henry, L. T.; Chaillou, S.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Ransom) were grown for 21 days on 4 sources of N (1.0 mM NO3-, 0.67 mM NO3- plus 0.33 mM NH4+, 0.33 mM NO3- plus 0.67 mM NH4+, and 1.0 mM NH4+) in hydroponic culture with the acidity of the nutrient solution controlled at pH 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Dry matter and total N accumulation of the plants was not significantly affected by N-source at any of the pH levels except for decreases in these parameters in plants supplied solely with NH4+ at pH 4.5. Shoot-to-root ratios increased in plants which had an increased proportion [correction of proporiton] of NH4(+)-N in their nutrient solutions at all levels of root-zone pH. Uptake of NO3- and NH4+ was monitored daily by ion chromatography as depletion of these ions from the replenished hydroponic solutions. At all pH levels the proportion of either ion that was absorbed increased as the ratio of that ion increased in the nutrient solution. In plants which were supplied with sources of NO3- plus NH4+, NH4+ was absorbed at a ratio of 2:1 over NO3- at pH 6.0. As the pH of the root-zone declined, however, NH4+ uptake decreased and NO3- uptake increased. Thus, the NH4+ to NO3- uptake ratio declined with decreases in root-zone pH. The data indicate a negative effect of declining root-zone pH on NH4+ uptake and supports a hypothesis that the inhibition of growth of plants dependent on NH4(+)-N at low pH is due to a decline in NH4+ uptake and a consequential limitation of growth by N stress.

  1. Thallium Transfer from Hydrochloric Acid Media into Pure Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Tereshatov, Evgeny E; Boltoeva, Maria Yu; Mazan, Valerie; Volia, Merinda F; Folden, Charles M

    2016-03-10

    Pure hydrophobic ionic liquids are known to extract metallic species from aqueous solutions. In this work we have systematically investigated thallium (Tl) extraction from aqueous hydrochloric acid (HCl) solutions into six pure fluorinated ionic liquids, namely imidazolium- and pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquids with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide and bis(fluorosulfonyl)-imide anions. The dependence of the Tl extraction efficiency on the structure and composition of the ionic liquid ions, metal oxidation state, and initial metal and aqueous acid concentrations have been studied. Tl concentrations were on the order of picomolar (analyzed using radioactive tracers) and millimolar (analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). The extraction of the cationic thallium species Tl(+) is higher for ionic liquids with more hydrophilic cations, while for the TlX(z)(3-z) anionic species (where X = Cl(-) and/or Br(-)), the extraction efficiency is greater for ionic liquids with more hydrophobic cations. The highest distribution value of Tl(III) was approximately 2000. An improved mathematical model based on ion exchange and ion pair formation mechanisms has been developed to describe the coextraction of two different anionic species, and the relative contributions of each mechanism have been determined. PMID:26769597

  2. Hydrogen-bubble-propelled zinc-based microrockets in strongly acidic media.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Uygun, Aysegul; Wang, Joseph

    2012-01-18

    Tubular polyaniline (PANI)/Zn microrockets are described that display effective autonomous motion in extreme acidic environments, without any additional chemical fuel. These acid-driven hydrogen-bubble-propelled microrockets have been electrosynthesized using the conical polycarbonate template. The effective propulsion in acidic media reflects the continuous thrust of hydrogen bubbles generated by the spontaneous redox reaction occurring at the inner Zn surface. The propulsion characteristics of PANI/Zn microrockets in different acids and in human serum are described. The observed speed-pH dependence holds promise for sensitive pH measurements in extreme acidic environments. The new microrockets display an ultrafast propulsion (as high as 100 body lengths/s) along with attractive capabilities including guided movement and directed cargo transport. Such acid-driven microtubular rockets offer considerable potential for diverse biomedical and industrial applications. PMID:22188367

  3. Removal of phosphorus from agricultural wastewaters using adsorption media prepared from acid mine drainage sludge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Montgomery, Gary A.; Ritenour, Kelsey L.; Tucker, Travis W.

    2009-01-01

    Excess phosphorus in wastewaters promotes eutrophication in receiving waterways. A??cost-effective method for the removal of phosphorus from water would significantly reduce the impact of such wastewaters on the environment. Acid mine drainage sludge is a waste product produced by the neutralization of acid mine drainage, and consists mainly of the same metal hydroxides used in traditional wastewater treatment for the removal of phosphorus. In this paper, we describe a method for the drying and pelletization of acid mine drainage sludge that results in a particulate media, which we have termed Ferroxysorb, for the removal of phosphorus from wastewater in an efficient packed bed contactor. Adsorption capacities are high, and kinetics rapid, such that a contact time of less than 5 min is sufficient for removal of 60-90% of the phosphorus, depending on the feed concentration and time in service. In addition, the adsorption capacity of the Ferroxysorb media was increased dramatically by using two columns in an alternating sequence so that each sludge bed receives alternating rest and adsorption cycles. A stripping procedure based on treatment with dilute sodium hydroxide was also developed that allows for recovery of the P from the media, with the possibility of generating a marketable fertilizer product. These results indicate that acid mine drainage sludges - hitherto thought of as undesirable wastes - can be used to remove phosphorus from wastewater, thus offsetting a portion of acid mine drainage treatment costs while at the same time improving water quality in sensitive watersheds.

  4. Dormancy and Impotency of Cocklebur Seeds: IV. Effects of Gibberellic Acid, Benzyladenine, Thiourea, and Potassium Nitrate on the Growth of Embryonic Axis and Cotyledon Segments.

    PubMed

    Esashi, Y; Katoh, H

    1977-02-01

    Germination of nondormant but impotent small cocklebur seeds (Xanthium pennsylvanicum Wallr.) was promoted profoundly with thiourea or benzyladenine, and slightly with gibberellic acid. Gibberellic acid was ineffective in causing the germination of dormant cocklebur seeds, although thiourea and benzyladenine were effective. Experiments with excised seed pieces showed that the promotive effects of thiourea, benzyladenine, and gibberellic acid on cocklebur seed germination were associated with the enhancement of growth of seed parts; thiourea stimulated predominantly the axial growth, whereas benzyladenine stimulated predominantly the cotyledonary growth.Potassium nitrate or indoleacetic acid had little effect on the initial growth of either axes or cotyledons. Except for gibberellic acid, all of the compounds employed enhanced ethylene production, but in general, the ethylene production seemed more likely to be a consequence of growth rather than a cause of it. We concluded that the chemical regulation of seed germination may be a consequence of the alteration of growth capabilities in either the axes or cotyledons, or both.

  5. Nitrate Utilization by the Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Juan L.; Llama, Maria J.; Cadenas, Eduardo

    1978-01-01

    Nitrate utilization has been characterized in nitrogen-deficient cells of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. In order to separate nitrate uptake from nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase activity was suppressed with tungstate. Neither nitrite nor the presence of amino acids in the external medium or darkness affects nitrate uptake kinetics. Ammonium strongly inhibits carrier-mediated nitrate uptake, without affecting diffusion transfer. A model is proposed for the uptake and assimilation of nitrate in S. costatum and their regulation by ammonium ions. PMID:16660653

  6. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

  7. Determination of intracellular nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, J M; Lara, C; Guerrero, M G

    1989-01-01

    A sensitive procedure has been developed for the determination of intracellular nitrate. The method includes: (i) preparation of cell lysates in 2 M-H3PO4 after separation of cells from the outer medium by rapid centrifugation through a layer of silicone oil, and (ii) subsequent nitrate analysis by ion-exchange h.p.l.c. with, as mobile phase, a solution containing 50 mM-H3PO4 and 2% (v/v) tetrahydrofuran, adjusted to pH 1.9 with NaOH. The determination of nitrate is subjected to interference by chloride and sulphate when present in the samples at high concentrations. Nitrite also interferes, but it is easily eliminated by treatment of the samples with sulphamic acid. The method has been successfully applied to the study of nitrate transport in the unicellular cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans. PMID:2497740

  8. The Arabidopsis Ethylene/Jasmonic Acid-NRT Signaling Module Coordinates Nitrate Reallocation and the Trade-Off between Growth and Environmental Adaptation[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Bin; Yi, Hong-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Stresses decouple nitrate assimilation and photosynthesis through stress-initiated nitrate allocation to roots (SINAR), which is mediated by the nitrate transporters NRT1.8 and NRT1.5 and functions to promote stress tolerance. However, how SINAR communicates with the environment remains unknown. Here, we present biochemical and genetic evidence demonstrating that in Arabidopsis thaliana, ethylene (ET) and jasmonic acid (JA) affect the crosstalk between SINAR and the environment. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that ethylene response factors (ERFs), including OCTADECANOID-RESPONSIVE ARABIDOPSIS AP2/ERF59, bind to the GCC boxes in the NRT1.8 promoter region, while ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) binds to the EIN3 binding site motifs in the NRT1.5 promoter. Genetic assays showed that cadmium and sodium stresses initiated ET/JA signaling, which converged at EIN3/EIN3-Like1 (EIL1) to modulate ERF expression and hence to upregulate NRT1.8. By contrast, ET and JA signaling mediated the downregulation of NRT1.5 via EIN3/EIL1 and other, unknown component(s). SINAR enhanced stress tolerance and decreased plant growth under nonstressed conditions through the ET/JA-NRT1.5/NRT1.8 signaling module. Interestingly, when nitrate reductase was impaired, SINAR failed to affect either stress tolerance or plant growth. These data suggest that SINAR responds to environmental conditions through the ET/JA-NRT signaling module, which further modulates stress tolerance and plant growth in a nitrate reductase-dependent manner. PMID:25326291

  9. Zeolite molecular sieves have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Nuno; Partridge, Johann; Halling, Peter J; Barreiros, Susana

    2002-02-01

    Zeolite molecular sieves very commonly are used as in situ drying agents in reaction mixtures of enzymes in nonaqueous media. They often affect enzyme behavior, and this has been interpreted in terms of altered hydration. Here, we show that zeolites can also have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in low water media, resulting from their cation-exchange ability. Initial rates of transesterification catalyzed by cross-linked crystals of subtilisin were compared in supercritical ethane, hexane, and acetonitrile with water activity fixed by pre-equilibration. Addition of zeolite NaA (4 A powder) still caused remarkable rate enhancements (up to 20-fold), despite the separate control of hydration. In the presence of excess of an alternative solid-state acid-base buffer, however, zeolite addition had no effect. The more commonly used Merck molecular sieves (type 3 A beads) had similar but somewhat smaller effects. All zeolites have ion-exchange ability and can exchange H+ for cations such as Na+ and K+. These exchanges will tend to affect the protonation state of acidic groups in the protein and, hence, enzymatic activity. Zeolites pre-equilibrated in aqueous suspensions of varying pH-pNa gave very different enzyme activities. Their differing basicities were demonstrated directly by equilibration with an indicator dissolved in toluene. The potential of zeolites as acid-base buffers for low-water media is discussed, and their ability to overcome pH memory is demonstrated.

  10. The effect of lipids on bongkrekic (Bongkrek) acid toxin production by Burkholderia cocovenenans in coconut media.

    PubMed

    Garcia, R A; Hotchkiss, J H; Steinkraus, K H

    1999-02-01

    Tempe bongkrek is an Indonesian food made by fermentation of coconut presscake or coconut milk residue Rhizopus oligosporus. Consumption of tempe bongkrek is associated with a food-borne human intoxication and significant numbers of deaths annually. The bacterium Burkholderia cocovenenans, which is the causative organism, produces two toxins, toxoflavin and bongkrekic acid (also commonly referred to as bongkrek acid). The reasons why these poisonings occur only in a very limited number of foods and only in isolated regions of the world are unclear. Our preliminary experiments in defined media and coconut investigated several compositional and environmental factors and suggested that lipid type and/or concentration were important. The effect of lipid concentration and fatty acid type on the production of bongkrekic acid by B. cocovenenans was examined by adding different amounts of coconut fat or individual free fatty acids to defatted and sterilized Rich Coconut Media (dRCM). The dRCM with added lipid was inoculated with B. cocovenenans, incubated at 30 degrees C for 5 days and the amount of bongkrekic acid formed quantified by HPLC. Coconut fat concentrations of 10% (dry basis) or less did not result in detectable amounts of bongkrekic acid even though the B. cocovenenans grew to high levels. Forty and 50% coconut fat resulted in as much as 1.4 mg/g bonkrekic acid (dry weight) at the same level of growth. Of eight saturated fatty acids tested, only lauric (12:0), myristic (14:0), and palmitic (16:0) acids stimulated the production of detectable amounts of toxin. When four 18-carbon free fatty acids with different degrees of saturation were compared, significant amounts of bongkrekic acid (2.62 mg/g dry weight) were produced only with oleic acid (18:1). These data indicate that the concentration and type of lipid in the substrate is critical for bongkrekic acid formation. This may explain why bongkrekic acid intoxication is limited to certain foods. Outbreaks

  11. The study of interaction of modified fatty acid with 99mTc in alcoholic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuridin, V. S.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Varlamova, N. V.; Nesterov, E. A.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Sadkin, V. L.; Rogov, A. S.; Ilina, E. A.; Larionova, L. A.; Sazonova, S. I.; Zelchan, R. V.; Villa, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory research aimed at the development of methods of synthesis of new radiodiagnostic agents based on modified fatty acid labelled with technetium-99m intended for scintigraphic evaluation of myocardial metabolism. In particular, the interaction of substance with 99mTc in alcoholic media and the use of ethanol as solvent in the synthesis of the radiopharmaceutical were studied.

  12. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  13. Evaluating Potential Bias in Media Coverage of the Public Debate over Acid Rain and Chlorofluorocarbons in the 1980s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tiffany Dawn; Moore, Rebecca; Markewitz, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates media coverage of two important environmental issues from the 1980s (acid rain and chlorofluorocarbons), providing historical context for current media coverage analysis. Focusing on popular magazine articles, this study identifies key characteristics of content and presentation. Content-related characteristics are inclusion…

  14. Nitrogen Isotopic Composition of Proteinaceous Coral Skeletal Amino Acids Records Change in Source Nitrate to the Euphotic Zone in the Western Tropical Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B.; Thibodeau, B.; Chikaraishi, Y.; Ohkouchi, N.; Grottoli, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    Instrumental and proxy data and global climate model experiments indicate a multi-decadal shoaling of the western tropical Pacific (WTP) thermocline potentially related to a shift in ENSO frequency. In the WTP, the nutricline coincides with the thermocline, and a shoaling of the nutricline brings more nitrate-rich seawater higher in the water column and within the sunlit euphotic zone. In the nutrient-poor WTP, this incursion of nitrate-rich water at the bottom of the euphotic zone may stimulate productivity in the water column. However, there is a general paucity of measurements below the surface with which to investigate recent changes in seawater chemistry. Nitrogen isotope (δ15N) measurements of particulate organic matter (POM) can elucidate the source of nitrogen to the WTP and related trophic dynamics. This POM is the food source to the long-lived proteinaceous corals, and drives the nitrogen isotopic composition of their skeleton. Here, we report time series δ15N values from the banded skeletons of proteinaceous corals from offshore Palau in the WTP that provide proxy information about past changes in euphotic zone nitrogen dynamics. Bulk skeletal δ15N values declined between 1977 and 2010 suggesting a progressively increasing contribution of deep water with isotopically-light nitrate to the euphotic zone and/or a shortening of the planktonic food web. Since only some amino acids are enriched in δ15N with each trophic transfer in a food web, we measured the δ15N composition of seven individual amino acids in the same coral skeleton. The δ15N time series of the individual amino acids also declined over time, mirroring the bulk values. These new data indicate that the changes in the source nitrogen to the base of the euphotic zone drives a decline in coral skeletal δ15N values, consistent with the shoaling nutricline, with no coinciding alteration of the trophic structure in the WTP.

  15. The Oxidation of Ascorbic Acid by Hexacyanoferrate(III) Ion in Acidic Aqueous Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Luis J. A.; da Costa, J. Barbosa

    1988-01-01

    Describes a kinetic and mechanistic investigation of ascorbic acid by a substitution-inert complex in acidic medium suitable for the undergraduate level. Discusses obtaining the second order rate constant for the rate determining step at a given temperature and comparison with the value predicted on the basis of the Marcus cross-relation. (CW)

  16. Evaluation of seed and seedling emergence enhancement of some population of Sahandy savory (Satureja sahendica) by gibberlic acid, potasium nitrate, pre-cooling, physical and chemical scarification treatment.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, M A; Arab, H A; Tabaie, R; Nasiri, M

    2013-10-15

    In greenhouse experiment, the seed samples of 3 populations were treated with treatments including: cold stratification, Gibberlic Acid (50 ppm and 100 ppm), Potassium nitrate (0.2%, 0.4%), physical scarification (sand paper), chemical scarification (Ethylic alcohol 70%) and distilled water (control), then these treated seed samples were sown in pots as randomize design with three replication. The germination characteristics including: germination percentage, speed of germination, length of root and shoot, seedling length, ratio of root length by shoot length, vigor index, fresh weight arid dry weight, ratio of dry weight by fresh weight were evaluated during 45 days of experiment. Comparing between three populations of Sahandy savory, seed germination characteristics of the Ghazvin population was higher than the other two populations. According to effect of treatment on germination seed characteristics, the species of savory and their population, it was concluded that effect of Gibberlic Acid and Potassium nitrate was higher than physical scarification and chemical scarification comparing with control. With more effective of gibberlic acid and KNO3 and cold treatment on seed germination enhancement of the population, it was clarified that the type of dormancy of some population of Sahandy savory was physiological dormancy. PMID:24506025

  17. Extraction of metals and/or metalloids from acidic media using supercritical fluids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Lin, Y.

    1998-06-23

    A method is described for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical carbon dioxide, containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent comprises a trialkyl phosphate, a triaryl phosphate, a trialkylphosphine oxide, a triarylphosphine oxide, or mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides from acidic solutions, and the process can be aided by the addition of nitrate salts. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs.

  18. Extraction of metals and/or metalloids from acidic media using supercritical fluids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Smart, Neil G.; Lin, Yuehe

    1998-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical carbon dioxide, containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent comprises a trialkyl phosphate, a triaryl phosphate, a trialkylphosphine oxide, a triarylphosphine oxide, or mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides from acidic solutions, and the process can be aided by the addition of nitrate salts. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  19. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  20. Recovery of lactic acid from simultaneous saccharification and fermentation media using anion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Moldes, A B; Alonso, J L; Parajó, J C

    2003-07-01

    The physicochemical properties (capacity, kinetics and selectivity) of the ion exchange resins Amberlite IRA900, IRA400, IRA96 and IRA67 were determined to evaluate their comparative suitability for lactic acid recovery. Both the kinetics of lactic acid sorption from aqueous solutions and the equilibrium were assessed using mathematical models, which provided a close interpretation of the experimental results. The best resins (Amberlite IRA96 and IRA67) were employed in further fixed-bed operation using aqueous lactic acid solutions as feed. In this set of experiments, parameters such as capacity, regenerant consumption, percentage of lactic acid recovery and product concentration were measured. Amberlite IRA67, a weak base resin, was selected for lactic acid recovery from SSF (simultaneous saccharification and fermentation) broths. Owing to the presence of nutrients and ions other than lactate, a slightly decreased capacity was determined when using SSF media instead aqueous lactic acid solutions, but quantitative lactic acid recoveries at constant capacities were obtained in four sequential load/regeneration cycles.

  1. Direct synthesis of formic acid from carbon dioxide by hydrogenation in acidic media

    PubMed Central

    Moret, Séverine; Dyson, Paul J.; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important as CO2 levels in the atmosphere continue to rise as a consequence of human activities. In this article we describe the direct hydrogenation of CO2 into formic acid using a homogeneous ruthenium catalyst, in aqueous solution and in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), without any additives. In water, at 40 °C, 0.2 M formic acid can be obtained under 200 bar, however, in DMSO the same catalyst affords 1.9 M formic acid. In both solvents the catalysts can be reused multiple times without a decrease in activity. Worldwide demand for formic acid continues to grow, especially in the context of a renewable energy hydrogen carrier, and its production from CO2 without base, via the direct catalytic carbon dioxide hydrogenation, is considerably more sustainable than the existing routes. PMID:24886955

  2. Absorption, fluorescence, and acid-base equilibria of rhodamines in micellar media of sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Obukhova, Elena N; Mchedlov-Petrossyan, Nikolay O; Vodolazkaya, Natalya A; Patsenker, Leonid D; Doroshenko, Andrey O; Marynin, Andriy I; Krasovitskii, Boris M

    2017-01-01

    Rhodamine dyes are widely used as molecular probes in different fields of science. The aim of this paper was to ascertain to what extent the structural peculiarities of the compounds influence their absorption, emission, and acid-base properties under unified conditions. The acid-base dissociation (HR(+)⇄R+H(+)) of a series of rhodamine dyes was studied in sodium n-dodecylsulfate micellar solutions. In this media, the form R exists as a zwitterion R(±). The indices of apparent ionization constants of fifteen rhodamine cations HR(+) with different substituents in the xanthene moiety vary within the range of pKa(app)=5.04 to 5.53. The distinct dependence of emission of rhodamines bound to micelles on pH of bulk water opens the possibility of using them as fluorescent interfacial acid-base indicators.

  3. Absorption, fluorescence, and acid-base equilibria of rhodamines in micellar media of sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Obukhova, Elena N; Mchedlov-Petrossyan, Nikolay O; Vodolazkaya, Natalya A; Patsenker, Leonid D; Doroshenko, Andrey O; Marynin, Andriy I; Krasovitskii, Boris M

    2017-01-01

    Rhodamine dyes are widely used as molecular probes in different fields of science. The aim of this paper was to ascertain to what extent the structural peculiarities of the compounds influence their absorption, emission, and acid-base properties under unified conditions. The acid-base dissociation (HR(+)⇄R+H(+)) of a series of rhodamine dyes was studied in sodium n-dodecylsulfate micellar solutions. In this media, the form R exists as a zwitterion R(±). The indices of apparent ionization constants of fifteen rhodamine cations HR(+) with different substituents in the xanthene moiety vary within the range of pKa(app)=5.04 to 5.53. The distinct dependence of emission of rhodamines bound to micelles on pH of bulk water opens the possibility of using them as fluorescent interfacial acid-base indicators. PMID:27423469

  4. Effect of puuC overexpression and nitrate addition on glycerol metabolism and anaerobic 3-hydroxypropionic acid production in recombinant Klebsiella pneumoniae ΔglpKΔdhaT.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Somasundar; Mohan Raj, Subramanian; Ko, Yeounjoo; Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Zhou, Shengfang; Kumar, Vinod; Park, Sunghoon

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP), an industrially important platform chemical, is used as a precursor during the production of many commercially important chemicals. Recently, recombinant strains of K. pneumoniae overexpressing an NAD(+)-dependent γ-glutamyl-γ-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase (PuuC) enzyme of K. pneumoniae DSM 2026 were shown to produce 3-HP from glycerol without the addition coenzyme B(12), which is expensive. However, 3-HP production in K. pneumoniae is accompanied with NADH generation, and this always results in large accumulation of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) and lactic acid. In this study, we investigated the potential use of nitrate as an electron acceptor both to regenerate NAD(+) and to prevent the formation of byproducts during anaerobic production of 3-HP from glycerol. Nitrate addition could improve NAD(+) regeneration, but decreased glycerol flux towards 3-HP production. To divert more glycerol towards 3-HP, a novel recombinant strain K. pneumoniae ΔglpKΔdhaT (puuC) was developed by disrupting the glpK gene, which encodes glycerol kinase, and the dhaT gene, which encodes 1,3-propanediol oxidoreductase. This strain showed improved cellular NAD(+) concentrations and a high carbon flux towards 3-HP production. Through anaerobic cultivation in the presence of nitrate, this recombinant strain produced more than 40±3mM 3-HP with more than 50% yield on glycerol in shake flasks and 250±10mM 3-HP with approximately 30% yield on glycerol in a fed-batch bioreactor.

  5. Isotopic Systematics (U, nitrate and Sr) of the F-Area Acidic Contamination Plume at the Savannah River Site: Clues to Contaminant History and Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, J. N.; Conrad, M. E.; Bill, M.; Denham, M.; Wan, J.; Rakshit, S.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Spycher, N.

    2010-12-01

    Seepage basins in the F-Area of the Savannah River Site were used from 1955 to 1989 for the disposal of low-level radioactive acidic (ave. pH ˜2.9) waste solutions from site operations involving irradiated uranium billets and other materials used in the production of radionuclides. These disposal activities resulted in a persistent acidic groundwater plume (pH as low as 3.2) beneath the F-Area including contaminants such as tritium, nitrate, 90Sr, 129I and uranium and that has impinged on surface water (Four Mile Branch) about 600 m from the basins. After cessation of disposal in 1989, the basins were capped in 1991. Since that time, remediation has consisted of a pump-and-treat system that has recently been replaced with in situ treatment using a funnel-and-gate system with injection of alkaline solutions in the gates to neutralize pH. In order to delineate the history of contamination and the current mobility and fate of contaminants in F-Area groundwater, we have undertaken a study of variations in the isotopic compositions of U (234U/238U, 235U/238U, 236U/238U), Sr (87Sr/86Sr) and nitrate (δ15N, δ18O) within the contaminant plume. This data can be used to trace U transport within the plume, evaluate chemical changes of nitrate, and potentially track plume/sediment chemical interaction and trace the migration of 90Sr. We have analyzed a suite of groundwater samples from monitoring wells, as well as pore-water samples extracted from aquifer sediment cores to map out the isotopic variation within the plume. The isotopic compositions of U from well samples and porewater samples are all consistent with the variable burn-up of depleted U. The variation in U isotopic composition requires at least three different endmembers, without any significant influence of background natural U. The δ15N and δ18O of nitrate from F-Area plume groundwater are distinct both from natural and unaltered synthetic nitrate, and likely represents fractionation due to waste volume

  6. Ammonia Formation by the Reduction of Nitrite/Nitrate by FeS: Ammonia Formation Under Acidic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    FeS reduces nitrite to, ammonia at pHs lower than the corresponding reduction by aqueous Fe+2. The reduction follows a reasonable first order decay, in nitrite concentration, with a half life of about 150 min (room temperature, CO2, pH 6.25). The highest ammonia product yield measured was 53%. Under CO2, the product yield decreases from pH 5.0 to pH 6.9. The increasing concentration of bicarbonate at higher pH interferes with the reaction. Bicarbonate interference is shown by comparing runs under N2 and CO2. The reaction proceeds well in the presence of such species as chloride, sulfate, and phosphate though the yield drops significantly with phosphate. FeS also reduces nitrate and, unlike with Fe+2, the reduction shows more reproducibility. Again, the product yield decreases with increasing pH, from 7% at pH 4.7 to 0% at pH 6.9. It appears as if nitrate is much more sensitive to the presence of added species, perhaps not competing as well for binding sites on the FeS surface. This may be the cause of the lack of reproducibility of nitrate reduction by Fe+2 (which also can be sensitive to binding by certain species).

  7. Pore-water distribution and quantification of diffusive benthic fluxes of silicic acid, nitrate and phosphate in surface sediments of the deep Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandel, Sibylle; Rickert, Dirk; Schlüter, Michael; Wallmann, Klaus

    Benthic fluxes and pore-water compositions of silicic acid, nitrate and phosphate were investigated for surface sediments of the abyssal Arabian Sea during four cruises (1995-1998). Five sites located in the northern (NAST), western (WAST), central (CAST), eastern (EAST), and southern (SAST) Arabian Sea were revisited during intermonsoonal periods after the NE- and SW-Monsoon. At these sites, benthic fluxes of remineralized nutrients from the sediment to the bottom water of 36-106, 102-350 and 4-16 mmol m -2 yr -1 were measured for nitrate, silicic acid and phosphate, respectively. The benthic fluxes and pore-water compositions showed a distinct regional pattern. Highest fluxes were observed in the western and northern region of the Arabian Sea, whereas decreasing fluxes were derived towards the southeast. At WAST, the general temporal pattern of primary production, related to the NE- and SW-Monsoon, is reflected by benthic fluxes. In contrast, at sites NAST, SAST, CAST, and EAST a temporal pattern of fluxes in response to the monsoon is not obvious. Our results reveal a clear coupling between the general regional pattern of production in surface waters and the response of the benthic environment, as indicated by the flux of remineralized nutrients, though a spatially differing degree of decoupling during transport and remineralization of particulate organic matter and biogenic opal was observed. This has to be taken into account regarding budget calculations and paleoceanographic topics.

  8. Geographic variation in the relationships of temperature, salinity or sigma sub t versus plant nutrient concentrations in the world ocean. [silicic acid, nitrate, and phosphate concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamykowski, D.; Zentara, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A NODC data set representing all regions of the world ocean was analyzed for temperature and sigma-t relationships with nitrate, phosphate or silicic acid. Six cubic regressions were for each ten degree square of latitude and longitude containing adequate data. World maps display the locations that allow the prediction of plant nutrient concentrations from temperature or sigma-t. Geographic coverage improves along the sequence: nitrate, phosphate, and silicic acid and is better for sigma-t than for temperature. Contour maps of the approximate temperature of sigma-t at which these nitrients are no longer measurable in a parcel of water are generated, based on a percentile analysis of the temperature or sigma-t at which less than a selected amount of plant nutrient occurs. Results are stored on magnetic tape in tabular form. The global potential to predict plant nutrient concentrations from remotely sensed temperature of sigma-t and to emphasize the latitudinally and longitudinally changing phytoplankton growth environment in present and past oceans is demonstrated.

  9. Determination of uranium isotopes in environmental samples by anion exchange in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media.

    PubMed

    Popov, L

    2016-09-01

    Method for determination of uranium isotopes in various environmental samples is presented. The major advantages of the method are the low cost of the analysis, high radiochemical yields and good decontamination factors from the matrix elements, natural and man-made radionuclides. The separation and purification of uranium is attained by adsorption with strong base anion exchange resin in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media. Uranium is electrodeposited on a stainless steel disk and measured by alpha spectrometry. The analytical method has been applied for the determination of concentrations of uranium isotopes in mineral, spring and tap waters from Bulgaria. The analytical quality was checked by analyzing reference materials. PMID:27451111

  10. Effect of acidity on the polarization sensitivity of azo-indicator based recording media*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaverdova, V. G.; Petrova, S. S.; Purtseladze, A. L.; Tarasashvili, V. I.; Obolashvili, N. Z.

    2013-01-01

    This is an experimental study of the photoanisotropic gyrotropic properties of recording media based on azoindicators — homologs (five dyes) of methyl orange-- introduced into the polymer matrix. Samples were prepared by a technology we have developed employing solvents with different acidities (pH 1.68-12.48). The samples were exposed to actinic radiation (λ = 488 nm) from an argon laser, and the photoinduced anisotropy measured in real time. The circular dichroism and circular birefringence in the layers under study are calculated for a neutral medium and at different pH levels.

  11. Cu-Co-Ni alloys: an efficient and durable electrocatalyst in acidic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Soumen; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V.; Lofland, Samuel E.; Ganguli, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed efficient nanostructures of Cu-Co-Ni alloy with varied stoichiometry as an alternative to the costly Pt-based alloys for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). These nanoparticles were synthesized using the reverse micellar method. The size of the alloy nanoparticles varied from 40 to 70 nm. An enhanced catalytic activity as evident from high current density was observed for these Cu-Co-Ni (111) alloys which follows the Volmer-Heyrovsky mechanism. They have excellent stability (up to 500 cycles) and significant activity in acid media which might be due to the low hydrogen binding energy.

  12. Furfural production in biphasic media using an acidic ionic liquid as a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Peleteiro, Susana; Santos, Valentín; Parajó, Juan C

    2016-11-20

    Ionic liquids are valuable tools for biorefineries. This study provides an experimental assessment on the utilization of an acidic ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate) as a catalyst for furfural production in water/solvent media. The substrates employed in experiments were commercial xylose (employed as a reference compound) or hemicellulosic saccharides obtained by hydrothermal processing of Eucalyptus globulus wood (which were employed as produced, after membrane concentration or after freeze-drying). A variety of reaction conditions (defined by temperature, reaction time and type of organic solvent) were considered. The possibility of recycling the catalyst was assessed in selected experiments. PMID:27561513

  13. Determination of uranium isotopes in environmental samples by anion exchange in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media.

    PubMed

    Popov, L

    2016-09-01

    Method for determination of uranium isotopes in various environmental samples is presented. The major advantages of the method are the low cost of the analysis, high radiochemical yields and good decontamination factors from the matrix elements, natural and man-made radionuclides. The separation and purification of uranium is attained by adsorption with strong base anion exchange resin in sulfuric and hydrochloric acid media. Uranium is electrodeposited on a stainless steel disk and measured by alpha spectrometry. The analytical method has been applied for the determination of concentrations of uranium isotopes in mineral, spring and tap waters from Bulgaria. The analytical quality was checked by analyzing reference materials.

  14. Furfural production in biphasic media using an acidic ionic liquid as a catalyst.

    PubMed

    Peleteiro, Susana; Santos, Valentín; Parajó, Juan C

    2016-11-20

    Ionic liquids are valuable tools for biorefineries. This study provides an experimental assessment on the utilization of an acidic ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hydrogen sulfate) as a catalyst for furfural production in water/solvent media. The substrates employed in experiments were commercial xylose (employed as a reference compound) or hemicellulosic saccharides obtained by hydrothermal processing of Eucalyptus globulus wood (which were employed as produced, after membrane concentration or after freeze-drying). A variety of reaction conditions (defined by temperature, reaction time and type of organic solvent) were considered. The possibility of recycling the catalyst was assessed in selected experiments.

  15. Electrochemistry of poly(vinylferrocene) modified electrodes in aqueous acidic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Touma B.; Singh, Pritam; Baker, Murray V.

    A cyclic voltammetric study of the electrochemistry and chemical stability of the poly(vinylferrocene) (PVFc) redox couple, coated on a gold substrate, in aqueous solutions of H 2SO 4, HClO 4 and HCl was carried out. It was found that the anodic peak potential ( Epa) did not depend on the acid concentration in the range (1.0 × 10 -2 to 1.0 × 10 -7 mol L -1). However, the Epa values shifted linearly to less positive potentials when investigated in more concentrated acid solutions in the range 1-5 mol L -1. The slope of the Epa versus acid concentration graph was found to be in the order H 2SO 4 > HCl > HClO 4. In this regard PVFc behaved very similar to 1,1'-bis(11-mercaptoundecyl)ferrocene (Fc(C 11SH) 2) except for its chemical stability. In H 2SO 4 media the PVFc was found to be much less stable than 1,1'-Fc(C 11SH) 2. The dependence of Epa on acid concentration could be used to monitor state of charge of lead-acid batteries. However, for this application Fc(C 11SH) 2 would be a better choice because of its superior chemical stability.

  16. Presence of viral nucleic acids in the middle ear: acute otitis media pathogen or bystander?

    PubMed

    Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Ruohola, Aino; Hendley, J Owen

    2012-04-01

    Viruses play an important role in acute otitis media (AOM) pathogenesis, and live viruses may cause AOM in the absence of pathogenic bacteria. Detection of AOM pathogens generally relies on bacterial culture of middle ear fluid. When viral culture is used and live viruses are detected in the middle ear fluid of children with AOM, the viruses are generally accepted as AOM pathogens. Because viral culture is not sensitive and does not detect the comprehensive spectrum of respiratory viruses, polymerase chain reaction assays are commonly used to detect viral nucleic acids in the middle ear fluid. Although polymerase chain reaction assays have greatly increased the viral detection rate, new questions arise on the significance of viral nucleic acids detected in the middle ear because nucleic acids of multiple viruses are detected simultaneously, and nucleic acids of specific viruses are detected repeatedly and in a high proportion of asymptomatic children. This article first reviews the role of live viruses in AOM and presents the point-counterpoint arguments on whether viral nucleic acids in the middle ear represent an AOM pathogen or a bystander status. Although there is evidence to support both directions, helpful information for interpretation of the data and future research direction is outlined.

  17. Effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate on polar lipids and fatty acids in leaves of morning glory and kidney bean. [Pharbitis nil; Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Nouchi, Isamu; Toyama, Susumu Ochanomizu Univ., Tokyo )

    1988-07-01

    To compare the effects of ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on leaf lipids, fatty acids and malondialdehyde (MDA), morning glory (Pharbitis nil Choisy cv Scarlet O'Hara) and kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Gintebo) plants were exposed to either ozone (0.15 microliter per liter for 8 hours) or PAN (0.10 microliter per liter for up to 8 hours). Ozone increased phospholipids in morning glory and decreased in kidney bean at the initial stage (2-4 hours) of exposure, while it scarcely changed glycolipids, the unsaturated fatty acids, and MDA in both plants. A large reduction of glycolipids occurred 1 day after ozone exposure in both plants. PAN caused marked drops in phospholipids and glycolipids in kidney bean at relatively late stage (6-8 hours) of exposure, while it increased phosphatidic acid and decreased the unsaturated fatty acids, an increase which was accompanied by a large increase in MDA. These results suggest that ozone may not directly oxidize unsaturated fatty acids at the initial stage of exposure, but may alter polar lipid metabolism, particularly phospholipids. On the other hand, PAN may abruptly and considerably degrade phospholipids and glycolipids by peroxidation or hydrolysis at the late stage of exposure. The present study shows that ozone and PAN affect polar lipids in different manners.

  18. Photochemical behavior of carbon nanotubes in natural waters: reactive oxygen species production and effects on •OH generation by Suwannee River fulvic acid, nitrate, and Fe (III).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Ya; Wang, Qi; Ferronato, Corinne; Yang, Xi; Chovelon, Jean-Marc

    2016-10-01

    The photochemical activities of three kinds of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated in the present study. Efficient procedures of dispersing the three kinds of carbon nanotubes in water were established, and the quantitative analysis methods were also developed by TOC-absorbance method. High pH value or low ionic strength of the colloidal solutions facilitated the dispersion of CNTs. The suspensions of three kinds of CNTs could generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and hydroxyl radical (•OH) under irradiation of simulated sunlight, while superoxide radical (O2 (•-)) was not detected. The steady-state concentrations of (1)O2 and •OH generated by these CNTs were also determined. The presence of CNTs in natural waters can affect the photochemical behavior of water constituents, such as nitrate, dissolved organic matter, and Fe(3+). Specifically, in nitrate solution, the presence of CNTs could inhibit the generation of •OH by nitrate through light screening effect, while the quenching effect of hydroxyl radicals by CNTs was not observed. Besides light screening effect, the three kinds of CNTs used in the experiments also have a strong inhibiting effect on the ability of DOM to produce •OH by binding to the active sites. Moreover, the adsorption of Fe(3+) on MWCNT-OH and MWCNT-COOH could lead to its inactivation of formation of •OH in acidic conditions. However, the presence of the three kinds of CNTs did not affect the ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) reaction of DOM-Fe (III) complex.

  19. Perfluoroalkyl acids in the Canadian environment: multi-media assessment of current status and trends.

    PubMed

    Gewurtz, Sarah B; Backus, Sean M; De Silva, Amila O; Ahrens, Lutz; Armellin, Alain; Evans, Marlene; Fraser, Susan; Gledhill, Melissa; Guerra, Paula; Harner, Tom; Helm, Paul A; Hung, Hayley; Khera, Nav; Kim, Min Gu; King, Martha; Lee, Sum Chi; Letcher, Robert J; Martin, Pamela; Marvin, Chris; McGoldrick, Daryl J; Myers, Anne L; Pelletier, Magella; Pomeroy, Joe; Reiner, Eric J; Rondeau, Myriam; Sauve, Marie-Claude; Sekela, Mark; Shoeib, Mahiba; Smith, Daniel W; Smyth, Shirley Anne; Struger, John; Spry, Doug; Syrgiannis, Jim; Waltho, Jasmine

    2013-09-01

    In Canada, perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been the focus of several monitoring programs and research and surveillance studies. Here, we integrate recent data and perform a multi-media assessment to examine the current status and ongoing trends of PFAAs in Canada. Concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), and other long-chain perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) in air, water, sediment, fish, and birds across Canada are generally related to urbanization, with elevated concentrations observed around cities, especially in southern Ontario. PFOS levels in water, fish tissue, and bird eggs were below their respective Draft Federal Environmental Quality Guidelines, suggesting there is low potential for adverse effects to the environment/organisms examined. However, PFOS in fish and bird eggs tended to exceed guidelines for the protection of mammalian and avian consumers, suggesting a potential risk to their wildlife predators, although wildlife population health assessments are needed to determine whether negative impacts are actually occurring. Long-term temporal trends of PFOS in suspended sediment, sediment cores, Lake Trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) eggs collected from Lake Ontario increased consistently from the start of data collection until the 1990s. However, after this time, the trends varied by media, with concentrations stabilizing in Lake Trout and Herring Gull eggs, and decreasing and increasing in suspended sediment and the sediment cores, respectively. For PFCAs, concentrations in suspended sediment, sediment cores, and Herring Gulls generally increased from the start of data collection until present and concentrations in Lake Trout increased until the late 1990s and subsequently stabilized. A multimedia comparison of PFAA profiles provided evidence that unexpected patterns in biota of some of the lakes were due to unique source patterns rather than internal lake processes. High

  20. Dissolution properties of co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations in buffer and biorelevant media.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, A T; DeClerck, L; Löbmann, K; Grohganz, H; Rades, T; Laitinen, R

    2015-07-01

    Co-amorphous formulations, particularly binary drug-amino acid mixtures, have been shown to provide enhanced dissolution for poorly-soluble drugs and improved physical stability of the amorphous state. However, to date the dissolution properties (mainly intrinsic dissolution rate) of the co-amorphous formulations have been tested only in buffers and their supersaturation ability remain unexplored. Consequently, dissolution studies in simulated intestinal fluids need to be conducted in order to better evaluate the potential of these systems in increasing the oral bioavailability of biopharmaceutics classification system class II drugs. In this study, solubility and dissolution properties of the co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine, gibenclamide-serine, glibenclamide-threonine and glibenclamide-serine-threonine were studied in phosphate buffer pH 7.2 and biorelevant media (fasted and fed state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF, respectively)). The co-amorphous formulations were found to provide a long-lasting supersaturation and improve the dissolution of the drugs compared to the crystalline and amorphous drugs alone in buffer. Similar improvement, but in lesser extent, was observed in biorelevant media suggesting that a dissolution advantage observed in aqueous buffers may overestimate the advantage in vivo. However, the results show that, in addition to stability advantage shown earlier, co-amorphous drug-amino acid formulations provide dissolution advantage over crystalline drugs in both aqueous and biorelevant conditions.

  1. Determination of dissociation parameters of weak acids in different media according to the isohydric method.

    PubMed

    Michałowski, Tadeusz; Pilarski, Bogusław; Asuero, Agustin G; Dobkowska, Agnieszka; Wybraniec, Sławomir

    2011-10-30

    The isohydricity (pH constancy) principle is referred to the pair of solutions: weak acid (HL, C(0)mol/L) and strong acid (HB, C mol/L) when mixed e.g., according to titrimetric mode. Such a case takes place if the relation C(0)=C+C(2) × 10(pK(1)) is valid, where pK(1)=-log K(1), K(1) - dissociation constant for a weak monoprotic acid HL. This principle, outlined and formulated in earlier paper (Michałowski et al., Talanta 82 (2010) 1965), is the basis for a sensitive method of pK(1) determination, confirmed for a series of weak acids in presence of basal electrolytes or in water+organic solvent (dimethyl sulphoxide, methanol, isopropanol) media. The results of titrations were elaborated according to principles of regression analysis, with use of least squares method. A new criterion for precision of the results obtained according to this method is formulated. The pK(1) values obtained are comparable with ones found in literature.

  2. Mobility of acid-treated carbon nanotubes in water-saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Peng, X J; Du, C J; Liang, Z; Wang, J; Luan, Z K; Li, W J

    2011-01-01

    The production, use, and disposal of nanomaterials may inevitably lead to their appearance in water. With the development of new industries around nanomaterials, it seems necessary to be concerned about the transport of nanomaterials in the environment. In this paper, the transport of acid-treated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in porous media was investigated. Before the mobility investigation, the stability of acid-treated CNT dispersions was studied using ultraviolet-visible spectra and it was indicated that, under the chemical conditions employed in this work, there was no apparent aggregation. The mobility investigation showed that transport of acid-treated CNTs increased with treatment time due to increase in particle zeta potential. Carbon nanotubes treated with nitric acid for 2, 6, and 12 h possessed measured zeta potentials of -30.0, -43.0, and -48.5 mV, respectively. Utilizing clean-bed filtration theory, we showed that acid-treated CNTs have the potential to migrate 3.28, 5.67, and 7.69 m in saturated glass beads, respectively. We showed that solution ionic strength and pH have important effects on the mobility of acid-treated CNTs. Increasing the pH from 6.0 to 7.9 resulted in an increase in migration potential from 2.96 to 10.86 m. Increasing the ionic strength from 0.005 to 0.020 M resulted in a decrease in CNT migration potential from 5.67 to 1.42 m.

  3. Solid and liquid media for isolating and cultivating acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ňancucheo, Ivan; Rowe, Owen F; Hedrich, Sabrina; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-05-01

    Growth media have been developed to facilitate the enrichment and isolation of acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacteria (aSRB) from environmental and industrial samples, and to allow their cultivation in vitro The main features of the 'standard' solid and liquid devised media are as follows: (i) use of glycerol rather than an aliphatic acid as electron donor; (ii) inclusion of stoichiometric concentrations of zinc ions to both buffer pH and to convert potentially harmful hydrogen sulphide produced by the aSRB to insoluble zinc sulphide; (iii) inclusion of Acidocella aromatica (an heterotrophic acidophile that does not metabolize glycerol or yeast extract) in the gel underlayer of double layered (overlay) solid media, to remove acetic acid produced by aSRB that incompletely oxidize glycerol and also aliphatic acids (mostly pyruvic) released by acid hydrolysis of the gelling agent used (agarose). Colonies of aSRB are readily distinguished from those of other anaerobes due to their deposition and accumulation of metal sulphide precipitates. Data presented illustrate the effectiveness of the overlay solid media described for isolating aSRB from acidic anaerobic sediments and low pH sulfidogenic bioreactors.

