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Sample records for acidic plutonic rocks

  1. Asyntectonic granites and the structural memory of plutonic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Saint-Blanquat, M.; Habert, G.; Law, R. D.; Morgan, S.; Tikoff, B.

    2003-04-01

    Because of their initial magmatic physical state, plutonic rocks are privileged recorders of their tectonic environment. Their structural memory, contained within the internal structure, and particularly within the fabric, is commonly used to reconstruct the tectonic context during and after emplacement. The main parameters which govern the internal structure are the regional strain regime, the local geometry, and the dynamics of magma infilling. As granitic magmatism is in general a short-lived event, this structural memory is short but precise. The combination of results obtained from various subcontemporaneous plutons could then allow to reconstruct the tectono-magmatic history of whole areas with very good time resolution. The main problem with the interpretation of the structural memory of granites is the difficulty to constrain the duration of its acquisition : the strain pattern within a pluton will not have the same meaning if the time of recording (= time of pluton construction) is 10 ky, 1 My, or significantly longer. A short recording time provides information on infinitesimal (or, in many cases, incremental) strain, whereas a longer time of emplacement will form fabrics which should be interpreted in terms of finite strain. Numerous recent studies have shown that the construction of plutons is discontinuous. The duration of pluton construction is then the total infilling time and the time between the successive pulses. The latter can be estimated using numerical simulations of the thermal history during pluton construction, constrained by textural relationships within and around the plutons. Our work on plutons emplaced in contrasted settings (transpression, extension, and absence of regional tectonics) permit us to quantify the duration of pluton construction, and shows that this duration depends primarily on the mechanism of emplacement, i.e. active (forceful) versus passive (permitted). We have obtained duration of pluton construction between 200 and

  2. Petrology of the Plutonic Rocks of west-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Thomas P.

    1970-01-01

    A series of plutons in west-central Alaska defines the Hogatza plutonic belt which extends for about 200 miles in an east-west direction from the northeastern Seward Peninsula to the Koyukuk River. The plutonic rocks have an aggregate area of about 1,200 square miles and their composition, distribution, and possible petrogenesis are discussed for the first time in this report. Field, petrographic and chemical data supported by K/Ar age dating indicate the plutonic rocks are divisible into two suites differing in age, location, and composition. The western plutons are mid-Cretaceous (~100 m.y.) in age and consist of a heterogeneous assemblage of monzonite, syenite, quartz monzonite. Associated with these granitic rocks is a group of alkaline sub-silicic rocks that forma belt of intrusive complexes extending for a distance of at least 180 miles from west-central Alaska to the Bering Sea. The complex at Granite Mountain shows a rare example of zoning from an alkaline rim to a quartz-bearing core. The occurrence of a similar complex at Cape Dezhnev on the easternmost tip of Siberia suggests the alkaline province may extend into Siberia. The easternmost plutons are Late Cretaceous (180 m.y.) in age and composed primarily of granodiorite and quartz monzonite similar to calc-alkaline plutons found throughout the North America Cordillera. The plutons are epizonal and intrude deformed but unmetamorphosed Lower Cretaceous andesitic volcanics and volcanic graywacke which constitute the highly mobile Yukon-Koyukuk volcanogenic province of west-central Alaska. No older rocks have been found within the confines of this vast tract; the occurrence of a bounding ophiolite sequence has lead to the suggestion that the province was formed by large-scale rifting and is underlain by oceanic crust. The possibility of no juvenile sialic crust over much of the area suggests that the potassium-rich magma now represented by the alkaline rocks originated in the mantle. The distribution of the

  3. Petrology of upper Eocene-Oligocene plutonic rocks of Moalleman Damghan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohansal, Reza; Zolfaghari, Seddigheh; Hashem Emami, Mohammad

    2010-05-01

    The plutonic rocks of this area include cryptodoms, hypoabyssal plutonic bodies and dikes which intruded in to the late Lutetian- late Eocene rocks. The hypoabyssal plutonic rocks in Moalleman are classified in to two main groups: - Acidic rocks, including microgranite to microgranodiorite. - Intermediate rocks, including microquartzmonzodiorite to microquartzdiorite of hypoabyssal type. Presence of fine-grained mafic xenoliths with abundant biotite, amphibole and pyroxene in the intermediate rocks may be considered as an evidence of the role of mantle melting occurrence in the formation of these rocks. Occurrence of a felsitic texture, showing a high differentiation coefficient and existence of large quarts which are embayed, rounded and infiltered by material, and finally turmalinization in the acidic rocks due to Boron metasomatism suggest the role of crust in the formation of afore mentioned rocks as well. In some acidic rocks plagioclases show oscillatory zoning. This phenomenon along with the fact that biotite granites in these rocks crystallized before crystallization of quarts and after crystallization of alkali feldspar suggest that the crystallization of these rocks accomplished in the presence of 2 percent water, pertitic texture in some feldspars of the intermediate rocks this conclusion. Supports on the basis of the geochemical studies most of the hypoabyssal rocks of Moalleman area fall in subalkaline- calcoalkaline fields. Variation of immobile incompatible trace elements versus differentiation coefficient and the situation of samples in winkler diagram show the role of crustal- melting in the formation of acidic rocks. Trace element content of some rocks (e.g. Cu and Sm) with in this group show mantle specification, while some other rocks (e.g. Zr, Th, Hf) show crustal specification. The intermediate rocks of the study area therefore, indicate a hybridization of magmas from both the mantle and crust. Study of the temperature and water vapour

  4. Apollo 14 inverted pigeonites - Possible samples of lunar plutonic rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papike, J. J.; Bence, A. E.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis of 'inverted pigeonites' found in Apollo 14 samples 14082 and 14083 (a polymict breccia, the 'white rock') by a combination of optical, electron probe, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. These 'inverted pigeonites' are regarded as samples of plutonic rocks that have been blasted out of the Imbrium Basin. It is also concluded that lunar pigeonites will invert to orthopyroxenes, given sufficiently slow cooling histories even in very anhydrous environments.

  5. Diagram "alkali sum - silica" (TAS) for chemical classification and diagnostics of plutonic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpenok, Lyudmila; Kostin, Aleksandr; Kukharenko, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Achievement of uniformity in diagnostics of magmatic rocks is one of the most important tasks of petrology. In order to solve this problem, many researchers proposed diagrams, taking into account the ratio of different components of rocks. On the 33rd International Geological Congress in Oslo, the Chairman of the IUGS Subcommission Bernard Bonin raised the question, whether the TAS-diagram for diagnostics of plutonic rocks can be used we created? In order to find the answer to this question the databank containing more then 6000 chemical analyses of plutonic rocks (except of ultrabasic and foid rocks) from various regions of the World. Figurative points of rocks' contents were plotted on the diagram and after the statistical processing of the data the areas of frequency maximums of chemical parameters were contoured. As a result, 15 fields of basic, intermediate and acid plutonic rocks of different alkalinity have been statistically defined. Determination of these fields was based on the principles and rules adopted by the IUGS Subcommission and on the methodics approved by authors of this paper at detailed elaboration of this diagram for volcanic rocks (Oslo, 2008). Defined fields of plutonites generally correspond to the fields of their volcanic analogs, but with some shift in the direction of silica increasing. Thereby the TAS-diagram, in our opinion, can be used for chemical classification of plutonic rocks as well as volcanic. Its practical application is the simplest and easy-to-use way for preliminary identification of magmatic rocks. It will provide the uniformity in there diagnostics and using of petrographic terms, which now are often ambiguous.

  6. Guidelines to classification and nomenclature of Arabian felsic plutonic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsay, C.R.; Stoeser, D.B.; Drysdall, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Well-defined procedures for classifying the felsic plutonic rocks of the Arabian Shield on the basis of petrographic, chemical and lithostratigraphic criteria and mineral-resource potential have been adopted and developed in the Saudi Arabian Deputy Ministry for Mineral Resources over the past decade. A number of problems with conventional classification schemes have been identified and resolved; others, notably those arising from difficulties in identifying precise mineral compositions, continue to present difficulties. The petrographic nomenclature used is essentially that recommended by the International Union of Geological Sciences. Problems that have arisen include the definition of: (1) rocks with sodic, zoned or perthitic feldspar, (2) trondhjemites, and (3) alkali granites. Chemical classification has been largely based on relative molar amounts of alumina, lime and alkalis, and the use of conventional variation diagrams, but pilot studies utilizing univariate and multivariate statistical techniques have been made. The classification used in Saudi Arabia for stratigraphic purposes is a hierarchy of formation-rank units, suites and super-suites as defined in the Saudi Arabian stratigraphic code. For genetic and petrological studies, a grouping as 'associations' of similar and genetically related lithologies is commonly used. In order to indicate mineral-resource potential, the felsic plutons are classed as common, precursor, specialized or mineralized, in order of increasing exploration significance. ?? 1986.

  7. Tertiary epizonal plutonic rocks of the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness, Idaho County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Motzer, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness identified approximately 731 kmS of epizonal plutonic granitic rocks within the Bitterroot lobe of the Idaho batholith. From north to south, the intrusions are the Rock Lake Creek stock and the Whistling Pig, Running Creek, Bad Luck and Painted Rocks plutons. The stock and plutons consist of medium- to coarse-grained biotite and hornblende-biotite syenorgranite to monzogranite and quartz syenite capped by fine-grained biotite leucogranite. These rocks are intruded by late-synplutonic leucogranite dikes and post plutonic porphyritic rhyolite to rhyodacite and basalt dikes. The medium-grained granitic rocks are high in SiO2, K2O, Na2O, Ga, Th, U, W and Zr, but low in Al7O3, CaO, MgO, Cr, Ni, Co and V. Most of the granites are peraluminous. Rare-earth element (REE) plots (rock sample/chondrite) show enrichment in light REE over heavy REE with strong EU depletions. K-Ar biotite radiometric age determinations for medium-grained granites in all of the plutons range from approximately 51 Ma (Whistling Pig pluton) to 43.7 Ma (Painted Rocks pluton). Petrogenetic studies suggest that the plutons were rapidly emplaced to within 3.0 km of the paleosurface. The types, textures and color of the rocks result from devolatilization of the crystallizing melt and very low-grade hydrothermal alteration. The fluorine-rich melts are the fractionated with accumulate residue; they are considered to be anorogenic (A-type) granites intruded into the center of a metamorphic core complex.

  8. Uranium-Lead Zircon Ages and Sr, Nd, and Pb Isotope Geochemistry of Selected Plutonic Rocks from Western Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unruh, Daniel M.; Lund, Karen; Kuntz, Mel A.; Snee, Lawrence W.

    2008-01-01

    Across the Salmon River suture in western Idaho, where allochthonous Permian to Cretaceous oceanic rocks are juxtaposed against Proterozoic North American rocks, a wide variety of plutonic rocks are exposed. Available data indicate much variation in composition, source, and structural state of these plutons. The plutonic rocks were long described as the western border zone of the Cretaceous Idaho batholith but limited pre-existing age data indicate more complicated origins. Because the affinity and age of the plutonic rocks cannot be reliably determined from field relations, TIMS U-Pb dating in conjunction with Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic studies of selected plutons across the suture in western Idaho were undertaken. The data indicate three general groups of plutons including (1) those that intruded the island arc terranes during the Triassic and Jurassic, those that intruded near the western edge of oceanic rocks along the suture in the Early Cretaceous, and the plutons of the Idaho batholith that intruded Proterozoic North American rocks in the Late Cretaceous. Plutons that intruded Proterozoic North American rocks commonly include xenocrystic zircons and in several cases, ages could not be determined. The least radiogenic Sr and most radiogenic Nd are found among the Blue Mountains superterrane island arc samples. Suture-zone plutons have isotopic characteristics that span the range between Idaho batholith and island arc samples but mostly follow island arc signatures. Plutons of the Idaho batholith have the most radiogenic initial Pb and Sr ratios and the least radiogenic Nd of the samples analyzed.

  9. Field Guide to Plutonic and Metamorphic Rocks. Earth Science Curriculum Project Pamphlet Series PS-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romey, William D.

    Suggested are methods for the collection of field evidence about processes that form plutonic and metamorphic rock. Description and discussion of these types of rocks are provided. The planning and execution of a successful field trip is discussed. Advanced field projects are also discussed. Included are five appendices, references, and a…

  10. Is there a geochemical link between volcanic and plutonic rocks in the Organ Mountains caldera?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memeti, V.; Davidson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Results from separate volcanic and plutonic studies have led to inconsistent conclusions regarding the origins and thus links between volcanic and plutonic systems in continental arcs and the magmatic processes and time scales responsible for their compositional variations. Some have suggested that there is a geochemical and geochronological disconnect between volcanic and plutonic rocks and hence have questioned the existence of magma mush columns beneath active volcanoes. Investigating contemporary volcanic and plutonic rocks that are spatially connected is thus critical in exploring these issues. The ca. 36 Ma Organ Mountains caldera in New Mexico, USA, represents such a system exposing contemporaneous volcanic and plutonic rocks juxtaposed at the surface due to tilting during extensional tectonics along the Rio Grande Rift. Detailed geologic and structural mapping [1] and 40Ar/39Ar ages of both volcanics and plutons [2] demonstrate the spatial and temporal connection of both rock types with active magmatism over >2.5 myr. Three caldera-forming ignimbrites erupted within 600 kyr [2] from this system with a total erupted volume of 500-1,000 km3 as well as less voluminous pre- and post-caldera trachyte and andesite lavas. The ignimbrite sequence ranges from a crystal-poor, high-SiO2 rhyolite at the base to a more crystal-rich, low-SiO2 rhyolite at the top. Compositional zoning with quartz-monzonite at the base grading to syenite and alaskite at the top is also found in the Organ Needle pluton, the main intrusion, which is interpreted to be the source for the ignimbrites [1]. Other contemporaneous and slightly younger plutons have dioritic to leucogranitic compositions. We examined both volcanic and plutonic rocks with petrography and their textural variations with color cathodoluminescence, and used whole rock element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotope geochemistry to constrain magma compositions and origins. Electron microprobe analyses on feldspars have been completed to

  11. Cretaceous plutonic rocks in the Donner Lake-Cisco Grove area, northern Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kulow, Matthew J.; Hanson, Richard E.; Girty, Gary H.; Girty, Melissa S.; Harwood, David S.

    1998-01-01

    The northernmost occurrences of extensive, glaciated exposures of the Sierra Nevada batholith occur in the Donner Lake-Cisco Grove area of the northern Sierra Nevada. The plutonic rocks in this area, which are termed here the Castle Valley plutonic assemblage, crop out over an area of 225 km2 and for the most part are shown as a single undifferentiated mass on previously published geological maps. In the present work, the plutonic assemblage is divided into eight separate intrusive units or lithodemes, two of which each consist of two separate plutons. Compositions are dominantly granodiorite and tonalite, but diorite and granite form small plutons in places. Spectacular examples of comb layering and orbicular texture occur in the diorites. U-Pb zircon ages have been obtained for all but one of the main units and range from ~120 to 114 Ma, indicating that the entire assemblage was emplaced in a narrow time frame in the Early Cretaceous. This is consistent with abundant field evidence that many of the individual phases were intruded penecontemporaneously. The timing of emplacement correlates with onset of major Cretaceous plutonism in the main part of the Sierra Nevada batholith farther south. The emplacement ages also are similar to isotopic ages for gold-quartz mineralization in the Sierran foothills west of the study area, suggesting a direct genetic relationship between the voluminous Early Cretaceous plutonism and hydrothermal gold mineralization.

  12. Plutonic rocks of intermediate composition on Gran Canaria: the missing link of the bimodal volcanic rock suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundt-Malecha, B.

    2001-07-01

    Analysis of abundant plutonic fragments in the voluminous Miocene rhyolitic-basaltic composite ignimbrite P1, the initial felsic cooling unit overlying the basaltic shield on Gran Canaria, helps to solve the problem of bimodal volcanism. Syenogabbros dominate the plutonic suite and provide evidence that magmas of intermediate composition formed abundantly at depth but did not erupt. The entire suite of plutonic fragments comprises (1) pyroxenitic to gabbroic cumulates that directly influenced the liquid line of descent of P1 magmas, (2) gabbro, syenogabbro, syenodiorite and quartz-syenite fragments showing moderate degrees of hydrothermal alteration (chloritization, partial melting), and (3) diverse xenoliths differing significantly in bulk-rock composition and texture from the erupted P1 magmas. The compositions of plutonic series (2) overlap with both bulk-rock and mineral compositions of the erupted magmas, whereas series (1) rocks show lower alkali and silica contents. Compositional variations among the plutonic rocks are compatible with fractional crystallization as the major petrogenetic process, locally modified by magma mixing and selective element contamination. Variations in trace element concentrations of the plutonic rocks, however, are inferred to be the result of evolved interstitial melts penetrating into, or draining out of, crystalline mushes during slow intratelluric solidification. The presence of F-rich amphibole suggests that crystalline mushes were invaded by F-bearing fluids. Overall compositional similarity, and the fact that selective contamination effects are similar, support the interpretation that the series (2) plutonic fragments represent solidified portions of the magmatic system that ultimately produced the erupted P1 magmas. This system extended from the zone of underplating at the mantle-crust boundary through the lower and into the upper crust of Gran Canaria and was roughly vertically zoned in composition as shown by

  13. Potassium-Argon and Lead-Alpha Ages of Plutonic Rocks, Bokan Mountain Area, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Lanphere, M A; Mackevett, E M; Stern, T W

    1964-08-14

    Most of the granitic rocks in the Bokan Mountain area, southeastern Alaska, are early Paleozoic (probably Ordovician) judged by potassium-argon and lead-alpha age measurements. The Bokan Mountain Granite, the youngest intrusive unit in the area, belongs to a Mesozoic plutonic episode. These age measurements are the first direct evidence for the emplacement of early Paleozoic granitic intrusive rocks close to the Pacific margin of North America.

  14. Potassium-argon and lead-alpha ages of plutonic rocks, Bokan Mountain area, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; MacKevett, E.M., Jr.; Stern, T.W.

    1964-01-01

    Most of the granitic rocks in the Bokan Mountain area, southeastern Alaska, are early Paleozoic (probably Ordovician) judged by potassium-argon and lead-alpha age measurements. The Bokan Mountain Granite, the youngest intrusive unit in the area, belongs to a Mesozoic plutonic episode. These age measurements are the first direct evidence for the emplacement of early Paleozoic granitic intrusive rocks close to the Pacific margin of North America.

  15. Rock-Forming feldspars of the Khibiny alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Konopleva, N. G.; Kalashnikov, A. O.; Korchak, Yu. A.; Selivanova, E. A.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the structural-compositional zoning of the well-known Khibiny pluton in regard to rock-forming feldspars. The content of K-Na-feldspars increases inward and outward from the Main foidolite ring. The degree of coorientation of tabular K-Na-feldspar crystals sharply increases in the Main ring zone, and microcline-dominant foyaite turns into orthoclase-dominant foyaite. The composition of K-Na-feldspars in the center of the pluton and the Main ring zone is characterized by an enrichment in Al. This shift is compensated by a substitution of some K and Na with Ba (the Main ring zone) or by an addition of K and Na cations to the initially cation-deficient microcline (the central part of the pluton). Feldspars of volcanosedimentary rocks occurring as xenoliths in foyaite primarily corresponded to plagioclase An15-40, but high-temperature fenitization and formation of hornfels in the Main ring zone gave rise to the crystallization of anorthoclase subsequently transformed into orthoclase and albite due to cooling and further fenitization. Such a zoning is the result of filling the Main ring fault zone within the homogeneous foyaite pluton with a foidolite melt, which provided the heating and potassium metasomatism of foyaite and xenoliths of volcanosedimentary rocks therein. The process eventually led to the transformation of foyaite into rischorrite-lyavochorrite, while xenoliths were transformed into aluminum hornfels with anorthoclase, annite, andalusite, topaz, and sekaninaite.

  16. Petrology and U-Pb geochronology of buried Avalonian plutonic rocks on southeastern Cape Cod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leo, G.W.; Mortensen, J.K.; Barreiro, B.; Phillips, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Plutonic rocks have been intersected by two separate drill holes on souteastern Cape Cod. Hole CC2 is located about 7 km south of the Nauset anomaly, an east-northeast-trending magnetic lineament that was considered to separate the distinct plutonic zones of Avalon terrane. This drill hole intersected weakly foliated, fairly homogeneous biotite granite. Zircons from this granite give a U-Pb age of 584+9/-8 Ma. Hole CC1 is located about 12 km north of the Nauset anomaly. The drill core intersected foliated, sheared, biotite granodiorite and biotite-hornblende-clinopyroxene-quartz gabbro, metamorphosed to greenschist facies. The deformed and altered state of these rocks, as well as their geochemistry, suggest that their origin and possibly their ages are distinct from the granite in hole CC2. No datable zircons were obtained from rocks in CC1. -from Authors

  17. Chemistry and petrology of the Apennine Front, Apollo 15. I - KREEP basalts and plutonic rocks. II - Impact melt rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, S. B.; Papike, J. J.; Laul, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    The mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry of rock fragments for the Apennine Front coarse fines (10-4 and 4-2 mm) have been determined. The data are consistent with a single eruptive event that produced several flows. It is found that most of the plutonic rocks are ferroan in nature, with a few belonging to the Mg-suite. The mineral and bulk chemistry of KREEP basalts and the composition of ferroan anorthosites are discussed. Petrographic studies of 21 impact melts are also presented, showing a variety of textures. It is found that the Apollo 15 impact melts are mixtures of low-K Fra Mauro, KREEP, and plutonic components. The Ni/Ir ratios of the melt rocks are shown to be greater than chondritic values, indicating ancient and/or iron meteorite components.

  18. An underground characterization program for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in plutonic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.M.; Everitt, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) is developing a concept for disposing of nuclear fuel waste that involves placing and sealing it in a disposal vault excavated 500 to 1,000 m deep in the stable plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. In this concept, engineered and natural barriers serve to isolate the waste from the biosphere. Since 1983, underground characterization and testing in support of the CNFWMP has been ongoing at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in southeastern Manitoba. This paper draws on experience gained at the URL to recommend an approach to underground characterization that would provide the necessary information to make design decisions for a disposal vault in plutonic rock.

  19. Paleoproterozoic layered PGE-bearing Monchetundra pluton, Kola Peninsula: Sm-Nd age of metamorphic alteration of mafic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunakkuzin, E. L.; Serov, P. A.; Bayanova, T. B.; Nerovich, L. I.; Borisenko, E. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work is Sm-Nd study of metamorphic alteration of massive gabbronorites from the Monchetundra pluton. The mafic rocks of the pluton are unevenly metamorphosed up to amphibolite facies with the formation of garnet, hornblende, and other minerals. The presence of garnet is a distinctive feature of this pluton in comparison with other Paleoproterozoic PGE-bearing plutons of the eastern part of the Baltic shield: Mt. General'skaya, Fedorovo-Pana, Imandra lopolith, and Monchepluton [9]. The degree of metamorphic alteration of rocks increases near the faults, the largest of which is Monchetundra fault separating the studied pluton from the Monchepluton. This fault was formed about 1.9-2.0 Ga ago according to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr mineral isochrons for minerals from metagabbro-anorthosites of the M1 well.

  20. Isotopic studies of the late Archean plutonic rocks of the Wind River Range, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.; Hedge, C.E.; Worl, R.G.; Simmons, K.R.; Nkomo, I.T.; Wenner, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two late Archaean intrusive events were documented in the Wind River Range by isotopic studies of the Rb-Sr and U-Th-Pb systems in whole-rock samples and the U-Pb systematics for zircon. An age of approx 2630(20) m.y. for the Louis Lake batholith and apparent ages of 2504(40) to 2575(50) m.y. for the Bear Ears pluton were obtained. Post-magmatic hydrothermal events approximately Tertiary in age, lowered delta 18O values and disturbed parent-daughter relationships in most of the isotopic systems investigated. The two intrusive units apparently were derived from different protoliths. Initial isotopic ratios and petrochemistry for the Louis Lake batholith are consistent with an early Archaean trondhjemitic to tonalitic source. The protolith for the Bear Ears pluton must have been subjected to high-grade metamorphism that caused loss of Rb and U prior to magma generation. -L.C.H.

  1. Intrusive rocks and plutonic belts of southeastern Alaska, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brew, David A.; Morrell, Robert P.; Roddick, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    About 30 percent of the 175,000-km2 area of southeastern Alaska is underlain by intrusive igneous rocks. Compilation of available information on the distribution, composition, and ages of these rocks indicates the presence of six major and six minor plutonic belts. From west to east, the major belts are: the Fairweather-Baranof belt of early to mid-Tertiary granodiorite; the Muir-Chichagof belt of mid-Cretaceous tonalite and granodiorite; the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt of porphyritic granodiorite, quartz diorite, and diorite of probable Cretaceous age; the Klukwan-Duke belt of concentrically zoned or Alaskan-type ultramafic-mafic plutons of mid-Cretaceous age within the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt; the Coast Plutonic Complex sill belt of tonalite of unknown, but perhaps mid-Cretaceous, age; and the Coast Plutonic Complex belt I of early to mid-Tertiary granodiorite and quartz monzonite. The minor belts are distributed as follows: the Glacier Bay belt of Cretaceous and(or) Tertiary granodiorite, tonalite, and quartz diorite lies within the Fair-weather-Baranof belt; layered gabbro complexes of inferred mid-Tertiary age lie within and are probably related to the Fairweather-Baranof belt; the Chilkat-Chichagof belt of Jurassic granodiorite and tonalite lies within the Muir-Chichagof belt; the Sitkoh Bay alkaline, the Kendrick Bay pyroxenite to quartz monzonite, and the Annette and Cape Fox trondhjemite plutons, all interpreted to be of Ordovician(?) age, together form the crude southern southeastern Alaska belt within the Muir-Chichagof belt; the Kuiu-Etolin mid-Tertiary belt of volcanic and plutonic rocks extends from the Muir-Chichagof belt eastward into the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt; and the Behm Canal belt of mid- to late Tertiary granite lies within and next to Coast Plutonic Complex belt II. In addition, scattered mafic-ultramafic bodies occur within the Fairweather-Baranof, Muir-Chichagof, and Coast Plutonic Complex belts I and II. Palinspastic

  2. Intrusive rocks of the Holden and Lucerne quadrangles, Washington; the relation of depth zones, composition, textures, and emplacement of plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cater, Fred W.

    1982-01-01

    The core of the northern Cascade Range in Washington consists of Precambrian and upper Paleozoic metamorphic rocks cut by numerous plutons, ranging in age from early Triassic to Miocene. The older plutons have been eroded to catazonal depths, whereas subvolcanic rocks are exposed in the youngest plutons. The Holden and Lucerne quadrangles span a -sizeable and representative part of this core. The oldest of the formations mapped in these quadrangles is the Swakane Biotite Gneiss, which was shown on the quadrangle maps as Cretaceous and older in age. The Swakane has yielded a middle Paleozoic metamorphic age, and also contains evidence of zircon inherited from some parent material more than 1,650 m.y. old. In this report, the Swakane is assigned an early Paleozoic or older age. It consists mostly of biotite gneiss, but interlayered with it are scattered layers and lenses of hornblende schist and gneiss, clinozoisite-epidote gneiss, and quartzite. Thickness of the Swakane is many thousands of meters, and the base is not exposed. The biotite gneiss is probably derived from a pile of siliceous volcanic rocks containing scattered sedimentary beds and basalt flows. Overlying the Swakane is a thick sequence of eugeosynclinal upper Paleozoic rocks metamorphosed to amphibolite grade. The sequence includes quartzite and thin layers of marble, hornblende schist and gneiss, graphitic schist, and smaller amounts of schist and gneiss of widely varying compositions. The layers have been tightly and complexly folded, and, in places, probably had been thrust over the overlying Swakane prior to metamorphism. Youngest of the supracrustal rocks in the area are shale, arkosic sandstone, and conglomerate of the Paleocene Swauk Formation. These rocks are preserved in the Chiwaukum graben, a major structural element of the region. Of uncertain age, but possibly as old as any of the intrusive rocks in the area, are small masses of ultramafic rocks, now almost completely altered to

  3. Plutonic rocks of Jurassic age in the Alaska-Aleutian Range batholith: chemical variation and polarity.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, B.I.; Miesch, A.T.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Plutonic rocks of Jurassic age exposed on the Pacific side of this batholith form a compositionally continuous calc-alkaline suite that ranges from hornblende gabbro to quartz monzonite. Tonalite and quartz diorite are the dominant rock types. Trend-surface analysis of 102 samples indicates that the direction of slope of the trend is approximately normal to the Jurassic magmatic arc. K2O and SiO2 increase towards the E-SE and the other oxides towards the W-NW. If the chemical trends reflect the approximate geometry of a palaeo-subduction zone, the polarity of the Jurassic magmatic arc is to the NW, i.e. subduction was directed towards the SE. Thus the palaeo-subduction zone is on the opposite side of the arc from the position that has generally been assumed, indicating that the Jurassic plutonic rocks were not generated in response to classical Andean-type convergent plate margins. The magmatic arc may have been formed in an intra-ocean environment and subsequently has been rafted northwards and accreted to this part of the N Pacific rim during the late Mesozoic. Middle and Upper Jurassic clastics underlying Cook Inlet to the SE and derived from the magmatic arc are classified as back-arc deposits, rather than as an arc-trench gap sequence.-L.C.H.

  4. Europium mass balance in polymict samples and implications for plutonic rocks of the lunar crust

    SciTech Connect

    Korotev, R.L.; Haskin, L.A. )

    1988-07-01

    From correlations of SM concentration and Sm/Eu ratio with Th concentration for a large number of polymict samples from various locations in the lunar highlands and the value of 0.91 {mu}g/g for the mean Th concentration of the highlands surface crust obtained by the orbiting gamma-ray experiments. The authors estimate the mean concentrations of Sm and Eu in the lunar surface crust to be between 2 and 3 {mu}g/g Sm and 0.7 and 1.2 {mu}g/g Eu. The compositional trends indicate that there is no significant enrichment or depletion of Eu, on the average, compared to Sm relative to chondritic abundances, i.e., there is no significant Eu anomaly in average upper crust. Although rich in plagioclase ({approximately}70%), the upper crust does not offer evidence for a gross vertical separation of plagioclase from the final liquid from which it crystallized. This and the chondritic ratio of Eu/Al in average highlands material imply that the net effect of the processes that led to formation of the lunar crust was to put most of the Al and incompatible elements in the crust. Among plutonic rocks, only plagioclase in rocks from the magnesian suite can supply the excess Eu in the polymict rocks. Owing to the intermediate value of the mean Mg/Fe ratio of the crust, a significant fraction of the mafic rocks of the lunar highlands must have lower Mg/Fe ratios than the norites and troctolites of the magnesian-suite of plutonic rocks. A large fraction of the plagioclase in the lunar crust is associated not with ferroan anorthosite, but with more mafic rocks. There is little evidence in the Eu data that the lunar crust ever consisted of a thick shell of nearly pure plagioclase, as envisioned in some formulations of the magma ocean model of its formation.

  5. Map showing the distribution and characteristics of plutonic rocks in the Tonopah 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The accompanying table includes the name (if any) of the pluton and its location, the age of the pluton (either a radiometric age or an age inferred from field relations), modal composition, texture, mineralogy, hydrothermal alteration and mineralization related to the pluton, the source of mapping shown on this map, and published references on the pluton. Radiometric ages are either published K-Ar and fission track ages or new whole-rock Rb-Sr ages determined by A. C. Robinson on samples collected either for this study or as part of regional Sr-isotope studies by R.W. Kistler and A.C. Robinson. K-Ar ages published prior to 1977 are corrected using the new I.U.C.S. constants (Steiger and Jager, 1977). Muscovite alteration ages are reported for several plutons and represent minimum ages for emplacement of these plutons. Compositional classification follows the T. J. G.S. system (“Streckeisen, 1976) and is based either on modal analyses of slabs or estimates from hand specimens. All modes, unless otherwise noted, were measured in this study. The number of modes determined is shown in parentheses, and the range in volume percent of major minerals is given. Where no modal data are available, the color index (percentage of mafic minerals) and major mafic minerals are given for most plutons. Data tabulated on hydrothermal alteration and mineralization related to plutons are based on observations made during field studies for this project. Clear genetic relation between granitic plutonism and several mineral deposits previously attributed to granitic plutonism were not substantiated, and these inconsistencies are noted in the table.

  6. Emplacement and geochemical evolution of eocene plutonic rocks in the Colville batholith

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Eocene plutonic rocks in the Colville batholith are divided on the basis of field evidence and chemical composition into, in order of decreasing age, (1) several calc-alkalic biotite-hornblende monzodiorite to granodiorite intrusions referred to as the Devils Elbow suite, and (2) compositionally variable calc-alkalic to alkali-calcic intrusions referred to as the Herron Creek suite. These Eocene suites are distinct from older, more voluminous, leucocratic granite and granodiorite intrusions, designated the Keller Butte suite, which are calcic and characteristically lack hornblende. Results of qualitative and computer modeling of major element variation and quantitative models of trace element variation in the chemically coherent Bridge Creek intrusions, a member of the Herron Creek suite, are compatible with fractionation of plagioclase feldspar + hornblende + biotite + magnetite + apatite from a parent magma of andesitic composition to account for the observed variation. Strongly curved variation trends preclude mixing as the primary mechanism for the observed variation. It is suggested that parallel variation trends in the other Eocene intrusions are also the result of crystal fractionation. Lateral chemical variations including a decrease in silica saturation suggest the chemical characteristics of these rocks reflect those of parental magmas derived from the mantle, with an unknown amount of crustal contribution. Rotated and angular xenoliths, discordant contacts, and temporal and spatial proximity to graben structures indicate that the Eocene plutons were passively implaced into the upper crust along graben-bounding faults during graben formation, the earlier stages of which appear to have been contemporaneous with regional mylonitic deformation.

  7. Geochemical evaluation of felsic plutonic rocks in the eastern and southeastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Bray, E.A.; Elliott, James E.; Stoeser, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    In a geochemical evaluation of the eastern and southeastern Arabian Shield, which included collection of 696 rock samples and 694 pan concentrate samples, a province of tin-anomalous granitoid plutons was defined. Pan concentrates collected in and around these plutons were enriched in tin and tungsten relative to the concentrate population. Rock samples of these leucocratic, muscovite-bearing, peraluminous granites contained anomalously high concentrations of lithium, fluorine, beryllium, lead, rubidium, niobium, yttrium, tin, bismuth, silver, and tungsten. Ten tin-anomalous plutons were located in the study area. The plutons are typically small, less than 10 km2 in areal extent, and circular to elliptical in plan view. The resource potential of these latest Proterozoic plutons has not been established; economically exploitable concentrations of tin, tungsten, molybdenum, or zinc may be present, and followup studies are warranted. Further, two of the plutons are characterized by higher than normal total-count radioactivity and have potential for uranium, thorium, or rare-earth element deposits.

  8. Miocene zircon crystals in dacite from Ilopango Caldera, El Salvador: Evidence for recycling of plutonic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, J. M.; Korm, S.; Schmitt, A. K.; Economos, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Ilopango Caldera is located in El Salvador and is part of the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) that extends from southern Mexico to Panama. The volcanic arc is situated on crust that ranges in age from 150-28 Ma and is covered with Miocene-Recent volcanic ash and pyroclastic flow deposits. Several large eruptions are associated with Ilopango Caldera, the most recent are from the Tierra Blanca Joven (TBJ) eruption, which produced massive pyroclastic flows 1600 years BP. Older eruptions from Ilopango Caldera are referred to as the Tierra Blanca (TB) deposits, and the TB2 ignimbrite has been dated at 12,000 years. The objective of this research is to use the ages of zircon crystals from the TBJ and TB2 eruptions to establish and compare storage times for these magma reservoirs. We used a CAMECA ims 1270 at UCLA's NSF National Ion Microprobe Facility in order to obtain U-Pb and U-Th ages for individual zircon crystals from each eruption. Depth profiling and U-Pb analyses were performed on both of the zircon crystals using established analysis techniques. The data show that zircon from both eruptions have 15 Ma old cores with thin rims (few μm) that are consistent with the young eruption ages. In both cases, however the transition from core to rim composition is abrupt and does not record continuous crystallization of the zircon crystals. We conclude that the presence of the old cores is consistent with assimilation of middle Miocene plutonic rock by juvenile magma during Quaternary activity of Ilopango Caldera. The most likely source of 15 Ma old zircon are the plutons associated with middle Miocene explosive volcanism in Central America. Ash deposits recovered from the sea floor (via ODP studies) record extensive explosive volcanism from 13-15 Ma that can be traced to ignimbrite deposits of the Chalatenango Formation in south-central Guatemala and El Salvador. We conclude that 1) the zircon crystals record only brief pre-eruptive crystallization histories for the

  9. Distribution of manganese between coexisting biotite and hornblende in plutonic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.; Gottfried, D.; Tilling, R.I.

    1968-01-01

    The distribution of manganese between coexisting biotite and hornblende for 80 mineral pairs from igneous rocks of diverse provenance (including Southern California, Sierra Nevada, Boulder, and Boulder Creek batholiths and the Jemez Mountains volcanics) has been determined by neutron activation analysis. Data on the distribution ratio (Kd = Mnhornblende Mnbiotite) indicate that an equilibrium distribution of Mn is closely approached, though not completely attained, in most samples from plutonic environments. Comparison of Kd values of mineral pairs with bulk chemical composition of host rocks reveals no correlation. Because initial crystallization temperatures vary with rock composition, the lack of correlation of composition with Kd suggests that the equilibrium distribution of Mn between biotite and hornblende reflects exchange at subsolidus temperatures rather than initial crystallization temperatures. The highest Kd values are for volcanic rocks, in which rapid quenching prevents subsolidus redistribution of Mn. For sample pairs from the Southern California and Sierra Nevada batholiths there is a positive correlation of Kd with TiO2 content of biotite. Though the evidence is not compelling, Kd may also correlate with the rate of cooling and/or the presence or absence of sphene in the rock. ?? 1968.

  10. Plutonic and metasedimentary rocks from the Coastal Range of northern Chile: Rb sbnd Sr and U sbnd Pb isotopic systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Karsten; Baumann, Albrecht

    1985-10-01

    More than 50% of the surface in the Coastal Range of northern Chile between the towns of Taltal and Chan˜aral consists of granitoid rocks. Age determinations by means of U sbnd Pb isotopic analyses on sized zircons and by means of Rb sbnd Sr isotopic measurements, in conjuction with other geochemical studies, reveal a complex pattern for the development of the plutonites. Though closely associated, two groups of intrusive rocks can be distinguished on the basis of isotopic and geochemical data: In a west-east transect southeast of Chan˜aral, several calc-alkaline plutonites with basic to acid members intruded mainly into Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. The U sbnd Pb data of the zircons from the plutonites yielded concordant ages ranging from Lower Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous. U sbnd Pb ages are identical with Rb sbnd Sr biotite ages within the error limits and almost coincide with the K sbnd Ar mineral ages. Both the ages and the initial 87Sr 86Sr ratios decrease continuously from west to east. The low initial Sr isotopic ratios (0.703-0.705) and other geochemical parameters indicate I-type characteristics. In the west-east segment northeast of Chan˜aral, mainly alkaline plutonic rocks intruded in an interval from Upper Permian to Upper Triassic. The U sbnd Pb data of zircons are slightly discordant and indicate a small portion of inherited crustal material > 1 Ga old. Rb sbnd Sr biotite ages were reset by thermal pulses due to the emplacement of younger granitoid rocks. The initial 87Sr 86Sr ratios of < 0.710 point to an origin of these rocks by anatexis of crustal rocks (S-type). The oldest rocks in the area of Chan˜aral consist of thick sequences of metasediments. The material for these rocks was derived from a source > 2.5 Ga old as indicated by the U sbnd Pb data of the zircons. The lower intercept age of the zircons points to metamorphism of the source area at about 600 Ma. Due to uplift in the Early Paleozoic the source area supplied the material for

  11. Transport and Depositional Model for Large Country Rock Blocks Within the Searchlight Pluton, Southern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, D. S.; Furbish, D. J.; Miller, C. F.

    2006-05-01

    Searchlight pluton, a steeply tilted, 10 km thick Miocene intrusion in the Colorado River Extensional Corridor, exposes a zone with abundant, 5-400 m long blocks of Proterozoic gneiss. Blocks are present within a pair of subparallel horizons that make up a 2 km-thick zone and extend about 6 km laterally away from the pluton's north margin slightly oblique to the initially subhorizontal boundary between the pluton's middle unit (granite) and lower unit (qtz monzonite). Blocks are a variety of Precambrian metasedimentary gneisses, granitic gneisses, and mylonites. Blocks are commonly polylithologic and well foliated, with long and intermediate dimensions parallel to both their own foliation and that of the granitic host. Their average aspect ratio is ~ 4:1. Blocks within these horizons are interpreted as stoped (detached country rock that experience gravity- induced displacement) based on several lines of evidence. First, the distribution and abundances of blocks are not consistent with an isolated panel of wall rock (screen). The zone is laterally discontinuous (local abundances vary from ~ 0-40 %); transects a gradational (cm-m scale) internal contact at a slightly oblique angle; and tapers away from the pluton's margin. Second, while block foliations are homoclinal and show fairly consistent attitudes from block to block, block foliations are discordant with wall rock foliations at the same stratigraphic level (adjacent north wall). Third, mush disturbance features such as schlieren and enhanced feldspar foliation beneath blocks suggest a downward compaction. We interpret the blocks to have been emplaced after wall collapse events. We are using scaled settling experiments to clarify how blocks move within viscous fluids and interact with crystal mushes. The experiments, involving tabular ceramic blocks with density ρ = 1.75-2.20 g cm-3 settling in shampoo (ρ = 1.02 g cm-3) with viscosity μ = 20.35 Pa s, are scaled to order-of-magnitude by the particle Reynolds

  12. Map showing distribution and classification of felsic plutonic rocks in the eastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Bray, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    This 1:500,000-scale compilation shows the distribution of felsic plutonic rocks, lithologic types, and associated mineralization in an area between lat 21° and 24°30’ N., long 43°30’ and 46° E. It is part of a shieldwide compilation being done within the framework of Saudi Arabian Deputy Ministry for Mineral Resources projects 2.04 and 3.12.

  13. Geochemistry of intrusive rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field, New Mexico, and contrasts between evolution of plutonic and volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Czamanske, G.K.; Lipman, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonic rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field comprise three groups: 1) ???25 Ma high-level resurgent plutons composed of monzogranite and silicic metaluminous and peralkaline granite, 2) 23-25 Ma syenogranite, and alkali-feldspar granite intrusions emplaced along the southern caldera margin, and 3) 19-23 Ma granodiorite and granite plutons emplaced south of the caldera. Major-element compositions of both extrusive and intrusive suites in the Latir field are broadly similar; both suites include high-SiO2 rocks with low Ba and Sr, and high Rb, Nb, Th, and U contents. Moreover, both intermediateto siliciccomposition volcanic and plutonic rocks contain abundant accessory sphene and apatite, rich in rare-earth elements (REE), as well as phases in which REE's are essential components. Strong depletion in Y and REE contents, with increasing SiO2 content, in the plutonic rocks indicate a major role for accessory mineral fractionation that is not observed in volcanic rocks of equivalent composition. Considerations of the rheology of granitic magma suggest that accessory-mineral fractionation may occur primarily by filter-pressing evolved magmas from crystal-rich melts. More limited accessory-mineral crystallization and fractionation during evolution of the volcanic magmas may have resulted from markedly lower diffusivities of essential trace elements than major elements. Accessory-mineral fractionation probably becomes most significant at high crystallinities. The contrast in crystallization environments postulated for the extrusive and intrusive rocks may be common to other magmatic systems; the effects are particularly pronounced in highly evolved rocks of the Latir field. High-SiO2 peralkaline porphyry emplaced during resurgence of the Questa caldera represents non-erupted portions of the magma that produced the Amalia Tuff during caldera-forming eruption. The peralkaline porphyry continues compositional and mineralogical trends found in the tuff. Amphibole

  14. Rock deformation in hydrothermal systems: the nature of fractures in plutons and their host rocks. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, D.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this program is to accumulate the types of field data which are important for the analysis of magma-hydrothermal systems. The structural effects of thermal processes were identified in order to distinguish the thermally induced deformations from the deformations that occurred subsequent to complete cooling of the system. Mapping techniques were developed to record the structural data on the ground from local domains characteristic of larger areas in the magma chamber, and in the air from low-angle oblique aerial photography of the entire region. The ground system is complete and preliminary testing is currently being carried out to verify the method. The results indicate that granitic crystalline rocks have no structural resistance to thermal perturbations. If nuclear wastes are to be stored in granite, precautionary buffers would have to be incorporated into the system. A total of 30 fossil magma chambers have been studied over the past 2 years. An extensive set of fracture imagery has been collected, together with information related to the geological history of the plutons. Fossil magma chambers in Arizona, Utah, California, Washington, Montana, and British Columbia have been studied.

  15. Two types of ultrapotassic plutonic rocks in the Bohemian Massif — Coeval intrusions at different crustal levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotková, Jana; Schaltegger, Urs; Leichmann, Jaromír

    2010-03-01

    We present U-Pb zircon age determinations of two Variscan ultrapotassic plutonic rocks from the Moldanubian Zone (Bohemian Massif). Equant, multifaceted zircons without inherited cores from a two-pyroxene-biotite quartz monzonite of the Jihlava Pluton yielded a precise age of 335.12 ± 0.57 Ma, interpreted as dating magma crystallization. The majority of both tabular and prismatic grains from the amphibole-biotite melagranite ("durbachite") from the Třebíč Pluton plot along a discordia intersecting the concordia at 334.8 ± 3.2 Ma; prismatic zircon grains commonly contain inherited cores and yield an upper intercept age of 2.2 Ga, indicating early Proterozoic inheritance. We therefore suggest that both types of the ultrapotassic plutonic rocks from the Bohemian Massif crystallized at ca 335 Ma, and the previously published ages higher than ca 340 Ma for "durbachites" were biased by a small amount of unresolved inheritance. The ultrapotassic magma emplacement in the middle crust was related to rapid exhumation of a deep crustal segment, considered as isothermal decompression between high-pressure (˜ 340 Ma) and medium-pressure (˜ 333 Ma) stages recorded in granulites. Mineral assemblages as well as external and internal zircon morphology suggest that the Jihlava intrusion was deep and dry, whereas the Třebíč intrusion was shallow and wet. Low ɛHf values of zircons (- 4.4 to - 7.5) in both rock types suggest a similar source with a predominant crustal component. However, inherited grains in the Třebíč melagranite indicate its contamination with crustal material during emplacement, and thus possibly a slower rate of exhumation and/or of magma ascent through the crust.

  16. Plutonic and metamorphic xenoliths from the Cascada Tuff, Chihuahua, Mexico, as evidence indicating the composition of the basement rocks beneath the Sierra Madre Occidental

    SciTech Connect

    Duex, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Sierra Madre Occidental of western Mexico is composed dominantly of Mid-Tertiary felsic and subordinate mafic volcanic rocks with only sparse outcrops of non-volcanic rocks. There are widely scattered but small exposure of plutonic rocks but regionally metamorphosed rocks are not known to occur in the Sierra. To this date the only known area where plutonic and metamorphic xenoliths have been found is near the village of Basaseachic in western Chihuahua where thick outcrops of the Cascada Tuff occur. The xenoliths are the only known occurrence of regionally metamorphosed rocks for a distance of about 400 km between exposures of Precambrian rocks to the west in Sonora and the east in central Chihuahua. Non-volcanic xenoliths from a few cm to about one meter in diameter occur most abundantly in the upper portions of the Cascada Tuff. They can be divided into four main groups in decreasing order of abundance as follows: (1) coarse-grained phaneritic felsic igneous rocks; (2) cataclastically deformed plutonic rocks; (3) fine-grained phaneritic, mafic to intermediate igneous rocks; and (4) low-grade schistose, gneissic, and non-foliated metamorphic rocks. The lithological composition of the xenoliths is grossly similar to that described for Precambrian metamorphic and plutonic rocks from northern Mexico and the southwestern US.

  17. A tale of 10 plutons - Revisited: Age of granitic rocks in the White Mountains, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.H.; Conrad, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar incremental heating analysis and conventional K-Ar age determinations on plutonic rocks of the White Mountains define two stages of magmatic emplacement: Late Cretaceous, between ca. 90 Ma and 75 Ma, and Middle-Late Jurassic, between ca. 180 and 140 Ma. The Jurassic stage can be divided into two substages, 180-165 Ma and 150-140 Ma. Thermal effects of the younger plutons on the older granitoids partially to completely reset ages, making it difficult to determine the age of emplacement and cooling of several of the plutons even by 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating analyses. New data together with published ages and regional geochronological synthesis of the Sierra Nevada batholith indicate that regions within the batholith have coherent periods or episodes of magmatic activity. In the White Mountains and Sierra Nevada directly to the west there was little or no activity in Early Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time; magmatism took place during relatively short intervals of 15 m.y. or less in the Middle and Late Jurassic and Late Cretaceous periods. The new K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar analyses of granitoids from the White Mountains help, but do not completely clarify the complex history of emplacement, cooling, and reheating of the batholith.

  18. Geochemistry and geochronology of the volcano-plutonic rocks associated with the Glojeh epithermal gold mineralization, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siani, Majid Ghasemi; Mehrabi, Behzad; Azizi, Hossein; Wilkinson, Camilla Maya; Ganerød, Morgan

    2015-08-01

    Eocene to Oligocene volcano-plutonic rocks are widespread throughout NW Iran. The Tarom-Hashtjin metallogenic province is one of the most promising epithermal-porphyry ore mineralized districts in NW Iran. The Glojeh gold deposit, located in the center of this province, is a typical high to intermediate sulfidation epithermal system, spatially and temporally associated with a granite intrusion and associated high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic volcano-plutonic rocks. The intrusive complexes of the Glojeh district are characterized by: SiO2 contents of 60.9 to 70.7 wt.%, K2O+Na2O of 7.60 to 8.92 wt.%, and K2O/Na2O ratios of 0.9 to 1.8. They are enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs), and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs), and have weak negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu*= 0.5 to 0.9). 40Ar/39Ar geochronology applied to biotite and feldspar, separated from two intrusives (Goljin and Varmarziar), and two feldspar aliquots separated from hydrothermal veins at North Glojeh and South Glojeh, was carried out to constrain magmatic and hydrothermal events. Plagioclase (± sericite), from North Glojeh and South Glojeh produced ages (42.20±0.34 Ma, and 42.56±1.47 Ma respectively) that overlap with the age of the Goljin intrusion (41.87±1.58 Ma). Geochemical data for the volcano-plutonic rocks in the Glojeh district, that have87Sr/86Sr isotopic compositions that range from 0.706344 to 0.708331, suggest an origin involving partial melting of a depleted mantle source during Neo-Tethyan subduction.

  19. Isotopic studies of the Eye-Dashwa Lakes pluton and the long-term integrity of whole-rock and mineral systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Zell E.; Kamineni, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents results of isotopic studies of the Eye-Dashwa Lakes pluton, located near Atikokan, Ontario. Suites of pristine 'unaltered' and 'highly altered' core samples from deep boreholes were used to study Rb-Sr, U-Th-Pb and Sr-Nd systematics, whole-rock Pb isotopes and fission track dating of apatite. The results have been used to investigate natural analogues for radionuclide migration in the geosphere, the tectonic stability of the pluton and the extent of water-rock interaction in fracture zones.

  20. Polytopic Vector Analysis (PVA) modelling of whole-rock and apatite chemistry from the Karkonosze composite pluton (Poland, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowiec, Katarzyna; Słaby, Ewa; Förster, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    This study presents a novel approach for analysing the magma evolution path in composite plutons, applying the so-termed Polytopic Vector Analysis (PVA) to whole-rock and apatite chemistry. As an example of a multiphase magmatic body the Karkonosze granitoid pluton was chosen, which formed by a combination of magma mixing and fractional crystallization of two distinct melts - granitic crust-derived and lamprophyric mantle-derived. The goal was to model end-member magma compositions recorded by apatite and to estimate to what extent these end-members interacted with each other. Although using single minerals as proxies to magma compositions is tricky, the studied apatite well reflects the compositional trends within the magma (e.g., decreasing LREE/Y ratios, varying halogen content, increasing Mn and Na concentrations). The results of PVA simulations for whole-rock geochemistry demonstrate a model similar to that constrained from previous studies. Apart from the main trend of mixing between a felsic (~ 80 wt.% SiO2) and a mafic (~ 53 wt.% SiO2) end-member (EM), an additional process has been recognized, representing most probably the continuous evolution of the mafic end-member, responsible for the compositional diversity of some rocks. One felsic (REE-poor, Mn-F-rich) and one mafic (Cl-Sr-Si-REE-rich) apatite end-members were recognized, whereas the third one represents most probably a fluid component (enriched in Si, Y, Ce and Nd), present at all magmatic stages, however, most prominent during the late stage. The widest range of EM proportions and the highest contribution of the mafic EM are displayed by apatites from the early stage. During the middle and late stages, the apatites present a narrow range of EM proportions, with almost all apatites bearing a felsic signature. This pattern reflects the progressive homogenization of the system. Although the PVA method applied to mineral chemistry poses some limitations, it may provide a more detailed image of the

  1. Crystal accumulation and compositional trends in a calc-alkaline batholith: implications for correlation of plutonic and volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. G.; Coint, N.

    2013-12-01

    -sized magma body (≥ 160 km3) in which both cumulates and differentiates are readily identified. In contrast, differentiates related to lower-zone cumulate rocks are rare, presumably because they intruded higher crustal levels and/or erupted. We conclude that compositional trends of lower-zone rocks are dominated by crystal accumulation and do not accurately reflect magmatic evolution owing to loss of differentiated magmas. If this process is common in such plutons, then the use of bulk-rock compositions to identify consanguineous plutonic and volcanic rocks will be difficult, at best.

  2. SHRIMP U-Pb dating and geochemistry of the Cretaceous plutonic rocks in the Korean Peninsula: A new tectonic model of the Cretaceous Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Won; Kwon, Sanghoon; Park, Seung-Ik; Lee, Changyeol; Cho, Deung-Lyong; Lee, Hong-Jin; Ko, Kyoungtae; Kim, Sook Ju

    2016-10-01

    The Cretaceous tectonomagmatism of the Korean Peninsula was examined based on geochemical and geochronological data of the Cretaceous plutonic rocks, along with distribution of volcano-sedimentary nonmarine N- to NE-trending fault bounded sedimentary basins. We conducted sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock geochemical compositions of 21 Cretaceous plutonic rocks, together with previously published data, from the central to southern Korean Peninsula. Four age groups of plutonic rocks were identified: Group I (ca. 119-106 Ma) in the northern to central area, Group II (ca. 99-87 Ma) in the central southern area, Group III (ca. 85-82 Ma) in the central to southern area, and Group IV (ca. 76-67 Ma) in the southernmost area. These results indicate a sporadic trenchward-younging trend of the Cretaceous magmatism in the Korean Peninsula. The Group I, II, and III rocks are dominated by high-K calc-alkaline I-type rocks with rift-related A-type granitoids. In contrast, the Group IV rocks are high-K calc-alkaline I-type plutonic rocks with no A-type rocks. The geochemical signatures of the entire groups indicated LREEs (light rare earth elements) enrichments and negative Nb, Ta, and Ti anomalies, indicating normal arc magmatism. A new tectonic model of the Cretaceous Korean Peninsula was proposed based on temporal and spatial distribution of the Cretaceous plutons represented by four age groups; 1) magmatic quiescence throughout the Korean Peninsula from ca. 160 to 120 Ma, 2) intrusions of the I- and A-type granitoids in the northern and central Korean Peninsula (Group I plutonic rocks from ca. 120 to 100 Ma) resulted from the partial melting of the lower continental crust due to the rollback of the Izanagi plate expressed as the conversion from flat-lying subduction to normal subduction. The Gyeongsang nonmarine sedimentary rift basin in the Korean Peninsula and adakite magmatism preserved in the present-day Japanese Islands

  3. Updated paleomagnetic pole from Cretaceous plutonic rocks of the Sierra Nevada, California: Tectonic displacement of the Sierra Nevada block

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.; Gromme, S.

    2011-01-01

    We report remanent magnetization measurements from 13 sites in Cretaceous plutonic rocks in the northern Sierra Nevada (38??N-39.5??N). By increasing the number of available paleomagnetic sites, the new data tighten constraints on the displacement history of the Sierra Nevada block and its pre-extensional position relative to interior North America. We collected samples in freshly exposed outcrops along four highway transects. The rocks include diorite, granodiorite, and tonalite with potassium-argon ages (hornblende) ranging from 100 Ma to 83 Ma. By combining our results with previous paleomagnetic determinations from the central and southern Sierra Nevada (excluding sites from the rotated southern tip east of the White Wolf-Kern Canyon fault system), we find a mean paleomagnetic pole of 70.5??N, 188.2??E, A95 = 2.6?? (N = 26, Fisher concentration parameter, K = 118). Thermal demagnetization indicates that the characteristic remanence is generally unblocked in a narrow range within 35 ??C of the Curie temperature of pure magnetite. Small apparent polar wander during the Cretaceous normal-polarity superchron, plus prolonged acquisition of remanence at the site level, may account for the low dispersion of virtual geomagnetic poles and relatively large K value. Tilt estimates based on overlapping sediments, stream gradients, and thermochronology of the Sierra Nevada plutons vary from 0?? to 3?? down to the southwest. Without tilt correction, the mean paleomagnetic pole for the Sierra Nevada is essentially coincident with the North American reference pole during the Cretaceous stillstand (125 Ma to 80 Ma). At 95% confidence, the apparent latitude shift is 1.1?? ?? 3.0?? (positive northward), and the apparent rotation is negligible, 0.0?? ?? 4.7??. Correcting for each degree of tilt, which is limited to 3?? on geologic evidence, increases the rotation anomaly 2.2?? counterclockwise, while the apparent latitude shift remains unchanged. ?? 2011 Geological Society of

  4. Mechanics of Triangle Plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, G. A.; Yin, A.

    2013-12-01

    Although most plutons around the world display circular or elliptic geometry in map view, some crop out with distinctive triangle geometry. The most prominent examples of the latter types of plutons are those exposed in the White-Inyo Mountains of eastern California. They include the Cretaceous Birch Creek pluton and Jurassic Beer Creek pluton. The triangle plutons are commonly bounded by overturned folds on all three sides, suggesting that the emplacement was mostly accommodated by magmatic expansion. Here, we present a mechanical model to explain the formation of triangle plutons. First, a rising pluton expands in the brittle upper crust, causing its overlain strain to expand uniformly in all directions. Such uniform expansion leads to the formation of a triple-junction like crack system, with three arms oriented at about 120 degrees from one another. Second, the rising and expanding magmatic body intrudes into the three extensional fracture zones and pushes the wall rocks of the cracks laterally as they fill and expand the cracks. Third, the three triangular domains bounded by the triple-junction like extensional cracks become folded as a result of uniform expansion of the magma. Our mechanical models are currently being evaluated against field observations using balanced cross sections around the rims of the Birch Creek pluton, and simulation of the mechanics and kinematic evolution of its country rocks using scaled analogue experiments.

  5. Evaluation of petrogenetic models for intermediate and silicic plutonic rocks from the Sierra de Valle Fértil-La Huerta, Argentina: Petrologic constraints on the origin of igneous rocks in the Ordovician Famatinian-Puna paleoarc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otamendi, J. E.; Pinotti, L. P.; Basei, M. A. S.; Tibaldi, A. M.

    2010-11-01

    The whole Valle Fértil-La Huerta section appears as a calc-alkaline plutonic suite typical of a destructive plate margin. New Sr and Nd isotopic whole-rock data and published whole-rock geochemistry suggest that the less-evolved intermediate (dioritic) rocks can be derived by magmatic differentiation, mainly by hornblende + plagioclase ± Fe-Ti oxide fractional crystallization, from mafic (gabbroic) igneous precursors. Closed-system differentiation, however, cannot produce the typical intermediate (tonalitic) and silicic (granodioritic) plutonic rocks, which requires a preponderant contribution of crustal components. Intermediate and silicic plutonic rocks from Valle Fértil-La Huerta section have formed in a plate subduction setting where the thermal and material input of mantle-derived magmas promoted fusion of fertile metasedimentary rocks and favored mixing of gabbroic or dioritic magmas with crustal granitic melts. Magma mixing is observable in the field and evident in variations of chemical elemental parameters and isotopic ratios, revealing that hybridization coupled with fractionation of magmas took place in the crust. Consideration of the whole-rock geochemical and isotopic data in the context of the Famatinian-Puna magmatic belt as a whole demonstrates that the petrologic model postulated for the Sierra Valle Fértil - La Huerta section has the potential to explain the generation of plutonic and volcanic rocks across the Early Ordovician paleoarc from central and northwestern Argentina. As the petrologic model does not require the intervention of old Precambrian continental crust, the nature of the basement on which thick accretionary turbiditic sequences were deposited remains a puzzling aspect. Discussion in this paper provides insights into the nature of magmatic source rocks and mechanisms of magma generation in Cordilleran-type volcano-plutonic arcs of destructive plate margins.

  6. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous rocks and sulfide minerals in Arizona: Implications for the sources of plutons and metals in porphyry copper deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouse, R.M.; Ruiz, J.; Titley, S.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyry copper deposits in Arizona are genetically associated with Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes that consist of older intermediate volcanic rocks and younger intermediate to felsic intrusions. The igneous complexes and their associated porphyry copper deposits were emplaced into an Early Proterozoic basement characterized by different rocks, geologic histories, and isotopic compositions. Lead isotope compositions of the Proterozoic basement rocks define, from northwest to southeast, the Mojave, central Arizona, and southeastern Arizona provinces. Porphyry copper deposits are present in each Pb isotope province. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutons, together with those of sulfide minerals in porphyry copper deposits and of Proterozoic country rocks, place important constraints on genesis of the magmatic suites and the porphyry copper deposits themselves. The range of age-corrected Pb isotope compositions of plutons in 12 Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes is 206Pb/204Pb = 17.34 to 22.66, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.43 to 15.96, and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.19 to 40.33. These Pb isotope compositions and calculated model Th/U are similar to those of the Proterozoic rocks in which the plutons were emplaced, thereby indicating that Pb in the younger rocks and ore deposits was inherited from the basement rocks and their sources. No Pb isotope differences distinguish Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes that contain large economic porphyry copper deposits from less rich or smaller deposits that have not been considered economic for mining. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutons and sulfide minerals from 30 metallic mineral districts, furthermore, require that the southeastern Arizona Pb province be divided into two subprovinces. The northern subprovince has generally lower 206Pb/204Pb and higher model Th/U, and the southern subprovince has higher 206Pb/204Pb and

  7. On identifying parent plutonic rocks from lunar breccia and soil fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Lindstrom, David J.

    1988-01-01

    Breccia fragments expected from a well-studied boulder of Stillwater anorthosite have been modeled to test the ability to identify parental rock types from examination of breccia and soil fragments. Depending on their size, the boulder fragments give distributions that suggest mixtures of rock types, including monominerallic anorthosite with subordinant amounts of more gabbroic anorthosite, anorthosite, and gabbro for small fragments. The distribution of FeO in samples of lunar ferroan anorthosite (FAN) indicates that FAN has a heterogeneous distribution of mafic minerals like the boulder.

  8. Complementary trace-element fractionation in volcanic and plutonic rocks: imperfect examples from ocean-floor basalts and gabbros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delong, Stephen E.; Chatelain, Carole

    1989-06-01

    A simple trace-element model that is generalized from one devised by Albarede (1976) can be used to treat plutonic rocks as mixtures of cumulate phases and trapped liquid. The model is based on the Rayleigh fractionation law, mass balance, and modal data and, with certain assumptions, can give estimates of the mass fraction of the liquid component ( X l) in a cumulate rock and of some of the characteristics of that liquid, including trace-element concentrations and the mass fraction of the original liquid ( F) that remained in the magma chamber when some of it was trapped. Application of the model to Cr and Zr data for ten dredged gabbros from the Oceanographer Fracture Zone (OFZ) in the North Atlantic yields results in the range X l=0.014 0.17 and F=0.04 0.22. A more complex model extends the equations developed by Greenland (1970) and combines them with constraints from 1-atm experiments on ocean-floor basalts to effectively map phase-saturation boundaries onto trace-element variation diagrams. On a Zr-Sr plot, the model is capable of mimicking mixing chords and differences in liquid lines of descent (or parental compositions) inferred from major-element chemistry for several OFZ basalts. Qualitatively, the associated gabbros can also be rationalized as cumulate/melt mixtures on this diagram, although the allowable range of liquid compositions is large. In addition, there is some suggestion that the Zr-Sr liquid line of descent fitted to the OFZ basalts may have more general relevance to other ocean-floor rocks (e.g., Galapagos and FAMOUS glasses).

  9. Assessment of gamma radiation exposure and distribution of natural radioactivity in beach sands associated with plutonic rocks of Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Argyrios; Koroneos, Antonios; Christofides, Georgios; Stoulos, Stylianos

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate the activity concentrations of 238U, 226Ra, 232Th, 228Th and 40K along beaches of Greece associated with plutonic rocks. They range from 6-940, 1-2292, 5-10143, 5-9953 and 27-1319 Bq/kg respectively, with some of them representing the highest values of natural radioactivity measured in sediments in Greece. The investigated beaches include Sithonia peninsula (Chalkidiki, N. Greece), some islands of the Aegean Sea (Mykonos, Paros, Naxos, Serifos, Ikaria), the area of Kavala (N. Greece), Samothraki island, NE Chalkidiki and Maronia (NE Greece). Several of these places are associated with high touristic activity such as Mykonos, Naxos, Paros, Serifos, Ikaria, Sithonia and Kavala. The (% wt.) heavy magnetic fraction (HM) (allanite, amphibole, mica, clinopyroxene, magnetite and hematite), the heavy non-magnetic fraction (HNM) (monazite, zircon, titanite and apatite) and the total heavy fraction (TH), were correlated with the concentrations of the measured radionuclides in the bulk samples. The heavy fractions seem to control the activity concentrations of 238U and 232Th of all the samples, showing some local differences in the main 238U and 232Th mineral carrier. The measured radionuclides in the beach sands were normalized to the respective values measured in the granitic rocks, which are their most probable parental rocks, so as to provide data upon their enrichment or depletion. The highest values of the equivalent dose have been reported in Mykonos, Naxos, Kavala and Sithonia. The annual equivalent dose which should be limited to at least 1 mSv y-1, varies between 0.003 and 0.759 mSv y-1 for tourists and from 0.012 to 3.164 mSv y-1 for local people working on the beach.