  4. Bile components and amino acids affect survival of the newly excysted juvenile Clonorchis sinensis in maintaining media.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunyu; Kim, Tae Im; Yoo, Won Gi; Cho, Pyo Yun; Kim, Tong-Soo; Hong, Sung-Jong

    2008-10-01

    Clonorchis sinensis thrives on bile juice. The effects of bile and bile acids on newly excysted juvenile C. sinensis (CsNEJ) were studied in terms of survival. Survival of CsNEJs maintained in 1x Locke's solution, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, NCTC 109, Eagle's, RPMI 1640, and 0.1% glucose was high, but dropped rapidly in 2x Locke's, 0.85% NaCl, and phosphate-buffered saline. Most amino acids in the media favored CsNEJ survival; however, aspartic and glutamic acids and adenine reduced survival. Survival was also significantly lower in media containing more than 0.1% bile. CsNEJs preconditioned in low bile media survived longer in higher bile media. All bile acids and conjugated bile salts were found to favor CsNEJ survival, except for lithocholic acid (LCA) which was toxic. NCTC 109 medium was found to be optimal for the in vitro maintenance of CsNEJs and 1x Locke's solution to be suitable for analyzing the biological effects of bioactive compounds and molecules. Based on these results, we propose that bile acids enhance activity of CsNEJs, but LCA deteriorate CsNEJs.

  5. Flows of elements, ions and abscisic acid in Ricinus communis and site of nitrate reduction under potassium limitation.

    PubMed

    Peuke, Andreas D; Jeschke, W Dieter; Hartung, Wolfram

    2002-02-01

    In a pot experiment Ricinus communis plants were cultivated in quartz sand and supplied daily with a nutrient solution which contained 4 mol m(-3) nitrate as the nitrogen source and either full strength potassium (1.3 mol m(-3), control) or 8% potassium (0.1 mol m(-3), K(+)-limitation). Although the final fresh weight of the whole plant was not affected by K(+)-limitation, the root-shoot ratio was increased due to a relatively increased root growth and inhibited development of younger shoot parts. Owing to K(+)-limitation, photosynthesis was slightly decreased, while dark respiration of the shoot markedly decreased and root respiration was nearly doubled. The transport of carbon in the phloem, and to some extent in the xylem, was greater and the root was favoured in the partitioning of carbon. This was also true for nitrogen and potassium which were both taken up at lower rates, particularly potassium. In these two cases a high remobilization and recycling from the old part of the shoot was observed. By contrast, uptake of sodium was 2.4-fold higher under K(+)-limitation and this resulted in increased flows in the plants, which was discussed generally as a means for charge balance (in combination with a slight increase in uptake of magnesium and calcium). Nitrate reduction took place in the same portion in the root and shoot. This was a shift to the root compared to the control and points to an inhibition of xylem transport caused by limitation of K(+) as an easily permeating countercation. Low K(+) supply also resulted in an increased biosynthesis of ABA in the roots (265%). This caused a slightly increased deposition of ABA in the roots (193%) and a 4.6-fold higher root-to-shoot and a doubled shoot-to-root ABA signal in the xylem or phloem, respectively. The high degradation of ABA in the shoots prevented ABA accumulation there. PMID:11807128

  6. The effect of nitrate, bicarbonate and natural organic matter on the degradation of sunscreen agent p-aminobenzoic acid by simulated solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liang; Meng, Cui; Zeng, Chao; Ji, Yuefei; Yang, Xi; Gao, Shixiang

    2011-11-15

    Our experiments revealed that a model sunscreen agent, p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), can be effectively transformed through reactions that are mediated by simulated solar irradiation. We systematically explored the effects of nitrate ions, bicarbonate and different types of natural organic matter (NOM) on the degradation of PABA by simulated solar irradiation. Experimental data suggest that these components ubiquitous in nature water have different influence on the rates of the photoinduced removal of PABA. Products were extracted and analyzed using LC/MS and a total of four products probably resulting from OH and NO2 radicals attack were identified and the possible reaction pathways were proposed. The findings in this study provide useful information for understanding the environmental transformation of sunscreen agent in aquatic system. PMID:21975008

  7. Nitrate removal by organotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria with C2/C3 fatty acid in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuhai; Li, Dong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Zeng, Huiping; Yang, Yin; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    In anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process, a harsh ratio of nitrite to ammonia in influent was demanded, and the max nitrogen removal efficiency could only achieve to 89%, both of which limited the development of Anammox. The aim of this work was to study the nitrate removal by organotrophic anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) with C2/C3 fatty acid in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. In this study, organotrophic AAOB was successfully enriched by adding acetate and propionate with the total organic carbon to nitrogen (TOC/N) ratio of 0.1. In the condition of low substrate, the TN removal efficiency reached 90%, with the effluent TN of around 11.8 mg L(-1). After the addition of acetate and propionate, the predominant species in Anammox granular sludge transformed to Candidatus Jettenia that belonging to organotrophic AAOB from the Candidatus Kuenenia relating to general AAOB. PMID:26151852

  8. Nutrient salts promote light-induced degradation of indole-3-acetic Acid in tissue culture media.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, J R; Robacker, K M

    1988-10-01

    The disappearance of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) from cell-free liquid culture medium was followed in response to nutrient salts found in Murashige-Skoog salt base, light, and pH range of 4 to 7. The loss of IAA was accelerated by light or Murashige-Skoog salts. However, the combination of both light and Murashige-Skoog salts acted synergistically to catalyze the destruction of over 80% of the original IAA within 7 days of continuous incubation. Under these same conditions, the loss of IAA was decreased to approximately 50% by adjusting the initial pH of the medium to 7. Iron was identified as the single major contributor to light-catalyzed destruction of IAA. Removal of nitrates, which represented 87% of the molar salt composition, also reduced the light-catalyzed loss of IAA. Treatments that protected IAA from degradation, such as darkness or removal of iron from the medium, suppressed the growth of muskmelon (Cucumis melo. Naud., var. reticulatus) callus tissue cultured for 30 days. Treatments in the light that rapidly degraded IAA resulted in maximum growth. Consequently, the brief exposure to IAA prior to degradation was apparently sufficient to initiate physiological changes required for growth. Possible approaches to the preservation of IAA during incubation are discussed. PMID:16666312

  9. Chronic suppurative otitis media due to nontuberculous mycobacteria: A case of successful treatment with topical boric acid.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Marie-Astrid; Quach, Caroline; Daniel, Sam J

    2015-07-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are an increasingly recognized cause of chronic suppurative otitis media in children with tympanostomy tubes. Treatment of this condition is difficult and typically requires a combination of systemic antibiotics and surgical debridement. We present the first case of a 2-year-old male with chronic suppurative otitis media due to NTM who failed systemic antibiotic therapy and was successfully managed with topical boric acid powder. This report highlights the challenges involved in treating this infection, and introduces boric acid as a potentially valuable component of therapy.

  10. Media optimization of Parietochloris incisa for arachidonic acid accumulation in an outdoor vertical tubular photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tababa, Hazel Guevarra; Hirabayashi, Seishiro; Inubushi, Kazuyuki

    2012-08-01

    The green alga Parietochloris incisa contains a significant amount of the nutritionally valuable polyunsaturated fatty acid and arachidonic acid (AA) and is being considered for mass cultivation for commercial AA production. This study was primarily aimed to define a practical medium formulation that can be used in commercial mass cultivation that will contribute to a substantial increase in the AA productivity of P. incisa with concomitant reduction of nutritional cost. The effect of nutrient limitation on growth and AA content of this microalga was explored in a batch culture in outdoor conditions using a vertical tubular photobioreactor. The study was conducted in two parts: the first was primarily focused on the effect of different nitrogen concentration on growth and AA content and the second part compares nitrogen deprivation, combination of nitrogen and phosphorus deprivation, and combined overall nutrient limitations at different levels of deprivation under low and high population densities. Since complete nitrogen deprivation hampers lipid and AA accumulation of P. incisa, thus, a critical value of nitrogen supply that will activate AA accumulation must be elucidated under specific growth conditions. Under the present experimental conditions, 0.5 g(-1) sodium nitrate obtained a higher AA productivity and volumetric yield relative to the nitrogen-deprived culture corresponding to 36.32 mg L(-1) day(-1) and 523.19 mg L(-1). The combined nitrogen and phosphorus limitation seemed to enhance AA productivity better than nitrogen deprivation alone. The effect of overall nutrient limitation indicates that acute nutrient deficiency can trigger rapid lipid and AA syntheses. The effect of light as a consequence of culture cell density was also discussed. This study therefore shows that the nutrient cost can be greatly reduced by adjusting the nutrient levels and culture density to induce AA accumulation in P. incisa. PMID:22798718

  11. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  12. Decomposition of dinitrotoluene isomers and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in spent acid from toluene nitration process by ozonation and photo-ozonation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Shing; Juan, Chien-Neng; Wei, Kuo-Ming

    2007-08-17

    Ozone and UV/O3 were employed to mineralize dinitrotoluene (DNT) isomers and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in spent acid from toluene nitration process. The oxidative degradation tests were carried out to elucidate the influence of various operating variables on the performance of mineralization of total organic compounds (TOC) in spent acid, including reaction temperature, intensity of UV (254 nm) irradiation, dosage of ozone and concentration of sulfuric acid. It is remarkable that the nearly complete mineralization of organic compounds can be achieved by ozonation combined with UV irradiation. Nevertheless, the hydroxyl radicals (*OH) would not be generated by either ozone decomposition or photolysis of ozone under the experimental condition of this study. According to the spectra identified by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) and further confirmed by gas chromatograph/flame ionization detector (GC/FID), the multiple oxidation pathways of DNT isomers are given, which include o-, m-, p-mononitrotoluene (MNT) and 1,3-dinitrobenzene, respectively. In addition, oxidative degradation of 2,4,6-TNT leads to a 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene intermediate. PMID:17257749

  13. Decomposition of dinitrotoluene isomers and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in spent acid from toluene nitration process by ozonation and photo-ozonation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Shing; Juan, Chien-Neng; Wei, Kuo-Ming

    2007-08-17

    Ozone and UV/O3 were employed to mineralize dinitrotoluene (DNT) isomers and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in spent acid from toluene nitration process. The oxidative degradation tests were carried out to elucidate the influence of various operating variables on the performance of mineralization of total organic compounds (TOC) in spent acid, including reaction temperature, intensity of UV (254 nm) irradiation, dosage of ozone and concentration of sulfuric acid. It is remarkable that the nearly complete mineralization of organic compounds can be achieved by ozonation combined with UV irradiation. Nevertheless, the hydroxyl radicals (*OH) would not be generated by either ozone decomposition or photolysis of ozone under the experimental condition of this study. According to the spectra identified by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) and further confirmed by gas chromatograph/flame ionization detector (GC/FID), the multiple oxidation pathways of DNT isomers are given, which include o-, m-, p-mononitrotoluene (MNT) and 1,3-dinitrobenzene, respectively. In addition, oxidative degradation of 2,4,6-TNT leads to a 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene intermediate.

  14. Effects of chemical oxidants on perfluoroalkyl acid transport in one-dimensional porous media columns.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Erica R; Siegrist, Robert L; McCray, John E; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a remediation approach that is often used to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with fuels and chlorinated solvents. At many aqueous film-forming foam-impacted sites, perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) can also be present at concentrations warranting concern. Laboratory experiments were completed using flow-through one-dimensional columns to improve our understanding of how ISCO (i.e., activated persulfate, permanganate, or catalyzed hydrogen peroxide) could affect the fate and transport of PFAAs in saturated porous media. While the resultant data suggest that standard ISCO is not a viable remediation strategy for PFAA decomposition, substantial changes in PFAA transport were observed upon and following the application of ISCO. In general, activated persulfate decreased PFAA transport, while permanganate and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide increased PFAA transport. PFAA sorption increased in the presence of increased aqueous polyvalent cation concentrations or decreased pH. The changes in contaminant mobility were greater than what would be predicted on the basis of aqueous chemistry considerations alone, suggesting that the application of ISCO results in changes to the porous media matrix (e.g., soil organic matter quality) that also influence transport. The application of ISCO is likely to result in changes in PFAA transport, where the direction (increased or decreased transport) and magnitude are dependent on PFAA characteristics, oxidant characteristics, and site-specific factors. PMID:25621878

  15. Effects of chemical oxidants on perfluoroalkyl acid transport in one-dimensional porous media columns.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Erica R; Siegrist, Robert L; McCray, John E; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a remediation approach that is often used to remediate soil and groundwater contaminated with fuels and chlorinated solvents. At many aqueous film-forming foam-impacted sites, perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) can also be present at concentrations warranting concern. Laboratory experiments were completed using flow-through one-dimensional columns to improve our understanding of how ISCO (i.e., activated persulfate, permanganate, or catalyzed hydrogen peroxide) could affect the fate and transport of PFAAs in saturated porous media. While the resultant data suggest that standard ISCO is not a viable remediation strategy for PFAA decomposition, substantial changes in PFAA transport were observed upon and following the application of ISCO. In general, activated persulfate decreased PFAA transport, while permanganate and catalyzed hydrogen peroxide increased PFAA transport. PFAA sorption increased in the presence of increased aqueous polyvalent cation concentrations or decreased pH. The changes in contaminant mobility were greater than what would be predicted on the basis of aqueous chemistry considerations alone, suggesting that the application of ISCO results in changes to the porous media matrix (e.g., soil organic matter quality) that also influence transport. The application of ISCO is likely to result in changes in PFAA transport, where the direction (increased or decreased transport) and magnitude are dependent on PFAA characteristics, oxidant characteristics, and site-specific factors.

  16. Degradation of emerging contaminants from water under natural sunlight: The effect of season, pH, humic acids and nitrate and identification of photodegradation by-products.

    PubMed

    Koumaki, Elena; Mamais, Daniel; Noutsopoulos, Constantinos; Nika, Maria-Christina; Bletsou, Anna A; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S; Eftaxias, Alexander; Stratogianni, Georgia

    2015-11-01

    Both photodegradation and hydrolysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) were investigated in order to evaluate their photochemical fate in aquatic environment and to assess the effect of season and specific characteristics of water (pH, humic acids and nitrate concentration) on the removal of target EDCs and NSAIDs through photodegradation. An additional objective was the identification of the photodegradation by-products of specific NSAIDs and their dependence on irradiation time. Selected compounds' transformation was investigated under natural sunlight radiation while control experiments were conducted in the dark. As expected, most of compounds' degradation rate decreased with decreasing light intensity between two different experimental periods. Most of the tested compounds exhibited different rates of degradation during direct and indirect photolysis. The degradation rate of the selected compounds increased in the presence of NO3(-) and the photodegradation rate was higher for some compounds in alkaline than in acidic solution. The effect of humic acids' presence in the water depends on the absorbance spectrum of the compound and the produced photosensitizers. More specifically, humic acids act as inner filter toward most of the selected NSAIDs and as photosensitizers toward most of the EDCs. The results of the irradiation experiments in the presence of both humic acids and NO3(-), indicate that the direct photolysis is much more efficient than indirect photochemical processes. Finally, several degradation by-products of ketoprofen and diclofenac were identified in the samples, exposed to sunlight. The dependence of these by-products on radiation time is also demonstrated.

  17. Simultaneous determination of amino acids and carbohydrates in culture media of Clostridium thermocellum by valve-switching ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fa, Yun; Yang, Haiyan; Ji, Chengshuai; Cui, He; Zhu, Xinshu; Du, Juan; Gao, Jun

    2013-10-10

    An improved method for the simultaneous determination of 20 amino acids and 7 carbohydrates using one-valve switching after injection, ion chromatography, and integrated pulsed amperometric detection is proposed. The resolution of the amino acids and carbohydrates in the cation trap column was investigated. In addition, parameters including flow liquid type, flow rate, concentration, and valve-switch timing were optimized. The method is time-saving, effective, and accurate for the simultaneous separation of amino acids and carbohydrates, with a mean correlation coefficient of >0.99 and repeatability of 0.5-4.6% for eight replicates. The method was successfully applied in the analysis of amino acids and carbohydrates in aseptic media and in extracellular culture media of three phenotypes of Clostridium thermocellum.

  18. Understanding Strategy of Nitrate and Urea Assimilation in a Chinese Strain of Aureococcus anophagefferens through RNA-Seq Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hong-Po; Huang, Kai-Xuan; Wang, Hua-Long; Lu, Song-Hui; Cen, Jing-Yi; Dong, Yue-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Aureococcus anophagefferens is a harmful alga that dominates plankton communities during brown tides in North America, Africa, and Asia. Here, RNA-seq technology was used to profile the transcriptome of a Chinese strain of A. anophagefferens that was grown on urea, nitrate, and a mixture of urea and nitrate, and that was under N-replete, limited and recovery conditions to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie nitrate and urea utilization. The number of differentially expressed genes between urea-grown and mixture N-grown cells were much less than those between urea-grown and nitrate-grown cells. Compared with nitrate-grown cells, mixture N-grown cells contained much lower levels of transcripts encoding proteins that are involved in nitrate transport and assimilation. Together with profiles of nutrient changes in media, these results suggest that A. anophagefferens primarily feeds on urea instead of nitrate when urea and nitrate co-exist. Furthermore, we noted that transcripts upregulated by nitrate and N-limitation included those encoding proteins involved in amino acid and nucleotide transport, degradation of amides and cyanates, and nitrate assimilation pathway. The data suggest that A. anophagefferens possesses an ability to utilize a variety of dissolved organic nitrogen. Moreover, transcripts for synthesis of proteins, glutamate-derived amino acids, spermines and sterols were upregulated by urea. Transcripts encoding key enzymes that are involved in the ornithine-urea and TCA cycles were differentially regulated by urea and nitrogen concentration, which suggests that the OUC may be linked to the TCA cycle and involved in reallocation of intracellular carbon and nitrogen. These genes regulated by urea may be crucial for the rapid proliferation of A. anophagefferens when urea is provided as the N source. PMID:25338000

  19. Carbonate minerals in porous media decrease mobility of polyacrylic acid modified zero-valent iron nanoparticles used for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Laumann, Susanne; Micić, Vesna; Lowry, Gregory V; Hofmann, Thilo

    2013-08-01

    The limited transport of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in porous media is a major obstacle to its widespread application for in situ groundwater remediation. Previous studies on nZVI transport have mainly been carried out in quartz porous media. The effect of carbonate minerals, which often predominate in aquifers, has not been evaluated to date. This study assessed the influence of the carbonate minerals in porous media on the transport of polyacrylic acid modified nZVI (PAA-nZVI). Increasing the proportion of carbonate sand in the porous media resulted in less transport of PAA-nZVI. Predicted travel distances were reduced to a few centimeters in pure carbonate sand compared to approximately 1.6 m in quartz sand. Transport modeling showed that the attachment efficiency and deposition rate coefficient increased linearly with increasing proportion of carbonate sand.

  20. Monoclinic hafnium oxynitride supported on reduced graphene oxide to catalyse the oxygen reduction reaction in acidic media.

    PubMed

    Chisaka, M; Sasaki, H; Muramoto, H

    2014-10-14

    Monoclinic HfO2 nanoparticles were doped with nitrogen via hydrothermal treatment that avoided high-cost pyrolysis with NH3 gas in order to develop a novel oxygen reduction reaction catalyst for use in acidic media. Catalyst size reduction was achieved using a reduced graphene oxide support, and activity above 0.8 V was obtained.

  1. Chemically defined media and auxotrophy of the prolific l-lactic acid producer Lactococcus lactis IO-1.

    PubMed

    Machii, Miki; Watanabe, Satoru; Zendo, Takeshi; Chibazakura, Taku; Sonomoto, Kenji; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2013-05-01

    Two chemically defined media, CDM-1G and CDM-1X, that use glucose and xylose as carbon sources, respectively, were prepared for Lactococcus lactis strain IO-1. The maximal cell density at 600 nm in CDM-1G exceeded 2. Omission growth experiments indicated that IO-1 is auxotrophic for 2 vitamins and 6 amino acids.

  2. Effects of organic phase, fermentation media, and operating conditions on lactic Acid extraction.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Monwar; Maisuria, J L

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid has extensive uses in the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic and chemical industry. Lately, its use in producing biodegradable polymeric materials (polylactate) makes the production of lactic acid from fermentation broths very important. The major part of the production cost accounts for the cost of separation from very dilute reaction media where productivity is low as a result of the inhibitory nature of lactic acid. The current method of extraction/separation is both expensive and unsustainable. Therefore, there is great scope for development of alternative technology that will offer efficiency, economic, and environmental benefits. One of the promising technologies for recovery of lactic acid from fermentation broth is reactive liquid-liquid extraction. In this paper the extraction and recovery of lactic acid based on reactive processes is examined and the performance of a hydrophobic microporous hollow-fiber membrane module (HFMM) is evaluated. First, equilibrium experiments were conducted using organic solutions consisting of Aliquat 336/trioctylamine (as a carrier) and tri-butyl phosphate (TBP)/sunflower oil (as a solvent) The values of the distribution coefficient were obtained as a function of feed pH, composition of the organic phase (ratio of carrier to solvent), and temperature (range 8-40 degrees C). The optimum extraction was obtained with the organic phase consisting of a mixture of 15 wt % tri-octylamine (TOA) and 15% Aliquat 336 and 70% solvent. The organic phase with TBP performed best but is less suitable because of its damaging properties (toxicity and environmental impact) and cost. Sunflower oil, which performed moderately, can be regarded as a better option as it has many desirable characteristics (nontoxic, environment- and operator-friendly) and it costs much less. The percentage extraction was approximately 33% at pH 6 and at room temperature (can be enhanced by operating at higher temperatures) at a feed flow rate of 15-20 L

  3. Agar media that indicate acid production from sorbitol by oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Kalfas, S; Edwardsson, S

    1985-12-01

    Two varieties of agar medium (Trypticase [BBL Microbiology Systems]-serum-sorbitol-bromcresol purple agar [TSSB] and Trypticase-blood-sorbitol-CaCO3 agar [TBSCa]) indicating microbial acid production from sorbitol were tested. The media were devised for use in studies on the prevalence of sorbitol-fermenting human oral microorganisms incubated in an anaerobic or microaerophilic atmosphere containing 5 to 6% CO2. TSSB contains bromcresol purple as the pH indicator and NaHCO3 as the main buffering salt. TBSCa contains CaCO3 as both the buffering salt and the indicator of acid production. The growth yield of pure cultures of oral microorganisms on TBSCa was shown to equal that on blood agar incubated under similar conditions. TSSB inhibited the growth of several bacteria to various extents. The recovery of sorbitol-fermenting microorganisms from oral specimens was the greatest when the specimens were assayed with TBSCa. The poorer results obtained with TSSB were mainly due to the decoloration of the pH indicator in this medium and the presence of greater numbers of sorbitol false-positive colonies.

  4. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-07-01

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations.

  5. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S; Kumta, Prashant N

    2016-01-01

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations. PMID:27380719

  6. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations. PMID:27380719

  7. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S; Kumta, Prashant N

    2016-07-06

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations.

  8. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-07-06

    We report that identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Furthermore, we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM basedmore » systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations.« less

  9. Effects of natural water ions and humic acid on catalytic nitrate reduction kinetics using an alumina supported Pd-Cu catalyst.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Brian P; Roundy, Eric; Guy, Kathryn A; Shapley, John R; Werth, Charles J

    2006-05-01

    Catalytic nitrate reduction was evaluated for the purpose of drinking water treatment. Common anions present in natural waters and humic acid were evaluated for their effects on NO3(-) hydrogenation over a bimetallic supported catalyst (Pd-Cu/gamma-Al2O3). Groundwater samples, with and without powder activated carbon (PAC) pretreatment, were also evaluated. In the absence of inhibitors the NO3- reduction rate was 2.4 x 10(-01) L/min g cat. However, the addition of constituents (SO4(2-), SO3(2-), HS-, CI-, HCO3-, OH-, and humic acid) on the order of representative concentrations for drinking water decreased the NO3- reduction rate. Sulfite, sulfide, and elevated chloride decreased the NO3- reduction rate by over 2 orders of magnitude. Preferential adsorption of Cl- inhibited NO3- reduction to a greater extent than NO2- reduction. Partial regeneration of catalysts exposed to SO3(2-) was achieved by using a dilute hypochlorite solution, however Cu dissolution occurred. Dissolved constituents in the groundwater sample decreased the NO3- reduction rate to 3.7 x 10(-03) L/min g cat and increased ammonia production. Removal of dissolved organic matter from the groundwater using PAC increased the NO3- reduction rate to 5.06 x 10(-02) L/min g cat and decreased ammonia production. Elemental analyses of catalysts exposed to the natural groundwater suggest that mineral precipitation may also contribute to catalyst fouling. PMID:16719114

  10. Incorporation of alpha-Ketoglutaric Acid as a Fixed Bed Scrubber Media for the Neutralization of Hydrazine Family Hypergolic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVor, R. W.; Santiago-Maldonado, E.; Parkerson, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    A candidate scrubber media, alpha-ketoglutaric acid (aKGA) adsorbed onto a silica-based substrate was examined as a potential alternative to the hydrazine-family hypergolic fuel neutralization techniques currently utilized at NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Helvenson et. al. has indicated that aKGA will react with hydrazines to produce non-hazardous, possibly biodegradable products. Furthermore, the authors have previously tested and demonstrated the use of aKGA aqueous solutions as a replacement neutralizing agent for citric acid, which is currently used as a scrubbing agent in liquid scrubbers at KSC. Specific properties examined include reaction efficiency, the loading capacity of aKGA onto various silica substrates, and the comparison of aKGA media performance to that of the citric acid vapor scrubber systems at KSC and a commercial vapor scrubber media. Preliminary investigations showed hydrophobic aerogel particles to be an ideal substrate for the deposition of the aKGA. Current studies have shown that the laboratory produced aKGA-Aerogel absorbent media are more efficient and cost effective than a commercially available fixed bed scrubber media, although much less cost effective than liquid-based citric acid scrubbers (although possibly safer and less labor intensive). A comparison of all three alternative scrubber technologies (liquid aKGA, solid-phase aKGA, and commercially available sorbent materials) is given considering both hypergolic neutralization capabilities and relative costs (as compared to the current citric acid scrubbing technology in use at NASA/KSC).

  11. Lewis Acid Pairs for the Activation of Biomass-derived Oxygenates in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, Yuriy

    2015-09-14

    The objective of this project is to understand the mechanistic aspects behind the cooperative activation of oxygenates by catalytic pairs in aqueous media. Specifically, we will investigate how the reactivity of a solid Lewis acid can be modulated by pairing the active site with other catalytic sites at the molecular level, with the ultimate goal of enhancing activation of targeted functional groups. Although unusual catalytic properties have been attributed to the cooperative effects promoted by such catalytic pairs, virtually no studies exist detailing the use heterogeneous water-tolerant Lewis pairs. A main goal of this work is to devise rational pathways for the synthesis of porous heterogeneous catalysts featuring isolated Lewis pairs that are active in the transformation of biomass-derived oxygenates in the presence of bulk water. Achieving this technical goal will require closely linking advanced synthesis techniques; detailed kinetic and mechanistic investigations; strict thermodynamic arguments; and comprehensive characterization studies of both materials and reaction intermediates. For the last performance period (2014-2015), two technical aims were pursued: 1) C-C coupling using Lewis acid and base pairs in Lewis acidic zeolites. Tin-, zirconium-, and hafnium containing zeolites (e.g., Sn-, Zr-, and Hf-Beta) are versatile solid Lewis acids that selectively activate carbonyl functional groups. In this aim, we demonstrate that these zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions. 2) One-pot synthesis of MWW zeolite nanosheets for activation of bulky substrates. Through

  12. Production of Antilisterial Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria in Dairy-Based Media: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Ünlü, Gülhan; Nielsen, Barbara; Ionita, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    One hundred and eight strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were screened for bacteriocin production by the modified deferred antagonism and agar well diffusion methods. When the modified deferred antagonism method was employed, 82 LAB strains showed inhibitory action against Listeria monocytogenes v7 ½a, whereas 26 LAB strains expressed no inhibition. Only 12 LAB strains exhibited inhibitory activity when the agar well diffusion method was used, 11 of which had been previously recognized as bacteriocin production positive (Bac(+)). Lactobacillus viridescens NRRL B-1951 was determined, for the first time, to produce an inhibitory compound with a proteinaceous nature. The inhibitory activity was observed in the presence of lipase, α-chymotrypsin, and trypsin, but no inhibition zone could be detected in the presence of proteinase K, indicating the proteinaceous nature of the inhibitory compound. The inhibitory compound was active against Lact. sake ATCC 15521 and Lact. plantarum NCDO 995. Bacteriocin production by the Bac(+) LAB strains was assessed in Lactobacillus MRS Broth as well as in dairy-based media such as nonfat milk, demineralized whey powder, and cheddar cheese whey supplemented with complex nutrient sources that are rich in nitrogen. Lact. sake ATCC 15521 and L. monocytogenes CWD 1002, CWD 1092, CWD 1157, CWD 1198, and v7 ½a were used as indicators. The inhibitory activities of the bacteriocins varied depending on the indicator strains and the growth media used. The LAB indicator strains were found to be more sensitive to inhibition by bacteriocins when compared to the listerial indicator strains. Among the listerial indicators, L. monocytogenes CWD 1002 and CWD 1198 were the most sensitive strains to the bacteriocins investigated in this study. Media composition had a significant influence on bacteriocin production and activity. When compared to demineralized whey powder medium and cheddar cheese whey medium supplemented with whey protein concentrate

  13. Production of Antilisterial Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria in Dairy-Based Media: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Ünlü, Gülhan; Nielsen, Barbara; Ionita, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    One hundred and eight strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were screened for bacteriocin production by the modified deferred antagonism and agar well diffusion methods. When the modified deferred antagonism method was employed, 82 LAB strains showed inhibitory action against Listeria monocytogenes v7 ½a, whereas 26 LAB strains expressed no inhibition. Only 12 LAB strains exhibited inhibitory activity when the agar well diffusion method was used, 11 of which had been previously recognized as bacteriocin production positive (Bac(+)). Lactobacillus viridescens NRRL B-1951 was determined, for the first time, to produce an inhibitory compound with a proteinaceous nature. The inhibitory activity was observed in the presence of lipase, α-chymotrypsin, and trypsin, but no inhibition zone could be detected in the presence of proteinase K, indicating the proteinaceous nature of the inhibitory compound. The inhibitory compound was active against Lact. sake ATCC 15521 and Lact. plantarum NCDO 995. Bacteriocin production by the Bac(+) LAB strains was assessed in Lactobacillus MRS Broth as well as in dairy-based media such as nonfat milk, demineralized whey powder, and cheddar cheese whey supplemented with complex nutrient sources that are rich in nitrogen. Lact. sake ATCC 15521 and L. monocytogenes CWD 1002, CWD 1092, CWD 1157, CWD 1198, and v7 ½a were used as indicators. The inhibitory activities of the bacteriocins varied depending on the indicator strains and the growth media used. The LAB indicator strains were found to be more sensitive to inhibition by bacteriocins when compared to the listerial indicator strains. Among the listerial indicators, L. monocytogenes CWD 1002 and CWD 1198 were the most sensitive strains to the bacteriocins investigated in this study. Media composition had a significant influence on bacteriocin production and activity. When compared to demineralized whey powder medium and cheddar cheese whey medium supplemented with whey protein concentrate

  14. The Stringent Response Is Required for Amino Acid and Nitrate Utilization, Nod Factor Regulation, Nodulation, and Nitrogen Fixation in Rhizobium etli†

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Flores, Arturo; Du Pont, Gisela; Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Merchant-Larios, Horacio; Servín-González, Luis; Durán, Socorro

    2005-01-01

    A Rhizobium etli Tn5 insertion mutant, LM01, was selected for its inability to use glutamine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. The Tn5 insertion in LM01 was localized to the rsh gene, which encodes a member of the RelA/SpoT family of proteins. The LM01 mutant was affected in the ability to use amino acids and nitrate as nitrogen sources and was unable to accumulate (p)ppGpp when grown under carbon and nitrogen starvation, as opposed to the wild-type strain, which accumulated (p)ppGpp under these conditions. The R. etli rsh gene was found to restore (p)ppGpp accumulation to a ΔrelA ΔspoT mutant of Escherichia coli. The R. etli Rsh protein consists of 744 amino acids, and the Tn5 insertion in LM01 results in the synthesis of a truncated protein of 329 amino acids; complementation experiments indicate that this truncated protein is still capable of (p)ppGpp hydrolysis. A second rsh mutant of R. etli, strain AC1, was constructed by inserting an Ω element at the beginning of the rsh gene, resulting in a null allele. Both AC1 and LM01 were affected in Nod factor production, which was constitutive in both strains, and in nodulation; nodules produced by the rsh mutants in Phaseolus vulgaris were smaller than those produced by the wild-type strain and did not fix nitrogen. In addition, electron microscopy revealed that the mutant bacteroids lacked poly-β-hydroxybutyrate granules. These results indicate a central role for the stringent response in symbiosis. PMID:16030199

  15. Substrate induction of nitrate reductase in barley aleurone layers.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, T E; Varner, J E

    1969-01-01

    Nitrate induces the formation of nitrate reductase activity in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Himalaya) aleurone layers. Previous work has demonstrated de novo synthesis of alpha-amylase by gibberellic acid in the same tissue. The increase in nitrate reductase activity is inhibited by cycloheximide and 6-methylpurine, but not by actinomycin D. Nitrate does not induce alpha-amylase synthesis, and it has no effect on the gibberellic acid-induced synthesis of alpha-amylase. Also, there is little or no direct effect of gibberellic acid (during the first 6 hr of induction) or of abscisic acid on the nitrate-induced formation of nitrate reductase. Gibberellic acid does interfere with nitrate reductase activity during long-term experiments (greater than 6 hr). However, the time course of this inhibition suggests that the inhibition may be a secondary one. Barley aleurone layers therefore provide a convenient tissue for the study of both substrate- and hormone-induced enzyme formation.

  16. Combination of best promoter and micellar catalyst for chromic acid oxidation of 1-butanol to 1-butanal in aqueous media at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Saha, Rumpa; Ghosh, Aniruddha; Saha, Bidyut

    2014-04-24

    In aqueous acidic media, picolinic acid, 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline promoted Cr(VI) oxidation of 1-butanol produces 1-butanal. 1-butanal is separated from mixture by fractional distillation. The anionic surfactant (SDS) and neutral surfactant (TX-100) accelerate the process while the cationic surfactant (CPC) retards the reaction. Combination of bipy and SDS is the best choice for chromic acid oxidation of 1-butanol to 1-butanal in aqueous media.

  17. Evaluation of culture media for selective enumeration of bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Süle, Judit; Kõrösi, Tímea; Hucker, Attila; Varga, László

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the suitability of Transgalactosylated oligosaccharides-mupirocin lithium salt (TOS-MUP) and MRS-clindamycin-ciprofloxacin (MRS-CC) agars, along with several other culture media, for selectively enumerating bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species commonly used to make fermented milks. Pure culture suspensions of a total of 13 dairy bacteria strains, belonging to eight species and five genera, were tested for growth capability under various incubation conditions. TOS-MUP agar was successfully used for the selective enumeration of both Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and B. breve M-16 V. MRS-CC agar showed relatively good selectivity for Lactobacillus acidophilus, however, it also promoted the growth of Lb. casei strains. For this reason, MRS-CC agar can only be used as a selective medium for the enumeration of Lb. acidophilus if Lb. casei is not present in a product at levels similar to or exceeding those of Lb. acidophilus. Unlike bifidobacteria and coccus-shaped LAB, all the lactobacilli strains involved in this work were found to grow well in MRS pH 5.4 agar incubated under anaerobiosis at 37 °C for 72 h. Therefore, this method proved to be particularly suitable for the selective enumeration of Lactobacillus spp.

  18. Lipase in biphasic alginate beads as a biocatalyst for esterification of butyric acid and butanol in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Ng, Choong Hey; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Esterification of organic acids and alcohols in aqueous media is very inefficient due to thermodynamic constraints. However, fermentation processes used to produce organic acids and alcohols are often conducted in aqueous media. To produce esters in aqueous media, biphasic alginate beads with immobilized lipase are developed for in situ esterification of butanol and butyric acid. The biphasic beads contain a solid matrix of calcium alginate and hexadecane together with 5 mg/mL of lipase as the biocatalyst. Hexadecane in the biphasic beads serves as an organic phase to facilitate the esterification reaction. Under optimized conditions, the beads are able to catalyze the production of 0.16 mmol of butyl butyrate from 0.5 mmol of butyric acid and 1.5 mmol of butanol. In contrast, when monophasic beads (without hexadecane) are used, only trace amount of butyl butyrate is produced. One main application of biphasic beads is in simultaneous fermentation and esterification (SFE) because the organic phase inside the beads is very stable and does not leach out into the culture medium. SFE is successfully conducted with an esterification yield of 6.32% using biphasic beads containing iso-octane even though the solvent is proven toxic to the butanol-producing Clostridium spp. PMID:26672465

  19. Humic Acid Effects on the Transport of Colloidal Particles in Unsaturated Porous Media: Humic Acid Dosage, pH, and Ionic Strength Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, V. L.; Gao, B.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Soil colloids and biocolloids can facilitate contaminant transport within the soil profile through the complexation of pollutants previously thought to have limited mobility. Dissolved organic substances are qualitatively known to alter the behavior of colloids and surface chemistry of soil particles in aquatic environments when adsorbed to their surfaces. Specifically, it has been observed that even small amounts of adsorbed humic acids result in a pronounced increase in colloid mobility in saturated porous systems, presumably by a combination of electrostatic and steric stabilization. However, the degree to which adsorbed humic acids stabilize colloidal suspension is highly sensitive to the system's solution chemistry; mainly in terms of pH, ionic strength, and metal ions present. The objective of this study is to expound quantitatively on the role that combined stabilizing and destabilizing solution chemistry components have on humic acid-colloid transport in unsaturated media by isolating experimentally some underlying mechanisms that regulate colloid transport in realistic aquatic systems. We hypothesize that in chemically heterogeneous porous media, with ionic strength values above 0 and pH ranges from 4 to 9, the effect of humic acid on colloid suspensions cannot be simply characterized by increased stability and mobility. That a critical salt concentration must exists for a given humic acid concentration and pH, above which the network of humic acid collapses by forming coordination complexes with other suspended or adsorbed humic acids, thus increasing greatly the retention of colloids in the porous medium by sweep flocculation. In addition, capillary forces in unsaturated media may contribute further to overcome repulsive forces that prevent flocculation of humic acid-colloid complexes. The experimental work in this study will include: jar tests to determine critical solution concentration combinations for desired coagulation/flocculation rates, column

  20. Fluorogenic Tagging of Peptide and Protein 3-Nitrotyrosine with 4-(Aminomethyl)-benzenesulfonic Acid for Quantitative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Nitration

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Victor S.; Dremina, Elena S.; Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Gerstenecker, Gary S.; Li, Xiaobao; Dobrowsky, Rick T.; Stobaugh, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Protein 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) has been recognized as an important biomarker of nitroxidative stress associated with inflammatory and degenerative diseases, and biological aging. Analysis of protein-bound 3-NT continues to represent a challenge since in vivo it frequently does not accumulate on proteins in amounts detectable by quantitative analytical methods. Here, we describe a novel approach of fluorescent tagging and quantitation of peptide-bound 3-NT residues based on the selective reduction to 3-AT followed by reaction with 4-(amino-methyl)benzenesulfonic acid (ABS) in the presence of K3Fe(CN)6 to form a highly fluorescent 2-phenylbenzoxazole product. Synthetic 3-NT peptide (0.005–1 μM) upon reduction with 10 mM sodium dithionite and tagging with 2 mM ABS and 5 μM K3Fe(CN)6 in 0.1 M Na2HPO4 buffer (pH 9.0) was converted with yields >95% to a single fluorescent product incorporating two ABS molecules per 3-NT residue, with fluorescence excitation and emission maxima at 360 ± 2 and 490 ± 2 nm, respectively, and a quantum yield of 0.77 ± 0.08, based on reverse-phase LC with UV and fluorescence detection, fluorescence spectroscopy and LC–MS–MS analysis. This protocol was successfully tested for quantitative analysis of in vitro Tyr nitration in a model protein, rabbit muscle phosphorylase b, and in a complex mixture of proteins from C2C12 cultured cells exposed to peroxynitrite, with a detection limit of ca. 1 pmol 3-NT by fluorescence spectrometry, and an apparent LOD of 12 and 40 pmol for nitropeptides alone or in the presence of 100 μg digested cell proteins, respectively. LC–MS–MS analysis of ABS tagged peptides revealed that the fluorescent derivatives undergo efficient backbone fragmentations, allowing for sequence-specific characterization of protein Tyr nitration in proteomic studies. Fluorogenic tagging with ABS also can be instrumental for detection and visualization of protein 3-NT in LC and gel-based protein separations. PMID:20703364

  1. Fluorogenic Tagging of Peptide and Protein 3-Nitrotyrosine with 4-(Aminomethyl)-benzenesulfonic Acid for Quantitative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Nitration.

    PubMed

    Sharov, Victor S; Dremina, Elena S; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Gerstenecker, Gary S; Li, Xiaobao; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Stobaugh, John F; Schöneich, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Protein 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) has been recognized as an important biomarker of nitroxidative stress associated with inflammatory and degenerative diseases, and biological aging. Analysis of protein-bound 3-NT continues to represent a challenge since in vivo it frequently does not accumulate on proteins in amounts detectable by quantitative analytical methods. Here, we describe a novel approach of fluorescent tagging and quantitation of peptide-bound 3-NT residues based on the selective reduction to 3-AT followed by reaction with 4-(amino-methyl)benzenesulfonic acid (ABS) in the presence of K(3)Fe(CN)(6) to form a highly fluorescent 2-phenylbenzoxazole product. Synthetic 3-NT peptide (0.005-1 μM) upon reduction with 10 mM sodium dithionite and tagging with 2 mM ABS and 5 μM K(3)Fe(CN)(6) in 0.1 M Na(2)HPO(4) buffer (pH 9.0) was converted with yields >95% to a single fluorescent product incorporating two ABS molecules per 3-NT residue, with fluorescence excitation and emission maxima at 360 ± 2 and 490 ± 2 nm, respectively, and a quantum yield of 0.77 ± 0.08, based on reverse-phase LC with UV and fluorescence detection, fluorescence spectroscopy and LC-MS-MS analysis. This protocol was successfully tested for quantitative analysis of in vitro Tyr nitration in a model protein, rabbit muscle phosphorylase b, and in a complex mixture of proteins from C2C12 cultured cells exposed to peroxynitrite, with a detection limit of ca. 1 pmol 3-NT by fluorescence spectrometry, and an apparent LOD of 12 and 40 pmol for nitropeptides alone or in the presence of 100 μg digested cell proteins, respectively. LC-MS-MS analysis of ABS tagged peptides revealed that the fluorescent derivatives undergo efficient backbone fragmentations, allowing for sequence-specific characterization of protein Tyr nitration in proteomic studies. Fluorogenic tagging with ABS also can be instrumental for detection and visualization of protein 3-NT in LC and gel-based protein separations. PMID

  2. Nitrate deposition and impact on Adirondack streams

    SciTech Connect

    Simonin, H.A.; Kretser, W.A.

    1997-12-31

    Acidic deposition has a great impact on water chemistry and fish populations in the Adirondack region. Although the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 have resulted in some reductions of sulfate deposition, nitrate deposition has not yet been well controlled, and continues to impact aquatic resources. As part of the USEPA funded Episodic Response Project four Adirondack headwater streams were intensively monitored over an 18 month period. Atmospheric deposition was also monitored at a centrally located station. The quantity of nitrate being deposited on the study watersheds was calculated based on monthly net deposition data which ranged from 0.6 kg/ha/month to 3.6 kg/ha/month. These data were then compared to the monthly export of nitrate from the watershed in these streams. Nitrate concentrations were highest in the streamwater during the spring snowmelt period prior to the time when forest vegetation actively utilizes nitrate. On an annual basis the amount of nitrate which left the watershed via stream water exceeded the amount which fell as nitrate deposition. These data are important in documenting the impact of nitrate in the acidification of Adirondack streams during the spring, which coincides with brook trout hatching. Control programs for nitrous oxide emissions are presently aimed at reducing ozone levels during the May-September period. These emissions control programs need to be expanded to also reduce nitrate deposition in the sensitive Adirondack region during the winter and spring periods when nitrate deposition has its greatest impact on aquatic resources.