  10. Neodymium, strontium, and lead isotopes in the Maloin Ranch Pluton, Wyoming: Implications for the origin of evolved rocks at anorthosite margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, A.; Hanson, G.N. ); Frost, C.D. ); Geist, D.J. )

    1991-08-01

    Neodymium, strontium, and lead isotopic data are used in this study to investigate the origin of chemically evolved rocks in the Maloin Ranch Pluton, a composite body that borders and intrudes the Laramie Anorthosite. In the Maloin Ranch Pluton, these include ferrodiorite at the base of the intrusion, overalain progressively by fine-grained monzonite, monzosyenite, and porphyritic granite. Biotite gabbro and fine-grained granitic dikes are present locally at various levels of this sequence. The origin of the evolved rocks and their possible relation to associated anorthositic bodies has been much debated. In the Maloin Ranch Pluton, each rock type has distinct isotopic characteristics which, together with trace-element data previously reported, suggest different source characteristics for each member. Strontium and neodymium isotopic data for Maloin Ranch ferrodiorite and Laramie anorthositic rocks show considerable overlap, consistent with a comagmatic relation. Biotite gabbro is chemically and isotopically the most primitive rock type in the Maloin Ranch Pluton. The data suggest that biotite gabbro has a mantle source, but has undergone extensive fractionation in the crust. The authors' results suggest that the remainder (and bulk) of the intrusion formed by partial melting of the lower crust due to the emplacement of the Laramie Anorthosite. Trace-element and isotopic characteristics of the fine-grained monzonite are explained by partial melting of mantle-dervied lower crust, added to the margin of the Archean Wyoming craton at about 1.8 Ga. Neodymium, strontium, and lead isotope data for Maloin Ranch monzosyenite and porphyritic granite also suggest a lower crustal source.

  11. Processes involved in the formation of magnesian-suite plutonic rocks from the highlands of the Earth's Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Halliday, Alex N.

    1995-01-01

    The earliest evolution of the Moon likely included the formation of a magma ocean and the subsequent development of anorthositic flotation cumulates. This primary anorthositic crust was then intruded by mafic magmas which crystallized to form the lunar highlands magnesian suite. The present study is a compilation of petrologic, mineral-chemical, and geochemical information on all pristine magnesian-suite plutonic rocks and the interpretation of this data in light of 18 'new' samples. Of these 18 clasts taken from Apollo 14 breccias, 12 are probably pristine and include four dunites, two norites, four troctolites, and two anorthosites. Radiogenic isotopic whole rock data also are reported for one of the 'probably pristine' anorthositic troctolites, sample 14303,347. The relatively low Rb content and high Sm and Nd abundances of 14303,347 suggest that this cumulate rock was derived from a parental magma which had these chemical characteristics. Trace element, isotopic, and mineral-chemical data are used to interpret the total highlands magnesian suite as crustal precipitates of a primitive KREEP (possessing a K-, rare earth element (REE)-, and P-enriched chemical signature) basalt magma. This KREEP basalt was created by the mixing of ascending ultramafic melts from the lunar interior with urKREEP (the late, K-, REE-, and P-enriched residuum of the lunar magma ocean). A few samples of the magnesian suite with extremely elevated large-ion lithophile elements (5-10x other magnesian-suite rocks) cannot be explained by this model or any other model of autometasomatism, equilibrium crystallization, or 'local melt-pocket equilibrium' without recourse to an extremely large-ion lithophile element-enriched parent liquid. It is difficult to generate parental liquids which are 2-4 x higher in the REE than average lunar KREEP, unless the liquids are the basic complement of a liquid-liquid pair, i.e., the so-called 'REEP-fraction,' from the silicate liquid immiscibility of ur

  12. The questa magmatic system: Petrologic, chemical and isotopic variations in cogenetic volcanic and plutonic rocks of the latir volcanic field and associated intrusives, northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Field, chemical and isotopic data demonstrate that nearly all igneous rocks at Questa resulted from interactions between mantle-derived parental magmas and the crust. Strontium, neodymium and lead isotope ratios of early andesites to rhyolites (28 to 26 Ma) indicate that these magmas assimilated > 25% lower crust. Injection of basaltic magmas extensively modified the strontium and neodymium but not the lead isotope compositions of the lower crust. Eruption of comendite magmas and the peralkaline Amalia Tuff 26 Ma is correlated with inception of regional extension. Lead isotope ratios identify different sources for the metaluminous granites and the peralkaline rocks. 26 Ma metaluminous granite to granodiorite intrusions have chemical and isotopic compositions to those of the precaldera intermediate-composition rocks, and are interpreted as representing the solidified equivalents of the precaldera magmatic episode. However, both conventional and ion-microprobe isotopic data prohibit significant assimilation of crustal rocks at the level of exposure, suggesting that the plutons were emplaced a relatively crystal-rich mushes which did not have sufficient heat to assimilate country rocks. This suggest that in some cases plutonic rocks are better than volcanic rocks in representing the isotopic compositions of their source regions, because the assimilation potential of crystal-rich magmas is significantly less than that of largely liquid magmas.

  13. Mineral compositions of plutonic rocks from the Lewis Hills massif, Bay of Islands ophiolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Susan E.; Elthon, Don

    1988-01-01

    Mineral compositions of residual and cumulate rocks from the Lewis Hills massif of the Bay of Islands ophiolite complex are reported and interpreted in the context of magnetic processes involved in the geochemical evolution of spatially associated diabase dikes. The mineral compositions reflect greater degrees of partial melting than most abyssal peridotites do and appear to represent the most depleted end of abyssal peridotite compositions. Subsolidus equilibration between Cr-Al spinal and olivine generally has occurred at temperatures of 700 to 900 C. The spinel variations agree with the overall fractionation of basaltic magmas producing spinels with progressively lower Cr numbers. The compositions of clinopyroxenes suggest that the fractionation of two different magma series produced the various cumulate rocks.

  14. Neutron activation and other analytical data for plutonic rocks from North America and Africa. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Price, V.; Fay, W.M.; Cook, J.R.

    1982-09-01

    The objective of this report is to retrieve the elements of an analytical study of granites and associated other plutonic rocks which was begun as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. A discussion of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) neutron activation analysis system is given so that a user will understand the linmitations of the data. Enough information is given so that an experienced geochemist can clean up the data set to the extent required by any project. The data are generally good as they are presented. It is intended that the data be read from a magnetic tape written to accompany this report. Microfiche tables of the data follow the text. These tables were prepared from data on the tape, and programs which will read the tape are presented in the section THE DATA TAPE. It is our intent to write a later paper which will include a thoroughly scrubbed data set and a technical discussion of results of the study. 1 figure.

  15. Tourmaline occurrences within the Penamacor-Monsanto granitic pluton and host-rocks (Central Portugal): genetic implications of crystal-chemical and isotopic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, I. Ribeiro; Mourão, C.; Récio, C.; Guimarães, F.; Antunes, I. M.; Ramos, J. Farinha; Barriga, F. J. A. S.; Palmer, M. R.; Milton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Tourmalinization associated with peraluminous granitic intrusions in metapelitic host-rocks has been widely recorded in the Iberian Peninsula, given the importance of tourmaline as a tracer of granite magma evolution and potential indicator of Sn-W mineralizations. In the Penamacor-Monsanto granite pluton (Central Eastern Portugal, Central Iberian Zone), tourmaline occurs: (1) as accessory phase in two-mica granitic rocks, muscovite-granites and aplites, (2) in quartz (±mica)-tourmaline rocks (tourmalinites) in several exocontact locations, and (3) as a rare detrital phase in contact zone hornfels and metapelitic host-rocks. Electron microprobe and stable isotope (δ18O, δD, δ11B) data provide clear distinctions between tourmaline populations from these different settings: (a) schorl-oxyschorl tourmalines from granitic rocks have variable foititic component (X□ = 17-57 %) and Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratios (0.19-0.50 in two-mica granitic rocks, and 0.05-0.19 in the more differentiated muscovite-granite and aplites); granitic tourmalines have constant δ18O values (12.1 ± 0.1 ‰), with wider-ranging δD (-78.2 ± 4.7 ‰) and δ11B (-10.7 to -9.0 ‰) values; (b) vein/breccia oxyschorl [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.31-0.44] results from late, B- and Fe-enriched magma-derived fluids and is characterized by δ18O = 12.4 ‰, δD = -29.5 ‰, and δ11B = -9.3 ‰, while replacement tourmalines have more dravitic compositions [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.26-0.64], close to that of detrital tourmaline in the surrounding metapelitic rocks, and yield relatively constant δ18O values (13.1-13.3 ‰), though wider-ranging δD (-58.5 to -36.5 ‰) and δ11B (-10.2 to -8.8 ‰) values; and (c) detrital tourmaline in contact rocks and regional host metasediments is mainly dravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.35-0.78] and oxydravite [Mg/(Mg + Fe) = 0.51-0.58], respectively. Boron contents of the granitic rocks are low (<650 ppm) compared to the minimum B contents normally required for tourmaline saturation in

  16. The Early Andean Magmatic Province (EAMP): 40Ar/ 39Ar dating on Mesozoic volcanic and plutonic rocks from the Coastal Cordillera, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveros, Verónica; Féraud, Gilbert; Aguirre, Luis; Fornari, Michel; Morata, Diego

    2006-10-01

    The Early Andean Magmatic Province (EAMP), consists of about 150 000 km 3 of volcanic and plutonic units in the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile and southern Peru and represents a major magmatic Mesozoic event in the world, for which the precise age of the thick volcanic series was unknown. Thirty 40Ar/ 39Ar analyses were carried out on primary mineral phases of volcanic and plutonic rocks from northern Chile (18°30'-24°S). Reliable plateau and "mini plateau" ages were obtained on plagioclase, amphibole and biotite from volcanic and plutonic rocks, despite widespread strong alteration degree. In the Arica, Tocopilla and Antofagasta (700 km apart) regions, the ages obtained on lava flows constrain the volcanic activity between 164 and 150 Ma and no N-S migration of volcanism is observed. The uppermost lava flows of the volcanic sequence at the type locality of the La Negra Formation extruded at ca. 153-150 Ma, suggesting the end of the volcanic activity of the arc at that time. The oldest volcanic activity occurred probably at ca. 175-170 Ma in the Iquique area, although no plateau age could be obtained. The plutonic bodies of the same regions were dated between ca. 160 and 142 Ma, indicating that they were partly contemporaneous with the volcanic activity. At least one volcanic pulse around 160 Ma is evidenced over the entire investigated reach of the EAMP, according to the ages found in Arica, Tocopilla, Michilla and Mantos Blancos regions. The episodic emplacement of huge amounts of subduction related volcanism is observed throughout the whole Andean history and particularly during the Jurassic (southern Peru, northern Chile and southern Argentina). These events probably correspond to periodic extensional geodynamic episodes, as a consequence of particular subduction conditions, such as change of obliquity of the convergence, change in the subduction angle, slab roll back effect or lower convergence rate, that remain to be precisely defined.

  17. Late-stage sinking of plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glazner, A.F.; Miller, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Many granodiorite to diorite plutons in the Great Basin of western North America are surrounded by rim monoclines or anticlines that suggest relative downward movement of the plutons while wall rocks were hot and ductile. We propose that such plutons rise to a level of approximately neutral buoyancy and then founder as their densities increase ??? 40% during crystallization. Late-stage sinking of intermediate to mafic plutons should be common when wall rocks are rich in weak, low-density minerals such as quartz and calcite. Structures related to sinking will overprint those related to initial pluton emplacement and may be mistaken for regional tectonic structures.

  18. Mesozoic thermal history and timing of structural events for the Yukon-Tanana Upland, east-central Alaska: 40Ar/39Ar data from metamorphic and plutonic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Lanphere, M.A.; Sharp, W.D.; Layer, P.W.; Hansen, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar ages for hornblende, muscovite, and biotite from metamorphic and plutonic rocks from the Yukon-Tanana Upland, Alaska. Integration of our data with published 40Ar/39Ar, kinematic, and metamorphic pressure (P) and temperature (T) data confirms and refines the complex interaction of metamorphism and tectonism proposed for the region. The oldest metamorphic episode(s) postdates Middle Permian magmatism and predates the intrusion of Late Triassic (215-212 Ma) granitoids into the Fortymile River assemblage (Taylor Mountain assemblage of previous papers). In the eastern Eagle quadrangle, rapid and widespread Early Jurassic cooling is indicated by ???188-186 Ma 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages for hornblende from plutons that intrude the Fortymile River assemblage, and for metamorphic minerals from the Fortymile River assemblage and the structurally underlying Nasina assemblage. We interpret these Early Jurassic ages to represent cooling resulting from northwest-directed contraction that emplaced the Fortymile River assemblage onto the Nasina assemblage to the north as well as the Lake George assemblage to the south. This cooling was the final stage of a continuum of subduction-related contraction that produced crustal thickening, intermediate- to high-P metamorphism within both the Fortymile River assemblage and the structurally underlying Lake George assemblage, and Late Triassic and Early Jurassic plutonism in the Fortymile River and Nasina assemblages. Although a few metamorphic samples from the Lake George assemblage yield Jurassic 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages, most yield Early Cretaceous 40Ar/39Ar ages: hornblende ???135-115 Ma, and muscovite and biotite ???110-108 Ma. We interpret the Early Cretaceous metamorphic cooling, in most areas, to have resulted from regional extension and exhumation of the lower plate, previously tectonically thickened during Early Jurassic and older convergence.

  19. Assessment of the long-term risk of a meteorite impact on a hypothetical Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault deep in plutonic rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wuschke, D.M.; Whitaker, S.H.; Goodwin, B.W.; Rasmussen, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    Canada has conducted an extensive research program on the safe disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The program has focused on disposal of used fuel in durable containers in an engineered facility or ``vault``, 500 to 1,000 m deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. This paper describes an assessment of the long-term radiological risk to a critical group, resulting from a meteorite impact on a hypothetical reference disposal vault. The authors assume the critical group is a small rural community which, sometime after the impact, moves to the area contaminated by nuclear fuel waste exposed by the impact. The estimated risk is compared to a risk criterion established by Canada`s nuclear regulatory agency.

  20. Comparative geochronology in the reversely zoned plutons of the Bottle Lake Complex, Maine: U-Pb on zircons and Rb-Sr on whole rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, R.A.; Arth, Joseph G.; Sinha, A.K.; Carlson, J.; Wones, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Bottle Lake Complex is a composite granitic batholith emplaced into Cambrian to Lower Devonian metasedimentary rocks. Both plutons (Whitney Cove and Passadumkeag River) are very coarse grained hornblende and biotite-bearing granites showing petrographic and geochemical reverse zonation. Two linear whole rock Rb/Sr isochrons on xenolith-free Whitney Cove and Passadumkeag River samples indicate ages of 379??5 m.y. and 381??4 m.y., respectively, in close agreement with published K-Ar ages for biotite from Whitney Cove of 377 m.y. and 379 m.y., and for hornblende 40Ar/39Ar determinations from Passadumkeag River which indicate an age of 378??4 m.y. The initial Sr isotopic ratio for Whitney Cove is 0.70553 and for Passadumkeag River is 0.70414. A whole-rock isochron on a suite of xenoliths from the Passadumkeag River granite indicates a whole rock Rb-Sr age of 496??14 m.y., with an initial Sr isotopic ratio of 0.70262. Two types of zircon exhibiting wide petrographic diversity are evident in variable proportions throughout the batholith. One of these types is preferentially found in a mafic xenolith and it is widely dispersed in the host granites forming discrete grains and probably as inclusions in the other type of zircon. U-Pb analyses of zircons give concordia intercept ages of 399??8 m.y. for Whitney Cove, 388??6 m.y. for Passadumkeag River, 415 m.y. for a mafic xenolith in Passadumkeag River, and 396??32 for combined Whitney Cove and Passadumkeag River granite. The zircons show a spread of up to 20 m.y. in the 207Pb/206Pb ages. Omitting the finest zircon fraction in the Passadumkeag River results in a concordia intercept age of 381??3 m.y., in better agreement with the whole-rock Rb-Sr and mineral K-Ar ages. For the Whitney Cove pluton, exclusion of the finest fraction does not bring the zircon age into agreement with the Rb-Sr data. Age estimates by the whole rock Rb-Sr, mineral K-Ar and Ar-Ar methods suggest that the crystallization age of the plutons is

  1. Sphene (Titanite) as Both Monitor and Driver of Evolution of Felsic Magma: Miocene Volcanic Plutonic and Rocks of the Colorado River Region, NV-AZ, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. F.; Colombini, L. L.; Wooden, J. L.; Mazdab, F. K.; Gualda, G. A.; Claiborne, L. E.; Ayers, J. C.

    2009-05-01

    Sphene is commonly the most abundant accessory mineral in metaluminous to weakly peraluminous igneous rocks. Its relatively large crystals preserve a wide array of zoning patterns and inclusions - notably, abundant other accessories and melt inclusions - and it is a major host for REE, U, Th, and HFSE. Thus it is a valuable repository of information about the history of the magmas from which it forms. Recent development of a Zr-in- sphene thermometer (Hayden et al CMP 155:529 2008) and of sensitive and precise in situ trace element analysis by SHRIMP-RG (Mazdab et al GSA abst 39:6:406 2007) permit more powerful exploitation of this repository. We have initiated a study of sphene in Miocene intrusive and extrusive rocks of the Colorado River extensional corridor for which extensive field, geochemical, and geochronological data provide context. Sphene is present as a late interstitial phase in some gabbros and diorites and common in quartz monzonites and granites. Among extrusive rocks, it occurs as phenocrysts in rhyolite lavas and tuffs that are products of small to giant eruptions (Peach Spring Tuff, >600 km3). Glasses that host sphene in the rhyolites are highly evolved (>76 wt% SiO2). Applying the Zr-in-sphene thermometer (TZr), SHRIMP-RG analyses indicate crystallization T between 730 and 810 C in both plutonic and volcanic rocks. This range is narrower than T estimates for zircon growth (Ti thermometry) for the same suite, which extend to somewhat lower and considerably higher values; zircons also tend to record more events and, evidently, longer histories. Ranges of REE patterns are variable and to some extent sample-specific, but all reveal common characteristics: (1) extremely high concentrations, especially for middle REE (maximum Sm in interiors 10-40x103 x chondrite); (2) deep negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* ca. 0.1-0.2); (3) TZr and REE dropping toward rims - especially pronounced for MREE. Estimated Kds for REE from sphene rims and rhyolite glass or

  2. Mixing and melt sources in the Miocene Aztec Wash pluton (Nevada, USA) as revealed by zircon Hf and O and whole rock Sr, Nd, and Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M.; Miller, J. S.; Miller, C. F.; Bromley, S.; Davies, G. R.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    The 15.6 Ma Aztec Wash Pluton (AWP) is one of several Miocene intrusions located within the northern Colorado River extensional corridor. Extensive E-W tilting of fault blocks has exposed the pluton from the roof to 5 km structural depth. Earlier field and petrologic studies subdivided the AWP into two distinct zones: (1) a Granite Zone (GZ) comprised of relatively homogeneous granite with subtle differences in textures and mineralogy; (2) a Heterogeneous Zone (HZ), which interfingers the GZ, contains evidence for mafic and felsic magma input with a wide compositional range (42-78 wt% SiO2), and abundant field evidence for hybridization. Previous whole rock geochemistry and zircon trace element analyses indicated that compositional variation was produced by multi-component mixing between mafic and felsic melts within the HZ. New whole rock Sr, Nd, and Hf isotope data from the HZ show that all rocks (including high-silica granites) formed by mixing Precambrian crust and enriched mantle, with mixtures having a large mantle fraction (≥50%). New Hf (n=189) and O (n=241) isotope analyses of zircon from samples in the HZ confirm these melt sources and provide a broader perspective on hybridization processes within the AWP. Zircon grains from all samples show heterogeneous Hf and O isotopic compositions (-5 to -18 ɛHf; 4.5-7.5% δ18O), but despite the clear signature of Precambrian crust in the whole rock data, obvious Precambrian zircons (or cores) were mostly absent; only one zircon was clearly Precambrian (ɛHf = -25). Resolvable intragrain variability is relatively limited (including the Precambrian grain, which is unzoned). Zircons from hand samples and from compositional groups also show heterogeneous ɛHf and δ18O values, although the spreads are more restricted than in the whole data set (6-10 ɛHf in granites, 5-7 ɛHf in intermediate "hybrids", 5-6 ɛHf in gabbro/diorite sheets). Oxygen isotope values for the zircons also show intra-handsample heterogeneity

  3. Large-scale fluid movement through crustal rocks by transition porosity generation: Feldspar replacement reactions within the Larvik Plutonic Complex, SE-Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los, Karin; Verberne, Rick; Plümper, Oliver; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Austrheim, Håkon

    2014-05-01

    Fluid flow through rocks transports heat and mass across the grain to tectonic plate scale. Fluids promote mineral reactions, redistribute elements to form ore deposits, cool the planet and form habitats for life. A fundamental understanding of fluid flow through rocks is central to interpreting geodynamic and geochemical interactions between the geosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Some geological systems are open to fluids, but the majority are nearly impermeable. Surprisingly though, even in rocks that are impermeable, evidence for widespread fluid-rock interactions are observed leading to the question: How can fluids migrate through vast amounts of initially impermeable rocks? Here we present work on the Larvik Plutonic Complex (SE-Norway) that provides an ideal natural laboratory to study fluid movement and feldspar re-equilibration reactions. The Larvik Plutonic Complex shows fluid-rock interactions on tens of kilometres. In the field, this is observed as a colour change: the blue larvikite rock is (partly) replaced by red tønsbergite. On the grain scale, mineral replacement is visible as porous crystals surrounding larvikite feldspar relicts. Chemical analysis shows that the alteration is zoned, from non-porous larvikite feldspar at the core to porous albite and orthoclase at the rim. A possible explanation would be infiltration of several fluids; another possibility is a changing fluid activity for Na+ and K+, resulting in a front which shifts during the reaction. The mineral replacement looks pervasive, starting with fluid flowing around the grain boundaries over a long distance. This is followed by slower consumption of the old mineral; the degree of alteration varies throughout the area of interest. Locally, alteration is related to fracture zones with pseudotachylites, which are overprinted by fluids in the vicinity of feldspars. Fluid flow and element mobilisation is controlled by an interaction between grain boundary diffusion and reaction front

  4. Geochronology of plutonic rocks and their tectonic terranes in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, southeast Alaska: Chapter E in Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, 2008-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brew, David A.; Tellier, Kathleen E.; Lanphere, Marvin A.; Nielsen, Diane C.; Smith, James G.; Sonnevil, Ronald A.

    2014-01-01

    We have identified six major belts and two nonbelt occurrences of plutonic rocks in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve and characterized them on the basis of geologic mapping, igneous petrology, geochemistry, and isotopic dating. The six plutonic belts and two other occurrences are, from oldest to youngest: (1) Jurassic (201.6–145.5 Ma) diorite and gabbro of the Lituya belt; (2) Late Jurassic (161.0–145.5 Ma) leucotonalite in Johns Hopkins Inlet; (3) Early Cretaceous (145.5–99.6 Ma) granodiorite and tonalite of the Muir-Chichagof belt; (4) Paleocene tonalite in Johns Hopkins Inlet (65.5–55.8 Ma); (5) Eocene granodiorite of the Sanak-Baranof belt; (6) Eocene and Oligocene (55.8–23.0 Ma) granodiorite, quartz diorite, and granite of the Muir-Fairweather felsic-intermediate belt; (7) Eocene and Oligocene (55.8–23.0 Ma) layered gabbros of the Crillon-La Perouse mafic belt; and (8) Oligocene (33.9–23.0 Ma) quartz monzonite and quartz syenite of the Tkope belt. The rocks are further classified into 17 different combination age-compositional units; some younger belts are superimposed on older ones. Almost all these plutonic rocks are related to Cretaceous and Tertiary subduction events. The six major plutonic belts intrude the three southeast Alaska geographic subregions in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, from west to east: (1) the Coastal Islands, (2) the Tarr Inlet Suture Zone (which contains the Border Ranges Fault Zone), and (3) the Central Alexander Archipelago. Each subregion includes rocks assigned to one or more tectonic terranes. The various plutonic belts intrude different terranes in different subregions. In general, the Early Cretaceous plutons intrude rocks of the Alexander and Wrangellia terranes in the Central Alexander Archipelago subregion, and the Paleogene plutons intrude rocks of the Chugach, Alexander, and Wrangellia terranes in the Coastal Islands, Tarr Inlet Suture Zone, and Central Alexander Archipelago subregions.

  5. Petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the early Mesozoic Xitian granitic pluton in the middle Qin-Hang Belt, South China: Constraints from zircon U-Pb ages and bulk-rock trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianhong; Cao, Jingya; Kong, Hua; Shao, Yongjun; Li, Huan; Xi, Xiaoshuang; Deng, Xuantong

    2016-10-01

    The Xitian pluton in southeast Hunan province is one of the early Mesozoic (Indosinian) granitic plutons in the South China Block. It is composed of biotite adamellite with K-feldspar megacrysts, biotite adamellite, and biotite granite that have U-Pb zircon ages of 229.9 ± 1.4 Ma, 223.6 ± 1.3 Ma, and 224.0 ± 1.4 Ma, respectively. The Indosinian granitoids in the Xitian pluton belong to S-type granites, with highly radiogenic initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.71397-0.71910), negative εNd(t) values ranging from -10.1 to -9.4, and old Nd model ages (1858-1764 Ma). They are enriched in radiogenic Pb isotopes, with (206Pb/204Pb)t ranging from 18.130 to 18.903, (207Pb/204Pb)t from 15.652 to 15.722, and (208Pb/204Pb)t from 38.436 to 39.037, respectively. These features indicate that the granitoidswithin the Xitian pluton were formed from magmas generated by remelting of metapelite and metapsammite of the Paleoproterozoic metamorphic basement at temperatures of ca. 800 °C, with low oxygen fugacity. The Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the rocks from Xitian pluton indicate that the granitic magmas were mixed with less than 10% mantle-derived magmas. We suggest that the Xitian pluton was emplaced in an extensional tectonic setting related to release of compressional stresses within the thickened crust during the early Mesozoic.

  6. A numerical method for retrieving high oxygen isotope temperatures from plutonic igneous rocks: An example from the Laramie Anorthosite Complex, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Farquhar, J.; Chacko, T. . Dept. of Geology); Frost, B.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The Sybille Pit is a late-stage magnetite-ilmenite-plagioclase-bearing differentiate of the Laramie Anorthosite with a wide range of grain sizes and modal mineralogy. This variability makes Sybille an ideal locality in which to study the factors that affect isotopic thermometry in plutonic environments. The authors have developed a numerical model based on isotope exchange trajectories that retrieves close to magmatic temperatures for samples from Sybille. This method is based on the premise that hand sample-scale sub-systems close to exchange with each other at temperatures that exceed those of the constituent minerals. The temperature of hand-sample scale closure is retrieved by back calculating the isotope exchange trajectories to the temperature at which two samples with widely different model compositions are in isotopic equilibrium. Application of these methods to samples from Sybille provides promising results. Whereas conventional isotopic thermometry of individual samples yields a wide range of temperatures ([approximately]600 to > 1000 C) depending on the mineral-pair chosen, application of this numerical model to multiple samples yields temperatures of 1,070 [+-] 100 C which corresponds closely to the inferred solidus for these rocks.

  7. Magnetic properties, acid neutralization capacity, and net acid production of rocks in the Animas River Watershed Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Yager, Douglas B.; Horton, Radley M.; Diehl, Sharon F.

    2006-01-01

    Federal land managers along with local stakeholders in the Upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colorado are actively designing and implementing mine waste remediation projects to mitigate the effects of acid mine drainage from several abandoned hard rock metal mines and mills. Local source rocks with high acid neutralization capacity (ANC) within the watershed are of interest to land managers for use in these remediation projects. A suite of representative samples was collected from propylitic to weakly sericitic-altered volcanic and plutonic rocks exposed in outcrops throughout the watershed. Acid-base accounting laboratory methods coupled with mineralogic and geochemical characterization provide insight into lithologies that have a range of ANC and net acid production (NAP). Petrophysical lab determinations of magnetic susceptibility converted to estimates for percent magnetite show correlation with the environmental properties of ANC and NAP for many of the lithologies. A goal of our study is to interpret watershed-scale airborne magnetic data for regional mapping of rocks that have varying degrees of ANC and NAP. Results of our preliminary work are presented here.

  8. Age and tectonic setting of subsurface plutonic rocks in south Alabama: Implications for igneous activity along the Alleghanian suture

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, G.M. ); Steltenpohl, M.G. . Dept. of Geology); Heatherington, A.L. . Dept. of Geology); Kunk, M.J. ); Defant, M.S. . Dept. of Geology); Salpas, P.A. )

    1994-03-01

    The proposed Alleghanian suture between ancestral North America and Suwannee terrane Gondwana crust trends east-west beneath coastal plain sediments from South Carolina to Alabama. Three distinct intrusive suites in south Alabama have been examined to determine their possible relationships with the suture. The first suite consists of rhyolite, andesite, andesitic breccia, and granodiorite and forms the stratigraphic base of the Suwannee terrane. Calc-alkaline metaluminous granodiorite yields a whole-rock depleted mantle Nd model age of 1,023 Ma, a U-Pb zircon crystallization age of 625 Ma, and a [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar cooling age (ca. 500 C) of ca. 612 Ma. The second suite comprises felsic granophyre, pyroxenite, and diabase. Metaluminous granophyre follows a calc-alkaline trend with pyroxenite. Trace element ratios (Ta/Yb and Rb/Yb+Ta) indicate a volcanic or syn-collisional arc environment. Biotite separates from granodiorite yield a [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar cooling age (ca. 300 C) of ca. 329 Ma. Pyroxenite and granophyre Nd model ages are 1,062 and 1,090 Ma, respectively. The third suite comprises high-iron quartz-normative tholeiitic diabase, gabbro, and basalt. These rocks have Ta/Yb and Rb/Yb+Ta ratios similar to within plate magmas, and are correlated with the Lower Jurassic North American diabase suite because of geochemical similarities and intrusive contacts with the Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic Newark Group.

  9. Part 1. Stratigraphy, structure and petrology of the Peterborough 1.5-minute quadrangle, New Hampshire and part 2. Graphite textural and isotropic variations in plutonic rocks, south-central New Hampshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, E. F.

    The stratigraphy of the Merrimack Synclinorium in the Peterborough quadrangle is reinterpreted and correlated with fossil dated Silurian-Lower Devonian strata of western Maine. The earliest phase of the Acadian Orogeny produced west directed fold thrust nappes in this area. The Kinsman Quartz Monzonite was intruded along axial surfaces of these structures, locally establishing peak metamorphic conditions in the wall rocks. Intrusion of the Kinsman was closely followed by mafic intrusions of the Spaulding Quartz. Dorite possibly accompanying west northwest F sub 2 folding, and peak metamorphic conditions were reached in adjacent rocks. Graphite occurs in two distinct textural varieties in syntectonic granifolds of the New Hampshire Plutonic Series and in associated metasedimentary wall rocks. Textural characteristics indicate that coarse graphite flakes (0.1 to 1.0mm) were present at an early stage of crystallization of the igneous rocks and may represent xenocrystic material assimilated from the wall rocks.

  10. Cogenetic Rock Fragments from a Lunar Soil: Evidence of a Ferroan Noritic-Anorthosite Pluton on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Haskin, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    The impact that produced North Ray Crater, Apollo 16 landing site, exhumed rocks that include relatively mafic members of the lunar ferroan anorthositic suite. Bulk and mineral compositions indicate that a majority of 2-4 mm lithic fragments from sample 67513, including impact breccias and monomict igneous rocks, are related to a common noritic-anorthosite precursor. Compositions and geochemical trends of these lithic fragments and of related samples collected along the rim of North Ray Crater suggest that these rocks derived from a single igneous body. This body developed as an orthocumulate from a mixture of cumulus plagioclase and mafic intercumulus melt, after the plagioclase had separated from any cogenetic mafic minerals and had become concentrated into a crystal mush (approximately 70 wt% plagioclase, 30 wt% intercumulus melt). We present a model for the crystallization of the igneous system wherein "system" is defined as cumulus plagioclase and intercumulus melt. The initial accumulation of plagioclase is analogous to the formation of thick anorthosites of the terrestrial Stillwater Complex; however, a second stage of formation is indicated, involving migration of the cumulus-plagioclase-intercumulus-melt system to a higher crustal level, analogous to the emplacement of terrestrial massif anorthosites. Compositional variations of the lithic fragments from sample 67513 are consistent with dominantly equilibrium crystallization of intercumulus melt. The highly calcic nature of orthocumulus pyroxene and plagioclase suggests some reaction between the intercumulus melt and cumulus plagioclase, perhaps facilitated by some recrystallization of cumulus plagioclase. Bulk compositions and mineral assemblages of individual rock fragments also require that most of the mafic minerals fortned in close contact with cumulus plagioclase, not as separate layers. The distribution of compositions (and by inference, modes) has a narrow peak at anorthosite and a broader, larger

  11. Early Paleozoic alkalic and calc-alkalic plutonism and associated contact metamorphism, central Virginia Piedmont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlides, Louis; Arth, Joseph G.; Sutter, J.F.; Stern, T.W.; Cortesini, Henry

    1994-01-01

    Early Paleozoic plutonism in the central Virginia Piedmont consists of the igneous Lahore Complex and Ellisville Pluton. The Lahore Complex consists of a small altered mafic pluton intruded by the shoshonitic, alkalic monzonites of the Lahore Pluton (-450 Ma) that, in turn, is intruded by the calc-alkaline, granodioritic Ellisville Pluton (-440 Ma). These plutons were emplaced at about 760aC at a depth of 12 to 18 km within greenschist-facies rocks and are enclosed by contact-metamorphosed rocks.

  12. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  13. Lignor process for acidic rock drainage treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, J M; Walsh, T

    2004-09-01

    The process using lignosulfonates for acidic rock drainage (ARD) treatment is referred to as the Lignor process. Lignosulfonates are waste by-products produced in the sulfite pulping process. The present study has shown lignosulfonates are able to protect lime from developing an external surface coating, and hence to favor its dissociation. Further, the addition of lignosulfonates to ARD solutions increased the dotting and settling rate of the formed sludge. The capability of lignosulfonates to form stable metal-lignin complexes makes them very useful in retaining metal ions and thus improving the long-term stability of the sludge against leaching. The Lignor process involves metal sorption with lignosulfonates, ARD neutralization by lime to about pH 7, pH adjustment with caustic soda to 9.4 - 9.6, air oxidation to lower the pH to a desired level, and addition of a minimum amount of FeCl3 for further removal of dissolved metals. The Lignor process removes all concerned metals (especially Al and Mn) from the ARD of the Britannia Mine (located at Britannia Beach, British Columbia, Canada) to a level lower than the limits of the B.C. Regulations. Compared with the high-density sludge (HDS) process, the Lignor process has many advantages, such as considerable savings in lime consumption, greatly reduced sludge volume, and improved sludge stability. PMID:15515269

  14. Petrology and radiogeology of the Stripa pluton

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, H.; Flexser, S.; Andersson, L.

    1980-12-01

    Both the quartz monzonite and the metavolcanic leptite which it intruded are strongly fractured. Two stages of fracture filling are evident; an earlier stage encompassing quartz, sericite, feldspar, epidote, and chlorite, and a later stage dominated by carbonate minerals. The Stripa quartz monozite is chemically and mineralogically distinct from other plutons in the region. Muscovite is the predominant mica in the quartz monzonite; biotite has been altered to chlorite, hornblende is absent, and accessory minerals are scarce. In contrast, in other plutons in the Stripa region, biotite and hornblende are prominent mafic minerals and accessory minerals are abundant. The Stripa quartz monzonite is also considerably more radioactive than the the leptite and other plutons in the region. Uranium and thorium abundances are both approx. 30 ppM, considerably higher than in normal granitic rocks where the thorium-to-uranium ratio generally exceeds 2. Potassium-argon dating of muscovite from the Stripa quartz monzonite indicates that this rock may be older, at 1691 million years than granitic rock of the neighboring Gusselby and Kloten massifs, whose ages, based on K-Ar dating of biotite, are respectively 1604 and 1640 m.y. Heat flow and heat productivity considerations show that although Stripa quartz monzonite contains high abundances of radioelements, the pluton has little efect on the regional heat flow. If it occurs in a layered plutonic setting, it is not more than 1.5 km thick; otherwise it may comprise a stock, dike, or border phase that is relatively small compared with the large granitic plutons exposed in the region.

  15. Petrology and radiogeology of the Stripa pluton

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, Harold; Flexser, Steve; Andersson, Lennart

    1980-12-01

    To better define the character of the rock encompassing the thermomechanical and hydrological experiments at the Stripa mine in central Sweden, and to help determine the size of the Stripa pluton, detailed studies were conducted of the petrology and radiogeology of the quartz monzonite and adjacent rocks. Petrologic studies emphasized optical petrography, with supplementary X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence and microprobe analyses. Radiogeologic investigations were based primarily on surface and underground gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of uranium, thorium and potassium, supplemented by laboratory gamma spectrometric analyses and fission-track radiographic determinations of the locations and abundance of uranium in the rock matrix. Both the quartz monzonite and the metavolcanic leptite which it intruded are strongly fractured. Two stages of fracture filling are evident; an earlier stage encompassing quartz, sericite, feldspar, epidote, and chlorite, and a later stage dominated by carbonate minerals. The Stripa quartz monzonite is chemically and mineralogically distinct from other plutons in the region. Muscovite is the predominant mica in the quartz monzonite; biotite has been altered to chlorite, hornblende is absent, and accessory minerals are scarce. In contrast, in other plutons in the Stripa region biotite and hornblende are prominent mafic minerals and accessory minerals are abundant. The Stripa quartz monzonite is also considerably more radioactive than the leptite and other plutons in the region. Uranium and thorium abundances are both- 30 ppm, considerably higher than in "normal" granitic rocks where the thorium-to-uranium ratio generally exceeds 2. Potassium-argon dating of muscovite from the Stripa quartz monzonite indicates that this rock may be older, at 1691 million years than granitic rock of the neighboring Gusselby and Kloten massifs, whose ages, based on K-Ar dating of biotite, are respectively 1604 and 1640 m.y. Heat flow and heat

  16. Acid rock drainage and climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    Rainfall events cause both increases and decreases in acid and metals concentrations and their loadings from mine wastes, and unmined mineralized areas, into receiving streams based on data from 3 mines sites in the United States and other sites outside the US. Gradual increases in concentrations occur during long dry spells and sudden large increases are observed during the rising limb of the discharge following dry spells (first flush). By the time the discharge peak has occurred, concentrations are usually decreased, often to levels below those of pre-storm conditions and then they slowly rise again during the next dry spell. These dynamic changes in concentrations and loadings are related to the dissolution of soluble salts and the flushing out of waters that were concentrated by evaporation. The underlying processes, pyrite oxidation and host rock dissolution, do not end until the pyrite is fully weathered, which can take hundreds to thousands of years. These observations can be generalized to predict future conditions caused by droughts related to El Ni??o and climate change associated with global warming. Already, the time period for dry summers is lengthening in the western US and rainstorms are further apart and more intense when they happen. Consequently, flushing of inactive or active mine sites and mineralized but unmined sites will cause larger sudden increases in concentrations that will be an ever increasing danger to aquatic life with climate change. Higher average concentrations will be observed during longer low-flow periods. Remediation efforts will have to increase the capacity of engineered designs to deal with more extreme conditions, not average conditions of previous years.

  17. Multiphase groundwater flow near cooling plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayba, D.O.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate groundwater flow near cooling plutons with a computer program that can model multiphase flow, temperatures up to 1200??C, thermal pressurization, and temperature-dependent rock properties. A series of experiments examines the effects of host-rock permeability, size and depth of pluton emplacement, single versus multiple intrusions, the influence of a caprock, and the impact of topographically driven groundwater flow. We also reproduce and evaluate some of the pioneering numerical experiments on flow around plutons. Host-rock permeability is the principal factor influencing fluid circulation and heat transfer in hydrothermal systems. The hottest and most steam-rich systems develop where permeability is of the order of 10-15 m2. Temperatures and life spans of systems decrease with increasing permeability. Conduction-dominated systems, in which permeabilities are ???10-16m2, persist longer but exhibit relatively modest increases in near-surface temperatures relative to ambient conditions. Pluton size, emplacement depth, and initial thermal conditions have less influence on hydrothermal circulation patterns but affect the extent of boiling and duration of hydrothermal systems. Topographically driven groundwater flow can significantly alter hydrothermal circulation; however, a low-permeability caprock effectively decouples the topographically and density-driven systems and stabilizes the mixing interface between them thereby defining a likely ore-forming environment.

  18. Relationship of voluminous ignimbrites to continental arc plutons: Petrology of Jurassic ignimbrites and contemporaneous plutons in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fohey-Breting, N. K.; Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.; Carter, C.A.; Schermer, E.R.

    2010-01-01

    Volcanism was broadly associated in both space and time with Mesozoic plutonism in the Cordillera continental margin arc, but the precise petrogenetic relationships between volcanic rocks and adjacent zoned plutons are not known. Igneous rocks in a tilted crustal section in California include four laterally extensive Jurassic ash flow tuffs from 550 to >1100 m thick underlain at deeper structural levels by Jurassic plutons. Zircon geochronology confirms previous correlations of individual tuffs, suggesting ignimbrites with eruptive volumes up to 800 km3 were deposited both during the apparent Early Jurassic plutonic lull as well as contemporaneous with solidification of regionally widespread Middle and Late Jurassic plutons. The tuffs are weakly to strongly porphyritic (5 to 55% phenocrysts) monotonous intermediate porphyritic dacite to low-silica rhyolite and show strong bulk rock chemical affinity to contemporaneous plutons. Trace element compositions of zircons from the tuffs and contemporaneous plutonic rocks record large and consistent differences in Hf/Zr and REE over similar ranges in Ti abundances, supporting bulk compositional similarities and illuminating similarities and variations in thermal histories despite the effects of hydrothermal alteration. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Miscellaneous investigations series: Bedrock geologic map of the Lone Mountain pluton area, Esmeralda County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, F.

    1984-12-31

    The joint attitudes were measured in the field and plotted on aerial photos at a scale of 1:24,000. The pluton is intensely jointed, primarily as a result of cooling and movement of the magma within a northwest-trending stress field. Foliation, in general, is poorly developed, and quality varies from area to area, but it is best developed close to the contacts with the metasedimentary rocks. A prominent northwest foliation direction was observed that parallels the northwest elongation of the exposed pluton. Faults in the pluton are difficult to identify because of the homogeneity of the rock. Several faults were mapped in the northern part of the area where they have a northeast trend and intersect the northwest-trending lamprophyre dikes with little apparent displacement. A major fault that bounds the northern part of the pluton is downthrown to the north and strikes northeast. This fault offsets the alluvium, the metasedimentary rocks, and the pluton and forms fault scraps as high as 10 m. Aeromagnetic data (US Geological Survey, 1979) suggest the following: (1) the local magnetic highs in the central part of the Lone Mountain pluton are probably related to topographic highs (peaks) where the flight lines are closer to the pluton; (2) a magnetic low in the northeastern part of Lone Mountain coincides with the pluton-country rock contact, which may be very steep; (3) the contours for the southwestern part of the mapped area indicate that the pluton-country rock contact is not as steep as that in the northeastern part and that the pluton probably coalesces at depth with the Weepah pluton, a pluton exposed south of the mapped area; and (4) the contours for the area of the Lone Mountain pluton express a northwest-trending gradient that parallels the northwest elongation of the Lone Mountain pluton and the northwest-trending stress field. 10 refs.

  20. Reexamining the significance of concordance vs. discordance for pluton emplacement models

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.K. Jr.; Paterson, S.R. )

    1993-04-01

    Traditionally, discordant pluton/country-rock contact relationships are attributed to passive'' pluton emplacement, whereas concordant relationships are attributed to forceful'' pluton emplacement. Actually, concordance and discordance from a continuum (0 to 90[degree]), vary strongly around single plutons. The degree of discordance along a contact segment depends on many factors, including: (1) geometry, intensity, and mechanisms of emplacement-related deformation; (2) initial relative orientation of country rock structures and the pluton margin; (3) strain significance of country-rock structures; and (4) effects of pre-, syn- and post-emplacement regional deformation. Discordance records the truncation and subsequent transfer of country-rock material out of the path of the ascending magma, either in a horizontally-directed sense or in a vertically-directed sense. Roof structures should indicate the dominant direction of country-rock material transfer. The roof rocks above a pluton emplaced primarily by horizontal country-rock transfer must be either structurally detached or highly extended, whereas roof rocks are expected to be unextended above a pluton emplaced primarily by vertical country-rock material transfer. The authors initial observations from contiguous pluton roofs and walls, such as the Yerington batholith, Nevada, Mt. Stewart batholith, Washington, and the Mt. Powell batholith, Montana, suggest that vertical, downward country-rock material transfer has been important during emplacement of these shallow- to moderate-level plutons. They believe that erosional removal of the roof rocks from many plutons may have biased previous interpretations of emplacement mechanisms, and that vertical country-rock material transfer processes, such as stopping, may be more prevalent than currently recognized.

  1. Radiometric dating of granitic rocks from the Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex (Czech Republic): constraints on the chronology of thermal and tectonic events along the Moldanubian-Barrandian boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, František V.; Cocherie, Alain; Rossi, Philippe

    1997-07-01

    ingle-zircon dating by step-wise evaporation has established that successive granitic intrusions were emplaced in the Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex (CBPC) during a short time span of about 10 Ma. In agreement with field data, the Požáry trondhjemite, emplaced early at 351 ±11 Ma and subcontemporaneously with the Sázava granodiorite dated at 349 ±12 Ma, was followed by the Blatná granodiorite at 346 ±10 Ma. The magnesium-potassium-rich units (durbachites) indicate younger ages both for the Čertovo Břemeno melagranite at 343 ±6 Ma (within the CPBC) and for durbachite from the Třebíč Massif (south-east of the CPBC) at 340 ±8 Ma. These data provide evidence that the sequence of intrusion and the age of the emplacement of the CBPC are comparable with those of other western Variscan batholiths (i.e. the Vosges or the French Massif Central) in similar structural environment.

  2. PASSIVE TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE FROM A SUBSURFACE MINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acidic, metal-contaminated drainages are a critical problem facing many areas of the world. Acid rock drainage results when metal sulfide minerals, particularly pyrite, are oxidized by exposure to oxygen and water. The deleterious effects of these drainages on receiving streams a...

  3. Petrology and Geochemistry of Neoproterozoic Arc Plutons Beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain, SRS, SC

    SciTech Connect

    Maryak, M.

    1998-10-21

    In this report is presented first a brief review of the regional geologic setting of the Savannah River Site, descriptions of the plutonic rock units sampled here, whole rock geochemical data on the plutonic igneous rocks, and finally, a discussion of how the crystalline basement rocks of the Savannah River Site formed and how they may correlate with other terranes exposed in the Piedmont of the Carolinas, Georgia, and Virginia.

  4. Petrogenesis of the reversely-zoned Turtle pluton, southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    Few plutons with a reversed geometry of a felsic rim and mafic core have been described in the geologic literature. The Turtle pluton of S.E. California is an intrusion composed of a granitic rim and granodioritic core and common microgranitoid enclaves. Field observations, mineral textures and chemistries, major and trace element geochemistry, and isotopic variability support a petrogenetic model of in situ, concomitant, magma mixing and fractional crystallization of rhyolitic magma progressively mixed with an increasing volume of andesitic magma, all without chemical contribution from entrained basaltic enclaves. Hornblende geobarometry indicates the Turtle pluton crystallized at about 3.5 kb. A crystallization sequence of biotite before hornblende (and lack of pyroxenes) suggests the initial granitic magma contained less than 4 wt% H{sub 2}O at temperatures less than 780C. U-Pb, Pb-Pb, Rb-Sr and oxygen isotope studies indicate the terrane intruded by the Turtle pluton is 1.8 Ga, that the Turtle pluton crystallized at 130 Ma, that the Target Granite and garnet aplites are about 100 Ma, and that these intrusions were derived from different sources. Models based on isotopic data suggest the rhyolitic end member magma of the Turtle pluton was derived from mafic igneous rocks, and was not derived from sampled Proterozoic country rocks. Similarity of common Sr and Pb isotopic ratios of these rocks to other Mesozoic intrusions in the Colorado River Region suggest the Turtle pluton and Target Granite have affinities like rocks to the east, including the Whipple Mountains and plutons of western Arizona. P-T-t history of the southern Turtle Mountains implies uplift well into the upper crust by Late Cretaceous time so that the heating and deformation events of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary observed in flanking ranges did not affect the study area.

  5. Application of Thermal Infrared Multiband Scanner (TIMS) data to mapping of Plutonic and stratified rock and assemblages in accreted terrains of the Northern Sierra, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taranik, James V.; Davis, David; Borengasser, Marcus

    1986-01-01

    The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data were acquired over the Donner Pass area in California on September 12, 1985. The higher peaks in the area approach 9,200 feet in elevation, while the canyon of the north fork of the American River is only 3000 feet in elevation. The vegetation is dominated by conifers, although manzanita and other shrubs are present in areas where soils have developed. The data contain noise patterns which cut across scan lines diagonally. The TIMS data were analyzed using both photointerpretative and digital processing techniques. Preliminary image interpretation and field analysis confirmed that TIMS image data displays the chert units and silicic volcanics as bright red. The imagery appears to display zoning in the batholithic and hypabyssal intrusive rocks, although this was not field checked at this time. Rocks which appear to be more dioritic in composition appear purple on the imagery, while rocks more granitic in composition appear shades of red and pink. Areas that have more than 40% vegetative cover appear green on the imagery.

  6. Petrology of Aztec Wash pluton, Eldorado Mountains, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Falkner, C.M.; Miller, C.F. ); Wooden, J.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Aztec Wash pluton, a 50 km[sup 2] intrusive complex in the northern Eldorado Mountains, was emplaced ca. 16 Ma (Faulds et al., 1990) during extension within the Colorado River Corridor. The pluton displays extreme compositional variability, ranging from olivine gabbro (ca. 50 wt% SiO[sub 2]) to highly evolved aplite (76% SiO[sub 2]). Most of the intrusion is medium grained, homogeneous granite (ca. 72% SiO[sub 2]), but 1/3 is highly heterogeneous and dominated by mafic to intermediate rocks; a 6 [times] 3km, N-S mafic zone almost bisects the pluton. Well-displayed magma mingling and late mafic and felsic dikes verify the coexistence of mafic and felsic melts. Hornblende barometry indicates that the entire exposed portion of Aztec Wash pluton was emplaced at very shallow depth (pluton has undergone little tilting. Mafic dikes that preceded emplacement of the pluton are variably dipping and in some cases sub horizontal, possibly suggesting a more complex pre-pluton deformational history. The authors propose the following emplacement history for Aztec Wash pluton: felsic magma intruded shallow levels of crust; the base of the magma chamber was intruded by basalt; after the upper portion of the initial magma was largely crystallized, basalt ascended into, perhaps remobilized, and mingled with felsic magma; this ascent may have been facilitated by E-W extension of the crystallizing pluton; more discrete syn- to post-pluton, mafic to felsic dikes mark additional intrusive pulses triggered by basalt intrusion and extensional fracturing. Field relations suggest that the mingling led to mixing in both the main units and the late dikes, but geochemical data indicate that mixing, if it occurred, was not a simple 2-end member process.

  7. Polymerization on the rocks: beta-amino acids and arginine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the accumulation of long oligomers of beta-amino acids on the surface of minerals using the 'polymerization on the rocks' protocol. We find that long oligopeptides of beta-glutamic acid which cannot be formed in homogeneous aqueous solution are accumulated efficiently on the surface of hydroxylapatite using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as condensing agent. The EDAC-induced oligomerization of aspartic acid on hydroxylapatite proceeds even more efficiently. Hydroxylapatite can also facilitate the ligation of the tripeptide (glu)3. The 'polymerization on the rocks' scenario is not restricted to negatively-charged amino acids. Oligoarginines are accumulated on the surface of illite using carbonyldiimidizole (CDI) as condensing agent. We find that FeS2 catalyzes the CDI-induced oligomerization of arginine, although it does not adsorb oligoarginines. These results are relevant to the formation of polypeptides on the primitive earth.

  8. Net Acid Production, Acid Neutralizing Capacity, and Associated Mineralogical and Geochemical Characteristics of Animas River Watershed Igneous Rocks Near Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Choate, LaDonna; Stanton, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents results from laboratory and field studies involving the net acid production (NAP), acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), and magnetic mineralogy of 27 samples collected in altered volcanic terrain in the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colo., during the summer of 2005. Sampling focused mainly on the volumetrically important, Tertiary-age volcanic and plutonic rocks that host base- and precious-metal mineralization in the study area. These rocks were analyzed to determine their potential for neutralization of acid-rock drainage. Rocks in the study area have been subjected to a regional propylitic alteration event, which introduced calcite, chlorite (clinochlore), and epidote that have varying amounts and rates of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC). Locally, hydrothermal alteration has consumed any ANC and introduced minerals, mainly pyrite, that have a high net acid production (NAP). Laboratory studies included hydrogen pyroxide (H2O2) acid digestion and subsequent sodium hydroxide (NaOH) titration to determine NAP, and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) acid titration experiments to determine ANC. In addition to these environmental rock-property determinations, mineralogical, chemical, and petrographic characteristics of each sample were determined through semiquantitative X-ray diffractometry (Rietveld method), optical mineralogy, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence, total carbon-carbonate, and inductively coupled plasma?mass spectrometric analysis. An ANC ranking was assigned to rock samples based on calculated ANC quantity in kilograms/ton (kg/t) calcium carbonate equivalent and ratios of ANC to NAP. Results show that talus near the southeast Silverton caldera margin, composed of andesite clasts of the Burns Member of the Silverton Volcanics, has the highest ANC (>100 kg/t calcium carbonate equivalent) with little to no NAP. The other units found to have moderate to high ANC include (a) andesite lavas and volcaniclastic rocks of the San Juan

  9. Sulfur Reduction in Acid Rock Drainage Environments.

    PubMed

    Florentino, Anna P; Weijma, Jan; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Microbiological suitability of acidophilic sulfur reduction for metal recovery was explored by enriching sulfur reducers from acidic sediments at low pH (from 2 to 5) with hydrogen, glycerol, methanol and acetate as electron donors at 30 °C. The highest levels of sulfide in the enrichments were detected at pH 3 with hydrogen and pH 4 with acetate. Cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene showed dominance of the deltaproteobacterial sulfur-reducing genus Desulfurella in all the enrichments and subsequently an acidophilic strain (TR1) was isolated. Strain TR1 grew at a broad range of pH (3-7) and temperature (20-50 °C) and showed good metal tolerance (Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+)), especially for Ni(2+) and Pb(2+), with maximal tolerated concentrations of 0.09 and 0.03 mM, respectively. Different sources of sulfur were tested in the enrichments, from which biosulfur showed fastest growth (doubling time of 1.9 days), followed by colloidal, chemical and sublimated sulfur (doubling times of 2.2, 2.5, and 3.6 days, respectively). Strain TR1's physiological traits make it a good candidate to cope with low pH and high metal concentration in biotechnological processes for treatment of metal-laden acidic streams at low and moderately high temperature.

  10. Geophysical modeling and structure of Ushuaia Pluton, Fuegian Andes, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroni, Javier Ignacio; Tassone, Alejandro Alberto; Menichetti, Marco; Cerredo, María Elena

    2009-10-01

    Within the area of Ushuaia Bay (Tierra del Fuego, southernmost South America) the deformed Lower Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of Yahgán Formation host the Ushuaia Pluton. The intrusive body is oval in map view; it is compositionally varied with rocks ranging from the ultrabasic to the mesosiliceous realm. The emplacement time is constrained within the Albian-Cenomanian span by new amphibole K/Ar data. Meso- and microstructures of Ushuaia Pluton and its host indicate a synkinematic emplacement with a dominant extensional component. A set of transcurrent and normal faults related to the sinistral strike-slip Beagle Channel Fault System affects the pluton and its host. On the basis of aeromagnetic data combined with field information, a new model is presented for the Ushuaia Pluton. Modeling results fit well with a laccolithic body with an estimated volume of around 111 km 3. The model pluton cross-section displays a central zone with an average thickness of 2000 m which progressively thins toward the margins (˜ 500 m) and a southern root which reaches 5000 m deep. The combined structural and geophysical model supports a transtensive scenario for the Ushuaia Pluton emplacement at Early-Late Cretaceous boundary.

  11. Interplay of plutonism and regional deformation in an obliquely convergent arc, southern Coast Belt, British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. H.; Talbot, J. L.; McClelland, W. C.; Feltman, J. A.; Lapen, T. J.; Bennett, J. D.; Hettinga, M. A.; Troost, M. L.; Alvarez, K. M.; Calvert, A. T.

    2000-06-01

    The Coast Plutonic Complex is an extensive zone of continental growth that formed along the Mesozoic convergent margin of northwestern North America. The orogeny creating this belt involved terrane accretion and assembly, massive upward transfer and emplacement of sial in the form of batholiths constituting a magmatic arc, and transformation of broad tracts of sedimentary and volcanic rocks into crystalline continental crust, all operating in more or less the same space and time. The mechanisms and interplay of these orogenic processes are well displayed in the Harrison Lake area of the southern Coast Belt, British Columbia. Great structural relief across the area exhibits a present-day architecture defined by thin, thrust-stacked terrane sheets and early concordant pluton sheets folded on a macroscopic scale, all truncated by oblique dextral-reverse faults and overlain by later floored plutons. Construction of this complex began with terrane assembly on orogen-normal thrusts during a lull in plutonism in the Early Cretaceous. Low-grade metamorphism during this event indicates only modest crustal thickening. Subsequent plutons intruded into the assembled terranes appear to be composites of sheets. Early pluton sheets are now steeply dipping due to folding but were likely intruded as horizontal bodies. Large ovoid post folding plutons are mostly subhorizontal floored bodies, at least in part sheeted. These plutons are underlain by Barrovian mineralogic aureoles that indicate downward vertical displacement of 10 km or more during plutonism, suggesting pluton emplacement by vertical inflation. Magmatic fabrics in these bodies, and the discordant relation of plutons to regional structures, preclude emplacement in active fault zones. Penetrative strain aureoles flanking plutons are mostly limited to zones a few hundred meters wide, and regional tectonic structures are widely preserved. Tectonic deformation of the arc is characterized by contraction and strike-slip, not

  12. Silicon Isotope Fractionation During Acid Water-Igneous Rock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boorn, S. H.; van Bergen, M. J.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2007-12-01

    Silica enrichment by metasomatic/hydrothermal alteration is a widespread phenomenon in crustal environments where acid fluids interact with silicate rocks. High-sulfidation epithermal ore deposits and acid-leached residues at hot-spring settings are among the best known examples. Acid alteration acting on basalts has also been invoked to explain the relatively high silica contents of the surface of Mars. We have analyzed basaltic-andesitic lavas from the Kawah Ijen volcanic complex (East Java, Indonesia) that were altered by interaction with highly acid (pH~1) sulfate-chloride water of its crater lake and seepage stream. Quantitative removal of major elements during this interaction has led to relative increase in SiO2 contents. Our silicon isotope data, obtained by HR-MC-ICPMS and reported relative to the NIST RM8546 (=NBS28) standard, show a systematic increase in &δ&&30Si from -0.2‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for unaltered andesites and basalts to +1.5‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for the most altered/silicified rocks. These results demonstrate that silicification induced by pervasive acid alteration is accompanied by significant Si isotope fractionation, so that alterered products become isotopically heavier than the precursor rocks. Despite the observed enrichment in SiO2, the rocks have experienced an overall net loss of silicon upon alteration, if Nb is considered as perfectly immobile. The observed &δ&&30Si values of the alteration products appeared to correlate well with the inferred amounts of silicon loss. These findings would suggest that &28Si is preferentially leached during water-rock interaction, implying that dissolved silica in the ambient lake and stream water is isotopically light. However, layered opaline lake sediments, that are believed to represent precipitates from the silica-saturated water show a conspicuous &30Si-enrichment (+1.2 ± 0.2‰). Because anorganic precipitation is known to discriminate against the heavy isotope (e.g. Basile- Doelsch et al., 2006

  13. Magmatic arc construction: Constraints from the structure of the Coast plutonic complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronicos, C. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Coast plutonic complex of British Columbia exposes the middle crust of a vigorous magmatic arc formed in the late Cretaceous and early Cenozoic. The arc is divided into two parts by the crustal scale Coast shear zone. West of the Coast shear zone between Prince Rupert and Douglas Channel plutons were emplaced at pressures between 500 and 850 MPa, are elongate with steeply dipping contacts and have tadpole shaped terminations. The steeply dipping sides of the plutons are concordant with country rock foliations that grade into mylonitic foliations in the cores of transpressive shear zones which strike NW parallel to the arc axis. Field relationships demonstrate that pluton emplacement occurred during displacement on the shear zones, folding of adjacent country rocks and pluton enhanced anatexis of host rocks. Pressure differences in single plutons and across shear zones attests to major vertical displacements during pluton construction. The data indicate that the plutons record emplacement during major transpressive deformation and crustal thickening. The tabular shape of the plutons, their steep dips and concordance with country rock fabric show that pluton emplacement and plate scale deformation were synchronous between ~120 and 85 Ma. East of plutons that intrude the Coast shear zone a sequence of upper amphibolite to granulite facies gneiss and migmatite (central gneiss complex) occurs that host gently dipping tonalite and granodiorite sills. Mineral assemblages in country rocks of the sills track uplift and exhumation from pressures of ~800 MPa to 200 MPa during sill emplacement between ~75 and 50 Ma. The gently to moderately dipping fabrics that host the sills are the result of transposition of an earlier steeply dipping foliation. Sill emplacement occurred during both contractional and extensional deformation as indicated by a reversal in shear from reverse to normal sense observed at a regional scale. The sills are concordant with host rock foliations and

  14. Reduction of acid rock drainage using steel slag in cover systems over sulfide rock waste piles.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo Pereira; Leite, Adilson do Lago; Borghetti Soares, Anderson

    2015-04-01

    The extraction of gold, coal, nickel, uranium, copper and other earth-moving activities almost always leads to environmental damage. In metal and coal extraction, exposure of sulfide minerals to the atmosphere leads to generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and in underground mining to acid mine drainage (AMD) due to contamination of infiltrating groundwater. This study proposes to develop a reactive cover system that inhibits infiltration of oxygen and also releases alkalinity to increase the pH of generated ARD and attenuate metal contaminants at the same time. The reactive cover system is constructed using steel slag, a waste product generated from steel industries. This study shows that this type of cover system has the potential to reduce some of the adverse effects of sulfide mine waste disposal on land. Geochemical and geotechnical characterization tests were carried out. Different proportions of sulfide mine waste and steel slag were studied in leachate extraction tests. The best proportion was 33% of steel slag in dry weight. Other tests were conducted as follows: soil consolidation, saturated permeability and soil water characteristic curve. The cover system was numerically modeled through unsaturated flux analysis using Vadose/w. The solution proposed is an oxygen transport barrier that allows rain water percolation to treat the ARD in the waste rock pile. The results showed that the waste pile slope is an important factor and the cover system must have 5 m thickness to achieve an acceptable effectiveness. PMID:25750056

  15. Reduction of acid rock drainage using steel slag in cover systems over sulfide rock waste piles.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo Pereira; Leite, Adilson do Lago; Borghetti Soares, Anderson

    2015-04-01

    The extraction of gold, coal, nickel, uranium, copper and other earth-moving activities almost always leads to environmental damage. In metal and coal extraction, exposure of sulfide minerals to the atmosphere leads to generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and in underground mining to acid mine drainage (AMD) due to contamination of infiltrating groundwater. This study proposes to develop a reactive cover system that inhibits infiltration of oxygen and also releases alkalinity to increase the pH of generated ARD and attenuate metal contaminants at the same time. The reactive cover system is constructed using steel slag, a waste product generated from steel industries. This study shows that this type of cover system has the potential to reduce some of the adverse effects of sulfide mine waste disposal on land. Geochemical and geotechnical characterization tests were carried out. Different proportions of sulfide mine waste and steel slag were studied in leachate extraction tests. The best proportion was 33% of steel slag in dry weight. Other tests were conducted as follows: soil consolidation, saturated permeability and soil water characteristic curve. The cover system was numerically modeled through unsaturated flux analysis using Vadose/w. The solution proposed is an oxygen transport barrier that allows rain water percolation to treat the ARD in the waste rock pile. The results showed that the waste pile slope is an important factor and the cover system must have 5 m thickness to achieve an acceptable effectiveness.

  16. Bibliography for acid-rock drainage and selected acid-mine drainage issues related to acid-rock drainage from transportation activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-rock drainage occurs through the interaction of rainfall on pyrite-bearing formations. When pyrite (FeS2) is exposed to oxygen and water in mine workings or roadcuts, the mineral decomposes and sulfur may react to form sulfuric acid, which often results in environmental problems and potential damage to the transportation infrastructure. The accelerated oxidation of pyrite and other sulfidic minerals generates low pH water with potentially high concentrations of trace metals. Much attention has been given to contamination arising from acid mine drainage, but studies related to acid-rock drainage from road construction are relatively limited. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to evaluate the occurrence and processes controlling acid-rock drainage and contaminant transport from roadcuts in Tennessee. The basic components of acid-rock drainage resulting from transportation activities are described and a bibliography, organized by relevant categories (remediation, geochemical, microbial, biological impact, and secondary mineralization) is presented.