  3. Application of talcum powder, trichloroacetic acid and silver nitrate in female rats for non-surgical sterilization: evaluation of the apoptotic pathway mRNA and miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Yumrutas, Onder; Kara, Murat; Atilgan, Remzi; Kavak, Salih Burcin; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods used for non-surgical sterilization in birth control including quinacrine, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), erythromycin, tetracycline, silver nitrate and talcum powder. Among these, talcum powder, TCA and silver nitrate are the most commonly used. However, the toxic and carcinogenic activities of these chemicals in ovarian tissue have been poorly elucidated. This study demonstrates the expression levels of antioxidant, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes after administration of talc powder, TCA and silver nitrate for non-surgical sterilization in female rat models. The expression changes of some microRNAs (miR-15b, miR-21, miR-34a and miR-98) that play key roles in the apoptosis pathway were also included. All expression analyses were evaluated with real-time PCR. The expression levels of all genes appeared to be upregulated in the talcum powder group, but the results were not statistically significant. Increased expression of Gsr and Sod1 genes was statistically significant in the talcum powder group. In TCA and silver nitrate group, expression of all genes was appeared to be elevated but only the Gsr expression was statistically significant in the TCA-administrated group; there were no statistically significant changes in the silver nitrate group. miRNA expression levels were increased in talcum powder and TCA-administrated groups, but these results were not significant. Expression levels of miR-15b, miR-21 and miR-98 in the silver nitrate group were significantly increased. Consequently, these chemicals appear to be non-carcinogenic agents for rat ovarian tissue which do not induce apoptosis. However, talcum powder and TCA can be considered as agents that are toxic to ovarian tissue. PMID:25885949

  4. Application of talcum powder, trichloroacetic acid and silver nitrate in female rats for non-surgical sterilization: evaluation of the apoptotic pathway mRNA and miRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Yumrutas, Onder; Kara, Murat; Atilgan, Remzi; Kavak, Salih Burcin; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2015-04-01

    There are several methods used for non-surgical sterilization in birth control including quinacrine, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), erythromycin, tetracycline, silver nitrate and talcum powder. Among these, talcum powder, TCA and silver nitrate are the most commonly used. However, the toxic and carcinogenic activities of these chemicals in ovarian tissue have been poorly elucidated. This study demonstrates the expression levels of antioxidant, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes after administration of talc powder, TCA and silver nitrate for non-surgical sterilization in female rat models. The expression changes of some microRNAs (miR-15b, miR-21, miR-34a and miR-98) that play key roles in the apoptosis pathway were also included. All expression analyses were evaluated with real-time PCR. The expression levels of all genes appeared to be upregulated in the talcum powder group, but the results were not statistically significant. Increased expression of Gsr and Sod1 genes was statistically significant in the talcum powder group. In TCA and silver nitrate group, expression of all genes was appeared to be elevated but only the Gsr expression was statistically significant in the TCA-administrated group; there were no statistically significant changes in the silver nitrate group. miRNA expression levels were increased in talcum powder and TCA-administrated groups, but these results were not significant. Expression levels of miR-15b, miR-21 and miR-98 in the silver nitrate group were significantly increased. Consequently, these chemicals appear to be non-carcinogenic agents for rat ovarian tissue which do not induce apoptosis. However, talcum powder and TCA can be considered as agents that are toxic to ovarian tissue. PMID:25885949

  5. Comparative avoidance behaviour of the earthworm Eisenia fetida towards chloride, nitrate and sulphate salts of Cd, Cu and Zn using filter paper and extruded water agar gels as exposure media.

    PubMed

    Demuynck, Sylvain; Lebel, Aurélie; Grumiaux, Fabien; Pernin, Céline; Leprêtre, Alain; Lemière, Sébastien

    2016-07-01

    We studied the avoidance behaviour of the earthworm Eisenia fetida towards Cd, Cu, and Zn, trace elements (TEs) tested as chloride, nitrate and sulphate salts. Sub adults were exposed individually using dual-cell chambers at 20+2°C in the dark. Recordings were realised at different dates from 2h to 32h. We used filter paper and extruded water agar gel as exposure media to evaluate the contribution of the dermal and the digestive exposure routes on the avoidance reactions. Exposures to Cu or Cd (10mgmetal ionL(-1)) resulted in highly significant avoidance reactions through the exposure duration. Worms avoided Zn poorly and reactions towards Zn salts varied along the exposure. Worm sensitivity towards TEs differed between salts and this could result from differential toxicity or accessibility of these TE salts to earthworms. The anion in itself was not the determinant of the avoidance reactions since exposures to similar concentrations of these anions using calcium salts did not result in significant avoidance worm behaviour. Avoidance responses towards TEs were higher in the case of water agar exposures than in filter paper exposures. Thus, dermal contacts with TE solutions would elicit worm avoidance but signals from receptors located inside the digestive tract could reinforce this behaviour. The use of extruded water agar gels as the substrate allows checking the real sensitivity of earthworm species towards TEs since the TE concentrations leading to significant avoidance reactions were below those reported in the literature when using TE-spiked soils.

  6. Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes with encapsulated ferric carbide as excellent electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in acid and alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Guoyu; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Peng, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) with encapsulated Fe3C nanoparticles (Fe3C@NCNTs) are synthesized by a simple direct pyrolysis of melamine and ferric chloride. The characterization results reveal that Fe3C is mainly encapsulated in the interior of NCNTs and N species is mainly distributed on the outside surface of NCNTs. Iron and iron carbide catalyze the growth of NCNTs and are wrapped by carbon to form Fe3C@NCNTs. The as-prepared Fe3C@NCNTs catalyst exhibits superior oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity, excellent methanol tolerance and long-term stability in both acid and alkaline media. It is proven that the doped N is the main active site for ORR and the inner Fe3C with outside carbon form the synergetic active site to enhance ORR activity. The ORR mechanism of direct four electron transfer pathway is proved in acid and alkaline media.

  7. Carbon nanotube/raspberry hollow Pd nanosphere hybrids for methanol, ethanol, and formic acid electro-oxidation in alkaline media.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhelin; Zhao, Bo; Guo, Cunlan; Sun, Yujing; Shi, Yan; Yang, Haibin; Li, Zhuang

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, raspberry hollow Pd nanospheres (HPNs)-decorated carbon nanotube (CNT) was developed for electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid in alkaline media. The electrocatalyst was fabricated simply by attaching HPNs onto the surface of CNT which had been functionalized by polymer wrapping. The as-prepared HPN-CNTs (CHPNs) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The increasing interest and intensive research on fuel cell inspire us to investigate the electrocatalytic properties of the prepared nanostructures. Besides that, previous reports about alkaline other than acidic media could supply a more active environment guide us to examine the electrocatalytic properties in alkaline electrolyte. It is found that this novel hybrid electrocatalyst exhibits excellent electrocatalytic properties and can be further applied in fuel cells, catalysts, and sensors.

  8. Crystalline Metaphosphate Acid Salts: Synthesis in Organic Media, Structures, Hydrogen-Bonding Capability, and Implication of Superacidity.

    PubMed

    Chakarawet, Khetpakorn; Knopf, Ioana; Nava, Matthew; Jiang, Yanfeng; Stauber, Julia M; Cummins, Christopher C

    2016-06-20

    Metaphosphate acids cannot be thoroughly studied in aqueous media because their acidity is leveled by the solvent, and the resulting metaphosphates are susceptible to acid-catalyzed hydrolysis. Exploration of metaphosphate acid chemistry has now been made possible with the development of a general synthetic method for organic media soluble metaphosphate acids. Protonation of the [PPN](+) salts ([PPN](+) = [N(PPh3)2](+)) of tri-, tetra-, and hexametaphosphates results in five new metaphosphate acids, [PPN]2[P3O9H] (2), [PPN]4[(P4O12)3H8] (3), [PPN]4[P6O18H2]·2H2O (4), [PPN]3[P6O18H3] (5), and [PPN]2[P6O18H2(H3O)2] (6), obtained in yields of 80, 71, 66, 88, and 76%, respectively. Additionally, our synthetic method can be extended to pyrophosphate to produce [PPN][P2O7H3] (7) in 77% yield. The structural configurations of these oxoacids are dictated by strong hydrogen bonds and the anticooperative effect. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds are observed in 2, 4, and 5 and the previously reported [PPN]2[P4O12H2] (1), while intermolecular hydrogen bonds are observed in 3, 6, and 7. The hydrogen bonds in 3-7 possess short distances and are classified as low-barrier hydrogen bonds. Gas-phase acidity computations reveal that the parent tri- and tetrametaphosphoric acids are superacids. Their remarkable acidity is attributable to the stabilization of their corresponding conjugate bases via intramolecular hydrogen bonding. PMID:27267865

  9. Characterization of bacteria that suppress rhizoctonia damping-off in bark compost media by analysis of Fatty Acid biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tunlid, A; Hoitink, H A; Low, C; White, D C

    1989-06-01

    Examination of cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L.) grown in bark compost media and of the surrounding edaphic substrate showed profiles of polar lipid fatty acids commonly found in bacteria. The composition of fatty acids in these profiles differed significantly between roots grown in a medium naturally suppressive to Rhizoctonia damping-off and roots from a conducive medium. Cucumber roots from the suppressive medium had higher proportions of cis-vaccenic acid (18:1 omega 7c) and the iso-branched monoenoic fatty acid i17:1 omega 8 but lower proportions of several iso- and anteiso-branched fatty acids compared with roots from the conducive medium. The concentrations of the bacterial fatty acids were significantly lower in the surrounding media. However, the suppressive and conducive growth substrates had differences in the composition of the bacterial fatty acids similar to those found between the cucumber roots proper. These results suggest major differences in bacterial community composition between suppressive and conducive systems. Fatty acid analyses were also utilized to examine the effects on bacterial community composition of root colonization by Flavobacterium balustinum 299, a biocontrol agent. The concentration of the most prominent fatty acid in this bacterium, i17:1 omega 8, was increased on roots produced from inoculated seeds in a medium rendered suppressive by the treatment. This change was concomitant with a significant increase in the concentration of 18:1 omega 7c, not present in the lipids of the antagonist, indicating a shift in the microflora from a conducive to a suppressive bacterial community.

  10. Crystalline Metaphosphate Acid Salts: Synthesis in Organic Media, Structures, Hydrogen-Bonding Capability, and Implication of Superacidity.

    PubMed

    Chakarawet, Khetpakorn; Knopf, Ioana; Nava, Matthew; Jiang, Yanfeng; Stauber, Julia M; Cummins, Christopher C

    2016-06-20

    Metaphosphate acids cannot be thoroughly studied in aqueous media because their acidity is leveled by the solvent, and the resulting metaphosphates are susceptible to acid-catalyzed hydrolysis. Exploration of metaphosphate acid chemistry has now been made possible with the development of a general synthetic method for organic media soluble metaphosphate acids. Protonation of the [PPN](+) salts ([PPN](+) = [N(PPh3)2](+)) of tri-, tetra-, and hexametaphosphates results in five new metaphosphate acids, [PPN]2[P3O9H] (2), [PPN]4[(P4O12)3H8] (3), [PPN]4[P6O18H2]·2H2O (4), [PPN]3[P6O18H3] (5), and [PPN]2[P6O18H2(H3O)2] (6), obtained in yields of 80, 71, 66, 88, and 76%, respectively. Additionally, our synthetic method can be extended to pyrophosphate to produce [PPN][P2O7H3] (7) in 77% yield. The structural configurations of these oxoacids are dictated by strong hydrogen bonds and the anticooperative effect. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds are observed in 2, 4, and 5 and the previously reported [PPN]2[P4O12H2] (1), while intermolecular hydrogen bonds are observed in 3, 6, and 7. The hydrogen bonds in 3-7 possess short distances and are classified as low-barrier hydrogen bonds. Gas-phase acidity computations reveal that the parent tri- and tetrametaphosphoric acids are superacids. Their remarkable acidity is attributable to the stabilization of their corresponding conjugate bases via intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

  11. The Kinetic Aspects of the Interaction of Nitrite Ions with Sulfanilic Acid and 1-Naphthylamine in Aqueous and Micellar Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneeva, O. I.; Chernova, R. K.; Doronin, S. Yu.

    2008-04-01

    The kinetics of the reaction of nitrite ions with sulfanilic acid and 1-naphthylamine in aqueous and micellar (sodium dodecyl sulfate) media was studied step-by-step. The diazotization of sulfanilic acid with the nitrite ion was found to occur virtually instantaneously. Anionic surfactant micelles did not influence the rate of this reaction. The calculated effective rate constants and activation energies of the azo coupling reaction between synthesized sulfophenyldiazonium and 1-naphthylamine showed that the passage from water into the micellar medium decelerated the reaction. It was found that sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles played the role of a reagent separator.

  12. Root-zone acidity and nitrogen source affects Typha latifolia L. growth and uptake kinetics of ammonium and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Brix, Hans; Dyhr-Jensen, Kirsten; Lorenzen, Bent

    2002-12-01

    H levels around the roots are very stressful for the plant. The common occurrence of T. latifolia in very acidic areas is probably only possible because of the plant's ability to modify pH-conditions in the rhizosphere. PMID:12432036

  13. Influence of pH, type of acid and recovery media on the thermal inactivation of Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Miller, Fátima A; Ramos, Bárbara; Gil, Maria M; Brandão, Teresa R S; Teixeira, Paula; Silva, Cristina L M

    2009-07-31

    Acidification of foods with organic acids, either by fermentation or by intentional addition, is an important and common mechanism for controlling foodborne pathogens in a diversity of food products. The objective of this work was to study thermal inactivation of Listeria innocua, an acid tolerant microorganism, at 52.5, 60.0 and 65.0 degrees C, at different pH values (4.5, 6.0 and 7.5), using three types of acid (lactic, acetic and hydrochloric) and three different plating media (Tryptic Soy Agar with 0.6% yeast extract-TSAYE; TSAYE plus 5% NaCl-TSAYE+5%NaCl; and Palcam Agar with selective supplement-Palcam Agar), according to a 3(4) factorial experimental design. Survival data experimentally obtained were fitted with a Gompertz-inspired model and kinetic parameters (shoulder, maximum inactivation rate-k(max), and tail) were estimated for all conditions considered. The influence of temperature, pH, type of acid and enumeration media on kinetic parameters was assessed. Results showed that, with the exception of the type of acid, all the remaining factors and their combinations significantly affected the shoulder period and k(max). In relation to tail, temperature and recovery media were the affectable factors. It was concluded that the survival of this bacteria is higher when combining low temperature with neutral pH, and when TSAYE is the enumeration medium. Bigelow-inspired models were successfully developed and describe accurately the temperature and pH effects on the kinetic parameters.

  14. Role of acid and aluminum-rich media in the growth and nutrition of Pacific Northwest conifers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Forest soils of coastal Washington and Oregon tend to be very acidic with large accumulations of organic matter. Yet the productivity of forest species on these sites can attain record levels. The effect of acid and aluminum-rich media on the growth and nutrition of Pacific Northwest conifer species was investigated for western hemlock, Douglas-fir, western redcedar, and Sitka spruce. The four different types of growth media utilized were solution cultures, sand cultures, mineral soils, and forest floor organic matter. Hydroponic nutrient solutions and sand cultures were used in experiments designed to differentiate the effect of aluminum ions from the hydrogen ions generated by hydrolysis of Al/sup 3 +/. Relative to agronomic plants, all the conifers were found tolerant of the acid solutions and high levels of aluminum. Species differed in their relative tolerance to H/sup +/ and Al/sup 3/ ions. Western hemlock seedling growth was superior to Douglas-fir in the acidified soils and forest floor media, while Ca(OH)/sub 2/ amendment favored Douglas-fir. The marginal increase in western hemlock growth in N + P treated soils was highest in acidified soils. Western hemlock exhibited an ability to absorb nutrients in the presence of excess solution H/sup +/ ions, maintain growth with low tissue requirements of Ca and Mg, and accumulate high levels of aluminum in its roots and foliage without major adverse effect. These attributes are considered to make western hemlock the most acid and Al-tolerant of the four Pacific Northwest forest species studied. Western redcedar was second in acid tolerance to western hemlock. This species' ability to accumulate Ca minimized Al absorption and H/sup +/ damage to its roots.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Gd{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+} co-doped ceria by using citric acid-nitrate combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Hong-Chang; Zhang, Yu-Xin; Liu, Jia-Jia; Li, Yue-Li; Wang, Jian-She; Li, Zhong-Jun

    2011-01-15

    A series of Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2-x}Nd{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} (x = 0-0.20) compositions have been synthesized by citric acid-nitrate combustion method. XRD measurements indicate that all the obtained materials crystallized in cubic fluorite-type structure. Lattice parameters were calculated by Rietveld method and the parameter a values in Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2-x}Nd{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} system obey Vegard's law, a (A) = 5.4224 + 0.1208x. The obtained powders have good sinterability and the relative density could reach above 95% after being sintered at 1400 {sup o}C. Impedance spectroscopy measurements indicated that the conductivity of Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2-x}Nd{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} first increased and then decreased with Nd dopant content x. The maximum conductivity, {sigma}{sub 700{sup o}C} = 6.26 x 10{sup -2} S/cm, was found in Ce{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.12}Nd{sub 0.08}O{sub 1.9} when sintered at 1300 {sup o}C. The corresponding activation energies of conduction had a minimum value E{sub a} = 0.676 eV. The results tested experimentally the validity of the effective atomic number concept of recent density functional theory, which had suggested that co-dopant with effective atomic number between 61 (Pm) and 62 (Sm) was the ideal dopant exhibiting high ionic conductivity and low activation energy.

  16. An efficient protocol for incorporation of an unnatural amino acid in perdeuterated recombinant proteins using glucose-based media.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Vincenzo; Fawzi, Nicolas L; Clore, G Marius

    2012-03-01

    The in vivo incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins is a well-established technique requiring an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for the unnatural amino acid that is incorporated at a position encoded by a TAG amber codon. Although this technology provides unique opportunities to engineer protein structures, poor protein yields are usually obtained in deuterated media, hampering its application in the protein NMR field. Here, we describe a novel protocol for incorporating unnatural amino acids into fully deuterated proteins using glucose-based media (which are relevant to the production, for example, of amino acid-specific methyl-labeled proteins used in the study of large molecular weight systems). The method consists of pre-induction of the pEVOL plasmid encoding the tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair in a rich, H(2)O-based medium prior to exchanging the culture into a D(2)O-based medium. Our protocol results in high level of isotopic incorporation (~95%) and retains the high expression level of the target protein observed in Luria-Bertani medium. PMID:22350951

  17. Hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangping; Zhou, Tao

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a hydrometallurgical process has been proposed to recover valuable metals from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media. Leaching efficiencies as high as 97%, 95%, 94%, and 99% of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li were achieved under the optimal leaching experimental conditions of citric acid concentration of 2 mol L(-1), leaching temperature of 80 °C, leaching time of 90 min, liquid-solid ratio of 30 ml g(-1), and 2 vol. % H2O2. For the metals recovery process, nickel and cobalt were selectively precipitated by dimethylglyoxime reagent and ammonium oxalate sequentially. Then manganese was extracted by Na-D2EHPA and the manganese-loaded D2EHPA was stripped with sulfuric acid. The manganese was recovered as MnSO4 in aqueous phase and D2EHPA could be reused after saponification. Finally, lithium was precipitated by 0.5 mol L(-1) sodium phosphate. Under their optimal conditions, the recovery percentages of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li can reach 98%, 97%, 98%, and 89%, respectively. This is a relatively simple route in which all metal values could be effectively leached and recovered in citric acid media.

  18. Hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangping; Zhou, Tao

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a hydrometallurgical process has been proposed to recover valuable metals from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media. Leaching efficiencies as high as 97%, 95%, 94%, and 99% of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li were achieved under the optimal leaching experimental conditions of citric acid concentration of 2 mol L(-1), leaching temperature of 80 °C, leaching time of 90 min, liquid-solid ratio of 30 ml g(-1), and 2 vol. % H2O2. For the metals recovery process, nickel and cobalt were selectively precipitated by dimethylglyoxime reagent and ammonium oxalate sequentially. Then manganese was extracted by Na-D2EHPA and the manganese-loaded D2EHPA was stripped with sulfuric acid. The manganese was recovered as MnSO4 in aqueous phase and D2EHPA could be reused after saponification. Finally, lithium was precipitated by 0.5 mol L(-1) sodium phosphate. Under their optimal conditions, the recovery percentages of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li can reach 98%, 97%, 98%, and 89%, respectively. This is a relatively simple route in which all metal values could be effectively leached and recovered in citric acid media. PMID:25378255

  19. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  20. Curcumin-cysteine and curcumin-tryptophan conjugate as fluorescence turn on sensors for picric Acid in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Bedanta; Sen Sarma, Neelotpal

    2015-06-01

    Rapid detection of picric acid in real sample is of outmost importance from the perspective of health, safety, and environment. In this study, a very simple and cost-effective detection of picric acid is accomplished by developing a couple of biobased conjugates curcumin-cysteine (CC) and curcumin-tryptophan (CT), which undergo efficient fluorescence turn on toward picric acid in aqueous media. Both the probes experience about 26.5-fold fluorescence enhancements at 70 nM concentration of the analyte. Here, the fluorescence turn on process is governed by the aggregation induced emission, which is induced from the electrostatic interaction between the conjugates with picric acid. The detection limit of CC and CT are about 13.51 and 13.54 nM of picric acid, respectively. Importantly, both the probes exhibit high selectivity and low interference of other analogues toward the detection of picric acid. In addition, the probes are highly photostable, show low response time and are practically applicable for sensing picric acid in real environmental samples, which is the ultimate goal of this work. PMID:25955402

  1. Short communication: Using diurnal patterns of (13)C enrichment of CO2 to evaluate the effects of nitrate and docosahexaenoic acid on fiber degradation in the rumen of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Klop, G; Bannink, A; Dieho, K; Gerrits, W J J; Dijkstra, J

    2016-09-01

    Nitrate decreases enteric CH4 production in ruminants, but may also negatively affect fiber degradation. In this experiment, 28 lactating Holstein dairy cows were grouped into 7 blocks. Within blocks, cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 isonitrogenous treatments in a 2×2 factorial arrangement: control (CON); NO3 [21g of nitrate/kg of dry matter (DM)]; DHA [3g of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)/kg of DM]; or NO3+DHA (21g of nitrate/kg of DM and 3g of DHA/kg of DM). Cows were fed a total mixed ration consisting of 21% grass silage, 49% corn silage, and 30% concentrates on a DM basis. Based on the difference in natural (13)C enrichment and neutral detergent fiber and starch content between grass silage and corn silage, we investigated whether a negative effect on rumen fiber degradation could be detected by evaluating diurnal patterns of (13)C enrichment of exhaled carbon dioxide. A significant nitrate × DHA interaction was found for neutral detergent fiber digestibility, which was reduced on the NO3 treatment to an average of 55%, as compared with 61, 64, and 65% on treatments CON, DHA, and NO3+DHA, respectively. Feeding nitrate, but not DHA, resulted in a pronounced increase in (13)C enrichment of CO2 in the first 3 to 4 h after feeding only. Results support the hypothesis that effects of a feed additive on the rate of fiber degradation in the rumen can be detected by evaluating diurnal patterns of (13)C enrichment of CO2. To be able to detect this, the main ration components have to differ considerably in fiber and nonfiber carbohydrate content as well as in natural (13)C enrichment. PMID:27344384

  2. Fabrication of MCM-41 fibers with well-ordered hexagonal mesostructure controlled in acidic and alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, A.; Sohrabnezhad, Sh.; Zanjanchi, M. A.; Arvand, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, synthesis and characterization of two type morphologies of the MCM-41mesoporous material, nano and microfibers, were investigated by electrospinning technique. The synthesis was performed in acidic and alkaline media, separately. The MCM-41 morphologies were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. Tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used as silica and template sources for the synthesis of MCM-41 morphologies, respectively. The SEM results showed that MCM-41 nanofibers were spun in acidic media and microfibers of MCM-41 were produced in alkaline media. The XRD study revealed a long range structural ordering of mesoporous materials. The TEM results indicated rough surfaces with uniform average diameter 200 nm for nanofibers and 2 μm for microfibers. The pore diameter and surface area of calcined MCM-41 nanofibers were 2.2 nm and 970 m2/g, respectively. For the MCM-41 microfibers, pore sizes of 2.7 nm and surface areas 420 m2/g was measured.

  3. CRASH-2 Study of Tranexamic Acid to Treat Bleeding in Trauma Patients: A Controversy Fueled by Science and Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Binz, Sophia; McCollester, Jonathon; Thomas, Scott; Miller, Joseph; Pohlman, Timothy; Waxman, Dan; Shariff, Faisal; Tracy, Rebecca; Walsh, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic, to trauma. CRASH-2, a large randomized controlled trial, was the first to show a reduction in mortality and recommend tranexamic acid use in bleeding trauma patients. However, this paper was not without controversy. Its patient recruitment, methodology, and conductance in moderate-to-low income countries cast doubt on its ability to be applied to trauma protocols in countries with mature trauma networks. In addition to traditional vetting in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, CRASH-2 came about at a time when advances in communication technology allowed debate and influence to be leveraged in new forms, specifically through the use of multimedia campaigns, social media, and Internet blogs. This paper presents a comprehensive view of tranexamic acid utilization in trauma from peer-reviewed evidence to novel multimedia influences. PMID:26448897

  4. CRASH-2 Study of Tranexamic Acid to Treat Bleeding in Trauma Patients: A Controversy Fueled by Science and Social Media.

    PubMed

    Binz, Sophia; McCollester, Jonathon; Thomas, Scott; Miller, Joseph; Pohlman, Timothy; Waxman, Dan; Shariff, Faisal; Tracy, Rebecca; Walsh, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic, to trauma. CRASH-2, a large randomized controlled trial, was the first to show a reduction in mortality and recommend tranexamic acid use in bleeding trauma patients. However, this paper was not without controversy. Its patient recruitment, methodology, and conductance in moderate-to-low income countries cast doubt on its ability to be applied to trauma protocols in countries with mature trauma networks. In addition to traditional vetting in scientific, peer-reviewed journals, CRASH-2 came about at a time when advances in communication technology allowed debate and influence to be leveraged in new forms, specifically through the use of multimedia campaigns, social media, and Internet blogs. This paper presents a comprehensive view of tranexamic acid utilization in trauma from peer-reviewed evidence to novel multimedia influences. PMID:26448897

  5. The Lewis acid catalyzed synthesis of hyperbranched Oligo(glycerol-diacid)s in aprotic polar media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lewis-acid, titanium (IV) butoxide (15% (w/w; catalyst/reactants)), was used to catalyze the condensation of 0.05 mol glycerol with 0.10 mol of either succinic acid, glutaric acid, or azelaic acid to produce oligomers. The reactions were refluxed in dilute solutions of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) o...

  6. Elucidation of adsorption processes at the surface of Pt(331) model electrocatalysts in acidic aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Marcus D; Colic, Viktor; Scieszka, Daniel; Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S

    2016-04-28

    The Pt(331) surface has long been known to be the most active pure metal electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media. Its activity is often higher than those known for the Pt-based alloys towards ORR, being comparable with the most active Pt3Ni(111), Pt3Y or Pt5Gd, and being more active than e.g. polycrystalline Pt3Ni. Multiple active sites at this surface offer adsorption energies which are close to the optimal binding energy with respect to the main ORR intermediates; nevertheless, the exact location of these sites is still not clear. Taking into account the unique surface geometry of Pt(331), some adsorbates (including some oxygenated ORR-intermediates) should also contribute to the electronic structure of the neighbouring catalytic centres. However, the experimental elucidation of the specific adsorption of oxygenated species at this surface appears to be a non-trivial task. Such information holds the keys to the understanding of the high activity of this material and would enable the rational design of nanostructured ORR catalysts even without alloying. In this work, the electrified Pt(331)/electrolyte interface has been characterised using cyclic voltammetry (CV) combined with potentiodynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (PDEIS) in 0.1 M HClO4 solutions. The systems were studied in the potential region between 0.05 V and 1.0 V vs. RHE, where the adsorption of *H, *OH and *O species is possible in both O2-free and O2-saturated electrolytes. Our CV and PDEIS results support the hypothesis that in contrast to Pt(111), many Pt(331) surface sites are likely blocked by *O species at the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell benchmark potential of 0.9 V (RHE). We propose a model illustrated by simplified adsorbate structures at different electrode potentials, which is, however, able to explain the voltammetric and impedance data, and which is in good agreement with previously reported electrocatalytic measurements. PMID

  7. Comparative avoidance behaviour of the earthworm Eisenia fetida towards chloride, nitrate and sulphate salts of Cd, Cu and Zn using filter paper and extruded water agar gels as exposure media.

    PubMed

    Demuynck, Sylvain; Lebel, Aurélie; Grumiaux, Fabien; Pernin, Céline; Leprêtre, Alain; Lemière, Sébastien

    2016-07-01

    We studied the avoidance behaviour of the earthworm Eisenia fetida towards Cd, Cu, and Zn, trace elements (TEs) tested as chloride, nitrate and sulphate salts. Sub adults were exposed individually using dual-cell chambers at 20+2°C in the dark. Recordings were realised at different dates from 2h to 32h. We used filter paper and extruded water agar gel as exposure media to evaluate the contribution of the dermal and the digestive exposure routes on the avoidance reactions. Exposures to Cu or Cd (10mgmetal ionL(-1)) resulted in highly significant avoidance reactions through the exposure duration. Worms avoided Zn poorly and reactions towards Zn salts varied along the exposure. Worm sensitivity towards TEs differed between salts and this could result from differential toxicity or accessibility of these TE salts to earthworms. The anion in itself was not the determinant of the avoidance reactions since exposures to similar concentrations of these anions using calcium salts did not result in significant avoidance worm behaviour. Avoidance responses towards TEs were higher in the case of water agar exposures than in filter paper exposures. Thus, dermal contacts with TE solutions would elicit worm avoidance but signals from receptors located inside the digestive tract could reinforce this behaviour. The use of extruded water agar gels as the substrate allows checking the real sensitivity of earthworm species towards TEs since the TE concentrations leading to significant avoidance reactions were below those reported in the literature when using TE-spiked soils. PMID:26995062

  8. Determination of the H 2ONO +2 and CH 3O(H)NO +2 bond strenghts and the proton affinities of nitric acid and methyl nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunderlin, L. S.; Squires, Robert R.

    1993-09-01

    The binding energies of water and methanol to NO +2 have been measured to be 14.8 ± 2.3 and 19.2 ± 2.3 kcal/mol, respectively, using energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation of H 2ONO +2 and CH 3O(H)NO +2 in a flowing afterglow triple quadrupole apparatus. These values are used with literature thermochemistry to derive proton affinities for nitric acid and methyl nitrate; PA(HONO 2) = 177.7 ± 2.3 kcal/mol and PA(CH 3ONO 2) = 175.0 ± 2.5 kcal/mol. These results are in good agreement with recent calculations by Lee and Rice, but only the methyl nitrate result is in agreement with experimental results of Cacace and co-workers.

  9. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality. PMID:25638338

  10. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  11. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33 Section 181.33 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions...

  12. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  13. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  14. Nitrate Transport, Sensing, and Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, José A; Vega, Andrea; Bouguyon, Eléonore; Krouk, Gabriel; Gojon, Alain; Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient that affects plant growth and development. N is an important component of chlorophyll, amino acids, nucleic acids, and secondary metabolites. Nitrate is one of the most abundant N sources in the soil. Because nitrate and other N nutrients are often limiting, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to ensure adequate supply of nutrients in a variable environment. Nitrate is absorbed in the root and mobilized to other organs by nitrate transporters. Nitrate sensing activates signaling pathways that impinge upon molecular, metabolic, physiological, and developmental responses locally and at the whole plant level. With the advent of genomics technologies and genetic tools, important advances in our understanding of nitrate and other N nutrient responses have been achieved in the past decade. Furthermore, techniques that take advantage of natural polymorphisms present in divergent individuals from a single species have been essential in uncovering new components. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of how nitrate signaling affects biological processes in plants. Moreover, we still lack an integrated view of how all the regulatory factors identified interact or crosstalk to orchestrate the myriad N responses plants typically exhibit. In this review, we provide an updated overview of mechanisms by which nitrate is sensed and transported throughout the plant. We discuss signaling components and how nitrate sensing crosstalks with hormonal pathways for developmental responses locally and globally in the plant. Understanding how nitrate impacts on plant metabolism, physiology, and growth and development in plants is key to improving crops for sustainable agriculture. PMID:27212387

  15. Nitrate Transport, Sensing, and Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, José A; Vega, Andrea; Bouguyon, Eléonore; Krouk, Gabriel; Gojon, Alain; Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient that affects plant growth and development. N is an important component of chlorophyll, amino acids, nucleic acids, and secondary metabolites. Nitrate is one of the most abundant N sources in the soil. Because nitrate and other N nutrients are often limiting, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to ensure adequate supply of nutrients in a variable environment. Nitrate is absorbed in the root and mobilized to other organs by nitrate transporters. Nitrate sensing activates signaling pathways that impinge upon molecular, metabolic, physiological, and developmental responses locally and at the whole plant level. With the advent of genomics technologies and genetic tools, important advances in our understanding of nitrate and other N nutrient responses have been achieved in the past decade. Furthermore, techniques that take advantage of natural polymorphisms present in divergent individuals from a single species have been essential in uncovering new components. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of how nitrate signaling affects biological processes in plants. Moreover, we still lack an integrated view of how all the regulatory factors identified interact or crosstalk to orchestrate the myriad N responses plants typically exhibit. In this review, we provide an updated overview of mechanisms by which nitrate is sensed and transported throughout the plant. We discuss signaling components and how nitrate sensing crosstalks with hormonal pathways for developmental responses locally and globally in the plant. Understanding how nitrate impacts on plant metabolism, physiology, and growth and development in plants is key to improving crops for sustainable agriculture.

  16. Synthesis of Nitrate Reductase in Chlorella

    PubMed Central

    Funkhouser, Edward A.; Shen, Teh-Chien; Ackermann, Renate

    1980-01-01

    Synthesis of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) in Chlorella vulgaris was studied under inducing conditions, i.e. with cells grown on ammonia and then transferred to nitrate medium. Cycloheximide (but not chloramphenicol) completely inhibited synthesis of the enzyme, but only if it was added at the start (i.e. at the time of nitrate addition) of the induction period. Cycloheximide inhibition became less effective as induction by nitrate proceeded. Enzyme from small quantities of culture (1 to 3 milliliters of packed cells) was purified to homogeneity with the aid of blue dextran-Sepharose chromatography. Incorporation of radioactivity from labeled arginine into nitrate reductase was measured in the presence and absence of cycloheximide. Conditions were found under which the inhibitor completely blocked the incorporation of labeled amino acid, but only slightly decreased the increase in nitrate reductase activity. The results indicate that synthesis of nitrate reductase from amino acids proceeds by way of a protein precursor which is inactive enzymically. PMID:16661310

  17. Optimization of media composition for D-amino acid oxidase production by Trigonopsis variabilis using biostatistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neeraj; Gundampati, Ravi Kumar; Debnath, M

    2012-08-01

    D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) is biotechnologically relevant enzyme that is used in various food and pharmaceutical industries. DAAO from the yeast Trigonopsis variabilis is an important agent for use in commercial applications because of its high activity with cephalosporin C and is reasonable resistant to the oxidants O2 and H2O2 byproducts of reaction. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) in shake flask culture was used to enhance the production of DAAO from T. variabilis by optimization of fermentation media composition. The effects of six factors (DL-alanine, glucose, pH, ZnSO4, (NH4)2SO4 and temperature) were evaluated on DAAO production. Results of Placket-Burman design showed that DL-alanine, pH, glucose and ZnSO4 were significant factors for DAAO production (P<0.05). The optimum values of media components as predicted by the central composite design were inducer (DL-alanine) concentration 3 g/L, pH 7.7, glucose 17 g/L and ZnSO4 34 mg/L. At these optimum values of media composition, maximum production of DAAO was 153 U/g yeast dry weight. Two-fold increase in DAAO production was achieved after optimization of the physical parameters by RSM.

  18. L-ascorbic acid quenching of singlet delta molecular oxygen in aqueous media: generalized antioxidant property of vitamin C

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, P.T.; Khan, A.U.

    1983-09-30

    L-ascorbic acid quenches singlet (/sup 1/..delta../sub g/) molecular oxygen in aqueous media (pH 6.8 for (/sup 1/H)H/sub 2/O and pD 7.2 for (/sup 2/H)D/sub 2/O) as measured directly by monitoring (0,0) /sup 1/..delta../sub g/ ..-->.. /sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/ emission at 1.28 micron. Singlet oxygen was generated at room temperature in the solutions via photosensitization of sodium chrysene sulfonate; this sulfonated polycyclic hydrocarbon was synthesized to provide a water soluble chromophore inert to usual dye-ascorbate photobleaching. A marked isotope effect is found; k/sub Q//sup H/sub 2/O/ is 3.3 times faster than k/sub Q//sup D/sub 2/O/, suggesting ascorbic acid is chemically quenching singlet oxygen.

  19. Fixed bed sorption of phosphorus from wastewater using iron oxide-based media derived from acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Tucker, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) releases to the environment have been implicated in the eutrophication of important water bodies worldwide. Current technology for the removal of P from wastewaters consists of treatment with aluminum (Al) or iron (Fe) salts, but is expensive. The neutralization of acid mine drainage (AMD) generates sludge rich in Fe and Al oxides that has hitherto been considered a waste product, but these sludges could serve as an economical adsorption media for the removal of P from wastewaters. Therefore, we have evaluated an AMD-derived media as a sorbent for P in fixed bed sorption systems. The homogenous surface diffusion model (HSDM) was used to analyze fixed bed test data and to determine the value of related sorption parameters. The surface diffusion modulus Ed was found to be a useful predictor of sorption kinetics. Values of Ed < 0.2 were associated with early breakthrough of P, while more desirable S-shaped breakthrough curves resulted when 0.2 < Ed < 0.5. Computer simulations of the fixed bed process with the HSDM confirmed that if Ed was known, the shape of the breakthrough curve could be calculated. The surface diffusion coefficient D s was a critical factor in the calculation of Ed and could be estimated based on the sorption test conditions such as media characteristics, and influent flow rate and concentration. Optimal test results were obtained with a relatively small media particle size (average particle radius 0.028 cm) and resulted in 96 % removal of P from the influent over 46 days of continuous operation. These results indicate that fixed bed sorption of P would be a feasible option for the utilization of AMD residues, thus helping to decrease AMD treatment costs while at the same time ameliorating the impacts of P contamination.

  20. [Investigation of viral nucleic acids in middle-ear effusion specimens from children with acute otitis media].

    PubMed

    Abu Sitteh, Muhammed H; Sener, Kenan; Yapar, Mehmet; Kiliç, Abdullah; Güney, Cakir; Kubar, Ayhan

    2008-07-01

    Acute otitis media with effusion (OME) is one of the major causes of antibiotic use, indication for operation and hearing loss in children. In two third of the cases the etiologic agents are bacteria. Nonetheless, increasing numbers of reports have implicated viruses as etiologic agents that may have some effect on prognosis of OME. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of nucleic acids of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) type A and B, influenza type A virus, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), and enteroviruses in the middle ear effusion specimens from children with otitis media by TaqMan real-time PCR. As a result, 18 of 30 (60%) OME samples were found positive in terms of viral nucleic acids by real-time PCR. RSV-A was detected in nine samples (30%), CMV in 3 (10%) samples and HSV-1 in 1 (3.3%) sample. In five of the samples two viruses were detected in the same sample (three were positive for adenovirus and RSV-A, and two were positive for CMV and RSV-A). Our data have supported the importance of viruses as etiologic agents of OME. Additionally, it was thought that TaqMan real-time PCR may be used as a reliable and rapid method for the detection of viruses in the middle ear effusion samples.

  1. Synthesis of ascorbyl oleate by transesterification of olive oil with ascorbic acid in polar organic media catalyzed by immobilized lipases.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Perez, Sonia; Filice, Marco; Guisan, Jose M; Fernandez-Lorente, Gloria

    2013-09-01

    The reaction of transesterification between oils (e.g., olive oil) and ascorbic acid in polar anhydrous media (e.g., tert-amyl alcohol) catalyzed by immobilized lipases for the preparation of natural liposoluble antioxidants (e.g., ascorbyl oleate) was studied. Three commercial lipases were tested: Candida antarctica B lipase (CALB), Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL) and Rhizomucor miehei lipase (RML). Each lipase was immobilized by three different protocols: hydrophobic adsorption, anionic exchange and multipoint covalent attachment. The highest synthetic yields were obtained with CALB adsorbed on hydrophobic supports (e.g., the commercial derivative Novozym 435). The rates and yields of the synthesis of ascorbyl oleate were higher when using the solvent dried with molecular sieves, at high temperatures (e.g. 45°C) and with a small excess of oil (2 mol of oil per mol of ascorbic acid). The coating of CALB derivatives with polyethyleneimine (PEI) improved its catalytic behavior and allowed the achievement of yields of up to 80% of ascorbyl oleate in less than 24h. CALB adsorbed on a hydrophobic support and coated with PEI was 2-fold more stable than a non-coated derivative and one hundred-fold more stable than the best TLL derivative. The best CALB derivative exhibited a half-life of 3 days at 75°C in fully anhydrous media, and this derivative maintained full activity after 28 days at 45°C in dried tert-amyl alcohol.

  2. Acidic Deep Eutectic Solvents As Hydrolytic Media for Cellulose Nanocrystal Production.

    PubMed

    Sirviö, Juho Antti; Visanko, Miikka; Liimatainen, Henrikki

    2016-09-12

    In this study, a new method to fabricate cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) based on DES pretreatment of wood cellulose fibers with choline chloride and organic acids are reported. Oxalic acid (anhydrous and dihydrate), p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate, and levulinic acid were studied as acid components of DESs. DESs were formed at elevated temperatures (60-100 °C) by combining choline chloride with organic acids and were then used to hydrolyze less ordered amorphous regions of cellulose. All the DES treatments resulted in degradation of wood fibers into microsized fibers and after mechanically disintegrating, CNCs were successfully obtained from choline chloride/oxalic acid dihydrate-treated fibers, whereas no liberation of CNCs was observed with other DESs. The DES-produced CNCs had a width and length of 9-17 and 310-410 nm, respectively. The crystallinity indexes (CrIs) and carboxylic acid content of the CNCs were 66-71% and 0.20-0.28 mmol/g, respectively. CNCs exhibited good thermal stabilities (the onset thermal degradation temperatures ranged from 275-293 °C). The demonstrated acidic DES method exhibits certain advantages over previously reported CNC productions, namely, milder processing conditions and easily obtainable and relatively inexpensive biodegradable solvents with low toxicity (compared, e.g., to ILs).

  3. Acidic Deep Eutectic Solvents As Hydrolytic Media for Cellulose Nanocrystal Production.

    PubMed

    Sirviö, Juho Antti; Visanko, Miikka; Liimatainen, Henrikki

    2016-09-12

    In this study, a new method to fabricate cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) based on DES pretreatment of wood cellulose fibers with choline chloride and organic acids are reported. Oxalic acid (anhydrous and dihydrate), p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate, and levulinic acid were studied as acid components of DESs. DESs were formed at elevated temperatures (60-100 °C) by combining choline chloride with organic acids and were then used to hydrolyze less ordered amorphous regions of cellulose. All the DES treatments resulted in degradation of wood fibers into microsized fibers and after mechanically disintegrating, CNCs were successfully obtained from choline chloride/oxalic acid dihydrate-treated fibers, whereas no liberation of CNCs was observed with other DESs. The DES-produced CNCs had a width and length of 9-17 and 310-410 nm, respectively. The crystallinity indexes (CrIs) and carboxylic acid content of the CNCs were 66-71% and 0.20-0.28 mmol/g, respectively. CNCs exhibited good thermal stabilities (the onset thermal degradation temperatures ranged from 275-293 °C). The demonstrated acidic DES method exhibits certain advantages over previously reported CNC productions, namely, milder processing conditions and easily obtainable and relatively inexpensive biodegradable solvents with low toxicity (compared, e.g., to ILs). PMID:27478001

  4. Photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1993-10-20

    The photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate solutions to tetravalent uranium was investigated as a means of producing uranium dioxide feed for the saltless direct oxide reduction (SDOR) process. At high uranium concentrations, reoxidation of U{sup +4} occurs rapidly. The kinetics of the nitric oxidation of tetravalent uranium depend on the concentrations of hydrogen ion, nitrate ion, nitrous acid, and tetravalent uranium in the same manner as was reported elsewhere for the nitrate oxidation of PU{sup +3}. Reaction rate data were successfully correlated with a mechanism in which nitrogen dioxide is the reactive intermediate. Addition of a nitrous acid scavenger suppresses the reoxidation reaction. An immersion reactor employing a mercury vapor lamp gave reduction times fast enough for routine production usage. Precipitation techniques for conversion of aqueous U(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} to hydrous UO{sub 2} were evaluated. Prolonged dewatering times tended to make the process time consuming. Use of 3- to 4-M aqueous NaOH gave the best dewatering times observed. Reoxidation of the UO{sub 2} by water of hydration was encountered, which required the drying process to be carried out under a reducing atmosphere.

  5. Energy coupling to nitrate uptake into the denitrifying cells of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Igor

    2005-09-01

    This study deals with the effects of the agents that dissipate the individual components of the proton motive force (short-chain fatty acids, nigericin, and valinomycin) upon the methyl viologen-coupled nitrate reductase activity in intact cells. Substitution of butyrate or acetate for chloride in Tris-buffered assay media resulted in a marked inhibition at pH 7. In a Tris--chloride buffer of neutral pH, the reaction was almost fully inhibitable by nigericin. Alkalinisation increased the IC(50) value for nigericin and decreased the maximal inhibition attained. Both types of inhibitions could be reversed by the permeabilisation of cells or by the addition of nitrite, and that caused by nigericin disappeared at high extracellular concentrations of potassium. These data indicate that nitrate transport step relies heavily on the pH gradient at neutral pH. Since the affinity of cells for nitrate was strongly diminished by imposing an inside-positive potassium (or lithium) diffusion potential at alkaline external pH, a potential dependent step may be of significance in the transporter cycle under these conditions. Experiments with sodium-depleted media provided no hints for Na(+) as a possible H(+) substitute. PMID:16112075

  6. Cylodextrin Polymer Nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosowski, Bernard; Ruebner, Anja; Statton, Gary; Robitelle, Danielle; Meyers, Curtis

    2000-01-01

    The development of the use of cyclodextrin nitrates as possible components of insensitive, high-energy energetics is outlined over a time period of 12 years. Four different types of cyclodextrin polymers were synthesized, nitrated, and evaluated regarding their potential use for the military and aerospace community. The synthesis of these novel cyclodextrin polymers and different nitration techniques are shown and the potential of these new materials is discussed.