  17. Late Silurian plutons in Yucatan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M. B.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1996-08-01

    U-Pb measurements of zircons from two composite plutons in the Maya Mountains of the Yucatan Block (Belize) give Late Silurian ages. Zircons from one of the five compositional phases of the Mountain Pine Ridge pluton yield an age of 418±3.6 Ma. A second compositional phase gives a minimum age of 404 Ma, and zircons from a third phase, although plagued with high common Pb, yield ages consistent with the other two. Zircons from one compositional phase of the Hummingbird-Mullins River pluton indicate an age of about 410-420 Ma. These data demonstrate that two of the three Maya Mountains plutons residing among the strata of the Late Pennsylvanian through Permian Santa Rosa Group are older than that sedimentation. Although the third pluton was not dated, both the similarity of sedimentary facies patterns adjacent to it to those adjacent to one of the plutons dated as Late Silurian and a published single Rb-Sr age of 428 ± 41 Ma suggest this third pluton also was emergent during Santa Rosa deposition. Thus the new U/Pb dates and other data suggest that all three Maya Mountains plutons pre-date Late Carboniferous sedimentation and that none intrude the Santa Rosa Group. Although very uniform ages of about 230 Ma amongst all plutons, derived from abundant earlier dating by the K-Ar system, led to the conclusion that intrusion mostly had occurred in the Late Triassic, the U-Pb ages (obtained from the same sites as the K-Ar dates) demonstrate that the K-Ar ages do not derive from a Late Triassic intrusive episode. The K-Ar dates probably are a signature of the rifting associated with Pangean breakup and formation of the Gulf of Mexico. In a reconstructed Pangea, the position of the Maya Mountains Late Silurian plutons suggests that the Late Silurian Acadian-Caledonian orogen of eastern North America extended through the region of the future Gulf of Mexico. Finally, the U-Pb ages of the Maya Mountains plutons are the same as those of a group of shocked zircons found in the

  18. The Geochronology and Geochemistry of Caldera-related Plutons in the Southern Rocky Mountain Volcanic Field: Insight into the Volcanic-plutonic Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerer, M. J.; Mills, R. D.; Tappa, M. J.; McIntosh, W. C.; Coleman, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    Preliminary Ar-Ar and U-Pb results from the Questa (NM) and Mt. Aetna (CO) caldera systems indicate that their caldera-related plutons are not cumulates or residual material from which caldera-collapse ignimbrites differentiated. Rio Grande rift-related faulting and erosion at both locations provide exposures of intracaldera volcanic rocks and subcaldera intrusions, allowing for the comparison of cogenetic volcanic and plutonic rocks. Resurgent plutons at both locations are indistinguishable in age to the associated ignimbrite, however the majority of plutons are either younger or older than the caldera-forming event. The geochemistry of the resurgent plutons and corresponding ignimbrite is similar. These results challenge the common interpretation that melt for ignimbrite eruptions is derived from crystal-mushes, which are then preserved as plutons. The Questa caldera, northern New Mexico, formed during the 25.4 Ma eruption of the peralkaline Amalia Tuff. Peralkaline phases of two resurgent plutons, Virgin Canyon and Canada Pinabete, are geochemically similar to the Amalia Tuff, but these phases have yet to be successfully dated. The metaluminous phase of the Canada Pinabete pluton is indistinguishable in age to the Amalia Tuff, suggesting that the peralkaline phase is also contemporaneous. The remaining seven plutons associated with the Questa caldera were emplaced between 25.2 and 19.4 Ma. Postcaldera plutonism was coeval with volcanism, though these plutons have not been geochemically linked to any postcaldera volcanic rocks. The Mt. Aetna complex consists of the Mt. Princeton batholith and the nested Mt. Aetna caldera. The Mt. Princeton batholith has been inferred to be the less-evolved source of the 37.2 Ma Wall Mountain Tuff. During the eruption of the 34.0 Ma Badger Creek Tuff, the fully crystallized Mt. Princeton batholith was involved in the Mt. Aetna caldera collapse. New Ar-Ar and U-Pb ages indicate the Mt. Princeton batholith is too young to be the

  19. Symmagmatic folding of the base of the Bergell pluton, Central Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, C.; Rosenberg, C.; Schmid, S. M.

    1996-11-01

    Evidence for magmatic, submagmatic and solid-state deformation in tonalite, granodiorite and country rocks found at the deep-seated floor (22-26 km) of the Bergell pluton demonstrates that final emplacement and crystallization occurred during regional deformation of the pluton and the underlying country rocks. After northward emplacement over the country rocks, but before complete crystallization, the floor of the pluton was folded during simultaneous N-S shortening and E-W stretching. This is evidenced by synmagmatic folds with E-W striking, nearly vertical axial planes, and by regional east-plunging stretching lineations in the country rocks which are parallel to the regional-scale fold axes and the magmatic mineral lineations in the pluton. Opposite senses of shear from the well-foliated, occasionally mylonitic contact suggest that deformation was mostly accomplished by pure shear. Synmagmatic deformation is related to late-stage N-S shortening of the Alpine orogen and shows that the still partially molten pluton responded to low differential stress very much like the country rocks deformed in the solid-state at high temperatures. Post-emplacement tilting associated with backthrusting along the Insubric mylonites led to the exposure of the pluton's floor at its present-day western margin.

  20. Closure plan evaluation for risk of acid rock drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Dwire, D.L.; Krause, A.J.; Russell, L.J.

    1999-07-01

    Control of acid rock drainage (ARD) is a long-term issue for many mine sites and is often a primary objective of remediation efforts. Some sites continue to require monitoring and management of ARD long after mine operation has ceased and closure is complete. In New Zealand, an innovative and quantitative approach was applied to evaluate the expected risk of ARD after implementation of the closure plan for the Golden Cross Mine. In addition, this future risk was compared to current operating conditions to provide an estimate of the reduction in risk provided by the remediation activities. This approach was useful to both the mine proponent and the regulatory agencies in assessing the effectiveness of the existing closure plan and providing focus on the components of greatest risk. Mine components remaining on site after closure that could potentially generate ARD under various failure scenarios were identified and evaluated. These components included the tailings decant pond, waste rock, stockpiles, open pit mine and water treatment systems. For each component, a series of initiating events and failure scenarios were identified, and a decision tree methodology was utilized to estimate the probability of ARD generation for both current and closure conditions. Due to the implementation of closure plans designed to minimize or eliminate ARD through regarding, construction of engineered covers and water management designs, the risk of ARD generation will be significantly reduced over time.

  1. Fault-Assisted Vertical Pluton Growth: Coastal Cordillera, North Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, J.; Arevalo, C.; Welkner, D.; Cruden, A.

    2004-12-01

    Immense volumes of plutonic rocks exposed in magmatic arcs challenge our ability to understand fundamental interactions between deformation and magma emplacement at convergent margins. Although close temporal and spatial relationships between fault activity and emplacement of arc plutons have been inferred, the hypothesis that there is always a direct link between faults and plutons in magmatic arcs remains controversial. It is also remarkable that there is no consensus on how individual arc plutonic complexes were constructed. The current assumption is that large granitic plutons formed from large magma bodies but this is rejected here because it fails to account for the sheet-like form and composite nature of many arc plutons. We show that composite arc plutons in the Chilean Coastal Cordillera were constructed incrementally, unit-by-unit, and that dip-slip on reactivated, steeply-dipping faults was instrumental to this process. Extension to oblique-extension of the overriding plate at the Andean subduction boundary in Triassic to Palaeocene time was accommodated by displacement on margin-parallel fault systems that were initially extensional but were reactivated as strike-slip and later still, as contractional fault systems. As the retreating subduction boundary evolved, large volumes of mainly granitic magmas were emplaced into the upper plate. In the Vallenar district (29ºS), elongate plutons with an asymmetrical, wedge-shaped cross section have one steeply-dipping side marked by synplutonic ductile fabrics that reworked a steeply-dipping fault. Partial-coupling across the fault during subsidence of the pluton floor caused a large-scale monocline to form in the host rocks, so that layering is characteristically deflected down towards the steep pluton margin. The vertical limb of these monoclines contains a high-temperature ductile shear zone with a down-dip stretching fabric and pluton-down shear sense. All of these features are expressions of fault

  2. Acid-rock drainage at Skytop, Centre County, Pennsylvania, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Brady, Keith; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent construction for Interstate Highway 99 (I?99) exposed pyrite and associated Zn-Pb sulfide minerals beneath a >10-m thick gossan to oxidative weathering along a 40-60-m deep roadcut through a 270-m long section of the Ordovician Bald Eagle Formation at Skytop, near State College, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Nearby Zn-Pb deposits hosted in associated sandstone and limestone in Blair and Centre Counties were prospected in the past; however, these deposits generally were not viable as commercial mines. The pyritic sandstone from the roadcut was crushed and used locally as road base and fill for adjoining segments of I?99. Within months, acidic (pH1,000 mg/L), seep waters at the base of the cut contain >100 mg/L dissolved Zn and >1 mg/L As, Co, Cu, and Ni. Lead is relatively immobile (<10 ?g/L in seep waters). The salts sequester metals and acidity between rainfall events. Episodic salt dissolution then contributes pulses of contamination including acid to surface runoff and ground water. The Skytop experience highlights the need to understand dynamic interactions of mineralogy and hydrology in order to avoid potentially negative environmental impacts associated with excavation in sulfidic rocks.

  3. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  4. A Sustainable Approach for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment using Clinoptilolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Y.; Xu, W.; Grace, J. R.

    2009-04-01

    Problems related to acid rock drainage (ARD) occur along many highways of British Columbia. The ARD problem at Pennask Creek along Highway 97C in the Thompson-Okanagan region is an ideal site for pilot study to investigate a possible remediation solution. The highway was opened in 1991. An ARD problem was identified in 1997. Both sides of Highway 97C are producing acidified runoff from both cut rock surface and a fractured ditch. This runoff eventually enters Pennask Creek, the largest spawning source of rainbow trout in British Columbia. The current remediation technique using limestone for ARD treatment appears to be unnecessarily expensive, to generate additional solid waste and to not be optimally effective. A soil mineral natural zeolite - clinoptilolite - which is inexpensive and locally available, has a high metal adsorption capacity and a significant buffering capacity. Moreover, the clinoptilolite materials could be back-flushed and reused on site. An earlier batch adsorption study from our laboratory demonstrated that clinoptilolite has a high adsorption capacity for Cu, Zn, Al, with adsorption concentrations 131, 158 and 215 mg/kg clinoptilolite, respectively, from ARD of pH 3.3. Removal of metals from the loaded clinoptilolite by back-flushing was found to depend on the pH, with an optimum pH range for extraction of 2.5 to 4.0 for a contact time of one hour. The rank of desorption effectiveness was EDTA > NaCl > NaNO3 > NaOAC > NaHCO3 > Na2CO3 > NaOH > Ca(OH)2. A novel process involving cyclic adsorption on clinoptilolite followed by regeneration of the sorbent by desorption is examined for the removal of heavy metals from acid rock drainage. Experimental results show that the adsorption of zinc and copper depends on the pH and on external mass transfer. Desorption is assisted by adding NaCl to the water. A slurry bubble column was able to significantly reduce the time required for both adsorption and desorption in batch tests. XRD analysis indicated

  5. Calc-alkaline plutonism along the Pacific rim of southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Travis

    1979-01-01

    Field, petrology, and age data on southern Alaska plutonic rocks now enable the delineation of eight calc-alkaline plutonic belts. These belts of plutons or batholithic complexes are curvilinear to linear and trend parallel or subparallel to the continental margin. The belts represent the principal loci of emplacement for plutons of specific ages and although there is spatial or temporal overlap in some cases, they are more commonly spatially and temporally distinct. Intermediate lithologies such as quartz diorite, tonalite, and granodiorite dominate in most of the Belts but granodiorite and granite characterize one. The belts are of Mesozoic or Cenozoic age and plutonism began in six of them at about 195, 175, 120, 75, 60, and 40 m.y. ago; age relations in two are poorly known. Recognition of the belts is important for future studies of regional geology, tectonism, and magmatism along the Pacific rim of southern Alaska.

  6. Thermal Modeling of Large Composite Plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartley, J. M.; Wohletz, K.; Coleman, D. S.; Glazner, A. F.

    2004-12-01

    Field and geochronologic evidence indicate that large plutons commonly amalgamate from many small intrusive increments [e.g., Glazner et al., 2004, GSA Today; Coleman et al., 2004, Geology]. To investigate the thermal consequences of this process, we model the growth of composite intrusions using the program HEAT. HEAT uses a finite-difference scheme to track transport and storage of heat, and resulting temperature variations, in a 2-D or 3-D intrusion and its wall rocks. Heat advected by wall-rock displacement is conserved kinematically by distributing the heat of intruded rock into adjacent mesh locations following a system determined by the aspect ratio of each intrusive increment. Modeling to date focuses on laccolithic plutons formed by stacking of sills. In a typical model, an 1100°C sill of intermediate-composition magma with a solidus of 750°C, 100-m-thick and 10-km-wide, is emplaced every 10 ka (10 mm/yr vertical inflation rate) for 600 ka to form a tabular pluton 6 km thick. Model runs to date have yielded at least three intriguing results. 1) Stacking of sills from bottom to top produces higher sustained temperatures than stacking from top to bottom. Over the first half of a 600 ka emplacement time, a bottom-up intrusion completely solidifies between increments but, during the latter half, a partial-melt zone becomes a steady-state feature. Dimensions of the partial melt zone vary through a 10 ka intrusive cycle, but the thickness reaches nearly 2 km by the time the last sill is emplaced. An otherwise identical top-down intrusion solidifies completely after each intrusive increment until the last 35 ka, when a small zone of partial melt persists between increments. The large composite complexes of the Sierra Nevada such as the Tuolumne and Whitney intrusive suites appear to have grown from their tops down, but bottom-up plutons also have been widely reported. 2) The partial-melt zone in a bottom-up intrusion mainly forms below each new intrusive

  7. Plutons and accretionary episodes of the Klamath Mountains, California and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irwin, William P.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    1999-01-01

    The Klamath Mountains consist of various accreted terranes and include many plutons that range in composition from gabbro to granodiorite. Some of the plutons (preaccretionary plutons) were parts of terranes before the terranes accreted; others (accretionary plutons) intruded during or after the accretion of their host terrane(s). This report attempts to (1) graphically illustrate how the Klamath Mountains grew by the accretion of allochthonous oceanic terranes during early Paleozoic to Cretaceous times, (2) identify the plutons as either preaccretionary or accretionary, and (3) genetically relate the plutonic intrusions to specific accretionary episodes. The eight accretionary episodes portrayed in this report are similar to those shown by Irwin and Mankinen (1998) who briefly described the basis for the timing of the episodes and who illustrated the ~110 degrees of clockwise rotation of the Klamath Mountains since Early Devonian time. Each episode is named for the accreting terrane. In all episodes (Figs. 1-8), the heavy black line represents a fault that separates the accreting oceanic rocks on the left from earlier accreted terranes on the right. The preaccretionary plutons are shown within the accreting oceanic crustal rocks to the left of the heavy black line, and the accretionary plutons in most instances are shown intruding previously accreted terranes to the right. Episodes earlier than the Central Metamorphic episode (Fig. 1), and that may have been important in the formation of the early Paleozoic nucleous of the province (the Eastern Klamath terrane), are not known. The 'Present Time' distribution of the accreted terranes and plutons is shown at a large scale in Figure 9. The schematic vertical section (Fig. 10) depicts the terranes as a stack of horizontal slabs that include or are intruded by vertical plutons. Note that at their base the ~170 Ma preaccretionary plutons of the Western Hayfork subterrane are truncated by the ~164 Ma Salt Creek

  8. Emplacement, rapid burial, and exhumation of 90-Ma plutons in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Himmelberg, G.R.; Haeussler, P.J.; Brew, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    In southeastern Alaska, granodiorite-tonalite plutons of the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt intruded the Jurassic-Cretaceous Gravina belt along the eastern side of the Alexander terrane around 90 Ma. These plutons postdate some deformation related to a major contractional event between the previously amalgamated Wrangellia and Alexander terranes and the previously accreted terranes of the North American margin. We studied the aureole mineral assemblages of these plutons near Petersburg, Alaska, determined pressure and temperature of equilibration, and examined structures that developed within and adjacent to these plutons. Parallelism of magmatic and submagmatic fabrics with fabrics in the country rock indicates synchroneity of pluton emplacement with regional deformation and suggests that magma transport to higher crustal levels was assisted by regional deformation. Replacement of andalusite by kyanite or sillimanite indicates crustal thickening soon after pluton emplacement. Regional structural analysis indicates the crustal thickening was accomplished by thrust burial. Thermobarometric analyses indicate the aureoles reached near-peak temperatures of 525 to 635 ??C at pressures of 570 to 630 MPa. Consideration of the rate of thermal decay of the aureoles suggests that burial was rapid and occurred at rates around 5 to 8 mm/year. Structural observations indicate there was contractional deformation before, during, and after emplacement of the 90-Ma plutons. Initial exhumation of the Admiralty-Revillagedo belt in the Petersburg area may have occurred along a thrust west of the pluton belt within the Gravina belt. ?? 2004 NRC Canada.

  9. Interactions between plutonism and detachments during metamorphic core complex formation, Serifos Island (Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabillard, Aurélien; Arbaret, Laurent; Jolivet, Laurent; Le Breton, Nicole; Gumiaux, Charles; Augier, Romain; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    In order to better understand the interactions between plutonic activity and strain localization during metamorphic core complex formation, the Miocene granodioritic pluton of Serifos (Cyclades, Greece) is studied. This pluton (11.6-9.5 Ma) intruded the Cycladic Blueschists during thinning of the Aegean domain along a system of low-angle normal faults belonging to the south dipping West Cycladic Detachment System (WCDS). Based on structural fieldwork, together with microstructural observations and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, we recognize a continuum of deformation from magmatic to brittle conditions within the magmatic body. This succession of deformation events is kinematically compatible with the development of the WCDS. The architecture of the pluton shows a marked asymmetry resulting from its interaction with the detachments. We propose a tectonic scenario for the emplacement of Serifos pluton and its subsequent cooling during the Aegean extension: (1) A first stage corresponds to the metamorphic core complex initiation and associated southwestward shearing along the Meghàlo Livadhi detachment. (2) In the second stage, the Serifos pluton has intruded the dome at shallow crustal level, piercing through the ductile/brittle Meghàlo Livadhi detachment. Southwest directed extensional deformation was contemporaneously transferred upward in the crust along the more localized Kàvos Kiklopas detachment. (3) The third stage was marked by synmagmatic extensional deformation and strain localization at the contact between the pluton and the host rocks resulting in nucleation of narrow shear zones, which (4) continued to develop after the pluton solidification.

  10. Typochemistry of rinkite and products of its alteration in the Khibiny Alkaline pluton, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopleva, N. G.; Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.; Mikhailova, Yu. A.; Selivanova, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence, morphology, and composition of rinkite are considered against the background of zoning in the Khibiny pluton. Accessory rinkite is mostly characteristic of foyaite in the outer part of pluton, occurs somewhat less frequently in foyaite and rischorrite in the central part of pluton, even more sparsely in foidolites and apatite-nepheline rocks, and sporadically in fenitized xenoliths of the Lovozero Formation. The largest, up to economic, accumulations of rinkite are related to the pegmatite and hydrothermal veins, which occur in nepheline syenite on both sides of the Main foidolite ring. The composition of rinkite varies throughout the pluton. The Ca, Na, and F contents in accessory rinkite and amorphous products of its alteration progressively increase from foyaite and fenitized basalt of the Lovozero Formation to foidolite, rischorrite, apatite-nepheline rocks, and pegmatite-hydrothermal veins.

  11. Volcanic-plutonic parity and the differentiation of the continental crust.

    PubMed

    Keller, C Brenhin; Schoene, Blair; Barboni, Melanie; Samperton, Kyle M; Husson, Jon M

    2015-07-16

    The continental crust is central to the biological and geological history of Earth. However, crustal heterogeneity has prevented a thorough geochemical comparison of its primary igneous building blocks-volcanic and plutonic rocks-and the processes by which they differentiate to felsic compositions. Our analysis of a comprehensive global data set of volcanic and plutonic whole-rock geochemistry shows that differentiation trends from primitive basaltic to felsic compositions for volcanic versus plutonic samples are generally indistinguishable in subduction-zone settings, but are divergent in continental rifts. Offsets in major- and trace-element differentiation patterns in rift settings suggest higher water content in plutonic magmas and reduced eruptibility of hydrous silicate magmas relative to dry rift volcanics. In both tectonic settings, our results indicate that fractional crystallization, rather than crustal melting, is predominantly responsible for the production of intermediate and felsic magmas, emphasizing the role of mafic cumulates as a residue of crustal differentiation. PMID:26178961

  12. Volcanic-plutonic parity and the differentiation of the continental crust.

    PubMed

    Keller, C Brenhin; Schoene, Blair; Barboni, Melanie; Samperton, Kyle M; Husson, Jon M

    2015-07-16

    The continental crust is central to the biological and geological history of Earth. However, crustal heterogeneity has prevented a thorough geochemical comparison of its primary igneous building blocks-volcanic and plutonic rocks-and the processes by which they differentiate to felsic compositions. Our analysis of a comprehensive global data set of volcanic and plutonic whole-rock geochemistry shows that differentiation trends from primitive basaltic to felsic compositions for volcanic versus plutonic samples are generally indistinguishable in subduction-zone settings, but are divergent in continental rifts. Offsets in major- and trace-element differentiation patterns in rift settings suggest higher water content in plutonic magmas and reduced eruptibility of hydrous silicate magmas relative to dry rift volcanics. In both tectonic settings, our results indicate that fractional crystallization, rather than crustal melting, is predominantly responsible for the production of intermediate and felsic magmas, emphasizing the role of mafic cumulates as a residue of crustal differentiation.

  13. An AMS study of the Takidani pluton (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Eva; Caricchi, Luca; Floess, David; Wallis, Simon; Harayama, Satoru

    2016-04-01

    Large plutonic bodies are typically constructed incrementally often by under-accretion of distinct successive magma pulses. Petrography and geochemistry of the Takidani Pluton (1.54 Ma ± 0.23 Ma) in the Northern Japanese Alps show that the chemical and textural variability observed at the roof of this intrusion is best explained by the segregation of residual melt from a crystallising magma body. We carried out a magnetic susceptibility survey (bulk susceptibility and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) to identify the structures associated with the emplacement and extraction of residual melts from a magmatic mush. Additionally, we determined shape preferred orientations (SPO) of amphibole at several locations within the Takidani pluton. From bottom to top of the intrusion, the bulk susceptibility is about constant in the main granodioritic part, decreases roofwards within the porphyritic unit, before increasing again within the marginal granodiorite close to the contact with the overlaying Hotaka Andesite. Such variability mimics the major and trace elements compositional variability measured in the whole rock samples. Magnetic foliations are observed at the western tectonic contact of the pluton potentially indicating overprint, while most other magnetic fabrics across the pluton are characterised by triaxial ellipsoids of magnetic susceptibility or magnetic lineations. Our preliminary data and the lack of internal contacts indicate that Takidani Pluton was likely emplaced as a series of successive magma pulses finally merging to produce a large connected magma body. While amphibole foliations may likely be the results of super-solidus tectonic overprint, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data may be related to post-emplacement melt segregation.

  14. Late Jurassic plutonism in the southwest U.S. Cordillera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, A.P.; Wooden, J.L.; Howard, K.A.; Richards, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Although plate reconstructions suggest that subduction was an approximately steady-state process from the mid-Mesozoic through the early Tertiary, recent precise geochronologic studies suggest highly episodic emplacement of voluminous continental-margin batholiths in the U.S. Cordillera. In central and southern California and western Arizona, major episodes of batholithic magmatism are known to have occurred in Permian-Triassic, Middle Jurassic, and late Early to Late Cretaceous time. However, recent studies of forearc-basin and continental-interior sediments suggest that Late Jurassic time was probably also a period of significant magmatism, although few dated plutons of this age have been recognized. We describe a belt of Late Jurassic plutonic and hypabyssal rocks at least 200 km in length that extends from the northwestern Mojave Desert through the Transverse Ranges. The belt lies outboard of both the voluminous Middle Jurassic arc and the ca. 148 Ma Independence dike swarm at these latitudes. The plutons include two intrusive suites emplaced between 157 and 149 Ma: a calc-alkaline suite compositionally unlike Permian-Triassic and Middle Jurassic mon-zonitic suites but similar to Late Cretaceous arc plutons emplaced across this region, and a contemporaneous but not comagmatic alkaline suite. The Late Jurassic was thus a time of both tectonic and magmatic transitions in the southern Cordillera. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  15. Strontium and oxygen isotopic variations in Mesozoic and Tertiary plutons of central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Criss, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Regional variations in initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (ri) of Mesozoic plutons in central Idaho locate the edge of Precambrian continental crust at the boundary between the late Paleozoic-Mesozoic accreted terranes and Precambrian sialic crust in western Idaho. The ri values increase abruptly but continuously from less than 0.704 in the accreted terranes to greater than 0.708 across a narrow, 5 to 15 km zone, characterized by elongate, lens-shaped, highly deformed plutons and schistose metasedimentary and metavolcanic units. The chemical and petrologic character of the plutons changes concomitantly from ocean-arc-type, diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite units to a weakly peraluminous, calcic to calcalkalic tonalite-granodiorite-granite suite (the Idaho batholith). Plutons in both suites yield Late Cretaceous ages, but Permian through Early Cretaceous bodies are confined to the accreted terranes and early Tertiary intrusions are restricted to areas underlain by Precambrian crust. The two major terranes were juxtaposed between 75 and 130 m.y. ago, probably between 80 and 95 m.y. Oxygen and strontium isotopic ratios and Rb and Sr concentrations of the plutonic rocks document a significant upper-crustal contribution to the magmas that intrude Precambrian crust. Magmas intruding the arc terranes were derived from the upper mantle/subducted oceanic lithosphere and may have been modified by anatexis of earlier island-arc volcanic and sedimentary units. Plutons near the edge of Precambrian sialic crust represent simple mixtures of the Precambrian wall-rocks with melts derived from the upper mantle or subducted oceanic lithosphere with ri of 0.7035. Rb/Sr varies linearly with ri, producing "pseudoisochrons" with apparent "ages" close to the age of the wall rocks. Measured ??18O values of the wall rocks are less than those required for the assimilated end-member by Sr-O covariation in the plutons, however, indicating that wall-rock ??18O was reduced significantly by exchange with

  16. Acid rock drainage and rock weathering in Antarctica: important sources for iron cycling in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dold, B; Gonzalez-Toril, E; Aguilera, A; Lopez-Pamo, E; Cisternas, M E; Bucchi, F; Amils, R

    2013-06-18

    Here we describe biogeochemical processes that lead to the generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and rock weathering on the Antarctic landmass and describe why they are important sources of iron into the Antarctic Ocean. During three expeditions, 2009-2011, we examined three sites on the South Shetland Islands in Antarctica. Two of them displayed intensive sulfide mineralization and generated acidic (pH 3.2-4.5), iron-rich drainage waters (up to 1.78 mM Fe), which infiltrated as groundwater (as Fe(2+)) and as superficial runoff (as Fe(3+)) into the sea, the latter with the formation of schwertmannite in the sea-ice. The formation of ARD in the Antarctic was catalyzed by acid mine drainage microorganisms found in cold climates, including Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Thiobacillus plumbophilus. The dissolved iron (DFe) flux from rock weathering (nonmineralized control site) was calculated to be 0.45 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) for the nowadays 5468 km of ice-free Antarctic rock coastline which is of the same order of magnitude as glacial or aeolian input to the Southern Ocean. Additionally, the two ARD sites alone liberate 0.026 and 0.057 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) as point sources to the sea. The increased iron input correlates with increased phytoplankton production close to the source. This might even be enhanced in the future by a global warming scenario, and could be a process counterbalancing global warming. PMID:23682976

  17. Acid rock drainage and rock weathering in Antarctica: important sources for iron cycling in the Southern Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dold, B; Gonzalez-Toril, E; Aguilera, A; Lopez-Pamo, E; Cisternas, M E; Bucchi, F; Amils, R

    2013-06-18

    Here we describe biogeochemical processes that lead to the generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and rock weathering on the Antarctic landmass and describe why they are important sources of iron into the Antarctic Ocean. During three expeditions, 2009-2011, we examined three sites on the South Shetland Islands in Antarctica. Two of them displayed intensive sulfide mineralization and generated acidic (pH 3.2-4.5), iron-rich drainage waters (up to 1.78 mM Fe), which infiltrated as groundwater (as Fe(2+)) and as superficial runoff (as Fe(3+)) into the sea, the latter with the formation of schwertmannite in the sea-ice. The formation of ARD in the Antarctic was catalyzed by acid mine drainage microorganisms found in cold climates, including Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans and Thiobacillus plumbophilus. The dissolved iron (DFe) flux from rock weathering (nonmineralized control site) was calculated to be 0.45 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) for the nowadays 5468 km of ice-free Antarctic rock coastline which is of the same order of magnitude as glacial or aeolian input to the Southern Ocean. Additionally, the two ARD sites alone liberate 0.026 and 0.057 × 10(9) g DFe yr(-1) as point sources to the sea. The increased iron input correlates with increased phytoplankton production close to the source. This might even be enhanced in the future by a global warming scenario, and could be a process counterbalancing global warming.

  18. Mixing-controlled uncertainty in long-term predictions of acid rock drainage from heterogeneous waste-rock piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedretti, D.; Beckie, R. D.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    The chemistry of drainage from waste-rock piles at mine sites is difficult to predict because of a number of uncertainties including heterogeneous reactive mineral content, distribution of minerals, weathering rates and physical flow properties. In this presentation, we examine the effects of mixing on drainage chemistry over timescales of 100s of years. We use a 1-D streamtube conceptualization of flow in waste rocks and multicomponent reactive transport modeling. We simplify the reactive system to consist of acid-producing sulfide minerals and acid-neutralizing carbonate minerals and secondary sulfate and iron oxide minerals. We create multiple realizations of waste-rock piles with distinct distributions of reactive minerals along each flow path and examine the uncertainty of drainage geochemistry through time. The limited mixing of streamtubes that is characteristic of the vertical unsaturated flow in many waste-rock piles, allows individual flowpaths to sustain acid or neutral conditions to the base of the pile, where the streamtubes mix. Consequently, mixing and the acidity/alkalinity balance of the streamtube waters, and not the overall acid- and base-producing mineral contents, control the instantaneous discharge chemistry. Our results show that the limited mixing implied by preferential flow and the heterogeneous distribution of mineral contents lead to large uncertainty in drainage chemistry over short and medium time scales. However, over longer timescales when one of either the acid-producing or neutralizing primary phases is depleted, the drainage chemistry becomes less controlled by mixing and in turn less uncertain. A correct understanding of the temporal variability of uncertainty is key to make informed long-term decisions in mining settings regarding the management of waste material.

  19. Magnetic fabrics in sub-caldera plutons recording magma ascent and fault-caldera interactions, the Etiavnica volcano-plutonic complex, Western Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomek, Filip; Žák, Jiří

    2013-04-01

    The Štiavnica volcano-plutonic complex in the Western Carpatians exposes a spectacular section through middle Miocene stratovolcano (50 km in diameter) built on Variscan basement and late Paleozoic to Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. The stratovolcano consists of early andesite lava flows, extrusive domes, and pyroclastic flow deposits intruded by andesite and andesite porphyry sills and laccoliths. At around 14.5-15.5 Ma, the pre-volcanic basement beneath the central portion of the stratovolcano was intruded by a diorite stock and a voluminous bell-jar granodiorite pluton followed by quartz diorite to granodiorite porphyry dikes and stocks. The pluton emplacement led to the development of a 20 km wide collapse caldera associated with late andesite and dacite extrusive domes, dome flows, pyroclastic deposits, and quartz-diorite porphyry dikes and sills. Subsequently, the central domain underwent resurgence accompanied by intrusion of small rhyolitic and granite porphyry bodies. The present-day exposure with significant vertical relief cuts through all these units including the sub-caldera plutons and their flat roof which represents the volcano basement. The sub-caldera plutons exhibit contrasting magnetic fabrics as revealed by anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). The diorite is characterized by very low degree of magnetic anisotropy (less than 10 %) and both prolate and oblate AMS ellipsoids. Magnetic foliations are mostly sub-parallel to the nearby pluton roof margin and are associated with steep lineations. In contrast, the younger granodiorite shows slightly higher degree of magnetic anisotropy (up to 12 %) and chiefly oblate susceptibility ellipsoids for the same magnetic mineralogy (both plutons are ferromagnetic, with the AMS carried predominantly by magnetite). Unlike fabric in the diorite, magnetic foliations are homogeneously oriented and dip moderately to the W to WNW whereas magnetic lineations vary from down-dip to subhorizontal. We interpret

  20. Reconnaissance geochemical exploration of plutons of syenite and shonkinite, southern Asir, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Overstreet, W.C.; Assegaff, A.B.; Hussain, M.A.; Naqvi, M.I.; Selner, G.I.; Matzko, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Reconnaissance geochemical exploration for rare metals in plutons of syenite and shonkinite disclosed generally less than 20 ppM Nb in rocks, wadi sediments, and concentrates. The sparsity of Nb is accompanied by low values for La, Sn, W, Y, and Zr and relatively high but insignificant values for Be and Mo. Base and precious metals are either below their respective limits of determination in the various sample media or are present at background levels commensurate with average crustal abundances in felsic rocks. Pegmatite dikes associated with the syenite plutons are rare and lack vermiculite. The present investigation disclosed no possible ore deposits in the plutons covered by the field work. Known kyanite-topaz-natroalunite rocks in the vicinity of the surveyed areas should be examined for possible deposits of Cu, Mo, or Au associated with high-alumina hydrothermal deposits. 27 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  1. Amino acids and hydrocarbons approximately 3,800-Myr old in the Isua rocks, southwestern Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, B.; Engel, M. H.; Zumberge, J. E.; Ogino, H.; Chang, S. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an analysis of amino acids and hydrocarbons found in the Isua banded iron formation, which contains the oldest known rocks on earth, are discussed. Similarities are pointed out between the relative amino acid abundances of the Isua rocks and those of lichens found on their surfaces, and a lack of substantial racemization indicated by the low D/L ratios in the 3800-million year old rock samples is noted. Experimental results showing the possibility of amino acid diffusion from lichens into the rocks are presented. Comparisons of the Isua rock amino acid D/L ratios with those reported for samples from other regions indicates that none of the Isua amino acids are older than a few tens of thousands to a few hundred thousand years. Analyses of the saturated hydrocarbons of the Isua samples reveals no odd carbon number preference, which may indicate antiquity, however laboratory experiments have shown that amino acids and aromatic and saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons could not have survived the metamorphic history of the Isua rocks. The evidence presented thus suggests that the amino acids and hydrocarbons found are not of the age of the sediments.

  2. Operational Lessons Leaned During bioreactor Demonstrations for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) has emphasized the development of biologically-based treatment technologies for acid rock drainage (ARD). Progressively evolving technology demonstrations have resulted in significant advances in sulf...

  3. Operational Lessons Learned During Bioreactor Demonstrations for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) has emphasized the development of biologically-based treatment technologies for acid rock drainage (ARD). Progressively evolving technology demonstrations have resulted in significant advances in sul...

  4. Testing the role of silicic acid and bioorganic materials in the formation of rock coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-11-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which the rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of the polymerization of silicic acid with the biooganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the natural ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly on Mars.

  5. Testing the Role of Silicic Acid and Bioorganic Materials in the Formation of Rock Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Vera; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-12-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which hte rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of hte polymerization of silicic acid with the bioorganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the nature ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly Mars.

  6. The Crabtree Creek pluton: A deformed Mid-Paleozoic( ) stitching pluton on the west flank of the Raleigh metamorphic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, E.F. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Stoddard, E.F. . Dept. of MEAS)

    1993-03-01

    Crystalline rocks on the west flank of the Alleghanian-aged Raleigh metamorphic belt are subdivided into four west-dipping lithotectonic terranes in the Falls Lake and north Raleigh areas. The rocks of these terranes are separated from east to west on the basis of bulk rock composition, metamorphic textural characteristics, and discrete structural discontinuities into the Raleigh terrane (RT), Crabtree terrane (CT), Falls Lake melange (FLM), and the volcanogenic Carolina slate belt (CSB). The RT and CT are separated by the dextral shear Nutbush Creek fault zone, while the Falls Lake thrust juxtaposes the CT and FLM. The structural character of the discontinuity separating the FLM and the CSB is unclear, although thrusting has been proposed. The results of geologic mapping in the Raleigh West 7.5[prime] quadrangle for the NC Geological Survey's COGEOMAP project in the Raleigh 1[degree] sheet indicate that only the CSB and CT are exposed west of I-440 between US 70 and I-40. This confirms the mapping results of Horton and others that the melange pinches out in north Raleigh just north of US 70. South of US 70, a large orthogneiss body, the Crabtree Creek composite granitic pluton, occupies the same relative position as the melange, separating mafic and intermediate metavolcanic rocks of the CSB from nonlineated and lineated interlayered schists and gneisses of the CT. The pluton is subdivided into a foliated leucocratic, medium grained muscovite granitic orthogneiss, and a foliated leucocratic to mesocratic medium to coarse grained muscovite [plus minus] biotite granitic orthogneiss containing abundant porphyroclastic disks, rods, and knobs of quartz. Because its lobes locally display intrusive contacts with metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks of both terranes, the Crabtree Creek pluton represents an intrusion that stitched the two terranes together.

  7. Apatite trace element and halogen compositions as petrogenetic-metallogenic indicators: Examples from four granite plutons in the Sanjiang region, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Li-Chuan; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Song; Bi, Xian-Wu; Zhu, Jing-Jing; Li, Chusi

    2016-06-01

    The abundances of trace elements including Sr, Ga and rare earth elements (REE) and halogens in apatite crystals from four intermediate-felsic plutons in the Zhongdian terrane in the Sanjiang region have been determined using electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to evaluate the potential of apatite as a petrogenic-metallogenic indicator. The selected plutons include one that is not mineralized (the Triassic Xiuwacu pluton, or the TXWC pluton), one that hosts a porphyry-type Cu deposit (the Pulang pluton, or the PL pluton), one that hosts a porphyry-type Mo deposit (the Tongchanggou pluton, or the TCG pluton), and one that hosts a vein-type Mo deposit (the Cretaceous Xiuwacu pluton, or the CXWC pluton). Except for the CXWC pluton, the other three plutons have adakite-like trace element signatures in whole rocks. The results from this study show that REE, Sr and halogens in apatite can be used to track magma compositions, oxidation states and crystallization history. Apatite crystals from the adakite-like plutons are characterized by much higher Sr/Y and δEu than the non-adakite-type pluton. This means that apatite, which is not susceptible to alteration, is a useful tool for identifying the adakite-like plutons that no longer preserve the initial Sr/Y ratios in whole rocks due to weathering and hydrothermal alteration. Based on apatite Ga contents and δEu values, it is inferred that the parental magmas for the two adakite-like plutons containing porphyry-type Cu and Mo mineralization are more oxidized than that for the non-adakite-type pluton containing vein-type Mo mineralization. Apatite crystals from the vein-type Mo deposit have much lower Cl/F ratios than those from the porphyry-type Cu and Mo deposits. Apatite crystals from the adakite-like pluton without Cu or Mo mineralization is characterized by much lower Cl/F ratios than those from the adakite-like plutons that host the porphyry-type Cu and Mo deposits. The

  8. Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutonism and deformation in the Skagit Gneiss Complex, north Cascade Range, Washington and British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, R.A.; Van Der Heyden, P.; Tabor, R.W.; Stacey, J.S.; Zartman, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Skagit Gneiss Complex forms a more-or-less continuous terrane within the North Cascade Range. The complex comprises abundant plutons intruded at mid-crustal depths into a variety of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks of both oceanic and volcanic-arc origin. U-Pb zircon ages from gneissis plutons within and near the Skagit Gneiss Complex indicate magmatic crystallziations between 75 and 60 Ma. Deformation, recrystallization, and migmatization in part postdate intrusion of the 75-60 Ma plutons. This latest Cretaceous and earliest Tertiary plutonism and migmatization may reflect thermal relaxation following early Late Cretaceous orogeny. The complex was ductilely extended northwest-southeast shortly after intrusion of granite dikes at ~45 Ma, but before emplacement of the earliest (~34 Ma) plutons of the Cascade arc. -from Authors

  9. Chemical and textural variations of plutons along the Wasatch intrusive belt, central Wasatch mountains, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, S.L.; Nash, W.P. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    The Wasatch intrusive belt, located in the central Wasatch mountains, consists of 11 Tertiary plutons. Uplift and rotation of the Wasatch mountains has exposed the 11 km thick section which hosts these plutons. They include from west to east, the Little Cottonwood (LC), Alta (AS) and Clayton Peak (CP) stocks, the Park City Porphyries, and the Park Premier Porphyries which intrude the Keetley Volcanics. Stratigraphic and fluid inclusion studies suggest that depths of emplacement range from nearly 11 km in the west to less than 1 km in the east. Both textural and chemical variations within the Wasatch plutons are consistent with successively shallower depths of emplacement. The LC, AS and CP rocks are phaneritic with grain size decreasing eastward, whereas Park City and Park Premier rocks exhibit a porphyritic texture. Or content in zoned plagioclase from the phaneritic stocks remains constant (Or[sub 1.7]) with decreasing An content, whereas Or content from the porphyritic stocks increases (Or[sub 1.3] to Or[sub 5.1]). Equilibration pressures calculated from hornblende compositions correspond to depths of approximately 9.8 km and 6.8 km for the western portion of LC stocks as AS, respectively. Although ages of many of these plutons are poorly constrained, there does not appear to be a direct correlation between east-west location and age. However, whole rock major element analyses exhibit a typical calc-alkaline enrichment trend with the older plutons being more mafic than the younger.

  10. Evidence from the Farmington pluton for early Devonian subduction-related magmatism in the Carolina zone of central North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esawi, E. K.

    2004-04-01

    The Concord plutonic suite consists of numerous gabbroic plutons scattered throughout the Carolina terrane with ages that cluster around 400 Ma. The Farmington pluton is located on the northeastern part of the Mocksville complex and consists mostly of gabbronorites and troctolites. Field, geochemical, and P-T studies of the Farmington gabbros suggest that the rocks are genetically related and formed by transitional to calc-alkaline differentiation of mafic magma. The pluton was formed in a moderate-pressure environment (˜6 kbar) and underwent limited differentiation after emplacement. The overall geological and geochemical features of the Farmington pluton are consistent with a transitional to arc origin. The Concord plutonic suite does not fit well in classical tectonothermal models suggested for the evolution of the Appalachian orogen. However, Field and geochemical data in this report and other data reported recently suggest that the origin of the Farmington pluton and possibly the Concord plutonic suite is that the suite represents a continuous to semi-continuous Taconian-Acadian magmatic event(s).

  11. Observations on lichens, granite rock outcrops and acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Lichen sensitivity to the synergistic effects of acid rain and toxic metals in the Atlanta, Georgia area is discussed. The disappearance of lichens on Stone Mountain after the placement of a safety galvinized fence lead to the observations of possible acid rain effects on population dynamics of the lichen community.

  12. 4-Dimensional Insights into Silicic Magma Reservoir Assembly from Late Miocene Southern Andean Plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaen, A. J.; Garibaldi, N.; Singer, B. S.; Schoene, B.; Cottle, J. M.; Tikoff, B.; Gutiérrez, F. J.; Jicha, B. R.; Payacán, I. J.

    2015-12-01

    Linking the development of magmatic flow fabrics to the T-X-t history of intraplutonic domains using modern structural and petrochronologic methods offers a frontier along which to explore for eruptability in plutonic rocks and better understand how shallow magma systems are assembled. The ~6.2 Ma Risco Bayo and Huemul plutons in the Chilean Andes (~36°S) exhibit a similar compositional spectrum and footprint to the active Laguna del Maule rhyolitic volcanic field nearby. The plutons comprise distinct lithological domains-each on the order of a few km3: gabbro to granite in Risco Bayo and granodiorite to leucogranite in Huemul. Whole rock variations and 87Sr/86Sr ratios highlight the importance of AFC processes during pluton assembly. Mixing and mingling of magma batches is observed geochemically and in the field as abundant mafic enclaves. U-Pb CA-ID-TIMS zircon ages of 6.36 to 6.18 Ma in Risco Bayo granodiorite and Huemul miarolitic leucogranite overlap with their 40Ar/39Ar biotite ages of ~6.24 Ma, suggesting coeval zircon saturation, emplacement, and rapid cooling of two compositionally and structurally distinct domains. A granodiorite domain within Huemul has a more protracted crystallization history and zircons with lower REE than in the adjacent miarolitic leucogranite, suggesting pluton construction by pulses on 10 to 100 kyr timescales. Al-in-hornblende barometry constrains emplacement to 3-4 km depth. Observations from Laguna del Maule (extrusion/intrusion rates, spatio-temporal pattern of mafic/rhyolitic volcanism, etc.) provide volcanic parallels with which to help interpret pluton assembly. AMS fabrics suggest possible upward migration of magma associated with decompression. Late Miocene silicic ignimbrites nearby are also being investigated to determine if they represent erupted products from the Risco Bayo-Huemul plutonic system.

  13. Conceptual models of the formation of acid-rock drainage at road cuts in Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Michael W.; Worland, Scott; Byl, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite and other minerals containing sulfur and trace metals occur in several rock formations throughout Middle and East Tennessee. Pyrite (FeS2) weathers in the presence of oxygen and water to form iron hydroxides and sulfuric acid. The weathering and interaction of the acid on the rocks and other minerals at road cuts can result in drainage with low pH (< 4) and high concentrations of trace metals. Acid-rock drainage can cause environmental problems and damage transportation infrastructure. The formation and remediation of acid-drainage from roads cuts has not been researched as thoroughly as acid-mine drainage. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Tennessee Department of Transportation, is conducting an investigation to better understand the geologic, hydrologic, and biogeochemical factors that control acid formation at road cuts. Road cuts with the potential for acid-rock drainage were identifed and evaluated in Middle and East Tennessee. The pyrite-bearing formations evaluated were the Chattanooga Shale (Devonian black shale), the Fentress Formation (coal-bearing), and the Precambrian Anakeesta Formation and similar Precambrian rocks. Conceptual models of the formation and transport of acid-rock drainage (ARD) from road cuts were developed based on the results of a literature review, site reconnaissance, and the initial rock and water sampling. The formation of ARD requires a combination of hydrologic, geochemical, and microbial interactions which affect drainage from the site, acidity of the water, and trace metal concentrations. The basic modes of ARD formation from road cuts are; 1 - seeps and springs from pyrite-bearing formations and 2 - runoff over the face of a road cut in a pyrite-bearing formation. Depending on site conditions at road cuts, the basic modes of ARD formation can be altered and the additional modes of ARD formation are; 3 - runoff over and through piles of pyrite-bearing material, either from construction or breakdown

  14. Structure and emplacement of granite plutons in the Paleoproterozoic crust of Eastern Burkina Faso: rheological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vegas, Nestor; Naba, Seta; Bouchez, Jean Luc; Jessell, Mark

    2008-11-01

    The Fada N'Gourma area in Burkina Faso is underlain by Paleoproterozoic rocks that make the northeastern West-African Craton. This region is composed of NE-trending volcano-sedimentary belts and foliated tonalites, affected by several shear zones. A generation of younger, ˜2100 Ma-old, non-foliated biotite-bearing granites intrudes the former rock units. We have investigated the younger granite pluton of Kouare that was previously considered as forming a single body with the pluton of Satenga to the west, a pluton which likely belongs to the ˜20 Ma more recent Tenkodogo-Yamba batholith. Magnetic fabric measurements have been combined with microstructural observations and the analysis of field and aeromagnetic data. The granite encloses angular enclaves of the host tonalites. Magmatic microstructures are preserved inside the pluton and solid-state, high-temperature deformation features are ubiquitous at its periphery. The presence of steeply plunging lineations in the pluton of Kouare and its adjacent host-rocks suggests that large volumes of granitic magmas became crystallized while they were ascending through the crust that was softened and steepened close to the contact. Around Kouare, the foliation in the host tonalites conforms with a map-scale, Z-shaped fold in between NNE-trending shear zones, implying a bulk clockwise rotation of the material contained in-between the shear zones, including the emplacing pluton. Regionally, the Fada N'Gourma area is concluded to result from NW-shortening associated with transcurrent shearing and vertical transfer of granitic magmas. This study concludes that the ˜2200 Myears old juvenile crust of Burkina Faso was brittle before the intrusion of the biotite-granites, became softened close to them and that gravity-driven and regional scale wrench tectonics were active together.

  15. Contact metamorphism associated with emplacement of the Papoose Flat pluton, Inyo Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, M.W.; Law, R.D.; Morgan, S.S. )

    1992-01-01

    Petrologic investigation of marbles and calc-silicates found within L-S tectonites from the western part of the Papoose Flat pluton's aureole has been undertaken to determine the wallrock thermal gradients associated with pluton emplacement. Temperatures of metamorphism of marbles were determined using Cal-Dol geothermometry coupled with constrains from phase equilibria of both carbonates and interbedded pelites. Throughout the aureole maximum temperatures for samples closest to the contact range from 475--500 C. The phase assemblage in these samples is Cal-Dol-Qtz-Ms-Phl [+-] Hb [+-] Chl. Temperatures decrease rapidly to ambient country rock conditions within 30--90 m away from the contact. Thermal gradients around the strongly deformed western margin of the pluton appear to all be linear and fall into three distinct groups: Type 1. gradients of 0--2.5 C/10m, Type 2. gradients of 13--18 C/10m and, Type 3. gradients of 47--59 C/10m. The strongly deformed nature of the contact rocks supports post- or synmetamorphic thinning of the aureole whereas the presence of skarn mineralization and strongly altered pelitic aureole rocks suggest a convective control to the thermal gradients. Portions of the aureole which have Type 1 gradients may represent areas where (1) convection was more efficient and therefore maintained a relatively steady state thermal profile, (2) introduction of new magma batches during pluton emplacement kept aureole temperatures constant or (3) the pluton-wallrock contact is oriented such that each sample locality is equidistant from the pluton margin. Thermal modeling using both convective and conductive parameters is currently being undertaken to further evaluate these models.

  16. 7th international conference on acid rock drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhisel, R.I.

    2006-07-01

    This meeting also serves as the 23rd annual meeting of the American Society of Mining and Reclamation. The papers discussed various aspects of acid mine drainage including its impact, sustainability issues, case studies, lessons learned, characterization, closure/land use issues, emerging technologies, forestry/ecology, abandoned mine lands, modelling, pit lakes/backfill, soils and overburden, and treatment.

  17. Acid-base properties of bentonite rocks with different origins.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Noémi M; Kónya, József

    2006-03-01

    Five bentonite samples (35-47% montmorillonite) from a Sarmatian sediment series with bentonite sites around Sajóbábony (Hungary) is studied. Some of these samples were tuffogenic bentonite (sedimentary), the others were bentonitized tuff with volcano sedimentary origin. The acid-base properties of the edge sites were studied by potentiometric titrations and surface complexation modeling. It was found that the number and the ratio of silanol and aluminol sites as well as the intrinsic stability constants are different for the sedimentary bentonite and bentonitized tuff. The characteristic properties of the edges sites depend on the origins. The acid-base properties are compared to other commercial and standard bentonites.

  18. COMPOST-FREE BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE, TECHNICAL EVALUATION BULLETIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  19. COMPOST-FREE BIOREACTOR TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE LEVIATHAN MINE, CALIFORNIA INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  20. PHYSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ACID ROCK DRAINAGE AT REMOTE SITES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program, Activity III, Project 42, Physical Solutions for Acid Rock Drainage at Remote Sites, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy. A...

  1. COMPOST-FREE BIOREACTOR TREATMENT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE - TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, an evaluation of the compost-free bioreactor treatment of acid rock drainage (ARD) from the Aspen Seep was conducted at the Leviathan Mine Superfund site located in a remote, high altitude area of Alpine Co...

  2. Aqueous Alteration of Mars-Analog Rocks Under an Acidic Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, M. A.; Moore, J. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The wind-blown fines of Mars have high amounts of salts that are easily mobilized by water. We report on laboratory experiments that produce brines from the interaction of water with Mars-analog rocks and a simulated acidic Mars paleoatmosphere. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Reconnaissance study of the Taylor Mountains pluton, southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Travis L.; Miller, Marti L.; Klimasauskas, Edward P.; Layer, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    The Taylor Mountains pluton is a Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary (median age 65 + or ? 2 Ma) epizonal, composite biotite granite stock located about 235 km (145 mi) northeast of Dillingham in southwestern Alaska. This 30 km2 (12 mi2) pluton has sharp and discordant contacts with hornfels that developed in Upper Cretaceous clastic sedimentary rocks of the Kuskokwim Group. The three intrusive phases in the Taylor Mountains pluton, in order of emplacement, are (1) porphyritic granite containing large K-feldspar phenocrysts in a coarse-grained groundmass, (2) porphyritic granite containing large K-feldspar and smaller, but still coarse, plagioclase, quartz, and biotite phenocrysts in a fine-grained groundmass, and (3) fine-grained, leucocratic, equigranular granite. The porphyritic granites have different emplacement histories, but similar compositions; averages are 69.43 percent SiO2, 1.62 percent CaO, 5.23 percent FeO+MgO, 3.11 percent Na2O, and 4.50 percent K2O. The fine-grained, equigranular granite is distinctly felsic compared to porphyritic granite; it averages 75.3 percent SiO2, 0.49 percent CaO, 1.52 percent FeO+MgO, 3.31 percent Na2O, and 4.87 percent K2O. Many trace elements including Ni, Cr, Sc, V, Ba, Sr, Zr, Y, Nb, La, Ce, Th, and Nd are strongly depleted in fine-grained equigranular granite. Trace elements are not highly enriched in any of the granites. Known hydrothermal alteration is limited to one tourmaline-quartz replacement zone in porphyritic granite. Mineral deposits in the Taylor Mountains area are primarily placer gold (plus wolframite, cassiterite, and cinnabar); sources for these likely include scattered veins in hornfels peripheral to the Taylor Mountain pluton. The granite magmas that formed the Taylor Mountains pluton are thought to represent melted continental crust that possibly formed in response to high heat flow in the waning stage of Late Cretaceous subduction beneath interior Alaska.

  4. Use of olivine and plagioclase saturation surfaces for the petrogenetic modeling of recrystallized basic plutonic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, G. N.

    1983-01-01

    During petrogenetic studies of basic plutonic rocks, there are at least three major questions to be considered: (1) what were the relative proportions of cumulate crystals and intercumulus melt in a given sample? (2) what is the composition and variation in composition of the melts within the pluton? and (3) what is the original composition of the liquids, their source and evolution prior to the time of emplacement? Use of both saturation surfaces can place strong limits on the compositions of potential cumulate phases and intercumulus melts. Consideration of appropriate trace elements can indicate whether a sample is an orthocumulate, adcumulate or mesocumulate. Thus, when trace element and petrographic data are considered together with the saturation surfaces, it should be possible to begin to answer the three major questions given above, even for strongly recrystallized basic plutons.

  5. A comparative study of two rear-arc plutons and implications for the Fuegian Andes tectonic evolution: Mount Kranck Pluton and Jeu-Jepén Monzonite, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Guillot, M.; Prezzi, C.; Acevedo, R. D.; Escayola, M.

    2012-10-01

    A petrologic, geochemical and geophysical study of two Late Cretaceous plutons of the Fuegian Andes is carried out: the Jeu-Jepén Monzonite (JJM) and the Mt. Kranck Pluton (MKP). The plutons show a wide lithological spectrum from ultramafic lithologies (clinopyroxenites and hornblendites), gabbros, diorites to late stage K-feldspar syenite veins. They represent the top of magmatic chambers exposed at or close to the roof level. Mode and chemistry indicate a monzonitic-mildly alkaline trend with high K2O content, equivalent to shoshonitic series. Trace element composition is typical of arc magmas. These features plus their high LILE content (Ba 320-1600 ppm, Sr 475-1560 ppm), high LILE/HFSE ratio (Rb/Zr 0.6-1.6) and age confirm they belong to a rear-arc, monzonitic to mildly alkaline suite (the Fuegian Potassic Magmatism). Therefore, they represent the farthest-from-the-trench plutons in the suite. The petrographical and chemical characteristics of the plutons suggest the lithological spectrum is the result of magmatic differentiation. The process involved crystal accumulation and magma mingling at the early stages, favored either by injections of fresh magma from deeper reservoirs and/or the action of convective currents within the chamber. Country rock assimilation also took part simultaneously with crystallization. The JJM and MKP lie along the trace of a Cenozoic left-lateral strike-slip fault (Magallanes-Fagnano fault system), on opposite blocks. However, lithological, chemical and geophysical subtle differences between these two plutons suggest they evolved in individual magmatic chambers and therefore the distance between them cannot be used as an estimation of total offset along the fault, as was indicated in previous studies.

  6. Petrogenesis of the Barcroft pluton, northern White-Inyo Mountains, east-central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, W. G.

    2013-03-01

    The White-Inyo Range lies within the regional transition from Paleozoic-Precambrian North American continental basement to outboard Mesozoic and younger accreted terranes and a superimposed Andean-type arc. In the central White Mountains, the metaluminous Barcroft granodiorite invaded a major NE-striking, SE-dipping high-angle reverse fault—the Barcroft break. Because it is a relatively isolated igneous body and is well exposed over an elevation range of 1,500-4,000 m, its thermal history and that of the surrounding superjacent section are clearer than those of nearly coeval, crowded plutons emplaced in the hotter Sierra Nevada belt. The Barcroft pluton was emplaced as a compositionally heterogeneous series of areally scattered melt pulses episodically injected over the approximate interval 167-161 Ma. The oldest dated rocks are relatively quartzofeldspathic, whereas the youngest is more ferromagnesian, suggesting progressive partial fusion of a relatively mafic protolith. Heavy rare earth-enriched zircons indicate that Barcroft melts were derived at mid-crustal depths from a previously emplaced metabasaltic protolith containing plagioclase but lacking garnet. Granodioritic magma genesis involved the possible mixing of mafic and felsic melts, as well as very minor assimilation of country rocks, but mainly by fractional fusion and crystallization. Bulk chemical, rare earth, and isotopic data suggest that analyzed Barcroft rocks are members of a single suite. Granodioritic rocks are slightly more magnetite-rich at higher elevations on the NE, nearer the roof of the pluton. Earlier thermobarometry chronicled cooling and re-equilibration of the Barcroft pluton from its margins inward, as well as from mid-crustal generation depths of ~25 km through ascent and stalling at ~10-12 km. Refractory phase assemblages crystallized along the pluton margins, whereas subsolidus minerals in the interior of the of body continued to exchange with upper crustal deuteric and

  7. Magnetic fabrics and their relationship with the emplacement of the Piracaia pluton, SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raposo, M. Irene B.; Pressi, Leonardo Frederico; de Assis Janasi, Valdecir

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic fabric and rock-magnetism studies were performed on the four units of the 578 ± 3-Ma-old Piracaia pluton (NW of São Paulo State, southern Brazil). This intrusion is roughly elliptical (~32 km2), composed of (i) coarse-grained monzodiorite (MZD-c), (ii) fine-grained monzodiorite (MZD-f), which is predominant in the pluton, (iii) monzonite heterogeneous (MZN-het), and (iv) quartz syenite (Qz-Sy). Magnetic fabrics were determined by applying both anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anisotropy of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (AARM). The two fabrics are coaxial. The parallelism between AMS and AARM tensors excludes the presence of a single domain (SD) effect on the AMS fabric of the units. Several rock-magnetism experiments performed in one specimen from each sampled units show that for all of them, the magnetic susceptibility and magnetic fabrics are carried by magnetite grains, which was also observed in the thin sections. Foliations and lineations in the units were successfully determined by applying magnetic methods. Most of the magnetic foliations are steeply dipping or vertical in all units and are roughly parallel to the foliation measured in the field and in the country rocks. In contrast, the magnetic lineations present mostly low plunges for the whole pluton. However, for eight sites, they are steep up to vertical. Thin-section analyses show that rocks from the Piracaia pluton were affected by the regional strain during and after emplacement since magmatic foliation evolves to solid-state fabric in the north of the pluton, indicating that magnetic fabrics in this area of the pluton are related to this strain. Otherwise, the lack of solid-state deformation at outcrop scale and in thin sections precludes deformation in the SW of the pluton. This evidence allows us to interpret the observed magnetic fabrics as primary in origin (magmatic) acquired when the rocks were solidified as a result of magma flow, in which steeply

  8. Plutonism in the central part of the Sierra Nevada Batholith, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bateman, Paul C.

    1992-01-01

    The Sierra Nevada batholith comprises the plutonic rocks of Mesozoic age that underlie most of the Sierra Nevada, a magnificent mountain range that originated in the Cenozoic by the westward tilting of a huge block of the Earth's crust. Scattered intrusions west of the batholith in the western metamorphic belt of the Sierra Nevada and east of the Sierra Nevada in the Benton Range and the White and Inyo Mountains are satellitic to but not strictly parts of the Sierra Nevada batholith. Nevertheless, all the plutonic rocks are related in origin. The batholith lies along the west edge of the Paleozoic North American craton, and Paleozoic and early Mesozoic oceanic crust underlies its western margin. It was emplaced in strongly deformed but weakly metamorphosed strata ranging in age from Proterozoic to Cretaceous. Sedimentary rocks of Proterozoic and Paleozoic age crop out east of the batholith in the White and Inyo Mountains, and metamorphosed sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age crop out west of the batholith in the western metamorphic belt. A few large and many small, generally elongate remnants of metamorphic rocks lie within the batholith. Sparse fossils from metasedimentary rocks and isotopic ages for metavolcanic rocks indicate that the metamorphic rocks in the remnants range in age from Early Cambrian to Early Cretaceous. Within the map area (the Mariposa 1 0 by 2 0 quadrangle), the bedding, cleavage, and axial surfaces of folds generally trend about N. 35 0 W., parallel to the long axis of the Sierra Nevada. The country rocks comprise strongly deformed but generally coherent sequences; however, some units in the western metamorphic belt may partly consist of melanges. Most sequences are in contact with other sequences, at least for short distances, but some sequences within the batholith are bounded on one or more sides by plutonic rocks. Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary strata east of the Sierra Nevada and Paleozoic strata in

  9. X-ray microtomography of hydrochloric acid propagation in carbonate rocks.

    PubMed

    Machado, A C; Oliveira, T J L; Cruz, F B; Lopes, R T; Lima, I

    2015-02-01

    Acid treatments are used in the oil and gas industry, to increase the permeability of the carbonate reservoirs by creating preferential channels, called wormholes. Channels formation is strongly influenced by acid type and injection rate. The aim of this study is to evaluate some characteristics of the microporous system of carbonate rocks, before and after acidizing. For that purpose X-ray high-resolution microtomography was used. The results show that this technique can be used as a reliable method to analyze microstructural characteristics of the wormholes.

  10. The Ajo Mining District, Pima County, Arizona--Evidence for Middle Cenozoic Detachment Faulting, Plutonism, Volcanism, and Hydrothermal Alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Dennis P.; Force, Eric R.; Wilkinson, William H.; More, Syver W.; Rivera, John S.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The Ajo porphyry copper deposit and surrounding Upper Cretaceous rocks have been separated from their plutonic source and rotated by detachment faulting. Overlying middle Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks have been tilted and show evidence for two periods of rotation. Following these rotations, a granitic stock (23.7?0.2 Ma) intruded basement rocks west of the Ajo deposit. This stock was uplifted 2.5 km to expose deep-seated Na-Ca alteration.