  7. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  8. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  9. Gallium nitrate revisited.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2003-04-01

    Gallium nitrate, the nitrate salt of the "near-metal" element gallium, is highly effective in the treatment of cancer-related hypercalcemia. Unlike bisphosphonates, gallium nitrate is effective in both parathyroid hormone-related protein-mediated and non-parathyroid hormone-related protein-mediated hypercalcemia. Gallium nitrate's effects on bone are clearly different from those of bisphosphonates. Gallium nitrate enhances calcium and phosphate content of bone and has direct, noncytotoxic effects on osteoclasts at markedly lower doses than those used for the treatment of cancer-related hypercalcemia. The drug may have clinical application in a variety of disorders associated with accelerated bone loss, including multiple myeloma. Gallium nitrate was originally evaluated as an antitumor agent. Its antitumor activity occurs at somewhat higher doses than those used in the treatment of cancer-related hypercalcemia. Gallium nitrate has substantial single-agent activity in the treatment of advanced lymphoma, particularly diffuse large cell lymphoma, small lymphocytic lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma. Because of its profile, including a different mechanism of action and minimal myelosuppression, the drug merits further evaluation in the treatment of advanced lymphoma. Gallium nitrate also has activity in advanced bladder cancer and may be useful in patients with metastatic or unresectable disease failing first-line chemotherapy regimens. Gallium nitrate exhibits a range of dose-dependent pharmacologic actions that provide a basis for its therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases and warrants further investigational evaluation as an antiresorptive and antitumor agent. PMID:12776253

  10. Formation of complex precursors of amino acids by irradiation of simulated interstellar media with heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.; Suzuki, N.; Taniuchi, T.; Kaneko, T.; Yoshida, S.

    A wide variety of organic compounds have been detected in such extraterrestrial bodies as meteorites and comets Amino acids were identified in the extracts from Murchison meteorite and other carbonaceous chondrites It is hypothesized that these compounds are originally formed in ice mantles of interstellar dusts ISDs in molecular clouds by cosmic rays and ultraviolet light UV Formation of amino acid precursors by high energy protons or UV irradiation of simulated ISDs was reported by several groups The amino acid precursors were however not well-characterized We irradiated a frozen mixture of methanol ammonia and water with heavy ions to study possible organic compounds abiotically formed in molecular clouds by cosmic rays A mixture of methanol ammonia and water was irradiated with carbon beams 290 MeV u from a heavy ion accelerator HIMAC of National Institute of Radiological Sciences Japan Irradiation was performed either at room temperature liquid phase or at 77 K solid phase The products were characterized by gel filtration chromatography GFC FT-IR pyrolysis PY -GC MS etc Amino acids were analyzed by HPLC and GC MS after acid hydrolysis or the products Amino acids such as glycine and alanine were identified in the products in both the cases of liquid phase and solid phase irradiation Energy yields G-values of glycine were 0 014 liquid phase and 0 007 solid phase respectively Average molecular weights of the products were estimated as to 2300 in both the case Aromatic hydrocarbons N-containing heterocyclic

  11. Effects of arachidonic acid on the concentration of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids in culture media of mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating into adipocytes or osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Casado-Díaz, Antonio; Ferreiro-Vera, Carlos; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Dorado, Gabriel; Luque-de-Castro, María Dolores; Quesada-Gómez, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Metabolites derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) may modulate the mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation. Such cells can differentiate into different cellular types, including adipocytes and osteoblasts. Aging favors the bone marrow MSC differentiation toward the former, causing a loss of bone density associated with pathologies like osteoporosis. The omega-6 arachidonic acid (AA) favors MSC adipogenesis to a greater extent than omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). In this work, we study the joint action of both PUFA. Thus, not induced and induced to adipocyte or osteoblast MSC were treated with 20 μM of each PUFA (either AA, AA + DHA or AA + EPA). The expression of osteogenic and adipogenic molecular markers, the alox15b lipoxygenase gene expression and the 5-, 8-, 11-, 12- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE) derived from the AA metabolism in the culture media were determined. The results show that the adipogenesis induction of AA is not suppressed by the joint presence of EPA and DHA. In fact, both increased the adipogenic effect of AA on MSC differentiated into osteoblasts. The different HETE concentrations increased in cultures supplemented with AA, albeit such concentrations were lower in the cultures induced to differentiate, mainly at day 21 after the induction. Furthermore, the reduction in the HETE concentration was correlated with a higher expression of the alox15b gene. These results highlight the PUFA metabolism differences between uninduced and induced MSC to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts, besides the relevant role of the lipoxygenase gene expression in adipogenesis induction.

  12. Removal of added nitrate in cotton burr compost, mulch compost, and peat: mechanisms and potential use for groundwater nitrate remediation.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunming; Puls, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    We conducted batch tests on the nature of removal of added nitrate in cotton burr compost, mulch compost, and sphagnum peat that may be potentially used in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for groundwater nitrate remediation. A rigorous steam autoclaving protocol (121 degrees C for 2h each day for three consecutive days) for the cotton burr compost and autoclaving of all labware and the nitrate working solutions resulted in drastically different results compared to the non-autoclaved treatment. In the non-autoclaved cotton burr compost, added nitrate at 20 mg N l(-1) decreased rapidly and was not detected after 3d; whereas, the autoclaved cotton burr compost showed persistent nitrate above 15.5 mg N l(-1) even after 10d, which is comparable with nitrate concentrations above 17.6 mg N l(-1) in a treatment using NaN(3) at 1000 mg l(-1). Dewaxed cotton burr compost showed decreased nitrate reduction compared to the pristine cotton burr compost. No nitrate reduction was detected in the dewaxed sphagnum peat. It is concluded that nitrate removal in the organic media is controlled by microbiologically mediated processes. The use of readily available cotton burr and mulch composts may offer a cost-effective method of nitrate removal from contaminated groundwater.

  13. Direct Capture of Organic Acids From Fermentation Media Using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.

    2004-11-03

    Several ionic liquids have been investigated for the extraction of organic acids from fermentation broth. Partitioning of representative organic acids (lactic, acetic, and succinic) between aqueous solution and nine hydrophobic ionic liquids was measured. The extraction efficiencies were strongly dependent on pH of the aqueous phase. Distribution coefficient was very good (approximately 60) at low succinic acid concentrations for one of the ionic liquids (trihexyltetradecylphosphonium methanesulfonate) at neutral pH. However, this ionic liquid had to be diluted with nonanol due to its high viscosity in order to be useful. A diluent (trioctylamine) was also added to this mixture. The results suggest that an extraction system based on ionic liquids may be feasible for succinic acid recovery from fermentation broth and that two ideal extraction stages are needed to reduce the concentration from 33 g/L to 1 g/L of succinic acid. Further studies are needed to evaluate other issues related to practical applications, including ionic liquid loss in the process, toxicity effects of ionic liquids during simultaneous fermentation and extractions.

  14. Novel method based on chromogenic media for discrimination and selective enumeration of lactic acid bacteria in fermented milk products.

    PubMed

    Galat, Anna; Dufresne, Jérôme; Combrisson, Jérôme; Thépaut, Jérôme; Boumghar-Bourtchai, Leyla; Boyer, Mickaël; Fourmestraux, Candice

    2016-05-01

    Microbial analyses of fermented milk products require selective methods to discriminate between close species simultaneously present in high amounts. A culture-based method combining novel chromogenic agar media and appropriate incubation conditions was developed to enumerate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains in fermented milk. M1 agar, containing two chromogenic substrates, allowed selective enumeration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, two strains of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei and Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus based on differential β-galactosidase and β-glucosidase activities. Depending on the presence of some or all of the above strains, M1 agar was supplemented with L-rhamnose or vancomycin and incubations were carried out at 37 °C or 44 °C to increase selectivity. A second agar medium, M2, containing one chromogenic substrates was used to selectively enumerate β-galactosidase producing Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus at 47 °C. By contrast with the usual culture media, the chromogenic method allowed unambiguous enumeration of each species, including discrimination between the two L. paracasei, up to 10(9) CFU/g of fermented milk. In addition, the relevance of the method was approved by enumerating reference ATCC strains in pure cultures and fermented milk product. The method could also be used for enumerations on non-Danone commercial fermented milk products containing strains different from those used in this study, showing versatility of the method. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a chromogenic culture method applied to selective enumeration of LAB.

  15. Novel method based on chromogenic media for discrimination and selective enumeration of lactic acid bacteria in fermented milk products.

    PubMed

    Galat, Anna; Dufresne, Jérôme; Combrisson, Jérôme; Thépaut, Jérôme; Boumghar-Bourtchai, Leyla; Boyer, Mickaël; Fourmestraux, Candice

    2016-05-01

    Microbial analyses of fermented milk products require selective methods to discriminate between close species simultaneously present in high amounts. A culture-based method combining novel chromogenic agar media and appropriate incubation conditions was developed to enumerate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains in fermented milk. M1 agar, containing two chromogenic substrates, allowed selective enumeration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, two strains of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei and Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus based on differential β-galactosidase and β-glucosidase activities. Depending on the presence of some or all of the above strains, M1 agar was supplemented with L-rhamnose or vancomycin and incubations were carried out at 37 °C or 44 °C to increase selectivity. A second agar medium, M2, containing one chromogenic substrates was used to selectively enumerate β-galactosidase producing Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus at 47 °C. By contrast with the usual culture media, the chromogenic method allowed unambiguous enumeration of each species, including discrimination between the two L. paracasei, up to 10(9) CFU/g of fermented milk. In addition, the relevance of the method was approved by enumerating reference ATCC strains in pure cultures and fermented milk product. The method could also be used for enumerations on non-Danone commercial fermented milk products containing strains different from those used in this study, showing versatility of the method. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a chromogenic culture method applied to selective enumeration of LAB. PMID:26742619

  16. A novel liquid plasma AOP device integrating microwaves and ultrasounds and its evaluation in defluorinating perfluorooctanoic acid in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Sato, Susumu; Abe, Masahiko; Serpone, Nick

    2011-09-01

    A simplified and energy-saving integrated device consisting of a microwave applicator and an ultrasonic homogenizer has been fabricated to generate liquid plasma in a medium possessing high dielectric factors, for example water. The microwave waveguide and the ultrasonic transducer were interconnected through a tungsten/titanium alloy stick acting both as the microwave antenna and as the horn of the ultrasonic homogenizer. Both microwaves and ultrasonic waves are simultaneously transmitted to the aqueous media through the tungsten tip of the antenna. The microwave discharge liquid plasma was easily generated in solution during ultrasonic cavitation. The simple device was evaluated by carrying out the degradation of the perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a system highly recalcitrant to degradation by conventional advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). PFOA is 59% degraded in an aqueous medium after only 90 s of irradiation by the plasma. Intermediates were identified by electrospray mass spectral techniques in the negative ion mode.

  17. Regulation of the Neurospora crassa assimilatory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ketchum, P A; Zeeb, D D; Owens, M S

    1977-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-nitrate reductase from Neurospora crassa was purified and found to be stimulated by certain amino acids, citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Stimulation by citrate and the amino acids was dependent upon the prior removal of EDTA from the enzyme preparations, since low quantities of EDTA resulted in maximal stimulation. Removal of EDTA from enzyme preparations by dialysis against Chelex-containing buffer resulted in a loss of nitrate reductase activity. Addition of alanine, arginine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, histidine, tryptophan, and citrate restored and stimulated nitrate reductase activity from 29- to 46-fold. The amino acids tested altered the Km of NADPH-nitrate reductase for NADPH but did not significantly change that for nitrate. The Km of nitrate reductase for NADPH increased with increasing concentrations of histidine but decreased with increasing concentrations of glutamine. Amino acid modulation of NADPH-nitrate reductase activity is discussed in relation to the conservation of energy (NADPH) by Neurospora when nitrate is the nitrogen source. PMID:19423

  18. Theoretical study of inhibition efficiencies of some amino acids on corrosion of carbon steel in acidic media: green corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dehdab, Maryam; Shahraki, Mehdi; Habibi-Khorassani, Sayyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition efficiencies of three amino acids [tryptophan (B), tyrosine (c), and serine (A)] have been studied as green corrosion inhibitors on corrosion of carbon steel using density functional theory (DFT) method in gas and aqueous phases. Quantum chemical parameters such as EH OMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), E LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), hardness (η), polarizability ([Formula: see text]), total negative charges on atoms (TNC), molecular volume (MV) and total energy (TE) have been calculated at the B3LYP level of theory with 6-311++G** basis set. Consistent with experimental data, theoretical results showed that the order of inhibition efficiency is tryptophan (B) > tyrosine (C) > serine (A). In order to determine the possible sites of nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks, local reactivity has been evaluated through Fukui indices.

  19. Nitrate Concentration near the Surface of Frozen Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Marrocco, Harley A; Michelsen, Rebecca R H

    2014-12-26

    Photolysis of nitrate plays an important role in the emission of nitrogen oxides from snow and ice, which affects the composition of the overlying atmosphere. In order to quantify these reactions, it is necessary to know how much nitrate is available for photolysis near the surfaces of snow and ice. The concentration of nitrate excluded from frozen solutions of nitric acid, sodium nitrate, and magnesium nitrate was measured with attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. Liquid water and nitrate were observed at and near the bottom surface of frozen aqueous solutions during annealing from -18 to -2 °C. At -2 °C, the nitrate concentration was determined to be ∼1.0 mol/L for frozen NaNO(3) and Mg(NO(3))(2) solutions and ∼0.8 mol/L for frozen HNO(3) solutions. At lower temperatures, nitrate concentration ranged from 1.6 to 3.7 mol/L. Ideal thermodynamics overestimates nitrate concentration at colder temperatures where the brine is highly concentrated for all solutions. The nitrate concentration at ice surfaces is well described by bulk freezing point depression data close to the melting point of ice and for nitric acid at colder temperatures. Effects of temperature and counterions and implications for modeling snow chemistry are discussed. PMID:25495473

  20. Polymerization of euphorbia oil with Lewis acid in carbon dioxide media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3-OEt2) Lewis acid catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of euphorbia oil (EO), a natural epoxy oil, in liquid carbon dioxide was conducted in an effort to develop useful vegetable oil based polymers. The resulting polymers (RPEO) were characterized by FTIR, 1H-...

  1. Determination of the optimum conditions for boric acid extraction with carbon dioxide gas in aqueous media from colemanite containing arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Ata, O.N.; Colak, S.; Copur, M.; Celik, C.

    2000-02-01

    The Taguchi method was used to determine optimum conditions for the boric acid extraction from colemanite ore containing As in aqueous media saturated by CO{sub 2} gas. After the parameters were determined to be efficient on the extraction efficiency, the experimental series with two steps were carried out. The chosen experimental parameters for the first series of experiments and their ranges were as follows: (1) reaction temperature, 25--70 C; (2) solid-to-liquid ratio (by weight), 0.091 to 0.333; (3) gas flow rate (in mL/min), 66.70--711; (4) mean particle size, {minus}100 to {minus}10 mesh; (5) stirring speed, 200--600 rpm; (6) reaction time, 10--90 min. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: reaction temperature, 70 C; solid-to-liquid ratio, 0.091; gas flow rate, 711 (in mL/min); particle size, {minus}100 mesh; stirring speed, 500 rpm; reaction time, 90 min. Under these optimum conditions, the boric acid extraction efficiency from the colemanite containing As was approximately 54%. Chosen experimental parameters for the second series of experiments and their ranges were as follows: (1) reaction temperature, 60--80 C; (2) solid-to-liquid ratio (by weight), 0.1000 to 0.167; (3) gas pressure (in atm), 1.5; 2.7; (4) reaction time, 45--120 min. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: reaction temperature, 70 C; solid-to-liquid ratio, 0.1; gas pressure, 2.7 atm; reaction time, 120 min. Under these optimum conditions the boric acid extraction efficiency from the colemanite ore was approximately 75%. Under these optimum conditions, the boric acid extraction efficiency from calcined colemanite ore was approximately 99.55%.

  2. Organic acids induce tolerance to zinc- and copper-exposed fungi under various growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Sazanova, Katerina; Osmolovskaya, Natalia; Schiparev, Sergey; Yakkonen, Kirill; Kuchaeva, Ludmila; Vlasov, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals, Zn and Cu, in high concentration (2 mM for Zn and 0.5 mM for Cu) have some inhibiting effect on the growth of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium citrinum. Toxic effects of these metals considerably depend on cultivation conditions including nitrogen sources, pH of nutrient media, and its consistency (presence or absence of agar). In general, nitrate media provides less inhibiting effect on fungal growth under heavy metal exposure than ammonium-containing media. Adding of Zn in nitrate media induces oxalic acid production by fungi. Importance of oxalic acid production in detoxification of heavy metals is confirmed by the formation of Zn-containing crystals in fungal cultures. Cu bringing to the cultural media had no stimulating effect on oxalic acid production as well as no copper-containing crystals were observed. But proceeding from essential increase in oxalic acid production during a long-term fungi adaptation to Cu, it may be proposed that oxalic acid plays some functional role in Cu tolerance of fungi as well. It may be concluded that the role of organic acids and oxalate, in particular, in fungi tolerance and adaptation to heavy metals can be determined by the nature of the metal and its ability to form stable complexes with an acid anion. Stimulating effect of metals on acid production is not universal for all species of fungi and largely depends on metal concentration, nitrogen form in a medium, and other cultivation conditions.

  3. Stimulation of bacteriocin production by dialyzed culture media from different lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, J A; González, M P; Murado, M A

    2005-04-01

    The cross-effects of dialyzed postincubates (with a cut-off at 1000 Da) on the biomass and bacteriocin production of six strains of lactic acid bacteria were studied, and a predominance of stimulating responses was found, the characteristics of which suggested merely nutritional effects or the presence of precursor fragments of the bacteriocins. Additionally, cluster analysis of the detected responses provides an approach to define groups of highly compatible (potential consortia) or doubtfully compatible strains of lactic acid bacteria. Such a definition, which does not claim taxonomic value, has practical interest, however, in cases (e.g., silage production) in which it is convenient to use mixed inocula including strains able to establish positive interactions.

  4. Electrochemical degradation of trichloroacetic acid in aqueous media: influence of the electrode material.

    PubMed

    Esclapez, M D; Díez-García, M I; Sàez, V; Bonete, P; González-García, José

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in water has been analysed through voltammetric studies with a rotating disc electrode and controlled-potential bulk electrolyses. The influence of the mass-transport conditions and initial concentration of TCAA for titanium, stainless steel and carbon electrodes has been studied. It is shown that the electrochemical reduction of TCAA takes place prior to the massive hydrogen evolution in the potential window for all electrode materials studied. The current efficiency is high (> 18%) compared with those normally reported in the literature, and the fractional conversion is above 50% for all the electrodes studied. Only dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and chloride anions were routinely detected as reduction products for any of the electrodes, and reasonable values of mass balance error were obtained. Of the three materials studied, the titanium cathode gave the best results. PMID:23530352

  5. Reactivity of D-fructose and D-xylose in acidic media in homogeneous phases.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Maxime B; Chagnault, Vincent; Postel, Denis

    2015-05-29

    Chemistry development of renewable resources is a real challenge. Carbohydrates from biomass are complex and their use as substitutes for fossil materials remains difficult (European involvement on the incorporation of 20% raw material of plant origin in 2020). Most of the time, the transformation of these polyhydroxylated structures are carried out in acidic conditions. Recent reviews on this subject describe homogeneous catalytic transformations of pentoses, specifically toward furfural, and also the transformation of biomass-derived sugars in heterogeneous conditions. To complete these informations, the objective of this review is to give an overview of the structural variety described during the treatment of two monosaccharides (D-Fructose and D-xylose) in acidic conditions in homogeneous phases. The reaction mechanisms being not always determined with certainty, we will also provide a brief state of the art regarding this. PMID:25889471

  6. Transport and Retention of TiO2 Rutile Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media: Influence of Solution pH, Ionic Strength, and the Presence of Humic Acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of solution pH, ionic strength, and varying concentrations of the Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) on the transport of titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticle aggregates (nTiO2) in saturated porous media was investigated through systematically examining the tra...

  7. Review and assessment of technologies for the separation of cesium from acidic media

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.J.; Brooks, K.P.; Kurath, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    A preliminary literature survey has been conducted to identify and evaluate methods for the separation of cesium from acidic waste. The most promising solvent extraction, precipitation, and ion exchange methods, along with some of the attributes for each method, are listed. The main criteria used in evaluating the separation methods were as follows: (1) good potential for cesium separation must be demonstrated (i.e., cesium decontamination factors on the order of 50 to 100). (2) Good selectivity for cesium over bulk components must be demonstrated. (3) The method must show promise for evolving into a practical and fairly simple process. (4) The process should be safe to operate. (5) The method must be robust (i.e., capable of separating cesium from various acidic waste types). (6) Secondary waste generation must be minimized. (7) The method must show resistance to radiation damage. The most promising separation methods did not necessarily satisfy all of the above criteria, thus key areas requiring further development are suggested for each method. The report discusses in detail these and other areas requiring further development, as well as alternative solvent extraction, precipitation, ion exchange, and {open_quote}other{close_quote} technologies that, based on current information, show less promise for the separation of cesium from acidic wastes because of significant process limitations. When appropriate, the report recommends areas of future development.

  8. Anticorrosive Activity of Kigelia pinnata Leaves Extract on Mild Steel in Acidic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, P.; Saravana Kumar, K.; Jeyaprabha, B.; Prakash, P.

    2014-09-01

    The corrosion inhibition of mild steel in 1 M H2SO4 and 1 M HCl solution with different concentrations of Kigelia pinnata leaves extract (KPLE) was investigated using mass loss, Tafel polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Inhibition efficiency of KPLE is found to increase with increasing concentration but to decrease with temperature. Polarization measurements reveal that KPLE acts as a mixed type inhibitor in both acids. Impedance curves show that increasing KPLE concentration increases charge transfer resistance and decreases double layer capacitance. The adsorption of KPLE on the mild steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The experimental results reveal that KPLE inhibits the corrosion reaction in both acid environments, and inhibition efficiency follows the order H2SO4 > HCl. The kinetic and adsorption parameters for mild steel in acid in the presence and absence of KPLE were evaluated and discussed. The negative value of the standard free energy of adsorption in the presence of inhibitor suggests spontaneous adsorption of inhibitor on the mild steel surface. Protective film formation against corrosion was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible), X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy techniques.

  9. Contribution of trans-aconitic acid to DPPH scavenging ability in different media.

    PubMed

    Piang-Siong, William; de Caro, Pascale; Marvilliers, Arnaud; Chasseray, Xavier; Payet, Bertrand; Shum Cheong Sing, Alain; Illien, Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    The antioxidant properties of trans-aconitic acid (TAA) alone or in the presence of usual antioxidants were assessed by DPPH assay. The IC50 value equal to 70mM was very high compared to usual antioxidants (vitamin C and trolox). A joint experimental/theoretical study suggested that hydrogen atom abstraction in TAA by DPPH was located on -CH2- methylene bridge because the corresponding radical was more stabilized than COO(·) and CC(·) radicals. In combination with antioxidants (vitamin C, gallic acid, caffeic acid, trolox), synergy or additivity effects were noticed. The magnitude of the synergistic effect varied between 1.06 and 1.24 depending on the type and concentration of antioxidant for a concentration of TAA equal to 22.3mM. Especially, the addition of TAA at a concentration below 32mM to a solution containing 20μM of vitamin C had a synergy effect. Beyond this concentration, TAA showed an additive effect. PMID:27507497

  10. Dissociation quotient of benzoic acid in aqueous sodium chloride media to 250{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Kettler, R.M.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The dissociation quotient of benzoic acid was determined potentiometrically in a concentration cell fitted with hydrogen electrodes. The hydrogen ion molality of benzoic acid/benzoate solutions was measured relative to a standard aqueous HCl solution at seven temperatures from 5 to 250{degrees}C and at seven ionic strengths ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 molal (NaCl). The molal dissociation quotients and selected literature data were fitted in the isocoulombic (all anionic) form by a six-term equation. This treatment yielded the following thermodynamic quantities for the acid dissociation equilibrium at 25{degrees}C and 1 bar: logK{sub a} = -4.206{+-}0.006, {Delta}H{sub a}{sup 0} = 0.3{+-}0.3 kJ-mol{sup {minus}1}, {Delta}S{sub a}{sup 0} = -79.6{+-}1.0 J-mol{sup {minus}1}-K{sup {minus}1}, and {Delta}C{sub p;a}{sup 0} = -207{+-}5 J-mol{sup {minus}1}-K{sup {minus}1}. A five-term equation derived to describe the dependence of the dissociation constant on solvent density is accurate to 250{degrees}C and 200 MPa.

  11. Comparison of the structural characterization and biological activity of acidic polysaccharides from Cordyceps militaris cultured with different media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengyao; Yan, Hui; Ma, Xiaoning; Jia, Junqiang; Zhang, Guozheng; Guo, Xijie; Gui, Zhongzheng

    2012-05-01

    Two acidic polysaccharide fractions, CM-jd-CPS2 and CM-jd(Y)-CPS2, were isolated from the fruiting bodies of cultured Cordyceps militaris grown on solid rice medium and silkworm pupa, respectively, by hot-water extraction, ethanol precipitation and fractionation using ion-exchange column (DEAE-cellulose-52) and gel-filtration column (Sephadex G-100) chromatography. Their structural characterizations were performed by gas chromatography and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Some differences existed between their structures, which indicated that culture media could influence the structure of polysaccharides of C. militaris. The antioxidant activities of CM-jd-CPS2 and CM-jd(Y)-CPS2 were evaluated by various methods in vitro. They had strong 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity and ferrous ion-chelating capacity, but moderate reducing power. The antioxidant activities of CM-jd(Y)-CPS2 were slightly higher than those of CM-jd-CPS2. These two acidic fractions were evaluated for proliferation of mouse splenocyte activity in vitro. They both possessed does-dependent mitogenic effects on mouse splenocytes, and could synergistically promote murine T- and B-lymphocytes induced by Con A and LPS. CM-jd(Y)-CPS2 exhibited stronger stimulatory activities upon immunomodulation than CM-jd-CPS2. These results are beneficial for the interpretation of the connection between polysaccharide structures and their biological activities. PMID:22806024

  12. Synthesis of Nanocrystalline CdS Quantum Dots via Paraffin Liquid as Solvent and Oleic Acid as the Reacting Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjiang; Wang, Mingrui; Xie, Fei; Zhu, Sha; Zhao, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals have been widely used as fluorescent materials in chemical sensors, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, biological imaging and many other fields. Compared to the conventional organic fluorophores, the inorganic quantum dots (QDs) have many advantages, including broad absorption spectra, narrow emission spectra, good photostability and long fluorescent lifetime after excitation. Here, the high quality CdS QDs were synthesized directly from sulfur and CdO using the paraffin liquid as solvent and the oleic acid as the reacting media. The synthesized CdS QDs with a zinc blende (cubic) crystal structure were proved by X-ray diffraction. HRTEM observation revealed that the CdS QDs were uniform and the average grain size was about 4 nm. The optical properties of the CdS QDs were characterized by using photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometer and Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectrophotometer. The formation mechanism of CdS QDs in the paraffin liquid and oleic acid system was proposed.

  13. Comparison of the structural characterization and biological activity of acidic polysaccharides from Cordyceps militaris cultured with different media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengyao; Yan, Hui; Ma, Xiaoning; Jia, Junqiang; Zhang, Guozheng; Guo, Xijie; Gui, Zhongzheng

    2012-05-01

    Two acidic polysaccharide fractions, CM-jd-CPS2 and CM-jd(Y)-CPS2, were isolated from the fruiting bodies of cultured Cordyceps militaris grown on solid rice medium and silkworm pupa, respectively, by hot-water extraction, ethanol precipitation and fractionation using ion-exchange column (DEAE-cellulose-52) and gel-filtration column (Sephadex G-100) chromatography. Their structural characterizations were performed by gas chromatography and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Some differences existed between their structures, which indicated that culture media could influence the structure of polysaccharides of C. militaris. The antioxidant activities of CM-jd-CPS2 and CM-jd(Y)-CPS2 were evaluated by various methods in vitro. They had strong 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity and ferrous ion-chelating capacity, but moderate reducing power. The antioxidant activities of CM-jd(Y)-CPS2 were slightly higher than those of CM-jd-CPS2. These two acidic fractions were evaluated for proliferation of mouse splenocyte activity in vitro. They both possessed does-dependent mitogenic effects on mouse splenocytes, and could synergistically promote murine T- and B-lymphocytes induced by Con A and LPS. CM-jd(Y)-CPS2 exhibited stronger stimulatory activities upon immunomodulation than CM-jd-CPS2. These results are beneficial for the interpretation of the connection between polysaccharide structures and their biological activities.

  14. Dilute nitric or nitrous acid solution containing halide ions as effective media for pure gold dissolution.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Masashi; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Okamura, Kei

    2015-08-14

    The greatly enhanced oxidation ability of dilute aqueous nitric acid (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) containing bromide and iodide salts as well as chloride salts has been examined based on the dissolution kinetics of pure gold at 30-60 °C. It has been found that bromide salts are more effective than chloride salts in gaining the ability of dissolving gold in dilute aqueous nitric acid solution. At 60 °C, a piece of gold-wire (ca. 20 mg) is dissolved in 20 mL of as low as 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 1.0-5.0 mol L(-1) NaBr and the dissolution rate constant, log(k/s(-1)), increases linearly (from -5.78 to -4.52) with the increasing NaBr concentration. The addition of organic solvents, such as acetonitrile and acetic acid, causes acceleration of gold dissolution in LiBr and NaBr solutions. With increasing MeCN contents, for instance, the log(k/s(-1)) value of 0.10 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution containing 2.0 mol L(-1) NaBr increases linearly from -5.30 to -4.61 at 30% (v/v) MeCN. The bromide salts affect the gold dissolution rate constant in the order of KBr < NaBr < LiBr < CaBr2. With increasing NaI concentration (0.20-3.0 mol L(-1)), some acceleration in log(k/s(-1)) of 0.50 or 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 solution has been observed; however, the slope of acceleration as the function of NaI concentration is much smaller than that of NaCl or NaBr. The gold dissolution ability has been examined also for nitrous acid containing chloride and bromide ions at 35 °C. The NaNO2 solution containing twice or more amounts of HX (X = Cl, Br) gives the maximum efficiency for gold dissolution, according to the log(k/s(-1)) values of the mixed solutions of NaNO2 (0.10-2.0 mol L(-1)) and HX of various concentrations. The influence of oxidation by dilute nitric and nitrous acids on the gold dissolution is discussed from the standpoint of the redox potentials in "modified" aqueous solutions and not of the changes in the activity coefficients of ions.

  15. Some effects of nitrate abundance and starvation on metabolism and accumulation of nitrogen in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Sonja).

    PubMed

    Barneix, A J; James, D M; Watson, E F; Hewitt, E J

    1984-11-01

    Nitrate and nitrite reductases were both induced by adding three concentrations of nitrate to the nutrient supply of nitrate-starved barley seedlings. Enzyme induction was not proportional to the amount of nitrate introduced. Glutamine synthetase also increased above a high endogenous activity but the increase did not differ significantly between any of the three nitrate treatments. Nitrate accumulated rapidly in leaves of plants given 4.0 mM or 0.5 mM nitrate but not with 0.1 mM nitrate. In all treatments, amino acids in leaves increased for 2 d, chiefly attributable to glutamine, then declined. Transferring plants from the three nitrate treatments to nitrate-free nutrient produced an immediate decline in nitrate reductase but nitrite reductase continued to increase for 2 d, before declining. Glutamine-synthetase activity was not affected by withdrawal of nitrate, nor did nitrate withdrawal retard plant growth during the 9-d period of the experiment. The disparity between accumulated nitrate and nitrate-reducing capacity and the rapid decrease in leaf nitrate when nutrient nitrate supply was removed, indicated the presence of a nitrate-storage pool that could be called upon to maintain amino-acid production in times of nitrogen starvation.

  16. Glucose-mediated tyrosine nitration in adipocytes: Targets and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Koeck, Thomas; Willard, Belinda; Crabb, John W.; Kinter, Mike; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Aulak, Kulwant S.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, a key factor in insulin resistance and diabetic pathology, is associated with cellular oxidative stress that promotes oxidative protein modifications. We report that protein nitration is responsive to changes in glucose concentrations in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Alterations in the extent of tyrosine nitration as well as the cellular nitroproteome profile correlated tightly with changing glucose concentrations. The target proteins we identified are involved in fatty acid binding, cell signaling, protein folding, energy metabolism, antioxidant capacity, and membrane permeability. The nitration of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (FABP4) at Tyr19 decreases, similar to phosphorylation, the binding of palmitic acid to the fatty acid-free protein. This potentially alters intracellular fatty acid transport, nuclear translocation of FABP4, and agonism of PPAR gamma. Our results suggest that protein tyrosine nitration may be a factor in obesity, insulin resistance, and the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:19135148

  17. Process for decomposing nitrates in aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a process for decomposing ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrates in an aqueous solution at an elevated temperature and pressure. Where the compound to be decomposed is a metal nitrate (e.g., a nuclear-fuel metal nitrate), a hydroxylated organic reducing agent therefor is provided in the solution. In accordance with the invention, an effective proportion of both nitromethane and nitric acid is incorporated in the solution to accelerate decomposition of the ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrate. As a result, decomposition can be effected at significantly lower temperatures and pressures, permitting the use of system components composed of off-the-shelf materials, such as stainless steel, rather than more costly materials of construction. Preferably, the process is conducted on a continuous basis. Fluid can be automatically vented from the reaction zone as required to maintain the operating temperature at a moderate value--e.g., at a value in the range of from about 130.degree.-200.degree. C.

  18. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1992-06-02

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  19. Influence of poly(aminoquinone) on corrosion inhibition of iron in acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyaprabha, C.; Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Phani, K. L. N.; Venkatachari, G.

    2005-11-01

    The inhibitor performance of chemically synthesized water soluble poly(aminoquinone) (PAQ) on iron corrosion in 0.5 M sulphuric acid was studied in relation to inhibitor concentration using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. On comparing the inhibition performance of PAQ with that of the monomer o-phenylenediamine (OPD), the OPD gave an efficiency of 80% for 1000 ppm while it was 90% for 100 ppm of PAQ. PAQ was found to be a mixed inhibitor. Besides, PAQ was able to improve the passivation tendency of iron in 0.5 M H 2SO 4 markedly.

  20. Influence of Nitrate and Ammonia on Photosynthetic Characteristics and Leaf Anatomy of Moricandia arvensis1

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Klaus; Usuda, Hideaki; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Schmitt, Mark; Edwards, Gerald E.; Thomas, Richard J.; Evert, Ray F.

    1982-01-01

    The leaf anatomy and certain photosynthetic properties of nitrate- and ammonia-grown plants of Moricandia arvensis (L.) DC., a species previously reported to be a C3-C4 intermediate, were investigated. Nitrate-grown plants had a high level of malate in the leaves while ammonia-grown plants had low levels of malate. In young leaves of nitrate-grown plants, there was a diurnal fluctuation of malate content, increasing during the day and decreasing during the night. Titratable acidity remained low in leaves of both nitrate- and ammonia-grown plants. In nitrate-grown plants, the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase was about 2-fold higher than in ammonia-grown plants, the latter having activity typical of C3 species. Also, in nitrate-grown plants, the ratio of activities of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/PEP carboxylase was lower than in ammonia-grown plants. Nitrate reductase activities were higher in nitrate- than in ammonia-grown plants and the greatest activity was found in younger leaves. With nitrate-grown plants, during a pulse-chase experiment the label in malate, as a percentage of the total labeled products, increased from about 7% after a 10-second pulse with 14CO2 up to 17% during a 5-minute chase with 12CO2. The pattern of 14C labeling in various metabolites suggests the primary carboxylation is through RuBP carboxylase with a secondary carboxylation through PEP carboxylase. In similar experiments, with ammonia-grown plants, the percentage label in malate was only 0% to 4% with no increase in malate labeling during the chase period. The CO2 compensation point was lower in nitrate-grown than ammonia-grown plants. There was no evidence of Kranz-like anatomy in either the nitrate or ammonia-grown plants. Mitochondria of bundle-sheath cells were strikingly positioned along the inner tangential wall. This might allow the chloroplasts of these cells to fix the mitochondrial photorespired CO2 more effectively and contribute to the low

  1. Acid/base front propagation in saturated porous media: 2D laboratory experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyaux-Lawniczak, Stéphanie; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    We perform laboratory scale reactive transport experiments involving acid-basic reactions between nitric acid and sodium hydroxide. A two-dimensional experimental setup is designed to provide continuous on-line measurements of physico-chemical parameters such as pH, redox potential (Eh) and electrical conductivity (EC) inside the system under saturated flow through conditions. The electrodes provide reliable values of pH and EC, while sharp fronts associated with redox potential dynamics could not be captured. Care should be taken to properly incorporate within a numerical model the mixing processes occurring inside the electrodes. The available observations are modeled through a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation. In this framework, EC is considered as a variable behaving as a conservative tracer and pH and Eh require solving the advection dispersion equation only once. The agreement between the computed and measured pH and EC is good even without recurring to parameters calibration on the basis of the experiments. Our findings suggest that the classical advection-dispersion equation can be used to interpret these kinds of experiments if mixing inside the electrodes is adequately considered.

  2. Coal desulfurization in oxidative acid media using hydrogen peroxide and ozone: a kinetic and statistical approach

    SciTech Connect

    F.R. Carrillo-Pedroza; A. Davalos Sanchez; M. Soria-Aguilar; E.T. Pecina Trevino

    2009-07-15

    The removal of pyritic sulfur from a Mexican sub-bituminous coal in nitric, sulfuric, and hydrochloric acid solutions was investigated. The effect of the type and concentration of acid, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and ozone as oxidants, in a temperature range of 20-60{sup o}C, was studied. The relevant factors in pyrite dissolution were determined by means of the statistical analysis of variance and optimized by the response surface method. Kinetic models were also evaluated, showing that the dissolution of pyritic sulfur follows the kinetic model of the shrinking core model, with diffusion through the solid product of the reaction as the controlling stage. The results of statistical analysis indicate that the use of ozone as an oxidant improves the pyrite dissolution because, at 0.25 M HNO{sub 3} or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 20{sup o}C and 0.33 g/h O{sub 3}, the obtained dissolution is similar to that of 1 M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 1 M HNO{sub 3} or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at 40{sup o}C. 42 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Acid/base front propagation in saturated porous media: 2D laboratory experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Loyaux-Lawniczak, Stéphanie; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    We perform laboratory scale reactive transport experiments involving acid-basic reactions between nitric acid and sodium hydroxide. A two-dimensional experimental setup is designed to provide continuous on-line measurements of physico-chemical parameters such as pH, redox potential (Eh) and electrical conductivity (EC) inside the system under saturated flow through conditions. The electrodes provide reliable values of pH and EC, while sharp fronts associated with redox potential dynamics could not be captured. Care should be taken to properly incorporate within a numerical model the mixing processes occurring inside the electrodes. The available observations are modeled through a numerical code based on the advection-dispersion equation. In this framework, EC is considered as a variable behaving as a conservative tracer and pH and Eh require solving the advection dispersion equation only once. The agreement between the computed and measured pH and EC is good even without recurring to parameters calibration on the basis of the experiments. Our findings suggest that the classical advection-dispersion equation can be used to interpret these kinds of experiments if mixing inside the electrodes is adequately considered.

  4. Acid-active neuraminidases in the growth media from cultures of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and in sonicates of rabbit alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Eisen, D; Franson, R C

    1987-05-19

    Using bovine mucin and isolated human myelin as sources of sialic acid, we demonstrate the presence of neuraminidase activities in the growth media of pathogenic, but not nonpathogenic, Naegleria sp. and in sonicates of rabbit alveolar macrophages. Neuraminidase activity was maximal at pH 4.5 and 5.0, and the specific activity for sialic acid release was up to 13-fold greater with mucin than with human myelin. Activity in the growth media from cultures of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri was ion-independent, while that of macrophage sonicates required divalent cation; optimal activity was noted with 2.5 mM Zn2+, while Mg2+ and Mn2+ supported activity to a lesser extent. Such acid-active neuraminidases may contribute to the reported glycolipid alterations associated with demyelinating diseases.

  5. Hydrothermal oxidation of organic wastes using reclaimed ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Proesmans, P.I.; Luan, L.; Buelow, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate is being studied as an alternative for ammonium perchlorate as an oxidizing agent in Department of Defense 1.1 and 1.3 rocket propellants. Use of ammonium nitrate would eliminate the HCl produced by ammonium perchlorate upon thermal decomposition. To stabilize the ammonium nitrate, which suffers from phase instability, potassium dinitramide (KDN) is added. This increased use of ammonium nitrate will ultimately create a need for environmentally responsible processes to reuse ammonium nitrate extracted from demilitarized rocket motors. Ammonium Nitrate was investigated as an oxidizing agent for methanol, acetic acid and phenol. High removal of organic, ammonia and nitrate was achieved at stoichiometric concentrations. The oxidation of ammonia by nitrate was much faster than the oxidation of either methanol or acetic acid. Phenol, however, was in strong competition with ammonia for the oxidizer (nitrate). Nitrogen products included N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2{sup {minus}}} as well as toxic NO and trace amounts of NO{sub 2}. Carbon products were CO{sub 2}, HCO{sub 3{sup {minus}}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, and CO.

  6. Heterocarbon nanosheets incorporating iron phthalocyanine for oxygen reduction reaction in both alkaline and acidic media.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Koangyong; Ueno, Tomonaga; Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-04-28

    Heterocarbon nanosheets incorporating iron phthalocyanine (FP-NCNs-SP) have been successfully synthesized by a facile one-pot solution plasma process at high repetition frequency. It was found that the Fe-N4 catalytic active sites could be preserved on the FP-NCNs-SP without degradation. The FP-NCNs-SP also possessed large surface area, good conductivity and high degree of graphitization. Electrochemical evaluations demonstrated that NCNs-SP had excellent electrocatalytic activity and selectivity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium through a direct four-electron pathway. Although the significant improvement in ORR activity was clearly observed in acidic medium, it was much poorer than in alkaline medium. We believe that the results presented in this work will shed light on the advanced synthesis and design of ORR electrocatalysts at room temperature with an abundance of catalytically active sites and high ORR performance. PMID:27055883

  7. Heterocarbon nanosheets incorporating iron phthalocyanine for oxygen reduction reaction in both alkaline and acidic media.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Koangyong; Ueno, Tomonaga; Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-04-28

    Heterocarbon nanosheets incorporating iron phthalocyanine (FP-NCNs-SP) have been successfully synthesized by a facile one-pot solution plasma process at high repetition frequency. It was found that the Fe-N4 catalytic active sites could be preserved on the FP-NCNs-SP without degradation. The FP-NCNs-SP also possessed large surface area, good conductivity and high degree of graphitization. Electrochemical evaluations demonstrated that NCNs-SP had excellent electrocatalytic activity and selectivity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium through a direct four-electron pathway. Although the significant improvement in ORR activity was clearly observed in acidic medium, it was much poorer than in alkaline medium. We believe that the results presented in this work will shed light on the advanced synthesis and design of ORR electrocatalysts at room temperature with an abundance of catalytically active sites and high ORR performance.

  8. Nitrate Reductase Regulates Expression of Nitrite Uptake and Nitrite Reductase Activities in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii 1

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Aurora; Cárdenas, Jacobo; Fernández, Emilio

    1992-01-01

    In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective at the structural locus for nitrate reductase (nit-1) or at loci for biosynthesis of the molybdopterin cofactor (nit-3, nit-4, or nit-5 and nit-6), both nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were repressed in ammonium-grown cells and expressed at high amounts in nitrogen-free media or in media containing nitrate or nitrite. In contrast, wild-type cells required nitrate induction for expression of high levels of both activities. In mutants defective at the regulatory locus for nitrate reductase (nit-2), very low levels of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities were expressed even in the presence of nitrate or nitrite. Both restoration of nitrate reductase activity in mutants defective at nit-1, nit-3, and nit-4 by isolating diploid strains among them and transformation of a structural mutant upon integration of the wild-type nit-1 gene gave rise to the wild-type expression pattern for nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Conversely, inactivation of nitrate reductase by tungstate treatment in nitrate, nitrite, or nitrogen-free media made wild-type cells respond like nitrate reductase-deficient mutants with respect to the expression of nitrite uptake and nitrite reductase activities. Our results indicate that nit-2 is a regulatory locus for both the nitrite uptake system and nitrite reductase, and that the nitrate reductase enzyme plays an important role in the regulation of the expression of both enzyme activities. PMID:16668656

  9. Evaluation of ability of ferulic acid to control growth and fumonisin production of Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium proliferatum on maize based media.

    PubMed

    Ferrochio, Laura; Cendoya, Eugenia; Farnochi, María Cecilia; Massad, Walter; Ramirez, María Laura

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ferulic acid (1, 10, 20 and 25 mM) at different water activity (aw) values (0.99, 0.98, 0.96 and 0.93) at 25 °C on growth and fumonisin production by Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium proliferatum on maize based media. For both Fusarium species, the lag phase significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.001), and the growth rates increased (p ≤ 0.001) at the lowest ferulic acid concentration used (1mM), regardless of the aw. However, high doses of ferulic acid (10 to 25 mM) significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.001) the growth rate of both Fusarium species, regardless of the a(w). In general, growth rate inhibition increased as ferulic acid doses increased and as media aw decreased. Fumonisin production profiles of both Fusarium species showed that low ferulic acid concentrations (1-10mM) significantly increased (p ≤ 0.001) toxin production, regardless of the aw. High doses of ferulic acid (20-25 mM) reduced fumonisin production, in comparison with the controls, by both Fusarium species but they were not statistically significant in most cases. The results show that the use of ferulic acid as a post-harvest strategy to reduce mycotoxin accumulation on maize needs to be discussed.