  11. Melt segregation evidence from a young pluton, Takidani Granodiorite (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Eva; Caricchi, Luca; Floess, David; Wallis, Simon; Harayama, Satoru; Chiaradia, Massimo; Kouzmanov, Kalin

    2016-04-01

    We are presenting new petrological data from one of the youngest exposed plutons in the world, the Takidani Granodiorite (Japan), which has been suggested as a source for large volume ignimbrites (> 300km3). Takidani Granodiorite (1.54 Ma ± 0.23 Ma) is located within the active Norikura Volcanic Chain in the Northen Japan Alps and has been previously linked to large andesitic (1.76 Ma ± 0.17 Ma) and rhyolitic eruptions (1.75 Ma ± 0.17 Ma). The pluton is vertically zoned and consists of granites (67 to 68 wt.% SiO2) in the lower section, granodiorites (65 to 66 wt.% SiO2) in the middle section, a chemically more evolved fine-grained porphyritic unit (67 to 71 wt.% SiO2) near the roof and a marginal granodiorite at the roof (67 to 68 wt.% SiO2). The porphyritic texture of the more evolved unit near the roof indicates rapid crystallisation, which could be the result of the late intrusion of this unit at the roof of the magmatic system. However, no sharp contact is found between the underlying granodiorite and the porphyritic unit. Instead, a gradual change in rock fabric, whole-rock chemistry and mineralogy is observed suggesting that melt was extracted from the granodiorite. Electron microprobe analyses of plagioclases show three main crystal populations (Type I, II and III) with distinct anorthite and Fe contents. Type I plagioclase (An30‑40) occurs dominantly within the marginal granodiorite at the roof. Type II plagioclase (An40‑45) are common in the granodiorite and porphyritic unit. Type III plagioclase (An45‑50) is predominantly present in the granite. All plagioclase populations share a common sodic rim (An22) across the different units. Takidani Granodiorite rocks are compared to crystallisation experiments from similar magmatic suites. Emplacement conditions of the Takidani Granodiorite are obtained from the latter as well as barometry, thermometry and hygrometry indicating that magmas were ultimately emplaced at around 200 MPa, 850° C to 875° C

  12. Melt segregation evidence from a young pluton, Takidani Granodiorite (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Eva; Caricchi, Luca; Floess, David; Wallis, Simon; Harayama, Satoru; Chiaradia, Massimo; Kouzmanov, Kalin

    2016-04-01

    We are presenting new petrological data from one of the youngest exposed plutons in the world, the Takidani Granodiorite (Japan), which has been suggested as a source for large volume ignimbrites (> 300km3). Takidani Granodiorite (1.54 Ma ± 0.23 Ma) is located within the active Norikura Volcanic Chain in the Northen Japan Alps and has been previously linked to large andesitic (1.76 Ma ± 0.17 Ma) and rhyolitic eruptions (1.75 Ma ± 0.17 Ma). The pluton is vertically zoned and consists of granites (67 to 68 wt.% SiO2) in the lower section, granodiorites (65 to 66 wt.% SiO2) in the middle section, a chemically more evolved fine-grained porphyritic unit (67 to 71 wt.% SiO2) near the roof and a marginal granodiorite at the roof (67 to 68 wt.% SiO2). The porphyritic texture of the more evolved unit near the roof indicates rapid crystallisation, which could be the result of the late intrusion of this unit at the roof of the magmatic system. However, no sharp contact is found between the underlying granodiorite and the porphyritic unit. Instead, a gradual change in rock fabric, whole-rock chemistry and mineralogy is observed suggesting that melt was extracted from the granodiorite. Electron microprobe analyses of plagioclases show three main crystal populations (Type I, II and III) with distinct anorthite and Fe contents. Type I plagioclase (An30-40) occurs dominantly within the marginal granodiorite at the roof. Type II plagioclase (An40-45) are common in the granodiorite and porphyritic unit. Type III plagioclase (An45-50) is predominantly present in the granite. All plagioclase populations share a common sodic rim (An22) across the different units. Takidani Granodiorite rocks are compared to crystallisation experiments from similar magmatic suites. Emplacement conditions of the Takidani Granodiorite are obtained from the latter as well as barometry, thermometry and hygrometry indicating that magmas were ultimately emplaced at around 200 MPa, 850° C to 875° C and

  13. Revisiting the Baja-British Columbia hypothesis: Argon-argon geochronology and paleomagnetism of the Ecstall, Butedale, and Smith Island plutons, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownlee, Sarah Jo

    The controversy concerning terrane displacements in western British Columbia, otherwise known as the Baja-BC hypothesis, is revisited using paleomagnetism, rock magnetism, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and thermal modeling. We studied three plutons in northwest British Columbia, the Ecstall, Butedale, and Smith Island plutons. The Ecstall pluton is the focus of this research as it has been the subject of considerable debate over the cause of systematic variations in paleomagnetic direction across the ˜25 km wide pluton. Hollister et al. (2004) proposed that magnetization carried by lamellar magnetism in ilmenite-hematite was variably reset during reheating by emplacement of the younger Quottoon plutonic complex on the eastern margin of the Ecstall pluton, thus causing the systematic variations in paleomagnetic direction. To test this hypothesis we conducted a number of studies on samples from the Ecstall pluton. First, a detailed mineralogic study using scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy found evidence of microstructural and mineralogic changes to the magnetic oxides of the Ecstall pluton as a function of distance from the Quottoon plutonic complex. Second, rock magnetic experiments on single crystals of Fe-Ti oxides confirm changes to the magnetic properties of single crystals that are related to both microstructure and distance from the Quottoon plutonic complex. Third, spatial trends in 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages from hornblende and biotite were found to be consistent with reheating by the Quottoon plutonic complex. In addition to reheating by the Quottoon plutonic complex, thermal modeling suggests that spatial trends in 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages are most consistent with a thermal history that also includes northeast side up tilt of the Ecstall. The Smith Island and Butedale plutons do not show evidence for tilting in their 40Ar/39Ar cooling age trends, and paleomagnetic directions from these plutons are approximately concordant with the

  14. Origin of adakite-like plutons in southern Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jeong-Im; Choi, Sung Hi; Yi, Keewook

    2016-10-01

    We present Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions for two adakite-like intrusions in southern Korea (Jindong and Bongnae), including major and trace element concentrations, and the sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon U-Pb age. Our aim is to constrain the origin and tectonomagmatic processes that gave rise to the plutons. A SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age of 88.7 ± 0.7 Ma was obtained from a Jindong granodiorite sample. The Jindong plutons belong to the medium-K calc-alkaline series, and have an overall enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE), such as K, Rb, Ba, and Pb, and a relative depletion in high field strength elements, such as Nb, Ta, and Ti, compared with the neighboring elements in the primitive mantle-normalized multi-trace element variation diagram. It was found that (87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.70475-0.70596, (143Nd/144Nd)i = 0.512547-0.512604, [(εNd)i = + 0.4 to 2.2], and (206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.19-18.37, which fall within the field of the arc-type Cretaceous to Tertiary Bulguksa intrusive rocks in the Sr-Nd and Pb-Pb isotopic correlation diagrams. The elevated Sr/Y (17-40), but low La/Yb (3.7-8.8) ratios of the Jindong plutons, together with their coherent geochemical trends and U-shaped rare earth element (REE) patterns, indicate that they were not formed by slab melting, but by amphibole-dominated fractional crystallization of the Bulguksa-like arc magma. A SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age of 226.5 ± 2.5 Ma was obtained from a Bongnae tonalite sample. The Bongnae plutons belong to the shoshonitic series. Their trace element patterns resemble the Jindong samples, but are characterized by significantly negative U anomalies in mafic rocks. They also have elevated MgO, Ni, Co, Cr, Rb, Ba, Sr, and low Al2O3 and Na2O contents at a given SiO2 concentration compared with the Jindong plutons, and are typified by highly radiogenic Sr and unradiogenic Nd and Pb isotopic compositions: [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.71096-0.71290, (143Nd/144Nd)i = 0.511641-0.511681, (εNd)i = - 13

  15. Constraints on the depth of generation and emplacement of a magmatic epidote-bearing quartz diorite pluton in the Coast Plutonic Complex, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, J.M.; Andronicos, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Petrology and P-T estimates indicate that a magmatic epidote-bearing quartz diorite pluton from Mt. Gamsby, Coast Plutonic Complex, British Columbia, was sourced at pressures below ???1.4 GPa and cooled nearly isobarically at ???0.9 GPa. The P-T path indicates that the magma was within the stability field of magmatic epidote early and remained there upon final crystallization. The pluton formed and crystallized at depths greater than ???30 km. REE data indicate that garnet was absent in the melting region and did not fractionate during crystallization. This suggests that the crust was less than or equal to ???55 km thick at 188 Ma during the early phases of magmatism in the Coast Plutonic Complex. Late Cretaceous contractional deformation and early Tertiary extension exhumed the rocks to upper crustal levels. Textures of magmatic epidote and other magmatic phases, combined with REE data, can be important for constraining the P-T path followed by magmas. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Tectonic rotations and internal structure of Eocene plutons in Chuquicamata, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somoza, R.; Tomlinson, A. J.; Zaffarana, C. B.; Singer, S. E.; Puigdomenech Negre, C. G.; Raposo, M. I. B.; Dilles, J. H.

    2015-07-01

    A paleomagnetic and AMS study on Eocene plutonic complexes in the Calama area, northern Chile, reveals high-temperature, high-coercivity magnetizations of dominantly thermoremanent origin and magnetic fabrics controlled by magnetite. The paleomagnetic results indicate that ~ 43 Ma plutons underwent clockwise tectonic rotation, whereas adjacent ~ 39 Ma plutons did not undergo discernible rotation. This points to a middle Eocene age for the younger tectonic rotations associated with the Central Andean Rotation Pattern in the Chuquicamata-Calama area. The petrofabric in these rocks formed under conditions ranging from purely magmatic (i.e. before full crystallization) to low-temperature solid-state deformation. AMS and paleomagnetism suggest that the plutonic bodies were formed by progressive amalgamation of subvertical magma sheets spanning multiple magnetic polarity chrons. The parallelism between magmatic and tectonic foliations suggests that regional tectonic stress controlled ascent, emplacement and rock deformation during cooling. In this context, we suggest that magma ascent and emplacement in the upper crust likely exploited Mesozoic structures which were locally reactivated in the Eocene.

  17. Numerical modeling of forceful pluton emplacement and associated deformation at different crustal levels - instantaneous, continuous or episodic intrusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Nabelek, P. I.

    2015-12-01

    The Papoose Flat pluton in the White-Inyo Range, California, is one of the best examples of forceful magma emplacement at mid-crustal levels that is revealed by a highly strained aureole. A thermo-rheological 2-D model of the pluton and its aureole is proposed. We explored how the frequency of magma input, from instantaneous to continuous to the bottom of the laccolith, affects the ductile width of the aureole and the crystallinity of the pluton, which has implications for eruption of magma. We modeled these aspects at mid- and upper-crustal levels. The pluton was assumed to be 5 km thick in the middle and 13 km wide. Except for instantaneous growth, pluton was assumed to grow over 5 m.y. The aureole was assumed to have power-law rheology of quartz with dependence on H2O fugacity, which was calculated using the CORK equation (Holland & Powell, 1991) Our result shows that the bottom of the Papoose Flat pluton was emplaced at the brittle-ductile transition zone of the crust. The crustal rheology profile assisted the softening of rocks around the pluton. The simulated temperature and strength profiles confirm that ductile deformation was related to thermal weakening (Saint-Blanquat et al., 2001). Results of incremental growth calculations show that the pluton remains hot and only partially crystalline for millions of years when it grows by frequent input of small batches of liquid. At the mid-crustal level, the ductile region around the pluton is much wider and exists longer than at the shallow crustal level. Brittle rheology is dominant during the late stage growth at the shallow depth. When the pluton grows instantly or by only few episodes of large batches of input, the mobile part of the pluton is thin and the ductile aureole is narrower. High-frequency incremental growth by smaller magma batches produces a large volume of mobile magma that has the potential to induce internal magmatic layering that may be reflected in aligned acquired magnetic susceptibility (AMS

  18. Fifteen new discriminant-function-based multi-dimensional robust diagrams for acid rocks and their application to Precambrian rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.; Pandarinath, Kailasa; Verma, Sanjeet K.; Agrawal, Salil

    2013-05-01

    For the discrimination of four tectonic settings of island arc, continental arc, within-plate (continental rift and ocean island together), and collision, we present three sets of new diagrams obtained from linear discriminant analysis of natural logarithm transformed ratios of major elements, immobile major and trace elements, and immobile trace elements in acid magmas. The use of discordant outlier-free samples prior to linear discriminant analysis had improved the success rates by about 3% on the average. Success rates of these new diagrams were acceptably high (about 69% to 97% for the first set, about 69% to 99% for the second set, and about 60% to 96% for the third set). Testing of these diagrams for acid rock samples (not used for constructing them) from known tectonic settings confirmed their overall good performance. Application of these new diagrams to Precambrian case studies provided the following generally consistent results: a continental arc setting for the Caribou greenstone belt (Canada) at about 3000 Ma, São Francisco craton (Brazil) at about 3085-2983 Ma, Penakacherla greenstone terrane (Dharwar craton, India) at about 2700 Ma, and Adola (Ethiopia) at about 885-765 Ma; a transitional continental arc to collision setting for the Rio Maria terrane (Brazil) at about 2870 Ma and Eastern felsic volcanic terrain (India) at about 2700 Ma; a collision setting for the Kolar suture zone (India) at about 2610 Ma and Korpo area (Finland) at about 1852 Ma; and a within-plate (likely a continental rift) setting for Malani igneous suite (India) at about 745-700 Ma. These applications suggest utility of the new discrimination diagrams for all four tectonic settings. In fact, all three sets of diagrams were shown to be robust against post-emplacement compositional changes caused by analytical errors, element mobility related to low or high temperature alteration, or Fe-oxidation caused by weathering.

  19. Thermal evolution of plutons: a parameterized approach.

    PubMed

    Spera, F

    1980-01-18

    A conservation-of-energy equation has been derived for the spatially averaged magma temperature in a spherical pluton undergoing simultaneous crystallization and both internal (magma) and external (hydrothermal fluid) thermal convection. The model accounts for the dependence of magma viscosity on crystallinity, temperature, and bulk composition; it includes latent heat effects and the effects of different initial water concentrations in the melt and quantitatively considers the role that large volumes of circulatory hydrothermal fluids play in dissipating heat. The nonlinear ordinary differential equation describing these processes has been solved for a variety of magma compositions, initial termperatures, initial crystallinities, volume ratios of hydrothermal fluid to magma, and pluton sizes. These calculations are graphically summarized in plots of the average magma temperature versus time after emplacement. Solidification times, defined as the time necessary for magma to cool from the initial emplacement temperature to the solidus temperature vary as R(1,3), where R is the pluton radius. The solidification time of a pluton with a radius of 1 kilometer is 5 x 10(4) years; for an otherwise identical pluton with a radius of 10 kilometers, the solidification time is approximately 10(6) years. The water content has a marked effect on the solidification time. A granodiorite pluton with a radius of 5 kilometers and either 0.5 or 4 percent (by weight) water cools in 3.3 x 10(5) or 5 x 10(4) years, respectively. Convection solidification times are usually but not always less than conduction cooling times.

  20. River Valley pluton, Ontario - A late-Archean/early-Proterozoic anorthositic intrusion in the Grenville Province

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, Lewis D.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic data indicating a late-Archean/early-Proterozoic age for the River Valley anorthositic pluton of the southwestern Grenville Province of Sudbury, Ontario. Pb-Pb isotopic data on 10 whole-rock samples ranging in composition from anorthosite to gabbro yield an age of 2560 + or - 155 Ma. The River Valley pluton is thus the oldest anorthositic intrusive yet recognized within the Grenville Province. The Sm-Nd isotopic system records an age of 2377 + or - 68 Ma. High Pb-208/Pb-204 of deformed samples relative to igneous-textured rocks implies Th introduction and/or U loss during metamorphism in the River Valley area. Rb-Sr data from igneous-textured and deformed samples and from mineral separates give an age of 2185 + or - 105 Ma, indicating substantial disturbance of the Rb-Sr isotopic system.

  1. Source variation for Mesozoic granitoid plutons in the White-Inyo Range, California, and implications for changes in the lithospheric structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammel, E.; Nabelek, P. I.; Phillips, E. H. W.; Scott, S. R.; Sims, K. W. W.

    2015-12-01

    shallower lithospheric material, or (2) two source materials are present at all times with varying degrees of mixing; older plutons represent a greater degree of mixing whereas younger plutons are primarily unmixed. Whole rock isotopic data and amphibole, pyroxene, feldspar compositional data will be used to explore these hypotheses.

  2. Rho Kinase ROCK2 Mediates Acid-Induced NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S Expression in Human Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of the progression from Barrett’s esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. We have shown that NOX5-S may be involved in this progression. However, how acid upregulates NOX5-S is not well known. We found that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression was significantly decreased by the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 in BE mucosal biopsies and FLO-1 EA cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased the Rho kinase activity in FLO-1 cells. The acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production was significantly decreased by knockdown of Rho kinase ROCK2, but not by knockdown of ROCK1. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active ROCK2, but not the constitutively active ROCK1, significantly enhanced the NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production. Moreover, the acid-induced increase in Rho kinase activity and in NOX5-S mRNA expression was blocked by the removal of calcium in both FLO-1 and OE33 cells. The calcium ionophore A23187 significantly increased the Rho kinase activity and NOX5-S mRNA expression. We conclude that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production may depend on the activation of ROCK2, but not ROCK1, in EA cells. The acid-induced activation of Rho kinase may be mediated by the intracellular calcium increase. It is possible that persistent acid reflux present in BE patients may increase the intracellular calcium, activate ROCK2 and thereby upregulate NOX5-S. High levels of reactive oxygen species derived from NOX5-S may cause DNA damage and thereby contribute to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:26901778

  3. Magmatic and metamorphic belts and plutonic-metamorphic complexes of southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Brew, D.A.; Himmelberg, G.R.; Ford, A.B.; Loney, R.A. . Branch of Alaskan Geology Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Cordilleran orogen in southeastern Alaska includes 24 distinct magmatic belts, ranging in age from Cambrian to Holocene, that are defined by map relations, lithology, age, and chemical composition. The youngest magmatic features are Quaternary-age pre- and post-glacial volcanic rocks that occur in three major fields in the region, as well as in isolated locations. Cenozoic magmatic features consist of four major and three minor belts. The major Tkope-Portland Peninsula belt of Oligocene age includes both volcanic and plutonic rocks. The major calcalkalic Coast Mountains belt of early and middle Eocene age is the single largest magmatic feature of the region. Early Tertiary and latest Cretaceous magmatism is represented by the major calcalkalic great tonalite sill belt, a remarkable long and narrow feature along the west side of the Coast Mountains. Cretaceous and Jurassic intrusive rocks occur in five major belts and two minor belts in the region and Paleozoic intrusive rocks occur in four major and two minor belts. The three major plutonic-metamorphic complexes (PMC), from east to west, are: the Coast PMC in the Coast Mountains; the Glacier Bay-Chichag of plutonic complex (Chugach MC) in the northern outer islands. The Coast PMC records dynamothermal and regional contact metamorphic events related to regional plutonism within several juxtaposed terranes; its lengthy and complicated history is related to the Late Cretaceous collision of the Alexander and Wrangellia terranes and the Gravina overlap assemblage to the west against the Yukon prong and Stikine terrane to the east. The relatively simple Glacier Bay PC history is recorded as the roots of a Late Jurassic through late Early Cretaceous island arc that probably developed during the early stages of the above tectonic event. The complicated Chugach MC history developed during and after the Late Cretaceous collision of the Chugach terrane with the Wrangellia and Alexander terranes.

  4. River Valley pluton, Ontario: A late-Archean/early-Proterozoic anorthositic intrusion in the Grenville Province

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwal, L.D. ); Wooden, J.L. )

    1989-03-01

    The River Valley pluton is a ca. 100 km{sup 2} body of anorthositic and gabbroic rocks located about 50 km northeast of Sudbury, Ontario. The pluton is situated entirely within the Grenville Province, but its western margin is a series of imbricate thrust faults associated with the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone. It is dominated by coarse leuconorite and leucogabbro, with lesser anorthosite, gabbro, and rare ultramafics. Igneous textured rocks are abundant and consist of plagioclase (An{sub 60-70}) charged with Fe-Ti oxide inclusions, low Ca pyroxene (orthopyroxene and/or inverted pigeonite) and augite. The most unfractionated rocks are minor olivine gabbros with Fo{sub 70-80}. A variety of deformed and recrystallized equivalents of the igneous-textured rocks is also present, and these are composed largely of calcic plagioclase and hornblende. An Sm-Nd isochron from 3 igneous-textured leucogabbros and an augite mineral separate gives 2,377 {plus minus} 68 Ma, implying slight disturbance of the Sm-Nd whole-rock-mineral system during later metamorphism. The Rb-Sr system has been substantially disturbed, giving an age of 2,185 {plus minus} 105 Ma, which is similar to internal Pb-Pb isochron ages of 2,165 {plus minus} 130 Ma and 2,100 {plus minus} 35 Ma for two igneous-textured rocks. Initial isotopic ratios for the River Valley pluton correspond to single-stage model parameters of {mu} = 8.06, {epsilon}{sub Nd} = O to {minus}3, and I{sub Sr} = 0.7015 to 0.7021. Collectively, these suggest either an enriched mantle source or crustal contamination of a mantle-derived magma. The crustal component involved must have been older and more radiogenic than the majority of rocks exposed at the surface in the nearby Superior Province.

  5. Asymmetric textural and structural patterns of a granitic body emplaced at shallow levels: The La Chinchilla pluton, northwestern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchioli Grande, M.; Alasino, P. H.; Rocher, S.; Larrovere, M. A.; Dahlquist, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    New mapping and a detailed structural study of the La Chinchilla stock, Sierra de Velasco, NW Argentina, suggest an asymmetrical shape of the pluton and provide strong evidence for its shallow emplacement depth. The pluton is a Lower Carboniferous monzogranite composed of K-feldspar, quartz, plagioclase and biotite. It exhibits an internal asymmetric textural zoning, defined by porphyritic granite in the southeastern region to equigranular granite in the northwestern region. The presence of subhorizontal dikes in the northwestern area, where the contacts dip shallowly, and subvertical dikes intruding the host rock nearby steep-dipping intrusive contacts in the southeastern region are compatible with an overall asymmetrical shape and internal structure of this pluton. Considering published crystallization ages, a dominant strain field occurring at around 12 Ma is inferred based on magmatic fabrics in the pluton and its host rock (the Huaco pluton), with a principal shortening direction oriented SW-NE, consistent with the general NW-SE strike of the body. Field evidence supports brittle fracturing and block displacement as the dominant emplacement mechanism, suggesting that magmatic stoping dominated during the late stage of the evolution of the magma chamber.

  6. The Shir-Kuh pluton (Central Iran): Magnetic fabric evidences for the coalescence of magma batches during emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheibi, M.; Bouchez, J. L.; Esmaeily, D.; Siqueira, R.

    2012-03-01

    The ˜136 Ma, NW-SE elongate Shir-Kuh pluton is one of the most poorly understood geological feature of Central Iran. It is composed of peraluminous rocks, corresponding to ilmenite-bearing S-type granites compositionally ranging from granodiorites to leucogranites. These rocks show a continuum in their chemistry attributed to progressive differentiation. This allows using the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility technique to tempt establishing the relative chronology between emplacements of magma batches in the pluton. The rather low susceptibility magnitudes (Km < 400 μSI) depict a dominant paramagnetic behavior of the pluton. The magnetic fabrics data (magnetic lineation and foliation maps, K, P and T parameters), complemented by field and microstructural observations, reveal that two feeder zones at least, as characterized by areas having steep lineations ascribed to magma flow likely issued from the base of the brittle crust, served as conduits for the magmas. The early Cretaceous age of the pluton, the orientations of the feeding zones, the overall lineation directions throughout the pluton, as well as the S-type nature of the magmas call for a dextral transpressive regime which might have been active in the back-arc region located above the subducting eastern branch of the Neo-Tethys.

  7. The Granite Aqueduct and Advection of Water and Heat Through Plutonic Terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazner, A. F.; Bartley, J. M.; Law, B.; Coleman, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    Although water plays a critical role in the genesis and movement of magma, it is largely lost from rocks upon crystallization. Observation of active volcanoes, analysis of magmatic inclusions, and experimental petrology indicate that intermediate magmas in subduction zones are water-rich, containing 5 wt% or more H2O. Carmichael (2002) wrote of the "andesite aqueduct" that conveys copious amounts of water from magma source regions in subduction zones to the surface and atmosphere. We suggest that this water plays a significant role in the thermal and textural history of the plutonic rocks through which it passes. A dacite magma with 5 wt% H2O crystallizes to granodiorite with ~0.5 wt% H2O, releasing >100 kg of H2O per m3. Field and geochronological data indicate that many sheet-like plutons are constructed from the top down, typically over 1 m.y. or more, likely bathing earlier pulses in ascending water released from later pulses. For a 5 km thick pluton, this release amounts to a condensed-water equivalent depth of ~500 m per unit of horizontal area, a truly vast amount. Plutons preserve abundant evidence for late-stage fluid transfer via a "granite aqueduct." For example, the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite of California is cut by myriad hydrothermally altered pipes that are typically found within or near aplite-pegmatite dikes (Mustart & Horrigan, 2000). The pipes attest to focused fluid flow, and the dikes themselves are the crystallized remnants of late-stage magmatic liquids. Upward advection of heat through dikes and pipes transfers thermal energy from newly crystallizing magma increments to older ones above much more efficiently and rapidly than thermal conduction, and could account for the widespread and profound recrystallization that produces the large grain size and low-temperature mineral assemblages of many granitic rocks. Although the concept that plutons represent the frozen record of huge, highly liquid magma chambers is losing favor, some recent studies

  8. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-20

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology. PMID:22012395

  9. Aerobic bacterial pyrite oxidation and acid rock drainage during the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Lalonde, Stefan V; Planavsky, Noah J; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lyons, Timothy W; Mojzsis, Stephen J; Rouxel, Olivier J; Barley, Mark E; Rosìere, Carlos; Fralick, Phillip W; Kump, Lee R; Bekker, Andrey

    2011-10-19

    The enrichment of redox-sensitive trace metals in ancient marine sedimentary rocks has been used to determine the timing of the oxidation of the Earth's land surface. Chromium (Cr) is among the emerging proxies for tracking the effects of atmospheric oxygenation on continental weathering; this is because its supply to the oceans is dominated by terrestrial processes that can be recorded in the Cr isotope composition of Precambrian iron formations. However, the factors controlling past and present seawater Cr isotope composition are poorly understood. Here we provide an independent and complementary record of marine Cr supply, in the form of Cr concentrations and authigenic enrichment in iron-rich sedimentary rocks. Our data suggest that Cr was largely immobile on land until around 2.48 Gyr ago, but within the 160 Myr that followed--and synchronous with independent evidence for oxygenation associated with the Great Oxidation Event (see, for example, refs 4-6)--marked excursions in Cr content and Cr/Ti ratios indicate that Cr was solubilized at a scale unrivalled in history. As Cr isotope fractionations at that time were muted, Cr must have been mobilized predominantly in reduced, Cr(III), form. We demonstrate that only the oxidation of an abundant and previously stable crustal pyrite reservoir by aerobic-respiring, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria could have generated the degree of acidity required to solubilize Cr(III) from ultramafic source rocks and residual soils. This profound shift in weathering regimes beginning at 2.48 Gyr ago constitutes the earliest known geochemical evidence for acidophilic aerobes and the resulting acid rock drainage, and accounts for independent evidence of an increased supply of dissolved sulphate and sulphide-hosted trace elements to the oceans around that time. Our model adds to amassing evidence that the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary was marked by a substantial shift in terrestrial geochemistry and biology.

  10. Tracking the waning stages of caldera magmatism using exposed subcaldera plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerer, M. J.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2012-12-01

    The emplacement and thermal histories of exposed plutons at three caldera systems were investigated to understand the time scales of postcaldera magmatism and assembly patterns of subcaldera batholiths. Rio Grande rifting has exposed silicic intrusions at the Mt. Aetna caldera (central CO), the Questa caldera (northern NM), and the Organ caldera (southern NM). At all three caldera systems, significant volumes of magma were intruded into the upper crust following caldera collapse. U/Pb ages established the emplacement history of the exposed intrusions. Ar/Ar dating and multiple diffusion domain (MDD) thermal modeling of plutonic K-feldspar determined cooling histories and detected reheating events by the emplacement of nonexposed intrusions. U/Pb and Ar/Ar ages indicate protracted magmatism following caldera-forming ignimbrite eruptions. The Mt. Aetna caldera erupted the Badger Creek Tuff at 34.3 Ma. Emplacement of post-Badger Creek Tuff luecogranites at 31 Ma caused reheating of adjacent rocks. MDD thermal modeling of postcaldera plutons indicates numerous reheating events between 27 and 30 Ma. The youngest reheating event occurred at 22 Ma. At the Questa caldera at least nine plutons were emplaced following the eruption of the 25.4 Ma Amalia Tuff. Ages of exposed plutons range from 25.4 to 19.3 Ma. MDD thermal modeling indicates a reheating event at 16.6 Ma, which corresponds to the emplacement of numerous small volume dikes in the southern portion of the field. The Organ caldera formed during the eruption of the 36.0 Ma Squaw Mountain Tuff. Few postcaldera plutons are exposed. The youngest postcaldera pluton was emplaced at 34.3 Ma. However, MDD thermal modeling indicates reheating events between 30 and 32 Ma and as young as 26 Ma. U/Pb and Ar/Ar ages provide useful information for understanding the assembly patterns of postcaldera magmas. The oldest intrusions are located at the top of the intrusive suite, indicating that these suites were assembled from the top

  11. Thermochronology of the Cornubian batholith in southwest England: Implications for pluton emplacement and protracted hydrothermal mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesley, J.T.; Halliday, A.N.; Snee, L.W.; Mezger, K.; Shepherd, T.J.; Scrivener, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    The metalliferous ore deposits of southwest England are associated with biotite-muscovite granites that intruded upper Paleozoic sediments and volcanic rocks at the end of the Hercynian Orogeny. The hydrothermal mineralization can be subdivided into four stages: 1. (1) exoskarns 2. (2) high-temperature tin and tungsten oxide-bearing sheeted greisen bordered veins and Sn-bearing tourmaline veins and breccias 3. (3) polymetallic quartz-tourmaline-chlorite-sulfide-fluorite-bearing fissure veins, which represent the main episode of economic mineralization 4. (4) late-stage, low-temperature polymetallic fluorite veins. U-Pb dating of monazite and xenotime and 40Ar 39Ar dating of muscovite were used to determine emplacement ages and cooling times for individual plutons within the Cornubian batholith, as well as separate intrusive phases within the plutons. In addition, 40Ar 39Ar ages from hornblende and secondary muscovite and Sm-Nd isochron ages from fluorite were employed to determine the relationship between pluton emplacement and different stages of mineralization. The U-Pb ages indicate that granite magmatism was protracted from ~300 Ma down to ~275 Ma with no evidence of a major hiatus. There is no systematic relation between the age of a pluton and its location within the batholith. The U-Pb ages for separate granite phases within a single pluton are resolvable and indicate that magma emplacement within individual plutons occurred over periods of as much as 4.5 myrs. Felsic porphyry dike emplacement was coeval with plutonism, but continued to ~270 Ma. The geochronologic data suggest that the Cornubian batholith originated from repeated melting events over 30 myrs and was formed by a series of small coalescing granitic bodies. Cooling rates of the main plutons are unrelated to emplacement age, but decrease from the southwest to the northeast from ~210??C myr-1 to ~60??C myr-1 with a mean of 100??C myr-1. These slow cooling rates appear to reflect the addition of

  12. Post-plutonic unroofing and morphogenesis of the Attic Cycladic complex (Aegea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejl, E.; Riedl, H.; Weingartner, H.

    2002-05-01

    The Attic-Cycladic complex of Greece comprises an Eocene high-P unit with blueschist occurrences. Unroofing of this unit took place in Oligocene-Miocene times and was accompanied by a regional low-P medium-T overprint and Miocene granitic plutonism. Apatite fission-track ages of 14 "crystalline" samples from the islands of Tinos, Mikonos and Serifos range between 13.1 and 5.3 Ma, corresponding to the middle and late Miocene. The frequency distributions of confined track lengths are characterised by high arithmetic means of 14.2-15.1 μm and by standard deviations from 0.9 to 1.6 μm. Thermochronological modelling of the data indicates rapid cooling between 10 and 6 Ma and subsequent deceleration of the cooling rates. For a short time, the Miocene plutons of Tinos, Mikonos and Serifos experienced maximum cooling rates above 50 °C/Ma. These exceptionally high cooling rates cannot be explained by strong vertical uplift and fast regional erosion. Such a process is disproved by preserved remnants of a former peneplain, including inselbergs and kaolinized tropical subsoil. On Mikonos, fast post-plutonic cooling of the lower plate was apparently accompanied by simultaneous sedimentation on the upper plate. We propose a post-plutonic cooling model which assumes strong periplutonic heat flow into much cooler host rocks and fast extensional unroofing.

  13. On the neutralization of acid rock drainage by carbonate and silicate minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, E. J.; Lawrence, R. W.; Poulin, R.

    1995-02-01

    The net result of acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions within mining wastes is termed acid rock drainage (ARD). The oxidation of sulfide minerals is the major contributor to acid generation. Dissolution and alteration of various minerals can contribute to the neutralization of acid. Definitions of alkalinity, acidity, and buffer capacity are reviewed, and a detailed discussion of the dissolution and neutralizing capacity of carbonate and silicate minerals related to equilibium conditions, dissolution mechanism, and kinetics is provided. Factors that determine neutralization rate by carbonate and silicate minerals include: pH, PCO 2, equilibrium conditions, temperature, mineral composition and structure, redox conditions, and the presence of “foreign” ions. Similar factors affect sulfide oxidation. Comparison of rates shows sulfides react fastest, followed by carbonates and silicates. The differences in the reaction mechanisms and kinetics of neutralization have important implications in the prediction, control, and regulation of ARD. Current static and kinetic prediction methods upon which mine permitting, ARD control, and mine closure plans are based do not consider sample mineralogy or the kinetics of the acid-generating and-neutralizing reactions. Erroneous test interpretations and predictions can result. The importance of considering mineralogy for site-specific interpretation is highlighted. Uncertainty in prediction leads to difficulties for the mine operator in developing satisfactory and cost-effective control and remediation measures. Thus, the application of regulations and guidelines for waste management planning need to beflexible.

  14. A paleomagnetic and stable isotope study of the pluton at Rio Hondo near Questa, New Mexico: implications for CRM related to hydrothermal alteration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Johnson, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data combined with stable isotope data from the middle Tertiary pluton along the Rio Hondo in northern New Mexico suggest that its magnetic remanence has both thermal (TRM) and high-temperature chemical (CRM) components. Oxygen isotope temperatures indicate that magnetite associated with the more rapidly cooled higher levels of the pluton, and with mafic inclusions and cogenetic rhyolitic dikes sampled at lower levels of exposure, ceased subsolidus recrystallization and isotopic exchange above its Curie temperature (580??C) in the presence of a magmatic fluid. Continued cooling imparted a TRM to these portions of the pluton. The more slowly cooled granodiorite at lower levels has quartz-magnetite isotopic temperatures that are below the Curie temperature of magnetite implying that its magnetization is high-temperature CRM. Sub-Curie isotopic temperatures for other granitic plutons in the western U.S.A. suggest that CRM may be commonly derived from subsolidus interactions between magnetite and magmatic fluids in plutonic rocks. A meteoric-hydrothermal system generated by the cooling Rio Hondo pluton, and not by younger adjacent intrusions, resulted in limited alteration along zones of high permeability near the southern margin of the Rio Hondo pluton, and in more prevasive alteration of the pluton to the north. The meteoric-hydrothermal alteration occurred at relatively high temperatures (> 350??C) and, with the exception of local chloritization, caused little visible alteration of the rocks. The isotopic ratios indicate that little of the magnetite could have grown from or exchanged with a meteoric-hydrothermal fluid. ?? 1986.

  15. Thondhjemite of the Talkeetna Mountains: An unusually large low-K pluton in Alaska's Peninsular terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, A.B.; Arth, J.G.; Csejtey, B. )

    1993-04-01

    An unusually large, elongate Jurassic pluton of trondhjemite, about 120- by 10--15 km in dimensions, intruded Jurassic plutonic and metamorphic rocks of the Peninsular terrane in the central Talkeetna Mountains of south-central Alaska. Muscovite and biotite yield minimum ages of 150--145 Ma. The N40[degree]E-trending body is concordant with regional structures. It is the youngest member of a subduction-related Jurassic plutonic suite in the Peninsular terrane that, along with Wrangellia, was accreted to the North American continent in the middle Cretaceous. Rocks, commonly sheared, are medium to coarse grained and leucocratic (CI = 3--9). Biotite is the chief mafic mineral. Minor muscovite and garnet are common and green hornblende rare. Samples (n = 27) from the body's entire length have an average Mg[number sign] of 45 and an SiO[sub 2] continuum of 67--74% (avg. 70.7%). High Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] (14.4--17.9%, avg. 16.5%) is typical of continental trondhjemite. Averages for Zr (109 ppm) and Nb (3.5 ppm) and the ratios K/Rb (491) and Zr/Nb (34) are typical of orogenic igneous rocks of subduction origin. Four samples analyzed have low ([sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr)[sub i] (avg. 0.7036). Very low Rb/Sr (avg. 0.027) is similar to Idaho batholith trondhjemites. REE patterns with low to moderate LREE and HREE with flat patterns and low contents suggest residual garnet or hornblende during partial melting or fractionation. The pluton appears homogeneous in outcrop. However, some geographic variations in chemistry, as in SiO[sub 2] contents and especially in Eu/Eu[sup *], suggest existence of perhaps three regionally separate plumbing systems, or chambers in which different processes such as plagioclase accumulation or hornblende fractionation were active.

  16. Applicability Comparison of Methods for Acid Generation Assessment of Rock Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chamteut; Ji, Sangwoo; Yim, Giljae; Cheong, Youngwook

    2014-05-01

    Minerals including various forms of sulfur could generate AMD (Acid Mine Drainage) or ARD (Acid Rock Drainage), which can have serious effects on the ecosystem and even on human when exposed to air and/or water. To minimize the hazards by acid drainage, it is necessary to assess in advance the acid generation possibility of rocks and estimate the amount of acid generation. Because of its relatively simple and effective experiment procedure, the method of combining the results of ABA (Acid Base Accounting) and NAG (Net Acid Generation) tests have been commonly used in determining acid drainage conditions. The simplicity and effectiveness of the above method however, are derived from massive assumptions of simplified chemical reactions and this often leads to results of classifying the samples as UC (Uncertain) which would then require additional experimental or field data to reclassify them properly. This paper therefore, attempts to find the reasons that cause samples to be classified as UC and suggest new series of experiments where samples can be reclassified appropriately. Study precedents on evaluating potential acid generation and neutralization capacity were reviewed and as a result three individual experiments were selected in the light of applicability and compatibility of minimizing unnecessary influence among other experiments. The proposed experiments include sulfur speciation, ABCC (Acid Buffering Characteristic Curve), and Modified NAG which are all improved versions of existing experiments of Total S, ANC (Acid Neutralizing Capacity), and NAG respectively. To assure the applicability of the experiments, 36 samples from 19 sites with diverse geologies, field properties, and weathering conditions were collected. The samples were then subject to existing experiments and as a result, 14 samples which either were classified as UC or could be used as a comparison group had been selected. Afterwards, the selected samples were used to conduct the suggested

  17. Chemical stability of acid rock drainage treatment sludge and implications for sludge management

    SciTech Connect

    Danny M. McDonald; John A. Webb; Jeff Taylor

    2006-03-15

    To assess the chemical stability of sludges generated by neutralizing acid rock drainage (ARD) with alkaline reagents, synthetic ARD was treated with hydrated lime (batch and high-density sludge process), limestone, and two proprietary reagents (KB-1 and Bauxsol). The amorphous metal hydroxide sludge produced was leached using deionized water, U.S. EPA methods (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure), and the new strong acid leach test (SALT), which leaches the sludge with a series of sulfuric acid extractant solutions; the pH decreases by {approximately} 1 pH unit with each test, until the final pH is {approximately}2. Sludges precipitated by all reagents had very similar leachabilities except for KB-1 and Bauxsol, which released more aluminum. SALT showed that lowering the pH of the leaching solution mobilized more metals from the sludges. Iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc began to leach at pH 2.5-3, {approximately}4.5, {approximately}5.5, and 6-6.5, respectively. The leachability of ARD treatment sludges is determined by the final pH of the leachate. A higher neutralization potential (e.g., a greater content of unreacted neutralizing agent) makes sludges inherently more chemically stable. Thus, when ARD or any acidic metalliferous wastewater is treated, a choice must be made between efficient reagent use and resistance to acid attack. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Chemical stability of acid rock drainage treatment sludge and implications for sludge management.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Danny M; Webb, John A; Taylor, Jeff

    2006-03-15

    To assess the chemical stability of sludges generated by neutralizing acid rock drainage (ARD) with alkaline reagents, synthetic ARD was treated with hydrated lime (batch and high-density sludge process), limestone, and two proprietary reagents (KB-1 and Bauxsol). The amorphous metal hydroxide sludge produced was leached using deionized water, U.S. EPA methods (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure), and the new strong acid leach test (SALT), which leaches the sludge with a series of sulfuric acid extractant solutions; the pH decreases by approximately 1 pH unit with each test, until the final pH is approximately 2. Sludges precipitated by all reagents had very similar leachabilities except for KB-1 and Bauxsol, which released more aluminum. SALT showed that lowering the pH of the leaching solution mobilized more metals from the sludges. Iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc began to leach at pH 2.5-3, approximately 4.5, approximately 5.5, and 6-6.5, respectively. The leachability of ARD treatment sludges is determined by the final pH of the leachate. A higher neutralization potential (e.g., a greater content of unreacted neutralizing agent) makes sludges inherently more chemically stable. Thus, when ARD or any acidic metalliferous wastewater is treated, a choice must be made between efficient reagent use and resistance to acid attack. PMID:16570625

  19. Impacts on water quality and biota from natural acid rock drainage in Colorado's Lake Creek watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, D.A.; Sares, Matthew A.; Policky, Greg A.; Schmidt, Travis S.; Church, Stanley E.

    2006-01-01

    Colorado's Lake Creek watershed hosts natural acid rock drainage that significantly impacts surface water, streambed sediment, and aquatic life. The source of the ARD is a group of iron-rich springs that emerge from intensely hydrothermally altered, unexploited, low-grade porphyry copper mineralization in the Grizzly Peak Caldera. Source water chemistry includes pH of 2.5 and dissolved metal concentrations of up to 277 mg/L aluminum, 498 mg/L iron, and 10 mg/L copper. From the hydrothermally altered area downstream for 27 kilometers to Twin Lakes Reservoir, metal concentrations in streambed sediment are elevated and the watershed experiences locally severe adverse impacts to aquatic life due to the acidic, metal-laden water. The water and sediment quality of Twin Lakes Reservoir is sufficiently improved that the reservoir supports a trout fishery, and remnants of upstream ARD are negligible.

  20. Acid-neutralizing potential of minerals in intrusive rocks of the Boulder batholith in northern Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, George A.; Briggs, Paul H.; Mazza, Nilah; Driscoll, Rhonda

    1998-01-01

    Experimental studies show that fresh granitic rocks of the Boulder batholith in the Boulder River headwaters near Basin, Montana have significant acid-neutralizing potential and are capable of neutralizing acidic water derived from metal-mining related wastes or mine workings. Laboratory studies show that in addition to the acidneutralizing potential (ANP) of minor amounts of calcite in these rocks, biotite, tremolite, and feldspars will contribute significantly to long-term ANP. We produced 0.45 micrometer-filtered acidic (pH = 2.95) leachate for use in these ANP experiments by exposing metal-mining related wastes to deionized water in a waste:leachate ratio of 1:20. We then exposed these leachates to finely-ground and sized fractions of batholith rocks, and some of their mineral fractions for extended and repeated periods, for which results are reported here. The intent was to understand what reactions of metal-rich acidic water and fresh igneous rocks would produce. The reactions between the acidic leachates and the bulk rocks and mineral fractions are complex. Factors such as precipitation of phases like Fe-hydroxides and Alhydroxides and the balance between dissolved cations and anions that are sulfate dominated complicate analysis of the results. Research by others of acid neutralization by biotite and tremolite attributed a rise in pH to proton (H+) adsorption in sites vacated by K, Mg, and Ca. Destruction of the silicate framework and liberation of associated structural hydroxyl ions may contribute to ANP. Studies by others have indicated that the conversion of biotite to a vermiculite-type structure by removal of K at a pH of 4 consumes about six protons for every mole of biotite, but at a pH of 3 there is pronounced dissolution of the tetrahedral lattice. The ANP of fresh granitic rocks is much higher than anticipated. The three bulk Boulder igneous rock samples studied have minimum ANP equivalent to about 10-14 weight percent calcite. This ANP is in

  1. Immobilization and phytotoxicity of Pb in contaminated soil amended with γ-polyglutamic acid, phosphate rock, and γ-polyglutamic acid-activated phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun; Cai, Zhijian; Su, Xiaojuan; Fu, Qingling; Liu, Yonghong; Huang, Qiaoyun; Violante, Antonio; Hu, Hongqing

    2015-02-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA), phosphate rock (PR), and γ-PGA-activated PR (γ-PGA-PR) on the immobilization and phytotoxicity of Pb in a contaminated soil. The proportion of residual Pb (Re-Pb) in soil was reduced by the addition of γ-PGA but was increased by the application of PR and γ-PGA-PR. The addition of γ-PGA in soil improved the accumulation of Pb in pak choi and decreased the growth of pak choi, suggesting the intensification of Pb phytotoxicity to pak choi. However, opposite effects of PR and γ-PGA-PR on the phytotoxicity of Pb to pak choi in soil were observed. Moreover, in the examined range, γ-PGA-PR activated by a higher amount of γ-PGA resulted in a greater proportion of Re-Pb in soil and weaker phytotoxicity of Pb to pak choi. The predominance of γ-PGA-PR in relieving the phytotoxicity of Pb was ascribed mainly to the increase of soil pH and available phosphate after the amendment, which could facilitate the precipitation of Pb in soil and provide pak choi with more phosphorus nutrient.

  2. An Investigation of the Acid Rock Drainage Generation from the Road Cut Slope in the Middle Part of South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, S.; Cheong, Y.; Yim, G.

    2006-05-01

    To examine the Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) generation from the road cut slope, a prediction study including Acid-Base Accounting (ABA) test and Net Acid Generation (NAG) test was performed for road cut rock samples (20 samples) at the new construction site of a highway in the middle part of South Korea. This slope is composed of slate and phyllite. It was a pit wall which was operated as a quarry which produced materials for roofing. pH1:2 and EC1:2 measurements were performed to evaluate free hydrogen ion contents and salts in samples. ABA test was performed to estimate the balance of the acid generating minerals (mainly pyrite) and the acid neutralizing minerals (mainly carbonates) in rock samples. Total sulfur was analyzed by sulfur analyzer, and then the maximum potential acidity (MPA, kg H2SO4/t) was calculated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed to identify the mineral composition of rock samples. Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) test, after the Sobek et al. (1978), was performed to estimate the amount of acid originated from the oxidation of sulfide minerals. NAPP (Net Acid Producing Potential) was calculated by total sulfur (MPA) and ANC. NAG test was performed with grounded samples and 15 % hydrogen peroxide, and then NAG was analyzed by measuring pH (NAGpH) of the mixed solution. pH1:2 and EC1:2 ranged from 2.95 to 7.23 and 17.1 to 3070.0 ¥ìS/cm, respectively. MPA of samples was ranged from 0.0 to 79.9 kg H2SO4/t. From the XRD analysis pyrite was found at the most samples. In the sample from highly weathered dike, goethite was found. Results of the ANC tests indicated that the value of ANC reached up to 59.36 kg H2SO4/t. Rock samples could be classified as Potential Acid Forming rock (PAF) and Non- Acid Forming rock (NAF) by plotting NAPP versus NAGpH. In this study 17 samples were classified as PAF rock. It means that this slope would generate ARD when they reacted with rain. Two samples were grouped as NAF. By application this ARD prediction

  3. Incorporating Geochemical And Microbial Kinetics In Reactive Transport Models For Generation Of Acid Rock Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, B. J.; Rajaram, H.; Silverstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    Acid mine drainage, AMD, results from the oxidation of metal sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite), producing ferrous iron and sulfuric acid. Acidophilic autotrophic bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans obtain energy by oxidizing ferrous iron back to ferric iron, using oxygen as the electron acceptor. Most existing models of AMD do not account for microbial kinetics or iron geochemistry rigorously. Instead they assume that oxygen limitation controls pyrite oxidation and thus focus on oxygen transport. These models have been successfully used for simulating conditions where oxygen availability is a limiting factor (e.g. source prevention by capping), but have not been shown to effectively model acid generation and effluent chemistry under a wider range of conditions. The key reactions, oxidation of pyrite and oxidation of ferrous iron, are both slow kinetic processes. Despite being extensively studied for the last thirty years, there is still not a consensus in the literature about the basic mechanisms, limiting factors or rate expressions for microbially enhanced oxidation of metal sulfides. An indirect leaching mechanism (chemical oxidation of pyrite by ferric iron to produce ferrous iron, with regeneration of ferric iron by microbial oxidation of ferrous iron) is used as the foundation of a conceptual model for microbially enhanced oxidation of pyrite. Using literature data, a rate expression for microbial consumption of ferrous iron is developed that accounts for oxygen, ferrous iron and pH limitation. Reaction rate expressions for oxidation of pyrite and chemical oxidation of ferrous iron are selected from the literature. A completely mixed stirred tank reactor (CSTR) model is implemented coupling the kinetic rate expressions, speciation calculations and flow. The model simulates generation of AMD and effluent chemistry that qualitatively agrees with column reactor and single rock experiments. A one dimensional reaction

  4. The chemical and isotopic differentiation of an epizonal magma body: Organ Needle pluton, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Farmer, G.L.; McCurry, M.; Mertzman, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Major and trace element, and Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of whole rocks and mineral separates from the Oligocene, alkaline Organ Needle pluton (ONP), southern New Mexico, constrain models for the differentiation of the magma body parental to this compositionally zoned and layered epizonal intrusive body. The data reveal that the pluton is rimmed by lower ??(Nd) (~-5) and higher 87Sr/86Sr (~0.7085) syenitic rocks than those in its interior (??(Nd) ~ 2, 87Sr/86Sr ~0.7060) and that the bulk compositions of the marginal rocks become more felsic with decreasing structural depth. At the deepest exposed levels of the pluton, the ??(Nd)~-5 lithology is a compositionally heterogeneous inequigranular syenite. Modal, compositional and isotopic data from separates of rare earth element (REE)-bearing major and accesory mineral phases (hornblende, titanite, apatite, zircon) demonstrate that this decoupling of trace and major elements in the inequigranular syenite results from accumulation of light REE (LREE)-bearing minerals that were evidently separated from silicic magmas as the latter rose along the sides of the magma chamber. Chemical and isotopic data for microgranular mafic enclaves, as well as for restite xenoliths of Precambrian granite wall rock, indicate that the isotopic distinction between the marginal and interior facies of the ONP probably reflects assimilation of the wall rock by ??(Nd) ~-2 mafic magmas near the base of the magma system. Fractional crystallization and crystal liquid separation of the crystally contaminated magma at the base and along the margins of the chamber generated the highly silicic magmas that ultimately pooled at the chamber top.

  5. Unravelling Magma Interaction Phenomena in Volcanic and Plutonic Environments: Analogies and Differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, G.; Perugini, D.

    2003-04-01

    rounded enclaves. Given that volcanic rocks are the result of quenching of magmas during eruption fluidal structures do not have time to homogenise, whereas in plutonic bodies fluid like structures have enough time to be completely homogenised. On the contrary enclaves cannot be homogenised readily even in the plutonic bodies and, thus, they can survive to the mixing process although they show clear fingerprint of interaction with the host magna. The geochemical aspect of magma interaction has been pointed out by attempting to isolate various phenomena. As a rule, the high variability found in the geochemical characteristics is the result of several processes acting concomitantly following the intrusion of a magma inside the other, and which can be attributed to: processes of fractional crystallization, loss of the liquid phase, and mechanical mixing of mineralogical phases between the two magmas. The combination of these processes did in fact lead to the formation of magmatic products with the enrichment and depletion of trace elements typical of evolved basic magmatic liquids, cumulitic rocks and rocks mixed mechanically with mono- and polymineral fragments of host magma. From an isotopic point of view the scenery seems to be more complicated, confirming the hypothesis that what induces isotope variations is a process of diffusion at the liquid state, with uphill and downhill phenomena. Trying to isolate the foremost parameters responsible for the different occurrences, it can be shown that final results depend on the different percentage of interacting magmas and the different rheological behaviour of the lower temperature magma. In spite of a general framework in which magmatic interaction processes can occur, the effects of such processes are different in the volcanic and plutonic environment and the basic reason has to be found in the relative timescales over which magma interaction processes occur in the two environments.

  6. I and S-type plutonism on Serifos (W-Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglseder, C.; Grasemann, B.; Schneider, D. A.; Petrakakis, K.; Miller, C.; Klötzli, U. S.; Thöni, M.; Zámolyi, A.; Rambousek, C.

    2009-07-01

    Tertiary I- and S-type plutonism is widespread in the Aegean region and frequently associated with extensional tectonic structures. This investigation presents the first evidence of protracted magmatism on the island of Serifos in the western Cyclades and at least two discrete generations of plutonism and coeval dyke generations can be distinguished: (1) An older granitoid with S-type characteristics intruded the Attic-Cycladic crystalline rocks. The granitoid and its host rocks were mylonitized by an earlier phase of deformation at temperature conditions > ~ 450 °C and WSW directed shear. This crustal-scale ductile shear zone has been reactivated during the initial stage of a metamorphic core complex formation recording top-SSW sense of shear. Rb-Sr muscovite data from the orthogneiss yield cooling, respectively deformation ages of 15-11.3 Ma. (2) An I-type hornblende-biotite-granodiorite pluton with dacitic to andesitic dyke generations intruded syn- to post-kinematically during ongoing extensional deformation at shallow crustal levels. Single grain zircon TIMS U-Pb ages of the main granodiorite body and its associated dykes are 11.6-9.5 Ma. Cooling ages of these samples scatter between 8.5 and 7.7 Ma (Rb-Sr on biotite).

  7. Distinctly different parental magmas for plutons and lavas in the central Aleutian arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Y.; Rioux, M. E.; Kelemen, P. B.; Goldstein, S. L.; Bolge, L.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    While it is generally agreed that continental crust is generated by arc magmatism, average arc lavas are basaltic while the bulk continental crust is andesitic, and this has led to many models for secondary reprocessing of the arc crust in order to form continental crust. We report new data on calc-alkaline plutons in the central Aleutians showing that they have distinctly different sources compared to Holocene tholeiitic lavas. Therefore the lavas are not representative of the net magmatic transfer from the mantle into the arc crust. Eocene to Miocene (9-39 Ma) intermediate to felsic plutonic rocks from the central Aleutian arc show higher SiO2 at a given Mg#, higher ɛNd- and ɛHf-values, and lower Pb isotope ratios than Holocene volcanic rocks from the same region. Instead, the plutonic rocks resemble volcanics from the western Aleutians isotopically, and have chemical compositions similar to bulk continental crust. These data could reflect temporal variation of Aleutian magma source compositions, from Eocene-Miocene "isotopically depleted" and predominantly calc-alkaline to Holocene "isotopically enriched" and predominantly tholeiitic. Alternatively, they may reflect different transport and emplacement processes for the magmas that form plutons and lavas: calc-alkaline magmas with higher Si content and high viscosity may preferentially form plutons, perhaps after extensive mid-crustal degassing of initially high water contents. The latter case implies that the upper and middle arc crust is more like the calc-alkaline bulk composition of the continental crust than the lavas alone. Crustal reprocessing mechanisms that preserve upper and middle arc crust, while removing lower arc crust, can account for the genesis and evolution of continental crust. Since gabbroic lower arc crust extends from ca 20-40 km depth, and is density stable over most of this depth range, "delamination" of dense lithologies [1] may not be sufficient to accomplish this. Alternatively

  8. Charon Cryovolcanism and Plutonian Plutonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desch, S. J.; Neveu, M.

    2013-12-01

    Extrusion of cold material from the interior of icy bodies, or cryovolcanism, has been observed on Enceladus and Triton. It may explain the observed evidence for a young surface on Charon (Pluto's surface is masked by frosts). Here, we evaluate 3 prerequisites for cryovolcanism on Pluto and Charon, and make testable predictions for the 2015 New Horizons flyby. 1. Subsurface liquid: Thermal evolution models of Pluto and Charon suggest that they should have differentiated into a rocky core and an icy mantle, and retained a liquid layer for many Gyr, possibly until today (Desch et al. 2009; Robuchon and Nimmo 2011; Rubin et al., in revision). Primordial volatile antifreezes (ammonia, methanol) enhance liquid persistence on Pluto, and are required for liquid on Charon. 2. Cryovolcanic processes: At the frigid temperatures (40-60 K) of Pluto's and Charon's surfaces, ice is brittle: diapirism and effusive volcanism are unlikely. Explosive volcanism can occur if cracks, resulting from freezing, develop in the ice shell. Water can then ascend in the crack up to the water/ice hydrostatic level, but cannot progress further unless the negative buoyancy of water in ice is overcome. This can happen via two mechanisms. First, the headspace pressure (difference between surrounding hydrostatic and crack water column pressures) inside cracks decreases as the crack's length increases. This can lead to the exsolution of volatiles from water to make a low-density foam (Crawford and Stevenson 1988). Here, we show that exsolution of non-polar volatiles such as H2, N2, Ar, CH4, CO, and CO2 allows crack propagation by positive buoyancy. However, exsolution does not happen a dwarf planets retains a primordial ice-rock crust like those modeled by Desch et al. 2009; it acts as a pressure seal to keep the volatiles dissolved. In the second mechanism, the negative buoyancy is overcome by the pressurization of water as the body cools and freezes (Fagents 2003; Manga and Wang 2007). Although

  9. Using Oxygen Isotopes of Zircon to Evaluate Magmatic Evolution and Crustal Contamination in the Halifax Pluton, Nova Scotia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, K. E.; Lackey, J.; Valley, J. W.; Nowak, R.

    2007-12-01

    Oxygen isotope analysis of zircon (Zrc) is well suited for parsing out the magmatic history in granitoids. The Halifax pluton is the largest pluton (1060 km2) in the peraluminous South Mountain batholith. The Halifax pluton is mapped as a concentrically zoned body, with outer units comprising granodiorite, monzogranite and a mafic porphyry; these units are locally rich in metasedimentary xenoliths and magmatic enclaves. The exterior units surround a more felsic core of leucogranite [1]. Previous oxygen isotope studies of the pluton report high whole rock δ18O values that range from 10.7-11.7‰ [2], and indicate a significant supracrustal component in the source of the pluton. We report the first δ18O(Zrc) values from the Peggy's Cove monzogranite and an associated mafic porphyry. Samples were collected across 30 km of discontinuous exposures of the monzogranite. Values of δ18O(Zrc) vary from 7.71-8.26‰ (average = 8.15±±0.32‰(2 S.D.); n = 10). Small but systematic E-W regional variation in δ18O(Zrc) values suggests heterogeneous magmatic contamination within the monzogranite. Meter-scale magmatic enclaves, observed in close association with pods of diverse xenoliths and smaller enclaves at the western Cranberry Head locality, are slightly enriched in δ18O relative to the host monzogranite. These data combined support a model of magma mingling and heterogeneous mixing at the rim of the pluton, with contamination by high-δ18O rocks. Additional high-δ18O(Zrc) data from granodiorites on the northern margin of the Halifax pluton concur with these observations [3]. Typically, closed magmatic systems show increasing δ18O with SiO2 because more felsic magmas have a greater percentage of high-δ18O minerals such as quartz and feldspar. Thus, the Halifax pluton appears to exhibit an enrichment trend opposite of what would be expected of a closed evolving system. Emplacement mechanisms for the Halifax pluton proposed by previous workers suggest that the outer

  10. Pennsylvanian pluton stitching of Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane, Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.C.; Bergman, S.C.; Cushing, G.W. ); Plafker, G. ); Campbell, R.B.; Dodds, C.J. ); McClelland, W.C. ); Mueller, P.A. ); MacKevett, E.M. Jr.

    1988-11-01

    A quartz monzonite-syenite-alkali granite plutonic complex in eastern Alaska crosscuts the contact of the Alexander terrane and Wrangellia and intrudes the basement rocks of both terranes. Zircon U-Pb data indicate an intrusion age of 309 {plus minus} 5 Ma (Middle Pennsylvanian) for the pluton, and {sup 40}K-{sup 40}Ar age for hornblende separates indicate cooling to about 450 C during Middle Pennsylvanian-Early Permian time. The new field relations and age data demonstrate the Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane were contiguous during the Middle Pennsylvanian. This conclusion provides an important new constraint on paleogeographic reconstructions of the northwest Cordillera, and necessitates reassessment of stratigraphic and paleomagnetic data that were cited as evidence that the terranes evolved separately until the late Mesozoic.

  11. Geochemical Relationships between Volcanic and Plutonic Upper to Mid Crustal Exposures of the Rosario Segment, Alisitos Arc (Baja California, Mexico): An Outstanding Field Analog to the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R.; DeBari, S. M.; Busby, C. J.; Medynski, S.

    2015-12-01

    Exposed paleo-arcs, such as the Rosario segment of the Cretaceous Alisitos Arc in Baja California, Mexico, provide an opportunity to explore the evolution of arc crust through time. Remarkable 3-D exposures of the Rosario segment record crustal generation processes in the volcanic rocks and underlying plutonic rocks. In this study, we explore the physical and geochemical connection between the plutonic and volcanic sections of the extensional Alisitos Arc, and elucidate differentiation processes responsible for generating them. These results provide an outstanding analog for extensional active arc systems, such as the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Arc. Upper crustal volcanic rocks have a coherent stratigraphy that is 3-5 km thick and ranges in composition from basalt to dacite. The most felsic compositions (70.9% SiO2) are from a welded ignimbrite unit. The most mafic compositions (51.5% SiO2, 3.2% MgO) are found in basaltic sill-like units. Phenocrysts in the volcanic units include plagioclase +/- amphibole and clinopyroxene. The transition to deeper plutonic rocks is clearly an intrusive boundary, where plutonic units intrude the volcanic units. Plutonic rocks are dominantly a quartz diorite main phase with a more mafic, gabbroic margin. A transitional zone is observed along the contact between the plutonic and volcanic rocks, where volcanics have coarsely recrystallized textures. Mineral assemblages in the plutonic units include plagioclase +/- quartz, biotite, amphibole, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. Most, but not all, samples are low K. REE patterns are relatively flat with limited enrichment. Normalization diagrams show LILE enrichment and HFSE depletion, where trends are similar to average IBM values. We interpret plutonic and volcanic units to have similar geochemical relationships, where liquid lines of descent show the evolution of least to most evolved magma types. We provide a model for the formation and magmatic evolution of the Alisitos Arc.

  12. Evolution and geochemistry of the Tertiary calc-alkaline plutons in the Adak Island region of the central Aleutian oceanic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Suzanne; Citron, Gary P.; Kay, Robert W.; Jicha, Brian; Tibbetts, Ashley

    2014-05-01

    Calc-alkaline plutons are major crustal building blocks of continental margin mountain belts like the Mesozoic to Tertiary Andes and the Sierra Nevada, but are rare in oceanic island arcs. Some of the most calc-alkaline I-type island arc plutons are in the Central Aleutians with the most extreme signatures, as indicated by FeO/MgO ratios of < ~2 at 48-70% wt. % SiO2, in the ~10 km wide Oligocene Hidden Bay pluton on southern Adak Island and the 10 km wide Miocene Kagalaska pluton to the north on eastern Adak and the adjacent Kagalaska Island. Although small compared to most continental plutons, similarities in intrusive units, mineralogy and chemistry suggest common formation processes. The Aleutian calc-alkaline plutonic rocks mainly differ from continental plutons in having more oceanic like isotopic (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703-0.7033; Epsilon Nd = 9-7.8) and LIL (e.g., higher K/Rb) ratios. The Adak region plutons differ from Tertiary plutons on Unalaska Island further east in being more K-rich and in having a more oxidized and lower-temperature mineralogy. From a regional perspective, the Adak area plutons intrude Eocene/Oligocene Finger Bay Formation mafic volcanic and sedimentary rocks and postdate the small ~38 Ma tholeiitic Finger Bay pluton. The chemistry of these older magmatic rocks is basically similar to that of young Central Aleutian magmatic rocks with boninites and arc tholeiitic magmas seemingly being absent. The formation of the calc-alkaline plutons seems to require a sufficient crustal thickness, fluid concentration and contractional stress such that magma chambers can stabilize significant amounts of pargasitic hornblende. Seismic receiver function analyses (Janiszewski et al., 2013) indicate the modern Adak crust is ~ 37 km thick. Existing and new hornblende, plagioclase and biotite Ar/Ar ages from 16 Hidden Bay pluton and Gannet Lake stock gabbro, porphyritic diorite, diorite, granodiorite, leucogranodiorite and aplite samples range from 34.6 to 30

  13. Temporal and chemical connections between plutons and ignimbrites from the Mount Princeton magmatic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Ryan D.; Coleman, Drew S.

    2013-05-01

    The Mount Princeton magmatic center, located in central Colorado, consists of the epizonal Mount Princeton batholith, the nested Mount Aetna caldera, and volumetrically minor leucogranites. New CA-TIMS U/Pb zircon ages indicate the majority of the Mount Princeton batholith was emplaced during a period of regional ignimbrite quiescence. The structurally highest unit of quartz monzonite yields a 206Pb/238U age of 35.80 ± 0.10 Ma, and the youngest dated unit of the quartz monzonite is a porphyritic unit that yields a 206Pb/238U age of 35.37 ± 0.10 Ma. Using the exposed, dated volume of the quartz monzonite and new geochronology yields an estimated pluton filling rate of ~0.002 km3/a. This rate is comparable to the accumulation rates published for other plutons, and at least an order of magnitude slower than fluxes necessary to support accumulation of large eruptible magma volumes. Geochronology for the two large ignimbrites spatially associated with the batholith indicates a temporal disconnect between the vast majority of pluton building and explosive eruption of magma. The Wall Mountain Tuff erupted from a source in the same geographic area as the Mount Princeton batholith at 37.3 Ma (Ar/Ar sanidine), but no structural evidence of a caldera or temporally associated plutonic rocks is known. The Badger Creek Tuff erupted at 34.3 Ma (Ar/Ar sanidine) during the formation of the Mount Aetna caldera in the southern portion of the batholith. Our 206Pb/238U age for the Badger Creek Tuff is 34.47 ± 0.05. The only analyzed plutonic rocks of similar age to the Badger Creek Tuff are an extra-caldera dike with a 206Pb/238U age of 34.57 ± 0.08 Ma, a ring dike with a 206Pb/238U age of 34.48 ± 0.09 Ma, and a portion of the Mount Aetna pluton with a 206Pb/238U age of 34.60 ± 0.13 Ma. The small volume intrusions related to the eruption of the Badger Creek Tuff are chemically similar to the ignimbrite and show no signature of crystal-liquid separation in the shallow crust.

  14. Genesis and evolution of water in a two-mica pluton: A hydrogen isotope study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, R.H.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements were made of the hydrogen isotope composition of 74 samples of muscovite, biotite, vein quartz and whole rocks from the Papoose Flat pluton, eastern California, U.S.A., and adjacent metamorphic and sedimentary rocks in order to elucidate the genesis and evolution of water and hydrous minerals in a two-mica granodiorite. Electron microprobe analyses were made of all micas so that the Suzuoki-Epstein equation could be used in evaluating the data. Based on experimental, theoretical and textural evidence of mica paragenesis, a model of hydrogen isotope fractionation between an aqueous vapor and a magma during crystallization has been constructed. This model accounts for the observed hydrogen isotope relations and implies that primary hydrogen isotope compositions have been preserved in a large portion of the pluton. The ?? D-values of biotites vary widely over the range -103 to -66% with most values lying between -90 and -70??? Muscovites, on the other hand, are isotopically more uniform and have ?? D-values of -61 to -41??? with most values lying between -50 and -46??? These data are consistent with the interpretation that biotite formed over a long period of crystallization whereas muscovite formed in a narrow interval, presumably during the final stages of crystallization when alumina and water contents were at their highest. Only 8 of the 21 muscovite-biotite pairs analyzed are in hydrogen isotope equilibrium as calculated from the Suzuoki-Epstein equation. Biotites in the western half of the pluton have relatively low ?? D-values of around -85???, whereas those in the eastern half have higher values of up to -66??? This pattern is a consequence of a loss of permeability associated with the syn-intrusive deformation of the western margin of the pluton. This loss of permeability enhanced the preservation of primary hydrogen isotope relations there by diverting water evolved from the magma out through the eastern half of the pluton where some deuteric

  15. Introduction to the Apollo collections. Part 1: Lunar igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, P. E.; Warner, J. L.; Simonds, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    The basic petrographic, chemical, and age data is presented for a representative suite of igneous rocks gathered during the six Apollo missions. Tables are given for 69 samples: 32 igneous rocks and 37 impactites (breccias). A description is given of 26 basalts, four plutonic rocks, and two pyroclastic samples. The textural-mineralogic name assigned each sample is included.