  10. Compound amino acids added in media improved Solanum nigrum L. phytoremediating CD-PAHS contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhe; Bai, Jiayi; Yang, Chuanjie; Zhang, Qianru; Knorrm, Klaus-Holger; Zhan, Jie; Gao, Qianhui

    2016-01-01

    Cd hyperaccumulator Solanum nigrum L. was a promising plant used to simultaneously remediate Cd-PAHs combined pollution soil through its extra accumulation capacity and rhizosphere degradation. This article compared the strengthening remediation role of cysteine (Cys), glycine (Gly) and glutamic acid (Glu) with EDTA and TW80. The results showed that the addition of 0.03 mmol L(-1) Cys, Gly, and Glu didn't significantly impact (p < 0.05) shoot biomass of S. nigrum, but obviously increased Cd concentration. Therefore, Cd capacity (µg pot(-1)) in shoots of S. nigrum was significantly increased (p < 0.05) by 37.7% compared to the control without reagent added. At the meantime, the PAHs degradation ratio in rhizoshpere was increased by 34.5%. Basically, the improving role of Cys, Gly, and Glu was higher than EDTA and TW80. The main reasons of enhanced the accumulation of S. nigrum to Cd might lie in the addition of Cys, Gly, and Glu which reduced pH and increased extractable Cd concentration in rhizosphere and phytochelatines (PCs) concentration in leaves. As for the degradation of PAHs in rhizosphere, increased microorganism number might be play important role.

  11. Reversible ring-opening reactions of nimetazepam and nitrazepam in acidic media at body temperature.

    PubMed

    Inotsume, N; Nakano, M

    1980-11-01

    Hydrolytic reactions of nimetazepam and nitrazepam in acidic solutions at body temperature were studied spectrophotometrically. The open-ring compounds produced by hydrolysis were in equilibrium with the corresponding closed-ring compounds (protonated nimetazepam and nitrazepam). Forward-reaction rate constants of both drugs were greater than the rate constant of diazepam. In nimetazepam, the forward-reaction rate constant was smaller than the reverse-reaction rate constant; in nitrazepam, the reverse-reaction rate constant was much smaller than the forward-reaction rate constant, and possible amide bond cleavage was indicated. The activation energies of the forward and reverse reactions of nimetazepam and the forward reaction of nitrazepam were calculated from Arrhenius-type plots, whereas no clear temperature dependency was observed in the reverse-reaction rate constant of nitrazepam. The effect of pH on these reactions also was examined. In addition, the pKa values of nimetazepam and nitrazepam were calculated to be 2.53 and 2.77, respectively.

  12. Column experiments to investigate transport of colloidal humic acid through porous media during managed aquifer recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenjing; Huan, Ying; Yu, Xipeng; Li, Fulin; Chen, Xuequn

    2016-09-01

    Colloids act as vectors for pollutants in groundwater, thereby creating a series of environmental problems. While managed aquifer recharge plays an important role in protecting groundwater resources and controlling land subsidence, it has a significant effect on the transport of colloids. In this study, particle size and zeta potential of colloidal humic acid (HA) have been measured to determine the effects of different hydrochemistry conditions. Column experiments were conducted to examine the effects on the transport of colloidal HA under varying conditions of pH (5, 7, 9), ionic strength (<0.0005, 0.02, 0.05 M), cation valence (Na+, Ca2+) and flow rate (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 ml/min) through collectors (glass beads) to model the properties and quality of artificial recharge water and changes in the hydrodynamic field. Breakthrough curves showed that the behavior of colloidal HA being transported varied depending on the conditions. Colloid transport was strongly influenced by hydrochemical and hydrodynamic conditions. With decreasing pH or increasing ionic strength, a decrease in the peak effluent concentration of colloidal HA and increase in deposition could be clearly seen. Comparison of different cation valence tests indicated that changes in transport and deposition were more pronounced with divalent Ca2+ than with monovalent Na+. Changes in hydrodynamic field (flow rate) also had an impact on transportation of colloidal HA. The results of this study highlight the need for further research in this area.

  13. Evidence for a plasma-membrane-bound nitrate reductase involved in nitrate uptake of Chlorella sorokiniana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischner, R.; Ward, M. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Anti-nitrate-reductase (NR) immunoglobulin-G (IgG) fragments inhibited nitrate uptake into Chlorella cells but had no affect on nitrate uptake. Intact anti-NR serum and preimmune IgG fragments had no affect on nitrate uptake. Membrane-associated NR was detected in plasma-membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The PM-associated NR was not removed by sonicating PM vesicles in 500 mM NaCl and 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and represented up to 0.8% of the total Chlorella NR activity. The PM NR was solubilized by Triton X-100 and inactivated by Chlorella NR antiserum. Plasma-membrane NR was present in ammonium-grown Chlorella cells that completely lacked soluble NR activity. The subunit sizes of the PM and soluble NRs were 60 and 95 kDa, respectively, as determined by sodium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis and western blotting.

  14. Methylhydrazinium nitrate. [rocket plume deposit chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, E. A.; Moran, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Methylhydrazinium nitrate was synthesized by the reaction of dilute nitric acid with methylhydrazine in water and in methanol. The white needles formed are extremely hygroscopic and melt at 37.5-40.5 C. The IR spectrum differs from that reported elsewhere. The mass spectrum exhibited no parent peak at 109 m/z, and thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the compound decomposed slowly at 63-103 C to give ammonium and methylammonium nitrate. The density is near 1.55 g/cu cm.

  15. SEPARATION OF URANYL NITRATE BY EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Stoughton, R.W.; Steahly, F.L.

    1958-08-26

    A process is presented for obtaining U/sup 233/ from solutions containing Pa/sup 233/. A carrier precipitate, such as MnO/sub 2/, is formed in such solutions and carries with it the Pa/sup 233/ present. This precipitate is then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is aged to allow decay of the Pa/ sup 233/ into U/sup 233/. After a sufficient length of time the U/sup 233/ bearing solution is made 2.5 to 4.5 Molar in manganese nitrate by addition thereof, and the solution is then treated with ether to obtain uranyl nitrate by solvent extraction techniques.

  16. Water soluble complex of palmitic acid in media for cultivation of leprosy-derived psychrophilic mycobacteria from Mycobacterium leprae infected tissues.

    PubMed

    Kátó, L; Szejtli, J; Szente, L

    1993-01-01

    Palmitic acid and palmitates were transformed into water soluble complexes with crystalline heptakis-2,6-di-0-methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. This formulation was incorporated into liquid and solid chemically well-defined media. The fatty acid served as C and energy source, ammonium thioglycolate as the sole source of N with the SH group as further source of energy. Minute amount of dimethyl-sulfoxide added was used for its known effect on cell membrane permeability. The media were inoculated with host grown Mycobacterium leprae cells isolated from human, armadillo and Nu mice foot pad lepromata. No growth occurred in the liquid medium at 22 or 32 degrees C, but cultures and subcultures of acid fast rods were grown at 10 degrees C. Bacilli in the cultures were solid, strongly acid fast rods, growing in clumps like globi. Growth on the semisolid media was visible as smooth round colonies, of white to ivory in colour, slowly expanding flatly at the periphery of the colony on the agar surface. Colonies developed within 2-3 weeks and reached maximum size at 50-80 days depending on the size of inoculum. Subcultures grow faster and more abundantly with adaptation to the media. No growth was seen without the water soluble complexes of palmitic acid or palmitates in the media. The free fatty acid or its salts had an equal growth supporting effect. Identical psychrophilic cultures were obtained from 7 out of 9 armadillo, 12 out of 12 Nu mice and 1 out of 2 human lepromata. None of the cultures grow on Loewenstein, Dubos or 7H9 media at 10 degrees C, 20 degrees C or 32 degrees C, respectively. The tested 4th to 7th subcultures of the strains were strongly positive for phenolic glycolipid-1. Heat killed suspensions of up to 7th subcultures gave negative late skin reaction in all of 16 LL cases. In 19 I, B and T cases the late skin reactions were all similar to that obtained with authentic human lepromin.

  17. J-aggregate formation of a water-soluble porphyrin in acidic aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Osamu; Kaizu, Youkoh; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    1993-09-01

    J aggregate of a water-soluble porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-sulfophenyl)porphyrin (H2TPPS44-), formed in acidified aqueous solutions, exhibits sharp and intense absorption bands at 491 and 707 nm. These characteristic transitions, J bands, are of linear oscillators polarized in the long axis of rodlike aggregate. The molecules in the aggregate stack so as to lift the degeneracy of the porphyrin planar oscillator excited states. Measurements of flow-induced linear dichroism, circular dichroism, magnetic circular dichroism, as well as polarized fluorescence excitation spectra provide evidence not only of linear oscillator character of the intense J band at 491 nm, but also of presence of another diffuse absorption band around at 420 nm polarized in the short axis of the aggregate, which is the counterpart of the 491 nm band of porphyrin Soret origin. Extrinsic circular dichroism is induced upon addition of L-tartaric acid or by mechanical swirling flow in the period of aggregate growth. Resonance Raman spectrum of the aggregate is rather similar to that of the monomeric diacid except the polarization. The observed shifts of Raman peaks to lower frequency are ascribed to a deformation of porphyrin moiety and/or hydrophobic interaction between component molecules in the aggregate. The sharp and intense J bands polarized in the long axis of aggregate cannot be well described without taking into account the participation of interporphyrin charge resonance excited states, whereas the broadbands polarized in the short axis are exclusively ascribed to exciton resonance excited states. The porphyrin J band is characterized as sustaining an exchange narrowing by fast migration of excitation over the whole system of chromophores in a linear array of the porphyrin planar oscillators in slipped face-to-face stacking.

  18. Transport in Porous Media of Poly(Acrylic Acid) Coated Ferrihydrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Xiang, A.; Koel, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Augmentation of soils with iron to enhance biological processes such as uranium reduction via iron reducing bacteria, e.g., Geobacter sp., might be achieved via the injection of iron nanoparticles into the subsurface. The challenge is to make these nanoparticles transportable in the subsurface while not affecting the iron bioavailability. Poorly crystallized 2-line ferrihydrite iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and coated with different amounts of poly(acrylic acid) polymers (Na-PAA6K or Na-PAA140K). Analyses were then performed on these particles, including sorption/desorption of the polymer onto the iron nanoparticles, particle size, zeta potential, transport in sand and soil columns, and bioavailabity of the Fe(III) in the absence and presence of the coating to iron reducing organisms. Results showed that at pH values of environmental relevance, the zeta potential of the particles varied from about 3 mV (pH=8.2) for the non-coated particles to about -30 mV for the particles coated with the polymers to their highest sorption capacity. The coated particle diameter was shown to be in the range of 200 nm. Column transport experiments showed that for the highest polymer coating the nanoparticle breakthrough was virtually identical to that of bromide, while significant filtration was observed for particles with an intermediate coating, and complete particle removal via filtration was observed for the non-coated particles. These results held for sand as well as for soil, which had been previously characterized, from a field site at Rifle, CO. Bioavailability experiments showed no difference in the iron reduction rate between the untreated and treated nanoparticles. These results show that it is possible to manufacture iron nanoparticles to enhance biological iron reduction, and that the transport properties of these treated particles is tunable so that a desired retention in the porous medium can be achieved.

  19. Structure of solvates of o-hydroxybenzoic acid in supercritical CO2-cosolvent media, according to molecular dynamics data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, V. E.; Antipova, M. L.; Gurina, D. L.

    2015-03-01

    Three-component supercritical carbon dioxide-cosolvent (methanol, ethanol, water)- o-hydroxybenzoic acid ( o-HBA) mixtures at a density of 0.7 g/cm3 and temperatures of 318 and 348 K are simulated by means of molecular dynamics. The solvate structures are investigated. It is shown that the solvation mechanism of o-HBA (particularly the o-HBA molecule forming a stable solvate complex with one molecule of a cosolvent via a hydrogen bond through the carboxyl group) does not depend on the temperature or the cosolvent. It is noted that the form of the cosolvent in a supercritical fluid varies: alcohols are distributed in the bulk in the form of monomers and hydrogen-bonded dimers, and water molecules tend to form microclusters along with chained and spatially branched structures by means of hydrogen bonds. It is established that the local molar fraction of cosolvent around the solvate complexes grows. It is concluded that the solvation of o-HBA is determined by the behavior of cosolvent in media of supercritical CO2.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue on 316L stainless steel in boric acid concentrated media at 320 C

    SciTech Connect

    Herms, E.; Olive, J.M.; Puiggali, M.; Boursier, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Corrosion-Fatigue (CF) tests were performed in autoclave at 320 C in concentrated boric acid chlorinated media in presence of oxygen or hydrogen on type 316L austenitic stainless steel. Crack Growth Rates (CGR) are higher in non deaerated solutions for both SCC and CF than in hydrogenated solutions. CGR are relatively similar in CF and in SCC, excepted for high load ratio in CF where CGR are higher than in SCC. Detailed analysis of the fracture surface shows some distinct features between SCC and CF. Intergranular and transgranular mode of fracture are observed on SCC and CF. Fracture modes depend on the chemistry of solution in SCC and on frequency in CF. Traces of slip bands and crack front marking associated with oxide scale present on fracture surfaces exist in SCC and CF. Fatigue striations appear for low load ratio and high frequency. Secondary intergranular and transgranular cracking is observed only on SCC fracture surfaces and ligament morphology can be different in SCC relative to FC.

  1. Kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of C-N bond rotation by N-methylacetohydroxamic acid in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Sippl, Stefanie P; White, Paul B; Fry, Charles G; Volk, Sarah E; Ye, Lingxiao; Schenck, Heather L

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxamic acids (HAs) perform tasks in medicine and industry that require bidentate metal binding. The two favored conformations of HAs are related by rotation around the C(=O)-N bond. The conformations are unequal in stability. Recently, we reported that the most stable conformation of a small secondary HA in water places the oxygen atoms anti to one another. The barrier to C-N bond rotation may therefore modulate metal binding by secondary HAs in aqueous media. We have now determined the activation barrier to C-N rotation from major to minor conformation of a small secondary HA in D2O to be 67.3 kJ/mol. The HA rotational barrier scales with solvent polarity, as is observed in amides, although the HA barrier is less than that of a comparable tertiary amide in aqueous solution. Successful design of new secondary HAs to perform specific tasks requires solid understanding of rules governing HA structural behavior. Results from this work provide a more complete foundation for HA design efforts.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the electrochemical formation of iron oxidation products on steel immersed in sour acid media.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Espejel, Antonio; Palomar-Pardavé, Manuel; Cabrera-Sierra, Román; Romero-Romo, Mario; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Arce-Estrada, Elsa M

    2011-03-01

    From electrochemical techniques (cyclic voltammetry, potential steps, and EIS), XRD, and SEM-EDX, the kinetics and mechanism of anodic film formation applying anodic potential steps on steel immersed in sour acid media was determined. It was found, from a thermodynamic analysis, based on equilibrium phase diagrams of the system considered in this work, that iron oxidation may produce different new solid phases, depending on the applied potential, the first being the iron oxidation associated with formation of FeS((c)) species, which in turn can be reoxidized to FeS(2(c)) or even to Fe(2)O(3(c)) at higher potential values. From analysis of the corresponding experimental potentiostatic current density transients, it was concluded that the electrochemical anodic film formation involves an E(1)CE(2) mechanism, whereby the first of the two simultaneous processes were the Fe electrochemical oxidation (E(1)) followed by FeS precipitation (C) that occurs by 3D nucleation and growth limited by mass transfer reaction and FeS oxidation (E(2)) forming a mix of different stoichiometry iron sulphides and oxides. From EIS measurements, it was revealed that the anodic film's charge transfer resistance diminishes as the potential applied for its formation becomes more anodic, thus behaving poorly against corrosion.

  3. 18O isotopic separation of stream nitrate sources in mid-Appalachian forested watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williard, Karl W. J.; DeWalle, David R.; Edwards, Pamela J.; Sharpe, William E.

    2001-10-01

    The δ18O values of atmospheric nitrate deposition, microbe-produced nitrate, and stream nitrate were measured to determine the dominant source of stream nitrate in 27 mid-Appalachian headwater forested watersheds (12-771 ha) with varying bedrock geologies, land disturbance histories, and stand ages. The 12 monthly composite nitrate δ18O values of wet deposition and throughfall exhibited similar pronounced seasonal trends, with relatively depleted δ18O values during the summer. Wet deposition and throughfall nitrate δ18O values were not significantly different between northern (Leading Ridge, PA) and southern (Fernow, WV) regional sampling sites, indicating that δ18O values were spatially similar across the study area. Atmospheric nitrate δ18O values were significantly greater than microbe-produced nitrate δ18O values, allowing the two sources of stream nitrate to be separated. During four baseflow and three stormflow sampling periods, microbe-produced nitrate was the dominant (>70%) source of nitrate in the study streams. This result does not mean atmospheric nitrogen deposition should be discounted as a source of forested stream nitrate, because atmospheric deposition is the primary external contributor to the long-term soil nitrogen pool that ultimately drives soil nitrate production rates. Stream nitrate δ18O values were greater during stormflow periods compared to baseflow periods, indicating greater contributions of atmospheric nitrate during storm events. Neither microbe-produced nitrate δ18O values from incubated forest soil samples nor stream nitrate δ18O values showed strong relationships with land disturbance history or stand age. However, watersheds dominated by Pottsville/Allegheny bedrock and associated extremely acid soils had greater summer stream nitrate δ18O values than watersheds containing predominantly Catskill/Chemung/Pocono and Mauch Chunk/Greenbrier bedrock. Inhibited microbial nitrate production by low soil pH could account for

  4. Functioning of antimony film electrode in acid media under cyclic and anodic stripping voltammetry conditions.

    PubMed

    Sebez, Bine; Ogorevc, Bozidar; Hocevar, Samo B; Veber, Marjan

    2013-06-27

    New insights into the functioning, i.e. electrochemical behaviour and analytical performance, of in situ prepared antimony film electrodes (SbFEs) under square-wave anodic stripping (SW-ASV) and cyclic (CV) voltammetry conditions are presented by studying several key operational parameters using Pb(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) as model analyte ions. Five different carbon- and metal-based substrate transducer electrodes revealed a clear advantage of the former ones while the concentration of the precursor Sb(III) ion exhibited a distinct influence on the ASV functioning of the SbFE. Among six acids examined as potential supporting electrolytes the HNO3 was demonstrated to yield nearly identical results in conducting ASV experiments with SbFE as so far almost exclusively used HCl. This is extremely important as HNO3 is commonly employed acidifying agent in trace metal analysis, especially in elemental mass spectrometry measurements. By carrying out a systematic CV and ASV investigation using a medium exchange protocol, we confirmed the formation of poorly soluble oxidized Sb species at the substrate electrode surface at the end of each stripping step, i.e. at the potentials beyond the anodic dissolution of the antimony film. Hence, the significance of the cleaning and initializing the surface of a substrate electrode after accomplishing a stripping step was thoroughly studied in order to find conditions for a complete removal of the adhered Sb-oxides and thus to assure a memory-free functioning of the in situ prepared SbFE. Finally, the practical analytical application of the proposed ASV method was successfully tested and evaluated by measuring the three metal analytes in ground (tap) and surface (river) water samples acidified with HNO3. Our results approved the appropriateness of the SbFE and the proposed method for measuring low μg L(-1) levels of some toxic metals, particularly taking into account the possibility of on-field testing and the use of low cost

  5. Electrolytic Removal of Nitrate From CELSS Crop Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colon, Guillermo; Sager, John

    1996-01-01

    The controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) resource recovery system is a waste processing system using aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors to recover plant nutrients and secondary foods from inedible biomass. Crop residues contain significant amounts of nitrate which presents two problems: (1) both CELSS biomass production and resource recovery consume large quantities of nitric acid, (2) nitrate causes a variety of problems in both aerobic and anaerobic bioreactors. A technique was proposed to remove the nitrate from potato inedible biomass leachate and to satisfy the nitric acid demand using a four compartment electrolytic cell.

  6. Ammonium and nitrate tolerance in lichens.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Since lichens lack roots and take up water, solutes and gases over the entire thallus surface, these organisms respond more sensitively to changes in atmospheric purity than vascular plants. After centuries where effects of sulphur dioxide and acidity were in the focus of research on atmospheric chemistry and lichens, recently the globally increased levels of ammonia and nitrate increasingly affect lichen vegetation and gave rise to intense research on the tolerance of lichens to nitrogen pollution. The present paper discusses the main findings on the uptake of ammonia and nitrate in the lichen symbiosis and to the tolerance of lichens to eutrophication. Ammonia and nitrate are both efficiently taken up under ambient conditions. The tolerance to high nitrogen levels depends, among others, on the capability of the photobiont to provide sufficient amounts of carbon skeletons for ammonia assimilation. Lowly productive lichens are apparently predisposed to be sensitive to excess nitrogen.

  7. A convenient method for preparation of pure standards of peroxyacetyl nitrate for atmospheric analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Torben; Hansen, Anne Maria; Thomsen, Erling Lund

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) is synthesized by nitration of peracetic acid (1.2 M), extracted by n- heptane, and purified with normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The purified PAN solution is free of acetyl nitrate. The content of PAN is determined by means of hydrolysis of PAN into nitrite, and determination by ion chromatography of nitrite and nitrate (formed by oxidation of nitrite). The purified PAN solution is used for the calibration of the gas Chromatograph with electron capture detection.

  8. Isolation, Characterization, and U(VI)-Reducing Potential of a Facultatively Anaerobic, Acid-Resistant Bacterium from Low-pH, Nitrate- and U(VI)-Contaminated Subsurface Sediment and Description of Salmonella subterranea sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Sullivan, Sara A.; O'Neill, Kathleen R.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, acid-resistant bacterium, designated strain FRCl, was isolated from a low-pH, nitrate- and U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediment at site FW-024 at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Strain FRCl was enriched at pH 4.5 in minimal medium with nitrate as the electron acceptor, hydrogen as the electron donor, and acetate as the carbon source. Clones with 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences identical to the sequence of strain FRCl were also detected in a U(VI)-reducing enrichment culture derived from the same sediment. Cells of strain FRCl were gram-negative motile regular rods 2.0 to 3.4 μm long and 0.7 to 0.9 μm in diameter. Strain FRCl was positive for indole production, by the methyl red test, and for ornithine decarboxylase; it was negative by the Voges-Proskauer test (for acetylmethylcarbinol production), for urea hydrolysis, for arginine dihydrolase, for lysine decarboxylase, for phenylalanine deaminase, for H2S production, and for gelatin hydrolysis. Strain FRCl was capable of using O2, NO3−, S2O32−, fumarate, and malate as terminal electron acceptors and of reducing U(VI) in the cell suspension. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of the isolate indicated that this strain was 96.4% similar to Salmonella bongori and 96.3% similar to Enterobacter cloacae. Physiological and phylogenetic analyses suggested that strain FRCl belongs to the genus Salmonella and represents a new species, Salmonella subterranea sp. nov. PMID:15128557

  9. A pH Scale for the Protic Ionic Liquid Ethylammonium Nitrate.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Ryo; Kodamatani, Hitoshi; Tomiyasu, Takashi; Watanabe, Hikari; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-17

    To quantify the properties of protic ionic liquids (PILs) as acid-base reaction media, potentiometric titrations were carried out in a neat PIL, ethylammonium nitrate (EAN). A linear relationship was found between the 14 pKa  values of 12 compounds in EAN and in water. In other words, the pKa  value in EAN was found to be roughly one unit greater than that in water regardless of the charge and hydrophobicity of the compounds. It is possible that this could be explained by the stronger acidity of HNO3 in EAN than that of H3 O(+) in water and not by the difference in the solvation state of the ions. The pH value in EAN ranges from -1 to 9 on the pH scale based on the pH value in water.

  10. Exclusion of Nitrate from Frozen Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, H. A.; Michelsen, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Reactions occurring at the surface of ice, sea ice, and snow in Earth's cryosphere have an impact on the composition of the overlying atmosphere. In order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and model their contributions to atmospheric processes, the morphology of frozen aqueous surfaces and amounts of reactants contained therein must be determined. To this end, the exclusion of nitrate ions to the surface of frozen aqueous solutions has been studied by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In this technique the near-surface region of the frozen films are interrogated to a depth of a few hundred nanometers from the film-crystal interface. Aqueous solutions (0.001 to 0.01 M) of sodium nitrate (NaNO3), magnesium nitrate (Mg(NO3)2), and nitric acid (HNO3) were quickly frozen on the germanium ATR crystal and observed at a constant temperature of about -18°C. In addition to ice and the solutes, liquid water in varying amounts was observed in the spectra. The amount of nitrate in the surface liquid is three to four orders of magnitude higher than in the unfrozen solution. While all the nitrate salts exhibit exclusion to the unfrozen surface, the dynamics are different for different counter-ions. Results are compared to freezing point depression data and the predictions of equilibrium thermodynamics.

  11. Conversion of carbohydrate biomass to γ-valerolactone by using water-soluble and reusable iridium complexes in acidic aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jin; Wang, Yan; Pan, Tao; Xu, Qing; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2013-07-01

    Mild-mannered manipulation: A catalytic method for the conversion of carbohydrate biomass to γ-valerolactone in acidic aqueous media has been developed. The water-soluble iridium complexes were observed to be extremely catalytically active for providing γ-valerolactone in high yields with high TONs. The homogeneous catalysts can also be recycled and reused by applying a simple phase separation process. PMID:23757330

  12. Exfoliation corrosion susceptibility and mechanisms of Al -- Li 2060 T8E30 aluminum lithium alloy in acidic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayan, Ahmad Ivan

    The Al - Li 2060 aluminum lithium alloy was first launched in 2011. This alloy is a potential candidate for the use at wing/fuselage forgings, lower wing, and fuselage/pressure cabin. However, since its first launching, the corrosion properties of this alloy has not been extensively explored. There are three common laboratory tests for assessing the exfoliation corrosion (EFC) susceptibility of aluminum alloy 2XXX, namely EFC test in EXCO, modified EXCO and MASTMAASIS media. The objectives of this work is to study the susceptibility and mecahnism of corrosion of this alloy in EXCO, modified EXCO and MATSMAASIS media. These three media are acid. In the EXCO solution, this alloy suffers EFC after a 96-hour EFC test. The pH dramatically increases in the first 11 hours from 0.25 to 0.30. The pH then slightly increases and tends to remain constant at pH of 3.45 after 96 hours. The cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) test results show the presence of negative hysteresis and one breakdwon potential. This negative hysteresis suggests the absence of pitting corrosion due to the breakdown of passive film. The potentiostatic tests at potentials below and above the breakdown potential show an abrupt increase in potential in the first minutes and the presence of current transients. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) examination confirms that the Al 20Cu2Mn3 particles preferentially dissolve, leaving the pitting after a potentiostatic test below the breakdown potential. From the potentiostatic test at a potential above the breakdown potential and an SEM examination after this potentiostatic test, intergranular corrosion (IGC) was observed. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) test and mathematical modeling indicates that the adsorption of intermediates in reduction of hydrogen ions is dominant in the first hours of immersion. The two time constants are observed when EFC occurs. The video capture microscopy

  13. Simple Resolution of Enantiomeric NMR Signals of α-Amino Acids by Using Samarium(III) Nitrate With L-Tartarate.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sen-Ichi; Kidani, Takahiro; Takada, Sayuri; Ofusa, Yumika

    2015-05-01

    Readily available L-tartaric acid, which is a bidentate ligand with two chiral centers forming a seven-membered chelate ring, was applied to the chiral ligand for the chiral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shift reagent of samarium(III) formed in situ. This simple method does not cause serious signal broadening in the high magnetic field. Enantiomeric (13)C and (1)H NMR signals and enantiotopic (1)H NMR signals of α-amino acids were successfully resolved at pH 8.0 and the 1:3 molar ratio of Sm(NO3)3:L-tartaric acid. It is elucidated that the enantiomeric signal resolution is attributed to the anisotropic magnetic environment for the enantiomers induced by the chiral L-tartarato samarium(III) complex rather than differences in stability of the diastereomeric substrate adducts. The present (13)C NMR signal resolution was also effective for the practical simultaneous analysis of plural kinds of DL-amino acids.

  14. Endogenously nitrated proteins in mouse brain: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Knyushko, Tatyana V; Wang, Haixing; Chin, Mark H; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Smith, Desmond J; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2006-07-01

    Increased abundance of nitrotyrosine modifications of proteins have been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types and play a role in the redox regulation of normal metabolism. To identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic data set identifying 7792 proteins from a whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in the identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. More than half of the nitrated proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces an increased level of nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high-resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, a characteristic consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. In addition, most sequences contain cysteines or methionines proximal to nitrotyrosines, contrary to suggestions that these amino acid side chains prevent tyrosine nitration. More striking is the presence of a positively charged moiety near the sites of nitration, which is not observed for non-nitrated tyrosines. Together, these observations suggest a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration and that cellular nitrating conditions play a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain.

  15. Broadcasting behavior change: a comparison of the effectiveness of paid and unpaid media to increase folic acid awareness, knowledge, and consumption among Hispanic women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Flores, Alina L; Prue, Christine E; Daniel, Katherine Lyon

    2007-04-01

    Awareness about folic acid's effectiveness in reducing the risk of certain birth defects has increased among women in the United States; however, few Hispanic women are consuming enough folic acid daily. A 1998 survey conducted by the Gallup Organization for the National March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation found that English-speaking Hispanic women had lower folic acid awareness (53% vs. 72%) and lower daily consumption (29% vs. 33%) than non-Hispanic White women. In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted baseline surveys with Spanish-speaking Hispanic women in selected U.S. markets to measure folic acid awareness, knowledge, and consumption. A Spanish-language public service announcement (PSA) volunteer campaign and a paid Spanish-language media and community education campaign were conducted in 2000 and 2002, respectively. Comparisons of postcampaign surveys indicate that the paid media campaign was significantly more effective than the PSA campaign in increasing folic acid awareness, knowledge, and consumption among Spanish-speaking Hispanic women.

  16. Monitoring utilizations of amino acids and vitamins in culture media and Chinese hamster ovary cells by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinshu; Chan, Pik Kay; Bondarenko, Pavel V

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring amino acids and vitamins is important for understanding human health, food nutrition and the culture of mammalian cells used to produce therapeutic proteins in biotechnology. A method including ion pairing reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed and optimized to quantify 21 amino acids and 9 water-soluble vitamins in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and culture media. By optimizing the chromatographic separation, scan time, monitoring time window, and sample preparation procedure, and using isotopically labeled (13)C, (15)N and (2)H internal standards, low limits of quantitation (≤0.054 mg/L), good precision (<10%) and good accuracy (100±10%) were achieved for nearly all the 30 compounds. Applying this method to CHO cell extracts, statistically significant differences in the metabolite levels were measured between two cell lines originated from the same host, indicating differences in genetic makeup or metabolic activities and nutrient supply levels in the culture media. In a fed-batch process of manufacturing scale bioreactors, two distinguished trends for changes in amino acid concentrations were identified in response to feeding. Ten essential amino acids showed a zigzag pattern with maxima at the feeding days, and 9 non-essential amino acids displayed a smoothly changing profile as they were mainly products of cellular metabolism. Five of 9 vitamins accumulated continuously during the culture period, suggesting that they were fed in access. The method serves as an effective tool for the development and optimization of mammalian cell cultures. PMID:26355770

  17. Monitoring utilizations of amino acids and vitamins in culture media and Chinese hamster ovary cells by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinshu; Chan, Pik Kay; Bondarenko, Pavel V

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring amino acids and vitamins is important for understanding human health, food nutrition and the culture of mammalian cells used to produce therapeutic proteins in biotechnology. A method including ion pairing reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed and optimized to quantify 21 amino acids and 9 water-soluble vitamins in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and culture media. By optimizing the chromatographic separation, scan time, monitoring time window, and sample preparation procedure, and using isotopically labeled (13)C, (15)N and (2)H internal standards, low limits of quantitation (≤0.054 mg/L), good precision (<10%) and good accuracy (100±10%) were achieved for nearly all the 30 compounds. Applying this method to CHO cell extracts, statistically significant differences in the metabolite levels were measured between two cell lines originated from the same host, indicating differences in genetic makeup or metabolic activities and nutrient supply levels in the culture media. In a fed-batch process of manufacturing scale bioreactors, two distinguished trends for changes in amino acid concentrations were identified in response to feeding. Ten essential amino acids showed a zigzag pattern with maxima at the feeding days, and 9 non-essential amino acids displayed a smoothly changing profile as they were mainly products of cellular metabolism. Five of 9 vitamins accumulated continuously during the culture period, suggesting that they were fed in access. The method serves as an effective tool for the development and optimization of mammalian cell cultures.

  18. Nitrate Promotes Capsaicin Accumulation in Capsicum chinense Immobilized Placentas

    PubMed Central

    Aldana-Iuit, Jeanny G.; Sauri-Duch, Enrique; Miranda-Ham, María de Lourdes; Castro-Concha, Lizbeth A.; Cuevas-Glory, Luis F.; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe A.

    2015-01-01

    In chili pepper's pods, placental tissue is responsible for the synthesis of capsaicinoids (CAPs), the compounds behind their typical hot flavor or pungency, which are synthesized from phenylalanine and branched amino acids. Placental tissue sections from Habanero peppers (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) were immobilized in a calcium alginate matrix and cultured in vitro, either continuously for 28 days or during two 14-day subculture periods. Immobilized placental tissue remained viable and metabolically active for up to 21 days, indicating its ability to interact with media components. CAPs contents abruptly decreased during the first 7 days in culture, probably due to structural damage to the placenta as revealed by scanning electron microcopy. CAPs levels remained low throughout the entire culture period, even though a slight recovery was noted in subcultured placentas. However, doubling the medium's nitrate content (from 40 to 80 mM) resulted in an important increment, reaching values similar to those of intact pod's placentas. These data suggest that isolated pepper placentas cultured in vitro remain metabolically active and are capable of metabolizing inorganic nitrogen sources, first into amino acids and, then, channeling them to CAP synthesis. PMID:25710024

  19. Nitrate promotes capsaicin accumulation in Capsicum chinense immobilized placentas.

    PubMed

    Aldana-Iuit, Jeanny G; Sauri-Duch, Enrique; Miranda-Ham, María de Lourdes; Castro-Concha, Lizbeth A; Cuevas-Glory, Luis F; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe A

    2015-01-01

    In chili pepper's pods, placental tissue is responsible for the synthesis of capsaicinoids (CAPs), the compounds behind their typical hot flavor or pungency, which are synthesized from phenylalanine and branched amino acids. Placental tissue sections from Habanero peppers (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) were immobilized in a calcium alginate matrix and cultured in vitro, either continuously for 28 days or during two 14-day subculture periods. Immobilized placental tissue remained viable and metabolically active for up to 21 days, indicating its ability to interact with media components. CAPs contents abruptly decreased during the first 7 days in culture, probably due to structural damage to the placenta as revealed by scanning electron microcopy. CAPs levels remained low throughout the entire culture period, even though a slight recovery was noted in subcultured placentas. However, doubling the medium's nitrate content (from 40 to 80 mM) resulted in an important increment, reaching values similar to those of intact pod's placentas. These data suggest that isolated pepper placentas cultured in vitro remain metabolically active and are capable of metabolizing inorganic nitrogen sources, first into amino acids and, then, channeling them to CAP synthesis. PMID:25710024

  20. Nitrate promotes capsaicin accumulation in Capsicum chinense immobilized placentas.

    PubMed

    Aldana-Iuit, Jeanny G; Sauri-Duch, Enrique; Miranda-Ham, María de Lourdes; Castro-Concha, Lizbeth A; Cuevas-Glory, Luis F; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe A

    2015-01-01

    In chili pepper's pods, placental tissue is responsible for the synthesis of capsaicinoids (CAPs), the compounds behind their typical hot flavor or pungency, which are synthesized from phenylalanine and branched amino acids. Placental tissue sections from Habanero peppers (Capsicum chinense Jacq.) were immobilized in a calcium alginate matrix and cultured in vitro, either continuously for 28 days or during two 14-day subculture periods. Immobilized placental tissue remained viable and metabolically active for up to 21 days, indicating its ability to interact with media components. CAPs contents abruptly decreased during the first 7 days in culture, probably due to structural damage to the placenta as revealed by scanning electron microcopy. CAPs levels remained low throughout the entire culture period, even though a slight recovery was noted in subcultured placentas. However, doubling the medium's nitrate content (from 40 to 80 mM) resulted in an important increment, reaching values similar to those of intact pod's placentas. These data suggest that isolated pepper placentas cultured in vitro remain metabolically active and are capable of metabolizing inorganic nitrogen sources, first into amino acids and, then, channeling them to CAP synthesis.

  1. Growth of wildtype and mutant E. coli strains in minimal media for optimal production of nucleic acids for preparing labeled nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Chandar S.; Brown, Margaret E.; Sama, Jacob N.; Jackson, Melantha E.

    2010-01-01

    Since RNAs lie at the center of most cellular processes, there is a need for synthesizing large amounts of RNAs made from stable isotope-labeled nucleotides to advance the study of their structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A particularly effective means of obtaining labeled nucleotides is to harvest these nucleotides from bacteria grown in defined minimal media supplemented with 15NH4Cl and various carbon sources. Given the high cost of carbon precursors required for labeling nucleic acids for NMR studies, it becomes important to evaluate the optimal growth for commonly used strains under standard minimal media conditions. Such information is lacking. In this study, we characterize the growth for Escherichia coli strains K12, K10zwf, and DL323 in three minimal media with isotopic-labeled carbon sources of acetate, glycerol, and glycerol combined with formate. Of the three media, the LeMaster-Richards and the Studier media outperform the commonly used M9 media and both support optimal growth of E. coli for the production of nucleotides. However, the growth of all three E. coli strains in acetate is reduced almost twofold compared to growth in glycerol. Analysis of the metabolic pathway and previous gene array studies help to explain this differential growth in glycerol and acetate. These studies should benefit efforts to make selective 13C-15N isotopic-labeled nucleotides for synthesizing biologically important RNAs. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00253-010-2813-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20730533

  2. The effect of nitrate on ethylene biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Li, Congna; Heber, Albert J

    2012-11-30

    This study investigated the effects of filter media types and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) concentrations in nutrient solutions on C(2)H(4) biofiltration. A new nutrient solution with zero NO(3)(-) concentration was supplied to two perlite-bed biotrickling filters, two perlite-bed biofilters, and two GAC (Granular Activated Carbon)-bed biofilters, while the other with 2 g L(-1) of NO(3)(-) was used for the other two GAC biofilters. All reactors underwent a total test duration of over 175 days with an EBRT (Empty Bed Residence Time) of 30 s, inlet gas flow rate of 7 L min(-1), and inlet C(2)H(4) concentrations of 20-30 mg m(-3). NO(3)(-) concentration and media type significantly affected the C(2)H(4) removal efficiencies in all types of biofiltration. The perlite media with no NO(3)(-) achieved C(2)H(4) removal efficiencies 10-50% higher than the others. A NO(3)(-) concentration as high as 2 g L(-1) in the original nutrient solution may act as an inhibitor that suppresses the growth or activity of C(2)H(4) degraders. In addition, the perlite media resulted in higher C(2)H(4) removal efficiencies than GAC media, because the hydrophilic surface of the perlite leads to a higher moisture content and thus to favorable microbial growth.

  3. Effectiveness of the bran media and bacteria inoculum treatments in increasing pH and reducing sulfur-total of acid sulfate soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufieq, Nur Anny Suryaningsih; Rahim, Sahibin Abdul; Jamil, Habibah

    2013-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effectiveness ofsulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in using bran as a source of food and energy, and to see the effectiveness of the bran media and bacteria inoculums treatments for pH and sulfur-total of acid sulfate reduction insoils. This study used two factors in group random designs with four treatments for bacteria inoculum of B1 (1%), B2 (5%), B3 (10%), B4 (15%) and two treatments for organic media (bran) of D1 (1:1) and D2 (1:19). Based on three replications, the combination resulted in a total of 24 treatments. Soil pH was measured using the Duddridge and Wainright method and determination of sulfate content in soil was conducted by the spectrophotometry method. The data obtained was analyzed for significance by Analysis of Variance and the Least Significant Difference Test. The pH of the initial acid sulfate soils ranged from 3 to 4 and the soil sulfur-total ranged from 1.4% to 10%. After mixing sulfate reducing bacteria with the bran mediaand incubated for four days, the pH of the acid sulfate soils increased from 3.67 to 4.20, while the soil sulfur-total contents had been reduced by 2.85% to 0.35%. This experiment has proven that an acid sulfate soil with low pH is a good growth medium for the sulfate reducing bacteria. The bestincubation period to achieve an effective bioremediation resultthrough sulfate percentage reduction by sulfate reducing bacteria was 10 days, while the optimum bran media dose was 1:19, and the bacteria inoculums dose was 10%.

  4. Effects of Nitrate Addition on Rumen Fermentation, Bacterial Biodiversity and Abundance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liping; Meng, Qingxiang; Ren, Liping; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xinzhuang; Huo, Yunlong; Zhou, Zhenming

    2015-10-01

    This study examined changes of rumen fermentation, ruminal bacteria biodiversity and abundance caused by nitrate addition with Ion Torrent sequencing and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Three rumen-fistulated steers were fed diets supplemented with 0%, 1%, and 2% nitrate (dry matter %) in succession. Nitrate supplementation linearly increased total volatile fatty acids and acetate concentration obviously (p = 0.02; p = 0.02; p<0.01), butyrate and isovalerate concentration numerically (p = 0.07). The alpha (p>0.05) and beta biodiversity of ruminal bacteria were not affected by nitrate. Nitrate increased typical efficient cellulolytic bacteria species (Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Ruminococcus ablus, and Fibrobacter succinogenes) (p<0.01; p = 0.06; p = 0.02). Ruminobactr, Sphaerochaeta, CF231, and BF311 genus were increased by 1% nitrate. Campylobacter fetus, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Mannheimia succiniciproducens were core nitrate reducing bacteria in steers and their abundance increased linearly along with nitrate addition level (p<0.01; p = 0.02; p = 0.04). Potential nitrate reducers in the rumen, Campylobacter genus and Cyanobacteria phyla were significantly increased by nitrate (p<0.01; p = 0.01). To the best of our knowledge, this was the first detailed view of changes in ruminal microbiota by nitrate. This finding would provide useful information on nitrate utilization and nitrate reducer exploration in the rumen. PMID:26194220

  5. Effects of Nitrate Addition on Rumen Fermentation, Bacterial Biodiversity and Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liping; Meng, Qingxiang; Ren, Liping; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xinzhuang; Huo, Yunlong; Zhou, Zhenming

    2015-01-01

    This study examined changes of rumen fermentation, ruminal bacteria biodiversity and abundance caused by nitrate addition with Ion Torrent sequencing and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Three rumen-fistulated steers were fed diets supplemented with 0%, 1%, and 2% nitrate (dry matter %) in succession. Nitrate supplementation linearly increased total volatile fatty acids and acetate concentration obviously (p = 0.02; p = 0.02; p<0.01), butyrate and isovalerate concentration numerically (p = 0.07). The alpha (p>0.05) and beta biodiversity of ruminal bacteria were not affected by nitrate. Nitrate increased typical efficient cellulolytic bacteria species (Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Ruminococcus ablus, and Fibrobacter succinogenes) (p<0.01; p = 0.06; p = 0.02). Ruminobactr, Sphaerochaeta, CF231, and BF311 genus were increased by 1% nitrate. Campylobacter fetus, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Mannheimia succiniciproducens were core nitrate reducing bacteria in steers and their abundance increased linearly along with nitrate addition level (p<0.01; p = 0.02; p = 0.04). Potential nitrate reducers in the rumen, Campylobacter genus and Cyanobacteria phyla were significantly increased by nitrate (p<0.01; p = 0.01). To the best of our knowledge, this was the first detailed view of changes in ruminal microbiota by nitrate. This finding would provide useful information on nitrate utilization and nitrate reducer exploration in the rumen. PMID:26194220

  6. Fluorimetric determination of tin and organotin compounds in hydroorganic and micellar media in the presence of 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Jourquin, G; Mahedero, M C; Paredes, S; Vire, J C; Kauffmann, J M

    1996-06-01

    The fluorescence of tin(IV) complexed by 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid (8-HQSA) has been studied in both aqueous and hydroorganic (acetate buffer and dimethylsulfoxide) media. Several experimental parameters such as pH, DMSO/water ratio and reactant concentration have been investigated to increase the fluorescence of the tin(IV)-8-HQSA complex. A linear relationship between tin(IV) concentration and fluorescence intensity was observed between 1.7 and 20 microM). Mechanistic and quantitative studies in the presence of surfactants have been performed. Judiciously selected micellar media permitted solubilisation and quantitation of tin(IV) as well as dibutyltin compounds. A linear relationship between concentration and fluorescence intensity was found for mono-, di- and tributyltin with detection limits of 0.1 microM, 0.7 microM and 1 microM, respectively.

  7. Nitrate enrichment alters a Daphnia-microparasite interaction through multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Tad; Drake, John M

    2014-02-01

    Nutrient pollution has the potential to alter many ecological interactions, including host-parasite relationships. One of the largest sources of nutrient pollution comes from anthropogenic alteration of the nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically the increased rate of nitrate (NO3-N) deposition to aquatic environments, potentially altering host-parasite relationships. This study aimed to assess the mechanisms through which nitrate may impact host-pathogen relationships using a fungal pathogen (Metschnikowia bicuspidata) parasitic to crustacean zooplankton (Daphnia dentifera) as a tractable model system. First, the influence of nitrate on host population dynamics was assessed along a gradient of nitrate concentrations. Nitrate decreased host population size and increased infection prevalence. Second, the influence of nitrate on host reproduction, mortality, and infection intensity was assessed at the individual host level by examining the relationship between pathogen dose and infection prevalence at ambient (0.4 mg NO3-N*L(-1)) and intermediate (12 mg NO3-N*L(-1)) levels of nitrate. Host fecundity and infection intensity both decreased with increasing pathogen dose, but increased nitrate levels corresponded to greater infection intensities. Nitrate had no effect on host growth rate, suggesting that hosts do not alter feeding behavior in nitrate-treated media compared with ambient conditions. This study suggests that nutrient enrichment may enhance disease through increased transmission and infection intensity, but that high levels of nitrate may result in smaller epidemics through reduced transmission caused by smaller population sizes and increased pathogen mortality.

  8. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  9. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  10. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  11. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations.