  16. Petrology of the igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    Papers published during the 1983-1986 period on the petrology and geochemistry of igneous rocks are discussed, with emphasis on tectonic environment. Consideration is given to oceanic rocks, subdivided into divergent margin suites (mid-ocean ridge basalts, ridge-related seamounts, and back-arc basin basalts) and intraplate suites (oceanic island basalts and nonridge seamounts), and to igneous rocks formed at convergent margins (island arc and continental arc suites), subdivided into volcanic associations and plutonic associations. Other rock groups discussed include continental flood basalts, layered mafic intrusions, continental alkalic associations, komatiites, ophiolites, ash-flow tuffs, anorthosites, and mantle xenoliths.

  17. Biochar enhances Aspergillus niger rock phosphate solubilization by increasing organic acid production and alleviating fluoride toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gilberto de Oliveira; Zafra, David Lopez; Vassilev, Nikolay Bojkov; Silva, Ivo Ribeiro; Ribeiro, José Ivo; Costa, Maurício Dutra

    2014-05-01

    During fungal rock phosphate (RP) solubilization, a significant quantity of fluoride (F(-)) is released together with phosphorus (P), strongly inhibiting the process. In the present study, the effect of two F(-) adsorbents [activated alumina (Al2O3) and biochar] on RP solubilization by Aspergillus niger was examined. Al2O3 adsorbed part of the F(-) released but also adsorbed soluble P, which makes it inappropriate for microbial RP solubilization systems. In contrast, biochar adsorbed only F(-) while enhancing phosphate solubilization 3-fold, leading to the accumulation of up to 160 mg of P per liter. By comparing the values of F(-) measured in solution at the end of incubation and those from a predictive model, it was estimated that up to 19 mg of F(-) per liter can be removed from solution by biochar when added at 3 g liter(-1) to the culture medium. Thus, biochar acted as an F(-) sink during RP solubilization and led to an F(-) concentration in solution that was less inhibitory to the process. In the presence of biochar, A. niger produced larger amounts of citric, gluconic, and oxalic acids, whether RP was present or not. Our results show that biochar enhances RP solubilization through two interrelated processes: partial removal of the released F(-) and increased organic acid production. Given the importance of organic acids for P solubilization and that most of the RPs contain high concentrations of F(-), the proposed solubilization system offers an important technological improvement for the microbial production of soluble P fertilizers from RP.

  18. Environmental risk assessment of acid rock drainage under uncertainty: The probability bounds and PHREEQC approach.

    PubMed

    Betrie, Getnet D; Sadiq, Rehan; Nichol, Craig; Morin, Kevin A; Tesfamariam, Solomon

    2016-01-15

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) is a major environmental problem that poses significant environmental risks during and after mining activities. A new methodology for environmental risk assessment based on probability bounds and a geochemical speciation model (PHREEQC) is presented. The methodology provides conservative and non-conservative ways of estimating risk of heavy metals posed to selected endpoints probabilistically, while propagating data and parameter uncertainties throughout the risk assessment steps. The methodology is demonstrated at a minesite located in British Columbia, Canada. The result of the methodology for the case study minesite shows the fate-and-transport of heavy metals is well simulated in the mine environment. In addition, the results of risk characterization for the case study show that there is risk due to transport of heavy metals into the environment.

  19. Mingled mafic and felsic magmas in the Jurassic Eagle Mountain pluton, southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, D.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Wooden, J.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The metalluminous, compositionally expanded Eagle Mountain pluton ([approx] 165 Ma) was epizonally emplaced within Proterozoic metaigneous and Proterozoic-Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks in the Eagle Mountains of southeastern California. The evolution of the pluton involved mingling and partial mixing between mafic and felsic magmas. Heterogeneous rocks consisting of discrete biotite-clinopyroxene microdioritic enclaves (49--54% SiO[sub 2]) enclosed in hornblende-biotite granodiorite (57--61% SiO[sub 2]) grade into complexly mingled microdiorite and granodiorite as the proportion of microdiorite increases. The dioritic enclaves are notably potassic (2.1 [+-] .2 wt. %), containing abundant biotite (up to 23%) and interstitial patches of K-feldspar. These features are attributed to selective potassium enrichment of dioritic magma by diffusion during mingling with host granodioritic magma. A similar phenomenon was observed in experiments by Johnston and Wyllie, and attributed to relatively rapid diffusion of potassium from felsic to mafic magma. Calculated Sr[sub i] for the enclaves, intermediate dioritoids, and three of four analyzed host rocks cluster at 0.7085 [+-] 0.0002. Several homogeneous monzogranites not associated with enclaves have slightly higher Sr[sub i] (up to 0.7094) and define two separate mixing/AFC arrays on a plot of Sr[sub i] vs. 1/Sr, both anchored at the cluster of less radiogenic rocks. Alternatively, relatively rapid self-diffusion of Sr may have contributed to isotopic homogeneity during mingling of magmas from isotopically distinct sources.

  20. Timing and nature of tertiary plutonism and extension in the Grouse Creek Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Egger, A.E.; Dumitru, T.A.; Miller, E.L.; Savage, C.F.I.; Wooden, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The Grouse Creek-Albion-Raft River metamorphic core complex in northwestern Utah and southern Idaho is characterized by several Tertiary plutons with a range of ages and crosscutting relations that help constrain the timing of extensional deformation. In the Grouse Creek Mountains, at least three distinct, superimposed, extension-related Tertiary deformational events are bracketed by intrusive rocks, followed by a fourth event: motion on range-bounding faults. The Emigrant Pass plutonic complex was emplaced at depths of less than 10 km into Permianage rocks. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon analysis indicates a three-stage intrusion of the complex at 41.3 ?? 0.3 Ma, 36.1 ?? 0.2 Ma, and 34.3 ?? 0.3 Ma. The two youngest phases represent distinctly younger intrusive event(s) than the oldest phase, separated by more than 5 m.y. The oldest phase cuts several metamorphosed and deformed younger-on-older faults, providing a pre-41 Ma age bracket for oldest extension-related deformation in the region. The youngest phase(s) are interpreted to have been intruded during delelopment of a map-scale. N-S-trending recumbent fold, the Bovine Mountain fold, formed during vertical shortening of roof rocks during intrusion. This second event folded older normal faults that are likely pre-41 Ma. Zircons from the youngest part of the pluton show inheritance from Archean basement (???2.5 Ga) and from its Proterozoic sedimentary cover (???1.65 Ga). The Red Butte pluton, emplaced at 15-20 km depth, intruded highly metamorphosed Archean orthogneiss at 25.3 ?? 0.5 Ma; cores of some zircons yield latest Archean ages of 2.55 Ga. The pluton is interpreted to have been intruded during a third deformational and metamorphic event that resulted in vertical flattening fabrics formed during NW to EW stretching, ultimately leading to thinning of cover and top-to-the west motion on the Ingham Pass fault. The Ingham Pass fault represents an important structure in the Grouse Creek Mountains, as it juxtaposes two parts

  1. In situ and experimental evidence for acidic weathering of rocks and soils on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Tosca, N. J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D. W.; Schröder, C.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for alteration of synthetic Martian basalts at pH = 0-1 indicate that chemical fractionations at low pH are vastly different from those observed during terrestrial weathering. Rock surface analyses from Gusev crater are well described by the relationships apparent from low-pH experimental alteration data. A model for rock surface alteration is developed, which indicates that a leached alteration zone is present on rock surfaces at Gusev. This zone is not chemically fractionated to a large degree from the underlying rock interior, indicating that the rock surface alteration process has occurred at low water to rock ratio. The geochemistry of natural rock surfaces analyzed by APXS is consistent with a mixture between adhering soil/dust and the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after brushing with the RAT is largely representative of the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after grinding with the RAT is largely representative of the interior of the rock, relatively unaffected by the alteration process occurring at the rock surface. Elemental measurements from the Spirit, Opportunity, Pathfinder, and Viking 1 landing sites indicate that soil chemistry from widely separated locations is consistent with the low-pH, low water to rock ratio alteration relationships developed for Gusev rocks. Soils are affected principally by mobility of Fe and Mg, consistent with alteration of olivine-bearing basalt and subsequent precipitation of Fe- and Mg-bearing secondary minerals as the primary control on soil geochemistry.

  2. Syn-extensional plutonism and peak metamorphism in the albion-raft river-grouse creek metamorphic core complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strickland, A.; Miller, E.L.; Wooden, J.L.; Kozdon, R.; Valley, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassia plutonic complex (CPC) is a group of variably deformed, Oligocene granitic plutons exposed in the lower plate of the Albion-Raft River- Grouse Creek (ARG) metamorphic core complex of Idaho and Utah. The plutons range from granodiorite to garnet-bearing, leucogranite, and during intrusion, sillimanite- grade peak metamorphism and ductile attenuation occurred in the country rocks and normal-sense, amphibolite-grade deformation took place along the Middle Mountain shear zone. U-Pb zircon geochronology from three variably deformed plutons exposed in the lower plate of the ARG metamorphic core complex revealed that each zircon is comprised of inherited cores (dominantly late Archean) and Oligocene igneous overgrowths. Within each pluton, a spread of concordant ages from the Oligocene zircon overgrowths is interpreted as zircon recycling within a long-lived magmatic system. The plutons of the CPC have very low negative whole rock ??Nd values of -26 to -35, and initial Sr values of 0.714 to 0.718, consistent with an ancient, crustal source. Oxygen isotope ratios of the Oligocene zircon overgrowths from the CPC have an average ??18O value of 5.40 ?? 0.63 permil (2SD, n = 65) with a slight trend towards higher ??18O values through time. The ??18O values of the inherited cores of the zircons are more variable at 5.93 ?? 1.51 permil (2SD, n = 29). Therefore, we interpret the plutons of the CPC as derived, at least in part, from melting Archean crust based on the isotope geochemistry. In situ partial melting of the exposed Archean basement that was intruded by the Oligocene plutons of the CPC is excluded as the source for the CPC based on field relationships, age and geochemistry. Correlations between Ti and Hf concentrations in zircons from the CPC suggest that the magmatic system may have become hotter (higher Ti concentration in zircon) and less evolved (lower Hf in zircon concentration) through time. Therefore, the CPC represents prolonged or episodic magmatism

  3. Forearc deformation and strain partitioning during growth of a continental magmatic arc: The northwestern margin of the Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex, Bohemian Massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žák, Jiří; Dragoun, František; Verner, Kryštof; Chlupáčová, Marta; Holub, František V.; Kachlík, Václav

    2009-04-01

    The Late Devonian subduction followed by the Early Carboniferous continental collision of the Saxothuringian and overriding upper-crustal Teplá-Barrandian units led to the growth of a large magmatic arc (the ˜ 354-337 Ma Central Bohemian Plutonic Complex) in the central part of the Bohemian Massif. Far-field tectonic forces resulting from the collision produced ˜WNW-ESE to ˜NW-SE regional shortening across the forearc upper crust above the subduction zone; the shortening was accommodated by predominantly top-to-the-ESE tectonic transport along the southeastern flank of the Teplá-Barrandian unit. Approaching the magmatic arc margin, the regional structural pattern changes and exhibits significant across- and along-strike variations interpreted as a result of strain partitioning, where the Saxothuringian/Teplá-Barrandian convergence interacted in different ways with the intruding magma pulses. Around the voluminous, northeasterly ˜ 354 Ma Sázava pluton the principal shortening was at high angle to the forearc-facing intrusive contact and the host rocks were significantly thermally softened. The regional top-to-the-ESE tectonic transport converted here into arc-parallel ductile flow within the structural aureole around and above the pluton. In contrast, a narrow to nonexistent ductile strain aureole is preserved in the host rocks around discordant sheet-like plutons (the southwesterly pre-354 (?) Ma Marginal granite and the Milín granodiorite of unknown radiometric age). Our AMS study of the Marginal granite and Milín granodiorite, and mapping of mesoscopic magmatic foliations and lineations in another neighboring sheet-like pluton (the ˜ 346 Ma Kozárovice granodiorite), reveals sigmoidal map-scale fabric patterns consistent with dextral transpression. We thus suggest that the thin sheet-like plutons were oriented obliquely to the principal shortening and were rheologically weaker than the host rocks prior to final crystallization, producing dextral

  4. Treatment of acid rock drainage using a sulfate-reducing bioreactor with zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the bioremediation of acid rock drainage (ARD) in flow-through columns testing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for the first time as the sole exogenous electron donor to drive sulfate-reducing bacteria in permeable reactive barriers. Columns containing ZVI, limestone or a mixture of both materials were inoculated with an anaerobic mixed culture and fed a synthetic ARD containing sulfuric acid and heavy metals (initially copper, and later also cadmium and lead). ZVI significantly enhanced sulfate reduction and the heavy metals were extensively removed (>99.7%). Solid-phase analyses showed that heavy metals were precipitated with biogenic sulfide in the columns packed with ZVI. Excess sulfide was sequestered by iron, preventing the discharge of dissolved sulfide. In the absence of ZVI, heavy metals were also significantly removed (>99.8%) due to precipitation with hydroxide and carbonate ions released from the limestone. Vertical-profiles of heavy metals in the columns packing, at the end of the experiment, demonstrated that the ZVI columns still had excess capacity to remove heavy metals, while the capacity of the limestone control column was approaching saturation. The ZVI provided conditions that enhanced sulfate reduction and generated alkalinity. Collectively, the results demonstrate an innovative passive ARD remediation process using ZVI as sole electron-donor. PMID:26808248

  5. Petrography and mineral chemistry of the composite Deboullie Pluton, northern Maine, USA: implications for the genesis of Cu-Mo mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loferski, P.J.; Ayuso, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Biotite and apatite mineral chemistry, particularly halogen abundances and ratios, are used to investigate the relation of the two contrasting parts of the Deboullie composite pluton (syenite-granodiorite) located in northern Maine. Biotite mineral chemistry helps to classify the weakly developed porphyry-style mineralization (Cu-Mo) associated with syenitic rocks of the Deboullie pluton. Biotite and apatite occur within the matrix of the rocks and within small multiphase inclusions hosted by clinopyroxene. The inclusions are interpreted to be crystallized melt inclusions rather than solid inclusions, that were trapped by clinopyroxene during growth. The multiphase inclusions consist of K-feldspar + quartz + biotite + apatite + magnetite. On a regional scale, biotite compositions from granitic plutons in Maine do not vary in a systematic manner. -from Authors

  6. Relationships between subduction and extension in the Aegean region: evidence from granite plutons of the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, K. N.; Catlos, E. J.; Oyman, T.; Demirbilek, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Biga Peninsula is a tectonically complex region in western Turkey characterized by Tethyan sutures overprinted by extensional grabens, active fault strands of the North Anatolian Shear Zone, and numerous granitoid plutons. Two end-member models for the initiation of extension in the Biga region have been proposed, both of which focus on the role of igneous assemblages. The first model involves the emplacement of a hot mantle plume that thins and weakens crust and isostatic doming drives extension. The second has regional tensional stresses as the driving force, and magmatism is a consequence of decompression. Here we focus on understanding the timing and geochemical evolution of three granitoid plutons located in and just south of the Biga Peninsula to understand which end-member model could be applicable to the Aegean region. The Kestanbolu pluton is located north of the proposed Vardar Suture Zone, whereas the Eybek and Kozak plutons are north of the Izmir-Ankara Suture Zone. These sutures may mark regions of the closure of branches of the NeoTethyan Ocean. To better understand their sources and tectonic evolution, we acquired geochemical and geochronological data, and cathodoluminescence (CL) images of the rocks. Previously reported ages of the plutons range from Late Eocene to Middle Miocene. Here we acquired in situ (in thin section) ion microprobe U-Pb ages of zircon grains found in a range of textural relationships. Ages from the Kozak pluton range from 37.8±5.4 Ma to 10.3±2.4 Ma (238U/206Pb, ±1σ) with two ages from a single grain of 287±26 Ma and 257±18 Ma. We also found Oligocene to Late Miocene zircon grains in the Kestanbolu pluton, whereas zircons from the Eybek pluton range from 34.3±4.8 Ma to 21.2±1.7 Ma. Samples collected from the Kozak and Eybek plutons are magnesian, calc-alkalic, and metaluminous, whereas the Kestanbolu rocks are magnesian, alkali-calcic, and metaluminous with one ferroan sample and one peraluminous sample. Trace

  7. Thermochronology and Cooling Histories of Intrusive Suites: Implications for Incremental Pluton Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Coleman, D.; Heizler, M.

    2007-12-01

    Debate persists about the timescales and mechanisms of pluton emplacement and batholith formation. An understanding of whether plutons accumulate as large masses of magma or as an incremental series of pulses, in which the active magma body is small relative to the final pluton, is important for understanding the relationship between volcanoes and plutons. If volcanic eruptions < 1000 km3 are the most common size and large ignimbrites are rare, it follows that most plutons should record accumulations of small volumes of melt that were emplaced over long time intervals (millions to tens of millions of years) and therefore preserve predictable, protracted thermal histories. Modeling predicts observable differences in thermal histories of plutons and their aureoles that can be tested through thermochronology. Application of multiple chronometers (zircon and titanite U-Pb TIMS; hornblende, biotite, and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar; zircon and titanite (U-Th)/He) combined with K-feldspar multiple diffusion domain (MDD) modeling were used to determine the thermal history and to calibrate thermal models of two eastern California, Sierra Nevada batholith intrusive suites; the dike-like John Muir Intrusive Suite (JMIS) and the laccolithic Mt. Whitney Intrusive Suite (MWIS), and their wall rocks. Preliminary results of (U-Th)/He zircon data from the JMIS and its wall rock (the Tinemaha granodiorite) show a tight cluster of dates ranging from 75.6 to 70.4 Ma. The JMIS is thought to be mesozonal (8 to 11 km) and these data are interpreted as resulting from exhumation and additional 40Ar/39Ar data are required to determine if the thermal history reflects incremental intrusions. In contrast to the JMIS, preliminary (U-Th)/He zircon data from the MWIS and its wall rock (the Bullfrog pluton) show a wide range in dates ranging from 91.4 to 74.6 Ma that are interpreted to reflect reheating events. Amphibole 40Ar/39Ar inverse isochron dates, K- feldspar age spectra, and (U-Th)/He zircon data

  8. Melt Extraction Zones in Shallow Arc Plutons: Insights from Fisher Lake Orbicules and Comb Layers, Northern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, A. J.; Muntener, O.

    2015-12-01

    Identifying the processes behind magma flow structures and complex sheeted zones within otherwise near-homogeneous shallow plutons is fundamental in order to understand the mechanisms of melt transport, magma differentiation, crustal recycling and growth of mid-upper crustal plutons. The Cretaceous gabbro-diorite pluton of Fisher Lake, Northern Sierra Nevada (USA), contains multiple m-sized orbicule and magma-breccia bodies as well as orbicule- and comb layer-bearing dikes. Olivine-bearing norites, hornblende diorites and gabbros which have crystallized at low pressure (2kbar) from hydrous basaltic-andesite melts form texturally diverse orbicule cores which act as nuclei for comb layers. Rising hydrous mafic melts remobilizing low pressure cumulates and/or crystal mushes are injected at the contact between cooling plutons prior to the initiation of comb layer growth. Multiple generations of melt injections are attested by the presence of magma-breccia bodies which incorporate fractured, disaggregated fragments of pre-existing orbicule and comb layer bodies. The cumulate signature of the orbicule-bearing matrix indicates that interstitial melt was extracted towards shallower depth. Though orbicule and comb layer bodies have been variously ascribed to melt migration within cooling plutons, magma mixing or fluid flow, we propose an alternative interpretation where these m-scale features represent localized subvertical channels formed during the extraction of multiple batches of hydrous melts within a volcanic plumbing system or shallow plutonic feeder zone. These features thus preserve unique evidence of upper-crustal melt migration processes during the transfer of hydrous mafic melts towards shallower depth. Geochemical gradients between decompressing liquids and crystallizing cumulates are the main driving force for crystallization. We will illustrate examples of this process on the basis of field observations, textural data, whole rock and mineral geochemistry.

  9. Is the southeast Coast Plutonic Complex the consequence of accretion of the insular superterrane Evidence from U-Pb zircon geochronometry in the northern Washington Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, N.W. ); Brown, E.H. )

    1991-07-01

    Zircon U-Pb geochronometry of orthogneisses and plutons in the southwestern crystalline core of the North Cascades, coupled with fabric and textural studies of the orthogneisses, plutons, and their metamorphic host rocks, indicates extensive synmetamorphic plutonism at 89-96 Ma. Metamorphic mineral assemblages define a culmination composed of an axial kyanite-sillimanite zone rimmed by lower grade zones. High-grade index minerals are typically syntectonic to posttectonic. Metamorphic fabrics are characterized by an orogen-parallel, northwest-striking, steep foliation that contains a subhorizontal stretching and mineral lineation interpreted to be the product of ductile strike-slip deformation. This fabric is crosscut by 96-92 Ma plutons yet is imprinted on 92-89 Ma orthogneisses, suggesting spatially diachronous fabric development during orogeny. Documentation of the spatial and temporal coincidence of magmatism with the peak of orogeny, together with the kinematic significance of the metamorphic fabric, precludes generation of the metamorphic fabric and plutons in response to thrust loading. The authors suggest that this part of the Coast Plutonic Complex evolved as a transpressional magmatic arc.

  10. Evidence for multiple mechanisms of crustal contamination of magma from compositionally zoned plutons and associated ultramafic intrusions of the Alaska Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reiners, P.W.; Nelson, B.K.; Nelson, S.W.

    1996-01-01

    Models of continental crustal magmagenesis commonly invoke the interaction of mafic mantle-derived magma and continental crust to explain geochemical and petrologic characteristics of crustal volcanic and plutonic rocks. This interaction and the specific mechanisms of crustal contamination associated with it are poorly understood. An excellent opportunity to study the progressive effects of crustal contamination is offered by the composite plutons of the Alaska Range, a series of nine early Tertiary, multiply intruded, compositionally zoned (peridotite to granite) plutons. Large initial Sr and Nd isotopic contrasts between the crustal country rock and likely parental magmas allow evaluation of the mechanisms and extents of crustal contamination that accompanied the crystallization of these ultramafic through granitic rocks. Three contamination processes are distinguished in these plutons. The most obvious of these is assimilation of crustal country rock concurrent with magmatic fractional crystallization (AFC), as indicated by a general trend toward crustal-like isotopic signatures with increasing differentiation. Second, many ultramafic and mafic rocks have late-stage phenocryst reaction and orthocumulate textures that suggest interaction with felsic melt. These rocks also have variable and enriched isotopic compositions that suggest that this felsic melt was isotopically enriched and probably derived from crustal country rock. Partial melt from the flysch country rock may have reacted with and contaminated these partly crystalline magmas following the precipitation and accumulation of the cumulus phenocrysts but before complete solidification of the magma. This suggests that in magmatic mush (especially of ultramafic composition) crystallizing in continental crust, a second distinct process of crustal contamination may be super-imposed on AFC or magma mixing involving the main magma body. Finally, nearly all rocks, including mafic and ultramafic rocks, have (87Sr

  11. The Middle Fork Plutonic Complex: A plutonic association of coeval peralkaline and metaluminous magmas in the north-central Alaska Range

    SciTech Connect

    Solie, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    The 57 m.y. Middle Fork Plutonic Complex (MFPC) intrudes Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks south of the Farewell Fault zone in the north-central Alaska Range. Though spatially related to the late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary subduction-related Alaska Range batholith, MFPC is more characteristic of an extensional or anorogenic setting. A swarm of basalt, hawaiite and rhyolite dikes east of the complex intruded, and was intruded by, the plutonic rocks. Approximately 30% of the exposed rock in the 125 km[sup 2] complex is hedenbergite - fayalite syenite, [approx equal]20% is peralkalin arfvedsonite-biotite alkali-feldspar granite (AF granite), and [le]20% is pyroxene-olivine-biotite gabbro. The rest is a mixed unit including clinopyroxene-biotite-amphibole diorite, and hornblende-biotite granite (HB granite). K-Ar and Rb-Sr radiometric dating of rock types shows that they are coeval. Their close spatial and temporal relationships led to complex magmatic interactions. Calculated initial [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr for gabbro and diorite group is around 0.705 to 0.706. HB granites are heterogeneous, but fall mostly around 0.707 to 0.708. Hypersolvus syenites and AF granites form an isochron with initial [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr of 0.70965. These groupings suggest that at least three different magmas formed the MFPC; scatter of isotopic data reflects mutual contamination and assimilation. Consanguinous hypersolvus syenite and AF granite mineralogy appears to be controlled by fluorine in the magma chamber. Eruptive stratigraphy, as predicted by intrusive history of MFPC, compares favorably with volcanic stratigraphies of peralkaline volcanic systems worldwide, and MFPC may be modelled as the root zone of a peralkaline volcanic system.

  12. Isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of jurassic plutons, Southeastern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayo, D.P.; Anderson, J.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The 165 Ma Eagle Mountain intrusion is a heterogeneous, enclave-bearing, metaluminous remnant of the Cordilleran Jurassic arc that cuts regionally metamorphosed pre-Mesozoic rocks in the southeastern Mojave Desert of California. The main phase of the intrusion consists of granodiorite to tonalite host facies, diorite mixed facies, and homogeneous monzogranite facies. The host facies contains microdiorite enclaves interpreted as intermingled masses of mafic magma. Late-phase leucogranite stocks cut the main phase. Mineral equilibria indicate emplacement at ???6.5 km depth, with solidus temperatures ranging from 760??C for diorite to 700??C for felsic granodiorite. Although uniform radiogenic-isotope compositions (Sri = 0.7085, ???Ndi = -9.4) suggest derivation from a single source, no known source has the composition required. A hybrid source is proposed, consisting of various proportions of juvenile mantle and recycled lower crust. Calculations indicate that the source of the Eagle Mountain intrusion comprised >60% juvenile mantle and <40% recycled crust. On the basis of their isotopic compositions, other mafic Jurassic plutons in the region were derived from sources containing different proportions of mantle and crustal components.

  13. River Valley pluton, Ontario: A late-Archean/early-Proterozoic anorthositic intrusion in the Grenville Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashwal, L.D.; Wooden, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The River Valley pluton is a ca. 100 km2 body of anorthositic and gabbroic rocks located about 50 km northeast of Sudbury, Ontario. The pluton is situated entirely within the Grenville Province, but its western margin is a series of imbricate thrust faults associated with the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone. It is dominated by coarse leuconorite and leucogabbro, with lesser anorthosite, gabbro, and rare ultramafics. Igneous textured rocks are abundant and consist of plagioclase (An60-70) charged with Fe-Ti oxide inclusions, low Ca pyroxene (orthopyroxene and/or inverted pigeonite) and augite. The most unfractionated rocks are minor olivine gabbros with Fo70-80. A variety of deformed and recrystallized equivalents of the igneous-textured rocks is also present, and these are composed largely of calcic plagioclase and hornblende. Ten samples, including both igneous and deformed lithologies give a Pb-Pb whole-rock isochron of 2560??155Ma, which is our best estimate of the time of primary crystallization. The River Valley pluton is thus the oldest anorthositic intrusive yet reported from the Grenville Province, but is more calcic and augitic than typical massifs, and lacks their characteristic Fe-Ti oxide ore deposits. The River Valley body may be more akin to similar gabbro-anorthosite bodies situated at the boundary between the Archean Superior Province and Huronian supracrustal belt of the Southern Province west of the Grenville Front. An Sm-Nd isochron from 3 igneous-textured leucogabbros and an augite mineral separate gives 2377 ?? 68 Ma, implying slight disturbance of the Sm-Nd whole-rock-mineral system during later metamorphism. The Rb-Sr system has been substantially disturbed, giving an age of 2185 ?? 105 Ma, which is similar to internal Pb-Pb isochron ages of 2165 ?? 130 Ma and 2100 ?? 35 Ma for two igneous-textured rocks. It is uncertain whether these ages correspond to a discrete event at this time or represent a partial resetting of the Rb-Sr and Pb

  14. Search for underground openings for in situ test facilities in crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Strisower, B.; Corrigan, D.J.; Graf, A.N.; O'Brien, M.T.; Pratt, H.; Board, M.; Hustrulid, W.

    1980-01-01

    With a few exceptions, crystalline rocks in this study were limited to plutonic rocks and medium to high-grade metamorphic rocks. Nearly 1700 underground mines, possibly occurring in crystalline rock, were initially identified. Application of criteria resulted in the identification of 60 potential sites. Within this number, 26 mines and 4 civil works were identified as having potential in that they fulfilled the criteria. Thirty other mines may have similar potential. Most of the mines identified are near the contact between a pluton and older sedimentary, volcanic and metamorphic rocks. However, some mines and the civil works are well within plutonic or metamorphic rock masses. Civil works, notably underground galleries associated with pumped storage hydroelectric facilities, are generally located in tectonically stable regions, in relatively homogeneous crystalline rock bodies. A program is recommended which would identify one or more sites where a concordance exists between geologic setting, company amenability, accessibility and facilities to conduct in situ tests in crystalline rock.

  15. Adakitic-like magmatism in western Ossa-Morena Zone (Portugal): Geochemical and isotopic constraints of the Pavia pluton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, S. M.; Neiva, A. M. R.; Ramos, J. M. F.

    2013-02-01

    Granitic rocks are a major component of the Earth's continental crust and occur in a wide variety of tectonic settings. Their chemical and isotopic characterization is crucial to the recognition of the potential sources and mechanisms involved in their generation. In this study, we present the first whole rock chemical and isotopic (Sr-Nd-O) data for the Pavia pluton (328-317 Ma), located near the western border of the Ossa-Morena Zone (Évora Massif, Portugal). Major and trace element geochemistry suggests that the different granitic phases composing this intrusive body (enclaves, granites (s.l.) and crosscutting dikes) represent independent magma pulses and the majority is similar to TTGs and adakites. The little Sr-Nd-O isotopic variation, with (87Sr/86Sr)328 = 0.70428-0.70560, ɛNd328 ranging between - 3.4 and + 0.4 and δ18O varying from + 5.6‰ to + 8.4‰ implies an isotopically similar protolith for all phases. The most viable mechanism for the generation of the Pavia pluton adakitic-like magmatism is assimilation-fractional crystallization of a mantle-derived magma. This mechanism was also invoked to explain the genesis of other plutons within the Évora Massif but they have a distinct chemistry (typical arc calc-alkaline rocks). The chemical differences between them and the Pavia pluton granitic rocks are interpreted as the result of lower degrees of crustal assimilation and higher degrees of contamination of mantle-derived magmas by the sinking slab (after subduction blocking and subsequent slab break-off).

  16. Mineral associations produced by sodic-calcic hydrothermal alteration in the Buffalo Mountain pluton, north-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, D. . Dept. of Geology and Geography)

    1993-03-01

    Sodic-calcic (Na-Ca) hydrothermal alteration is prevalent throughout Mesozoic-age arc igneous rocks in the western US. The middle Jurassic Buffalo Mountain pluton, located in north-central Nevada, contains particularly well developed Na-Ca metasomatism. The Buffalo Mountain pluton is composed of porphyritic syenite, quartz monzonite, small bordering stocks (which account for less than 1% of the pluton), and an extensive felsic dike swarm. Quartz monzonite intruded syenite and constitutes the majority of the surface area. Unaltered porphyritic syenite is composed of perthite, plagioclase, quartz, augite, hornblende, biotite, olivine, magnetite, and other minerals accounting for less than 1% of the rock. Unaltered quartz monzonite is an aggregate of K-feldspar, plagioclase, quartz, biotite, hornblende, and accessory minerals accounting for less than 1% of the rock. The dikes cut both phases of the total intrusive rock body and are closely related in space to zones of Na-Ca alteration. Alteration variably affects all igneous rock types and exists as both fracture-controlled and pervasive Na-Ca alteration. Sodic-calcic alteration resulted in the following mineral reactions: K-feldspar is replaced by chalky-colored plagioclase, and primary mafic minerals react to form pale green diopside or, less commonly, actinolite. Garnet, scapolite, and epidote are often spatially associated with Na-Ca altered rocks. The fact that Na-Ca alteration occurs most commonly in and around dikes suggests that they might have been the source of channel for fluid entry into the surrounding igneous rocks. Further study will seek to constrain the origins and pathways of Na-Ca fluids.

  17. In-Situ and Experimental Evidence for Acidic Weathering of Rocks and Soils on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Tosca, N. J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D.; Schroeder, C.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for alteration of synthetic Martian basalts at pH=0-1 indicate that chemical fractionations at low pH are vastly different from those observed during terrestrial weathering. Rock analyses from Gusev crater are well described by the relationships apparent from low pH experimental alteration data. A model for rock surface alteration is developed which indicates that a leached alteration zone is present on rock surfaces at Gusev. This zone is not chemically fractionated to a large degree from the underlying rock interior, indicating that the rock surface alteration process has occurred at low fluid-to-rock ratio. The geochemistry of natural rock surfaces analyzed by APXS is consistent with a mixture between adhering soil/dust and the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after brushing with the RAT is largely representative of the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after grinding with the RAT is largely representative of the interior of the rock, relatively unaffected by the alteration process occurring at the rock surface. Elemental measurements from the Spirit, Opportunity, Pathfinder and Viking 1 landing sites indicate that soil chemistry from widely separated locations is consistent with the low-pH, low fluid to rock ratio alteration relationships developed for Gusev rocks. Soils are affected principally by mobility of FeO and MgO, consistent with alteration of olivine-bearing basalt and subsequent precipitation of FeO and MgO bearing secondary minerals as the primary control on soil geochemistry.

  18. Jurassic plutons in the Desolation wilderness, northern Sierra Nevada batholith, California: A new segment in the Jurassic magmatic arc

    SciTech Connect

    Sabine, C. . Quaternary Sciences Center)

    1993-04-01

    A 164[+-]7 Ma U-P zircon date establishes a Middle- to Late-Jurassic age for the Pyramid Peak granite and synplutonic dioritoids and hybrid rocks that comprise the Crystal Range suite, located southwest of Lake Tahoe. A Jurassic age is also assigned to the Keiths Dome quartz monzonite and the Desolation Valley and Camper Flat granodiorites (Loomis', 1983, Early Granitic Group) which are distinctly older than surrounding Cretaceous granitoids. The Keiths Dome quartz monzonite, the oldest pluton of the group, may be as old as 180 Ma and is distinguished by ductile shear zones and recrystallization textures which indicate an episode of deformation not undergone by other plutons. The Camper flat and Desolation Valley granodiorites are the youngest plutons of the group. ENE-trending microdiorite dikes filled extensional fractures, perpendicular to the direction of shortening, in all Jurassic plutons but on none of the Cretaceous bodies. Jurassic plutons may help constrain ages of metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks and associated structures in the Mount Tallac roof pendant. The Pyramid Peak granite intrudes the Sailor Canyon Formation which bears Late Pliensbachian ammonites (Fisher, 1990), and the Keiths Dome quartz monzonite intrudes the overlying Tuttle Lake Formation and transects faults and shear zones in the pendant. Initial Sr isotope ratios for the Pyramid Peak granite range between 0.705427 and 0.706874, spanning the 0.706 value taken by some to mark the western limit of sialic lower crust. Data suggest an isotopically mixed source containing mantle and crustal components. Such an environment is not inconsistent with a passive continental margin where mafic magma invades rifted continental crust.

  19. Deformation within the cannibal creek pluton and its aureole, Queensland, Australia: a re-evaluation of ballooning as an emplacement mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Paul

    1994-05-01

    Structures within the foliated Cannibal Creek granite and its deformed aureole indicate that the pluton appears to have been emplaced after a minimum of two strong regional deformation events ( D1, D2), that contact metamorphic porphyroblast growth began during the early stages of a third aureole-centred event ( Da) and that a fourth weak deformation overprints all earlier structures, at least within the strain-softened aureole. The aureole deformation ( Da) is most strongly developed at the pluton contact, decreasing in intensity both inwards to the core, and outwards into the wall rock. Earlier interpretations linking ( Da) strain to expansion (ballooning) of the pluton during emplacement are no longer favoured. Previously discussed diagnostic criteria of ballooning, such as closed elliptical trend lines for the aureole foliation, and new field evidence, such as radial magmatic lineations and moderate to high-temperature solid-state deformation of external sheath dykes, are either ambiguous or point strongly toward syn- to pre-tectonic emplacement of a piercement diapir. Less than 30% of the pluton volume appears to have been accommodated by wall rock shortening as the result of ballooning or diapiric ascent. The rest was likely accommodated by a combination of broad wavelength regional doming (1-5 mm year -1) above the pluton, far field redistribution of mass into the source area plus or minus some component of diapiric backflow, stoping, assimilation and dilation in fault bends or fold hinges.

  20. Oil sands thickened froth treatment tailings exhibit acid rock drainage potential during evaporative drying.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2015-02-01

    Bitumen extraction from oil sands ores after surface mining produces different tailings waste streams: 'froth treatment tailings' are enriched in pyrite relative to other streams. Tailings treatment can include addition of organic polymers to produce thickened tailings (TT). TT may be further de-watered by deposition into geotechnical cells for evaporative drying to increase shear strength prior to reclamation. To examine the acid rock drainage (ARD) potential of TT, we performed predictive analyses and laboratory experiments on material from field trials of two types of thickened froth treatment tailings (TT1 and TT2). Acid-base accounting (ABA) of initial samples showed that both TT1 and TT2 initially had net acid-producing potential, with ABA values of -141 and -230 t CaCO₃ equiv. 1000 t(-1) of TT, respectively. In long-term kinetic experiments, duplicate ~2-kg samples of TT were incubated in shallow trays and intermittently irrigated under air flow for 459 days to simulate evaporative field drying. Leachates collected from both TT samples initially had pH~6.8 that began decreasing after ~50 days (TT2) or ~250 days (TT1), stabilizing at pH~2. Correspondingly, the redox potential of leachates increased from 100-200 mV to 500-580 mV and electrical conductivity increased from 2-5 dS m(-1) to 26 dS m(-1), indicating dissolution of minerals during ARD. The rapid onset and prolonged ARD observed with TT2 is attributed to its greater pyrite (13.4%) and lower carbonate (1.4%) contents versus the slower onset of ARD in TT1 (initially 6.0% pyrite and 2.5% carbonates). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis revealed rapid shift in microbial community when conditions became strongly acidic (pH~2) favoring the enrichment of Acidithiobacillus and Sulfobacillus bacteria in TT. This is the first report showing ARD potential of TT and the results have significant implications for effective management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams/deposits. PMID:25306090

  1. Oil sands thickened froth treatment tailings exhibit acid rock drainage potential during evaporative drying.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2015-02-01

    Bitumen extraction from oil sands ores after surface mining produces different tailings waste streams: 'froth treatment tailings' are enriched in pyrite relative to other streams. Tailings treatment can include addition of organic polymers to produce thickened tailings (TT). TT may be further de-watered by deposition into geotechnical cells for evaporative drying to increase shear strength prior to reclamation. To examine the acid rock drainage (ARD) potential of TT, we performed predictive analyses and laboratory experiments on material from field trials of two types of thickened froth treatment tailings (TT1 and TT2). Acid-base accounting (ABA) of initial samples showed that both TT1 and TT2 initially had net acid-producing potential, with ABA values of -141 and -230 t CaCO₃ equiv. 1000 t(-1) of TT, respectively. In long-term kinetic experiments, duplicate ~2-kg samples of TT were incubated in shallow trays and intermittently irrigated under air flow for 459 days to simulate evaporative field drying. Leachates collected from both TT samples initially had pH~6.8 that began decreasing after ~50 days (TT2) or ~250 days (TT1), stabilizing at pH~2. Correspondingly, the redox potential of leachates increased from 100-200 mV to 500-580 mV and electrical conductivity increased from 2-5 dS m(-1) to 26 dS m(-1), indicating dissolution of minerals during ARD. The rapid onset and prolonged ARD observed with TT2 is attributed to its greater pyrite (13.4%) and lower carbonate (1.4%) contents versus the slower onset of ARD in TT1 (initially 6.0% pyrite and 2.5% carbonates). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis revealed rapid shift in microbial community when conditions became strongly acidic (pH~2) favoring the enrichment of Acidithiobacillus and Sulfobacillus bacteria in TT. This is the first report showing ARD potential of TT and the results have significant implications for effective management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams/deposits.

  2. Reclamation of acidic, denuded copper basin land: Revegetation performance of phosphate rock vs other nutrient sources

    SciTech Connect

    Soileau, J.M.; Sikora, F.J.; Maddox, J.J.; Kelsoe, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    Open pit smelting of Copper ore about 100 years ago resulted in approximately 9,300 ha of severely eroded, very acidic (pH 4.0 to 5.0) soils at Copper Basin, Tennessee. Along with other essential nutrients, phosphorus (P) amendments are critical for long-term productivity and sustainability of vegetation on this depleted soil. A field study was conducted (1992-1995) to compare revegetation from surface-applied North Carolina phosphate rock (PR) and triple superphosphate (TSP) at 20, 59, and 295 kg P ha{sup -1}, and to determine benefits of starter NPK tree tablets. The experimental design consisted of 7.3 x 9.1 m replicated plots, each planted to 20 loblolly pine seedlings and aerially seeded with a mixture of grasses and legumes. Tree survivability was high from all treatments. Through the third year, tree height and diameter increased with increasing P to 59 kg P ha without fertilizer tablets. There were no pine growth differences between PR and TSP. Weeping lovegrass has been the dominant cover crop through 1995, with increased stimulation to tree tablets and surface P. Tall fescue (KY 31), sericea lespedeza, and black locust responded more to PR than to TSP. Surface soil pH increased, and 0.01 M SrCl{sub 2} extractable Al decreased, with increasing rate of PR. For future loblolly pine plantings in the Copper Basin, this study suggests there is no benefit to applying both tree tablets and surface P at rates above 59 kg P ha{sup -1}. For reclaiming land with high acidity and low P fertility, PR has significant benefits. In reclaiming steep, gullied land, there is great potential for aerial application of PR and/or pelletized liming agents.

  3. Trace metal mobilization from oil sands froth treatment thickened tailings exhibiting acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Alsu; Kuznetsov, Petr; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2016-11-15

    Froth treatment thickened tailings (TT) are a waste product of bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores. When incubated in a laboratory under simulated moist oxic environmental conditions for ~450d, two different types of TT (TT1 and TT2) exhibited the potential to generate acid rock drainage (ARD) by producing acid leachate after 250 and 50d, respectively. We report here the release of toxic metals from TT via ARD, which could pose an environmental threat if oil sands TT deposits are not properly managed. Trace metal concentrations in leachate samples collected periodically revealed that Mn and Sr were released immediately even before the onset of ARD. Spikes in Co and Ni concentrations were observed both pre-ARD and during active ARD, particularly in TT1. For most elements measured (Fe, Cr, V, As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Se), leaching was associated with ARD production. Though equivalent acidification (pH2) was achieved in leachate from both TT types, greater metal release was observed from TT2 where concentrations reached 10,000ppb for Ni, 5000ppb for Co, 3000ppb for As, 2000ppb for V, and 1000ppb for Cr. Generally, metal concentrations decreased in leachate with time during ARD and became negligible by the end of incubation (~450d) despite appreciable metals remaining in the leached TT. These results suggest that using TT for land reclamation purposes or surface deposition for volume reduction may unfavorably impact the environment, and warrants application of appropriate strategies for management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams. PMID:27443453

  4. Trace metal mobilization from oil sands froth treatment thickened tailings exhibiting acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Alsu; Kuznetsov, Petr; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2016-11-15

    Froth treatment thickened tailings (TT) are a waste product of bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores. When incubated in a laboratory under simulated moist oxic environmental conditions for ~450d, two different types of TT (TT1 and TT2) exhibited the potential to generate acid rock drainage (ARD) by producing acid leachate after 250 and 50d, respectively. We report here the release of toxic metals from TT via ARD, which could pose an environmental threat if oil sands TT deposits are not properly managed. Trace metal concentrations in leachate samples collected periodically revealed that Mn and Sr were released immediately even before the onset of ARD. Spikes in Co and Ni concentrations were observed both pre-ARD and during active ARD, particularly in TT1. For most elements measured (Fe, Cr, V, As, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Se), leaching was associated with ARD production. Though equivalent acidification (pH2) was achieved in leachate from both TT types, greater metal release was observed from TT2 where concentrations reached 10,000ppb for Ni, 5000ppb for Co, 3000ppb for As, 2000ppb for V, and 1000ppb for Cr. Generally, metal concentrations decreased in leachate with time during ARD and became negligible by the end of incubation (~450d) despite appreciable metals remaining in the leached TT. These results suggest that using TT for land reclamation purposes or surface deposition for volume reduction may unfavorably impact the environment, and warrants application of appropriate strategies for management of pyrite-enriched oil sands tailings streams.

  5. Mechanism of lead immobilization by oxalic acid-activated phosphate rocks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guanjie; Liu, Yonghong; Huang, Li; Fu, Qingling; Deng, Youjun; Hu, Hongqing

    2012-01-01

    Lead (Pb) chemical fixation is an important environmental aspect for human health. Phosphate rocks (PRs) were utilized as an adsorbent to remove Pb from aqueous solution. Raw PRs and oxalic acid-activated PRs (APRs) were used to investigate the effect of chemical modification on the Pb-binding capacity in the pH range 2.0-5.0. The Pb adsorption rate of all treatments above pH 3.0 reached 90%. The Pb binding on PRs and APRs was pH-independent, except at pH 2.0 in activated treatments. The X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed that the raw PRs formed cerussite after reacting with the Pb solution, whereas the APRs formed pyromorphite. The Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated that carbonate (CO3(2-)) in raw PRs and phosphate (PO4(3)) groups in APRs played an important role in the Pb-binding process. After adsorption, anomalous block-shaped particles were observed by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data further indicated that both chemical and physical reactions occurred during the adsorption process according to the binding energy. Because of lower solubility of pyromorphite compared to cerussite, the APRs are more effective in immobilizing Pb than that of PRs.

  6. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  7. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. PMID:27318730

  8. Biofilm hydrous manganese oxyhydroxides and metal dynamics in acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Haack, Elizabeth; Warren, Lesley A

    2003-09-15

    Biofilms in shallow, tailings-associated acid rock drainage (ARD) accumulated metals from May to September, indicating scavenging is stable within these biological solids over seasonal time frames. Results indicate a doubling (Mn, Cr) to over a 6-fold increase (Ni, Co) in biofilm metal concentrations. Biofilm oxygen and pH gradients measured over diel time scales with microelectrodes were observed to be both spatially and temporally variable, indicating that biofilms are highly dynamic geochemical environments. Biofilm metal retention and affinities were element specific indicating different processes control their sequestration. Metals were specifically scavenged by the organic constituents of the biofilm itself (Ni, Co) and associated biominerals of amorphous Mn oxyhydroxides (HMO; Ni, Co, and Cr). Results are consistent with sorption and coprecipitation processes controlling Ni and Co biofilm association, while Cr dynamics appear linked to those of Mn through redox processes. Biofilm HMO concentrations increased seasonally but showed significant diel fluctuations, indicating that both formation and dissolution processes occurred over rapid time scales in these biofilms. Biofilm HMO concentrations increased nocturnally but decreased during daylight hours to late afternoon minima. Under the geochemical conditions of the streams, observed HMO formation rates can only be explained by microbial catalysis. These results are the first to quantitatively examine microbial biofilm metal dynamics using microscale, geochemical techniques at both diel and seasonal time scales. They provide strong evidence for the significant role that microbial activity can play in metal geochemistry in natural environments. PMID:14524446

  9. Acid Fluid-Rock Interactions with Shales Comprising Unconventional Hydrocarbon Reservoirs and with Shale Capping Carbon Storage Reservoirs: Experimental Insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Bratcher, J.; Marcon, V.; Herz-Thyhsen, R.

    2015-12-01

    Injection of HCl is often a first stage in the hydraulic fracturing process. These acidic fluids react with marls or shales in unconventional reservoirs, reactions generally comparable to reaction between shale caprocks and acidic, carbonated formation waters in a carbon storage reservoir. Hydrothermal experiments examine acid fluid-rock interaction with 1) an unconventional shale reservoir and 2) a model shale capping a carbon storage reservoir. In the former, unconventional reservoir rock and hydraulic fracturing fluid possessing a range of ionic strengths (I = 0.01, 0.15) and initial pH values (2.5 and 7.3) reacted at 115°C and 35 MPa for 28 days. In the latter, a model carbon storage reservoir (Fe-rich dolomite), shale caprock (illite), and shale-reservoir mixture each reacted with formation water (I = 0.1 and pH 6.3) at 160°C and 25 MPa for ~15 days. These three experiments were subsequently injected with sufficient CO2 to maintain CO2 saturation in the water and allowed to react for ~40 additional days. Acidic frac fluid was rapidly buffered (from pH 2.5 to 6.2 after 38 hrs) by reaction with reservoir rock whereas the pH of near-neutral frac fluid decreased (from 7.3 to 6.9) after 47 hrs. Carbonate dissolution released Ca and Sr into solution and feldspar dissolution released SiO2 and Li; the extent of reaction was greater in the experiment containing acidic frac fluid. All three carbon storage experiments displayed a similar pH decrease of 1.5 units after the addition of CO2. The pH remained low for the duration of the experiments because the immiscible supercritical CO2 phase provided an infinite reservoir of carbonic acid that could not be consumed by reaction with the rock. In all three experiments, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn and SO4 increase with injection, but slowly decline through termination of the experiments. This trend suggests initial dissolution followed by re-precipitation of carbonates, which can be seen in modeling and SEM results. New clay minerals

  10. Radiological, chemical and morphological characterizations of phosphate rock and phosphogypsum from phosphoric acid factories in SW Spain.

    PubMed

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Vioque, Ignacio; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo

    2010-09-15

    In this work, radiological, chemical, and also morphological characterization was performed in phosphate rock and phosphogypsum samples, in order to understand the behavior of toxic elements. Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), gamma spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX). Our results show that the phosphate rock was mainly composed of fluorapatite, calcite, perovskite, quartz, magnetite, pyrite and kaolinite, whereas phosphogypsum only exhibited dihydrated calcium sulfate. The activity concentration of U-series radioisotopes in phosphate rock was around 1640 Bq/kg. (226)Ra and (210)Pb tend to be distributed into phosphogypsum by up to 80%, whereas the fraction of U-isotopes is 10%. The most abundant trace elements in phosphate rock were Sr, Cr, V, Zn, Y, Ni and Ba. Some elements, such as Ba, Cd, Cu, La, Pb, Se, Sr, Th and Y, were enriched in the phosphogypsum. This enrichment may be attributed to an additional input associated to the sulfuric acid used for the phosphoric acid production. Furthermore, results from SEM-EDX demonstrated that toxic elements are not distributed homogeneously into phosphogypsum. Most of these elements are concentrated in particles <20 microm of high porosity, and could be easily mobilized by leaching and/or erosion.

  11. Radiological, chemical and morphological characterizations of phosphate rock and phosphogypsum from phosphoric acid factories in SW Spain.

    PubMed

    Rentería-Villalobos, Marusia; Vioque, Ignacio; Mantero, Juan; Manjón, Guillermo

    2010-09-15

    In this work, radiological, chemical, and also morphological characterization was performed in phosphate rock and phosphogypsum samples, in order to understand the behavior of toxic elements. Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), gamma spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX). Our results show that the phosphate rock was mainly composed of fluorapatite, calcite, perovskite, quartz, magnetite, pyrite and kaolinite, whereas phosphogypsum only exhibited dihydrated calcium sulfate. The activity concentration of U-series radioisotopes in phosphate rock was around 1640 Bq/kg. (226)Ra and (210)Pb tend to be distributed into phosphogypsum by up to 80%, whereas the fraction of U-isotopes is 10%. The most abundant trace elements in phosphate rock were Sr, Cr, V, Zn, Y, Ni and Ba. Some elements, such as Ba, Cd, Cu, La, Pb, Se, Sr, Th and Y, were enriched in the phosphogypsum. This enrichment may be attributed to an additional input associated to the sulfuric acid used for the phosphoric acid production. Furthermore, results from SEM-EDX demonstrated that toxic elements are not distributed homogeneously into phosphogypsum. Most of these elements are concentrated in particles <20 microm of high porosity, and could be easily mobilized by leaching and/or erosion. PMID:20537794

  12. Geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotope composition of granitoids of the Early Cretaceous Copiapó plutonic complex (27°30'S), Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschik, Robert; Fontignie, Denis; Chiaradia, Massimo; Voldet, Pia

    2003-10-01

    Early Cretaceous plutonic rocks exposed south of Copiapó form part of the Coastal Batholith of northern Chile. These rocks intrude arc-derived volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks and marine limestones that were deposited in the Early Cretaceous Atacama backarc basin. The Copiapó plutonic complex consists mainly of calc-alkaline, medium- to coarse-grained diorite, granodiorite, tonalite, monzodiorite, and quartz monzonite. The plutonic rocks are subalkaline to alkaline, metaluminous, magnetite-series, volcanic arc, I-type granitoids. Batholithic magmas are a heat, potential fluid, metal, and sulphur source for the hydrothermal iron oxide-rich Cu-Au mineralization in the Candelaria-Punta del Cobre district. Ore-related hydrothermal alteration affected large portions of the Copiapó complex. The least altered batholithic rocks have initial 87Sr/ 86Sr of 0.703070-0.703231; initial 143Nd/ 144Nd of 0.512733-0.512781; and 206Pb/ 204Pb, 207Pb/ 204Pb, and 208Pb/ 204Pb of 18.428-18.772, 15.550-15.603, and 38.127-38.401, respectively. The δ18O values for these rocks range from +6.9 to +8.6‰. Isotope signatures and trace element distributions suggest that the magmas are mantle derived. A subduction fluid-modified mantle source may explain the geochemical characteristics of the Copiapó complex. The ascent of magmas occurred along deep-rooted structures without significant crustal contamination, though minor contamination by relatively young (e.g. Jurassic) igneous rocks during ascent is possible. Intrusive rocks with high-K to shoshonitic characteristics probably represent residual liquids of less evolved magmas. The regional geologic context suggests that the plutons of the Copiapó complex were emplaced at a relatively shallow crustal level of 2-3 km.

  13. Archaean multiphase Porosozero sanukitoid pluton of the Kola region: petrological, geochronological and geochemical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, Nikolai; Mokrushin, Artem; Petrovsky, Michail; Elizarov, Dmitry

    2013-04-01

    The Porosozero sanukitoid intrusion is located in the greenstone belt of the Kolmozero-Voronja, north-eastern part Fennoscandian (Baltic) Shield. The Porosozero multiphase pluton was formed as a result of the 4 magmatic phases during the period ca. 60 million years. The main phase is represented by a differentiated series of gabbro-diorite - quartz monzodiorite - granodiorite - granite. The zircon TIMS ages of granodiorite and quartz monzodiorites are 2733±6 Ma and 2734±4 Ma, respectively. The second phase is composed of leucogranites formed during intrusion of the residual melt portion from intracrustal source. The age of zircon from leucogranite is 2712±6 Ma. The third phase is represented by the lamprophyre dykes with the zircon age 2680±8 Ma. The late pegmatite veins were formed during the fourth final phase. The volume relationships between the gabbro-diorite, quartz monzodiorites, granodiorites and granites are 5:55:27:13, respectively. The medium weighted composition of the initial melt, calculated from the rock compositions of the first phase is andesite (wt.%): SiO2 = 61.53, TiO2 = 0.58, Al2O3 = 15.74, Fe2O3 = 3.75, FeO = 3.07, MnO = 0.10, MgO = 3.06, CaO = 5.83, Na2O = 3.78, K2O = 2.37. The compositional variation is the result of fractional crystallization. The last magmas may have experienced some crustal contamination. All rocks of the first phase are enriched in Ba (500-800 ppm), Sr (450-700 ppm), K2O (1.8-3.2 wt. %), P2O5 (0.15-0.35), LREE [(La/Yb)N=15-23] and contain high concentrations of Cr (150-400 ppm) and Ni (60-140 ppm), possess high mg# values (0.45-0.65), and show a negative Nb-Ta anomaly. Sm-Nd isotopic data for sanukitoids indicate their formation from a mantle source enriched in LILE and LREE with ɛNd (2740) = +1.02 - +0.36, T(DM)=2.9-2.8 Ga. The Porosozero polyphasic pluton is similar to worldwide Archaean and Phanerozoic magmatic sanukitoide series. The Porosozero pluton formation is determined by the processes of mantle

  14. Jim River and Hodzana plutons, Alaska: the role of assimilation in the petrogenesis of syenite and granite

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, J.D.; Blum, A.E.; Dillon, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    Early Cretaceous plutonic rocks in central Alaska intrude both Devonian to Jurassic oceanic rocks of the Angayuchum terrane (AT) and early Paleozoic to Precambrian continental metasediments of the Ruby terrane (RT). Most plutons intrude only the RT and are biotite and two-mice granite. The Hodzana pluton intrudes both fault-bounded terranes, constraining movement between them to the emplacement age of about 110 million years, and is mainly biotite-amphibole granite with some monzodiorite. Modal and chemical data from the Jim River and Hodzana plutons define two distinct compositional trends. One trend is monzonitic to syenitic while the other is mostly granitic. The two suites are the same age, yet cannot be related by simple differentiation due to a pronounced chemical discontinuity. Rb-Sr whole-rock isochrons yield an age of 112 million years and (87Sr/86Sr)o of .7078 for the syenitic suite, and an age of 108 million years and (87Sr/86Sr)o of .7079 for the granitic suite. The authors suggest that the monzonite represents a primary magma that formed in the lower crust or mantle and initiated upper crustal melting as it intruded the AT and RT. Assimilation of continental crust could have allowed the portion of the magma that intruded the RT to evolve from a monzonite to a granite. Fractionation of these two parent magmas may have resulted in the contemporaneous syenitic and granitic suites. The two suites may reflect the contrasting composition of assimilated wallrock across the AT-RT boundary. Isotopic studies of the wallrocks are in progress and may help to constrain the amount and composition of crust that was assimilated where the magma intruded the AT versus the RT.

  15. Magmatic evolution within the lower arc crust: Insights from crystal zoning in the Tenpeak pluton, North Cascades crystalline core, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. F.; Kent, A. J.; Miller, R. B.; Paterson, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Deep-crustal plutons are important for understanding heat, melting and mass transfer processes in the lower crust. Our comprehension of these processes influences perspectives of crustal growth and how magma ascends to form large volume batholiths in the upper crust. Despite the importance of these systems, it is difficult to study deep-crustal plutons in many terranes due to insufficient exhumation and modification by regional metamorphism and deformation. For this study we focus on the Tenpeak pluton, intruded at 7-10 kbar between 92.3-89.7 Ma in the Northern Washington Cascades crystalline core, which is part of a continental magmatic arc. The Tenpeak is a well-exposed and relatively unmodified composite pluton consisting predominantly of tonalite with zones of mingled and sheeted gabbro, tonalite, and hornblendite. The objectives of this study are to: (1) document how composition and compositional zoning of major and minor phases vary between different episodes of magma influx; (2) constrain formation mechanisms for the pluton; and (3) investigate the role of diffusive processes in controlling mineral zoning patterns. A combination of field mapping, geochronology, whole rock geochemistry (XRF and ICP-MS), and mineral chemistry (LA-ICP-MS and EMPA) has been used to help reconstruct the magmatic and thermal history of the pluton. Our initial studies focus on a 91.8 Ma sheeted complex near the southwest margin of the batholith, which has been previously interpreted to reflect numerous pulses of magma with different chemical histories. Preliminary data show distinct chemical differences between felsic and mafic sheets, both at the whole-rock and mineral scale. Bulk rock compositions show overlap in Mg # (range: 0.57-0.70) but lower abundances of incompatible trace elements (e.g. La, Zr) and higher compatible trace elements (e.g. Cr, Ni) in the mafic magmas. Mafic sheets also have greater depletion of LREE and higher HREE contents. Significant differences are also

  16. Attached and Unattached Bacterial Communities in a 120-Meter Corehole in an Acidic, Crystalline Rock Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, R. Michael; Roberto, Francisco F.; Earley, Drummond; Bruhn, Debby F.; Brink, Susan E.; O'Connell, Sean P.; Delwiche, Mark E.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2001-01-01

    The bacteria colonizing geologic core sections (attached) were contrasted with those found suspended in the groundwater (unattached) by examining the microbiology of 16 depth-paired core and groundwater samples using a suite of culture-independent and culture-dependent analyses. One hundred twenty-two meters was continuously cored from a buried chalcopyrite ore hosted in a biotite-quartz-monzonite porphyry at the Mineral Park Mine near Kingman, Ariz. Every fourth 1.5-m core was acquired using microbiologically defensible methods, and these core sections were aseptically processed for characterization of the attached bacteria. Groundwater samples containing unattached bacteria were collected from the uncased corehole at depth intervals corresponding to the individual cores using an inflatable straddle packer sampler. The groundwater was acidic (pH 2.8 to 5.0), with low levels of dissolved oxygen and high concentrations of sulfate and metals, including ferrous iron. Total numbers of attached cells were less than 105 cells g of core material−1 while unattached cells numbered about 105 cells ml of groundwater−1. Attached and unattached acidophilic heterotrophs were observed throughout the depth profile. In contrast, acidophilic chemolithotrophs were not found attached to the rock but were commonly observed in the groundwater. Attached communities were composed of low numbers (<40 CFU g−1) of neutrophilic heterotrophs that exhibited a high degree of morphologic diversity, while unattached communities contained higher numbers (ca. 103 CFU ml−1) of neutrophilic heterotrophs of limited diversity. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were restricted to the deepest samples of both core and groundwater. 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis of attached, acidophilic isolates indicated that organisms closely related to heterotrophic, acidophilic mesophiles such as Acidiphilium organovorum and, surprisingly, to the moderately thermophilic Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius were present

  17. Manifestation of Preferential Flow and Nitrate Transport in Central European Soils on Acid Crystalline Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolezal, F.; Cislerova, M.; Vogel, T.; Zavadil, J.; Vacek, J.; Kvitek, T.; Prazak, P.; Nechvatal, M.; Bayer, T.

    2006-12-01

    Large areas of Central Europe are occupied by highlands and peneplains of medium altitudes, built by acid crystalline rocks. The soils overlying them are typically of medium textures. They are neither markedly water- repellent nor greatly swelling and shrinking. These landscapes are characterized by high vulnerability of water bodies, both surface and subsurface. The existing methodologies of vulnerability assessment regard the heavier among these soils as little vulnerable to diffuse pollution, while in reality they may be virtually equally vulnerable, because of the short-circuiting effect of preferential flow and transport. Our experiment site was Valeèov (49° 38' 40" N, 14° 30' 25" E, 461 m a.s.l.) in the Bohemo-Moravian highland, with average annual precipitation 660 mm and average annual air temperature 7.2 ° C. The field trials, starting from 2001, were focused on growing potato under different conditions. Soil moisture content was measured by Theta- probe capacitance sensors, soil water suction by Watermark sensors and tensiometers. Nitrate leaching was monitored by soil solution sampling with ceramic suction cups and zero-tension lysimeters. The hydraulic conductivity of the soil was measured on small cores and by suction and pressure infiltrometers. The following preferential flow manifestations are analyzed and quantified: a) the spatial variability of soil moisture content and suction after rainstorms, b) the spatial and temporal variability of soil's hydraulic conductivity and its dependence on soil moisture content, c) the spatial variability of percolation volumes in parallel lysimeters, d) the variability of nitrate concentrations in the lysimeter leachate, e) the apparent absence of correlation between leachate volumes and leachate concentrations in lysimeters, f) the lower mean and higher variance of leachate concentrations in lysimeters, in comparison with those in suction cups.

  18. 8,9-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analog protects pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from apoptosis via ROCK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Shulin; Ma, Cui; Li, Weiyang; Falck, J.R.; Manthati, Vijay L.; Reddy, D. Sudarshan; Medhora, Meetha; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Zhu, Daling

    2010-08-15

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP), have many essential biologic roles in the cardiovascular system including inhibition of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. In the present study, we tested the potential of 8,9-EET and derivatives to protect pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from starvation induced apoptosis. We found 8,9-epoxy-eicos-11(Z)-enoic acid (8,9-EET analog (214)), but not 8,9-EET, increased cell viability, decreased activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, and decreased TUNEL-positive cells or nuclear condensation induced by serum deprivation (SD) in PASMCs. These effects were reversed after blocking the Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway with Y-27632 or HA-1077. Therefore, 8,9-EET analog (214) protects PASMC from serum deprivation-induced apoptosis, mediated at least in part via the ROCK pathway. Serum deprivation of PASMCs resulted in mitochondrial membrane depolarization, decreased expression of Bcl-2 and enhanced expression of Bax, all effects were reversed by 8,9-EET analog (214) in a ROCK dependent manner. Because 8,9-EET and not the 8,9-EET analog (214) protects pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs), these observations suggest the potential to differentially promote apoptosis or survival with 8,9-EET or analogs in pulmonary arteries.

  19. From steep feeders to tabular plutons - Emplacement controls of syntectonic granitoid plutons in the Damara Belt, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Duncan; Kisters, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Granitoid plutons in the deeply eroded south Central Zone of the Damara Belt in Namibia commonly show tabular geometries and pronounced stratigraphic controls on their emplacement. Subhorizontal, sheet-like pluton geometries record emplacement during regional subhorizontal shortening, but the intrusion of spatially and temporally closely-related granitoid plutons at different structural levels and in distinct structural settings suggests independent controls on their levels of emplacement. We describe and evaluate the controls on the loci of the dyke-to-sill transition that initiated the emplacement of three syntectonic (560-530 Ma) plutons in the basement-cover stratigraphy of the Erongo region. Intrusive relationships highlight the significance of (1) rigidity anisotropies associated with competent sedimentary packages or pre-existing subhorizontal granite sheets and (2) rheological anisotropies associated with the presence of thick ductile marble horizons. These mechanical anisotropies may lead to the initial deflection of steep feeder conduits as well as subsequent pluton assembly by the repeated underaccretion of later magma batches. The upward displacement of regional isotherms due to the heat advection associated with granite emplacement is likely to have a profound effect on the mechanical stratification of the upper crust and, consequently, on the level at which granitoid pluton emplacement is initiated. In this way, pluton emplacement at progressively shallower crustal depths may have resulted in the unusually high apparent geothermal gradients recorded in the upper crustal levels of the Damara Belt during its later evolution.

  20. Geologic and mineralogic controls on acid and metal-rich rock drainage in an alpine watershed, Handcart Gulch, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, Dana J.; Caine, Jonathan S.; Lowers, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The surface and subsurface geology, hydrothermal alteration, and mineralogy of the Handcart Gulch area was studied using map and drill core data as part of a multidisciplinary approach to understand the hydrology and affects of geology on acid-rock drainage in a mineralized alpine watershed. Handcart Gulch was the locus of intense hydrothermal alteration that affected an area of nearly 3 square kilometers. Hydrothermal alteration and accompanied weak mineralization are spatially and genetically associated with small dacite to low-silica rhyolite stocks and plugs emplaced about 37-36 Ma. Felsic lithologies are commonly altered to a quartz-sericite-pyrite mineral assemblage at the surface, but alteration is more variable in the subsurface, ranging from quartz-sericite-pyrite-dominant in upper core sections to a propylitic variant that is more typical in deeper drill core intervals. Late-stage, hydrothermal argillic alteration [kaolinite and(or) smectite] was superimposed over earlier-formed alteration assemblages in the felsic rocks. Smectite in this late stage assemblage is mostly neoformed resulting from dissolution of chlorite, plagioclase, and minor illite in more weakly altered rocks. Hydrothermally altered amphibolites are characterized by biotitic alteration of amphibole, and subsequent alteration of both primary and secondary biotite to chlorite. Whereas pyrite is present both as disseminations and in small veinlets in the felsic lithologies, it is mostly restricted to small veinlets in the amphibolites. Base-metal sulfides including molybdenite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and galena are present in minor to trace amounts in the altered rocks. However, geologic data in conjunction with water geochemical studies indicate that copper mineralization may be present in unknown abundance in two distinct areas. The altered rocks contain an average of 8 weight percent fine pyrite that is largely devoid of metals in the crystal structure, which can be a significant

  1. Geochemical characterization of acid mine drainage from a waste rock pile, Mine Doyon, Québec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sracek, O.; Choquette, M.; Gélinas, P.; Lefebvre, R.; Nicholson, R. V.

    2004-03-01

    Water quality in the unsaturated and saturated zones of a waste rock pile containing sulphides was investigated. The main objectives of the project were (1) the evaluation of geochemical trends including the acid mine drainage (AMD)-buffering mechanism and the role of secondary minerals, and (2) the investigation of the use of stable isotopes for the interpretation of physical and geochemical processes in waste rock. Pore water in unsaturated zone was sampled from suction lysimeters and with piezometers in underlying saturated rocks. The investigation revealed strong temporal (dry period vs. recharge period), and spatial (slope vs. central region of pile) variability in the formation of acid mine drainage. The main secondary minerals observed were gypsum and jarosite. There was a higher concentration of gypsum in solid phase at Site TBT than at Site 6, suggesting that part of the gypsum formed at Site 6 in the early stage of AMD has been already dissolved. Formation of secondary minerals contributed to the formation of AMD by opening of foliation planes in waste rock, thus increasing the access of oxidants like O 2 and Fe 3+ to previously encapsulated pyrite. The behavior of several dissolved species such as Mg, Al, and Fe 2+ can be considered as conservative in the leachate. Stable isotopes, deuterium and 18O, indicated internal evaporation within the pile, and were used to trace recharge pulses from snowmelt. Isotope trends for 34S and 18O(SO 4) indicated a lack of sulfate reduction and zones of active oxidation of pyrite, respectively. Results of numerical modeling of pyrite oxidation and gas and water transport were consistent with geochemical and isotopic trends and confirmed zones of high evaporation rate within the rock pile close to the slope. The results indicate that physical and chemical processes within the pile are strongly coupled and cannot be considered separately when oxidation rates are high and influence gas transport as a result of heat

  2. Geochemical characterization of acid mine drainage from a waste rock pile, Mine Doyon, Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Sracek, O; Choquette, M; Gélinas, P; Lefebvre, R; Nicholson, R V

    2004-03-01

    Water quality in the unsaturated and saturated zones of a waste rock pile containing sulphides was investigated. The main objectives of the project were (1) the evaluation of geochemical trends including the acid mine drainage (AMD)-buffering mechanism and the role of secondary minerals, and (2) the investigation of the use of stable isotopes for the interpretation of physical and geochemical processes in waste rock. Pore water in unsaturated zone was sampled from suction lysimeters and with piezometers in underlying saturated rocks. The investigation revealed strong temporal (dry period vs. recharge period), and spatial (slope vs. central region of pile) variability in the formation of acid mine drainage. The main secondary minerals observed were gypsum and jarosite. There was a higher concentration of gypsum in solid phase at Site TBT than at Site 6, suggesting that part of the gypsum formed at Site 6 in the early stage of AMD has been already dissolved. Formation of secondary minerals contributed to the formation of AMD by opening of foliation planes in waste rock, thus increasing the access of oxidants like O2 and Fe3+ to previously encapsulated pyrite. The behavior of several dissolved species such as Mg, Al, and Fe2+ can be considered as conservative in the leachate. Stable isotopes, deuterium and 18O, indicated internal evaporation within the pile, and were used to trace recharge pulses from snowmelt. Isotope trends for 34S and 18O(SO4) indicated a lack of sulfate reduction and zones of active oxidation of pyrite, respectively. Results of numerical modeling of pyrite oxidation and gas and water transport were consistent with geochemical and isotopic trends and confirmed zones of high evaporation rate within the rock pile close to the slope. The results indicate that physical and chemical processes within the pile are strongly coupled and cannot be considered separately when oxidation rates are high and influence gas transport as a result of heat generation

  3. Phosphate Stability in Diagenetic Fluids Constrains the Acidic Alteration Model for Lower Mt. Sharp Sedimentary Rocks in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, J. A.; Schmidt, M. E.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Gellert, R.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; VanBommel, S. J.; McAdam, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars rover Curiosity has encountered silica-enriched bedrock (as strata and as veins and associated halos of alteration) in the largely basaltic Murray Fm. of Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater. Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) investigations of the Murray Fm. revealed decreasing Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Al, and higher S, as silica increased (Fig. 1). A positive correlation between SiO2 and TiO2 (up to 74.4 and 1.7 wt %, respectively) suggests that these two insoluble elements were retained while acidic fluids leached more soluble elements. Other evidence also supports a silica-retaining, acidic alteration model for the Murray Fm., including low trace element abundances consistent with leaching, and the presence of opaline silica and jarosite determined by CheMin. Phosphate stability is a key component of this model because PO4 3- is typically soluble in acidic water and is likely a mobile ion in diagenetic fluids (pH less than 5). However, the Murray rocks are not leached of P; they have variable P2O5 (Fig. 1) ranging from average Mars (0.9 wt%) up to the highest values in Gale Crater (2.5 wt%). Here we evaluate APXS measurements of Murray Fm. bedrock and veins with respect to phosphate stability in acidic fluids as a test of the acidic alteration model for the Lower Mt. Sharp rocks.

  4. From Migmatites to Plutons: Power Law Relationships in the Evolution of Magmatic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soesoo, Alvar; Bons, Paul D.

    2015-07-01

    Magma is generated by partial melting from micrometre-scale droplets at the source and may accumulate to form >100 km-scale plutons. Magma accumulation thus spans well over ten orders of magnitude in scale. Here we provide measurements of migmatitic leucosomes and granitic veins in drill cores from the Estonian Proterozoic basement and outcrops at Masku in SW Finland and Montemor-o-Novo, central Portugal. Despite the differences in size and number of measured leucosomes and magmatic veins, differences in host rock types and metamorphic grades, the cumulative width distribution of the studied magmatic leucosomes/veins follows a power law with exponents usually between 0.7 and 1.8. Published maps of the SE Australian Lachlan Fold Belt were used to investigate the distribution of granitoid pluton sizes. The granites occupy ca. 22 % of the 2.6 × 105 km2 area. The cumulative pluton area distributions show good power law distributions with exponents between 0.6 and 0.8 depending on pluton area group. Using the self-affine nature of pluton shapes, it is possible to estimate the total volume of magma that was expelled from the source in the 2.6 × 105 km2 map area, giving an estimated 0.8 km3 of magma per km2. It has been suggested in the literature that magma batches in the source merge to form ever-bigger batches in a self-organized way. This leads to a power law for the cumulative distribution of magma volumes, with an exponent m V between 1 for inefficient melt extraction, and 2/3 for maximum accumulation efficiency as most of the volume resides in the largest batches that can escape from the source. If m V ≥ 1, the mass of the magma is dominated by small batches; in case m = 2/3, about 50 % of all magma in the system is placed in a single largest batch. Our observations support the model that the crust develops a self-organized critical state during magma generation. In this state, magma batches accumulate in a non-continuous, step-wise manner to form ever

  5. The Tynong pluton, its mafic synplutonic sheets and igneous microgranular enclaves: the nature of the mantle connection in I-type granitic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, J. D.; Regmi, K.; Nicholls, I. A.; Weinberg, R.; Maas, R.

    2016-04-01

    In the Lachlan Orogen of south-eastern Australia, the high-level, postorogenic, 368-Ma, I-type Tynong pluton contains granitic to granodioritic rocks that crystallised from a variety of mainly crustally derived magmas emplaced in the shallow crust, in an extensional regime. The isotopic characteristics of the main plutonic rocks are relatively unevolved (87Sr/86Sr t ~ 0.705-0.706 and ɛNd t ~ -0.4 to 0.6), suggesting source rocks not long separated from the mantle. We infer that arc mafic to intermediate rocks and associated immature greywackes formed the main crustal source rocks and that these are located in the largely unexposed Neoproterozoic-Cambrian Selwyn Block that forms the basement. As exposed near its southern margin, the pluton also contains minor, pillowed sheet-like intrusions of quartz dioritic rock that show mainly mingling structures with the enclosing granodiorites, as well as some hybrid pods and fairly abundant igneous microgranular enclaves that we infer to have been derived from the quartz dioritic sheets. Despite this evidence of direct mantle input into the Tynong magma system, the main granodioritic series do not appear to have been formed by magma mixing processes. Of any I-type granite in the region, the Tynong pluton has perhaps the most direct connection with mantle magmas. Nevertheless, the main mantle connection here is probably in the mantle-derived protolith for these crustal magmas and in the mantle thermal event that gave rise to melting of the deep crust in the Selwyn Block. This degree of mantle connectedness seems typical for I-type granitic rocks worldwide.

  6. Paleocene plutonism and its tectonic implications, North Cascades, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.B. ); Bowring, S.A. ); Hoppe, W.J. )

    1989-09-01

    U-Pb zircon geochronology has identified a northwest-trending belt of Paleocene (68-59 Ma) plutons within the crystalline core of the North Cascades. Most of these plutons show amphibolite facies assemblages and solid-state foiliation. They document extensive Paleogene dynamothermal metamorphism in the core, and combined with other recent studies, demonstrate ongoing metamorphism from mid-Cretaceous to mid-Eocene time. The Paleocene plutons were emplaced during an interval that marked a magmatic lull throughout much of the northern Cordillera. The distribution of latest Cretaceous and Paleocene plutons suggests that magmatism in the North Cascades core records the same eastward retreat that occurred farther north in the Cordillera.

  7. Death Valley turtlebacks: Mesozoic contractional structures overprinted by Cenozoic extension and metamorphism beneath syn-extensional plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, T. L.; Miller, M.; Serpa, L.

    2008-07-01

    -thrust belts. Our work to the east of Death Valley suggests these thrusts were part of a NW trending thrust system that overprinted an older NE trending fold-thrust system that tracks into the Death Valley region from Nevada. These NW trending thrusts probably underlie all of the southern Black Mountains (south of the turtlebacks) and we suggest that pre-extensional structural relief along these basement thrusts placed basement at shallow crustal levels throughout what is now the Black Mountains; a conclusion consistent with the absence of rocks younger than Cambrian beneath Tertiary unconformities throughout the southern Death Valley region. In Late Miocene time, a major detachment system formed and the turtlebacks represent a mid-crustal shear zone developed during that time period, but this system is older, and structurally beneath younger detachments systems that comprise the Amargosa fault system. During motion on the detachment, an ~2km thick plutonic sheet was emplaced along the shear zone forming the Miocene plutonic assemblages of the Black Mountains, and produced upper amphibolite facies metamorphic assemblages along the floor of the pluton in what are now the Copper Canyon and Mormon Point turtlebacks, but the Badwater Turtleback escaped this metamorphism due to a different structural position. Motion continued along the floor of the pluton but syn-extensional folding produced structural relief along folds with axes parallel to the extension direction. Ultimately a new detachment system cut obliquely across the older extensional system, removing the roof of the pluton, but cutting down to its floor in the turtlebacks. This fault system formed a complex detachment system updip in the famous 'Amargosa Chaos', and removing the entire cover sequence from the Black Mountains (~10-12km of crustal section). The turtlebacks are therefore a composite structure in which extension contemporaneous with folding, presumably as a result of distributed transcurrent motion during

  8. Lead isotope systematics of some igneous rocks from the Egyptian Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, J. G.; Dixon, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Lead isotope data on whole-rock samples and two feldspar separates for a variety of Pan-African (late Precambrian) igneous rocks for the Egyptian Shield are presented. It is pointed out that the eastern desert of Egypt is a Late Precambrian shield characterized by the widespread occurrence of granitic plutons. The lead isotope ratios may be used to delineate boundaries between Late Precambrian oceanic and continental environments in northeastern Africa. The samples belong to three groups. These groups are related to a younger plutonic sequence of granites and adamellites, a plutonic group consisting of older tonalites to granodiorites, and the Dokhan volcanic suite.

  9. Character of the pre-Mesozoic basement along the edge of the western US craton: Pb isotopic evidence from Mesozoic plutonism

    SciTech Connect

    Wooden, J.L.; Kistler, R.W.; Robinson, A.; Tosdal, R.M. ); Wright, J.E. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    The pre-Mesozoic cratonic crust of the western US was a composite of provinces composed mostly of Archean and Early Proterozoic rocks that had been truncated by Late Proterozoic rifting and had some new Paleozoic crust added along the western edge. Mesozoic and younger geologic events greatly obscured this pre-Mesozoic basement along the craton edge. However, the Pb isotopic signatures of Mesozoic plutons provide significant clues to the character of the crust in which they formed or were emplaced because of a strong contrast in Pb concentration between low-Pb, mantle-derived melts and Pb-rich crust. Thus, magmas whether derived from the crust or the mantle with subsequent crustal interaction, will likely have Pb isotopic compositions that reflect those of the crust. In the western US the Pb isotopic compositions of Mesozoic plutonic rocks have strong regional characteristics. Within the Early Proterozoic Mojave crustal province, Mesozoic plutonic rocks have a large range of 206Pb/204Pb ratios that plot above the crustal average, relatively high 207Pb/204Pb ratios that suggest an Archean contribution, and Pb and Sr isotopic compositions that are not correlated and that do not distinguish age groups. At the southern and western edge of this province where some 1.1 Ga rocks are exposed, 208Pb/204Pb ratios lie along the average crust model curve. These data suggest that any individual pluton provides a composite Pb isotopic composition for a discrete vertical section of the crust. Pb isotopic compositions of plutons in the Sierra Nevada and Great Basin are very different from those described above with 206Pb/204Pb ratios starting at 18.6, well-correlated Pb isotopic trends starting below the crustal model but extending to values that require input from the very radiogenic Wyoming province Archean crust, and good correlations between Pb and (1) Sr isotopic compositions and (2) W-E geographic position.

  10. Petrogenesis of the Neoproterozoic Ngondo Plutonic complex (Cameroon, west central Africa): a case of late-collisional ferro-potassic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagne-Kamga, Gabriel

    2003-04-01

    The Ngondo complex is a late-collisional pluton, which was emplaced around 600 Ma along a N030° E strike-slip shear zone in the southwestern part of the Neoproterozoic Fold Belt of Cameroon. It comprises three successively emplaced plutonic groups of rocks: (i) mafic to felsic intrusive rocks (MFR), (ii) fine-grained granites (FGG) and (iii) coarse-grained granites (CGG). Late aplitic and pegmatite dykes were emplaced along brittle fractures in these plutons. The complex is metaluminous to weakly peraluminous, high-K, calc-alkaline to " trans-alkaline" ferro-potassic, with mineralogical and geochemical characteristic of I-type granites. The plutonic rocks are characterised by high Ba, Sr, Rb and ∑REE concentrations and low Ni and Cr contents in the mafic members. They also display chondrite-normalised REE patterns characterised by variable LREE enrichment, moderate to minor HREE fractionation with moderate to pronounced negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu∗: 0.6-0.9 (MFR), 0.2-0.5 (FGG), 0.3-0.7 (CGG)). Trace element distribution patterns for the three plutonic groups are similar with a distinctive depletion in Nb, Sr and Ti relative to other trace elements and a greater enrichment in LILE compared to HFSE. These plutonic groups present distinct evolutionary trends precluding their origin from differentiation of a single parental magma. The geochemical and isotopic data indicate that they derived from partial melting of heterogeneous (meta)-igneous mafic lower crustal materials, having possibly the composition of amphibolitised high-K calc-alkaline basaltic andesites and andesitic metagreywackes. Petrographic evidences such as the presence of quartz-ocelli, xenocrysts of feldspar, fragments of country rocks (migmatitic gneisses) strongly indicate that crustal contamination may have played an important role in the genesis of the plutonic rocks. This contamination process is further supported by the variation of major and trace elements together with Sr-Nd isotopic data

  11. Ductile strain rate recorded in the Symvolon syn-extensional plutonic body (Rhodope core complex, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrincione, Rosolino; Fazio, Eugenio; Ortolano, Gaetano; Fiannacca, Patrizia; Kern, Hartmut; Mengel, Kurt; Pezzino, Antonino; Punturo, Rosalda

    2016-04-01

    The present contribution deals with quantitative microstructural analysis, which was performed on granodiorites of the syn-tectonic Symvolon pluton (Punturo et al., 2014) at the south-western boundary of the Rhodope Core Complex (Greece). Our purpose is the quantification of ductile strain rate achieved across the pluton, by considering its cooling gradient from the centre to the periphery, using the combination of a paleopiezometer (Shimizu, 2008) and a quartz flow law (Hirth et al., 2001). Obtained results, associated with a detailed cooling history (Dinter et al., 1995), allowed us to reconstruct the joined cooling and strain gradient evolution of the pluton from its emplacement during early Miocene (ca. 700°C at 22 Ma) to its following cooling stage (ca. 500-300°C at 15 Ma). Shearing temperature values were constrained by means of a thermodynamic approach based on the recognition of syn-shear assemblages at incremental strain; to this aim, statistical handling of mineral chemistry X-Ray maps was carried out on microdomains detected at the tails of porphyroclasts. Results indicate that the strain/cooling gradients evolve "arm in arm" across the pluton, as also testified by the progressive development of mylonitic fabric over the magmatic microstructures approaching the host rock. References • Dinter, D. A., Macfarlane, A., Hames, W., Isachsen, C., Bowring, S., and Royden, L. (1995). U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Symvolon granodiorite: Implications for the thermal and structural evolution of the Rhodope metamorphic core complex, northeastern Greece. Tectonics, 14 (4), 886-908. • Shimizu, I. (2008). Theories and applicability of grain size piezometers: The role of dynamic recrystallization mechanisms. Journal of Structural Geology, 30 (7), 899-917. • Hirth, G., Teyssier, C., and Dunlap, J. W. (2001). An evaluation of quartzite flow laws based on comparisons between experimentally and naturally deformed rocks. International Journal of Earth

  12. Synkinematic high-K calc-alkaline plutons associated with the Pan-African Central Cameroon shear zone (W-Tibati area): Petrology and geodynamic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njanko, Théophile; Nédélec, Anne; Affaton, Pascal

    2006-04-01

    Four plutons from the W-Tibati area of central Cameroon crop out in close relationships with the Pan-African Adamawa ductile shear zone (Central Cameroon Shear Zone: CCSZ). These plutons include diorites, tonalites, granodiorites and granites, and most of them are porphyritic due to the abundance of pink K-feldspar megacrysts. Syn-kinematic magma emplacement is demonstrated by the elongate shape of the plutons and by magmatic and ductile (gneissic) foliations that strike parallel to or at a low angle with the CCSZ; the foliation obliquity is consistent with dextral transcurrent tectonics. Whole-rock geochemistry points to high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic magmatism. Mixing-mingling features can be observed in the field. However, fractional crystallization of plagioclase, amphibole, biotite (+ K-feldspar in the more felsic compositions) appears to have played a dominant role in the magmatic differentiation processes, as confirmed by mass balance calculations based on major elements. Isotopic signatures suggest that the magmas may have originated from different sources, i.e. either from a young mafic underplate for most magmas with ɛNdi(600 Ma) around -1 to -2 and Sri (600 Ma) around 0.705, or from an enriched lithospheric mantle for some diorites with ɛNdi(600 Ma) at -6 and Sri (600 Ma) at 0.7065; mixing with young crustal component is likely. The plutonic rocks of W-Tibati are similar to other Pan-African high-K calk-alkaline syn-kinematic plutons in western Cameroon. They also display striking similarities with high-K calk-alkaline plutons associated with the Patos and Pernambuco shear zones of the Borborema province in NE Brazil.

  13. Review of ''Draft - Area Recommendation Report for the Crystalline Repository Project'', January 1986. [Rolesville pluton and Elk River complex

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.R.

    1986-03-13

    The Draft-Area Recommendation Report identifies portions of crystalline rock bodies as proposed potentially acceptable sites for consideration as repositories of high-level radioactive waste. The review is in three parts. Part I is a general summary of the main comments, written in semi-technical language and without detailed documentation or references. It includes summaries of comments on the two preliminary candidate areas for a nuclear-waste repository in North Carolina (Rolesville pluton and Elk River complex) and on the rest of the report. The following two parts are written in the technical language of a geological report and include both documentation and references for each of the points discussed: Part II - Rolesville pluton, Site SE-4; Part III - Elk River complex, Site SE-5.

  14. The role of felsic microgranular enclaves on the evolution of some Neoproterozoic granite plutons in SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Adriana; Janasi, Valdecir A.; Pereira, Giovanna

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies of granite petrogenesis are strongly influenced by the finding that mafic microgranular enclaves (mme) witness frequent and volumetrically significant contribution of mantle-derived magmas to the origin and evolution of granitic melts, be it as a heat source and/or as a source compositional diversity. On the other hand, the origin of felsic microgranular enclaves (fme) is still a matter of debate; current hypotheses consider them as fragments of chilled margins, products of protracted hybridization between invading basic magmas and resident granite mushes or products of interaction between fairly similar melts. Felsic microgranular enclaves are widespread in various granite plutons from SE Brazil, in many cases surpassing mme in size and volume. Two groups of occurrences are studied in more detail illustrate different scenarios, with and without clear connections with mafic magmas. In the Mauá and Mogi das Cruzes plutons, made up of (muscovite)-biotite monzogranite, only fme occur, and the participation of more mafic melts is not evident from field structures or from whole rock and mineral chemical/isotope data. Our preferred model relate the fme to self-mixing events, suggesting mingling/mixing between highly viscous and chemically similar felsic endmembers. In the Itu Batholith, mme enclaves occur, albeit in very different volumes, in three chemically distinct plutons, all with A-type chemical affinities, In the rapakivi Salto Pluton, fme are large (dm to meter-sized) and widespread, except in a central body of porphyry granite. Scattered cm-sized mme of variable composition, some clearly brought as inclusions in the fme, are thought to represent different stages of hybridization, as indicated by disequilibrum features common also in the host syenogranites (rapakivi texture; mafic-rimmed quartz). The enclave assemblage of the Cabreúva Pluton is similarly dominated by fme, but larger mme and small diorite occurrences are evidence that basic magmas

  15. The Rho/ROCK pathway for lysophosphatidic acid-induced proteolytic enzyme expression and ovarian cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jeong, K J; Park, S Y; Cho, K H; Sohn, J S; Lee, J; Kim, Y K; Kang, J; Park, C G; Han, J W; Lee, H Y

    2012-09-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a biolipid that has diverse biological activities implicated in ovarian cancer initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown the critical role of the Rho/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway in LPA-induced ovarian cancer progression. However, detailed underlying mechanism by which the Rho/ROCK pathway induces ovarian cancer cell invasion is still incompletely understood. In the present study, we observed that the Rho/ROCK pathway is implicated in the production of proteolytic enzymes, leading to LPA-induced ovarian cancer cell invasion. LPA induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expression in CAOV-3 and PA-1 cells and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in SKOV-3 cells. LPA-induced proteolytic enzyme expression was required for the invasion of ovarian cancer cells expressing corresponding enzymes. Pretreatment of cells with a pharmacological inhibitor of Rho/ROCK (Y-27632) or overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of Rho (Rho N19) profoundly inhibited LPA-induced proteolytic enzyme expression as well as the invasive potential of ovarian cancer cells. In addition, transfection with dominant-negative Ras (Ras N17) significantly inhibited LPA-induced Rho activation as well as MMP-9 and uPA expression. Consistently, Y-27632 reduced LPA-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation that is critical for proteolytic enzyme expression and cellular invasion. Collectively, we demonstrate a mechanism by which LPA promotes ovarian cancer progression through coordinate activation of a Ras/Rho/ROCK/NF-κB signaling pathway and the proteolytic enzyme secretion, providing novel biomarkers and promising therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer cell progression.

  16. Development of modal layering in granites: a case study from the Carna Pluton, Connemara, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Kirsty; McCarthy, William; Hunt, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Modal layering in igneous rocks uniquely record dynamic processes operating in magma chambers and also host a large proportion of Earth's strategic mineral deposits. This research investigates the origin of biotite modal layering and primary pseudo-sedimentary structures in felsic magmas, by using a combination of Crystal Size Distribution (CSD) analysis and Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA) to determine the mechanisms responsible for the development of these structures in the Carna Pluton, Connemara, Ireland. The Carna Pluton is a composite granodiorite intrusion and is one of five plutons comprising the Galway Granite Complex (425 - 380 Ma). Prominent 30 cm thick modal layers are defined by sharp basal contacts to a biotite-rich (20%) granite, which grades upward over 10 cm into biotite-poor, alkali-feldspar megacrystic granite. The layering strikes parallel to, and dips 30-60° N toward the external pluton contact. Pseudo-sedimentary structures (cross-bedding, flame structures, slumping and crystal graded bedding) are observed within these layers. Petrographic observations indicate the layers contain euhedral biotite and fresh undeformed quartz and feldspar. Throughout the pluton, alkali-feldspar phenocrysts define a foliation that is sub-parallel to the strike of biotite modal layers. Together these observations indicate that the intrusion's concentric foliation, biotite layers and associated structures formed in the magmatic state and due to a complex interaction between magma flow and crystallisation processes. Biotite CSDs (>250 crystals per sample) were determined for nine samples across three biotite-rich layers in a single unit. Preliminary CSD results suggest biotite within basal contacts accumulated via fractional crystallisation within an upward-growing crystal pile, likely reflecting the yield strength of the magma as a limiting factor to gravitational settling of biotite. This is supported by the abrupt decrease in mean biotite crystal size across

  17. Rock specific hydraulic fracturing and matrix acidizing to enhance a geothermal system — Concepts and field results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Günter; Blöcher, Guido; Reinicke, Andreas; Brandt, Wulf

    2011-04-01

    Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) are engineered reservoirs developed to extract economic amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. To enhance the productivity of reservoirs, a site specific concept is necessary to actively make reservoir conditions profitable using specially adjusted stimulation treatments, such as multi fracture concepts and site specific well path design. The results of previously performed stimulation treatments in the geothermal research well GtGrSk4/05 at Groß Schönebeck, Germany are presented. The reservoir is located at a 4100-4300 m depth within the Lower Permian of the NE German Basin with a bottom-hole temperature of 150 °C. The reservoir rock is classified by two lithological units from bottom to top: volcanic rocks (andesitic rocks) and siliciclastics ranging from conglomerates to fine-grained sandstones (fluvial sediments). The stimulation treatments included multiple hydraulic stimulations and an acid treatment. In order to initiate a cross-flow from the sandstone layer, the hydraulic stimulations were performed in different depth sections (two in the sandstone section and one in the underlying volcanic section). In low permeability volcanic rocks, a cyclic hydraulic fracturing treatment was performed over 6 days in conjunction with adding quartz in low concentrations to maintain a sustainable fracture performance. Flow rates of up to 150 l/s were realized, and a total of 13,170 m 3 of water was injected. A hydraulic connection to the sandstone layer was successfully achieved in this way. However, monitoring of the water level in the offsetting well EGrSk3/90, which is 475 m apart at the final depth, showed a very rapid water level increase due to the stimulation treatment. This can be explained by a connected fault zone within the volcanic rocks. Two gel-proppant treatments were performed in the slightly higher permeability sandstones to obtain long-term access to the reservoir rocks. During each

  18. Late Precambrian alkaline plutons in southwest India: Geochronologic and rare-earth element constraints on Pan-African magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosh, M.; Iyer, S. S.; Vasconcellos, M. B. A.; Enzweiler, J.

    1989-12-01

    The Precambrian granulite facies terrain of southwestern India is intruded by a suite of alkali granite and syenite plutons. RbSr whole-rock isotope data for the Angadimogar syenite (AM) and the Peralimala alkali granite (PM), belonging to this suite, define isochron ages of 638 ± 28 and 750 ± 40 Ma, respectively, with initial {87Sr}/{86Sr} ratios of 0.7032 ± 0.0008 and 0.7031 ± 0.0008, respectively. These age data, together with data from previous studies, demonstrate long-lived magmatic activity in the time span from the late Proterozoic to the early Palaeozoic, broadly contemporaneous with Pan-African events in other fragments of the Gondwana supercontinent. REE patterns are reported for four plutons of this Pan-African alkali granite-syenite suite: Chengannoor (CR), Vellingiri (VL) and the two dated intrusions (AM and PM). CR and AM are characterised by high total REE, strongly LREE-enriched patterns with no Eu anomaly, associated with low Sr, Rb, U and Th. K 2O, {K2O }/{Na2O }, {K2O }/{MgO} and the agpaitic index are lower for these plutons as compared to the other two. The PM and VL intrusions have lower total REE and less strongly fractionated REE patterns, associated with high K 2O, {K2O }/{Na2O } and {K2O }/{MgO} ratios, high Sr and Rb levels, but low U and Th. The geochemical patterns in these rocks compare them well with A-type granites and their tectonic relations assign affinities to magmatism of within-plate type. The alkaline magmatism manifests an extensional phase associated with the pre-rift tectonics of the Indian continent within the Gondwana assemblage. A petrogenetic model is development for these plutons, involving decompression-induced melting of deep crustal source materials characterised by low initial {87Sr}/{86Sr} and high {K}/{Rb} ratios.

  19. Reactivity of Hontomín carbonate rocks to acidic solution injection: reactive "push-pull" tracer tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gaspari, Francesca; Cabeza, Yoar; Luquot, Linda; Rötting, Tobias; Saaltink, Maarten W.; Carrera, Jesus

    2014-05-01

    Several field tests will be carried out in order to characterize the reservoir for CO2 injection in Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) as part of the Compostilla project of "Fundación Ciudad de la Energía" (CIUDEN). Once injected, the dissolution of the CO2 in the resident brine will increase the acidity of the water and lead to the dissolution of the rocks, constituted mainly by carbonates. This mechanism will cause changes in the aquifer properties such as porosity and permeability. To reproduce the effect of the CO2 injection, a reactive solution with 2% of acetic acid is going to be injected in the reservoir and extracted from the same well (reactive "push-pull" tracer tests) to identify and quantify the geochemical reactions occurring into the aquifer. The reactivity of the rock will allow us also to evaluate the changes of its properties. Previously, theoretical calculations of Damkhöler numbers were done to determine the acid concentrations and injection flow rates needed to generate ramified-wormholes patterns, during theses "push-pull" experiments. The aim of this work is to present the results and a preliminary interpretation of the field tests.

  20. The Papoose Flat pluton, Inyo Mountains, California: A reassessment of the kinematics of deformation and emplacement history in the light of current fabric data

    SciTech Connect

    Law, R.D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Morgan, S.S. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Sylvester, A.G. . Dept. of Geology); Nyman, M. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    The Papoose Flat pluton of eastern California is characterized by intense crystal plastic deformation and dynamic recrystallization accompanied by stratigraphic attenuation around its western margin. Previously reported microstructures and crystal fabrics within quartz veins from the pluton's gneissic border facies and quartzites within the overlying aureole, indicated a dominant top-to-the-SE shear sense. Models proposed to account for this shear sense in these quartz-rich L-S tectonites have included: (a) magmatic wedging towards the NW beneath a static cover of sedimentary rocks, (b) SE directed overthrusting of the cover rocks during the pluton's cooling stage, and (c) synchronous magmatic wedging and overthrusting. New fabric analyses based on a more detailed field sampling program indicate that while the aureole quartzites display either symmetrical c-axis fabrics or asymmetric fabrics indicating a top-to-the-SE shear sense, the quartz veins in the gneissic border facies are characterized by asymmetric fabrics indicating a domainal (km scale) distribution of top-to-the-SE and top-to-the-NW shear senses. This domainal variation in shear sense is difficult to reconcile with a simple overthrusting model, but could be explained by a more complex model involving NW directed magmatic wedging accompanied and/or postdated by localized magma chamber inflation. Such localized inflation could result in a top-to-the-NW shear sense being superimposed on gneissic border facies quartz veins located beneath the NW dipping areas of the pluton's roof.

  1. Solution of rocks and refractory minerals by acids at high temperatures and pressures. Determination of silica after decomposition with hydrofluoric acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, I.; Rowe, J.J.

    1965-01-01

    A modified Morey bomb was designed which contains a removable nichromecased 3.5-ml platinium crucible. This bomb is particularly useful for decompositions of refractory samples for micro- and semimicro-analysis. Temperatures of 400-450?? and pressures estimated as great as 6000 p.s.i. were maintained in the bomb for periods as long as 24 h. Complete decompositions of rocks, garnet, beryl, chrysoberyl, phenacite, sapphirine, and kyanite were obtained with hydrofluoric acid or a mixture of hydrofluoric and sulfuric acids; the decomposition of chrome refractory was made with hydrochloric acid. Aluminum-rich samples formed difficultly soluble aluminum fluoride precipitates. Because no volatilization losses occur, silica can be determined on sample solutions by a molybdenum-blue procedure using aluminum(III) to complex interfering fluoride. ?? 1965.

  2. Multiphase transfer processes in waste rock piles producing acid mine drainage 1: Conceptual model and system characterization.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, R; Hockley, D; Smolensky, J; Gélinas, P

    2001-11-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) results from the oxidation of sulfides, mainly pyrite, present in mine wastes, either mill tailings or waste rock. This is the first of two papers describing the coupled physical processes taking place in waste rock piles undergoing AMD production. Since the oxidation of pyrite involves the consumption of oxygen and the production of heat, the oxidation process initiates coupled processes of gas transfer by diffusion and convection as well as heat transfer. These processes influence the supply of oxygen that is required to sustain the oxidation process. This first paper describes a general conceptual model of the interaction of these coupled transfer processes. This general conceptual model is illustrated by the physicochemical conditions observed at two large sites where extensive characterization programs revealed widely different properties. The South Dump of the Doyon mine in Canada is permeable and has a high pyrite oxidation rate leading to high temperatures (over 65 degrees C), thus making temperature-driven air convection the main oxygen supply mechanism. The Nordhalde of the Ronnenberg mining district in Germany contains lower permeability material which is less reactive, thus leading to a more balanced contribution of gaseous diffusion and convection as oxygen supply mechanisms. The field characterization and monitoring data at these sites were thoroughly analyzed to yield two coherent sets of representative physical properties. These properties are used in the second paper as a basis for applications of numerical simulation in AMD-producing waste rock piles. PMID:11695739

  3. A field and laboratory investigation of acid effects on largemouth bass, rock bass, black crappie, and yellow perch

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, J.G.; McCormick, J.H. ); Swenson, W.A. ); Simonson, T.D. ); Jensen, K.M. )

    1992-09-01

    One-half of Little Rock Lake, a small seepage lake in north-central Wisconsin, was gradually acidified by additions of sulfuric acid between August 1983 and November 1990. The ambient pH (6.1) of the lake was reduced at successive 2-year intervals to pH 5.6, 5.1, and 4.7. Responses of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, rock bass Ambloplites rupestris, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, and yellow perch Perca flavescens populations to the pH reductions were recorded and compared to the responses of these species during in situ bioassays and laboratory toxicity tests on embryos and larvae. Laboratory results obtained for largemouth bass and rock bass underestimated, black crappie results overestimated, and yellow perch results were similar to effects observed in field studies. In situ bioassays predicted field responses better than did laboratory toxicity tests. Laboratory results showed that monomeric Al concentrations of approximately 50 [mu]g/L, which were comparable to Al concentrations in the acidified half of the lake, altered low-pH toxicity. Reduced recruitment was observed in field populations at higher pH than that at which adult mortality was observed. The results indicate that laboratory toxicity tests with early life stages may not accurately predict field population responses and that results from laboratory tests should be field-validated whenever possible. 42 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Field and laboratory investigation of acid effects on largemouth bass, rock bass, black crappie, and yellow perch

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, J.G.; Swenson, W.A.; McCormick, J.H.; Simonson, T.D.; Jensen, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    One-half of Little Rock Lake, a small seepage lake in north-central Wisconsin, was gradually acidified by additions of sulfuric acid between August 1983 and November 1990. The ambient pH (6.1) of the lake was reduced at successive 2-year intervals to pH 5.6, 5.1, and 4.7. Responses of largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, rock bass Ambloplites rupestris, black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus, and yellow perch Perca flavescens populations to the pH reductions were recorded and compared to the responses of these species during in situ bioassays and laboratory toxicity tests on embryos and larvae. Laboratory results obtained for largemouth bass and rock bass underestimated, black crappie results overestimated, and yellow perch results were similar to effects observed in field studies. In situ bioassays predicted field responses better than did laboratory toxicity tests. Laboratory results showed that monomeric Al concentrations of approximately 50 microgram/l, which were comparable to Al concentrations in the acidified half of the lake, altered low-pH toxicity. Reduced recruitment was observed in field populations at higher pH than that at which adult mortality was observed. The results indicate that laboratory toxicity tests with early life stages may not accurately predict field population responses and that results from laboratory tests should be field-validated whenever possible.

  5. Agronomic effectiveness of biofertilizers with phosphate rock, sulphur and Acidithiobacillus for yam bean grown on a Brazilian tableland acidic soil.

    PubMed

    Stamford, N P; Santos, P R; Santos, C E S; Freitas, A D S; Dias, S H L; Lira, M A

    2007-04-01

    Phosphate rocks have low available P and soluble P fertilizers have been preferably used in plant crop production, although economic and effective P sources are needed. Experiments were carried out on a Brazilian Typic Fragiudult soil with low available P to evaluate the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate rock (PR) compared with soluble phosphate fertilizer. Yam bean (Pachyrhizus erosus) inoculated with rhizobia (strains NFB 747 and NFB 748) or not inoculated was the test crop. Biofertilizers were produced in field furrows by mixing phosphate rock (PR) and sulphur inoculated with Acidithiobacillus (S+Ac) in different rates (50, 100, 150 and 200 g S kg(-1) PR), with 60 days of incubation. Treatments were carried out with PR; biofertilizers B(50), B(100), B(150), B(200); triple super phosphate (TSP); B(200) without Acidithiobacillus and a control treatment without P application (P(0)). TSP and biofertilizers plus S inoculated with Acidithiobacillus increased plant growth. Soil acidity and available P increased when biofertilizers B(150) and B(200) were applied. We conclude that biofertilizers may be used as P source; however, long term use will reduce soil pH and potentially reduce crop growth. PMID:16815009

  6. A topaz- and amazonite-bearing leucogranite pluton in eastern Xinjiang, NW China and its zoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lian-xing; Zhang, Zun-zhong; Wu, Chang-zhi; Gou, Xiao-qin; Liao, Jing-juan; Yang, Hao

    2011-10-01

    The highly evolved Baishitouquan (BST) beryl-mineralised and topaz-bearing amazonite granite pluton is situated in the eastern Tianshan orogen of northwestern China. This pluton exhibits five well-exposed lithological zones, which, gradational from the lowest level, are leucogranite (zone-a), amazonite-bearing granite (zone-b), amazonite granite (zone-c), topaz-bearing amazonite granite (zone-d) and topaz albite granite (zone-e). The rocks are composed mainly of quartz, albite, and K-feldspar with varying amounts of topaz and amazonite. Quartz and topaz phenocrysts are the earliest phases that crystallised from the melt. Amazonite which replaced albite and K-feldspar was formed at the late magmatic stage or during the magmatic-hydrothermal transition. Geochemically, this pluton is characterised by high F (>2 wt.%) and Rb (499.5-1087.04 ppm), low P 2O 5 (⩽0.06 wt.%), Na 2O > K 2O, A/NKC = 1.00-1.11, low ratios of K/Rb, Al/Ga, Y/Ho, Zr/Ha and Nb/Ta, Σ14 REE = 28.6-231.9 ppm with gull wing-shaped distribution patterns (La CN/Lu CN = 0.11-0.68, Eu/Eu * = 0.0005-0.0110) and tetrad effects, and δ 18O = 9.75-7.32‰. Melt and fluid-melt inclusions coexist with liquid and vapour inclusions. The rocks were originated from a highly evolved granitic magma. The BST pluton exhibits transition in the following aspects from zone-a to zone-e: (1) As quartz and topaz phenocrysts progressively increase in size and crystal euhedral shape, rock textures change from equigranular to porphyritic. (2) Amazonite begins to appear in zone-b and becomes most concentrated in zone-c, whereas topaz begins to appear in zone-d becoming highly concentrated in zone-e. (3) Li and (Al + Ti) increase in white mica. (4) Petrochemically, there are general trends of increasing F, Al 2O 3 and Na 2O, and decreasing SiO 2, (Fe 2O 3 + FeO + MgO + MnO) and K 2O. Plots of normative compositions on the Qz-Ab-Or diagram move gradually towards the Ab apex. (5) Overall, Cr, Ni, Co, V, W, Nb, Zr, U, Th and Y

  7. A petrologic comparison of Triassic plutonism in the San Gabriel and Mule Mountains, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, A.P. ); Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L. )

    1990-11-10

    Triassic magmatism in the southwest US Cordillera forms a semicontinuous magmatic arc extending from northwestern Nevada to southeastern California. Quartz monzodioritic and quartz monzonitic rocks and associated diorites and granites are widespread in southeastern California, and the authors suggest that these rocks represent exposure of a structurally deeper part of the Triassic arc, where it was emplaced into comparatively thick Proterozoic crust. Elemental and isotopic data suggest that Triassic quartz monzodiorites and quartz monzonites in the Mule and San Gabriel Mountains were derived from a relatively undepleted, nonradiogenic mafic lithospheric source, with virtually no upper crustal interaction. Very limited data for associated Triassic ( ) diorites indicate a wide range in composition and a surprisingly radiogenic isotopic signature. Younger Triassic( ) granites record a strong geochemical signature of interaction with continental crust, including inherited zircon and high initial Sr ratios but comparatively less radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions. The major and trace element geochemistry of Late Triassic plutonic rocks in southeastern California is similar in many respects to akalic components of the Triassic arc in the Mojave Desert. However, contemporaneous rocks farther north have a calc-alkalic signature, perhaps reflecting the variation in age and composition of lithosphere across which the Triassic arc was constructed.

  8. Polymerization on the rocks: negatively-charged alpha-amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Bohler, C.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Oligomers of the negatively-charged amino acids, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and O-phospho-L-serine are adsorbed by hydroxylapatite and illite with affinities that increase with oligomer length. In the case of oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite, addition of an extra residue results in an approximately four-fold increase in the strength of adsorption. Oligomers much longer than the 7-mer are retained tenaciously by the mineral. Repeated incubation of short oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite or illite with activated monomer leads to the accumulation of oligomers at least 45 units long. The corresponding reactions of aspartic acid and O-phospho-L-serine on hydroxylapatite are less effective in generating long oligomers, while illite fails to accumulate substantial amounts of long oligomers of aspartic acid or of O-phospho-L-serine.

  9. Stabile Chlorine Isotope Study of Martian Shergottites and Nakhlites; Whole Rock and Acid Leachates and Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C-Y; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    We have established a precise analytical technique for stable chlorine isotope measurements of tiny planetary materials by TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) [1], for which the results are basically consistent with the IRMS tech-nique (gas source mass spectrometry) [2,3,4]. We present here results for Martian shergottites and nakhlites; whole rocks, HNO3-leachates and residues, and discuss the chlorine isotope evolution of planetary Mars.

  10. Extent and bioavailability of trace metal contamination due to acid rock drainage in Pennask Creek, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, L. D.; Li, L. Y.; Hall, K. J.

    2010-05-01

    Pennask Creek is one of the most important rainbow trout producing streams in British Columbia (BC). Much of the Pennask Creek watershed is located within a BC Parks Protected Area, which was set aside to protect the spawning and rearing habitat of this wild rainbow trout population. Construction of Highway 97C, which bisects the Pennask Creek watershed, resulted in the exposure of a highly pyritic rock formation, which began releasing acid rock drainage and causing metals to be leached into Highway Creek, a tributary of Pennask Creek. Previous studies commissioned by the BC Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure indicate that Highway Creek yields fewer invertebrates and elevated levels of some metals in the water when compared with downstream sites in Pennask Creek. This study examines the impacts of this acid rock drainage and metal leaching by determining the extent of trace metal contamination in the water and sediments of the Pennask Creek watershed and determining the bioavailability of these trace metals. Preliminary results indicate concentrations of Al, Cu, and Zn in the water as well as levels of total As, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn in the sediments that are above the BC Water and Sediment Quality Guidelines for the Protection of Aquatic Life. The highest level of trace metal contamination is found in Highway Creek, downstream of Highway 97C, with concentrations generally returning to near background levels downstream of the confluence with Pennask Creek. Levels of Cu in the water and Zn in the sediments appear to be of greatest concern in areas furthest from the highway.

  11. Development of Megacrysts and Magmatic Fabrics in Plutons via Thermal Cycling and Thermal Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazner, A. F.; Ratner, J.; Mills, R. D.

    2009-12-01

    selective dissolution and growth of dendritic crystallites of diverse orientation in the starting material. These results have important implications for interpreting texture in plutonic rocks. Formation of megacrysts via transfer of mass from small to large crystals during thermal cycling, a form of Ostwald ripening, explains formation of K-feldspar megacrysts late in a pluton's history, as required by phase equilibria. Production of lineation or foliation by crystal growth in a thermal gradient may explain fabrics that do not make structural sense. These observations suggest that many common interpretations of plutonic fabric must be reexamined.

  12. Zircon U-Pb ages, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic constraints on petrogenesis of the Tarom-Olya pluton, Alborz magmatic belt, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabatian, Ghasem; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Honarmand, Maryam; Neubauer, Franz

    2016-02-01

    A petrological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic study was carried out on the Tarom-Olya pluton, Iran, in the central part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. The pluton is composed of diorite, monzonite, quartz-monzonite and monzogranite, which form part of the Western Alborz magmatic belt. LA-ICP-MS analyses of zircons yield ages from 35.7 ± 0.8 Ma to 37.7 ± 0.5 Ma, interpreted as the ages of crystallization of magmas. Rocks from the pluton have SiO2 contents ranging from 57.0 to 69.9 wt.%, high K2O + Na2O (5.5 to 10.3 wt.%) and K2O/Na2O ratio of 0.9 to 2.0. Geochemical discrimination criteria show I-type and shoshonitic features for the studied rocks. All investigated rocks are enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs), large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), depleted in high-field strength elements (HFSEs), and show weak or insignificant Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.57-1.02) in chondrite-normalized trace element patterns. The Tarom-Olya pluton samples also show depletions in Nb, Ta and Ti typical of subduction-related arc magmatic signatures. The samples have relatively low ISr (0.7047-0.7051) and positive εNd(36 Ma) (+ 0.39 to + 2.10) values. The Pb isotopic ratios show a (206Pb/204Pb)i ratio of 18.49-18.67, (207Pb/204Pb)i ratio of 15.58-15.61 and (208Pb/204Pb)i ratio of 38.33-38.77. The εHf(t) values of the Tarom-Olya pluton zircons vary from - 5.9 to + 8.4, with a peak at + 2 to + 4. The depleted mantle Hf model ages for the Tarom-Olya samples are close to 600 Ma. These isotope evidences indicate contribution of juvenile sources in petrogenesis of the Tarom-Olya pluton. Geochemical and isotopic data suggest that the parental magma of the Tarom-Olya pluton was mainly derived from a sub-continental lithospheric mantle source, which was metasomatized by fluids and melts from the subducted Neotethyan slab with a minor crustal contribution. Subsequent hot asthenospheric upwelling and lithospheric extension caused decompression melting in the final stage of

  13. Palaeomagnetic constraints from granodioritic plutons (Jiaodong Peninsula): New insights on Late Mesozoic continental extension in Eastern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Nicolas; Chen, Yan; Augier, Romain; Gumiaux, Charles; Lin, Wei; Faure, Michel; Monié, Patrick; Choulet, Flavien; Wu, Fuyuan; Zhu, Rixiang; Wang, Qingchen

    2011-08-01

    Mechanism and kinematics of the Late Mesozoic continental extension event of Eastern Asia are still debated. In order to better constrain its evolution, two granodioritic plutons of the Jiaodong Peninsula have been chosen as targets for a time-constrained palaeomagnetic study. Indeed, plutons are devoid of visible deformation, did not experience rotation along horizontal axis and are precisely dated by U/Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar methods. Multidomain (MD) magnetite has been identified as the principal magnetic remanent carrier. The interpolation of existing and new U/Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar ages revealed that characteristic remanent magnetisation was acquired in a narrow range of 116 ± 2 Ma. Twenty out of 27 sites present stable magnetic directions calculated from high-temperature or high-coercive components. The observations of the solo normal magnetic polarity for this palaeomagnetic collection and of the magnetic remanent age consistent with the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (CNS) argue that the characteristic magnetic remanence may be considered as primary. Detailed field observations of the intrusive relationship between the plutons and country rocks and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) study reveal the absence of the subsequent deformation of plutons, or rigid rotation of plutons along a horizontal axis. Two palaeomagnetic poles have been therefore calculated from these plutons. Among 12 out 15 Cretaceous palaeomagnetic poles, including the two new poles provided by this study, from the Jiaodong Peninsula and on both sides of Tan-Lu and Muping-Jimo faults are statistically consistent. As a result, the Jiaodong Peninsula behaved as a rigid block as internal deformation appears negligible. The remaining three derived poles are probably due to the secular variation or/and the vicinity of fault zones near of the palaeomagnetic sampling site. Thus, they can not be applied to the peninsula-scaled tectonics. Comparison of these time-constrained Cretaceous

  14. Emplacement and deformation of the Fomopéa pluton: Implication for the Pan-African history of Western Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njanko, T.; Nédélec, A.; Kwékam, M.; Siqueira, R.; Esteban, L.

    2010-03-01

    The Fomopéa pluton (622-613 Ma) is located in the western part of the Pan-African belt in Cameroon. It comprises of 3 units: biotite-hornblende granitoids (BHG), biotite monzogranites (BmG) and edenite syenogranites (EsG). The BHG unit displays magnetic fabrics characterized by foliations gently dipping towards the ESE and ENE-trending lineations (D1 event). Microstructures are magmatic to submagmatic. In discrete N-S deformation bands (D2), lineations are rotated towards the North and microstructures indicate solid-state deformation at mid- to low-T conditions, with kinematic indicators pointing to a sinistral motion. The second unit, BmG, displays lineation trajectories suggesting emplacement during the D2 event. The EsG unit displays fabrics consistent with a later emplacement, with no superposed deformation. The last event (D3) corresponds to a dextral shear zone, that runs along the southeastern border of the Fomopéa pluton. It was responsible for protomylonitic deformation of the granitic rocks in greenschist facies conditions, whereas the core of the shear zone registered higher temperatures and strain. This shear zone induced a rejuvenation of the Rb/Sr isotopic system in the pluton at ca 572 Ma. It belongs to the Central Cameroon shear zone system, regarded as the prolongation of the dextral Patos shear zone system in Brazil.

  15. Lipid, fatty acid and protein content of late larval to early juvenile stages of the western rock lobster, Panulirus cygnus.

    PubMed

    Limbourn, Andrew J; Nichols, Peter D

    2009-03-01

    Lipid, fatty acid and protein content were determined individually on 7 phyllosomata, 69 clear pueruli, 286 pre-moult pueruli, and 86 juvenile western rock lobster (WRL) collected from four locations between the settlement seasons 2000 to 2006 to evaluate compositional changes during the non-feeding puerulus stage. Only the lipid content, particularly the phospholipids, decreased significantly with development. Protein declined sharply following moult to the juvenile. PL comprised between 86-94% of total lipid in all animals, and declined most between phyllosomata and clear pueruli (238.5 to 121.4 mg g(-1) DW) (p<0.001). Triacylglycerols were the only lipid to increase in absolute amounts with development, but declined 53% on average following moult to juvenile. This increase in TAG is likely due to the conversion of phospholipids to triacylglycerols. Monounsaturated fatty acids were the main energy form utilised during benthic development while polyunsaturated fatty acids showed a high degree of sparing. The n-3:n-6 fatty acid ratio of juveniles indicates that they may be approaching critically low levels of stored lipid energy reserves. Both protein, and lipid, declined sharply from the final puerulus phase to the juvenile confirming that a high energetic demand is required to fuel the moulting process.

  16. Granitoid emplacement by multiple sheeting during Variscan dextral transpression: The Saint-Laurent - La Jonquera pluton (Eastern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Philippe; Druguet, Elena; Castaño, Lina Marcela; Gleizes, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    The structural study of the Saint-Laurent - La Jonquera pluton (Eastern Pyrenees), a Variscan composite laccolithic intrusion emplaced in metasedimentary and gneissic rocks of the Roc de Frausa dome, by means of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) technique has allowed the determination of the nature and orientation of its magmatic fabrics. The magmatic foliation has a predominant NE-SW strike and the mean lineation is also NE-SW trending with a shallow plunge. A strain gradient is measured so that the tonalites to granodiorites that form the basal parts of the pluton, and are intruded into amphibolite-facies metamorphic rocks, recorded the highest anisotropies, whereas the monzogranites and leucogranites, emplaced into upper crustal, low-grade metamorphic rocks, are weakly deformed. These results point to the synkinematic sequential emplacement of multiple granitoid sheets, from less to more differentiated magmatic stages, during the Late Carboniferous D2 event characterized by an E-W-trending dextral transpression. The magmatic foliation appears locally disturbed by the effects of two tectonic events. The first of them (D3) produced mylonitization of granitoids along NW-SE retrograding shear zones and open folds in the host Ediacaran metasediments of the Roc de Frausa massif, likely during late Variscan times. Interference between D2 and D3 structures was responsible for the dome geometry of the whole Roc de Frausa massif. The second and last perturbation consisted of local southward tilting of the granitoids coupled to the Mesozoic-Cenozoic cover during the Alpine.

  17. Paleozoic subduction complex and Paleozoic-Mesozoic island-arc volcano-plutonic assemblages in the northern Sierra terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Richard E.; Girty, Gary H.; Harwood, David S.; Schweickert, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    This field trip provides an overview of the stratigraphic and structural evolution of the northern Sierra terrane, which forms a significant part of the wall rocks on the western side of the later Mesozoic Sierra Nevada batholith in California. The terrane consists of a pre-Late Devonian subduction complex (Shoo Fly Complex) overlain by submarine arc-related deposits that record the evolution of three separate island-arc systems in the Late Sevonian-Early Mississippian, Permian, and Late Triassic-Jurassic. The two Paleozoic are packages and the underlying Shoo Fly Complex have an important bearing on plate-tectonic processes affecting the convergent margin outboard of the Paleozoic Cordilleran miogeocline, although their original paleogeographic relations to North America are controversial. The third arc package represents an overlap assemblage that ties the terrane to North America by the Late Triassic and helps constrain the nature and timing of Mesozoic orogenesis. Several of the field-trip stops examine the record of pre-Late Devonian subduction contained in the Shoo Fly Complex, as well as the paleovolcanology of the overlying Devonian to Jurassic arc rocks. Excellent glaciated exposures provide the opportunity to study a cross section through a tilted Devonian volcano-plutonic association. Additional stops focus on plutonic rocks emplaced during the Middle Jurassic arc magmatism in the terrane, and during the main pulse of Cretaceous magmatism in the Sierra Nevada batholith to the east.

  18. Exploring the plutonic crust at a fast-spreading ridge:new drilling at Hess Deep

    SciTech Connect

    Gillis, Kathryn M.; Snow, Jonathan E.; Klaus, Adam; Guerin, Gilles; Abe, Natsue; Akizawa, Norikatsu; Ceuleneer, Georges; Cheadle, Michael J.; Adriao, Alden de Brito; Faak, Kathrin; Falloon, Trevor J.; Friedman, Sarah A.; Godard, Marguerite M.; Harigane, Yumiko; Horst, Andrew J.; Hoshide, Takashi; Ildefonse, Benoit; Jean, Marlon M.; John, Barbara E.; Koepke, Juergen H.; Machi, Sumiaki; Maeda, Jinichiro; Marks, Naomi E.; McCaig, Andrew M.; Meyer, Romain; Morris, Antony; Nozaka, Toshio; Python, Marie; Saha, Abhishek; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2013-02-28

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Hess Deep Expedition 345 was designed to sample lower crustal primitive gabbroic rocks that formed at the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) in order to test models of magmatic accretion and the intensity of hydrothermal cooling at depth. The Hess Deep Rift was selected to exploit tectonic exposures of young EPR plutonic crust, building upon results from ODP Leg 147 as well as more recent submersible, remotely operated vehicle, and near-bottom surveys. The primary goal was to acquire the observations required to test end-member crustal accretion models that were in large part based on relationships from ophiolites, in combination with mid-ocean ridge geophysical studies. This goal was achieved with the recovery of primitive layered olivine gabbros and troctolites with many unexpected mineralogical and textural relationships, such as the abundance of orthopyroxene and the preservation of delicate skeletal olivine textures.

  19. Pluton emplacement and magmatic arc construction: A model from the Patagonian batholith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Robert; Nelson, Eric; Weaver, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    A model of batholithic construction in Andean arcs and its applicability to possibly similar environments in the past is described. Age and compositional data from the Patagonian batholith of southern Chile show a long history of magmatism in any given area (total age range is 15 to 157 Ma), but different regions appear to have different magmatic starting ages. Furthermore, mafic rocks seem to be the oldest components of any given region. An assembly line model involving semicontinuous magmatism and uplift was outlined, which has implications for other terranes: uplift rates will be proportional to observed ranges in age, and total uplift will be proportional to the age of the oldest pluton in any given area. It is suggested that misleading results would be obtained if only small areas of similar terranes in the Archean were available for study.

  20. Geology and geochemistry of the Mount Riley-Mount Cox pluton, Dona Ana County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbelman, D.R.; Siems, D.F.; Kilburn, J.E.; Hubert, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Mount Riley-Mount Cox area is comprised of a relatively homogeneous pluton of rhyodacite rising some 1600 feet above the La Mesa surface. The pluton, of apparent Tertiary age, intrudes Cretaceous sedimentary rocks and Tertiary ( ) latite and tuff. The rhyodacite is holocrystalline, light gray to pinkish gray, porphyritic to microporphyritic, and locally banded. Phenocrysts include hornblende, quartz, biotite, and calcite. The phenocrysts range in size from 0.2 to 2 mm and make up one to fifteen percent of the rock. The phenocrysts often display a glomerophyric texture within a trachytic groundmass. The groundmass ranges from cryptocrystalline to very fine grained and is composed of plagioclase, quartz, potassium feldspar, hornblende/biotite, and iron-oxide material. Locally, the rhyodacite displays millimeter-scale banding and a poikilitic texture consisting of quartz oikiocrysts and plagioclase chadocrysts. The rhyodacite averages 68.74%, SiO/sub 2/, 0.39% TiO/sub 2/, 16.40% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 2.87% Fe/sub t/, 0.10% MnO, 1.21% MgO, 2.56% CaO, 3.79% Na/sub 2/O, and 3.96% K/sub 2/O. The rhyodacite is cut by veins and veinlets of brown to white calcite. The veins attain a maximum thickness of one meter, are locally bordered by calcite-cemented breccia zones, and locally include pyrite. The veins trend north or northwest, consistent with regional trends for the Rio Grande rift and the Texas Lineament, respectively. Sixty-five samples of rhyodacite, breccia, and vein were analyzed for 31 elements by emission-spectrographic methods. Trace-element data suggestive of hydrothermal mineralization was not recognized.

  1. Petrology and geochemistry of the Russian peak pluton, Klamath Mountains, northern California

    SciTech Connect

    Cotkin, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Jurassic Russian Peak pluton consists of an older peridotite-to-quartz diorite complex intruded by younger granodiorite. U-Pb ages of 159 Ma have been obtained for both units. The peridotite-to-quartz diorite complex consists principally of quartz diorite; however, cumulate ultramafic rocks occur where it is in contact with Ordovician serpentinite, and the following zonation from serpentinite to quartz diorite is present: peridotite, pyroxenite, hornblendite, eucrite, and diorite. In order to evaluate the petrogenesis of the pluton a combination of field, petrographic, microprobe, X-ray fluorescence, and instrumental neutron activation analysis, and Rb-Sr data have been collected. Major and trace element modeling indicates that quartz-rich quartz diorite formed by crystallization, quartz-poor quartz diorite by accumulation of crystals plus trapped liquid, and ultramafic rocks by assimilation of serpentinite. Granodiorite on the other hand can be modeled by crystallization alone, with the precipitation of plagioclase, amphibole, and biotite accounting for the major and minor element variations. REE modeling indicates that a garnet-clinopyroxene amphibolite is a plausible source. A variety of techniques have been used to decipher the conditions of crystallization in each unit, including a comparison of paragenesis with crystallization experiments, geological thermometry and barometry, and phase equilibria. Pressure of intrusion is considered to have been approximately 3 kbar. The peridotite-to-quartz diorite complex intruded at about 1000/sup 0/C and was completely crystalline at 790/sup 0/C. Granodiorite intruded at somewhat lower temperatures and was completely crystalline at about 700/sup 0/C. The oxygen fugacity for both units was slightly above QFM. At its solidus, granodiorite was saturated with H/sub 2/O, which may account for the pervasive deuteric alteration of this unit.

  2. Magmatic and solid state structures of the Abu Ziran pluton: Deciphering transition from thrusting to extension in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Harald; Loizenbauer, Jürgen; Wallbrecher, Eckart

    2014-11-01

    The 606 Ma old Abu Ziran granite of the Eastern Desert of Egypt intruded the southern margin of the Meatiq dome in a sinistral shear extensional setting. Its emplacement was enabled by a system of NW-trending sinistral shears, related Riedel shears and N-S extensional shear zones and faults. Magmatic flow was east-directed and controlled by Riedel shears that progressively rotated to an orientation favourable for extension. Strain markers that document magmatic flow show eastward decreasing strain together with strain increase from pluton centre to margins. This is explained by Newtonian flow between non-parallel plates and differences in flow velocities across the pluton. Solid state fabrics including shear fabrics, orientation of late magmatic dykes and quartz tension gashes, together with quartz C-axes distributions, document southward extensional shear within the solidified pluton and adjacent host rocks. Extensional shear is correlated with exhumation of the Meatiq dome coeval and soon after pluton solidification (585 Ma). Pressure temperature evolutionary paths, derived from fluid inclusions, show a clockwise path with exhumation by isothermal decompression in the Meatiq dome. By contrast, the overlying volcanosedimentary nappes experienced an anti-clockwise path released by temperature rise due to pluton emplacement followed by isobaric cooling. Quartz fabrics indicate high-temperature coaxial N-S flow in the northern Meatiq dome and lower-temperature, non-coaxial southward flow within the overlaying superficial nappe. This is explained by the exhumation process itself that progressively localised into simple shear domains when rocks approached higher crustal levels. Late extension at ca. 580 Ma was pure shear dominated and resulted in reversal of shear, now dextral, in the western Meatiq shear zone.

  3. Rocks, soils, and water quality. Relationships and implications for effects of acid precipitation on surface water in the northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, E.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Protas, A.

    1981-05-01

    Distribution of rocks and soils in Northeast counties were investigated for the degree to which they influence pH and alkalinity in surface waters. Using 283 counties, path analysis resulted in two models of equivalent explanatory power. Each model indicated the importance of both rocks and soils as determinants of pH and alkalinity in surface waters, and as important factors in the sensitivity of natural waters to acidification from acid precipitation. Previous studies have emphasized the importance of bedrock geology, at the expense of knowledge about soils, in an understanding of waters sensitive to the effects of acid precipitation. Our regional analysis found that rocks were contributors to the buffering capacity of surface water; however, the presence of a large percentage of alfisol soils better indicates locations of waters with higher levels of alkalinity, and thus of greater resistance to effects of acid rain.