  12. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  13. The activation state of nitrate reductase is not always correlated with total nitrate reductase activity in leaves

    PubMed

    Man; Abd-El Baki GK; Stegmann; Weiner; Kaiser

    1999-10-01

    The relation between nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) activity, activation state and NR protein in leaves of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings was investigated. Maximum NR activity (NRA(max)) and NR protein content (Western blotting) were modified by growing plants hydroponically at low (0.3 mM) or high (10 mM) nitrate supply. In addition, plants were kept under short-day (8 h light/16 h dark) or long-day (16 h light/8 h dark) conditions in order to manipulate the concentration of nitrate stored in the leaves during the dark phase, and the concentrations of sugars and amino acids accumulated during the light phase, which are potential signalling compounds. Plants were also grown under phosphate deficiency in order to modify their glucose-6-phosphate content. In high-nitrate/long-day conditions, NRA(max) and NR protein were almost constant during the whole light period. Low-nitrate/long-day plants had only about 30% of the NRA(max) and NR protein of high-nitrate plants. In low-nitrate/long-day plants, NRA(max) and NR protein decreased strongly during the second half of the light phase. The decrease was preceded by a strong decrease in the leaf nitrate content. Short daylength generally led to higher nitrate concentrations in leaves. Under short-day/low-nitrate conditions, NRA(max) was slightly higher than under long-day conditions and remained almost constant during the day. This correlated with maintenance of higher nitrate concentrations during the short light period. The NR activation state in the light was very similar in high-nitrate and low-nitrate plants, but dark inactivation was twice as high in the high-nitrate plants. Thus, the low NRA(max) in low-nitrate/long-day plants was slightly compensated by a higher activation state of NR. Such a partial compensation of a low NR(max) by a higher dark activation state was not observed with phosphate-depleted plants. Total leaf concentrations of sugars, of glutamine and glutamate and of glucose-6-phosphate did

  14. Insights into the interplay of Lewis and Brønsted acid catalysts in glucose and fructose conversion to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural and levulinic acid in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Vinit; Mushrif, Samir H; Ho, Christopher; Anderko, Andrzej; Nikolakis, Vladimiros; Marinkovic, Nebojsa S; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Sandler, Stanley I; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2013-03-13

    5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) and levulinic acid production from glucose in a cascade of reactions using a Lewis acid (CrCl3) catalyst together with a Brønsted acid (HCl) catalyst in aqueous media is investigated. It is shown that CrCl3 is an active Lewis acid catalyst in glucose isomerization to fructose, and the combined Lewis and Brønsted acid catalysts perform the isomerization and dehydration/rehydration reactions. A CrCl3 speciation model in conjunction with kinetics results indicates that the hydrolyzed Cr(III) complex [Cr(H2O)5OH](2+) is the most active Cr species in glucose isomerization and probably acts as a Lewis acid-Brønsted base bifunctional site. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations indicate a strong interaction between the Cr cation and the glucose molecule whereby some water molecules are displaced from the first coordination sphere of Cr by the glucose to enable ring-opening and isomerization of glucose. Additionally, complex interactions between the two catalysts are revealed: Brønsted acidity retards aldose-to-ketose isomerization by decreasing the equilibrium concentration of [Cr(H2O)5OH](2+). In contrast, Lewis acidity increases the overall rate of consumption of fructose and HMF compared to Brønsted acid catalysis by promoting side reactions. Even in the absence of HCl, hydrolysis of Cr(III) decreases the solution pH, and this intrinsic Brønsted acidity drives the dehydration and rehydration reactions. Yields of 46% levulinic acid in a single phase and 59% HMF in a biphasic system have been achieved at moderate temperatures by combining CrCl3 and HCl.

  15. Fracture-controlled nitrate and atrazine transport in four Iowa till units.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Martin F; Simpkins, William W; Horton, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Fractures in till may provide pathways for agricultural chemicals to contaminate aquifers and surface waters. This study was conducted to quantify the influence of fractures on solute fate and transport using three conservative and two nonconservative tracers. The conservative tracers were potassium bromide (KBr), pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA), and 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid disodium salt (PIPES); the nonconservative tracers were nitrate and atrazine [6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine]. Three sites in Iowa were investigated, including four late Wisconsinan and Pre-Illinoian tills. Laboratory tracer experiments were conducted using eight large (0.4-0.45 m long by 0.43 m in diameter), undisturbed columns of till collected from depths of 1 to 28 m. The tills were densely fractured, with fracture spacing ranging from 3.8 to 10.4 cm. First arrival velocities of Br- ranged from 0.004 to 64.8 m d(-1), 10 to 100 times faster than predicted for unfractured media. Nitrate behaved as a conservative tracer in weathered till columns, but degraded during experiments using deeper tills. Sorption caused retardation of atrazine in the shallowest four columns. Atrazine degradation occurred in deeper columns as demonstrated by deviations between atrazine and the conservative tracers. Mobile-immobile model (MIM) simulations estimated first-order exchange coefficients (alpha) ranging from 1 x 10(-8) to 1.7 x 10(-2) s(-1), sorption coefficients (K(d)) for atrazine ranging from 2.6 x 10(-5) to 1 x 10(-3) m3 kg(-1), and degradation half-lives ranging from 0.24 to 67 d (nitrate) and 1.6 to 277 d (atrazine). This study suggests that aquifers and surface waters associated with thin, fractured till units may be vulnerable to contamination, yet deeper aquifers may be protected by these materials due to increased residence times provided by matrix diffusion.

  16. Enrichment of sulfate-reducing bacteria and resulting mineral formation in media mimicking pore water metal ion concentrations and pH conditions of acidic pit lakes.

    PubMed

    Meier, Jutta; Piva, Angela; Fortin, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Acid mine drainage sites are extreme environments with high acidity and metal ion concentrations. Under anoxic conditions, microbial sulfate reduction may trigger the formation of secondary minerals as a result of H2S production and pH increase. This process was studied in batch experiments with enrichment cultures from acidic sediments of a pit lake using growth media set at different pH values and containing elevated concentrations of Fe²⁺ and Al³⁺. At initial pH values of 5 and 6, sulfate reduction occurred shortly after inoculation. Sulfate- reducing bacteria affiliated to the genus Desulfosporosinus predominated the microbial communities as shown by 16S rRNA gene analysis performed at the end of the incubation. At initial pH values of 3 and 4, sulfate reduction and cell growth occurred only after an extended lag phase, however, at a higher rate than in the less acidic assays. At the end of the growth phase, enrichments were dominated by Thermodesulfobium spp. suggesting that these sulfate reducers were better adapted to acidic conditions. Iron sulfides in the bulk phase were common in all assays, but specific aluminum precipitates formed in close association with cell surfaces and may function as a detoxification mechanism of dissolved Al species at low pH.

  17. Minimizing Nitrate Reduction during Kjeldahl Digestion of Plant Tissue Extracts and Stem Exudates : APPLICATION TO N STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Pace, G M; Mackown, C T; Volk, R J

    1982-01-01

    From 10 to 60% of the nitrate present in plant tissue extracts and stem exudates of corn (Zea mays L.) was found to be reduced during Kjeldahl digestion, even in the absence of added reducing agents. This reduction is of particular concern in [(15)N]nitrate assimilation studies, because it results in an overestimate of nitrate reduction. To overcome this problem, a method was developed for removing nitrate prior to Kjeldahl digestion, thereby preventing nitrate reduction. The procedure utilizes hydrogen peroxide for partial oxidation of organic matter in order to minimize the nitration of organic compounds. The free nitrates are then volatilized as nitric acid from concentrated sulfuric acid at 95 degrees C. When the proposed method was used as a pretreatment to Kjeldahl digestion, less than 0.5% of the applied nitrate was recovered in the reduced nitrogen fraction of plant tissue extracts and stem exudates.

  18. Glycine lithium nitrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Valenzuela, R.; Hernández-Paredes, J.; Medrano-Pesqueira, T.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Jesús-Castillo, S.; Rodriguez-Mijangos, R.; Terpugov, V. S.; Alvarez-Ramos, M. E.; Duarte-Möller, A.

    Crystals of glycine lithium nitrate with non-linear optical properties have been grown in a solution by slow evaporation at room temperature. The crystal shows a good thermal stability from room temperature to 175 °C where the crystal begins to degrade. This property is desirable for future technological applications. Also, a good performance on the second harmonic generation was found, characterizing the emitted dominant wavelength by a customized indirect procedure using luminance and chromaticity measured data based on the CIE-1931 standard. Additionally, the 532 nm signal was detected by using a variant to the Kurtz and Perry method.

  19. Part 1. Conducting polymer: Experimental aspects of piezoelectric quartz crystal oscillator and electrodeposited polyvinylferrocene (PVF) film system. Part 2. Voltammetric studies of nitrate and nitrite ions at rotating silver disk and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mensah, E.A.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental aspects of the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) techniques have been studied. These two techniques were applied to the investigation of polyvinylferrocene (PVF) film(s) on gold (Au) substrate. Additionally the EQCM and the Ag rotating disk electrodes were employed in tandem to investigate nitrate/nitrite reduction in basic and acidic media. In Chapter 2, a broad historical perspective of QCM, its application in the vacuum community, and the extended use in various liquids and hence the exploitation of the beneficial characteristics for electrochemical purposes (EQCM), are discussed. Chapter 3 treats the relatively new, yet established field of conducting polymer. Imbued in this chapter is the discussion of electrodeposition, rigidity determination, and characterization of PVF film. The studies of electroreduction of nitrate and nitrite ions are examined in chapters 4 and 5. Reduction in a basic solution is discussed in chapter 4, while chapter 5 looks at reduction in an acid medium.

  20. Modeling the acid-base properties of glutathione in different ionic media, with particular reference to natural waters and biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Cigala, Rosalia Maria; Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2012-08-01

    The acid-base properties of γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine (glutathione, GSH) were determined by potentiometry (ISE-H(+), glass electrode) in pure NaI((aq)) and in NaCl((aq))/MgCl(2(aq)), and NaCl((aq))/CaCl(2(aq)) mixtures, at T = 298.15 K and different ionic strengths (up to I(c) ~ 5.0 mol L(-1)). In addition, the activity coefficients of glutathione were also determined by the distribution method at the same temperature in various ionic media (LiCl((aq)), NaCl((aq)), KCl((aq)), CsCl((aq)), MgCl(2(aq)), CaCl(2(aq)), NaI((aq))). The results obtained were also used to calculate the Specific ion Interaction Theory (SIT) and Pitzer coefficients for the dependence on medium and ionic strength of glutathione species, as well as the formation constants of weak Mg(j)H( i )(GSH)((i+2j-3)) and Ca(j)H(i)(GSH)((i+2j-3)) complexes. Direct calorimetric titrations were also carried out in pure NaCl((aq)) and in NaCl((aq))/CaCl(2(aq)) mixtures at different ionic strengths (0.25 ≤ I (c )/mol L(-1) ≤ 5.0) in order to determine the enthalpy changes for the protonation and complex formation equilibria in these media at T = 298.15 K. Results obtained are useful for the definition of glutathione speciation in any aqueous media containing the main cations of natural waters and biological fluids, such as Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+). Finally, this kind of systematic studies, where a series of ionic media (e.g., all alkali metal chlorides) is taken into account in the determination of various thermodynamic parameters, is useful for the definition of some trends in the thermodynamic behavior of glutathione in aqueous solution. PMID:21997535

  1. Modeling the acid-base properties of glutathione in different ionic media, with particular reference to natural waters and biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Cigala, Rosalia Maria; Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2012-08-01

    The acid-base properties of γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine (glutathione, GSH) were determined by potentiometry (ISE-H(+), glass electrode) in pure NaI((aq)) and in NaCl((aq))/MgCl(2(aq)), and NaCl((aq))/CaCl(2(aq)) mixtures, at T = 298.15 K and different ionic strengths (up to I(c) ~ 5.0 mol L(-1)). In addition, the activity coefficients of glutathione were also determined by the distribution method at the same temperature in various ionic media (LiCl((aq)), NaCl((aq)), KCl((aq)), CsCl((aq)), MgCl(2(aq)), CaCl(2(aq)), NaI((aq))). The results obtained were also used to calculate the Specific ion Interaction Theory (SIT) and Pitzer coefficients for the dependence on medium and ionic strength of glutathione species, as well as the formation constants of weak Mg(j)H( i )(GSH)((i+2j-3)) and Ca(j)H(i)(GSH)((i+2j-3)) complexes. Direct calorimetric titrations were also carried out in pure NaCl((aq)) and in NaCl((aq))/CaCl(2(aq)) mixtures at different ionic strengths (0.25 ≤ I (c )/mol L(-1) ≤ 5.0) in order to determine the enthalpy changes for the protonation and complex formation equilibria in these media at T = 298.15 K. Results obtained are useful for the definition of glutathione speciation in any aqueous media containing the main cations of natural waters and biological fluids, such as Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+). Finally, this kind of systematic studies, where a series of ionic media (e.g., all alkali metal chlorides) is taken into account in the determination of various thermodynamic parameters, is useful for the definition of some trends in the thermodynamic behavior of glutathione in aqueous solution.

  2. Acclimation of sublethal acidic and alkaline media of Tilapia mossambica (Peters): changes in glycogen metabolism of red muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskar, M.; Govindappa, S.

    1986-07-01

    Freshwater bodies at several parts of the globe are presently undergoing progressive acidification due to acid precipitation and acid mine drainage. Significant changes under altered pH stress includes reduced primary production of algal biomass, benthic communities and rapid decline in fish populations. Studies dealing with the physiological responses of fish to acidic and alkaline water pollution are very limited. Hence, the studies dealing with the biological impact of acidity and alkalinity on the physiology and biochemistry of freshwater fish has been undertaken.

  3. Regulation of Nitrate Assimilation and Nitrate Respiration in Aerobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Van 'T Riet, J.; Stouthamer, A. H.; Planta, R. J.

    1968-01-01

    The influence of growth conditions on assimilatory and respiratory nitrate reduction in Aerobacter aerogenes was studied. The level of nitrate reductase activity in cells, growing in minimal medium with nitrate as the sole nitrogen source, was much lower under aerobic than anaerobic conditions. Further, the enzyme of the aerobic cultures was very sensitive to sonic disintegration, as distinct from the enzyme of anaerobic cultures. When a culture of A. aerogenes was shifted from anaerobic growth in minimal medium with nitrate and NH4+ to aerobiosis in the same medium, but without NH4+, the production of nitrite stopped instantaneously and the total activity of nitrate reductase decreased sharply. Moreover, there was a lag in growth of about 3 hr after such a shift. After resumption of growth, the total enzymatic activity increased again slowly and simultaneously became gradually sensitive to sonic disintegration. These findings show that oxygen inactivates the anaerobic nitrate reductase and represses its further formation; only after a de novo synthesis of nitrate reductase with an assimilatory function will growth be resumed. The enzyme in aerobic cultures was not significantly inactivated by air, only by pure oxygen. The formation of the assimilatory enzyme complex was repressed, however, by NH4+, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that the formation of the assimilatory enzyme complex and that of the respiratory enzyme complex are regulated differently. We suggest that both complexes have a different composition, but that the nitrate reductase in both cases is the same protein. PMID:5726295

  4. Production of citric and oxalic acids and solubilization of calcium phosphate by Penicillium bilaii.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, J E; Kuiack, C

    1992-01-01

    An isolate of Penicillium bilaii previously reported to solubilize mineral phosphates and enhance plant uptake of phosphate was studied. Using agar media with calcium phosphate and the pH indicator alizarin red S, the influence of the medium composition on phosphate solubility and medium acidification was recorded. The major acidic metabolites produced by P. bilaii in a sucrose nitrate liquid medium were found to be oxalic acid and citric acid. Citric acid production was promoted under nitrogen-limited conditions, while oxalic acid production was promoted under carbon-limited conditions. Citric acid was produced in both growth and stationary phases, but oxalic acid production occurred only in stationary phase. When submerged cultures which normally produce acid were induced to sporulate, the culture medium shifted toward alkaline rather than acid reaction with growth. PMID:1622211

  5. Inorganic nitrate promotes the browning of white adipose tissue through the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lee D; Ashmore, Tom; Kotwica, Aleksandra O; Murfitt, Steven A; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J; Griffin, Julian L

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic nitrate was once considered an oxidation end product of nitric oxide metabolism with little biological activity. However, recent studies have demonstrated that dietary nitrate can modulate mitochondrial function in man and is effective in reversing features of the metabolic syndrome in mice. Using a combined histological, metabolomics, and transcriptional and protein analysis approach, we mechanistically defined that nitrate not only increases the expression of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue but also induces the expression of brown adipocyte-specific genes and proteins in white adipose tissue, substantially increasing oxygen consumption and fatty acid β-oxidation in adipocytes. Nitrate induces these phenotypic changes through a mechanism distinct from known physiological small molecule activators of browning, the recently identified nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway. The nitrate-induced browning effect was enhanced in hypoxia, a serious comorbidity affecting white adipose tissue in obese individuals, and corrected impaired brown adipocyte-specific gene expression in white adipose tissue in a murine model of obesity. Because resulting beige/brite cells exhibit antiobesity and antidiabetic effects, nitrate may be an effective means of inducing the browning response in adipose tissue to treat the metabolic syndrome.

  6. Use of a hydrogen anode for nitrate waste destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kalu, E.E.; White, R.E.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1996-10-01

    Processes are being evaluated to separate the high-level radioactive species from the waste and store them permanently in the form of durable solids. The remaining low-level radioactive waste contains species such as nitrites and nitrates that are capable of contaminating ground water. The use of a hydrogen gas-fed anode and an acid analyte in an electrochemical cell used to destroy nitrate is demonstrated. A mixed Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} anolyte is shown to favor nitrate cell performance and the generation of a higher hydroxide ion concentration in the catholyte. The suggested scheme is an apparent method of sodium sulfate disposal and a possible means through which ammonia (to ammonium sulfate, fertilizer) and hydrogen gas could be recycled through the anode side of the reactor. This could result in a substantial savings in the operation of a nitrate destruction cell.

  7. Effects of different media and nitrogen sources and levels on growth and lipid of green microalga Botryococcus braunii KMITL and its biodiesel properties based on fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Ruangsomboon, Suneerat

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to find an optimum culture medium for green microalga Botryococcus braunii KMITL and investigate its biodiesel properties based on fatty acid composition. Four different media were tested. Chlorella medium was the best medium for lipid yield. Among four nitrogen sources tested, KNO3 produced the highest lipid yield. When varied the nitrogen concentrations, this strain gave the highest lipid yield at the highest nitrogen level. When cultivated in the best medium and nitrogen source and level for 30 days, and then cultivated further for 14 days in the medium with no nitrogen, the highest lipid content and yield were 49.94±0.82% and 2.71±0.02 g L(-1), respectively. C16:0 fatty acid was the major fatty acid found. Fatty acid profiles of B. braunii KMITL cultivated in Chlorella medium with 1.25 g L(-1) KNO3 gave the best biodiesel properties with the lowest iodine value, maximum cetane number, and lowest degree of unsaturation.

  8. Palladium-catalyzed mono-N-allylation of unprotected anthranilic acids with allylic alcohols in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Hikawa, Hidemasa; Yokoyama, Yuusaku

    2011-10-21

    Palladium-catalyzed N-allylation of anthranilic acids 1a-j with allyl alcohol 2a in the presence of Pd(OAc)(2), sodium diphenylphosphinobenzene-3-sulfonate (TPPMS) in THF-H(2)O at room temperature gave only mono-N-allylated anthranilic acids 3a-j in good yields (70-98%). The reactions of 4-bromoanthranilic acid 1i with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol 2b showed complete chemoselectivity in N-allylation (neutral conditions) and C-vinylation (basic conditions). In our catalytic system, the keys to success are use of an unprotected anthranilic acid as a starting material and the presence of water in the reaction medium. The carboxyl group of anthranilic acid and water may play important roles for the smooth generation of the π-allyl palladium species by activation of the hydroxyl group of the allylic alcohol. PMID:21919524

  9. Observations of Fine and Coarse Particle Nitrate at Several Rural Locations in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taehyoung; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2008-04-01

    Nitrate comprises an important part of aerosol mass at many non-urban locations during some times of the year. Little is known, however, about the chemical form and size distribution of particulate nitrate in these environments. While submicron ammonium nitrate is often assumed to be the dominant species, this assumption is rarely tested. Properties of aerosol nitrate were characterized at several IMPROVE monitoring sites during a series of field studies. Study sites included Bondville, Illinois (February 2003), San Gorgonio Wilderness Area, California (April and July 2003), Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (May 2003), Brigantine National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee (July/August 2004). Nitrate was found predominantly in submicron ammonium nitrate particles during the Bondville and San Gorgonio (April) campaigns. Coarse mode nitrate particles, resulting from reactions of nitric acid or its precursors with sea salt or soil dust, were more important at Grand Canyon and Great Smoky Mountains. Both fine and coarse mode nitrate were important during the studies at Brigantine and San Gorgonio (July). These results, which complement earlier findings about the importance of coarse particle nitrate at Yosemite and Big Bend National Parks, suggest a need to more closely examine common assumptions regarding the importance of ammonium nitrate at non-urban sites, to include pathways for coarse mode nitrate formation in regional models, and to consider impacts of coarse particle nitrate on visibility. Because coarse particle nitrate modes often extend well below 2.5 µm aerodynamic diameter, measurements of PM2.5 nitrate in these environments should not automatically be assumed to contain only ammonium nitrate.

  10. Two Novel Bacterial Biosensors for Detection of Nitrate Availability in the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Ji, Pingsheng; Firestone, Mary K.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    The nitrate-regulated promoter of narG in Escherichia coli was fused to promoterless ice nucleation (inaZ) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter genes to yield the nitrate-responsive gene fusions in plasmids pNice and pNgfp, respectively. While the promoter of narG is normally nitrate responsive only under anaerobic conditions, the L28H-fnr gene was provided in trans to enable nitrate-dependent expression of these reporter gene fusions even under aerobic conditions in both E. coli DH5α and Enterobacter cloacae EcCT501R. E. cloacae and E. coli cells containing the fusion plasmid pNice exhibited more than 100-fold-higher ice nucleation activity in cultures amended with 10 mM sodium nitrate than in nitrate-free media. The GFP fluorescence of E. cloacae cells harboring pNgfp was uniform at a given concentration of nitrate and increased about 1,000-fold when nitrate increased from 0 to 1 mM. Measurable induction of ice nucleation in E. cloacae EcCT501R harboring pNice occurred at nitrate concentrations of as low as 0.1 μM, while GFP fluorescence was detected in cells harboring pNgfp at about 10 μM. In the rhizosphere of wild oat (Avena fatua), the whole-cell bioreporter E.cloacae(pNgfp) or E. cloacae(pNice) expressed significantly higher GFP fluorescence or ice nucleation activity when the plants were grown in natural soils amended with nitrate than in unamended natural soils. Significantly lower nitrate abundance was detected by the E. cloacae(pNgfp) reporter in the A. fatua rhizosphere compared to in bulk soil, indicating plant competition for nitrate. Ice- and GFP-based bacterial sensors thus are useful for estimating nitrate availability in relevant microbial niches in natural environments. PMID:16332845

  11. Some History of Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    2003-12-01

    The history of saltpeter is an interesting combination of chemistry, world trade, technology, politics, and warfare. Originally it was obtained from the dirt floors of stables, sheep pens, pigeon houses, caverns, and even peasants' cottages; any place manure and refuse accumulated in soil under dry conditions. When these sources became inadequate to meet demand it was manufactured on saltpeter plantations, located in dry climates, where piles of dirt, limestone, and manure were allowed to stand for three to five years while soil microbes oxidized the nitrogen to nitrate—an example of early bioengineering. Extensive deposits of sodium nitrate were mined in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile from 1830 until the mid 1920s when the mines were displaced by the Haber Ostwald process.

  12. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  13. Mortality of nitrate fertiliser workers.

    PubMed

    Al-Dabbagh, S; Forman, D; Bryson, D; Stratton, I; Doll, R

    1986-08-01

    An epidemiological cohort study was conducted to investigate the mortality patterns among a group of workers engaged in the production of nitrate based fertilisers. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that individuals exposed to high concentrations of nitrates might be at increased risk of developing cancers, particularly gastric cancer. A total of 1327 male workers who had been employed in the production of fertilisers between 1946 and 1981 and who had been occupationally exposed to nitrates for at least one year were followed up until 1 March 1981. In total, 304 deaths were observed in this group and these were compared with expected numbers calculated from mortality rates in the northern region of England, where the factory was located. Analysis was also carried out separately for a subgroup of the cohort who had been heavily exposed to nitrates--that is, working in an environment likely to contain more than 10 mg nitrate/m3 for a year or longer. In neither the entire cohort nor the subgroup was any significant excess observed for all causes of mortality or for mortality from any of five broad categories of cause or from four specific types of cancer. A small excess of lung cancer was noted more than 20 years after first exposure in men heavily exposed for more than 10 years. That men were exposed to high concentrations of nitrate was confirmed by comparing concentrations of nitrates in the saliva of a sample of currently employed men with control men, employed at the same factory but not in fertiliser production. The men exposed to nitrate had substantially raised concentrations of nitrate in their saliva compared with both controls within the industry and with men in the general population and resident nearby. The results of this study therefore weight against the idea that exposure to nitrates in the environment leads to the formation in vivo of material amounts of carcinogens. PMID:3015194

  14. Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Krapukhin, V.B.; Krasavina, E.P. Pikaev, A.K.

    1997-07-01

    From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs.

  15. Dissolution kinetics and mechanism of Mg-Al layered double hydroxides: a simple approach to describe drug release in acid media.

    PubMed

    Parello, Mara L; Rojas, Ricardo; Giacomelli, Carla E

    2010-11-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) weathering in acidic media is one of the main features that affects their applications in drug delivery systems. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of biocompatible Mg-Al LDHs was studied at different initial pH values and solid concentrations using a simple and fast experimental method that coupled flow injection analysis and amperometric detection. A carbonate intercalated sample was used to determine the controlling step of the process and the dissolution mechanism. Finally, the study was extended to an ibuprofen intercalated LDH. The obtained results showed that the weathering process was mainly controlled by the exposed area and surface reactivity of LDHs particles. The dissolution mechanism at the particle surface was described in two steps: fast formation of surface reactive sites by hydroxyl group protonation and slow detachment of metal ions from surface. At strongly acidic conditions, the reaction rate was pH dependent due to the equilibrium between protonated (active) and deprotonated (inactive) hydroxyl groups. On the other hand, at mildly acidic conditions, the dissolution behavior was also ruled by the equilibrium attained between the particle surface reactive sites and the dissolved species. LDHs solubility and dissolution rate presented strong dependence with the interlayer anion. The ibuprofen intercalated sample was more soluble and more rapidly dissolved than the carbonate intercalated one in acetic/acetate buffer. On the other hand, the dissolution mechanism was invariant with the interlayer anion.

  16. Characterization and fatty acid profiling in two fresh water microalgae for biodiesel production: Lipid enhancement methods and media optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Karpagam, Rathinasamy; Raj, Kalimuthu Jawahar; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem; Varalakshmi, Perumal

    2015-01-01

    Two fresh water microalgae, Coelastrella sp. M-60 and Micractinium sp. M-13 were investigated in this study for their potential of biodiesel production. For increasing biomass and lipid production, these microalgae were subjected to nutrient starvation (nitrogen, phosphorous, iron), salinity stress and nutrient supplementation with sugarcane industry effluent, citric acid, glucose and vitamin B12. The lipid productivity obtained from the isolates Coelastrella sp. M-60 (13.9 ± 0.4 mg/L/day) and Micractinium sp. M-13 (11.1 ± 0.2 mg/L/day) was maximum in salinity stress. The media supplemented with all the four nutrients yielded higher lipid productivity than the control. The response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to evaluate the effect of sugarcane industry effluent and citric acid on growth and lipid yield. Fatty acid profile of Coelastrella sp. M-60 and Micractinium sp. M-13 were composed of C-14, C-16:0, C-18:0, C-18:1 and C-18:2 and their fuel properties were also in accordance with international standards.

  17. Suitable combination of promoter and micellar catalyst for kilo fold rate acceleration on benzaldehyde to benzoic acid conversion in aqueous media at room temperature: A kinetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aniruddha; Saha, Rumpa; Ghosh, Sumanta K.; Mukherjee, Kakali; Saha, Bidyut

    2013-05-01

    The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde by chromic acid in aqueous and aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, alkyl phenyl polyethylene glycol, Triton X-100 and N-cetylpyridinium chloride, CPC) media have been investigated in the presence of promoter at 303 K. The pseudo-first-order rate constants (kobs) were determined from a logarithmic plot of absorbance as a function time. The rate constants were found to increase with introduction of heteroaromatic nitrogen base promoters such as Picolinic acid (PA), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). The product benzoic acid has been characterized by conventional melting point experiment, NMR, HRMS and FTIR spectral analysis. The mechanism of both unpromoted and promoted reaction path has been proposed for the reaction. In presence of the anionic surfactant SDS, cationic surfactant CPC and neutral surfactant TX-100 the reaction can undergo simultaneously in both aqueous and micellar phase with an enhanced rate of oxidation in the micellar phase. Both SDS and TX-100 produce normal micellar effect whereas CPC produce reverse micellar effect in the presence of benzaldehyde. The observed net enhancement of rate effects has been explained by considering the hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the surfactants and reactants. SDS and bipy combination is the suitable one for benzaldehyde oxidation.

  18. Suitable combination of promoter and micellar catalyst for kilo fold rate acceleration on benzaldehyde to benzoic acid conversion in aqueous media at room temperature: a kinetic approach.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aniruddha; Saha, Rumpa; Ghosh, Sumanta K; Mukherjee, Kakali; Saha, Bidyut

    2013-05-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of benzaldehyde by chromic acid in aqueous and aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, alkyl phenyl polyethylene glycol, Triton X-100 and N-cetylpyridinium chloride, CPC) media have been investigated in the presence of promoter at 303 K. The pseudo-first-order rate constants (kobs) were determined from a logarithmic plot of absorbance as a function time. The rate constants were found to increase with introduction of heteroaromatic nitrogen base promoters such as Picolinic acid (PA), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). The product benzoic acid has been characterized by conventional melting point experiment, NMR, HRMS and FTIR spectral analysis. The mechanism of both unpromoted and promoted reaction path has been proposed for the reaction. In presence of the anionic surfactant SDS, cationic surfactant CPC and neutral surfactant TX-100 the reaction can undergo simultaneously in both aqueous and micellar phase with an enhanced rate of oxidation in the micellar phase. Both SDS and TX-100 produce normal micellar effect whereas CPC produce reverse micellar effect in the presence of benzaldehyde. The observed net enhancement of rate effects has been explained by considering the hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction between the surfactants and reactants. SDS and bipy combination is the suitable one for benzaldehyde oxidation.

  19. Mathematical modeling of cadmium(II) solvent extraction from neutral and acidic chloride media using Cyanex 923 extractant as a metal carrier.

    PubMed

    Leopold, A A; Coll, M T; Fortuny, A; Rathore, N S; Sastre, A M

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes experimental work and the mathematical modeling of solvent extraction of cadmium(II) from neutral and acidic aqueous chloride media with a Cyanex 923 extractant in Exxol D-100. Solvent extraction experiments were carried out to analyze the influence of variations in the composition of the aqueous and organic phases on the efficiency of cadmium(II) extraction. In neutral and acidic chloride conditions, the extraction of cadmium(II) by the organophosphorous extractant Cyanex 923 (L) is based on the solvation mechanism of neutral H(n)CdCl((2+n)) species and the formation of H(n)CdCl((2+n))L(q) complexes in the organic phase, where n=0, 1, 2 and q=1, 2. The mathematical model of cadmium(II) extraction was derived from the mass balances and chemical equilibria involved in the separation system. The model was computed with the Matlab software. The equilibrium parameters for metal extraction, i.e. the stability constants of the aqueous Cd-Cl complexes, the formation constants of the acidic Cd-Cl species and the metal equilibrium extraction constants, were proposed. The optimized constants were appropriate, as there was good agreement when the model was fitted to the experimental data for each of the experiments.

  20. Oxidative leaching process with cupric ion in hydrochloric acid media for recovery of Pd and Rh from spent catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C A; Paiva, A P; Oliveira, P C; Costa, M C; da Costa, A M Rosa

    2014-08-15

    The recycling of platinum-group metals from wastes such as autocatalytic converters is getting growing attention due to the scarcity of these precious metals and the market pressure originated by increase of demand in current and emerging applications. Hydrometallurgical treatment of such wastes is an alternative way to the most usual pyrometallurgical processes based on smelter operations. This paper focuses on the development of a leaching process using cupric chloride as oxidising agent, in HCl media, for recovery of palladium and rhodium from a spent catalyst. The chloride media allows the adequate conditions for oxidising and solubilising the metals, as demonstrated by equilibrium calculations based on thermodynamic data. The experimental study of the leaching process revealed that Pd solubilisation is clearly easier than that of Rh. The factors temperature, time, and HCl and Cu(2+) concentrations were significant regarding Pd and Rh leaching, the latter requiring higher factor values to achieve the same results. Leaching yields of 95% Pd and 86% Rh were achieved under optimised conditions (T = 80 °C, t = 4h, [HCl] = 6M, [Cu(2+)] = 0.3M). PMID:24953939

  1. Oxidative leaching process with cupric ion in hydrochloric acid media for recovery of Pd and Rh from spent catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C A; Paiva, A P; Oliveira, P C; Costa, M C; da Costa, A M Rosa

    2014-08-15

    The recycling of platinum-group metals from wastes such as autocatalytic converters is getting growing attention due to the scarcity of these precious metals and the market pressure originated by increase of demand in current and emerging applications. Hydrometallurgical treatment of such wastes is an alternative way to the most usual pyrometallurgical processes based on smelter operations. This paper focuses on the development of a leaching process using cupric chloride as oxidising agent, in HCl media, for recovery of palladium and rhodium from a spent catalyst. The chloride media allows the adequate conditions for oxidising and solubilising the metals, as demonstrated by equilibrium calculations based on thermodynamic data. The experimental study of the leaching process revealed that Pd solubilisation is clearly easier than that of Rh. The factors temperature, time, and HCl and Cu(2+) concentrations were significant regarding Pd and Rh leaching, the latter requiring higher factor values to achieve the same results. Leaching yields of 95% Pd and 86% Rh were achieved under optimised conditions (T = 80 °C, t = 4h, [HCl] = 6M, [Cu(2+)] = 0.3M).

  2. Nitrate concentrations under irrigated agriculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaporozec, A.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, considerable interest has been expressed in the nitrate content of water supplies. The most notable toxic effect of nitrate is infant methemoglobinemia. The risk of this disease increases significantly at nitrate-nitrogen levels exceeding 10 mg/l. For this reason, this concentration has been established as a limit for drinking water in many countries. In natural waters, nitrate is a minor ionic constituent and seldom accounts for more than a few percent of the total anions. However, nitrate in a significant concentration may occur in the vicinity of some point sources such as septic tanks, manure pits, and waste-disposal sites. Non-point sources contributing to groundwater pollution are numerous and a majority of them are related to agricultural activities. The largest single anthropogenic input of nitrate into the groundwater is fertilizer. Even though it has not been proven that nitrogen fertilizers are responsible for much of nitrate pollution, they are generally recognized as the main threat to groundwater quality, especially when inefficiently applied to irrigated fields on sandy soils. The biggest challenge facing today's agriculture is to maintain the balance between the enhancement of crop productivity and the risk of groundwater pollution. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  3. Polyvinyl alcohol and amino acids as substitutes for bovine serum albumin in culture media for mouse preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Biggers, J D; Summers, M C; McGinnis, L K

    1997-01-01

    The effect of replacing bovine serum albumin (BSA) in a simple defined medium (KSOM) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and/or amino acids on the percentages of mouse zygotes that develop to at least the blastocyst stage and that hatch at least partially or completely is reported. Blastocysts could form when BSA was replaced with only PVA, but at a moderately reduced rate; however, partial hatching, and hence complete hatching, were severely impaired when BSA was replaced with only PVA. The substitution of BSA with amino acids alone resulted in a high rate of blastocyst formation and moderate impairment of hatching. The addition of PVA to BSA-free KSOM supplemented with amino acids had no extra effect. BSA had significant effects when added to BSA-free KSOM supplemented with amino acids. The BSA caused a significant increase in the rate of partial hatching, and may even have had a small effect on the rate of blastocyst formation. The results also showed that glucose, at a high concentration of 5.56 mM, does not inhibit the development of mouse zygotes to hatched blastocysts when cultured in KSOM supplemented with amino acids. PMID:9286737

  4. SPATIO-TEMPORAL ANALYSIS OF TOTAL NITRATE CONCENTRATIONS USING DYNAMIC STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric concentrations of total nitrate (TNO3), defined here as gas-phase nitric acid plus particle-phase nitrate, are difficult to simulate in numerical air quality models due to the presence of a variety of formation pathways and loss mechanisms, some of which ar...

  5. Nitration of Phenols Using Cu(NO[subscript 3])[subscript 2]: Green Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yadav, Urvashi; Mande, Hemant; Ghalsasi, Prasanna

    2012-01-01

    An easy-to-complete, microwave-assisted, green chemistry, electrophilic nitration method for phenol using Cu(NO[subscript 3])[subscript 2] in acetic acid is discussed. With this experiment, students clearly understand the mechanism underlying the nitration reaction in one laboratory session. (Contains 4 schemes.)

  6. Modeling of the dissolution of oxide phases I. Electrochemical model of the dissolution of copper(II) oxides in acidic media

    SciTech Connect

    Gorichev, I.G.; Dorofeev, M.V.; Batrakov, V.V.; Shaplygin, I.S.; Nevskaya, E.Yu.

    1994-12-01

    Suggested in this report is a theoretical substantiation of the change in the order of reaction with respect to hydrogen ions in the reaction of Cu(II) oxides with electrolytes. This idea is based on the electrochemical concepts concerning the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL). It was shown that during the dissolution of Cu(II) oxides in acidic media, the order of reaction with respect to hydrogen ions changes from 0.5 to 1.5 as the pH of the solution grows. This change is correlated with the charge acquired by the oxide-electrolyte solution interface. The developed concepts can be applied to describing dissolution kinetics for other oxides.

  7. Changing the Action of Iron from Stoichiometric to Electrocatalytic in the Hydrogenation of Ketones in Aqueous Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, Marina; Easton, Max; Fabos, Viktoria; Guo, Si-Xuan; Zhang, Jie; Perosa, Alvise; Selva, Maurizio; Bond, Alan M; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Cyclohexanone, a model compound chosen to conveniently represent small oxygenates present in the aqueous phase of biomass hydrothermal upgrading streams, was hydrogenated in the presence of electrodeposited iron(0) using aqueous formic or sulfuric acid as a hydrogen donor. Under these conditions, zero-valent iron is consumed stoichiometrically and serves as both a formic acid decomposition site and a hydrogen transfer agent. However, the resulting iron(II) can be used to continuously regenerate iron(0) when a potential is applied to the glassy carbon working electrode. Controlled potential electrolysis experiments show a 17% conversion of cyclohexanone (over 1000 seconds) to cyclohexanol with >80% efficiency of iron deposition from an iron(II) sulfate solution containing formic or sulfuric acid. In the absence of electrodeposited iron, formation of cyclohexanol could not be detected.

  8. Changing the Action of Iron from Stoichiometric to Electrocatalytic in the Hydrogenation of Ketones in Aqueous Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, Marina; Easton, Max; Fabos, Viktoria; Guo, Si-Xuan; Zhang, Jie; Perosa, Alvise; Selva, Maurizio; Bond, Alan M; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Cyclohexanone, a model compound chosen to conveniently represent small oxygenates present in the aqueous phase of biomass hydrothermal upgrading streams, was hydrogenated in the presence of electrodeposited iron(0) using aqueous formic or sulfuric acid as a hydrogen donor. Under these conditions, zero-valent iron is consumed stoichiometrically and serves as both a formic acid decomposition site and a hydrogen transfer agent. However, the resulting iron(II) can be used to continuously regenerate iron(0) when a potential is applied to the glassy carbon working electrode. Controlled potential electrolysis experiments show a 17% conversion of cyclohexanone (over 1000 seconds) to cyclohexanol with >80% efficiency of iron deposition from an iron(II) sulfate solution containing formic or sulfuric acid. In the absence of electrodeposited iron, formation of cyclohexanol could not be detected. PMID:26382111

  9. Modelling of The Atmospheric Chemistry of Organic Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsland, N.

    Organic nitrates are linked to the formation of tropospheric ozone and the cycling and transport of nitrogen-containing species in the atmosphere. Few laboratory stud- ies have been carried out on the reactions of organic nitrates. Photolysis quantum yield studies and UV absorption spectra have been carried out for the simple alkyl nitrates and PAN. Studies of PAN and ethyl nitrate with other atmospheric components (the hydroxyl radical - OH - and the chlorine atom - Cl) have been carried out to mea- sure their rates of reaction. However, the products and mechanisms of these reactions are poorly understood. We present here the results of modelling the reactions of the C1-C8 alkyl nitrates and PAN with the hydroxyl radical. These models are based on information from current literature and from photochemical reactor studies carried out at the Environment Institute, EU Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy. These studies give us a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms and products of the atmospheric loss of organic nitrates due to reaction with the hydroxyl radical. Preliminary studies show that the major products are aldehydes, ketones, nitro-oxy aldehydes, nitro-oxy ketones, NOx and nitric acid.

  10. [Photodegradation of UV filter PABA in nitrate solution].

    PubMed

    Meng, Cui; Ji, Yue-Fei; Zeng, Chao; Yang, Xi

    2011-09-01

    The aqueous photolysis of a UV filter p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) using Xe lamp as simulated solar irradiation source was investigated in the presence of nitrate ions. The effects of pH, concentration of nitrate ions and concentration of humic substance in natural water on the photodegradation of PABA were studied. The results showed that photodegradation of PABA in nitrate solution followed the first order kinetics. The increasing concentration of nitrate ion increased favored the photodegradaton of PABA, of which the first order constant increased from 0.002 2 min(-10 to 0.017 9 min(-1). The photodegradation of PABA promoted with the increase of pH while the increasing concentration of humic substance showed inhibiting effect. Hydroxyl radicals determined by the molecular probe method played a very importnant role in the photolysis process of PABA. Photoproducts upon irradiation of PABA in nitrate solution were isolated by means of solid-phase extraction (SPE) and identified by LC-MS techniques. The probable photoinduced degradation pathways in nitrate solution were proposed. PMID:22165219

  11. Acidity and complex formation studies of 3-(adenine-9-yl)-propionic and 3-(thymine-1-yl)-propionic acids in ethanol-water media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammud, Hassan H.; El Shazly, Shawky; Sonji, Ghassan; Sonji, Nada; Bouhadir, Kamal H.

    2015-05-01

    The ligands 3-(adenine-9-yl)propionic acid (AA) and 3-(thymine-1-yl)propionic acid (TA) were prepared by N9-alkylation of adenine and N1-alkylation of thymine with ethylacrylate in presence of a base catalyst, followed by acid hydrolysis of the formed ethyl esters to give the corresponding propionic acid derivatives. The products were characterized by spectral methods (FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR), which confirm their structures. The dissociation constants of ligands, were potentiometrically determined in 0.3 M KCl at 20-50 °C temperature range. The work was extended to study complexation behavior of AA and TA with various biologically important divalent metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Mn2+ and Pb2+) in 50% v/v water-ethanol medium at four different temperatures, keeping ionic strength constant (0.3 M KCl). The order of the stability constants of the formed complexes decreases in the sequence Cu2+ > Pb2+ > Zn2+ > Ni2+ > Co2+ > Mn2+ > Cd2+ for both ligands. The effect of temperature was also studied and the corresponding thermodynamic functions (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) were derived and discussed. The formation of metal complexes has been found to be spontaneous, and the stability constants were dependant markedly on the basicity of the ligands.

  12. Conformation and protonation of 2,2'-bipyridine and 4,4'-bipyridine in acidic aqueous media and acidic ZSM-5 zeolites: a Raman scattering study.

    PubMed

    Moissette, A; Batonneau, Y; Brémard, C

    2001-12-12

    In situ FT-Raman scattering spectroscopy was used to monitor the sorption kinetics of 2,2'- and 4,4'-bipyridine in acidic ZSM-5 zeolites. The data processing of all the Raman spectra was applied to extract the characteristic Raman spectra of occluded species and respective Raman contribution generated from many spectral data which resolves spectrum of mixture into pure component spectra without any prior information. The assignment of the extracted spectra was performed according to careful comparison with corresponding spectra extracted from a set of Raman spectra recorded during the protonation of 2,2'- or 4,4'-bipyridine (bpy) in hydrochloric acid aqueous solutions. The data processing of the Raman spectra recorded during the slow sorption of 4,4'-bpy in acidic H(n)ZSM-5 (n = 3, 6) zeolites provides specific Raman spectrum of N,N'-diprotonated dication 4,4'-bpyH(2)(2+) as unique species generated in the void space of acidic ZSM-5 zeolites. No evidence of Lewis acid sites was found during the sorption of 4,4'-bpy by Raman scattering spectroscopy. The data processing of the Raman spectra recorded during the slow sorption of 2,2'-bpy in acidic H(n)ZSM-5 (n = 3, 6) zeolites provides specific Raman spectrum of trans-N-monoprotonated cation 2,2'-bpyH+ as major species generated in the void space of acidic ZSM-5 zeolites at loading corresponding to 1 mol per unit cell. The trans/cis interconversion occurs at higher loading even after the complete uptake of the sorbate and indicates some rearrangement in the void space over a long time. The cations were found to be located in straight channels in the vicinity of the intersection with the zigzag channel of the porous materials with the expected conformations deduced from ab initio calculations. However, the motions of occluded species within the channel of ZSM-5 are hindered but remain in the range of the isotropic limit of a liquid at room temperature.