  4. Experimental Acid Weathering of Fe-Bearing Mars Analog Minerals and Rocks: Implications for Aqueous Origin of Hematite-Bearing Sediments in Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Koster, A. M.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    A working hypothesis for Meridiani evaporite formation involves the evaporation of fluids derived from acid weathering of Martian basalts and subsequent diagenesis [1, 2]. However, there are no reported experimental studies for the formation of jarosite and gray hematite (spherules), which are characteristic of Meridiani rocks from Mars analog precursor minerals. A terrestrial analog for hematite spherule formation from basaltic rocks under acidic hydrothermal conditions has been reported [3], and we have previously shown that the hematite spherules and jarosite can be synthetically produced in the laboratory using Fe3+ -bearing sulfate brines under hydrothermal conditions [4]. Here we expand and extend these studies by reacting Mars analog minerals with sulfuric acid to form Meridiani-like rock-mineral compositions. The objective of this study is to provide environmental constraints on past aqueous weathering of basaltic materials on Mars.

  5. Natural radioactivity and radiation index of the major plutonic bodies in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, A; Christofides, G; Koroneos, A; Papadopoulou, L; Papastefanou, C; Stoulos, S

    2013-10-01

    The natural radioactivity of the major plutonic bodies in Greece, as well as the assessment of any potential health hazard due to their usage as decorative building materials is studied. One hundred and twenty one samples from every major plutonic body in Greece, including various rock-types from gabbro to granite, have been measured for their natural radioactivity using γ-spectrometry methodology. According to the experimental results, the natural radioactivity levels were ranged up to 315 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, up to 376 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th and up to 1632 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K, with arithmetic mean values and standard deviations of 74 (±51), 85 (±54) and 881 (±331) Bq kg(-1) respectively, which are below the international representative mean values for granite stones. The excess on the effective dose received annually indoors due to granite tiles usage is estimated considering a standard room model where granite tiles with 1.5 cm in thickness cover only the floor of the room. The increment on the external γ-radiation effective dose rate shows a Gaussian distribution well dispersed below 0.3 mSv y(-1), presenting a mean value of 0.14 (±0.06) mSv y(-1). In case of the internal α-radiation a log-normal distribution is appeared scattering below 0.5 mSv y(-1) with a mean value 0.19 (±0.13) mSv y(-1), for a well-ventilated living environment. In case of a poor-ventilated room the increment on internal effective dose rate is estimated with a mean value 0.27 (±0.19) mSv y(-1) scattering below 0.8 mSv y(-1). The majority of the samples increase the external as well as the internal dose less than 30% of the maximum permitted limit of the effective dose rate. Therefore, at least from radiological point of view, the plutonic rocks of Greece could be safely used as decorative building materials. PMID:23827232

  6. Natural radioactivity and radiation index of the major plutonic bodies in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, A; Christofides, G; Koroneos, A; Papadopoulou, L; Papastefanou, C; Stoulos, S

    2013-10-01

    The natural radioactivity of the major plutonic bodies in Greece, as well as the assessment of any potential health hazard due to their usage as decorative building materials is studied. One hundred and twenty one samples from every major plutonic body in Greece, including various rock-types from gabbro to granite, have been measured for their natural radioactivity using γ-spectrometry methodology. According to the experimental results, the natural radioactivity levels were ranged up to 315 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, up to 376 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th and up to 1632 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K, with arithmetic mean values and standard deviations of 74 (±51), 85 (±54) and 881 (±331) Bq kg(-1) respectively, which are below the international representative mean values for granite stones. The excess on the effective dose received annually indoors due to granite tiles usage is estimated considering a standard room model where granite tiles with 1.5 cm in thickness cover only the floor of the room. The increment on the external γ-radiation effective dose rate shows a Gaussian distribution well dispersed below 0.3 mSv y(-1), presenting a mean value of 0.14 (±0.06) mSv y(-1). In case of the internal α-radiation a log-normal distribution is appeared scattering below 0.5 mSv y(-1) with a mean value 0.19 (±0.13) mSv y(-1), for a well-ventilated living environment. In case of a poor-ventilated room the increment on internal effective dose rate is estimated with a mean value 0.27 (±0.19) mSv y(-1) scattering below 0.8 mSv y(-1). The majority of the samples increase the external as well as the internal dose less than 30% of the maximum permitted limit of the effective dose rate. Therefore, at least from radiological point of view, the plutonic rocks of Greece could be safely used as decorative building materials.

  7. Petrochemistry of ultrapotassic tephrites and associated cognate plutonic xenoliths with carbonatite affinities from the late Quaternary Qa’le Hasan Ali maars, central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, S.; Stern, C. R.; Moradian, A.

    2014-08-01

    The Quaternary Qa’le Hasan Ali (QHA) maars in central Iran occur at the intersection of the north-south Nayband fault, which defines the western boundary of the Lut micro-continental block, and a system of northwest-southeast faults, subparallel to the Zagros suture zone, that formed during the Arabian-Eurasian collision. These post-collisional maars intrude Eocene volcanic rocks of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic belt, which was generated by the subduction of Neotethys oceanic lithosphere below Iran. The highly potassic, Ti-phlogopite + Mg-rich (Fo89-92) olivine + diopside-augite + aegirine-augite basanite tephrites forming the tuff rims of the QHA maars contain tephrite-coated plutonic xenoliths, some of which are interpreted as co-genetic with the tephrites based on their similar mineralogy and Sr isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70590). Cognate plutonic xenoliths have up to ∼20 vol% calcite, considered to be magmatic calcite because of (1) its grain size, which is similar to feldspars and aegirine-augite pyroxenes in these rocks, (2) the occurrence of fine-grained inclusions of pyroxene and apatite within these calcite grains, and (3) the similarity of the Sr-isotopic composition of this calcite with the other minerals in these rocks. The fact that the magmatic calcite has remained intact and did not volatilize during the transport of these xenoliths to the surface in the hot tephrite magma implies a short transit time, indicating that they are samples of a shallow plutonic complex, as does the presence of anorthoclase in these plutonic xenoliths. Their high modal proportion of magmatic calcite suggests that this shallow plutonic complex has affinities with carbonatites. The magmatic calcite-bearing plutonic xenoliths have high LREE/HREE ratios and contain REE-rich allanite (with up to ∼20 wt% LREE) and britholite (∼60 wt% LREE) that make up ∼3 modal percent of the most calcite-rich samples. Similar to many post-collisional highly potassic rocks

  8. Emplacement mechanism of the Middle-Late Jurassic Qitianling pluton and its implications on the Mesozoic tectonics of South China Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongsheng; Chen, Yan; Faure, Michel; Scaillet, Bruno; Wang, Bo; Martelet, Guillaume; Huang, Fangfang; Zhu, Jinchu; Wang, Rucheng; Erdmann, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    The widespread Mesozoic magmatism that extends about 1500km along the NE-SW strike and 800km wide in the southeastern part of the South China Block is a remarkable feature that has attracted the attention of geoscientists since 1940's. Numerous studies have been carried out, and consequently, several geodynamic models related to the emplacement mechanism have been proposed, based essentially on petrology, geochronology, and (isotopic) geochemistry. Recently, a general consensus is apparently achieved within the geosciences community on the tectonic contexts of the South China Block during the Triassic (compressive) and Cretaceous (extensive) periods, however the tectonic setting of the Jurassic is still in debate, moreover the Jurassic magmatism is closely related to abundant mineralization of rare metal elements. Due to the similarities in age, rock type and major geochemical feature of Jurassic granite, the Qitianling granitic pluton, situated in the Nanling area and dated at ca. 157 Ma, was chosen as the target of this study among 41 visited plutons. Previous studies divide the Qitianling pluton into three petrographic facies, namely: i) Bt + Qtz + Fsd + Amp, ii) Bt + Qtz + Fsd + (Amp) , iii) Bt + Qtz + Fsd. Zircon U-Pb dating indicate the age peak of these different facies at 161Ma, 157-156Ma and 149Ma, respectively. The field observation shows that: 1) the granite is isotropic without visible preferred mineral orientation or deformation; 2) the contact between the granite and country rocks is sharp, with a 1-10m narrow thermal aureole, but without any visible deformation. The microscopic observation on the thin sections of wall rocks and granite doesn't show any mineral preferred orientation consisting to the field observation. Therefore, a total of 53 sampling sites and 318 oriented cores were collected from the Qitianling pluton for an Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) study. The investigation on rock magnetism shows the pseudo

  9. Kilbuck terrane: Oldest known rocks in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Box, S.E. ); Moll-Stalcup, E.J.; Wooden, J.L. ); Bradshaw, J.Y. )

    1990-12-01

    The Kilbuck terrane in southwestern Alaska is a narrow, thin crustal sliver or flake of amphibolite facies orthogneiss. The igneous protolith of this gneiss was a suite of subduction-related plutonic rocks. U-Pb data on zircons from trondhjemitic and granitic samples yield upper-intercept (igneous) ages of 2,070 {plus minus}16 and 2,040 {plus minus}74 Ma, respectively. Nd isotope data from these rocks suggest that a diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite suite ({epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) = +2.1 to +2.7; T is time of crystallization) evolved from partial melts of depleted mantle with no discernible contamination by older crust, whereas a coeval granitic pluton ({epsilon}{sub Nd}(T) = {minus}5.7) contains a significant component derived from Archean crust. Orthogneisses with similar age and Nd isotope characteristics are found in the Idono complex 250 km to the north. Early Proterozoic rocks are unknown elsewhere in Alaska. However, Phanerozoic plutons cutting several continental terranes in Alaska (southern Brooks Range and Ruby, Seward, and Yukon-Tanana terranes) have Nd isotope compositions indicative of Early Proterozoic (or older) crustal components that could be correlative with rocks of the Kilbuck terrane. Rocks with similar igneous ages in cratonal North America are rare, and those few that are known have Nd isotope compositions distinct from those of the Kilbuck terrane. Conversely, provinces with Nd model ages of 2.0-2.1 Ga are characterized by extensive 1.8 Ga or younger plutonism, which is unknown in the Kilbuck terrane. At present the case for a North American parentage of the Kilbuck terrane is not compelling. The possibility that the Kilbuck terrane was displaced from provinces of similar age in other cratons (e.g., Australian, Baltic, Guiana, and west African shields), or from the poorly dated Siberian craton, cannot be excluded.

  10. Origin of saline, neutral-pH, reduced epithermal waters by reaction of acidic magmatic gas condensates with wall rock

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.H. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartz and sphalerite of epithermal veins containing galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite with silver sulfides and electrum commonly have salinities of 2 to 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Examples include Bohemia, OR, Comstock, NV, and Creede, CO. Salinities in such base metal-rich systems are apparently greater than those in gold-adularia, base metal-poor systems such as Sleeper, NV, Republic, WA, and Hishikare, Kyushu. Saline epithermal fluids are commonly assumed to have been derived from saline magmatic brines, from local host formations, as has been suggested for Creede, or from evaporative concentration (boiling) of more dilute meteoric ground water. Another possibility, which may be the most common origin, is reaction of wall rocks with magmatic gas condensates rich in HCl and sulfuric acid. A mixture of one part Augustine Volcanic gas condensate in 10 parts cold ground water has a pH of 0.7 and the dominant cation is H[sup +] by a factor of 10[sup 4]. Calculated reaction of this condensate mixture with andesite at 300 C to a water/rock ratio (w/r) of 4.6 yields an NaCl-dominated fluid with a total salinity of 2.1 wt %. and pH 3.7. Further reaction, to w/r 0.14 yields a fluid salinity of 2.6 wt % and pH of 5.7; this fluid is in equilibrium with a propylitic alteration assemblage. Aqueous sulfide accumulates during the rock reaction as sulfate is reduced to sulfide when ferrous iron is oxidized to ferric iron. Sulfide concentration in the latter fluid is 32 ppm, far exceeding sulfate concentration. In the overall reaction, hydrogen ion is exchanged for base cations (including base metals) and sulfate is reduced to sulfide.

  11. Natural radioactivity distribution and gamma radiation exposure of beach sands close to Kavala pluton, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Argyrios; Koroneos, Antonios; Christofides, Georgios; Stoulos, Stylianos

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the activity concentrations of 238U, 226Ra, 232Th, 228Th and 40K along the beaches of Kavala being adjacent to the rock-types of the Kavala pluton. These ranged from 14-940, 16-1710, 26- 4547, 27-4488 and 194-1307 Bq/kg respectively, representing the highest values of natural radioactivity measured in sediments of Greece. The (%wt.) heavy magnetic (HM) (allanite, amphibole, mica, clinopyroxene, magnetite and hematite) fraction, the heavy non-magnetic (HNM) (monazite, zircon, titanite and apatite) fraction and the total heavy fraction (TH), were correlated with the concentrations of the measured radionuclides in the bulk samples. The heavy fractions seem to control the activity concentrations of 238U and 232Th of all the samples, showing some local differences in the main 238U and 232Th mineral carrier. The measured radionuclides in the beach sands were normalized to the respective values measured in the granitic rocks, which are their most probable parental rocks, so as to provide data upon their enrichment or depletion. The annual equivalent dose varies between 0.01 and 0.35 mSv y-1 for tourists and from 0.03 to 1.48 mSv y-1 for local people working on the beach.

  12. Anti-cancer effect of ursolic acid activates apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Wen-Tao; Yu, Da-Peng; Wang, Xin-Sheng; Wang, Pei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid is a type of pentacyclic triterpene compound with multiple pharmacological activities including cancer resistance, protection from liver injury, antisepsis, anti-inflammation and antiviral activity. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid. Ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis and its pro-apoptotic mechanism remains to be fully elucidated. Cell Counting kit-8 assays, flow cytometric analysis and analysis of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity were used to estimate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid on DU145 prostate cancer cells. The protein expression of cytochrome c, rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and cofilin-1 were examined using western blot analysis. In the present study, ursolic acid significantly suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis, as well as increasing caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities of DU145 cells. Furthermore, cytoplasmic and mitochondrial cytochrome c protein expression was significantly activated and suppressed, respectively, by ursolic acid. Ursolic acid significantly suppressed the ROCK/PTEN signaling pathway and inhibited cofilin-1 protein expression in DU145 cells. The results of the present study indicate that the anticancer effect of ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer.

  13. Anti-cancer effect of ursolic acid activates apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Wen-Tao; Yu, Da-Peng; Wang, Xin-Sheng; Wang, Pei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid is a type of pentacyclic triterpene compound with multiple pharmacological activities including cancer resistance, protection from liver injury, antisepsis, anti-inflammation and antiviral activity. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid. Ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis and its pro-apoptotic mechanism remains to be fully elucidated. Cell Counting kit-8 assays, flow cytometric analysis and analysis of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity were used to estimate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid on DU145 prostate cancer cells. The protein expression of cytochrome c, rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and cofilin-1 were examined using western blot analysis. In the present study, ursolic acid significantly suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis, as well as increasing caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities of DU145 cells. Furthermore, cytoplasmic and mitochondrial cytochrome c protein expression was significantly activated and suppressed, respectively, by ursolic acid. Ursolic acid significantly suppressed the ROCK/PTEN signaling pathway and inhibited cofilin-1 protein expression in DU145 cells. The results of the present study indicate that the anticancer effect of ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer. PMID:27698874

  14. The link between volcanism and plutonism in epizonal magma systems; high-precision U-Pb zircon geochronology from the Organ Mountains caldera and batholith, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Matthew; Farmer, G. Lang; Bowring, Samuel A.; Wooton, Kathleen M.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Coleman, Drew S.; Verplanck, Philip L.

    2016-02-01

    The Organ Mountains caldera and batholith expose the volcanic and epizonal plutonic record of an Eocene caldera complex. The caldera and batholith are well exposed, and extensive previous mapping and geochemical analyses have suggested a clear link between the volcanic and plutonic sections, making this an ideal location to study magmatic processes associated with caldera volcanism. Here we present high-precision thermal ionization mass spectrometry U-Pb zircon dates from throughout the caldera and batholith, and use these dates to test and improve existing petrogenetic models. The new dates indicate that Eocene volcanic and plutonic rocks in the Organ Mountains formed from ~44 to 34 Ma. The three largest caldera-related tuff units yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates of 36.441 ± 0.020 Ma (Cueva Tuff), 36.259 ± 0.016 Ma (Achenback Park tuff), and 36.215 ± 0.016 Ma (Squaw Mountain tuff). An alkali feldspar granite, which is chemically similar to the erupted tuffs, yielded a synchronous weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 36.259 ± 0.021 Ma. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates from the larger volume syenitic phase of the underlying Organ Needle pluton range from 36.130 ± 0.031 to 36.071 ± 0.012 Ma, and the youngest sample is 144 ± 20 to 188 ± 20 ka younger than the Squaw Mountain and Achenback Park tuffs, respectively. Younger plutonism in the batholith continued through at least 34.051 ± 0.029 Ma. We propose that the Achenback Park tuff, Squaw Mountain tuff, alkali feldspar granite and Organ Needle pluton formed from a single, long-lived magma chamber/mush zone. Early silicic magmas generated by partial melting of the lower crust rose to form an epizonal magma chamber. Underplating of the resulting mush zone led to partial melting and generation of a high-silica alkali feldspar granite cap, which erupted to form the tuffs. The deeper parts of the chamber underwent continued recharge and crystallization for 144 ± 20 ka after the final eruption. Calculated magmatic

  15. Comparison of hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride and oxalic acid leaching of stream sediment and coated rock samples as anomaly enhancement techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filipek, L.H.; Chao, T.T.; Theobald, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    A hot hydroxylamine hydrochloride (H-Hxl) extraction in 25% acetic acid is compared with the commonly used oxalic acid extraction as a method of anomaly enhancement for Cu and Zn in samples from two very different metal deposits and climatic environments. Results obtained on minus-80-mesh stream sediments from an area near the Magruder massive sulfide deposit in Lincoln County, Georgia, where the climate is humid subtropical, indicate that H-Hxl enhances the anomaly for Cu by a factor of 2 and for Zn by a factor of 1.5, compared to the oxalic method. Analyses of Fe oxide-coated rock samples from outcrops overlying the North Silver Bell porphyry copper deposit near Tucson, Arizona, where the climate is semi-arid to arid, indicate that both techniques effectively outline the zones of hydrothermal alteration. The H-Hxl extraction can also perform well in high-carbonate or high-clay environments, where other workers have suggested that oxalic acid is not very effective. Therefore, the H-Hxl method is recommended for general exploration use. ?? 1982.

  16. C3 Photosynthesis and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in a Kansas Rock Outcrop Succulent, Talinum calycinum Engelm. (Portulacaceae) 1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Craig E.; Zee, Aaron Klaas

    1983-01-01

    The potential for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) was investigated in the sandstone outcrop succulent Talinum calycinum in central Kansas. Field studies revealed CAM-like diurnal acid fluctuations in these plants. These fluctuations persisted under all moisture and temperature regimes in the laboratory. Despite this CAM-like acid metabolism, simultaneous gravimetric determinations of day- and nighttime transpiration rates indicated the presence of a C3 gas exchange pattern. Subsequent analyses of diurnal CO2 and H2O exchange patterns under well-watered conditions and after 3, 5, and 7 days of drought confirmed these findings, though low rates of nocturnal CO2 uptake were observed on the fifth night after continuous drought. Finally, the δ13C/12C value of this succulent, −27.8‰, emphasizes the insignificance of any nocturnal CO2 uptake in the lifelong accumulation of carbon in this species. Thus, it is proposed that T. calycinum is a C3 plant with some CAM characteristics, including the ability to re-fix respiratory CO2 at night under all moisture regimes, potentially resulting in a conservation of carbon, and occasionally to fix atmospheric CO2 at night. These findings may prove to be common among rock outcrop succulents. PMID:16663289

  17. C(3) Photosynthesis and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in a Kansas Rock Outcrop Succulent, Talinum calycinum Engelm. (Portulacaceae).

    PubMed

    Martin, C E; Zee, A K

    1983-11-01

    The potential for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) was investigated in the sandstone outcrop succulent Talinum calycinum in central Kansas. Field studies revealed CAM-like diurnal acid fluctuations in these plants. These fluctuations persisted under all moisture and temperature regimes in the laboratory. Despite this CAM-like acid metabolism, simultaneous gravimetric determinations of day- and nighttime transpiration rates indicated the presence of a C(3) gas exchange pattern. Subsequent analyses of diurnal CO(2) and H(2)O exchange patterns under well-watered conditions and after 3, 5, and 7 days of drought confirmed these findings, though low rates of nocturnal CO(2) uptake were observed on the fifth night after continuous drought. Finally, the delta(13)C/(12)C value of this succulent, -27.8 per thousand, emphasizes the insignificance of any nocturnal CO(2) uptake in the lifelong accumulation of carbon in this species. Thus, it is proposed that T. calycinum is a C(3) plant with some CAM characteristics, including the ability to re-fix respiratory CO(2) at night under all moisture regimes, potentially resulting in a conservation of carbon, and occasionally to fix atmospheric CO(2) at night. These findings may prove to be common among rock outcrop succulents.

  18. Metamorphic facies map of Southeastern Alaska; distribution, facies, and ages of regionally metamorphosed rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Brew, D.A.; Douglass, S.L.

    1996-01-01

    Nearly all of the bedrock in Southeastern Alaska has been metamorphosed, much of it under medium-grade conditions during metamorphic episodes that were associated with widespread plutonism. The oldest metamorphisms affected probable arc rocks near southern Prince of Wales Island and occurred during early and middle Paleozoic orogenies. The predominant period of metamorphism and associated plutonism occurred during Early Cretaceous to early Tertiary time and resulted in the development of the Coast plutonic-metamorphic complex that extends along the inboard half of Southeastern Alaska. Middle Tertiary regional thermal metamorphism affected a large part of Baranof Island.

  19. Exploring Elongation-Inclination Relationships in Datasets from Plutons and Remagnetized Sediments: Examples from the North Cascades and the Blue Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housen, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Tectonic applications of paleomagnetism rely upon establishment of paleohorizontal at the time of magnetization. Paleohorizontal can be established in sedimentary rocks and volcanics, but is poorly constrained in plutonic rocks and areas that have experienced regional remagnetizations. This study will explore another latitudinal-dependent property of the geomagnetic field- elongation of elliptical distributions of directional data- to evaluate whether the combination of elongation and inclination can be used to constrain effects of tilt or other paleohorizontal uncertainties in paleomagnetic datasets. This work is inspired by the application of the E-I relationship proposed by Tauxe and Kent (2004) to evaluate effects of inclination error in sedimentary rocks. The first example is from the Blue Mountains of eastern OR. Remagnetized Permian-Jurassic sedimentary rocks (Hillhouse et al, 1982, Harbert et al, 1995, Housen, 2007, Kalk, 2008) have magnetizations that match those of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous plutons (Wilson and Cox, 1980, Housen, 2007). Directions from 64 sites of these rocks yields a mean of D = 33°, I = 64°, k= 26, α95 = 3.7°. The E-I method can be used to determine the effects of calculated paleohorizontal errors by finding an optimal paleohorizontal error that results in the best agreement between E and I for a set of data. For the Blue Mountains rocks, the optimal E-I relationship yields a corrected inclination of I = 65° (+7°/-4°), and estimated paleolatitude of 47°N (42° to 57°). The second example is from the Cretaceous Mt Stuart batholith in the North Cascades of central WA- these 95-88 Ma plutonic rocks have well defined magnetizations (Housen et al, 2003). Directions from 89 samples have a mean of D = 350°, I=44°, k=50, α95 = 2.1°. The E-I relationship suggests a corrected mean inclination of I=46° (+12°/-3°), and estimated paleolatitude of 27°N (25° to 39°). For the Blue Mountains, this comparison indicates that the

  20. Oxalic-acid leaching of rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples as an anomaly-accentuated technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alminas, Henry V.; Mosier, Elwin L.

    1976-01-01

    In many instances total-rock and sieved-soil and stream-sediment samples lack the sensitivity and contrast required for reconnaissance exploration and necessary in the search for blind ore deposits. Heavy-mineral concentrates incorporate the required sensitivity and contrast but are overly expensive for two reasons: time-consuming sample preparation is required to obtain them, and they cannot be easily derived from all bulk-sample types. Trace-metal-content comparisons of the oxalic-acid-leachable portions with heavy-mineral concentrates show that the leachates are equal to the heavy-mineral concentrates in sensitivity and contrast. Simplicity of preparation and the resultant cost savings are additional advantages of this proposed method.

  1. Effects of acid rock drainage on stocked rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): an in-situ, caged fish experiment.

    PubMed

    Todd, Andrew S; McKnight, Diane M; Jaros, Chris L; Marchitto, Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    In-situ caged rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) studies reveal significant fish toxicity and fish stress in a river impacted by headwater acid rock drainage (ARD). Stocked trout survival and aqueous water chemistry were monitored for 10 days at 3 study sites in the Snake River watershed, Colorado, U.S.A. Trout mortality was positively correlated with concentrations of metals calculated to be approaching or exceeding conservative toxicity thresholds (Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd). Significant metal accumulation on the gills of fish stocked at ARD impacted study sites support an association between elevated metals and fish mortality. Observations of feeding behavior and significant differences in fish relative weights between study site and feeding treatment indicate feeding and metals-related fish stress. Together, these results demonstrate the utility of in-situ exposure studies for stream stakeholders in quantifying the relative role of aqueous contaminant exposures in limiting stocked fish survival.

  2. Effects of acid rock drainage on stocked rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): an in-situ, caged fish experiment.

    PubMed

    Todd, Andrew S; McKnight, Diane M; Jaros, Chris L; Marchitto, Thomas M

    2007-07-01

    In-situ caged rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) studies reveal significant fish toxicity and fish stress in a river impacted by headwater acid rock drainage (ARD). Stocked trout survival and aqueous water chemistry were monitored for 10 days at 3 study sites in the Snake River watershed, Colorado, U.S.A. Trout mortality was positively correlated with concentrations of metals calculated to be approaching or exceeding conservative toxicity thresholds (Zn, Mn, Cu, Cd). Significant metal accumulation on the gills of fish stocked at ARD impacted study sites support an association between elevated metals and fish mortality. Observations of feeding behavior and significant differences in fish relative weights between study site and feeding treatment indicate feeding and metals-related fish stress. Together, these results demonstrate the utility of in-situ exposure studies for stream stakeholders in quantifying the relative role of aqueous contaminant exposures in limiting stocked fish survival. PMID:17180429

  3. A direct in situ fingerprinting method for acid rock drainage using voltammetric techniques with a single renewable gold microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Nuzzio, Donald B; Zettler, Erik R; Aguilera, Angeles; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A

    2011-04-15

    Electrochemistry allows for rapid identification of multiple metals and other chemical complexes common in acid rock drainage (ARD) systems. Voltammetric scans using a single gold microelectrode of water samples from geochemically distinct areas of the Río Tinto (RT) in southwestern Spain were clearly recognizable in the field and in samples stored at room temperature for over 6 months. Major voltammetric peaks of iron(III) and copper(II) were identified on a single constantly renewable gold microelectrode. Confirmation of these peaks was performed by spiking with standard metal solutions in the laboratory. This voltammetric technique is a rapid, direct and inexpensive in situ method for identification of water sources and their chemical characteristics, as well as an economical way to monitor environmental changes and remediation efforts.

  4. The Pombal granite pluton: Magnetic fabric, emplacement and relationships with the Brasiliano strike-slip setting of NE Brazil (Paraiba State)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archanjo, C. J.; Bouchez, J.-L.; Corsini, M.; Vauchez, A.

    1994-03-01

    The Pombal pluton (500 km 2), a suite of diorite, syenite and porphyritic granite bodies, is here used to constrain kinematics of Brasiliano-age tectonic episodes in northeast Brazil. The pluton intrudes high-grade to migmatitic gneiss forming the western basement of the Seridó belt, and is located at the intersection between two sets of continental-scale dextral strike-slip shear zones. The northern set of shear zone strikes NE-SW and branches, southwards, into the E-W Patos mega-shear zone. A detailed microstructural and low-field magnetic susceptibility study was performed to unravel the relationships between solid-state deformation in the country rocks and magma emplacement. Porphyritic granite and syenite have quite high magnetic susceptibilities (10 -3-10 -2 SI units) indicative of magnetite as the principal carrier of susceptibility. The magnetic fabric is remarkably homogeneous in orientation throughout the pluton. It is characterized by a shape-preferred alignment of magnetite, itself parallel to the shape fabric of mainly biotite (±amphibole), i.e. to the magmatic fabric. Even close to the contact with the high-temperature mylonites of the Patos shear zone, south of Pombal, no imprint of the E-W-trending structures is observed in the fabrics of either the granite or the host rocks. Granite emplacement and its internal fabric development is concluded to be independent of the movement of the Patos shear zone. In the southwestern border of the pluton, a low-dip foliation bearing a NE-SW-striking lineation is shared in both the magmatic fabric of the pluton and the solid-state fabric. Farther to the north, approaching the NE-SW strike-slip shear zone, the magmatic fabric is characterized by a steeply dipping NE-striking foliation carrying a subhorizontal lineation. Transition from low to steep dips of the planar fabrics is progressive. Two models are proposed for emplacement of the Pombal pluton. One considers magma injection during an early episode of

  5. Reconnaissance geochemical exploration of the plutons of quartz monzonite and granite in the Jabal Lababa and Ar Rayth areas, Southern Asir, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Overstreet, W.C.; Assegaff, A.B.; Jambi, M.; Hussain, M.A.; Selner, G.I.; Matzko, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Geochemical reconnaissance for rare metals in plutons of albite-muscovite granite and quartz monzonite in the vicinity of Jabal Lababa disclosed positive geochemical anomalies for beryllium, tantalum, thorium, lanthanum, niobium, tin, yttrium, and zirconium. The low anomalous values for the rare metals in rocks and the short mechanical dispersion trains, seldom exceeding 4 km in length, of rare-metal-bearing heavy minerals, are interpreted to indicate that primary deposits of these metals are lacking, and any placers would be small and low in tenor. Small positive anomalies for barium were detected at scattered localities in the metasediments adjacent to the plutons in the Jabal Lababa area. Positive anomalies for the precious metals are lacking, and the low values observed for base metals do not indicate the presence of sulfide deposits. The abundant quartz lag gravel in the eastern part of the area is unmineralized. Small books of muscovite are present in some pegmatite, but is of non-commercial volume and quality. A subcircular structure at the coast of the Red Sea near the month of Wadi Nahb should be tested to determine if it is a buried salt dome. Three nonmagnetic high-density concentrates containing 1000 to 15,000 ppm lead were found on the granitic pluton near Ar Rayth. The source of the lead is not galena, and high values for lead appear to be characteristic of the pluton but do not indicate an ore deposit. 74 refs., 11 figs., 43 tabs.

  6. Indoor radon risk associated to post-tectonic biotite granites from Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton, northern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Martins, L M O; Gomes, M E P; Teixeira, R J S; Pereira, A J S C; Neves, L J P F

    2016-11-01

    At Vila Pouca de Aguiar area, northern Portugal, crops out a post-tectonic Variscan granite pluton, related with the Régua-Vila Real-Verín fault zone, comprising three types of biotite granites. Among these granites, PSG granite yield the highest average contents of U, probably due to its enrichment in accessory U-bearing minerals such as zircon. In the proximity of faults and joints, these granites are often affected by different degrees of hydrothermal alteration, forming reddish altered rocks, commonly known as "episyenites". These altered rocks are probably associated to the occurrence of hydrothermal processes, which led to uranium enrichment in the most advanced stages of episyenitization. In these granites, both average gamma absorbed dose rates in outdoor and indoor air are higher than those of the world average. Furthermore, even in the worst usage scenario, all these granites can be used as a building material, since their annual effective doses are similar to the limit defined by the European Commission. The geometric mean of radon activity of 91 dwellings located at the Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton is 568Bqm(-3), exceeding that of other northern Portuguese granites. Measurements carried out during a winter season, indicate that 62.6% of the analysed dwellings yield higher indoor radon average values than the Portuguese legislation limit (400Bqm(-3)), and annual effective doses due higher than the world's average value (1.2mSvy(-1)). The interaction of geogenic, architectural and anthropogenic features is crucial to explain the variance in the geometric mean of radon activity of dwellings from Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton, but the role of geologic faults is probably the most important decisive factor to increase the indoor radon concentration in dwellings. Hence, the development of awareness campaigns in order to inform population about the incurred radiological risks to radon exposure are highly recommended for this specific area. PMID:27448957

  7. Indoor radon risk associated to post-tectonic biotite granites from Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton, northern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Martins, L M O; Gomes, M E P; Teixeira, R J S; Pereira, A J S C; Neves, L J P F

    2016-11-01

    At Vila Pouca de Aguiar area, northern Portugal, crops out a post-tectonic Variscan granite pluton, related with the Régua-Vila Real-Verín fault zone, comprising three types of biotite granites. Among these granites, PSG granite yield the highest average contents of U, probably due to its enrichment in accessory U-bearing minerals such as zircon. In the proximity of faults and joints, these granites are often affected by different degrees of hydrothermal alteration, forming reddish altered rocks, commonly known as "episyenites". These altered rocks are probably associated to the occurrence of hydrothermal processes, which led to uranium enrichment in the most advanced stages of episyenitization. In these granites, both average gamma absorbed dose rates in outdoor and indoor air are higher than those of the world average. Furthermore, even in the worst usage scenario, all these granites can be used as a building material, since their annual effective doses are similar to the limit defined by the European Commission. The geometric mean of radon activity of 91 dwellings located at the Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton is 568Bqm(-3), exceeding that of other northern Portuguese granites. Measurements carried out during a winter season, indicate that 62.6% of the analysed dwellings yield higher indoor radon average values than the Portuguese legislation limit (400Bqm(-3)), and annual effective doses due higher than the world's average value (1.2mSvy(-1)). The interaction of geogenic, architectural and anthropogenic features is crucial to explain the variance in the geometric mean of radon activity of dwellings from Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton, but the role of geologic faults is probably the most important decisive factor to increase the indoor radon concentration in dwellings. Hence, the development of awareness campaigns in order to inform population about the incurred radiological risks to radon exposure are highly recommended for this specific area.

  8. Constraints on ages of Taconian and Acadian deformation from zircon evaporation ages of felsic plutons from western Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, B.F.; Karabinos, P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    New dates on three felsic plutons constrain the age of Taconian and Acadian deformation in western Massachusetts. The tonalitic Hallockville Pond Gneiss intrudes the Moretown Formation of the Rowe-Hawley belt and shows deformation comparable in degree and orientation to that of the surrounding rocks. The Middlefield Granite, a quartz monzonite, intrudes the Rowe and Moretown Formations at their contact. The Williamsburg Granodiorite, of minimum-melt composition, intrudes Silurian and Devonian formations of the Connecticut Valley Synclinorium, east of the Row-Hawley belt, and contains no obvious deformation fabric. [sup 207]Pb/[sup 206]Pb single-grain zircon evaporation ages for these plutons are as follows: the Hallockville Pond Gneiss, 484 [plus minus] 7 Ma; the Middlefield Granite, 447 [plus minus] 3 Ma (weighted average of 4 grains); and the Williamsburg Granodiorite, 373 [plus minus] 5 Ma (weighted average of 3 grains). The Moretown Formation, presently correlated with the Middle Ordovician Beauceville Formation in Quebec, must be older than 484 Ma (Early Ordovician), the age of the intruding Hallockville Pond Gneiss, which might be related to rocks in the proposed Shelburne Falls arc of similar age (Karabinos and Tucker, 1992). Field relations and the age of the Middlefield Granite show that if the Rowe-Moretown contact is a fault, one interpretation suggested by Stanley and Hatch (1988) and advocated by Ratcliffe et al. (1992), then Taconian thrusting in this area ended by 447 Ma because the pluton is not offset by faults. The 373 Ma age of the unfoliated Williamsburg Granodiorite, together with a U-Pb zircon age on a strongly deformed sill in the Granville dome of 376 [plus minus] 4 Ma, tightly constrains the timing of the main phase of Acadian deformation in western Massachusetts.

  9. Phosphorus leaching in an acid tropical soil "recapitalized" with phosphate rock and triple superphosphate.

    PubMed

    Gikonyo, Esther W; Zaharah, Abdul R; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Anuar, Rahim A

    2010-01-01

    With high rates of phosphorus applied to increase "capital P" as a stock for plant uptake over several years, the question of P leaching is inevitable. We conducted an intact soil column experiment in the field to evaluate P leached from soils treated with triple superphosphate (TSP) and Gafsa phosphate rock (GPR) at 300, 600, and 900 kg P ha-1 with and without integration of cattle manure. The lysimeters, made from PVC tubes of 30-cm length, were inserted into the soil up to the 25-cm depth. The tubes were fitted with a resin bag containing a mixture of cation and anion exchange resin (50:50) at the lower end of the tube inserted into the soil. The tubes, arranged in a completely randomized design, were sampled randomly at 10-week intervals for 12 months. Phosphorus extractable from the top- and subsoil at the end of experiment and leached P were determined. More P was leached out from TSP (threefold) compared to GPR, and the amount of P leached increased with increasing rates of P fertilizer applied. Application of manure intensified the amounts of P leached from TSP, particularly at the 6-month sampling time. There was hardly any substantial P leached from the soil treated with GPR. Thus, for effective and efficient long-term P fertilizer management strategies, choosing the right P fertilizer source and monitoring P losses through leaching has to be done for enhanced fertilizer use efficiency and thus reducing P pollution of ground waters. PMID:20694445

  10. Remarkable isotopic and trace element trends in potassic through sodic Cretaceous plutons of the Yukon-Koyukuk Basin, Alaska, and the nature of the lithosphere beneath the Koyukuk terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arth, Joseph G.; Criss, Robert E.; Zmuda, Clara C.; Foley, Nora K.; Patton, W.W.; Miller, T.P.

    1989-01-01

    During the period from 110 to 80 m.y. ago, a 450-km-long magmatic belt was active along the northern margin of Yukon-Koyukuk basin and on eastern Seward Peninsula. The plutons intruded Upper Jurassic(?) and Lower Cretaceous volcanic arc rocks and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in Yukon-Koyukuk basin and Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic continental rocks in Seward Peninsula. Within Yukon-Koyukuk basin, the plutons vary in composition from calc-alkalic plutons on the east to potassic and ultrapotassic alkalic plutons on the west. Plutons within Yukon-Koyukuk basin were analyzed for trace element and isotopic compositions in order to discern their origin and the nature of the underling lithosphere. Farthest to the east, the calc-alkalic rocks of Indian Mountain pluton are largely tonalite and sodic granodiorite, and have low Rb (average 82 ppm), high Sr (>600 ppm), high chondrite-normalized (cn) Ce/Yb (16–37), low δ18O (+6.5 to +7.1), low initial 87Sr/86Sr (SIR) (0.704), and high initial 143Nd/144Nd (NIR) (0.5126). These rocks resemble those modelled elsewhere as partial melts and subsequent fractionates of basaltic or gabbroic metaigneous rocks, and may be products of melting in the deeper parts of the Late Jurassic(?) and Early Cretaceous volcanic arc. Farthest to the west, the two ultrapotassic bodies of Selawik and Inland Lake are high in Cs (up to 93 ppm), Rb (up to 997 ppm), Sr, Ba, Th, and light rare earth elements, have high (Ce/Yb)cn (30, 27), moderate to low δ18O (+8.4, +6.9), high SIR (0.712, 0.710), and moderate NIR (0.5121–0.5122). These rocks resemble rocks of Australia and elsewhere that were modelled as melts of continental mantle that had been previously enriched in large cations. This mantle may be Paleozoic or older. The farthest west alkalic pluton of Selawik Hills is largely monzonite, quartz monzonite, and granite; has moderate Rb (average 284 ppm), high Sr (>600 ppm), high (Ce/Yb)cn (15–25), moderate δ18O (+8.3 to +8.6), high SIR (0.708

  11. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the Piedmont Province of Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Wenner, D.B.; Gillon, K.A.

    1980-10-01

    A literature study was conducted on the Piedmont province of Georgia to designate areas that may be favorable for field exploration for consideration of a repository for storage of radioactive waste. The criteria utilized in such a designation was based upon consideration of the rock unit having favorable geological, geotechnical, and geohydrological features. The most important are that the rock unit have: (1) satisfactory unit dimensions (> 100 km/sup 2/ outcrop area and at least 1500 meters (approx. 5000 feet) depth of a continuous rock type); and (2) acceptable geohydrological conditions. Among all rock types, it is concluded that the granites of the large post-metamorphic plutons and large, homogeneous orthogneissic units offer the most favorable geologic settings for exploration for siting a radioactive waste repository. Virtually all other rock types, including most metavolcanic and metasedimentary lithologies have unacceptable unit dimensions, generally unfavorable geohydrologic settings, and deleterious mechanical and physical geotechnical properties. After consideration of all major lithologies that comprise the Georgia Piedmont, the following units were deemed favorable: (1) the Elberton Pluton; (2) the Siloam Pluton; (3) the Sparta Pluton; (4) two unnamed plutons adjacent to the Snelson body of S.W. Georgia; (5) the Lithonia Gneiss; (6) basement orthogneisses and charnockites of the Pine Mountain Belt.

  12. Hot dry rock geothermal prospects, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; Laughlin, A. W.; Aldrich, J.; Ander, M. E.; Arney, B. H.; Decker, E.; Gardner, J.; Heiken, G.; Kron, A. J.; Ladelfe, C. M.

    Sites within the USA as candidates for development of a second hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal system were assessed. Potential sites examined fall broadly into three categories according to the nature of their thermal anomalies: (1) quaternary magmahydrothermal (volcanic or igneous) systems; (2) regional thermal anomalies of tectonic origin; and (3) prequaternary plutonic and metamorphic complexes. Sites with both electrical generation and direct use potential were considered however, efforts were concentrated on electrical sites.

  13. Crustal-scale perspective on the rapid development of Oligocene silicic calderas and related underlying plutonic systems, western Nevada USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgan, J. P.; John, D. A.; Henry, C.; Watts, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Geologic mapping, U-Pb zircon ages, and 40Ar/39Ar sanidine ages document the timing and extent of Oligocene magmatism in the southern Stillwater Range and Clan Alpine Mountains of western Nevada, where Miocene extension has exposed five nested silicic calderas and related granitic plutons to crustal depths locally ≥9 km. The ≤29.4-28.8 Ma Job Canyon caldera in the Stillwater Range is filled with ~4 km of intracaldera tuff and lava flows; the 28.4 Ma IXL pluton intrudes intracaldera tuff and extends to ≥9 km depth. The 29 Ma Deep Canyon caldera covers ~250 km2 of the Clan Alpine Mountains, but only the upper ~1 km is exposed. The ≤26.0-25.2 Ma Poco Canyon caldera in the Stillwater Range is filled with two distinct intracaldera tuffs totaling 4.5 km thick, underlain by the 24.8 Ma Freeman Creek pluton exposed to depths ≥8 km. The small 25.3 Ma Louderback Mountains caldera in the SW Clan Alpine Mountains is filled with ~600 m of intracaldera tuff deposited on Oligocene rhyolite lava flows. The 25.1 Ma Elevenmile Canyon caldera spans ~1600 km2 in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, and Desatoya Mountains, where it overlaps or cross cuts older calderas. Its total volume is ≥2500 km3, mostly consisting of the 1-4 km thick tuff of Elevenmile Canyon. 24.9-25.5 Ma silicic intrusive rocks underlie the Louderback Mountains and Elevenmile Canyon calderas to depths ≥6-8 km, locally surrounding septa of basement rock and older Oligocene igneous rocks. Two magmatic pulses, each lasting ~1 m.y. and associated with the 29 and 25 Ma caldera complexes, replaced almost the entire Mesozoic upper crust with Oligocene intrusive and extrusive rock to depths ≥9 km over a 1500 km2 area (pre-extension). Magma emplacement was most likely accommodated by downward transfer of country rocks and accompanied by isostatic surface uplift. If other Great Basin calderas are similar, the dense concentration of shallowly exposed calderas in central Nevada may be underlain by a

  14. Acid neutralizing capacity and leachate results for igneous rocks, with associated carbon contents of derived soils, Animas River AML site, Silverton, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Stanton, Mark R.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Burchell,

    2009-01-01

    Mine planning efforts have historically overlooked the possible acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) that local igneous rocks can provide to help neutralize acidmine drainage. As a result, limestone has been traditionally hauled to mine sites for use in neutralizing acid drainage. Local igneous rocks, when used as part of mine life-cycle planning and acid mitigation strategy, may reduce the need to transport limestone to mine sites because these rocks can contain acid neutralizing minerals. Igneous hydrothermal events often introduce moderately altered mineral assemblages peripheral to more intensely altered rocks that host metal-bearing veins and ore bodies. These less altered rocks can contain ANC minerals (calcite-chlorite-epidote) and are referred to as a propylitic assemblage. In addition, the carbon contents of soils in areas of new mining or those areas undergoing restoration have been historically unknown. Soil organic carbon is an important constituent to characterize as a soil recovery benchmark that can be referred to during mine cycle planning and restoration.
    This study addresses the mineralogy, ANC, and leachate chemistry of propylitic volcanic rocks that host polymetallic mineralization in the Animas River watershed near the historical Silverton, Colorado, mining area. Acid titration tests on volcanic rocks containing calcite (2 – 20 wt %) and chlorite (6 – 25 wt %), have ANC ranging from 4 – 146 kg/ton CaCO3 equivalence. Results from a 6-month duration, kinetic reaction vessel test containing layered pyritic mine waste and underlying ANC volcanic rock (saturated with deionized water) indicate that acid generating mine waste (pH 2.4) has not overwhelmed the ANC of propylitic volcanic rocks (pH 5.8). Sequential leachate laboratory experiments evaluated the concentration of metals liberated during leaching. Leachate concentrations of Cu-Zn-As-Pb for ANC volcanic rock are one-to-three orders of magnitude lower when compared to leached

  15. There's more than one way to build a caldera magma chamber: Evidence from volcanic-plutonic relationships at three faulted Rio-Grande-rift calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerer, M. J.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2011-12-01

    The temporal and chemical relationships of volcanic and plutonic rocks of the Questa (NM), Mt. Aetna (CO), and Organ caldera (NM) complexes were investigated to establish the origin of these silicic magmas. Rio Grande Rift faulting at these systems has exposed both intracaldera sequences and subvolcanic plutons. Ar/Ar and U/Pb ages reveal the timing of volcanic activity and pluton emplacement and cooling. We observe a link between ignimbrite zoning patterns and the temporal-chemical relationship of volcanic and plutonic rocks. The Questa caldera erupted the high-SiO2 peralkaline Amalia Tuff (AT) at 25.4 Ma. Volumetrically minor phases of two resurgent plutons and a ring dike are compositionally similar to the AT. The age of the ring dike (25.4 Ma) is indistinguishable to AT, suggesting that the peralkaline intrusions are nonerupted AT. The remaining pluton ages are 100 ka to 6.1 Ma younger than AT and are too young to be the AT residual crystal mush. The Mt. Princeton batholith and nested Mt. Aetna caldera are interpreted to be the sources for the 37.3 Ma, low-SiO2 rhyolitic Wall Mountain Tuff (WMT) and the 34.3 Ma, dacitic Badger Creek Tuff (BCT). U/Pb and Ar/Ar ages of Mt. Princeton batholith (36.5 to 35.1 Ma) indicate that it was emplaced and rapidly cooled during the interval between the WMT and BCT eruptions, and that any WMT age intrusions are now eroded. During the eruption of the BCT, the fully crystallized Mt. Princeton batholith collapsed into the Mt. Aetna caldera. Intrusions along the margins of the Mt. Aetna caldera are compositionally identical the BCT and contain zircons 100 to 500 ka older than the tuff, suggesting that the BCT magma chamber was incrementally emplaced prior to caldera eruption. The Organ caldera complex erupted three ignimbrites: a basal high-silica 36.5 Ma rhyolite, a middle intermediate-silica 36.2 Ma rhyolite, and an upper 36.0 Ma low-silica rhyolite. The intracaldera sequence is intruded by the Organ Needle pluton. U/Pb zircon

  16. K Ar ages of plutonism and mineralization at the Shizhuyuan W Sn Bi Mo deposit, Hunan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jingwu; Kim, Sang Jung; Lee, Hyun Koo; Itay, Tetsumaru

    2002-01-01

    The Qianlishan granite complex, situated 16 km southeast of Chenzhou City, Hunan Province, China, hosts the Shizhuyuan W-Sn-Bi-Mo deposit. This complex, which intruded the Protozoic metasedimentary rocks and the Devonian clastic sedimentary and carbonate rocks, consists of mainly medium- to coarse-grained biotite granites and minor amounts of fine-grained biotite granite in addition to granite and quartz porphyry. K-Ar ages suggest three episodes of plutonism: the medium- to coarse-grained biotite granite (before 152 Ma), the fine-grained biotite granite (137 Ma), and the granite porphyry (129-131 Ma). Muscovite ages of the greisen are 145-148 Ma, suggesting that the W-Sn-Bi-Mo mineralization was related to the main, medium- to coarse-grained biotite granites. The K-Ar age of the hydrothermal vein mineralization is 92 Ma and is probably related to the porphyries.

  17. [Analysis of X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Plasma Mass Spectrometry of Pangxidong Composite Granitoid Pluton and Its Implications for Magmatic Differentiation].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chang-yu; Ding, Ru-xin; Li, Hong-zhong; Zhou, Yong-zhang; Niu, Jia; Zhang, Jie-tang

    2015-11-01

    Pangxidong composite granitoid pluton located in the southwestern margin of Yunkai massif. The metamorphic grade of this pluton increases from outside to inside, that is, banded-augen granitic gneisses, gneissoid granites and granites distribute in order from edge to core. X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Plasma Mass Spectrometry are conducted to study the geochemical characteristics of the three types of rocks. The result shows that all the three types of rocks are peraluminous rocks and their contents of main elements and rare earth elements change gradually. From granitic gneisses to granites, the contents of Al₂O₃, CaO, MgO, TiO₂, total rare earth elements and light rare earth elements increase, but the contents of SiO₂ and heavy rare earth elements decrease. It is suggested that the phylogenetic relationship exists between granitic gneisses, gneissoid granites and granites during the multi-stage tectonic evolution process. Furthermore, the remelting of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks in Yunkai massif is probably an important cause of granitoid rocks forming. The evolutionary mechanism is probably that SiO₂ and heavy rare earth elements were melt out from the protolith and gradually enriched upward, but Al₂O₃, CaO, MgO, TiO₂ and light rare earth elements enriched downward.

  18. [Analysis of X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Plasma Mass Spectrometry of Pangxidong Composite Granitoid Pluton and Its Implications for Magmatic Differentiation].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chang-yu; Ding, Ru-xin; Li, Hong-zhong; Zhou, Yong-zhang; Niu, Jia; Zhang, Jie-tang

    2015-11-01

    Pangxidong composite granitoid pluton located in the southwestern margin of Yunkai massif. The metamorphic grade of this pluton increases from outside to inside, that is, banded-augen granitic gneisses, gneissoid granites and granites distribute in order from edge to core. X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Plasma Mass Spectrometry are conducted to study the geochemical characteristics of the three types of rocks. The result shows that all the three types of rocks are peraluminous rocks and their contents of main elements and rare earth elements change gradually. From granitic gneisses to granites, the contents of Al₂O₃, CaO, MgO, TiO₂, total rare earth elements and light rare earth elements increase, but the contents of SiO₂ and heavy rare earth elements decrease. It is suggested that the phylogenetic relationship exists between granitic gneisses, gneissoid granites and granites during the multi-stage tectonic evolution process. Furthermore, the remelting of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks in Yunkai massif is probably an important cause of granitoid rocks forming. The evolutionary mechanism is probably that SiO₂ and heavy rare earth elements were melt out from the protolith and gradually enriched upward, but Al₂O₃, CaO, MgO, TiO₂ and light rare earth elements enriched downward. PMID:26978933

  19. The plutonic-volcanic connection: are we even on the right track? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundstrom, C.; Chakraborty, P.; Zambardi, T.

    2013-12-01

    The connection between silicic volcanic and plutonic rocks is full of contradictions. Foremost, granitic plutons reflect long slow incremental emplacement yet vast amounts of aphyric ignimbrite can be erupted rapidly. Heat flow, geophysical tomography, geochronology, geochemistry and petrology all provide observations, yet we are far from any consensus. The two most popular suggestions for forming ignimbrites, extraction of partial melt from a granitic upper crust reservoir or lower crustal hot zone melting, are each inconsistent with some observations/constraints. 100% melting of a granite mush, which may be consistent with many observations, was previously proposed1 but dismissed due to the large amount of latent heat needed to completely melt a mush. This work first presents new non-traditional isotope ratio data (Fe, Si) for plutonic and volcanic rocks suites showing that like Harker diagrams, volcanics and plutonics produce identical systematic behavior with differentiation. δ56Fe forms upwardly curving trends with increasing silica whereas δ30Si increases linearly. The logical deduction is that volcanics reflect 100% mobilization of a granite mush (not necessarily melting). While the origin of NTSI variations remains debated, the systematic NTSI trends are consistent with prediction of a top-down thermal migration zone refining (TMZR) process2. In part 2, we assume TMZR generates a granitic mush and propose that an instability in this mush leads to a runaway effect that results in eruption of aphyric ignimbrite. Experiments show that wet andesite evolves to granite at the cold (400°C) end of a thermal gradient3 with hydrous peralkaline melt existing interstitially. Previous work4 shows that such melts show retrograde immiscibility, segregating into a water rich melt and a water poor melt with temperature increase. Thus, as the mush builds down into hot crust, it crosses the immiscibility boundary triggering release of the water-rich phase; buoyant rise and

  20. Paleomagnetism and magnetic fabric of Miocene plutons of the Tonalá shearz zone, Chiapas, Mexico: evidence of rotation of the remanence vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Garza, Roberto S.; Geissman, John W.

    2016-04-01

    The Late Miocene plutons of coastal Chiapas are elongated parallel to the Tonalá mylonite belt, and some plutons show asymmetric outcrop patterns with sheared tails that trail behind the intrusions. Plutons were emplaced within a transpressional sinistral shear zone. Magnetic fabrics in the plutons are well-developed, and are subparallel to the structural trend of the Tonalá mylonitic belt, but locally magmatic fabrics are preserved. Magnetic fabrics in undeformed granites with igneous textures are also subparallel to the shear zone axis. Strongly deformed plutons have Ṕvalues as high as 1.7. Fabric ellipsoids are predominantly oblate, but they are triaxial in sites with igneous textures. Characteristic magnetizations reside in a cubic phase, such as low-Ti magnetite, but abundant particles in the MD range prevent isolating a stable magnetization in many of the sites. Site means are NW to NE directed, and of moderate positive inclination (or its antipodal), but locally they are very discordant in declination. The overall mean, discarding highly discordant sites is of D= 359.5 and I=41.9 (k=14.2, alpha95=8.1), which is nearly concordant with the NA reference direction indicating gentle northward tilt of less than about 10°. We explain the highly discordant directions as caused by continuing, progressive, deformation in the transpressive shear zone of a thermochemical remanence acquired during deformation. Deformation resulted in rotations, both in a clockwise and an anticlockwise sense. These results are interpreted as paleomagnetic vectors affected by distortional strain, which based on AMS exceed 40% shortening and accommodate shape and volume change in the rock.

  1. Zircon U-Pb geochronology, Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic composition and geological significance of the Late Triassic Baijiazhuang and Lvjing granitic plutons in West Qinling Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Meng; Niu, Yaoling; Kong, Juanjuan; Sun, Pu; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Shuo; Li, Jiyong

    2016-09-01

    The Qinling Orogen was a consequence of continental collision of the South China Craton with the North China Craton in the Triassic and caused widespread granitoid magmatism. However, the petrogenesis of these granitoids remains controversial. In this paper, we choose the Baijiazhuang (BJZ) and Lvjing (LJ) plutons in the West Qinling Orogen for a combined study of the zircon U-Pb geochronology, whole-rock major and trace element compositions and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic characteristics. We obtained zircon crystallization ages of ~ 216 Ma and ~ 212 Ma for the BJZ and the LJ plutons, respectively. The granitoid samples from both plutons have high K2O metaluminous to peraluminous compositions. They are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), light rare earth elements (LREEs) and depleted in high field-strength elements (HFSEs) with significant negative Eu anomalies. The BJZ samples have initial Sr isotopic ratios of 0.7032 to 0.7078, εNd(t) of - 10.99 to - 8.54 and εHf (t) of - 10.22 to - 6.41. The LJ granitoids have initial Sr isotopic ratios of 0.7070 to 0.7080, εNd(t) of - 5.37 to - 4.58 and εHf(t) of - 3.64 to - 1.78. The enriched isotopic characteristics of the two plutons are consistent with their source being dominated by ancient continental crust. However, two BJZ samples show depleted Sr isotope compositions, which may infer possible involvement of mantle materials. Mantle-derived melt, which formed from partial melting of mantle wedge peridotite facilitated by dehydration of the subducted/subducting Mianlue ocean crust, provide the required heat for the crustal melting while also contributing to the compositions of these granitoids. That is, the two granitic plutons are magmatic responses to the closure of the Mianlue ocean basin and the continental collision between the Yangtze and South Qinling crustal terranes.

  2. Age and zircon inheritance of eastern Blue Ridge plutons, southwestern North Carolina and northeastern Georgia, with implications for magma history and evolution of the southern Appalachian origin

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.F.; Hatcher, R.D. Jr.; Ayers, J.C.; Coath, C.D.; Harrison, T.M.

    2000-02-01

    High-resolution ion microprobe analysis of zircon has provided ages for previously undated plutons of the high-grade eastern Blue Ridge of northeastern Georgia and southwestern North Carolina. These data, together with backscattered electron imaging, reveal the presence of nearly ubiquitous inherited cores of highly variable age and magmatic rims that have experienced variable Pb loss, thus making interpretation of conventional U-Pb analyses very difficult. Ion probe rim analyses indicate that the plutons were emplaced during both the mod-Ordovician and mid-Devonian. Zircons from all intrusions have predominantly 1.0 to 1.25 Ga cores (Grenvillian). In addition, both Devonian and Ordovician plutons have smaller populations of Late Proterozoic-early Paleozoic (0.5--0.75 Ga), Middle Proterozoic (1.4 Ga), and Late Archean (2.6--2.9 Ga) cores. The ubiquitous, round cores and thick magmatic rims suggest significant resorption and then protracted growth within the melts. Zircon saturation temperatures based on whole-rock ({approximately}melt) Zr concentrations are lower than expected for magma generation (710--760 C). Zirconium concentrations may not reflect saturation at maximum temperature, if melting was very rapid (<{approximately}10{sup 5} yrs), or if zircon cores represent grains that were shielded from melt inside host grains for much of the magmatic history. Ages of magmatic and inherited zones of zircon from the plutons demonstrate that similar crust underlay the eastern Blue Ridge during both Taconian and Acadian orogenies, that there was no single episode of voluminous magmatism, and that metamorphism and deformation began before 470 Ma and continued after 370 Ma. These plutons do not constitute a significant convergence-related arc, though it is possible that they represent a displaced part of an arc that lies primarily to the east (in the Inner Piedmont?).

  3. Origin and interaction of some alkalic and silicic plutons in the Vermilion Granitic Complex, NE Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, G.W.; Nabelek, P.I.; Bauer, R.L.; Glascock, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    Alkalic gabbros and tonalites comprise a significant portion of the Archaean crust in the Vermilion Granitic Complex of NE Minnesota. The origin of these and associated rocks has been modeled using major and trace element approaches. Samples of the alkalic gabbro collected from three different intrusions have similar major element, REE, and transition metal concentrations. The REE patterns of these rocks can be modeled as the result of 1% to 3% melting of an undepleted garnet herzolite mantle with REE concentrations three times that of chondrites. However, their Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//CaO ratios of 2 - 3, Sr content of 900-1400 ppm and Ba of 100 - 1600 ppm suggest that the source may have been an enriched, metasomatized mantle. The hornblendites associated with these alkalic rocks have REE patterns which are consistent with crystallization and accumulation from the gabbroic magma. Major and trace element modeling suggest that the granitic dikes which are common throughout the area may be residual liquids formed by 60% crystallization of plagioclase, biotite, hornblende and apatite from the nearby tonalites such as the Burntside of Wakemup Bay plutons. Porphyritic hornblende monzonites composed of centimeter sized hornblende crystals floating in a granitic matrix occur locally. The field relations as well as the major and trace element data are consistent with the formation of these monzonitic rocks by mixing of the granite with partially consolidated hornblendite. These results suggest a complex interaction between alkalic gabbros and tonalites involving fractionation and mixing during the development of the Archaean crust of NE Minnesota.

  4. Petrological and geochemical constraints on granitoid formation: The Waldoboro Pluton Complex, Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M. . Dept. of Geological Science); Sidle, W.S. )

    1992-01-01

    The Waldoboro Pluton Complex (WPC) comprises seven units ranging from qtz-diorite to aplite. The country rocks are biotite-rich metagraywackes with minor shales mostly belonging to the Proterozoic Z-Ordovician Bucksport Formation. Field evidence strongly suggests that the WPC formed in-situ: contacts with the country rock are cryptic, transitional and concordant; restitic minerals in the granitoids are identical to those in the country rocks; prolific metasedimentary enclaves in the WPC are locally derived. Major and trace element data for country rock and the most voluminous units of the WPC define consistent linear trends suggesting limited melt segregation and retention of a high proportion of restite. Mixing models and partial melting models require 54--76% melting for generation of the gneissic granites and two-mica granites. Garnet-biotite geothermometry and garnet-Al[sub 2]SiO[sub 5]-SiO[sub 2]-plagioclase geobarometry indicate that the WPC formed at T = 740--780 C and P = 0.4--0.7 GPa. Published experimental data show that < 50% melting is likely under these conditions if melting is controlled by dehydration reactions. Bucksport lithologies contain < 20% biotite, suggesting that the maximum amount of melt that could have formed by dehydration melting is < 20%, even if all biotite was consumed during melting. It seems probable that a free fluid phase was required to generate the WPC. Migmatization is apparent in all lithologies (including amphibolites) in the vicinity of the WPC, consistent with fluid-present melting. Fluid may have ingressed along the St. George thrust, but the source of the fluid is unknown.

  5. Total copper content and its distribution in acid vineyards soils developed from granitic rocks.

    PubMed

    Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Queijeiro, José Manuel G; Blanco-Ward, Daniel; Alvarez-Olleros, Cristalina; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; García-Rodeja, Eduardo

    2007-05-25

    Total and extractable (5 extractants) Cu concentrations were determined in thirteen acid vineyards soils. Mean total copper concentration was 259 mg kg(-1) and most of the soil samples (87%) were above the upper limit allowed by the European Union for this element in soils. The largest Cu fraction was found to be that bound to soil organic matter, which accounted for 49% of the total Cu. None of the Cu fractions showed significant differences with depth. Nevertheless, bioavailable Cu (extracted in Na(2)-EDTA) was found to show a strong correlation with Cu bound to soil organic matter, which may indicate that Na(2)-EDTA is able to extract part of the organically bound Cu, resulting in an overestimation of bioavailable Cu. However, practices associated to soil use change and management affecting the stability of Cu organic complexes could induce an increase in bioavailable Cu levels in these soils.

  6. Onset of Grain Boundary Migration and Drastic Weakening of Quartzite during increasing grade of Metamorphism in the Contact Aureole surrounding the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek pluton, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, S. S.; Student, J. J.; Jakeway, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek (EJB) pluton in eastern California is surrounded by a ~1.3 km wide intensely deformed concordant aureole of metasedimentary rocks. South of the pluton, the Harkless Quartzite can be mapped from where it is located outside the aureole, with its regional strike through the transition into the aureole and concordancy with the pluton. The transition into concordancy, which is fairly abrupt, occurs over a distance of less than 100 m. Across this transition the bedding rotates close to 90° to become subvertical. Here the metasedimentary formations in the aureole have undergone 65% shortening. A suite of Harkless Quartzite samples was collected starting at 2.3 km south of the pluton, across the transition into concordancy at 1.3 km, and to within 450m from the pluton contact. Microstructurally, the transition is defined by changes in the dominant recrystallization mechanisms. At 2.3 km from the pluton, subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR) plus grain boundary migration (GBM) operate together and many sedimentary grains (rounded grain boundaries) exist. As the pluton is approached, SGR decreases, GBM increases, and rounded grain boundaries slowly disappear. The abrupt transition into concordancy is marked by the final disappearance of SGR and rounded grain boundaries and extensive GBM. The transition is not completely smooth, and other variables such as pinning and amount of fluid inclusions seem to have a strong local affect on the dominant recrystallization mechanism. We suspect that the onset of extensive GBM allows for the diffusion of water into the crystal lattice which results in the drastic weakening and rotation of metasedimentary formations into concordancy.

  7. Tilted middle Tertiary ash-flow calderas and subjacent granitic plutons, southern Stillwater Range, Nevada: cross sections of an Oligocene igneous center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Steeply tilted late Oligocene caldera systems in the Stillwater caldera complex record a number of unusual features including extreme thickness of caldera-related deposits, lack of evidence for structural doming of the calderas and preservation of vertical compositional zoning in the plutonic rocks. The Stillwater caldera complex comprises three partly overlapping ash-flow calderas and subjacent plutonic rocks that were steeply tilted during early Miocene extension. The Job Canyon caldera, the oldest (ca. 29-28 Ma) caldera, consists of two structural blocks. The 25 to 23 Ma Poco Canyon and Elevenmile Canyon calderas and underlying Freeman Creek pluton overlap in time and space with each other. Caldera collapse occurred mostly along subvertical ring-fracture faults that penetrated to depths of >5 km and were repeatedly active during eruption of ash-flow tuffs. The calderas collapsed as large piston-like blocks, and there is no evidence for chaotic collapse. Preserved parts of caldera floors are relatively flat surfaces several kilometers across. -from Author

  8. Domain-level rocking motion within a polymerase that translocates on single-stranded nucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huiyung; Li, Changzheng; Zhou, Sufeng; Poulos, Thomas L.; Gershon, Paul David

    2013-04-01

    An X-ray crystallographic structure is described for unliganded Vaccinia virus poly(A) polymerase monomer (VP55), showing the first domain-level structural isoforms among either VP55, it’s processivity factor VP39, or the VP55-VP39 heterodimer. The occurrence of domain-level motion specifically in monomeric VP55 is consistent with the finding that the monomeric protein undergoes saltatory translocation whereas the heterodimer does not. Vaccinia virus poly(A) polymerase (VP55) is the only known polymerase that can translocate independently with respect to single-stranded nucleic acid (ssNA). Previously, its structure has only been solved in the context of the VP39 processivity factor. Here, a crystal structure of unliganded monomeric VP55 has been solved to 2.86 Å resolution, showing the first backbone structural isoforms among either VP55 or its processivity factor (VP39). Backbone differences between the two molecules of VP55 in the asymmetric unit indicated that unliganded monomeric VP55 can undergo a ‘rocking’ motion of the N-terminal domain with respect to the other two domains, which may be ‘rigidified’ upon VP39 docking. This observation is consistent with previously demonstrated experimental molecular dynamics of the monomer during translocation with respect to nucleic acid and with different mechanisms of translocation in the presence and absence of processivity factor VP39. Side-chain conformational changes in the absence of ligand were observed at a key primer contact site and at the catalytic center of VP55. The current structure completes the trio of possible structural forms for VP55 and VP39, namely the VP39 monomer, the VP39–VP55 heterodimer and the VP55 monomer.