  13. Formation processes of CuCl and regenerated Cu crystals on bronze surfaces in neutral and acidic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Julin; Xu, Chunchun; Lv, Guocheng

    2006-07-01

    The paper is devoted to investigating the formation of CuCl and regenerated Cu crystals on bronze. Electrochemical behaviour of bronze in simulated anoxic edaphic media and occluded cell (O.C.) solutions was studied with cycle voltammetry (CV) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Within potential range of -800 to +800 mV, oxidation occurred was largely a process in which Cu is oxidized to CuCl and the reduction process was a reverse of it. An atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to observe the morphology of CuCl crystals, regenerated Cu crystals and corrosion interface at nm level. The deposition of regenerated Cu on simulated archaeological bronzes was simulated under experimental conditions for the first time. CuCl could be thoroughly reduced to pure Cu if reduction time interval were sufficiently prolonged. This provided a theoretical and experimental basis for getting rid of harmful CuCl patina from archaeological bronzes with electrochemical means.

  14. Biological nitrate removal processes from drinking water supply-a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews both heterotrophic and autotrophic processes for the removal of nitrate from water supplies. The most commonly used carbon sources in heterotrophic denitrification are methanol, ethanol and acetic acid. Process performance for each feed stock is compared with particular reference nitrate and nitrite residual and to toxicity potential. Autotrophic nitrate removal has the advantages of not requiring an organic carbon source; however the slow growth rate of autotrophic bacteria and low nitrate removal rate have contributed to the fact that relatively few full scale plants are in operation at the present time. PMID:24355262

  15. Lewis acid catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of natural epoxy oil (Euphorbia oil) in carbon dioxide media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an attempt to build up useful application of plant oil based polymers, natural epoxy oil (euphorbia oil-EuO) was polymerized in liquid carbon dioxide in the presence of Lewis acid catalyst [Boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3•OEt2)]. The resulting polymers (RPEuO) were characterized by FTIR ...

  16. Physicochemical properties and ecotoxicological effects of yttrium oxide nanoparticles in aquatic media: Role of low molecular weight natural organic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Zhuang; Wang, Se; Fang, Hao; Chen, Mindong; Xu, Defu; Tang, Lili; Wang, Degao

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) interact with natural organic acids is important to ecological risk assessment of ENPs, but this interaction remains poorly studied. Here, we investigate the dispersion stability, ion release, and toxicity of yttrium oxide nanoparticles (nY2O3) suspensions after exposure to two low molecular weight natural organic acids (LOAs), namely benzoic acid and gallic acid. We find that in the presence of LOAs the nY2O3 suspensions become more stable with surface zeta potential more positive or negative, accompanied by small agglomerated size. LOA interaction with nY2O3 is shown to promote the release of dissolved yttrium from the nanoparticles, depending on the concentrations of LOAs. Toxic effects of the nY2O3 suspensions incubated with LOAs on Scenedesmus obliquus as a function of their mixture levels show three types of signs: stimulation, inhibition, and alleviation. The mechanism of the effects of LOAs on the nY2O3 toxicity may be mainly associated with the degree of agglomeration, particle-induced oxidative stress, and dissolved yttrium. Our results stressed the importance of LOA impacts on the fate and toxicity of ENPs in the aquatic environment.

  17. EFFECT OF HEMIN AND OXYGEN TENSION ON GROWTH AND NITRATE REDUCTION BY BACTERIA.

    PubMed

    JACOBS, N J; HEADY, R E; JACOBS, J M; CHAN, K; DEIBEL, R H

    1964-06-01

    Jacobs, N. J. (American Meat Institute Foundation, Chicago, Ill.), R. E. Heady, J. M. Jacobs, K. Chan, and R. H. Deibel. Effect of hemin and oxygen tension on growth and nitrate reduction by bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 87:1406-1411. 1964.-The effect of hemin supplementation of growth media on the ability of several bacteria to reduce nitrate was studied. Added hemin had no detectable effect on the ability of these organisms to reduce nitrate when grown in stationary cultures exposed to air. However, under anaerobic conditions, six strains of facultatively anaerobic staphylococci required hemin for nitrate reduction and growth stimulation in complex, nitrate-containing media. In a nutritionally defined medium, one strain of Staphylococcus required both hemin and nitrate for anaerobic growth. Anaerobic growth and nitrite production of the aerobe Bacillus subtilis was stimulated by addition of hemin. However, the anaerobic growth response was markedly de-decreased as compared with that obtained under static atmospheric conditions. Hemin had no detectable effect on anaerobic nitrate reduction or growth of the obligate aerobe Pseudomonas denitrificans, or of the facultative anaerobes Escherichia coli, B. polymyxa, and Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

  18. Reduction of Sodium Nitrate Liquid Waste in Nuclear Reprocessing Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Numata, M.; Mihara, S.; Kojima, S.; Ito, H.; Kato, T.

    2006-07-01

    Sodium nitrate solution has been generated from nuclear reprocessing plant as a result of neutralization of nitric acid. The sodium nitrate has been immobilized by bitumen, cement or other material in the site and waste packages have been produced. In order to reduce an environmental impact of the waste packages from the reprocessing plant, it is preferable to decompose nitrate ion to harmless gases such as nitrogen. A combination of formic acid and catalyst has been proposed for this purpose. But, the method is inadequate for a full decomposition of the nitrate ion. In addition, a mixture of NO and NO{sub 2} is produced during the reaction. Formaldehyde and hydrazine were selected as reductants and a combined use of Pd-Cu catalyst was tried to decompose the nitrate ion. As a result, the nitrate ion can almost entirely be decomposed without any generation of NO and NO{sub 2}. The test was conducted by 1 L flask. In case of formaldehyde, nitrate ion concentration can be reduced from 0.017 mol/l to 3.9x10{sup -4} mol/l. In case of hydrazine, nitrate concentration can be decreased from 2.8 mol/l to 9.5 x 10{sup -3} mol/l and ammonium ion is detected. The ammonium ion concentration in the final solution is 0.12 mol/l when 2.8 mol/l nitrate is reduced by hydrazine. Chemical reactions for formaldehyde on the Pd-Cu catalyst are estimated as combination of: NO{sub 3-} + HCHO = NO{sub 2-} + HCOOH; 2NO{sub 2-} + 3HCOOH = N{sub 2} + 3CO{sub 2} + 2H{sub 2}O + 2OH-; 4NO{sub 2-} + 3HCHO = 2N{sub 2} + 3CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O + 4OH-. the other hand, for hydrazine with the Pd-Cu catalyst: 3N{sub 2}H{sub 4} = 2NH{sub 3} + 2N{sub 2} + 3H{sub 2}; NO{sub 3-} + H{sub 2} = NO{sub 2-} + H{sub 2}O; NO{sub 2-} + NH{sub 3} = N{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O + OH-. The fundamental research shows that the combination usage of the Pd-Cu catalyst and formaldehyde or hydrazine is applicable for the reduction of nitrate liquid waste in the nuclear reprocessing plant. (authors)

  19. Kinetics of toluene degradation by a nitrate-reducing bacterium isolated from a groundwater aquifer.

    PubMed

    Elmén, J; Pan, W; Leung, S Y; Magyarosy, A; Keasling, J D

    1997-07-01

    Groundwater from a xylene-contaminated acquifer was enriched in the laboratory in the presence of toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, and benzene. A pure culture that degrades toluene and m-xylene under nitrate-reducing conditions was isolated. Fatty acid analysis, 16S rRNA sequencing, and morphological traits indicate that the isolate was a strain of Azoarcus tolulyticus. The kinetics of toluene degradation under nitrate-reducing conditions by this isolate was determined. Nitrate reduction does not proceed beyond nitrite. Nitrate and toluene are substrate limiting at low concentrations, whereas toluene, nitrate, and nitrite are inhibitory at high concentrations. Several inhibition models were compared to experimental data to represent inhibition by these substrates. A kinetic model for toluene and nitrate degradation as well as for cell growth and nitrite production was developed and compared to experimental data. The results of this work may find important application in the remediation of groundwater aquifers contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons.

  20. Vasodilator Therapy: Nitrates and Nicorandil.

    PubMed

    Tarkin, Jason M; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Nitrates have been used to treat symptoms of chronic stable angina for over 135 years. These drugs are known to activate nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophasphate (cGMP) signaling pathways underlying vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation, albeit many questions relating to how nitrates work at the cellular level remain unanswered. Physiologically, the anti-angina effects of nitrates are mostly due to peripheral venous dilatation leading to reduction in preload and therefore left ventricular wall stress, and, to a lesser extent, epicardial coronary artery dilatation and lowering of systemic blood pressure. By counteracting ischemic mechanisms, short-acting nitrates offer rapid relief following an angina attack. Long-acting nitrates, used commonly for angina prophylaxis are recommended second-line, after beta-blockers and calcium channel antagonists. Nicorandil is a balanced vasodilator that acts as both NO donor and arterial K(+) ATP channel opener. Nicorandil might also exhibit cardioprotective properties via mitochondrial ischemic preconditioning. While nitrates and nicorandil are effective pharmacological agents for prevention of angina symptoms, when prescribing these drugs it is important to consider that unwanted and poorly tolerated hemodynamic side-effects such as headache and orthostatic hypotension can often occur owing to systemic vasodilatation. It is also necessary to ensure that a dosing regime is followed that avoids nitrate tolerance, which not only results in loss of drug efficacy, but might also cause endothelial dysfunction and increase long-term cardiovascular risk. Here we provide an update on the pharmacological management of chronic stable angina using nitrates and nicorandil.

  1. Formulation of low-cost fermentative media for lactic acid production with Lactobacillus rhamnosus using vinification lees as nutrients.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Guadalupe; Moldes, Ana Belén; Cruz, José Manuel; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2004-02-25

    Lees coming from different steps in white wine and red wine vinification were characterized under physicochemical analyses to determine the content in carbon, nitrogen, ashes, solids in suspension, organic compounds, and minerals. Due to the hydrolytic activity of Lactobacillus strains, lees without autolysis treatments were used directly as the unique nutrient or in combination with corn steep liquor to carry out the glucose to lactic acid fermentation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus CECT-288. Time courses of glucose and lactic acid were modeled according to reported models. Using 20 g/L of lees coming from the white wine technology and re-collected after the second decanting step before distillation, as the only nutrient, the values achieved (P = 105.5 g/L, Q(P) = 2.470 g/L.h) were even higher than those obtained with the costly MRS broth (P = 104.3 g/L, Q(P) = 2.251 g/L.h).

  2. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  3. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  4. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  5. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  6. Porous media investigation before and after hydrochloric acid injection on a pre-salt carbonate coquinas sample.

    PubMed

    Machado, A C; Teles, A P; Pepin, A; Bize-Forest, N; Lima, I; Lopes, R T

    2016-04-01

    Porous space characterization of carbonate rocks is an important aid in petroleum exploration from carbonate reservoir. In this study, X-ray microtomography technique was applied to evaluate total porosity of a coquina sample extracted from pre-salt reservoir, in Brazil, before and after acid injection. Two image processing program were used in order to assess performance. The results showed that microtomography has potential to compute porosity of coquina samples and provides information about rock porous network. PMID:26794261

  7. Perfluorinated carboxylic and sulphonic acids in surface water media from the regions of Tibetan Plateau: Indirect evidence on photochemical degradation?

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Eriko; Falandysz, Jerzy; Taniyasu, Sachi; Hui, Ge; Jurkiewicz, Gabriela; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Yang, Yong-Liang; Lam, Paul K S

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorinated surfactants and repellents are synthetic substances that have found numerous industrial and customer applications. Due to their persistence, at least two groups of these substances-perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs)-are diffused widely in the environment. It is hypothesized that the Tibetan Plateau, is one of few unique places on the Earth, due to its topography, specifically the vast space and high elevation above sea level, geographic location, climate, high solar radiation, lack of industry, little urbanization and general lack of significant direct sources of pollution. There it is believed possible to gain an insight into atmospheric fate (possible photochemical degradation of higher molecular mass and formation of lower molecular mass PFCAs and PFSAs) of PFASs under un-disturbed environmental conditions. Ultratrace analytical method for PFCAs and PFSAs and use of transportation and field blanks, laboratory blanks and isotopically labelled surrogates for recovery control has allowed the determination of nine perfluorinated carboxylic acids and six perfluorinated sulfonic acids at ultra-trace levels in water based samples from the alpine dimension regions of the Tibetan Plateau, the eastern slope of Minya Konka peak at the eastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, and also from the city of Chengdu from the lowland of the Sichuan Province in China. The specific compositional pattern of PFCAs and PFSAs and low levels of pollution with those compounds were observed in the central region of the Tibetan Plateau and in the region adjacent to the peaks of Minya Konka in the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The fingerprint of the compositional pattern of PFCAs and PFSAs in water samples in the central region of the Tibetan Plateau and in the alpine region adjacent to the peaks of Minya Konka in the Eastern Tibetan Plateau may be explained by the result of photochemical degradation with dealkylation of longer chain

  8. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-12

    Nitrate and nitrite have been almost completely removed from the synthetic effluent steam with good efficiency by affecting a separation across a pair of ion exchange membranes. In addition to recovering acid and base in this process, the volume of the remaining effluent is reduced considerably by transport of water across the membrane. One of the problems that remains with this process, however, is the stability of the membranes and particularly the stability of the anion exchange membrane. This membrane is exposed to both nitric acid and strongly alkaline solutions in the cell and to date long term stability has been a problem with the membranes tested. It is recommended that further work should evaluate other newly available membranes as well as study the effects of radiation on the performance of the membranes. The direct reduction of nitrate and nitrite has been studied at several different electrode materials and it has been demonstrated that cathode material has a large effect on both the efficiency and the gas product distribution. Highest current efficiencies for the reduction process are seen at those electrode materials that are known to show high hydrogen overpotentials. Flow cell studies have demonstrated that temperature and current density are also important parameters in the system. The reduction process has been run efficiently at high current densities (600 mAcm{sup {minus}2}) at 80{degrees}C at a lead cathode.

  9. ANSID: a Solid-Phase Proteomic Approach for Identification and Relative Quantification of Aromatic Nitration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriel, Tal; Whitehouse, Julia; Ma, Yuliang; Mercer, Emily; Brown, Neil; Gross, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Nitration of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acid residues in proteins occurs in the setting of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases – importantly, this modification has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases and the physiological process of tissue aging. To understand the biological consequences of aromatic nitration in both health and disease, it is critical to molecularly identify the proteins that undergo nitration, specify their cognate modification sites and quantify their extent of nitration. To date, unbiased identification of nitrated proteins has painstakingly employed 2D-gel electrophoresis followed by Western Blotting with an anti-nitrotyrosine antibody for detection. Apart from being relatively slow and laborious, this method suffers from limited coverage, the potential for false-positive identifications and failure to reveal specific amino acid modification sites. To overcome these shortcomings, we have developed a solid-phase, chemical-capture approach for unbiased and high-throughput discovery of nitrotyrosine and nitrotryptophan sites in proteins. Utilizing this method, we have successfully identified several endogenously nitrated proteins in rat brain and a total of 244 nitrated peptides from 145 proteins following in vitro exposure of rat brain homogenates to the nitrating agent peroxynitrite (1 mM). As expected, Tyr residues constituted the great majority of peroxynitrite-mediated protein nitration sites; however, we were surprised to discover several brain proteins that contain nitrated Trp residues. By incorporating a stable-isotope labeling step, this new Aromatic Nitrtion Site IDentification (ANSID) method was also adapted for relative quantification of nitration site abundances in proteins. Application of the quantitative ANSID method offers great potential to advance our understanding of the role of protein nitration in disease pathogenesis and normal physiology.

  10. ANSID: a Solid-Phase Proteomic Approach for Identification and Relative Quantification of Aromatic Nitration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriel, Tal; Whitehouse, Julia; Ma, Yuliang; Mercer, Emily; Brown, Neil; Gross, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Nitration of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acid residues in proteins occurs in the setting of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases - importantly, this modification has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases and the physiological process of tissue aging. To understand the biological consequences of aromatic nitration in both health and disease, it is critical to molecularly identify the proteins that undergo nitration, specify their cognate modification sites and quantify their extent of nitration. To date, unbiased identification of nitrated proteins has painstakingly employed 2D-gel electrophoresis followed by Western Blotting with an anti-nitrotyrosine antibody for detection. Apart from being relatively slow and laborious, this method suffers from limited coverage, the potential for false-positive identifications and failure to reveal specific amino acid modification sites. To overcome these shortcomings, we have developed a solid-phase, chemical-capture approach for unbiased and high-throughput discovery of nitrotyrosine and nitrotryptophan sites in proteins. Utilizing this method, we have successfully identified several endogenously nitrated proteins in rat brain and a total of 244 nitrated peptides from 145 proteins following in vitro exposure of rat brain homogenates to the nitrating agent peroxynitrite (1 mM). As expected, Tyr residues constituted the great majority of peroxynitrite-mediated protein nitration sites; however, we were surprised to discover several brain proteins that contain nitrated Trp residues. By incorporating a stable-isotope labeling step, this new Aromatic Nitrtion Site IDentification (ANSID) method was also adapted for relative quantification of nitration site abundances in proteins. Application of the quantitative ANSID method offers great potential to advance our understanding of the role of protein nitration in disease pathogenesis and normal physiology.

  11. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN THE SINGLE, BINARY, AND TERNARY SYSTEMS OF COTTON BURR COMPOST, ZEROVALENT IRON, AND SEDIMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research has shown that carbonaceous solid materials and zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as media in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to degrade groundwater nitrate via heterotrophic denitrification in the solid carbon system, and via abiotic reduction and ...

  12. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  13. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents. PMID:20876180

  14. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  15. EXTRACTION OF URANYL NITRATE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Furman, N.H.; Mundy, R.J.

    1957-12-10

    An improvement in the process is described for extracting aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions with an organic solvent such as ether. It has been found that the organic phase will extract a larger quantity of uranyl nitrate if the aqueous phase contains in addition to the uranyl nitrate, a quantity of some other soluble nitrate to act as a salting out agent. Mentioned as suitable are the nitrates of lithium, calcium, zinc, bivalent copper, and trivalent iron.

  16. On the importance of aerosol nitrate over Europe : data analysis and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, M.

    2003-12-01

    The central theme of this thesis is the nitrate content of aerosols (or particulate matter (PM)). Aerosols play an important role in the climate system by scattering and/or absorbing solar radiation. In the last decades research has been devoted to quantify the radiative forcing of aerosols on climate. However, little is known about the forcing of aerosol nitrate. The large uncertainties around the nitrate forcing are directly related to a lack of reliable measurement data. In this thesis a study devoted to assess the importance of nitrate for the radiation balance over Europe is presented. The first step in this study was to search for data on aerosol nitrate. However, sampling aerosol nitrate is subject to evaporation losses and adsorption of nitric acid. Therefore, an analysis of sampling artefacts is presented first. Main results of this analysis are that quartz filters loose nitrate above 20ºC and that cellulose filters sample both nitrate and nitric acid quantitatively. Using the knowledge of artefacts we constructed a nitrate field over Europe for the winter. High nitrate levels are projected over north western, central and eastern Europe. There the nitrate concentrations exceed 4 µg/m3. Maximum levels are found in the Po valley. In Scandinavia nitrate levels trail off from 2.5 µg/m3 in the south to less than 0.5 µg/m3 in the north. In addition, we developed a chemistry-transport model (CTM) to describe the formation, dispersion and removal of nitrate and other aerosol components in the atmosphere. The model is able to reproduce the general features of the wintertime distribution derived from the observations. In winter nitric acid, the precursor for aerosol nitrate, is formed through heterogeneous reactions on the surface of aerosols. Appreciable ammonium nitrate concentrations in summer are limited to those areas with high ammonia emissions, e.g. the Netherlands. Over large parts of eastern and southern Europe low ammonium nitrate concentrations are

  17. [Acute liver injury in rats by praseodymium nitrate (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schriewer, H; Gebauer, B; Rauen, H M

    1976-01-01

    After acute intoxication with praseodymium nitrate (10 mg/kg body weight i.v.), time functions of enzyme activities of GOT, GPT, ChE, AP and of free fatty acids concentration in rat serum were analysed and the results subjected to significance and correlation analysis. Time functions of free fatty acids concentration corresponded with those of enzyme activities of GOT and GPT. In the early state of intoxication serum concentrations of palmitoleinic and oleic acid were more increased than those of stearinic acid. There seems to be an alteration in the correlations of analysed measures with regard to their temporal changes parallel to the progress of intoxication.

  18. Modeling nitrate-nitrogen load reduction strategies for the des moines river, iowa using SWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Wolter, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Des Moines River that drains a watershed of 16,175 km2 in portions of Iowa and Minnesota is impaired for nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) due to concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for public water supplies. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was used to model streamflow and nitrate loads and evaluate a suite of basin-wide changes and targeting configurations to potentially reduce nitrate loads in the river. The SWAT model comprised 173 subbasins and 2,516 hydrologic response units and included point and nonpoint nitrogen sources. The model was calibrated for an 11-year period and three basin-wide and four targeting strategies were evaluated. Results indicated that nonpoint sources accounted for 95% of the total nitrate export. Reduction in fertilizer applications from 170 to 50 kg/ha achieved the 38% reduction in nitrate loads, exceeding the 34% reduction required. In terms of targeting, the most efficient load reductions occurred when fertilizer applications were reduced in subbasins nearest the watershed outlet. The greatest load reduction for the area of land treated was associated with reducing loads from 55 subbasins with the highest nitrate loads, achieving a 14% reduction in nitrate loads achieved by reducing applications on 30% of the land area. SWAT model results provide much needed guidance on how to begin implementing load reduction strategies most efficiently in the Des Moines River watershed. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  19. The effect of peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst MnTBAP on aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 nitration by organic nitrates: role in nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mollace, Vincenzo; Muscoli, Carolina; Dagostino, Concetta; Giancotti, Luigino Antonio; Gliozzi, Micaela; Sacco, Iolanda; Visalli, Valeria; Gratteri, Santo; Palma, Ernesto; Malara, Natalia; Musolino, Vincenzo; Carresi, Cristina; Muscoli, Saverio; Vitale, Cristiana; Salvemini, Daniela; Romeo, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Bioconversion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) into nitric oxide (NO) by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH-2) is a crucial mechanism which drives vasodilatory and antiplatelet effect of organic nitrates in vitro and in vivo. Oxidative stress generated by overproduction of free radical species, mostly superoxide anions and NO-derived peroxynitrite, has been suggested to play a pivotal role in the development of nitrate tolerance, though the mechanism still remains unclear. Here we studied the free radical-dependent impairment of ALDH-2 in platelets as well as vascular tissues undergoing organic nitrate ester tolerance and potential benefit when using the selective peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst Mn(III) tetrakis (4-Benzoic acid) porphyrin (MnTBAP). Washed human platelets were made tolerant to nitrates via incubation with GTN for 4h. This was expressed by attenuation of platelet aggregation induced by thrombin (40U/mL), an effect accompanied by GTN-related induction of cGMP levels in platelets undergoing thrombin-induced aggregation. Both effects were associated to attenuated GTN-induced nitrite formation in platelets supernatants and to prominent nitration of ALDH-2, the GTN to NO metabolizing enzyme, suggesting that GTN tolerance was associated to reduced NO formation via impairment of ALDH-2. These effects were all antagonized by co-incubation of platelets with MnTBAP, which restored GTN-induced responses in tolerant platelets. Comparable effect was found under in in vivo settings. Indeed, MnTBAP (10mg/kg, i.p.) significantly restored the hypotensive effect of bolus injection of GTN in rats made tolerants to organic nitrates via chronic administration of isosorbide-5-mononitrate (IS-5-MN), thus confirming the role of peroxynitrite overproduction in the development of tolerance to vascular responses induced by organic nitrates. In conclusion, oxidative stress subsequent to prolonged use of organic nitrates, which occurs via nitration of ALDH-2, represents a key event

  20. The effect of peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst MnTBAP on aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 nitration by organic nitrates: role in nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mollace, Vincenzo; Muscoli, Carolina; Dagostino, Concetta; Giancotti, Luigino Antonio; Gliozzi, Micaela; Sacco, Iolanda; Visalli, Valeria; Gratteri, Santo; Palma, Ernesto; Malara, Natalia; Musolino, Vincenzo; Carresi, Cristina; Muscoli, Saverio; Vitale, Cristiana; Salvemini, Daniela; Romeo, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Bioconversion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) into nitric oxide (NO) by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH-2) is a crucial mechanism which drives vasodilatory and antiplatelet effect of organic nitrates in vitro and in vivo. Oxidative stress generated by overproduction of free radical species, mostly superoxide anions and NO-derived peroxynitrite, has been suggested to play a pivotal role in the development of nitrate tolerance, though the mechanism still remains unclear. Here we studied the free radical-dependent impairment of ALDH-2 in platelets as well as vascular tissues undergoing organic nitrate ester tolerance and potential benefit when using the selective peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst Mn(III) tetrakis (4-Benzoic acid) porphyrin (MnTBAP). Washed human platelets were made tolerant to nitrates via incubation with GTN for 4h. This was expressed by attenuation of platelet aggregation induced by thrombin (40U/mL), an effect accompanied by GTN-related induction of cGMP levels in platelets undergoing thrombin-induced aggregation. Both effects were associated to attenuated GTN-induced nitrite formation in platelets supernatants and to prominent nitration of ALDH-2, the GTN to NO metabolizing enzyme, suggesting that GTN tolerance was associated to reduced NO formation via impairment of ALDH-2. These effects were all antagonized by co-incubation of platelets with MnTBAP, which restored GTN-induced responses in tolerant platelets. Comparable effect was found under in in vivo settings. Indeed, MnTBAP (10mg/kg, i.p.) significantly restored the hypotensive effect of bolus injection of GTN in rats made tolerants to organic nitrates via chronic administration of isosorbide-5-mononitrate (IS-5-MN), thus confirming the role of peroxynitrite overproduction in the development of tolerance to vascular responses induced by organic nitrates. In conclusion, oxidative stress subsequent to prolonged use of organic nitrates, which occurs via nitration of ALDH-2, represents a key event

  1. Wet sulfate and nitrate deposition patterns in eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemba, S. G.; Golomb, D.; Fay, J. A.

    Four year (1982-1985) averaged acid deposition (sulfate and nitrate ion) data obtained at 77 stations of the Acid Deposition System in Eastern North America (ENA) are analyzed for seasonal and spatial variations. Average sulfate concentrations over most of ENA range from 1.5-3 mg l-1. Highest sulfate depositions (>35kg ha -1y -1) occur over west Pennsylvania, the Virginias, east Michigan, and southern Ontario between Lakes Huron and Erie. Sulfate isopleths generally stretch along a SW-NE axis. In the northeast quadrant of ENA, 65-70% of the annual sulfate depositions occur in the April-September half year; some regions in southern Canada experience as much as 75% in that period. Average nitrate concentrations range from 1-2mg l-1 throughout much of ENA. Peak nitrate depositions (>20kg ha -1 y -1) fall between Lakes Michigan and Ontario; 15 kg ha -1y -1 or more cover most of the Midwest, New York, New England and south Ontario. Nitrate depositions are more evenly distributed throughout the year, with 55-65% occurring in the April-September half year. The average annual molar ratio of SO 42- to NO 3- varies from 0.8-1.5 over ENA. The ratio is highest at south-central receptors and lower at northern latitudes. Implications of these findings on strategies to mitigate acid deposition are discussed.

  2. Impact assessment and remediation strategies for roadway construction in acid-bearing media: case study from Mid-Appalachia

    SciTech Connect

    Viadero, R.C.; Fortney, R.H.; Creel, A.T.

    2008-09-15

    The likelihood of encountering land impacted by current and/or historic coal mining activities is high when constructing roadways in the Mid-Appalachian region. Through additional disturbance of these lands, environmental impacts such as acid and dissolved metals loading and subsequent impacts to aquatic flora and fauna will ensue. Consequently, it is necessary to affect a paradigm shift in roadway design and construction to account for the presence of factors that compound the already difficult task of working in a region characterized by steep topography and aggressive geochemistry. In this study, assessments of the water chemistry and biological impacts of a waste pile containing spoils from previous mining and the presence of an exposed coal mine bench were made as representative microcosmic examples of typical conditions found in the region. Based on quantitative measurements of water quality and biological conditions, recommendations are presented for the assessment and avoidance of impacts prior to construction through acid-bearing materials and suggestions are offered for postconstruction remediation at previously impacted sites.

  3. A solution for cesium removal from high-salinity acidic or alkaline liquid waste: The crown calix[4]arenes

    SciTech Connect

    Dozol, J.F.; Simon, N.; Lamare, V.; Rouquette, H.; Eymard, S.; Tournois, B.; Marc, D. de; Macias, R.M.

    1999-04-01

    Calix[4]arenes monocrown or biscrown, blocked in 1,3 alternative cone conformation, display an exceptional efficiency for cesium extraction, even from very acid or alkaline media. Moreover, they possess an important selectivity for cesium over sodium that makes possible the extraction of cesium from media containing high sodium nitrate loadings. Another advantage, since the extraction of cesium is reversible, is that the stripping of cesium can be carried out in deionized water, a property which leads to very high concentration factors. 79 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Exogenous Addition of Arachidonic Acid to the Culture Media Enhances the Functionality of Dendritic Cells for Their Possible Use in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jeetendra; Gurav, Rupali; Kale, Vaijayanti; Limaye, Lalita

    2014-01-01

    The development of dendritic cell based vaccines is a promising approach in cancer immunotherapy. For their successful use in the clinics, the propagation and functionality of DCs is crucial. We earlier established a two-step method for the large scale generation of DCs from umbilical cord blood derived MNCs/CD34+ cells. This work aims at improving their functionality based on the following observations: in vitro generated DCs can be less efficient in migration and other functional activities due to lower eicosanoid levels. The production of eicosanoids from Arachidonic Acid (AA) can be hampered due to suppression of the enzyme phospholipase A2 by IL-4, an essential cytokine required for the differentiation of DCs. We hypothesized that exogenous addition of AA to the culture media during DC generation may result in DCs with improved functionality. DCs were generated with and without AA. The two DC sets were compared by phenotypic analysis, morphology and functional assays like antigen uptake, MLR, CTL assay and in vitro and in vivo migration. Though there were no differences between the two types of DCs in terms of morphology, phenotype and antigen uptake, AA+ DCs exhibited an enhanced in vitro and in vivo migration, T cell stimulatory capacity, CTL activity and significantly higher transcript levels of COX-2. AA+ DCs also show a favorable Th1 cytokine profile than AA- DCs. Thus addition of AA to the culture media is skewing the DCs towards the secretion of more IL-12 and less of IL-10 along with the restoration of eicosanoids levels in a COX-2 mediated pathway thereby enhancing the functionality of these cells to be used as a potent cellular vaccine. Taken together, these findings will be helpful in the better contriving of DC based vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25369453

  5. Listeria phage and phage tail induction triggered by components of bacterial growth media (phosphate, LiCl, nalidixic acid, and acriflavine).

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Jean-Paul; Duroux, Amandine; Pimpie, Romain; Duez, Jean-Marie; Milat, Marie-Louise

    2015-03-01

    The detection of Listeria monocytogenes from food is currently carried out using a double enrichment. For the ISO methodology, this double enrichment is performed using half-Fraser and Fraser broths, in which the overgrowth of L. innocua can occur in samples where both species are present. In this study, we analyzed the induction of phages and phage tails of Listeria spp. in these media and in two brain heart infusion (BHI) broths (BHIM [bioMérieux] and BHIK [Biokar]) to identify putative effectors. It appears that Na2HPO4 at concentrations ranging from 1 to 40 g/liter with an initial pH of 7.5 can induce phage or phage tail production of Listeria spp., especially with 10 g/liter of Na2HPO4 and a pH of 7.5, conditions present in half-Fraser and Fraser broths. Exposure to LiCl in BHIM (18 to 21 g/liter) can also induce phage and phage tail release, but in half-Fraser and Fraser broths, the concentration of LiCl is much lower (3 g/liter). Low phage titers were induced by acriflavine and/or nalidixic acid. We also show that the production of phages and phage tails can occur in half-Fraser and Fraser broths. This study points out that induction of phages and phage tails could be triggered by compounds present in enrichment media. This could lead to a false-negative result for the detection of L. monocytogenes in food products.

  6. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  7. Modelling of the growth-no growth interface of Issatchenkia occidentalis, an olive spoiling yeast, as a function of the culture media, NaCl, citric and sorbic acid concentrations: study of its inactivation in the no growth region.

    PubMed

    Arroyo López, F N; Quintana, M C Durán; Fernández, A Garrido

    2007-06-30

    A global logistic model incorporating a dummy variable for the growth medium (laboratory media or table olives brine) was used for the estimation of the growth-no growth interface of Issatchenkia occidentalis as a function of NaCl, citric and sorbic acid concentrations. The model permitted the deduction of the region where the combination of citric and sorbic acids in laboratory media (above 0.3% and 0.03% wt/vol, respectively) and brine (above 0.1% and 0.03% wt/vol), at 5% NaCl, inhibited the growth of the yeast. Subsequently, the model was validated in laboratory media within the no growth region by a response surface D-optimal design. Inactivation concentrations of sorbic acid produced a progressive loss of viability in I. occidentalis that followed a first order kinetic or downward concave inactivation curves, depending on environmental variables. These curves were properly described by a (primary) model deduced from the Weibull distribution, whose parameters, first decimal reduction time (D(beta)) and shape (beta), were expressed as a function of sorbic acid concentrations (secondary model). At 5% NaCl and within the experimental region checked, an increase of 0.010% and 0.008% sorbic acid reduced D(beta) in 10 h and decrease beta by 10%. Finally, the model was also validated in real "seasoned" table olives packing reporting a complete inactivation of the yeasts' population.

  8. Metallic Iron-Nickel Sulfide Ultrathin Nanosheets As a Highly Active Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Long, Xia; Li, Guixia; Wang, Zilong; Zhu, HouYu; Zhang, Teng; Xiao, Shuang; Guo, Wenyue; Yang, Shihe

    2015-09-23

    We report on the synthesis of iron-nickel sulfide (INS) ultrathin nanosheets by topotactic conversion from a hydroxide precursor. The INS nanosheets exhibit excellent activity and stability in strong acidic solutions as a hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, lending an attractive alternative to the Pt catalyst. The metallic α-INS nanosheets show an even lower overpotential of 105 mV at 10 mA/cm(2) and a smaller Tafel slope of 40 mV/dec. With the help of DFT calculations, the high specific surface area, facile ion transport and charge transfer, abundant electrochemical active sites, suitable H(+) adsorption, and H2 formation kinetics and energetics are proposed to contribute to the high activity of the INS ultrathin nanosheets toward HER.

  9. Metallic Iron-Nickel Sulfide Ultrathin Nanosheets As a Highly Active Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Long, Xia; Li, Guixia; Wang, Zilong; Zhu, HouYu; Zhang, Teng; Xiao, Shuang; Guo, Wenyue; Yang, Shihe

    2015-09-23

    We report on the synthesis of iron-nickel sulfide (INS) ultrathin nanosheets by topotactic conversion from a hydroxide precursor. The INS nanosheets exhibit excellent activity and stability in strong acidic solutions as a hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalyst, lending an attractive alternative to the Pt catalyst. The metallic α-INS nanosheets show an even lower overpotential of 105 mV at 10 mA/cm(2) and a smaller Tafel slope of 40 mV/dec. With the help of DFT calculations, the high specific surface area, facile ion transport and charge transfer, abundant electrochemical active sites, suitable H(+) adsorption, and H2 formation kinetics and energetics are proposed to contribute to the high activity of the INS ultrathin nanosheets toward HER. PMID:26338434

  10. Increased Salivary Nitrite and Nitrate Excretion in Rats with Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Somayeh; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Shahsavari, Fatemeh; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Grayesh-Nejad, Siyavash; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2015-11-01

    Increased nitric oxide (NO) formation is mechanistically linked to pathophysiology of the extrahepatic complications of cirrhosis. NO is formed by either enzymatic or non-enzymatic pathways. Enzymatic production is catalyzed by NO synthase (NOS) while entero-salivary circulation of nitrate and nitrite is linked to non-enzymatic formation of NO under acidic pH in the stomach. There is no data on salivary excretion of nitrate and nitrite in cirrhosis. This study was aimed to investigate salivary levels of nitrate and nitrite in a rat model of biliary cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Four weeks after the operation, submandibular ducts of anesthetized BDL and control rats were cannulated with polyethylene microtube for saliva collection. Assessment of pH, nitrite and nitrate levels was performed in our research. We also investigated NOS expression by real time RT-PCR to estimate eNOS, nNOS and iNOS mRNA levels in the submandibular glands. Salivary pH was significantly lower in BDL rats in comparison to control animals. We also observed a statistically significant increase in salivary levels of nitrite as well as nitrate in BDL rats while there was no elevation in the mRNA expression of nNOS, eNOS, and iNOS in submandibular glands of cirrhotic groups. This indicates that an increased salivary level of nitrite/nitrate is less likely to be linked to increased enzymatic production of NO in the salivary epithelium. It appears that nitrate/nitrite can be transported from the blood stream by submandibular glands and excreted into saliva as entero-salivary circulation, and this mechanism may have been exaggerated during cirrhosis. PMID:26786986

  11. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Barua, Sumitra; Reed, SB; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrikson, JK; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  12. Nitrate Uptake into Barley (Hordeum vulgare) Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Deane-Drummond, Celia E.; Glass, Anthony D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence is presented that chlorate is an extremely good analog for nitrate during nitrate uptake by intact barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Fergus) roots. The depletion of ClO3− or NO3− from uptake media over 2 to 6 hours by seedlings was found to be dependent on combined NO3− plus ClO3− concentrations, and total anion uptake was equivalent at different NO3−/ClO3− ratios. After loading barley seedlings with 36ClO3− for 6 hours, kinetic parameters were derived from the analysis of efflux of [36Cl] chlorate into unlabeled solution. On the basis of this analysis, the half times for exchange for the cytoplasmic and vacuolar phases were 17 minutes and 20 hours, respectively. Data pooled from a number of different experiments were used to calculate kinetic constants (Km and Vmax) for 36ClO3− influx into barley roots at different external ClO3−/NO3− ratios, using short (10 minutes) influx times. There appeared to be no discrimination by the root cells between ClO3− and NO3−. Lineweaver-Burk analysis of the interaction between nitrate and chlorate were characteristic of competitive inhibition at low nitrate concentrations (0-0.5 mm). At higher concentrations, in the range of >1 mm, similar interactions between these ions were evident. PMID:16662478

  13. Pt based nanocomposites (mono/bi/tri-metallic) decorated using different carbon supports for methanol electro-oxidation in acidic and basic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Baljit; Murad, Lukaa; Laffir, Fathima; Dickinson, Calum; Dempsey, Eithne

    2011-08-01

    Pt based mono/bi/tri-metallic nanocomposites on different carbon based supports (activated carbon (AC), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs)) were synthesised and Pt surface enrichment achieved. The overall theoretical metallic content (Pt + Au + Sn) was 20% (w/w) in all mono/bi/tri-metallic nanocomposites and was found to be uniformly distributed in the supporting matrix (80%). The surface morphology and composition of the synthesised materials was characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while cyclic voltammetry was employed in order to confirm their typical metallic electrochemical characteristics. Electrochemical measurements indicated that Pt2Au1Sn1 trimetallic catalysts demonstrated a significantly higher electrochemically active surface area relative to activated carbon supported PtAu based bimetallic counterparts. The results show that the CNT based trimetallic catalyst (Pt2Au1Sn1/CNT) showed greatest electroactive surface area (49.3 m2/g) and current density for methanol oxidation in acidic (490 mA mg-1 Pt) as well as basic (1700 mA mg-1 Pt) conditions. Results demonstrated that in comparison to Au/C and Sn/C (no/negligible response), the presence of a small amount of Pt in the Au and Sn based nanocomposites, significantly modified the catalytic properties. The activated carbon supported bimetallic (Pt1Au3/C) catalyst showed reasonably good response (260 mA mg-1 Pt) among all bimetallic nanomaterials examined. The current response achieved for Pt2Au1Sn1/CNT was 1.9 times (in acidic media) and 2.1 times (in basic media) that for synthesised Pt/C in terms of per mg Pt activity. Overall the methanol oxidation studies demonstrated that the presence of Au and Sn in Pt based catalysts strongly

  14. Vibrational analysis of amino acids and short peptides in hydrated media. VIII. Amino acids with aromatic side chains: L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine, and L-tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Belén; Pflüger, Fernando; Adenier, Alain; Kruglik, Sergei G; Ghomi, Mahmoud

    2010-11-25

    Four out of the 20 natural α-amino acids (α-AAs) contain aromatic rings in their side chains. In a recent paper (J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 9072-9083), we have analyzed the structural and vibrational features of l-histidine, one of the potent elements of this series. Here, we report on the three remaining members of this family, i.e., l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine, and l-tryptophan. Their solution (H(2)O and D(2)O) Raman scattering and Fourier transform infrared absorption attenuated total reflection (FT-IR ATR) spectra were measured at room temperature from the species corresponding to those existing at physiological conditions. Because of the very low water solubility of tyrosine, special attention was paid to avoid any artifact concerning the report of the vibrational spectra corresponding to nondissolved powder of this AA in aqueous solution. Finally, we could obtain for the first time the Raman and FT-IR spectra of tyrosine at very low concentration (2.3 mM) upon long accumulation time. To clarify this point, those vibrational spectra of tyrosine recorded either in the solid phase or in a heterogeneous state, where dissolved and nondissolved species of this AA coexist in aqueous solution, are also provided as Supporting Information . To carry out a discussion on the general geometrical and vibrational behavior of these AAs, we resorted to quantum mechanical calculations at the DFT/B3LYP/6-31++G* level, allowing (i) determination of potential energy surfaces of these AAs in a continuum solvent as a function of the torsion angles χ(1) and χ(2), defining the conformation of each aromatic side chain around C(α)-C(β) and C(β)-C(γ) bonds, respectively; (ii) analysis of geometrical features of the AAs surrounded by clusters of n explicit (n = 5-7) water molecules interacting with the backbone and aromatic rings; and (iii) assignment of the observed vibrational modes by means of the theoretical data provided by the lowest energy conformers of explicitly

  15. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves

  16. Effects of mineral dust on global atmospheric nitrate concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, Vlassis; Tsimpidi, Alexandra; Astitha, Marina; Lelieveld, Jos

    2014-05-01

    Inorganic particulate nitrate contributes significantly to the total aerosol mass. While nitrate is predominantly present in the submicron mode, coarse mode aerosol nitrate can also be produced by adsorption of nitric acid onto soil particles. Naturally emitted particles affect the phase partitioning of nitrate, especially in areas where dust comprises a significant portion of total particulate matter, and the simulation of these effects can considerably improve model predictions. However, most thermodynamic models used in global studies lack a realistic treatment of crustal species. This work aims to improve the representation of nitrate aerosols in the global chemistry climate model EMAC, and addresses the shortcomings of previous models. EMAC calculates the aerosol microphysics and gas/aerosol partitioning by using the GMXe aerosol module. The aerosol size distribution is described by 7 interacting lognormal modes (4 hydrophilic and 3 hydrophobic modes). An advanced dust emission module also accounts for the soil particle size distribution of different deserts worldwide. Gas/aerosol partitioning is simulated using the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model which considers the interaction of K(+), Ca(+2), Mg(+2), NH4(+), Na(+), SO4(-2), NO3(-), Cl(-), H2O aerosol components. The EMAC model is tested in long-term simulations covering the years 2005-2008. Model predictions are compared with data from the European network EMEP, the IMPROVE network in North America, and the EANET Network in East Asia.

  17. Hydrogen anode for nitrate waste destruction. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Kalu, E.E.; White, R.E.

    1996-02-10

    Large quantities of radioactive and hazardous wastes have been generated from nuclear materials production during the past fifty years. Processes are under evaluation to separate the high level radioactive species from the waste and store them permanently in the form of durable solids. The schemes proposed will separate the high level radioactive components, cesium-137 and strontium-90, into a small volume for incorporation into a glass wasteform. The remaining low-level radioactive waste contain species such as nitrites and nitrates that are capable of contaminating ground water. Electrochemical destruction of the nitrate and nitrite before permanent storage has been proposed. Not only will the electrochemical processing destroy these species, the volume of the waste could also be reduced. The use of a hydrogen gas-fed anode and an acid anolyte in an electrochemical cell used to destroy nitrate was demonstrated. A mixed Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} anolyte was shown to favor the nitrate cell performance, and the generation of a higher hydroxide ion concentration in the catholyte. The suggested scheme is an apparent method of sodium sulfate disposal and a possible means through which ammonia (to ammonium sulfate, fertilizer) and hydrogen gas could be recycled through the anode side of the reactor. This could result in a substantial savings in the operation of a nitrate destruction cell.

  18. Induction of the Nitrate Assimilation nirA Operon and Protein-Protein Interactions in the Maturation of Nitrate and Nitrite Reductases in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frías, José E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate is widely used as a nitrogen source by cyanobacteria, in which the nitrate assimilation structural genes frequently constitute the so-called nirA operon. This operon contains the genes encoding nitrite reductase (nirA), a nitrate/nitrite transporter (frequently an ABC-type transporter; nrtABCD), and nitrate reductase (narB). In the model filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, which can fix N2 in specialized cells termed heterocysts, the nirA operon is expressed at high levels only in media containing nitrate or nitrite and lacking ammonium, a preferred nitrogen source. Here we examined the genes downstream of the nirA operon in Anabaena and found that a small open reading frame of unknown function, alr0613, can be cotranscribed with the operon. The next gene in the genome, alr0614 (narM), showed an expression pattern similar to that of the nirA operon, implying correlated expression of narM and the operon. A mutant of narM with an insertion mutation failed to produce nitrate reductase activity, consistent with the idea that NarM is required for the maturation of NarB. Both narM and narB mutants were impaired in the nitrate-dependent induction of the nirA operon, suggesting that nitrite is an inducer of the operon in Anabaena. It has previously been shown that the nitrite reductase protein NirA requires NirB, a protein likely involved in protein-protein interactions, to attain maximum activity. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis confirmed possible NirA-NirB and NarB-NarM interactions, suggesting that the development of both nitrite reductase and nitrate reductase activities in cyanobacteria involves physical interaction of the corresponding enzymes with their cognate partners, NirB and NarM, respectively. IMPORTANCE Nitrate is an important source of nitrogen for many microorganisms that is utilized through the nitrate assimilation system, which includes nitrate/nitrite membrane transporters and the nitrate and nitrite reductases. Many

  19. Seed Germination in Chenopodium album L: Relationships between Nitrate and the Effects of Plant Hormones.

    PubMed

    Saini, H S; Bassi, P K; Spencer, M S

    1985-04-01

    Effects of ethylene, gibberellins, and kinetin on the germination of two lots of Chenopodium album L. seeds, collected from the field in 1982 and 1983, were studied in relation to the availability of nitrate. The experiments were conducted in darkness and at temperatures ranging from 12 to 32 degrees C. Ethylene induced over 75% germination in the 1983 seed but had little effect on the 1982 seed. Nitrate was only slightly promotive in either of the two seed lots. A combination of ethylene and nitrate, however, acted synergistically on 1982 seed, resulting in as much germination as that induced in 1983 seed by ethylene alone. In 1983 seed, a combination of ethylene and nitrate was only marginally more effective than ethylene. A similar relationship was observed in the effects of gibberellic acid(4+7) (GA(4+7)) and nitrate on seeds from the two lots. The 1982 seed, which responded synergistically to combinations of nitrate with ethylene or GA(4+7) was found to contain an extremely low endogenous level of nitrate as compared to 1983 seed. Thus, high levels of either endogenous or applied nitrate appeared to enhance the germination response to ethylene or GA(4+7).Kinetin had no effect on 1982 seed and only a small promotive effect on 1983 seed. There was no synergism between kinetin and nitrate in either of the seed lots.

  20. Highly sensitive reaction of nitrate with brucine and 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone hydrochloride for the determination of nitrate in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Padmarajaiah; Kumar, Mattighatta Hemantha; Yathirajan, Hemmige; Prakash, Jainara

    2003-06-01

    A modified and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of nitrate in trace quantities in environmental samples is described. The method is based on the reaction of nitrate ion with brucine and 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone hydrochloride (MBTH) in sulfuric acid medium to yield a violet-colored product which is stable for over two days. The optimum photometric range for the determination of nitrate is 0.04-0.16 microg cm(-3) and the Sandell's sensitivity being 0.000279 microg cm(-2). The proposed method is applied to various water samples and the results indicate that the reaction is highly sensitive than the original brucine method.

  1. Optimization and effect of dairy industrial waste as media components in the production of hyaluronic acid by Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Naresh; Balakrishnan, Rengesh; Sivaprakasam, Senthilkumar

    2016-08-17

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) production using a dairy industrial waste is a more cost-efficient strategy than using an expensive synthetic medium. In this study, we investigated the production of HA using Streptococcus thermophilus under shake flask conditions using dairy industrial waste as nutritional supplements, namely whey permeate (WP) and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH). Preliminary screening using Plackett-Burman design exhibited WP, WPH, initial pH, and inoculum size as significant factors influencing HA titer. Response surface methodology design of four factors was formulated at three levels for enhanced production of HA. Shake flask HA fermentation by S. thermophilus was performed under global optimized process conditions and the optimal HA titer (342.93 mg L(-1)) corroborates with Box-Behnken design prediction. The molecular weight of HA was elucidated as 9.22-9.46 kDa. The ultralow-molecular weight HA reported in this study has a potential role in drug and gene delivery applications. PMID:26681350

  2. Sonosynthesis of nano TiO2 on wool using titanium isopropoxide or butoxide in acidic media producing multifunctional fabric.

    PubMed

    Behzadnia, Amir; Montazer, Majid; Rashidi, Abousaeid; Rad, Mahnaz Mahmoudi

    2014-09-01

    This study presents a novel idea to prepare nanocrystalline structure of TiO2 under ambient pressure at 60-65 °C using in situ sonochemical synthesis by hydrolysis of either titanium isopropoxide or titanium butoxide in an acidic aqueous solution. The nano titanium dioxide coated wool fabrics possess significant antibacterial/antifungal activity and self-cleaning property by discoloring Methylene blue stain under sunlight irradiation. This process has no negative effect on cytotoxicity and tensile strength of the sonotreated fabric even reduces alkaline solubility and photoyellowing and improves hydrophilicity. More titanium isopropoxide or titanium butoxide as a precursor led to higher photocatalytic activities of the treated fabrics. Also introducing more ethanol improved the adsorption of TiO2 on the wool fabric surface leading to enhanced photocatalytic activity. EDS and XRD patterns, SEM images, X-ray mapping confirmed the presence of nano TiO2 particles on the fabric surface. The role of both solvent and precursor concentrations on the various properties of the fabric was investigated and the optimized conditions were obtained using response surface methodology.

  3. Nitrate Trends in Minnesota Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, Dave; Christopherson, Dave; Lorenz, Dave; Martin, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess long-term trends (30 to 35 years) of flow-adjusted concentrations of nitrite+nitrate-N (hereinafter referred to as nitrate) in a way that would allow us to discern changing trends. Recognizing that these trends are commonly different from one river to another river and from one part of the state to another, our objective was to examine as many river monitoring sites across the state as possible for which sufficient long term streamflow and concentration data were available.

  4. Tracking sources of unsaturated zone and groundwater nitrate contamination using nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes at the Hanford site, Washington.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Michael J; Woods, Katharine N; Conrad, Mark E; Depaolo, Donald J; Dresel, P Evan

    2005-05-15

    The nitrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of nitrate in pore water extracts from unsaturated zone (UZ) core samples and groundwater samples indicate at least four potential sources of nitrate in groundwaters at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site in south-central Washington. Natural sources of nitrate identified include microbially produced nitrate from the soil column (delta15N of 4 - 8 per thousand, delta18O of -9 to 2 per thousand) and nitrate in buried caliche layers (delta15N of 0-8 per thousand, delta 18O of -6to 42 per thousand). Isotopically distinctindustrial sources of nitrate include nitric acid in low-level disposal waters (delta15N approximately per thousand, delta 18O approximately 23%o) per thousandnd co-contaminant nitrate in high-level radioactive waste from plutonium processing (6'5delta1of 8-33 % o, per thousand18delta oO -9 to 7%0). per thousandThe isotopic compositions of nitrate from 97 groundwater wells with concentrations up to 1290 mg/L NO3- have been analyzed. Stable isotope analyses from this study site, which has natural and industrial nitrate sources, provide a tool to distinguish nitrate sources in an unconfined aquiferwhere concentrations alone do not. These data indicate that the most common sources of high nitrate concentrations in groundwater at Hanford are nitric acid and natural nitrate flushed out of the UZ during disposal of low-level wastewater. Nitrate associated with high-level radioactive UZ contamination does not appear to be a major source of groundwater nitrate at this time.

  5. Aniline-induced nitrosative stress in rat spleen: Proteomic identification of nitrated proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Xiuzhen; Wang Jianling; Soman, Kizhake V.; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-08-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis, and a variety of sarcomas on chronic exposure in rats. However, mechanisms by which aniline elicits splenotoxic responses are not well understood. Earlier we have shown that aniline exposure leads to increased nitration of proteins in the spleen. However, nitrated proteins remain to be characterized. Therefore, in the current study using proteomic approaches, we focused on characterizing the nitrated proteins in the spleen of aniline-exposed rats. Aniline exposure led to increased tyrosine nitration of proteins, as determined by 2D Western blotting with anti-3-nitrotyrosine specific antibody, compared to the controls. The analyzed nitrated proteins were found in the molecular weight range of 27.7 to 123.6 kDa. A total of 37 nitrated proteins were identified in aniline-treated and control spleens. Among them, 25 were found only in aniline-treated rats, 11 were present in both aniline-treated and control rats, while one was found in controls only. The nitrated proteins identified mainly represent skeletal proteins, chaperones, ferric iron transporter, enzymes, nucleic acids binding protein, and signaling and protein synthesis pathways. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in the spleen, suggesting its role in increased reactive nitrogen species formation and contribution to increased nitrated proteins. The identified nitrated proteins provide a global map to further investigate alterations in their structural and functional properties, which will lead to a better understanding of the role of protein nitration in aniline-mediated splenic toxicity. - Highlights: > Proteomic approaches are used to identify nitrated proteins in the spleen. > Twenty five nitrated proteins were found only in the spleen of aniline-treated rats. > Aniline exposure led to increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in

  6. Photocatalytic reduction of nitrate using titanium dioxide for regeneration of ion exchange brine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Doudrick, Kyle; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Nitrate is often removed from groundwater by ion exchange (IX) before its use as drinking water. Accumulation of nitrate in IX brine reduces the efficiency of IX regeneration and the useful life of the regeneration brine. For the first time, we present a strategy to photocatalytically reduce nitrate in IX brine, thereby extending the use of the brine. Titanium dioxide (Evonik P90), acting as photocatalyst, reduced nitrate effectively in both synthetic brines and sulfate-removed IX brine when formic acid (FA) was used as the hole scavenger (i.e., electron donor) and the initial FA to nitrate molar ratio (IFNR) was 5.6. Increasing the NaCl level in the synthetic brine slowed the nitrate reduction rate without affecting by-product selectivity of ammonium and gaseous N species (e.g., N(2), N(2)O). In a non-modified IX brine, nitrate removal was greatly inhibited owing to the presence of sulfate, which competed with nitrate for active surface sites on P90 and induced aggregation of P90 nanoparticles. After removing sulfate through barium sulfate precipitation, nitrate was effectively reduced; approximately 3.6 × 10(24) photons were required to reduce each mole of nitrate to 83% N Gases and 17% NH(4)(+). To make optimum use of FA and control the residual FA level in treated brine, the IFNR was varied. High IFNRs (e.g., 4, 5.6) were found to be more efficient for nitrate reduction but left higher residual FA in brine. IX column tests were performed to investigate the impact of residual FA for brine reuse. The residual FA in the brine did not significantly affect the nitrate removal capacity of IX resins, and formate contamination of treated water could be eliminated by rinsing with one bed volume of fresh brine.

  7. Photocatalytic reduction of nitrate using titanium dioxide for regeneration of ion exchange brine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Doudrick, Kyle; Westerhoff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate is often removed from groundwater by ion exchange (IX) before its use as drinking water. Accumulation of nitrate in IX brine reduces the efficiency of IX regeneration and the useful life of the regeneration brine. For the first time, we present a strategy to photocatalytically reduce nitrate in IX brine, thereby extending the use of the brine. Titanium dioxide (Evonik P90), acting as photocatalyst, reduced nitrate effectively in both synthetic brines and sulfate-removed IX brine when formic acid (FA) was used as the hole scavenger (i.e., electron donor) and the initial FA to nitrate molar ratio (IFNR) was 5.6. Increasing the NaCl level in the synthetic brine slowed the nitrate reduction rate without affecting byproduct selectivity of ammonium and gaseous N species (e.g., N2, N2O). In a non-modified IX brine, nitrate removal was greatly inhibited owing to the presence of sulfate, which competed with nitrate for active surface sites on P90 and induced aggregation of P90 nanoparticles. After removing sulfate through barium sulfate precipitation, nitrate was effectively reduced; approximately 3.6 × 1024 photons were required to reduce each mole of nitrate to 83% N Gases and 17% NH4+. To make optimum use of FA and control the residual FA level in treated brine, the IFNR was varied. High IFNRs (e.g., 4, 5.6) were found to be more efficient for nitrate reduction but left higher residual FA in brine. IX column tests were performed to investigate the impact of residual FA for brine reuse. The residual FA in the brine did not significantly affect the nitrate removal capacity of IX resins, and formate contamination of treated water could be eliminated by rinsing with one bed volume of fresh brine. PMID:23276425

  8. Effect of nitrate, organic carbon, and temperature on potential denitrification rates in nitrate-rich riverbed sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfenning, K.S.; McMahon, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    A study conducted in 1994 as part of the US Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program, South Platte River Basin investigation, examined the effect of certain environmental factors on potential denitrification rates in nitrate-rich riverbed sediments. The acetylene block technique was used to measure nitrous oxide (N2O) production rates in laboratory incubations of riverbed sediments to evaluate the effect of varying nitrate concentrations, organic carbon concentrations and type, and water temperature on potential denitrification rates. Sediment incubations amended with nitrate, at concentrations ranging from 357 to 2142 ??mol l-1 (as measured in the field), produced no significant increase (P > 0.05) in N2O production rates, indicating that the denitrification potential in these sediments was not nitrate limited. In contrast, incubations amended with acetate as a source of organic carbon, at concentrations ranging from 0 to 624 ??mol l-1, produced significant increases (P < 0.05) in N2O production rates with increased organic carbon concentration, indicating that the denitrification potential in these sediments was organic carbon limited. Furthermore, N2O production rates also were affected by the type of organic carbon available as an electron donor. Acetate and surface-water-derived fulvic acid supported higher N2O production rates than groundwater-derived fulvic acid or sedimentary organic carbon. Lowering incubation temperatures from 22 to 4??C resulted in about a 77% decrease in the N2O production rates. These results help to explain findings from previous studies indicating that only 15-30% of nitrate in groundwater was denitrified before discharging to the South Platte River and that nitrate concentrations in the river generally were higher in winter than in summer.

  9. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, V C

    1999-01-01

    For decades, media violence has been viewed as largely a Western problem. New studies indicate that Indian children have increasing access to the media and that media violence will subject them to the same problems as Western children: imitation, desensitization, fear, and inappropriate attitudes about violence and aggression. Solutions exist but will have to be implemented within the next decade to protect Indian children and adolescents from the harmful effects of media violence.

  10. Electroactive Materials for Anion Separation - Technetium from Nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sukamto, Johanes H.; Smyrl, William H.; McBreen, James; Hubler, Timothy L.; Lilga, Michael A.

    2000-06-01

    Many contaminants of interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) exist as anions. These include the high priority pollutants chromate, pertechnetate, and nitrate ions. In addition, there are also industrial and urban applications where the separation of anionic species from aqueous streams is critical. Examples include industrial water recycle and waste water treatment (e.g., chloride ion removal for the pulp and paper industry, borate ion in the chemical and nuclear industries) and drinking water and agricultural waste treatment (e.g., nitrate removal). In the proposed research, technetium is chosen as the target pollutant. Because of its half-life of 213,000 years, technetium (99Tc) presents a long-term hazard for waste disposal. Much of the 99Tc in the tank wastes is present as pertechnetate (TcO4-), accounting for its high solubility and mobility in aqueous systems. Several sorbents are available for removing TcO4- from alkaline waste brines, but each has important drawbacks. The use of commercial ion exchange (IX) resins to extract TcO4-, e.g., Reillex{trademark}-HPQ (Reilly Industries) and ABEC 5000 (Eichrom Industries), generates significant secondary waste. The elution of TcO4- from Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resins requires either concentrated nitric acid or a concentrated caustic solution of ethylene-diamine containing a small amount of tin chloride. This eluant has a short shelf life requiring frequent preparation, and the 99Tc is delivered in a complexed, reduced form. While TcO4- can be eluted from ABEC 5000 resins using de-ionized water, the much-reduced capacity of ABEC 5000 resins in comparison to the Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resins leads to a low column capacity. In general, unwanted secondary wastes are generated because (1) the only effective eluant happens to be hazardous and/or (2) the IX material has a low capacity or selectivity for the target ion, resulting in more frequent elution and column replacements. Alternative IX materials that have

  11. Comparative Study of the Early Loading of Resorbable Blasting Media and Sandblasting with Large-grit and Acid-etching Surface Implants: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Beom; Kim, Young-Kyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares the prognosis (the survival rate and marginal bone loss) of resorbable blasting media (RBM) surface implants and sandblasting with large-grit and acid-etching (SLA) surface implants in the early loading. Methods: This study targeted 123 patients treated by implants installation from January 2008 to March 2010. The loading was initiated in the maxilla within three to four months and in the mandible within one to two months. The types of restoration were single crown and fixed partial prosthesis. Those functioned over one year. The implants were classified by the surface of implants as Group 1: RBM surface (GS III; OSSTEM, Busan, Korea) and, Group 2: SLA surface (Superline; Dentium, Seoul, Korea). The groups were categorized by maxilla and mandible and compared by survival rate, marginal bone loss through clinical records evaluation, and radiographic measurements. Results: The marginal bone loss in the maxilla was 0.14±0.34 mm (Group 1) and 0.30±0.37 mm (Group 2), a statistically significant difference (P <0.05). In the mandible those were 0.28±0.54 mm (Group 1) and 0.20±0.33 mm (Group 2), not significant (P >0.05). There was no significant difference of marginal bone loss between maxilla and mandible by groups. During observation there was no implant failure, a survival rate of 100%. Conclusion: Both surfaces showed an excellent survival rate, and the marginal bone loss was not substantial. PMID:27489842

  12. Salvianolic Acid B Prevents Iodinated Contrast Media-Induced Acute Renal Injury in Rats via the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tongqiang, Liu; Shaopeng, Liu; Xiaofang, Yu; Nana, Song; Xialian, Xu; Jiachang, Hu; Ting, Zhang; Xiaoqiang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-induced acute renal injury (CI-AKI) has become a common cause of hospital-acquired renal failure. However, the development of prophylaxis strategies and approved therapies for CI-AKI is limited. Salvianolic acid B (SB) can treat cardiovascular-related diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of SB on prevention of CI-AKI and explore its underlying mechanisms. We examined its effectiveness of preventing renal injury in a novel CI-AKI rat model. Compared with saline, intravenous SB pretreatment significantly attenuated elevations in serum creatinine and the histological changes of renal tubular injuries, reduced the number of apoptosis-positive tubular cells, activated Nrf2, and lowered the levels of renal oxidative stress induced by iodinated contrast media. The above renoprotection of SB was abolished by the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin). In HK-2 cells, SB activated Nrf2 and decreased the levels of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide and subsequently improved cell viability. The above cytoprotection of SB was blocked by the PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin) or siNrf2. Thus, our results demonstrate that, due to its antioxidant properties, SB has the potential to effectively prevent CI-AKI via the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathway. PMID:27382429

  13. Transport of ARS-labeled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in saturated granular media is influenced by surface charge variability even in the presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dengjun; Bradford, Scott A; Harvey, Ronald W; Hao, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Dongmei

    2012-08-30

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticle (nHAP) is increasingly being used to remediate soils and water polluted by metals and radionuclides. The transport and retention of Alizarin red S (ARS)-labeled nHAP were investigated in water-saturated granular media. Experiments were carried out over a range of ionic strength (I(c), 0-50mM NaCl) conditions in the presence of 10 mg L(-1) humic acid. The transport of ARS-nHAP was found to decrease with increasing suspension I(c) in part, because of enhanced aggregation and chemical heterogeneity. The retention profiles (RPs) of ARS-nHAP exhibited hyperexponential shapes (a decreasing rate of retention with increasing transport distance) for all test conditions, suggesting that some of the attachment was occurring under unfavorable conditions. Surface charge heterogeneities on the collector surfaces and especially within the ARS-nHAP population were contributing causes for the hyperexponential RPs. Consideration of the effect(s) of I(c) in the presence of HA is needed to improve the efficacy of nHAP for scavenging metals and actinides in real soils and groundwater environments.

  14. New Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downtown Business Quarterly, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue explores lower Manhattan's burgeoning "New Media" industry, a growing source of jobs in lower Manhattan. The first article, "New Media Manpower Issues" (Rodney Alexander), addresses manpower, training, and workforce demands faced by new media companies in New York City. The second article, "Case Study: Hiring @ Dynamid" (John…

  15. Performance of experimental bioreactors developed for removing nitrate from nursery runoff water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A bacterial-based bioreactor containing Kaldness media as a substrate for bacteria to grow on was established at a commercial nursery. Data from approximately 90 sampling events are reported. Results indicate that the system, when properly managed, offers much potential for removing nitrate from s...

  16. Dietary nitrate and cardiovascular health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahluwalia, A.; Gladwin, M.T.; Harman, Jane L.; Ward, M.H.; Nolan, Bernard T.

    2014-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened this workshop to discuss the results of recent research on the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on the cardiovascular system, possible long term effects of these compounds in the diet and drinking water, and future research needs including population-wide effects examined through epidemiological studies.

  17. Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Chester W.; Brinkley, Frank S.

    1977-01-01

    Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

  18. Compost product optimization for surface water nitrate treatment in biofiltration applications.

    PubMed

    Alcala, Martin; Jones, Kim D; Ren, Jianhong; Andreassen, Thomas E

    2009-09-01

    Compost based material has been proposed for use as media for biofiltration for environmental restoration in many areas to remediate contaminated water and soil. The objective of this project was to develop techniques to produce compost products for nitrate removal in storm water biofiltration applications, from typical solid waste materials. Compost products were manufactured from different feedstocks and evaluated for their nitrate removal efficiencies. Three different compost products manufactured from varying feedstock amounts of wood chips and grass clippings, along with some dry compost material from the City of Brownsville Municipal Landfill Facility (BMLF), were evaluated using column studies. Indicators of the compost product's quality included moisture % content, pH, and conductivity measurements. The columns were loaded with water containing at least 13.5mg/L nitrate-nitrogen and effluent water from the columns was tested to determine the nitrate reduction for the different products. All of the manufactured compost products and the BMLF material removed some nitrate. The project demonstrated that compost product materials can be effectively used for some nitrate removal for surface water quality improvement and that compost product feedstocks and blends can influence the materials capability for nitrate removal. PMID:19375308

  19. Practical Application of Electrochemical Nitrate Sensor under Laboratory and Forest Nursery Conditions.

    PubMed

    Caron, William-Olivier; Lamhamedi, Mohammed S; Viens, Jeff; Messaddeq, Younès

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of nitrate leaching to ensure greater protection of groundwater quality has become a global issue. The development of new technologies for more accurate dosing of nitrates helps optimize fertilization programs. This paper presents the practical application of a newly developed electrochemical sensor designed for in situ quantification of nitrate. To our knowledge, this paper is the first to report the use of electrochemical impedance to determine nitrate concentrations in growing media under forest nursery conditions. Using impedance measurements, the sensor has been tested in laboratory and compared to colorimetric measurements of the nitrate. The developed sensor has been used in water-saturated growing medium and showed good correlation to certified methods, even in samples obtained over a multi-ion fertilisation season. A linear and significant relationship was observed between the resistance and the concentration of nitrates (R² = 0.972), for a range of concentrations of nitrates. We also observed stability of the sensor after exposure of one month to the real environmental conditions of the forest nursery. PMID:27483266

  20. Compost product optimization for surface water nitrate treatment in biofiltration applications.

    PubMed

    Alcala, Martin; Jones, Kim D; Ren, Jianhong; Andreassen, Thomas E

    2009-09-01

    Compost based material has been proposed for use as media for biofiltration for environmental restoration in many areas to remediate contaminated water and soil. The objective of this project was to develop techniques to produce compost products for nitrate removal in storm water biofiltration applications, from typical solid waste materials. Compost products were manufactured from different feedstocks and evaluated for their nitrate removal efficiencies. Three different compost products manufactured from varying feedstock amounts of wood chips and grass clippings, along with some dry compost material from the City of Brownsville Municipal Landfill Facility (BMLF), were evaluated using column studies. Indicators of the compost product's quality included moisture % content, pH, and conductivity measurements. The columns were loaded with water containing at least 13.5mg/L nitrate-nitrogen and effluent water from the columns was tested to determine the nitrate reduction for the different products. All of the manufactured compost products and the BMLF material removed some nitrate. The project demonstrated that compost product materials can be effectively used for some nitrate removal for surface water quality improvement and that compost product feedstocks and blends can influence the materials capability for nitrate removal.

  1. Role of humic substances in promoting autotrophic growth in nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kanaparthi, Dheeraj; Conrad, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation was discovered in 1996 and has been reported from various environments ever since. To date, despite the widespread nature of this process, all attempts to cultivate chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-dependent iron oxidizers have been unsuccessful. The present study was focused on understanding the influence of natural chelating agents of iron, like humic substances, on the culturability, activity, and enumeration, of these microorganisms. Pure culture studies conducted with Thiobacillus denitrificans showed a constant increase in cell mass with a corresponding nitrate-dependent iron oxidation activity only when Fe(II) was provided together with humic substances, compared to no growth in control incubations without humic substances. The presence of a relatively strong chelating agent, such as EDTA, inhibited the growth of Thiobacillus denitrificans. It was concluded that complex formation between humic substances and iron was required for chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation. Most probable number enumerations showed that numbers of chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacteria were one to three orders of magnitude higher in the presence of humic substances compared to media without. Similar results were obtained when potential nitrate-dependent iron oxidation activity was determined in soil samples. In summary, this study showed that humic substances significantly enhanced the growth and activity of autotrophic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing microorganisms, probably by chelation of iron.

  2. Practical Application of Electrochemical Nitrate Sensor under Laboratory and Forest Nursery Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Caron, William-Olivier; Lamhamedi, Mohammed S.; Viens, Jeff; Messaddeq, Younès

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of nitrate leaching to ensure greater protection of groundwater quality has become a global issue. The development of new technologies for more accurate dosing of nitrates helps optimize fertilization programs. This paper presents the practical application of a newly developed electrochemical sensor designed for in situ quantification of nitrate. To our knowledge, this paper is the first to report the use of electrochemical impedance to determine nitrate concentrations in growing media under forest nursery conditions. Using impedance measurements, the sensor has been tested in laboratory and compared to colorimetric measurements of the nitrate. The developed sensor has been used in water-saturated growing medium and showed good correlation to certified methods, even in samples obtained over a multi-ion fertilisation season. A linear and significant relationship was observed between the resistance and the concentration of nitrates (R2 = 0.972), for a range of concentrations of nitrates. We also observed stability of the sensor after exposure of one month to the real environmental conditions of the forest nursery. PMID:27483266

  3. Peroxynitrite: an endogenous oxidizing and nitrating agent.

    PubMed

    Ducrocq, C; Blanchard, B; Pignatelli, B; Ohshima, H

    1999-07-01

    Peroxynitrite, the reaction product between nitric oxide (.NO) and superoxide, has been presumed to be a mediator of cellular and tissue injury in various pathological situations. It is formed at the convergence of two independent radical-generating metabolic pathways. Its biological effects are due to its reactivity towards a large range of molecules including amino acids such as cysteine, methionine, tyrosine and tryptophan, nucleic bases and antioxidants (e.g. phenolics, selenium- and metal-containing compounds, ascorbate and urate). Peroxynitrite reactions involve oxidation and nitration. The chemical properties depend on the presence of CO2 and metallic compounds as well as the concentrations of reagents and kinetic laws. This complex chemistry can be explained by the formation of several structural forms and active intermediates released from peroxynitrite. PMID:10442088

  4. Quantitative identification of protein nitration sites.

    PubMed

    Chiappetta, Giovanni; Corbo, Claudia; Palmese, Angelo; Galli, Francesco; Piroddi, Marta; Marino, Gennaro; Amoresano, Angela

    2009-03-01

    Several labelling strategies have been developed targeting specific amino acid residues and/or PTMs. Methods specifically tailored for the qualitative and sometimes quantitative determination of PTMs have emerged. Many research groups have focused their attention towards o-nitrotyrosine residues, developing various methodologies for their identification, while direct quantification has remained elusive. So far the iTRAQ chemistry has been limited to primary amines. Here, we report a new strategy based on the use of iTRAQ reagents coupled to MS analysis for the selective labelling of o-nitrotyrosine residues. This method was proved to lead to the simultaneous localisation and quantification of nitration sites both in model proteins and in biological systems. PMID:19242934

  5. Thermal Decomposition of Nitrated Tributyl Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Paddleford, D.F.; Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    Contact between tributyl phosphate and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Even though such operations have been routinely performed safely for decades as an intrinsic part of the Purex separation processes, several so-called ``red oil`` explosions are known to have occurred in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The most recent red oil explosion occurred at the Tomsk-7 separations facility in Siberia, in April 1993. That explosion destroyed part of the unreinforced masonry walls of the canyon-type building in which the process was housed, and allowed the release of a significant quantity of radioactive material.

  6. Nitric Oxide is Involved in Nitrate-induced Inhibition of Root Elongation in Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong-Yan; Tian, Qiu-Ying; Li, Ling-Hao; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Root growth and development are closely dependent upon nitrate supply in the growth medium. To unravel the mechanism underlying dependence of root growth on nitrate, an examination was made of whether endogenous nitric oxide (NO) is involved in nitrate-dependent growth of primary roots in maize. Methods Maize seedlings grown in varying concentrations of nitrate for 7 d were used to evaluate the effects on root elongation of a nitric oxide (NO) donor (sodium nitroprusside, SNP), a NO scavenger (methylene blue, MB), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (Nω-nitro-L-arginine, L-NNA), H2O2, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and a nitric reducatse inhibitor (tungstate). The effects of these treatments on endogenous NO levels in maize root apical cells were investigated using a NO-specific fluorescent probe, 4, 5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA) in association with a confocal microscopy. Key Results Elongation of primary roots was negatively dependent on external concentrations of nitrate, and inhibition by high external nitrate was diminished when roots were treated with SNP and IAA. MB and L-NNA inhibited root elongation of plants grown in low-nitrate solution, but they had no effect on elongation of roots grown in high-nitrate solution. Tungstate inhibited root elongation grown in both low- and high-nitrate solutions. Endogenous NO levels in root apices grown in high-nitrate solution were lower than those grown in low-nitrate solution. IAA and SNP markedly enhanced endogenous NO levels in root apices grown in high nitrate, but they had no effect on endogenous NO levels in root apical cells grown in low-nitrate solution. Tungstate induced a greater increase in the endogenous NO levels in root apical cells grown in low-nitrate solution than those grown in high-nitrate solution. Conclusions Inhibition of root elongation in maize by high external nitrate is likely to result from a reduction of nitric oxide synthase-dependent endogenous NO levels in maize

  7. Inhibitory effect of peroxyacetyl nitrate on cyclic photophosphorylation by chloroplasts from black valentine bean leaves.

    PubMed

    Koukol, J; Dugger, W M; Palmer, R L

    1967-10-01

    The inhibitory effect of peroxyacetyl nitrate on the cyclic photophosphorylation of chloroplasts isolated from Black Valentine variety bean leaves (Phaseolis vulgaris L.) has been studied. Peroxyacetyl nitrate caused inhibition to photophosphorylation, in either the dark or the light, by affecting the chloroplast. Evidence is presented which suggests that peroxyacetyl nitrate could oxidize sulfhydryl groups on enzymes necessary for photophosphorylation. The inhibition to photophosphorylation caused by peroxyacetyl nitrate cannot be reversed by glutathione, even when added in large amounts, whereas the inhibition to photophosphorylation caused by para-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid is easily reversed by small quantities of glutathione. This suggests that if peroxyacetyl nitrate is oxidizing sulfhydryl groups necessary for photophosphorylation, this oxidation is proceeding beyond the disulfide state.

  8. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  9. Nitrate reduction in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marietou, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) gain their energy by coupling the oxidation of organic substrate to the reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Several SRBs are able to use alternative terminal electron acceptors to sulfate such as nitrate. Nitrate-reducing SRBs have been isolated from a diverse range of environments. In order to be able to understand the significance of nitrate reduction in SRBs, we need to examine the ecology and physiology of the nitrate-reducing SRB isolates.

  10. High detection rates of nucleic acids of a wide range of respiratory viruses in the nasopharynx and the middle ear of children with a history of recurrent acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Wiertsema, Selma P; Chidlow, Glenys R; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S; Corscadden, Karli J; Mowe, Eva N; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; Coates, Harvey L; Harnett, Gerald B; Richmond, Peter C

    2011-11-01

    Both bacteria and viruses play a role in the development of acute otitis media, however, the importance of specific viruses is unclear. In this study molecular methods were used to determine the presence of nucleic acids of human rhinoviruses (HRV; types A, B, and C), respiratory syncytial viruses (RSV; types A and B), bocavirus (HBoV), adenovirus, enterovirus, coronaviruses (229E, HKU1, NL63, and OC43), influenza viruses (types A, B, and C), parainfluenza viruses (types 1, 2, 3, 4A, and 4B), human metapneumovirus, and polyomaviruses (KI and WU) in the nasopharynx of children between 6 and 36 months of age either with (n = 180) or without (n = 66) a history of recurrent acute otitis media and in 238 middle ear effusion samples collected from 143 children with recurrent acute otitis media. The co-detection of these viruses with Streptococcus pneumoniae, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis was analyzed. HRV (58.3% vs. 42.4%), HBoV (52.2% vs. 19.7%), polyomaviruses (36.1% vs. 15.2%), parainfluenza viruses (29.4% vs. 9.1%), adenovirus (25.0% vs. 6.1%), and RSV (27.8% vs. 9.1%) were detected significantly more often in the nasopharynx of children with a history of recurrent acute otitis media compared to healthy children. HRV was predominant in the middle ear and detected in middle ear effusion of 46% of children. Since respiratory viruses were detected frequently in the nasopharynx of both children with and without a history of recurrent acute otitis media, the etiological role of specific viruses in recurrent acute otitis media remains uncertain, however, anti-viral therapies may be beneficial in future treatment and prevention strategies for acute otitis media.

  11. Nitrate reductase assay using sodium nitrate for rapid detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Maíra Bidart; Groll, Andrea Von; Fissette, Krista; Palomino, Juan Carlos; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Martin, Anandi

    2012-01-01

    We validated the nitrate reductase assay (NRA) for the detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) using sodium nitrate (NaNO3) in replacement of potassium nitrate (KNO3) as nitrate source. NaNO3 is cheaper than KNO3 and has no restriction on use which facilitates the implementation of NRA to detect MDR-TB. PMID:24031916

  12. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  13. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  14. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  15. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  16. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  17. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  18. Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film

    DOEpatents

    Lupica, S.B.

    1975-12-23

    An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

  19. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  20. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  1. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing agent in the processing of...

  2. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  3. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  4. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  5. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified foods in accordance with...

  6. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  7. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  8. Protective effect of salivary nitrate and microbial nitrate reductase activity against caries.

    PubMed

    Doel, J J; Hector, M P; Amirtham, C V; Al-Anzan, L A; Benjamin, N; Allaker, R P

    2004-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that a combination of high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing capacity are protective against dental caries, 209 children attending the Dental Institute, Barts and The London NHS Trust were examined. Salivary nitrate and nitrite levels, counts of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp., and caries experience were recorded. Compared with control subjects, a significant reduction in caries experience was found in patients with high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing ability. Production of nitrite from salivary nitrate by commensal nitrate-reducing bacteria may limit the growth of cariogenic bacteria as a result of the production of antimicrobial oxides of nitrogen, including nitric oxide. PMID:15458501

  9. Formation kinetics and abundance of organic nitrates in α-pinene ozonolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    Formation of organic nitrates affects the total atmospheric budget of oxidized nitrogen (NOy) and alters the total aerosol mass yield from secondary sources. We investigated the formation of organic nitrate species during ozonolysis of α-pinene and subsequent formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) using the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N inside an aerosol flow reactor (Ammann et al., 2001). The results represent direct measurements of the organic nitrate content of α-pinene secondary aerosol and give insight into the kinetics of organic nitrate formation. Organic nitrates constituted up to 40 % of aerosol mass with a pronounced influence during the initial period of particle growth. Kinetic modelling, as well as additional experiments using OH scavengers and UV irradiation, suggests that organic peroxy radicals (RO2) from the reaction of α-pinene with secondarily produced OH are important intermediates in the organic nitrate formation process. Direct oxidation of α-pinene by NO3 was found to be a less efficient pathway for formation of particle phase nitrate. The organic nitrate content decreased very slightly with an increase of relative humidity on the experimental time scale. The experiments show a tight correlation between organic nitrate content and SOA number concentrations, implying that organic nitrates play an important role in nucleation and growth of nanoparticles. Since present in large amounts in organic aerosol, organic nitrates deposited in the lung might have implications for human health as they release nitric acid upon hydrolysis, especially in regions influenced by urban pollution and large sources of monoterpene SOA precursors. References Ammann et al. (2001) Radiochimica Acta 89, 831.

  10. Metagenomic analysis of nitrate-reducing bacteria in the oral cavity: implications for nitric oxide homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Embriette R; Andrade, Fernando; Vaksman, Zalman; Parthasarathy, Kavitha; Jiang, Hong; Parthasarathy, Deepa K; Torregrossa, Ashley C; Tribble, Gena; Kaplan, Heidi B; Petrosino, Joseph F; Bryan, Nathan S

    2014-01-01

    The microbiota of the human lower intestinal tract helps maintain healthy host physiology, for example through nutrient acquisition and bile acid recycling, but specific positive contributions of the oral microbiota to host health are not well established. Nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis is crucial to mammalian physiology. The recently described entero-salivary nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has been shown to provide bioactive NO from dietary nitrate sources. Interestingly, this pathway is dependent upon oral nitrate-reducing bacteria, since humans lack this enzyme activity. This pathway appears to represent a newly recognized symbiosis between oral nitrate-reducing bacteria and their human hosts in which the bacteria provide nitrite and nitric oxide from nitrate reduction. Here we measure the nitrate-reducing capacity of tongue-scraping samples from six healthy human volunteers, and analyze metagenomes of the bacterial communities to identify bacteria contributing to nitrate reduction. We identified 14 candidate species, seven of which were not previously believed to contribute to nitrate reduction. We cultivated isolates of four candidate species in single- and mixed-species biofilms, revealing that they have substantial nitrate- and nitrite-reduction capabilities. Colonization by specific oral bacteria may thus contribute to host NO homeostasis by providing nitrite and nitric oxide. Conversely, the lack of specific nitrate-reducing communities may disrupt the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway and lead to a state of NO insufficiency. These findings may also provide mechanistic evidence for the oral systemic link. Our results provide a possible new therapeutic target and paradigm for NO restoration in humans by specific oral bacteria.

  11. Nitrate Reduction to Nitrite, Nitric Oxide and Ammonia by Gut Bacteria under Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  12. Metolachor-ESA as a marker for nitrate flux in a first-order stream and riparian zones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There appears to be a connection with nitrate cycling in subsurface systems of the soil and metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA) which is a major environmental metabolite of metolachlor. This linkage has the potential to better define agricultural inputs of nitrate versus non-agricultural source...

  13. Effect of dissolved organic matter on nitrate-nitrogen removal by anion exchange resin and kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Song, Haiou; Yao, Zhijian; Wang, Mengqiao; Wang, Jinnan; Zhu, Zhaolian; Li, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the removal of nitrate-nitrogen from the model contaminated water have been investigated utilizing the strong base anion exchange resins. With the increase of gallic acid concentration from 0 to 400 mg/L, the adsorption amount of nitrate-nitrogen on the commercial resins, including D201, Purolite A 300 (A300) and Purolite A 520E (A520E), would significantly decrease. However, the presence of tannin acid has little impact on nitrate-nitrogen adsorption on them.Compared to D201 and A300 resins, A520E resin exhibited more preferable adsorption ability toward nitrate-nitrogen in the presence of competing organic molecules, such as gallic acid and tannin acid at greater levels in aqueous solution. Attractively, the equilibrium data showed that the adsorption isotherm of nitrate-nitrogen on A520E resin was in good agreement with Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The rate parameters for the intra particle diffusion have been estimated for the different initial concentrations. In batch adsorption processes, nitrate-nitrogen diffuse in porous adsorbent and rate process usually depends on t1/2 rather than the contact time. The pseudo first- and the second-order kinetic models fit better for nitrate-nitrogen adsorption onto A520E resin. The observations reported herein illustrated that A520E resin will be an excellent adsorbent for enhanced removal of nitrate-nitrogen from contaminated groundwater.

  14. Electrochemical processing of nitrate waste solutions. Phase 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Genders, D.; Weinberg, N.; Hartsough, D.

    1992-10-07

    The second phase of research performed at The Electrosynthesis Co., Inc. has demonstrated the successful removal of nitrite and nitrate from a synthetic effluent stream via a direct electrochemical reduction at a cathode. It was shown that direct reduction occurs at good current efficiencies in 1,000 hour studies. The membrane separation process is not readily achievable for the removal of nitrites and nitrates due to poor current efficiencies and membrane stability problems. A direct reduction process was studied at various cathode materials in a flow cell using the complete synthetic mix. Lead was found to be the cathode material of choice, displaying good current efficiencies and stability in short and long term tests under conditions of high temperature and high current density. Several anode materials were studied in both undivided and divided cell configurations. A divided cell configuration was preferable because it would prevent re-oxidation of nitrite by the anode. The technical objective of eliminating electrode fouling and solids formation was achieved although anode materials which had demonstrated good stability in short term divided cell tests corroded in 1,000 hour experiments. The cause for corrosion is thought to be F{sup {minus}} ions from the synthetic mix migrating across the cation exchange membrane and forming HF in the acid anolyte. Other possibilities for anode materials were explored. A membrane separation process was investigated which employs an anion and cation exchange membrane to remove nitrite and nitrate, recovering caustic and nitric acid. Present research has shown poor current efficiencies for nitrite and nitrate transport across the anion exchange membrane due to co-migration of hydroxide anions. Precipitates form within the anion exchange membranes which would eventually result in the failure of the membranes. Electrochemical processing offers a highly promising and viable method for the treatment of nitrate waste solutions.

  15. Modeling the Current and Future Roles of Particulate Organic Nitrates in the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Pye, Havala O T; Luecken, Deborah J; Xu, Lu; Boyd, Christopher M; Ng, Nga L; Baker, Kirk R; Ayres, Benjamin R; Bash, Jesse O; Baumann, Karsten; Carter, William P L; Edgerton, Eric; Fry, Juliane L; Hutzell, William T; Schwede, Donna B; Shepson, Paul B

    2015-12-15

    Organic nitrates are an important aerosol constituent in locations where biogenic hydrocarbon emissions mix with anthropogenic NOx sources. While regional and global chemical transport models may include a representation of organic aerosol from monoterpene reactions with nitrate radicals (the primary source of particle-phase organic nitrates in the Southeast United States), secondary organic aerosol (SOA) models can underestimate yields. Furthermore, SOA parametrizations do not explicitly take into account organic nitrate compounds produced in the gas phase. In this work, we developed a coupled gas and aerosol system to describe the formation and subsequent aerosol-phase partitioning of organic nitrates from isoprene and monoterpenes with a focus on the Southeast United States. The concentrations of organic aerosol and gas-phase organic nitrates were improved when particulate organic nitrates were assumed to undergo rapid (τ = 3 h) pseudohydrolysis resulting in nitric acid and nonvolatile secondary organic aerosol. In addition, up to 60% of less oxidized-oxygenated organic aerosol (LO-OOA) could be accounted for via organic nitrate mediated chemistry during the Southern Oxidants and Aerosol Study (SOAS). A 25% reduction in nitrogen oxide (NO + NO2) emissions was predicted to cause a 9% reduction in organic aerosol for June 2013 SOAS conditions at Centreville, Alabama.

  16. The calcium sensor CBL7 modulates plant responses to low nitrate in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing; Tang, Ren-Jie; Zheng, Xiao-Jiang; Wang, Suo-Min; Luan, Sheng

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) serves as a critical messenger in a number of adaptation and developmental processes. In plants, CBL family represents a unique group of calcium sensors that decodes calcium signals. Several CBL members have been functionally characterized in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, but the role of CBL7 remains unknown. Here, we report that CBL7 is involved in the regulation of low-nitrate response in Arabidopsis. Expression of CBL7 was predominant in the root of young seedlings and substantially induced by nitrate starvation. Cbl7 mutant was more inhibited in root growth upon nitrate starvation compared to the wild-type. Interestingly, the growth arrest of cbl7 under low-nitrate conditions relied on acidic pH. Further analyses revealed that expression of two high-affinity nitrate transporter genes, NRT2.4 and NRT2.5, was down-regulated in cbl7 under nitrogen-starvation condition. Accordingly, the cbl7 mutant plants retained lower nitrate content than wild-type plants under low-nitrate condition. Taken together, our results uncover a novel role of CBL7 in the response to nitrate deficiency in Arabidopsis. PMID:26549233

  17. Culture media optimization for growth and phycoerythrin production from Porphyridium purpureum.

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, S; Sarada, R; Bhattacharya, Sila; Ravishankar, G A

    2007-02-15

    Porphyridium spp. is a red micro alga and is gaining importance as a source of valuable products viz., phycobiliproteins (PB), sulfated exopolysaccharides, and polyunsaturated fatty acids with potential applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the present study, the effects of the major media constituents of Porphyridium species were studied using response surface methodology (RSM) on biomass yield, total PB and the production of phycoerythrin (PE). A second order polynomial can be used to predict the PB and PE production in terms of the independent variables. The independent variables such as the concentrations of sodium chloride, magnesium sulfate, sodium nitrate, and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate influenced the total PB and PE production. The optimum conditions showed that total PB was 4.8% at the concentration of sodium chloride 26.1 g/L, magnesium sulfate 5.23 g/L, sodium nitrate 1.56 g/L, and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate 0.034 g/L. In case of optimum PE production (3.3%), the corresponding values are 29.62, 6.11, 1.59, and 0.076 g/L, respectively. PE production depends greatly on the concentrations of chloride, nitrate, and sulfate as well as phosphate of which the former possess the maximum effect.

  18. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed. PMID:24605161

  19. Bismuth catalysts in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shū; Ueno, Masaharu; Kitanosono, Taku

    2012-01-01

    Several bismuth-catalyzed synthetic reactions, which proceed well in aqueous media, are discussed. Due to increasing demand of water as a solvent in organic synthesis, catalysts that can be used in aqueous media are becoming more and more important. Although bismuth Lewis acids are not very stable in water, it has been revealed that they can be stabilized by basic ligands. Chiral amine and related basic ligands combined with bismuth Lewis acids are particularly useful in asymmetric catalysis in aqueous media. On the other hand, bismuth hydroxide is stable and works as an efficient catalyst for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions in water. PMID:21769719

  20. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.