  9. Formation of lower continental crust by relamination of buoyant arc lavas and plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, Peter B.; Behn, Mark D.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of the Earth's continents is enigmatic. Volcanic arc magmas generated above subduction zones have geochemical compositions that are similar to continental crust, implying that arc magmatic processes played a central role in generating continental crust. Yet the deep crust within volcanic arcs has a very different composition from crust at similar depths beneath the continents. It is therefore unclear how arc crust is transformed into continental crust. The densest parts of arc lower crust may delaminate and become recycled into the underlying mantle. Here we show, however, that even after delamination, arc lower crust still has significantly different trace element contents from continental lower crust. We suggest that it is not delamination that determines the composition of continental crust, but relamination. In our conceptual model, buoyant magmatic rocks generated at arcs are subducted. Then, upon heating at depth, they ascend and are relaminated at the base of the overlying crust. A review of the average compositions of buoyant magmatic rocks -- lavas and plutons -- sampled from the Aleutians, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, Kohistan and Talkeetna arcs reveals that they fall within the range of estimated major and trace elements in lower continental crust. Relamination may thus provide an efficient process for generating lower continental crust.

  10. Metamorphism and plutonism in the Quetico Belt, Superior Province, N.W. Ontario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percival, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Quetico Belt lies between the metavolcanic Wawa-Shebandowan and Wabigoon Belts. It consists of marginal metasedimentary rocks and central pelitic, gneissic and plutonic rocks. Metamorphism is Barrovian, at depths less than 10 km, and grade increases from margins to core of the belt: the outermost pelites are at chlorite-muscovite grade; inward a garnet-andalusite zone formed throughout the inner margin; and the central zone ranges form garnet-andalusite in the west and garnet-sillimanite-muscovite to garnet-sillimanite-cordierite and rare kyanite 6 to 150 km to the east. This increase is correlated with granitic intrusives. Migmatites in the core have intrusive leucosomes in the west and locally derived ones in the east. Isograd surfaces are steep where the belt is narrow and dip gently where it is wide. The Quetico Park intrusive complex of the central region of the Quetico Belt shows a zonation across it 20 to 50 km width from older, medium grained biotite composition to younger, coarse to pegmatitic granitic composition. Sediment of the Quetico basin had its source in the bordering metavolcanic belts and was deposited ca. 2.75 to 2.70 Ga ago. Boundaries of the belt dip inward, so it essentially is a graben of inter-arc or back-arc type.

  11. Geochemical Database for the Boulder Batholith and Its Satellitic Plutons, Southwest Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; Lund, Karen; Tilling, Robert I.; Denning, Paul D.; DeWitt, Ed

    2009-01-01

    Geochemical data presented in this report pertain to Cretaceous igneous intrusions of the Boulder batholith and its satellitic plutons in southwest Montana. The geographic area addressed in this compilation is approximately bounded by lats 45.6 deg and 46.7 deg N. and longs 112.75 deg and 111.5 deg W. These data were compiled in order to establish the geologic framework for world-class mineral deposits of the Butte district. Although these deposits and their host rocks have been the subject of many investigations, the petrologic characteristics of associated intrusive rocks have not been systematically compiled, synthesized, or interpreted. Abundant late Mesozoic intrusions in the study area are probably byproducts of subduction-related processes, including back-arc magmatism that prevailed along the west edge of the North American plate during this interval. The ultimate goal of this effort will be an evaluation of the time-space-compositional evolution of Mesozoic magmatism associated with the Boulder batholith and identification of genetic associations between magmatic and mineralizing processes in this region.

  12. Geochemistry and Geochronology of Eocene Plutons in Northeastern Washington: A Test of Farallon Slab Rollback as a Cause of the Challis Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, L.; Tepper, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The causes of widespread magmatism and extension that affected the Pacific Northwest during the Eocene "Challis Event" are poorly understood. Two models that have been advanced to explain this activity are passage of a slab window (e.g., Haeussler et al., 2011) and rollback of the subducting Farallon slab following accretion of Siletzia (Schmandt and Humphreys, 2011). Both scenarios would have resulted in widespread magmatism but with different temporal patterns. Based on reconstructed plate motion vectors magmatism related to a slab window should produce a younging-to-the-NW pattern whereas magmatism associated with slab rollback should young to the S or SW. Existing dates on Eocene igneous units in NE Washington appear to show an overall younging to the SW, consistent with the slab rollback model. However, many of these dates (mainly K-Ar) have large uncertainties so we are conducting a U-Pb dating and geochemical survey of Eocene plutons across the region. An initial set of zircon U-Pb ages (by LA-MC-ICP-MS) from five intrusions in east-central WA range from 50.7 - 46.7 Ma and young to the SW, a trend similar to that observed among Eocene rocks in the Idaho Batholith (Gaschnig et al., 2013). To further investigate this pattern we are dating an additional ten plutonic units that define a ~100 km SW-NE transect through NE WA. From NE to SW the units in this transect are (with dates from WA DNR mapping) as follows: Sheppard granite (undated), Herron Creek intrusion (51.4 +/- 1.9 Ma), Mt. Bonaparte pluton (52.8 +/- 2.6 Ma), Daisy Trail granite (49.9 +/- 0.3 Ma), Swimptkin Creek pluton (48.2 +/- 1.2 Ma), Moses pluton (48.6 +/- 1.2 Ma), Keller Butte granite (52.9 +/- 0.4 Ma), Johnny George plutonic complex (49.9 +/- 0.45 Ma), Manilla Creek (undated), and Swawilla Basin pluton (58.8 +/- 2.2 Ma). Results of this study should lead to a better understanding of the cause(s) of Challis magmatism and specifically its relationship to the ~50-48 Ma accretion of Siletzia.

  13. The Swansea Plutonic Suite: Synextensional magmatism in the Buckskin and Rawhide Mountains, west-central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, B.; Nealey, L.D. . Denver Federal Center); Wooden, J.L. )

    1993-04-01

    About 200 km[sup 2] of the crystalline rocks exposed below the Buckskin-Rawhide detachment fault in west-central Arizona consists of gabbro to granite of the 20--30 Ma Swansea Plutonic Suite. Gabbro is only locally mylonitized and is intruded by more felsic rocks of the suite. The felsic rocks have a well-developed mylonitic texture and northeast-trending mineral lineation formed by ductily deformed quartz grains and aggregates. The felsic rocks are generally fine to medium grained except for a distinctive porphyritic phase, in which K-feldspar phenocrysts (now porphyroclasts) are as much as 3 cm in diameter. The suite is calcic to alkali calcic, metaluminous to weakly peraluminous (A/CNK = 0.7--1), and has average Th/U of 4.8 and Rb/Sr of 0.11. It shows a wide range in total rare-earth abundances (REE = 132--393 ppm), light to heavy REE enrichment (chondrite normalized [CN] La/Yb = 3--52), and heavy REE enrichment (CN Yb = 2.6--24.5). Intermediate and silicic members are depleted in HREE compared with mafic members, indicating magmatic control by clinopyroxene with or without amphibole or garnet. The porphyritic phase has the highest total REE and HREE abundances. Lead isotope ratios cluster in tight groups between reference lines for the Mohave and central Arizona crustal provinces. Lead in the porphyritic phase is distinctly less radiogenic than in the other phases. U-Pb zircon age of a granite in the suite is 21 [+-] 1.5 Ma. Upper intercept of the discordia line is 1,420 [+-] 54 Ma, indicating that 1,400-Ma rock dominates the source region for at least the felsic rocks of the suite. The suite was emplaced during the beginning and early phases of crustal extension and was probably pulled southwest out from beneath the Colorado Plateau transition zone as extension progressed. Thus the suite may represent roots of subaerial volcanic centers at the margin of the transition zone, which chemically resemble rocks of the suite in major-element chemistry.

  14. Selective Precipitation of Thorium lodate from a Tartaric Acid-Hydrogen Peroxide Medium Application to Rapid Spectrophotometric Determination of Thorium in Silicate Rocks and in Ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a selective iodate separation of thorium from nitric acid medium containing d-tartaric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is prevented by the use of 8quinolinol. A few micrograms of thorium are separated sufficiently clean from 30 mg. of such oxides as cerium, zirconium, titanium, niobium, tantalum, scandium, or iron with one iodate precipitation to allow an accurate determination of thorium with the thoronmesotartaric acid spectrophotometric method. The method is successful for the determination of 0.001% or more of thorium dioxide in silicate rocks and for 0.01% or more in black sand, monazite, thorite, thorianite, eschynite, euxenite, and zircon.

  15. Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 Containing an Artificial Oxalate Operon and Vitreoscilla Hemoglobin Secretes Oxalic Acid and Solubilizes Rock Phosphate in Acidic Alfisols

    PubMed Central

    Archana, G.; Naresh Kumar, G.

    2014-01-01

    Oxalate secretion was achieved in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 by incorporation of genes encoding Aspergillus niger oxaloacetate acetyl hydrolase (oah), Fomitopsis plaustris oxalate transporter (FpOAR) and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (vgb) in various combinations. Pf (pKCN2) transformant containing oah alone accumulated 19 mM oxalic acid intracellularly but secreted 1.2 mM. However, in the presence of an artificial oxalate operon containing oah and FpOAR genes in plasmid pKCN4, Pf (pKCN4) secreted 13.6 mM oxalate in the medium while 3.6 mM remained inside. This transformant solubilized 509 μM of phosphorus from rock phosphate in alfisol which is 4.5 fold higher than the Pf (pKCN2) transformant. Genomic integrants of P. fluorescens (Pf int1 and Pf int2) containing artificial oxalate operon (plac-FpOAR-oah) and artificial oxalate gene cluster (plac-FpOAR-oah, vgb, egfp) secreted 4.8 mM and 5.4 mM oxalic acid, released 329 μM and 351 μM P, respectively, in alfisol. The integrants showed enhanced root colonization, improved growth and increased P content of Vigna radiata plants. This study demonstrates oxalic acid secretion in P. fluorescens by incorporation of an artificial operon constituted of genes for oxalate synthesis and transport, which imparts mineral phosphate solubilizing ability to the organism leading to enhanced growth and P content of V. radiata in alfisol soil. PMID:24705024

  16. Treatment and prevention of ARD using silica micro encapsulation[Acid Rock Drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, P.; Rybock, J.; Wheaton, A.

    1999-07-01

    In response to the known drawbacks of liming and the ever-increasing regulatory demands on the mining industry, KEECO has developed a silica micro encapsulation (SME) process. SME is a cost-effective, high performance reagent that is utilized in conjunction with simple chemical delivery systems. By encapsulating metals in a silica matrix formation and rapidly precipitating them into a sand-like sludge, it offers all the advantages of liming without the negative drawbacks. Utilizing an injection technique via a high shear mixing device, a slurry form of the SME product called KB-1{trademark} was applied to ARD at the Bunker Hill Mine in Idaho and to ARD pumped from collection ponds at a remote mine site in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Flow rates at both sites ranged form 500 to 800 gallons per minute. Treated water from the Bunker Hill Mine operation achieved the site's NPDES criteria for all evaluated metals and US Drinking Water quality for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and zinc with a dosage rate of 1.34 grams KB-1{trademark} per liter. Treated water from the Sierra Nevada project focused on the control of aluminum, arsenic, copper, iron and nickel. All water samples displayed a >99.5% reduction in these metals, as well as an 84%--87% reduction in the concentration of sulfate. Testing on sludge generated form both operations achieved TCLP Action Limits. The SME process is currently under evaluation as a means to coat the pyrite surfaces of newly generated mine tailings to prevent oxidation and future acid generation.

  17. Lower Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks of Southern Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Dillion, J.T.

    1985-04-01

    Lower Paleozoic or Proterozoic basement rocks occur in windows and thrust plates in several areas of the Brooks Range. Uranium-lead radiometric analyses of highly metamorphosed rocks from the Baird Mountains and Ernie Lake area have yielded Proterozoic ages. Structural, stratigraphic, petrologic, and isotopic evidence exists for Proterozoic(.) rocks in the schist belt; around the Chandalar, Arrigetch,and Igikpak plutons; and in the Cosmos Hills window. Fossiliferous, Lower Paleozoic, low-grade metasedimentary rocks occur in the Romanzof Mountains, Doonerak window, and Baird Mountains, and may also surround the Chandalar plutons. Locally, the Lower Paleozoic rocks are unconformably overlain by Devonian to Mississippian metasediments and may stratigraphically overlie older, higher grade metamorphic rocks. Similarities in the stratigraphic settings and lithologies and in fossil ages and affinities allow correlation of the Lower Paleozoic rocks in the southern Brooks Range. Correlation of Lower Paleozoic rocks exposed beneath the Endicott allochthon at the Doonerak fenster with coeval rocks in an overlying thrust plate to the south at Snowsden Mountain is especially significant. A west-trending thrust fault, which is rooted in Lower Paleozoic basement, along the north side of Snowsden Mountain is postulated to account for these relationships. Apparently, the Endicott allochthon roots beneath the Snowsden Mountain thrust fault. Evidence form conodont samples currently being studied by A. Harris may bear on the extent of the Lower Paleozoic rocks in the upper plate of the Snowsden Mountain thrust and in the Chandalar area.

  18. Zinc isotope investigation of surface and pore waters in a mountain watershed impacted by acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Suzan; Borrok, David M; Wanty, Richard B; Balistrieri, Laurie S

    2012-03-15

    The pollution of natural waters with metals derived from the oxidation of sulfide minerals like pyrite is a global environmental problem. However, the metal loading pathways and transport mechanisms associated with acid rock drainage reactions are often difficult to characterize using bulk chemical data alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of zinc (Zn) isotopes to complement traditional geochemical tools in the investigation of contaminated waters at the former Waldorf mining site in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A. Geochemical signatures and statistical analysis helped in identifying two primary metal loading pathways at the Waldorf site. The first was characterized by a circumneutral pH, high alkalinity, and high Zn/Cd ratios. The second was characterized by acidic pHs and low Zn/Cd ratios. Zinc isotope signatures in surface water samples collected across the site were remarkably similar (the δ(66)Zn, relative to JMC 3-0749-L, for most samples ranged from 0.20 to 0.30‰±0.09‰ 2σ). This probably suggests that the ultimate source of Zn is consistent across the Waldorf site, regardless of the metal loading pathway. The δ(66)Zn of pore water samples collected within a nearby metal-impacted wetland area, however, were more variable, ranging from 0.20 to 0.80‰±0.09‰ 2σ. Here the Zn isotopes seemed to reflect differences in groundwater flow pathways. However, a host of secondary processes might also have impacted Zn isotopes, including adsorption of Zn onto soil components, complexation of Zn with dissolved organic matter, uptake of Zn into plants, and the precipitation of Zn during the formation of reduced sulfur species. Zinc isotope analysis proved useful in this study; however, the utility of this isotopic tool would improve considerably with the addition of a comprehensive experimental foundation for interpreting the complex isotopic relationships found in soil pore waters. PMID:22326318

  19. Microbacter margulisiae gen. nov., sp. nov., a propionigenic bacterium isolated from sediments of an acid rock drainage pond.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Andrea, Irene; Sanz, Jose Luis; Stams, Alfons J M

    2014-12-01

    A novel anaerobic propionigenic bacterium, strain ADRI(T), was isolated from sediment of an acid rock drainage environment (Tinto River, Spain). Cells were small (0.4-0.6×1-1.7 µm), non-motile and non-spore-forming rods. Cells possessed a Gram-negative cell-wall structure and were vancomycin-resistant. Strain ADRI(T) utilized yeast extract and various sugars as substrates and formed propionate, lactate and acetate as major fermentation products. The optimum growth temperature was 30 °C and the optimum pH for growth was pH 6.5, but strain ADRI(T) was able to grow at a pH as low as 3.0. Oxidase, indole formation, and urease and catalase activities were negative. Aesculin and gelatin were hydrolysed. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain ADRI(T) were anteiso-C15 : 0 (30.3 %), iso-C15 : 0 (29.2 %) and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (14.9 %). Major menaquinones were MK-8 (52 %) and MK-9 (48 %). The genomic DNA G+C content was 39.9 mol%. Phylogenetically, strain ADRI(T) was affiliated to the family Porphyromonadaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes. The most closely related cultured species were Paludibacter propionicigenes with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 87.5 % and several species of the genus Dysgonomonas (similarities of 83.5-85.4 % to the type strains). Based on the distinctive ecological, phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics of strain ADRI(T), a novel genus and species, Microbacter margulisiae gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is ADRI(T) ( = JCM 19374(T) = DSM 27471(T)).

  20. Zinc isotope investigation of surface and pore waters in a mountain watershed impacted by acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Suzan; Borrok, David M; Wanty, Richard B; Balistrieri, Laurie S

    2012-03-15

    The pollution of natural waters with metals derived from the oxidation of sulfide minerals like pyrite is a global environmental problem. However, the metal loading pathways and transport mechanisms associated with acid rock drainage reactions are often difficult to characterize using bulk chemical data alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of zinc (Zn) isotopes to complement traditional geochemical tools in the investigation of contaminated waters at the former Waldorf mining site in the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A. Geochemical signatures and statistical analysis helped in identifying two primary metal loading pathways at the Waldorf site. The first was characterized by a circumneutral pH, high alkalinity, and high Zn/Cd ratios. The second was characterized by acidic pHs and low Zn/Cd ratios. Zinc isotope signatures in surface water samples collected across the site were remarkably similar (the δ(66)Zn, relative to JMC 3-0749-L, for most samples ranged from 0.20 to 0.30‰±0.09‰ 2σ). This probably suggests that the ultimate source of Zn is consistent across the Waldorf site, regardless of the metal loading pathway. The δ(66)Zn of pore water samples collected within a nearby metal-impacted wetland area, however, were more variable, ranging from 0.20 to 0.80‰±0.09‰ 2σ. Here the Zn isotopes seemed to reflect differences in groundwater flow pathways. However, a host of secondary processes might also have impacted Zn isotopes, including adsorption of Zn onto soil components, complexation of Zn with dissolved organic matter, uptake of Zn into plants, and the precipitation of Zn during the formation of reduced sulfur species. Zinc isotope analysis proved useful in this study; however, the utility of this isotopic tool would improve considerably with the addition of a comprehensive experimental foundation for interpreting the complex isotopic relationships found in soil pore waters.

  1. Remagnetization of igneous rocks in Gupis area of Kohistan arc, northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M. N.; Fujiwara, Y.; Paudel, L. P.

    2001-05-01

    The Kohistan arc was formed due to subduction of neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath Asia. The arc is comprised of volcanic, plutonic and sedimentary rocks of Mesozoic to Tertiary age, formed prior and after the suturing of the Indian and Asian continents. Paleomagnetic investigations have been carried out on Paleocene volcanic and plutonic rocks exposed in the northern part of the arc. A total of 110 samples from 16 sites were drilled. According to rock-magnetic studies the main magnetic carrier is magnetite. Optical microscopy study reveals that low-grade metamorphism have effected all rocks. Magnetite is found as both a primary magmatic mineral and secondary alteration product in all samples. Samples of volcanics yield post tilting characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRM). The in situ mean direction of the ChRMs of the intrusives is similar to the in situ mean direction of volcanics. The presence of secondary magnetite in plutons, the similarity of in situ mean ChRM of plutons with that of post-tilting ChRMs of similar age volcanics and dissimilarity of the mean ChRM of plutons from expected directions at the time of formation of plutons support a secondary origin for the ChRM of plutons. As the ChRM directions of the volcanics and intrusives are the same, it implies that both ChRMs were acquired during the same remagnetization event. Comparing the mean paleolatitude (25 ± 6°N) from Gupis area with those from Indian APWP and considering the fact that there was prevailing heating event in Lower Tertiary in the area, the acquisition age of this secondary remanent magnetization can be bracketed between 50 and 35 Ma.

  2. An integrated zircon geochronological and geochemical investigation into the Miocene plutonic evolution of the Cyclades, Aegean Sea, Greece: part 2—geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolhar, Robert; Ring, Uwe; Kemp, Anthony I. S.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Weaver, Steve D.; Woodhead, Jon D.; Uysal, I. Tonguc; Turnbull, Rose

    2012-12-01

    Zircons from 14 compositionally variable granitic rocks were examined in detail using CL image-guided micro-analysis to unravel the complex magmatic history above the southward retreating Hellenic subduction zone system in the Aegean Sea. Previously published U-Pb ages document an episodic crystallisation history from 17 to 11 Ma, with peraluminous (S-type) granitic rocks systematically older than closely associated metaluminous (I-type) granitic rocks. Zircon O- and Hf isotopic data, combined with trace element compositions, are highly variable within and between individual samples, indicative of open-system behaviour involving mantle-derived melts and evolved supracrustal sources. Pronounced compositional and thermal fluctuations highlight the role of magma mixing and mingling, in accord with field observations, and incremental emplacement of distinct melt batches coupled with variable degrees of crustal assimilation. In the course of partial fusion, more fertile supracrustal sources dominated in the earlier stages of Aegean Miocene magmatism, consistent with systematically older crystallisation ages of peraluminous granitic rocks. Differences between zircon saturation and crystallisation temperatures (deduced from zircon Ti concentrations), along with multimodal crystallisation age spectra for individual plutons, highlight the complex and highly variable physico-compositional and thermal evolution of silicic magma systems. The transfer of heat and juvenile melts from the mantle varied probably in response to episodic rollback of the subducting lithospheric slab, as suggested by punctuated crystallisation age spectra within and among individual granitic plutons.

  3. U.S. Geological Survey research in Handcart Gulch, Colorado—An alpine watershed with natural acid-rock drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, Andrew H.; Caine, Jonathan Saul; Verplanck, Philip L.; Bove, Dana J.; Kahn, Katherine G.

    2009-01-01

    Handcart Gulch is an alpine watershed along the Continental Divide in the Colorado Rocky Mountain Front Range. It contains an unmined mineral deposit typical of many hydrothermal mineral deposits in the intermountain west, composed primarily of pyrite with trace metals including copper and molybdenum. Springs and the trunk stream have a natural pH value of 3 to 4. The U.S. Geological Survey began integrated research activities at the site in 2003 with the objective of better understanding geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic controls on naturally occurring acid-rock drainage in alpine watersheds. Characterizing the role of groundwater was of particular interest because mountain watersheds containing metallic mineral deposits are often underlain by complexly deformed crystalline rocks in which groundwater flow is poorly understood. Site infrastructure currently includes 4 deep monitoring wells high in the watershed (300– 1,200 ft deep), 4 bedrock (100–170 ft deep) and 5 shallow (10–30 ft deep) monitoring wells along the trunk stream, a stream gage, and a meteorological station. Work to date at the site includes: geologic mapping and structural analysis; surface sample and drill core mineralogic characterization; geophysical borehole logging; aquifer testing; monitoring of groundwater hydraulic heads and streamflows; a stream tracer dilution study; repeated sampling of surface and groundwater for geochemical analyses, including major and trace elements, several isotopes, and groundwater age dating; and construction of groundwater flow models. The unique dataset collected at Handcart Gulch has yielded several important findings about bedrock groundwater flow at the site. Most importantly, we find that bedrock bulk permeability is nontrivial and that bedrock groundwater apparently constitutes a substantial fraction of the hydrologic budget. This means that bedrock groundwater commonly may be an underappreciated component of the hydrologic system in studies of

  4. Optimization of the Acetic Acid method for microfossil extraction from lithified carbonate rocks: Examples from the Jurassic and Miocene of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Septriandi; Malik, Muhammad; Kaminski, Michael; Babalola, Lamidi

    2016-04-01

    We report the first ever use of the acetic acid processing method for the extraction of microfossils from indurated limestones in Saudi Arabia. Two different limestone samples from Middle Jurassic and Middle Miocene formation in Saudi Arabia were tested under different concentrations of acid from 50% to 100% and with processing times from 2 hours to 10 hours, in an attempt to optimize the processing methodology. The recovery of acid residues shows a similar trend for both Jurassic and Miocene samples. The weight percentage of residue particle size > 1 mm decreases as acid concentration increases, especially in the 50 to 80% acid concentration range, and the weight percentage of the smallest size particles >0.063 mm increases as acid concentration increases. The small fraction of residue between 0.50 - 0.063 mm was split into 3 g subsamples and picked for microfossils in order to assess their preservation. All concentrations of acetic acid tested show promising results for both the Jurassic Dhruma and Miocene Dam formation carbonates. Higher acid concentrations with longer reaction times yield better recovery than higher concentrations with less reaction time. Based on our experiment, we recommended a 60% concentration of acetic acid to be the optimal concentration for use on routine micropaleontological samples of Saudi Arabian carbonate rocks. By lowering the concentration of acetic acid from 80% to 60%, the consumption of acid is reduced without compromising the recovery of microfossils, and the sample can be processed in a more environmentally friendly manner.

  5. Origin of the fluorine-rich highly differentiated granites from the Qianlishan composite plutons (South China) and implications for polymetallic mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Ma, Xinghua; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2014-10-01

    Many composite granite plutons occur in South China, accompanied by large-scale polymetallic mineralization. Each composite pluton is composed of main-phase granite and late-stage highly differentiated granite. Traditionally, the highly differentiated granite is thought to be residual melt of the former via fractionation, and ore-forming materials and fluids are from granite magma itself. We propose a different model for the origin of the granites and related mineralization, based on petrological and geochemical studies on the Qianlishan composite plutons that host the supergiant Shizhuyuan W-Sn-Bi-Mo deposit. The main-phase granite shows features of normal granites, while the highly differentiated granite is characterized by F-rich, water-deficient, low fO2, alkalinity, REE tetrad effect, and modified behavior of some trace elements, e.g., very high K/Ba and low K/Rb and Zr/Hf ratios. We suggest that the parent magma of the highly differentiated granite was derived from melting of dominantly lower crustal rocks, triggered by underplating of a new pulse of basaltic magmas; small amounts of basaltic magmas and volatiles such as fluorine were involved in the source of the granite. Addition of fluorine lowered the solidus temperature and viscosity of granite magma, and thus prolonged the process of magma evolution. This resulted in extreme fractional crystallization, and intense interaction between melt and circulating waters from country rocks, forming the unusual geochemical features of the granite. The high temperature circulating waters, along with metamorphic fluids released from deep crustal rocks, subsequently, extract ore-forming metals from country rocks through forming F-bearing complexation, forming the polymetallic deposits.

  6. Neogene Uplift and Exhumation of Plutonic Bodies in the Beni Bou Ifrour Massif (Nador, northeastern Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebret, Noëmie; Jolivet, Laurent; Branquet, Yannick; Bourdier, Jean-Louis; Jolivet, Marc; Marcoux, Eric

    2013-04-01

    illustrate the geometry of the Beni Bou Ifrour massif. A paleomagnetism campaign was conducted, to determine if the plutonic intrusions have been tilted since their emplacement. Apatite fission tracks and 40Ar-39Ar dating allow us to estimate the exhumation age of the igneous bodies, and therefore add chronological constraints to the tectonic model. Geochemical study has also been performed on the magmatic rocks, and added to an extensive dataset (El Bakkali, 1995; Kerchaoui, 1995; Duggen et al., 2005). The existence of a magmatic chamber below the Beni Bou Ifrour dome will thus be discussed. Once established, the tectonic model of the Beni Bou Ifrour massif will help to precise the emplacement of the mineralized bodies and to integrate the iron-skarn metallogenesis within the structural evolution of the Rif orogenic segment.

  7. Genesis of adakitic granitoids by partial melting of thickened lower crust and its implications for early crustal growth: A case study from the Huichizi pluton, Qinling orogen, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhengwei; Wu, Yuanbao; Siebel, Wolfgang; Gao, Shan; Wang, Hao; Abdallsamed, Mohammed. I. M.; Zhang, Wenxiang; Yang, Saihong

    2015-12-01

    Adakitic rocks are often considered as a key to deciphering the genesis of Archean TTGs and the early crustal growth. Granites from the Huichizi pluton in the North Qinling (NQ) unit have high Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N ratios similar to adakites. Their relatively high SiO2, K2O, and Na2O and very low MgO, Cr, and Ni contents are in the range of high-SiO2 adakites and early Archean TTGs and are compositionally similar to experimental melts derived from metabasalt sources. New SIMS zircon U-Pb dating constrains the emplacement age of the Huichizi pluton at 422 ± 5 Ma. Rock samples from the Huichizi pluton have εNd(t) and zircon εHf(t) values similar to the Neoproterozoic metabasalts in the NQ unit. In combination with their normal mantle-like δ18Ozir values, these adakites are best explained by partial melting of the Neoproterozoic mafic crustal root due to subduction of the Shangdan ocean. Regional geological data suggest that the crust was probably thickened by a ca. 490 Ma arc-collision process prior to the emplacement of the Huichizi pluton. Our results confirm that underplating of mafic magma and its subsequent fusion triggered by slab subduction under high pressure conditions could be an important mechanism for the formation of early continental crust.

  8. Sr and Pb isotopic geochemistry of feldspars and implications for the growth of megacrysts in plutonic settings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munnikhuis, J.; Glazner, A. F.; Coleman, D. S.; Mills, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    Why megacrystic textures develop in silicic igneous rocks is still unknown. One hypothesis is that these crystals nucleate early in a magma chamber with a high liquid content. A supportive observation of this hypothesis is areas in plutons with high concentrations of megacrysts suggesting flow sorting. Another group of hypotheses suggest megacrystic textures form during protracted late-stage coarsening in a low-melt, interlocked matrix due to either thermal oscillations from incremental pluton emplacement, or Ostwald ripening. Isotopic analyses of large, euhedral K-feldspar megacrysts from the Cretaceous intrusive suites of the Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB) provide new insight into their origin. Megacrysts from the SNB reach the decimeter scale, are Or rich (85-90%), are perthitic, and host mineral inclusions of nearly all phases in the host rock. In-situ micro-drilling of transects, from core to rim, of the alkali feldspars provides material for Sr and Pb isotopic analyses by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Preliminary 87Sr/86Sr(i) isotopic data from samples from the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite range from 0.706337 to 0.706452 (~1.6ɛSr) near the cores, whereas a sawtooth pattern with larger variability, 0.706179 to 0.706533 (~5ɛSr), occurs nears the rims. We interpret these preliminary data to indicate that the late portion of growth (i.e. crystal rim) was dominated by either cannibalism of small K-feldspar crystals with isotopic variability, or by addition of isotopically diverse late components to the magma. By comparing the Sr and Pb isotopic stratigraphy of megacrysts from a variety of rock matrices and different granitoids in the SNB isotopic trends can be evaluated to determine if crystals sizes are dependent on disequilibrium processes or grow at a steady state.

  9. Origin and evolution of calcalkaline plutons in the Northeast Kingdom batholith, Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Ayuso, R.A.; Arth, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Geochemical and petrographic study of five calcalkaline Devonian plutons in the Northeast Kingdom batholith suggests that they were generated from similar sources but evolved differently. The modally homogeneous Willoughby granite (WG) and the Derby granodiorite (DG) are the most aluminous plutons and contain muscovite and biotite (+/- garnet). The West Charleston diorite (WCD) and the Nulhegan granodiorite (NG) are relatively mafic plutons containing pyroxene, hornblende, and biotite. The Echo Pond (EP) has a granodioritic core but is dioritic along its southern margin. Regular variations of major and trace elements are found in NG and in the relatively sodic DG. More erratic chemical variations are found for WG. The more mafic plutons have higher Sr and lower Rb, Nb and Ta compared to the more felsic WG and DG. Rare-earth patterns for all plutons show higher light than heavy rare-earths. However, the more mafic plutons are comparatively less enriched, have smaller Eu anomalies, and tend to have higher contents of heavy rare earths than the WG and DG. The felsic Willoughby pluton is the best candidate for an upper crustal minimum melt. A deeper origin for the more mafic plutons is likely. Significant differences in the rare earths and ferromagnesian elements indicate that the WG, DG, and EP cannot be related by a simple fractionation scheme to the more mafic plutons.

  10. Geologic and hydrologic controls on the economic potential of hydrothermal systems associated with upper crustal plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Scott, Samuel; Lecumberri-Sanchez, Pilar

    2016-04-01

    Heat and mass transport in hydrothermal systems associated with upper crustal magmatic intrusions can result in resources with large economic potential (Kesler, 1994). Active hydrothermal systems can form high-enthalpy geothermal reservoirs with the possibility for renewable energy production. Fossil continental or submarine hydrothermal systems may have formed ore deposits at variable crustal depths, which can be mined near today's surface with an economic profit. In both cases, only the right combination of first-order geologic and hydrologic controls may lead to the formation of a significant resource. To foster exploration for these hydrothermal georesources, we need to improve our understanding of subsurface fluxes of mass and energy by combining numerical process modelling, observations at both active and fossil systems, as well as knowledge of fluid and rock properties and their interactions in natural systems. The presentation will highlight the role of non-linear fluid properties, phase separation, salt precipitation, fluid mixing, permeability structure, hydraulic fracturing and the transition from brittle to ductile rock behavior as major geologic and hydrologic controls on the formation of high-enthalpy and supercritical geothermal resources (Scott et al., 2015), and magmatic-hydrothermal mineral resources, such as porphyry copper, massive sulfide and epithermal gold deposits (Lecumberri-Sanchez et al., 2015; Weis, 2015). References: Kesler, S. E., 1994: Mineral Resources, economics and the environment, New York, McMillan, 391. Lecumberri-Sanchez, P., Steele-MacInnis, M., Weis, P., Driesner, T., Bodnar, R.J. (2015): Salt precipitation in magmatic-hydrothermal systems associated with upper crustal plutons. Geology, v. 43, p. 1063-1066, doi:10.1130/G37163.1 Scott, S., Driesner, T., Weis, P. (2015): Geologic controls on supercritical geothermal resources above magmatic intrusions. Nature Communications, 6:7837 doi: 10.1038/ncomms8837 Weis, P. (2015): The

  11. A hybrid origin for two Cretaceous monzonitic plutons in eastern Zhejiang Province, Southeast China: Geochronological, geochemical, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liang; Qiu, Jian-Sheng; Zhao, Jiao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Monzonites can provide important information about the nature of the mantle sources and the mechanism of crust-mantle interactions. However, details on the origin of Late Mesozoic monzonites in the Southeastern China remain poorly constrained. This paper presents whole-rock geochemical, Sr-Nd isotopic and zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data for two monzonitic plutons (Huangtanyang and Kanggu) in eastern Zhejiang Province, with the aim of elucidating their petrogenesis, and providing important insights into the process of crust-mantle interaction. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating results imply that the Huangtanyang and Kanggu quartz monzonites were emplaced in Cretaceous (104-109 Ma). All quartz monzonites are intermediate to acidic, metaluminous to weakly peraluminous, subalkaline, and K-rich in composition. They are enriched in large ion lithophile (e.g., Rb, Ba and Pb) and light rare earth elements, depleted in high-field strength elements (e.g., Nb, Ta, and Ti), and show weakly negative or no Eu anomalies (δEu = 0.78-1.02). All quartz monzonites have homogeneous initial ISr values (0.7084-0.7090) and εNd(t) values (-7.50 to -6.84). They are characterised by highly variable zircon Hf isotopic compositions, with εHf(t) values ranging from -13.3 to -5.7. The combined geochemical evidences (such as high Mg# values, low Nb/U and Ta/U ratios, and variable zircon Hf isotopic compositions) suggests that both depleted asthenospheric and metasomatically enriched mantle components were involved in the formation of the monzonites. The existence of some zircons with unusually low εHf(t) values (low to -13.3) and Palaeoproterozoic two-stage Hf model ages from the Huangtanyang and Kanggu quartz monzonites also argues strongly for Palaeoproterozoic crustal involvement. Magma mixing played a dominated role in the genesis of these monzonites, as indicated by their wide range in zircon Hf isotopic compositions and the occurrence of mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs). The MMEs show

  12. Magma Emplacement and Mafic-Felsic Magma Hybridisation: Structural, Microstructural and Geochemical Evidences From the Pan-African Negash Pluton, Northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ASRAT, A.; BARBEY, P.; GLEIZES, G.; LUDDEN, J.

    2002-05-01

    The Negash pluton (50 sq. km) consists of late Pan-African, high-K, calc-alkaline granitoids intruded into low-grade metavolcanics and metasediments. This almost circular massif consists of monzogranites, granodiorites, monzodiorites, monzogabbros, and hybrid quartz monzodiorites. The rocks are enriched in LIL-elements, depleted in HFS-elements, have fractionated REE patterns, low 87Sr/86Sri (0.702344 - 0.703553) and 143Nd/144Ndi (0.512031 - 0.512133) ratios, positive ɛ Nd values (3.46 to 5.40), and Pan-African model Nd ages (0.83 to 1.08 Ga). These data, along with single zircon U-Pb dating, show that the pluton was emplaced at 608 Ma from primitive source (underplated material or juvenile island arc crust) with contamination by the country rocks. The pluton shows widespread mafic-felsic magma interactions of two types: (i) homogeneous and heterogeneous hybrid monzodiorites at the northwestern part; and (ii) mingled interfaces at the diorite-granodiorite contact zones in the Eastern and Southeastern parts. Detailed structural (using the method of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) and microstructural studies have been applied to understand how these interactions occurred with respect to pluton construction. The monzodiorites constituting the northwestern part of the pluton, which are composed of complexly zoned plagioclases or unzoned plagioclase laths, euhedral hornblende with biotite cores and acicular apatites, are characterized by abundant net veining, synplutonic dikes, microgranitoid enclaves, and juxtaposed series of discrete mafic-felsic pulses of hybrid nature with vertical syn-emplacement structures. The mingled interfaces between the diorites and granodiorites, on the other hand, are characterized by lobate contacts with interfingering of diorites into granodiorites at the decametric scale, abundant inclined to horizontal granitic pipes, breccia dykes and veins, which are strongly enriched in megacrysts of K-feldspars, and numerous swarms of

  13. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of high-K "sanukitoids" from the Bulai pluton, Central Limpopo Belt, South Africa: Implications for geodynamic changes at the Archaean-Proterozoic boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Oscar; Martin, Hervé; Doucelance, Régis; Moyen, Jean-François; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2011-04-01

    The Neoarchaean Bulai pluton is a magmatic complex intrusive in the Central Zone of the Limpopo Belt (Limpopo Province, South Africa). It is made up of large volumes of porphyritic granodiorites with subordinate enclaves and dykes of monzodioritic, enderbitic and granitic compositions. New U-Pb LA-ICP-MS dating on zircon yield pluton-emplacement ages ranging between 2.58 and 2.61 Ga. The whole pluton underwent a high-grade thermal overprint at ~ 2.0 Ga, which did not affect the whole-rock compositions for most of the major and trace-elements, as suggested by a Sm-Nd isochron built up with 16 samples and yielding an age consistent with U-Pb dating. The whole-rock major- and trace-element compositions evidence that the Bulai pluton belongs to a high-K, calc-alkaline to shoshonitic suite, as well as unequivocal affinities with "high-Ti" sanukitoids. Monzodioritic enclaves and enderbites have both "juvenile" affinities and a strongly enriched signature in terms of incompatible trace elements (LREE, HFSE and LILE), pointing to an enriched mantle source. Based on trace-element compositions, we propose the metasomatic agent at their origin to be a melt deriving from terrigenous sediments. We therefore suggest a two-step petrogenetic model for the Bulai pluton: (1) a liquid produced by melting of subducted terrigenous sediments is consumed by reactions with mantle peridotite, producing a metasomatic assemblage; (2) low-degree melting of this metasomatized mantle gives rise to Bulai mafic magmas. Such a model is supported by geochemical modelling and is consistent with previous studies concluding that sanukitoids result from interactions between slab melts and the overlying mantle wedge. Before 2.5 Ga, melting of hydrous subducted metabasalts produced large volumes of TTG (Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite) forming most of the volume of Archaean continental crust. By constrast, our geochemical study failed in demonstrating any significant role played by melting of

  14. Arc petrogenesis in southern Ireland and the Isle of Man: Implications for Ordovician accretionary history and constraints from Late Caledonian plutonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritschle, Tobias; Daly, J. Stephen; Whitehouse, Martin J.; McConnell, Brian; Buhre, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Peri-Laurentian and peri-Gondwanan magmatic arcs and microcontinents, and their attendant sedimentary basins were assembled during the Caledonian Orogeny (c. 490 - 400 Ma) to form the Irish and British lithosphere. Accretion of these terranes to Laurentia and subsequent closure of the Iapetus Ocean initiated the generation of widespread Late Caledonian plutons (c. 425 - 400 Ma). Petrogenetic investigation of Ordovician arc-related rocks aims to test possible terrane affinities, using geochemical data from the arcs and related rocks as well as isotopic signatures preserved within Late Caledonian granites. SIMS zircon U-Pb geochronology has provided middle to early Ordovician ages for volcanic rocks with arc affinities from Avoca (Ireland, c. 463 Ma) and a newly discovered volcanic sequence from Port-e-Vullen (Isle of Man, c. 473 Ma). Granitic rocks from Leinster (Ireland), interpreted as arc plutons, yielded late to middle Ordovician ages of c. 457 - 454 Ma (Croghan Kinshelagh) and c. 462 - 459 Ma (Graiguenamanagh), similar to the c. 457 Ma age of the Dhoon Granite (Isle of Man). Oxygen isotopic compositions of zircons from the Ordovician volcanic and plutonic rocks are close to or slightly heavier than mantle values (δ18O generally < 7 ‰). Lu-Hf zircon compositions suggest different terrane affinities: relatively juvenile ɛHfT values (c. +8.5 - +5.3) for the Avoca volcanics are similar to those of the older unit of the Croghan Kinshelagh Granite, whereas the Port-e-Vullen volcanics and the Graiguenamanagh Granite have less radiogenic ɛHfT values (c. +4.4 - +1.3). The present-day geographic distribution of these rocks and petrogenetic inferences from their North American correlatives invite comparison with the Avalonian and the Ganderian microcontinent, respectively[1]. These constraints are supported by inherited zircons and corresponding isotopic analyses. ɛHfT values (c. +11.5 - +1.5) from magmatic zircons of the Dhoon Granite and the younger unit of the

  15. Diel cycling of zinc in a stream impacted by acid rock drainage: Initial results from a new in situ Zn analyzer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapin, T.P.; Nimick, D.A.; Gammons, C.H.; Wanty, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that many trace metals undergo dramatic diel (24-h) cycles in near neutral pH streams with metal concentrations reproducibly changing up to 500% during the diel period (Nimick et al., 2003). To examine diel zinc cycles in streams affected by acid rock drainage, we have developed a novel instrument, the Zn-DigiScan, to continuously monitor in situ zinc concentrations in near real-time. Initial results from a 3-day deployment at Fisher Creek, Montana have demonstrated the ability of the Zn-DigiScan to record diel Zn cycling at levels below 100 ??g/l. Longer deployments of this instrument could be used to examine the effects of episodic events such as rainstorms and snowmelt pulses on zinc loading in streams affected by acid rock drainage. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  16. Magmatic and crustal differentiation history of granitic rocks from Hf-O isotopes in zircon.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A I S; Hawkesworth, C J; Foster, G L; Paterson, B A; Woodhead, J D; Hergt, J M; Gray, C M; Whitehouse, M J

    2007-02-16

    Granitic plutonism is the principal agent of crustal differentiation, but linking granite emplacement to crust formation requires knowledge of the magmatic evolution, which is notoriously difficult to reconstruct from bulk rock compositions. We unlocked the plutonic archive through hafnium (Hf) and oxygen (O) isotope analysis of zoned zircon crystals from the classic hornblende-bearing (I-type) granites of eastern Australia. This granite type forms by the reworking of sedimentary materials by mantle-like magmas instead of by remelting ancient metamorphosed igneous rocks as widely believed. I-type magmatism thus drives the coupled growth and differentiation of continental crust.

  17. Magmatic and crustal differentiation history of granitic rocks from Hf-O isotopes in zircon.

    PubMed

    Kemp, A I S; Hawkesworth, C J; Foster, G L; Paterson, B A; Woodhead, J D; Hergt, J M; Gray, C M; Whitehouse, M J

    2007-02-16

    Granitic plutonism is the principal agent of crustal differentiation, but linking granite emplacement to crust formation requires knowledge of the magmatic evolution, which is notoriously difficult to reconstruct from bulk rock compositions. We unlocked the plutonic archive through hafnium (Hf) and oxygen (O) isotope analysis of zoned zircon crystals from the classic hornblende-bearing (I-type) granites of eastern Australia. This granite type forms by the reworking of sedimentary materials by mantle-like magmas instead of by remelting ancient metamorphosed igneous rocks as widely believed. I-type magmatism thus drives the coupled growth and differentiation of continental crust. PMID:17303751

  18. Why are plutons dry? Outgassing mechanisms of crustal magmatic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    parmigiani, andrea; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Leclaire, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    Magma bodies crystallizing to completion within the crust (i.e., forming plutons) typically undergo significant amounts of second boiling (i.e. cooling and crystallization of dominantly anhydrous minerals lead to volatile saturation and bubble nucleation/growth). The low water content (< 1 wt % H2O) and vanishing residual porosity of most plutons, despite the high volatile concentrations of their magma sources (commonly > 6 wt % H2O for evolved compositions in subduction zones), testify that outgassing from crystalline mushy reservoirs must be an efficient and widespread process. Understanding this outgassing mechanism is key to understand how volatiles are transferred from mantle depths to the surface. From the hydrodynamics point of view, the mass balance of exsolved volatiles in these plutonic bodies is controlled by the difference between the rate of degassing (formation of bubbles by 2nd boiling) and outgassing (transport of gas out of the magma body). In this study, we use pore-scale multiphase modeling to constrain these rates as function of the crystal and volatile contents in the magma. Because second boiling is a slow process, one can consider equilibrium degassing as a valid assumption. Outgassing, on the other end, is controlled by the competition between buoyancy, capillary and viscous forces. Our numerical simulations are used to determine the most efficient setting for gas to escape its magmatic trap. The high viscosity of interstitial melts and capillary forces (due to the non-wetting nature of the gas phase with most of the mineral phases in magmatic systems) strongly limits gas transport until vertically extensive gas channels are generated. We show that channels can readily form in volatile-rich coarse-grained mush zones in the upper crust, and allow efficient outgassing at crystallinities around 50-75 vol%, when millimetric bubbles can still win capillary resistive forces.

  19. Performance of an open limestone channel for treating a stream affected by acid rock drainage (León, Spain).

    PubMed

    Santofimia, Esther; López-Pamo, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    The generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) was observed after the oxidation dissolution of pyrite-rich black shales, which were excavated during the construction of a highway in León (Spain). ARDs are characterized by the presence of high concentrations of sulfate and metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Th, and U) that affect the La Silva stream. Dissolved element concentrations showed values between one and four orders of magnitude higher than those of natural waters of this area. A passive treatment system was constructed; the aim of which was to improve the quality of the water of the stream. This work provides a hydrochemical characterization of the La Silva stream after its transit through the different elements that constitute the passive treatment system (open limestone channel (OLC), small ponds, and a wetland), during its first year of operation. The passive treatment system has two sections separated by a tunnel 230 m long. The first section, which stretches between the highway and the tunnel entrance, is an OLC 350 m long with a slope of 16 %. The second section, which stretches from the tunnel exit to the end wetland, has a length of 700 m and a slope of 6 %; it is in this section where six small ponds are located. In the first section of this passive treatment system, the OLC was effectively increasing the pH from 3 to 4-4.5 and eliminating all of the dissolved Fe and the partially dissolved Al. These elements, after hydrolysis at a pH 3-3.5 and 4-4.5, respectively, had precipitated as schwertmannite and hydrobasaluminite, while other dissolved metals were removed totally or partially for adsorption by the precipitates and/or by coprecipitation. The second section receives different inputs of water such as ARDs and natural waters. After exiting the treatment system, the stream is buffered by Al at a pH of 4-4.3, showing high Al concentrations (19-101 mg/L) but with a complete removal of dissolved Fe. Unfortunately, the outflow shows similar or

  20. Performance of an open limestone channel for treating a stream affected by acid rock drainage (León, Spain).

    PubMed

    Santofimia, Esther; López-Pamo, Enrique

    2016-07-01

    The generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) was observed after the oxidation dissolution of pyrite-rich black shales, which were excavated during the construction of a highway in León (Spain). ARDs are characterized by the presence of high concentrations of sulfate and metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Th, and U) that affect the La Silva stream. Dissolved element concentrations showed values between one and four orders of magnitude higher than those of natural waters of this area. A passive treatment system was constructed; the aim of which was to improve the quality of the water of the stream. This work provides a hydrochemical characterization of the La Silva stream after its transit through the different elements that constitute the passive treatment system (open limestone channel (OLC), small ponds, and a wetland), during its first year of operation. The passive treatment system has two sections separated by a tunnel 230 m long. The first section, which stretches between the highway and the tunnel entrance, is an OLC 350 m long with a slope of 16 %. The second section, which stretches from the tunnel exit to the end wetland, has a length of 700 m and a slope of 6 %; it is in this section where six small ponds are located. In the first section of this passive treatment system, the OLC was effectively increasing the pH from 3 to 4-4.5 and eliminating all of the dissolved Fe and the partially dissolved Al. These elements, after hydrolysis at a pH 3-3.5 and 4-4.5, respectively, had precipitated as schwertmannite and hydrobasaluminite, while other dissolved metals were removed totally or partially for adsorption by the precipitates and/or by coprecipitation. The second section receives different inputs of water such as ARDs and natural waters. After exiting the treatment system, the stream is buffered by Al at a pH of 4-4.3, showing high Al concentrations (19-101 mg/L) but with a complete removal of dissolved Fe. Unfortunately, the outflow shows similar or

  1. Unusual transition in quartzite dislocation creep regimes and crystal slip systems in the aureole of the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek pluton, California: a case for anhydrous conditions created by decarbonation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Sven S.; Law, Richard D.

    2004-06-01

    Microstructures and quartz c-axis fabrics were analyzed in five quartzite samples collected across the eastern aureole of the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek composite pluton. Temperatures of deformation are estimated to be 740±50 °C based on a modified c-axis opening angle thermometer of Kruhl (J. Metamorph. Geol. 16 (1998) 142). In quartzite layers located closest (140 m) to the pluton-wall rock contact, flattened detrital grains are plastically deformed and partially recrystallized. The dominant recrystallization process is subgrain rotation (dislocation creep regime 2 of Hirth and Tullis (J. Struct. Geol. 14 (1992) 145)), although grain boundary migration (dislocation creep regime 3) is also evident. Complete recrystallization occurs in quartzite layers located at a distance of ˜240 m from the contact, and coincides with recrystallization taking place dominantly through grain boundary migration (regime 3). Within the quartzites, strain is calculated to be lowest in the layers closest to the pluton margin based on the aspect ratios of flattened detrital grains. The c-axis fabrics indicate that < a> slip operated within the quartzites closest to the pluton-wall rock contact and that with distance from the contact the operative slip systems gradually switch to prism [ c] slip. The spatial inversion in microstructures and slip systems (apparent "high temperature" deformation and recrystallization further from the pluton-contact and apparent "low temperature" deformation and recrystallization closer to the pluton-contact) coincides with a change in minor phase mineral content of quartzite samples and also in composition of the surrounding rock units. Marble and calc-silicate assemblages dominate close to the pluton-wall rock contact, whereas mixed quartzite and pelite assemblages are dominant further from the contact. We suggest that a thick marble unit located between the pluton and the quartzite layers acted as a barrier to fluids emanating from the pluton

  2. Assimilation of the plutonic roots of the Andean arc controls variations in U-series disequilibria at Volcan Llaima, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reubi, O.; Bourdon, B.; Dungan, M. A.; Koornneef, J. M.; Sellés, D.; Langmuir, C. H.; Aciego, S.

    2011-02-01

    U-series disequilibria provide important constraints on the processes and time scales of melt production, differentiation, and transport in subduction settings. Such constraints, which are essential for understanding the chemical evolution of the continental crust, are conventionally based on the assumption that the U-series disequilibria measured in mafic lavas are produced during mantle metasomatism and melting, and that intracrustal differentiation and assimilation have limited impacts. Here we show that mantle-derived U-series disequilibria in mafic lavas erupted at Volcán Llaima, Chile are significantly diminished by assimilation of plutonic rocks forming Llaima's subvolcanic basement. This contamination process is extremely subtle in terms of "classical" indicators of crustal assimilation like Sr, Nd or Pb isotopes because it is a manifestation of assimilative recycling of the plutonic roots of the arc. This process results in variations in U-series disequilibria and incompatible trace element ratios that are significant compared to regional and global variability in arc magmas. Furthermore, it yields linear correlations between U-series excesses and incompatible trace element ratios that are generally interpreted as slab-fluid indicators and chronometers, or tracers of sediment recycling in subduction zone. Cannibalization of ancestral magmas by ascending melts warrants careful evaluation when considering the components and chemical fluxes in subduction zones. Linear arrays defined by activity ratios of U-series nuclides with different half-lives may be the most reliable indicators of assimilative recycling of ancestral intrusive magmas.

  3. Fabrics of pre- and syntectonic granite plutons and chronology of shear zones in the Eastern Borborema Province, NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archanjo, Carlos J.; Hollanda, Maria Helena B. M.; Rodrigues, Sérgio W. O.; Neves, Benjamim B. B.; Armstrong, Richard

    2008-03-01

    We used the fabrics of two granite plutons and U/Pb (SHRIMP) zircon ages to constrain the tectonic evolution of the E-trending Patos shear zone (Borborema Province, NE Brazil). The pre-tectonic Teixeira batholith consists of an amphibole leucogranite locally with aegirine-augite. Zircons from a syenogranite yielded crystallization ages of 591 ± 5 Ma. The batholith fabrics were determined by anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and mineral shape preferred orientation. The fabrics support pre-transcurrent batholith emplacement, as evidenced by: (i) magmatic/magnetic fabrics in low susceptibility (<0.35 mSI) leucogranites highly discordant to the regional host rock structure, and (ii) concordant magnetic fabrics restricted to high susceptibility (>1 mSI) corridors connected to shear zones branching off from Patos. One of these satellite shear zones controlled the syntectonic emplacement of the Serra Redonda pluton, which yields a crystallization age of 576 ± 3 Ma. This late shearing event marks the peak regional deformation that, south of Patos, was coupled to crustal shortening nearly perpendicular to the shear belt. The chronology of the deformational events indicates that the major shear zones of the eastern Borborema are late structures active after the crustal blocks amalgamated.

  4. Pre-Eocene rocks of Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketner, Keith B.; Kastowo,; Modjo, Subroto; Naeser, C.W.; Obradovich, J.D.; Robinson, Keith; Suptandar, Tatan; Wikarno,

    1976-01-01

    The exposed pre-Eocene rocks of Java can be divided into two compound units for purposes of reconnaissance mapping and structural interpretation: a sedimentary sequence and melange. The sedimentary sequence consists of moderately deformed and little-metamorphosed conglomerate, sandstone, mudstone, claystone, chert, and limestone. The melange consists of a chaotic mechanical mixture of rocks identical to those of the sedimentary sequence and their metamorphic equivalents, such as schist, phyllite, quartzite, and marble. In addition, it contains a large proportion of quartz porphyry and smaller amounts of granite, basalt, gabbro, peridotite, pyroxenite, and serpentinite. The sedimentary sequence is at least partly of Early Cretaceous age and the melange is of Early Cretaceous to very early Paleocene age. They are overlain unconformably by Eocene rocks. The presence in the melange of blocks of quartz porphyry and granite is not easily reconcilable with current plate tectonic concepts in which the sites of formation of melange and plutonic rocks should be hundreds of kilometres apart.

  5. Structural characterization of the Misajé granitic pluton (NW Cameroon): constraints from magnetic and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fozing, Eric Martial; Njanko, Théophile; Naba, Séta; Kwékam, Maurice; Njonfang, Emmanuel; Rochette, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The Misajé granitic pluton, emplaced between 569 and 560 Ma in an amphibolitic and gneissic host rock, comprises four petrographic units namely biotite-hornblende granite (BHG), granodiorite (Gd), biotite granite (BG), and leucocratic granite (LG). Four major tectonic events have been described in the studied area: a D1-early tectonic event, responsible of the E-W flat foliation which has been progressively transposed by a D2 tectonic event. A D2 event has developed heterogeneous simple shear in a dextral transpressive context with moderate to strong dipping NE-SW striking foliation; a D3 tectonic event has lead to a sinistral N-S ductile shear characterized by N- to ENE-striking foliation and E-W strike-slip shear corridors and a D4 tectonic event that developed N-S dextral ductile strike-slip deformation. The magnetic study of the pluton, based on the AMS parameters, reveals the coexistence of both paramagnetic (dominated by iron-bearing silicates; 54 % of sites) and ferromagnetic (due to the occurrence of PSD and MD grains of magnetite or other ferromagnetic minerals; 46 % of sites) behaviors. Magnetic foliation shows best poles at 55/82 for the whole pluton, 95/32 in BHG, and 273/83 in BG, and the magnetic lineation trends are mostly NNE-SSW with best lines at 210/8, 198/19, and 36/3, respectively. The trend of the magnetic lineation in BG indicates an S-shape trajectory, suggesting a sinistral sense of shear motion along discrete E-W corridors situated at the northern and southern ends. Kinematic indicators in BG point to a sinistral sense of shear, suggesting its emplacement during the D3 event. The close relationship between K 1 and K 3 points to a syn-kinematic emplacement and crystallization of the Misajé granitic pluton during the Pan-African event, and the tectonic evolution of the study area is considered to be coeval with the tectonic evolution of the trans-Saharan Pan-African belt of eastern Nigeria.

  6. Integrating field, microstructures, magnetic fabrics, metamorphic studies to establish Yavapai-Mazatazal-aged syntectonic pluton emplacement and strain localization in the Tusas Mountains, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P.; Kruckenberg, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Paleoproterozoic metamorphic rocks in the northern Tusas Mountains of New Mexico record the conditions of deposition, deformation and tectonic processes during assembly and stabilization of these rocks to the southern margin of the Laurentian craton. Metasedimentary and metavolcanic supracrustal rocks of the Vadito and Hondo groups comprise the majority of exposures, detrital zircon from within these units constrain the age of deposition ca. 1.70 Ga. - the Yavapai-Mazatazal temporal orogenic boundary. P-T conditions are ~425-600 C and 4-6 kbars. Two pervasive fold and fabric events are regionally displayed that have been locally modified by a third deformation event. Regional constraints on tectonism timing are mixed, with recent work showing that tectonism occurred ca. 1.4 Ga. Two orthogneiss bodies, the Tres Piedras (TP) and Tusas Mountain (TM) granites, were emplaced into supracrustal host rocks at ca. 1.69 Ga. Several datasets that include mapping and characterization of metamorphic assemblages, EBSD microstructural analysis, and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility analyses suggest that emplacement was syntectonic. Metamorphic assemblages show a field-gradient that is roughly concentric to the TP and TM plutons from greenschist facies (ca. 400-425 C) in the distant country rock, to upper amphibolite facies (ca. 650 C) near the pluton contacts. This is a new discovery for the region, as most of northern New Mexico displays a regional amphibolite facies signature. Quartz and feldspar microstructures suggest that the body of both plutons record non-coaxial deformation from near solidus to high-T conditions (>600 C). Muscovite inclusions in cm-scale euhedral microcline grains are aligned with S1, and isoclinal folds in the TP lack an axial planar fabric. Measurement of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) suggest that the orientation of magmatic fabrics within these plutons are consistent with principal regional fabrics (D1) recorded in the

  7. Zircon U-Pb Ages Chronicle 3 Myr of Episodic Crystallization in the Composite Miocene Tatoosh Pluton, Mount Rainier National Park, Washington Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.; Du Bray, E. A.; Wooden, J. L.; Mazdab, F. K.

    2007-12-01

    Zircon geochronology of upper crustal plutons can constrain longevities of intermediate to silicic magmatic systems. As part of a larger study of the geochemistry and metallogeny of Tertiary Cascades magmatic arc rocks, we used the USGS-Stanford SHRIMP RG to determine 20 to 28 238U-206Pb ages for zircons from each of 6 quartz monzodiorite (qmd), quartz monzonite (qm), or granodiorite (grd) samples representative of the Tatoosh pluton, and one grd from the nearby Carbon River stock. The 7x12 km composite Tatoosh pluton, discontinuously exposed on the south flank of Mount Rainier, consists of at least 4 petrographic/compositional phases, here termed Pyramid Peak, Nisqually, Reflection Lake, and Tatoosh. These collectively intrude gently folded and weakly metamorphosed basaltic andesite flows and volcaniclastic rocks of the Eocene Ohanapecosh Formation, silicic ignimbrites and sedimentary rocks of the Oligocene Stevens Ridge Formation, and basaltic to intermediate volcanic rocks of the Miocene Fifes Peak Formation. Histograms and relative probability plots of U- Pb ages indicate 2 to 4 age populations within each sample. The weighted mean age of each of the youngest populations (all ±2σ) is interpreted as the time of final solidification: Pyramid Peak qmd (58.5% SiO2) 17.4±0.2 Ma, Nisqually grd (in Paradise Valley; 65.4% SiO2) 16.7±0.2 Ma, Nisqually grd (at Christine Falls; 66.4% SiO2) 17.3±0.2 Ma, Reflection Lake qm (along Pinnacle Peak trail; 66.6% SiO2) 17.1±0.2 Ma, Tatoosh grd (in Stevens Canyon; 67.8% SiO2) 18.2±0.2 Ma, Tatoosh grd (south of Louise Lake; 69.3% SiO2) 19.3±0.1 Ma, and Carbon River grd (68.0% SiO2) 17.4±0.3 Ma. The older Nisqually grd age is indistinguishable from a TIMS zircon age of 17.5±0.1 Ma reported by Mattinson (GSA Bulletin 88:1509-1514, 1977) for grd from a nearby locality. None of the 164 SHRIMP-RG U-Pb ages, including cores, is older than 21 Ma. The relatively small, high-level pluton likely was emplaced and solidified in pulses

  8. The displaced eugeoclinal rocks in the El Paso Mountains and northern Mojave Desert: A Triassic sliver

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.S.; Glazner, A.F. . Dept. of Geology); Walker, J.D.; Martin, M.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Many workers have drawn attention to the displaced eugeoclinal rocks in the northern Mojave Desert and El Paso Mountains and their importance in models for the development of an active continental margin in the western Cordillera. Existing models can generally for either strike-slip juxtaposition or thrust emplacement. New field data, U-Pb zircon geochronology, and isotopic data for metasedimentary rocks and plutons in the northern Mojave Desert and El Paso Mountains shed light on the timing and mechanism of emplacement of the eugeoclinal allocthon. The observations and data above indicate that Early Triassic plutons in the northern Mojave Desert came through oceanic lithosphere but later Jurassic plutons intercepted continental lithosphere. The authors suggest a model where eugeoclinal rocks were deposited on oceanic crust which was initially brought southward along a strike-slip fault and later thrust eastward over the cratonal assemblage. Permian thrusting is incompatible with their data and observations. Intrusion of lower Triassic strata by Early Triassic plutons in the Lane Mountain area permits some Early Triassic thrusting but the oceanic affinity of the plutons implies that thrusting did not involve continental lithosphere.

  9. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  10. Structural evolution of the Rieserferner Pluton: insight into the localization of deformation and regional tectonics implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccato, Alberto; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    The Rieserferner pluton (RFP, Eastern Alps, 32.2±0.4 Ma, Romer et al. 2003) represents a relatively deep intrusion (12-15 km; Cesare, 1994) among Periadriatic plutons. The central portion of the RFP consists of dominant tonalites and granodiorites that show a sequence of solid-state deformation structures developed during pluton cooling and exhumation. This sequence includes: (1) quartz veins, filling two set of steeply-dipping joints trending respectively E-W and NW-SE, commonly showing a millimetric grain size and associated with strike-slip displacement. (2) Quartz- and locally epidote-filled shallowly E-dipping joint set, commonly exploited as discrete derived from both the quartz veins and the host tonalite. These mylonites show a composite sense of shear with a first stage of left-lateral strike-slip followed by a top-to-E dip-slip (normal) movement. The synmylonitic assemblage includes biotite + plagioclase + white mica + epidote ± sphene ± garnet. (3) Set of N-S-trending steeply-dipping joints. These joints are concentrated in zones 1-2 m wide, separated by otherwise un-jointed domains a few tens to hundred meters wide, and are commonly exploited as brittle-ductile faults with dominant dip-slip (normal) kinematics. The mineral assemblage of fault rocks includes white mica + calcite ± chlorite ± quartz. The joints/faults are locally involved in folding. (4) Mafic dikes, dated at 26.3±3 Ma (Steenken et al., 2000), locally injecting the N-S trending set of joints. (5) Cataclasite- and pseudotachylyte-bearing faults also forming a set of steeply-dipping N-S-trending structures. These faults are commonly associated with epidote veins surrounded by bleaching haloes. (6) Zeolite-bearing faults marked by whitish cataclasites, fault gouges and mirror-like surfaces. These faults have a complex oblique- to strike-slip kinematics with an overall N-S trending lineation. As observed in other plutons (e.g. Adamello; Pennacchioni et al., 2006), the network of

  11. Influence of the Trojan Nickel Mine on surface water quality, Mazowe valley, Zimbabwe: Runoff chemistry and acid generation potential of waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupankwa, Keretia; Love, David; Mapani, Benjamin; Mseka, Stephen; Meck, Maideyi

    The impacts of mining on the environment depend on the nature of the ore body, the type of mining and the size of operation. The focus of this study is on Trojan Nickel Mine which is located 90 km north of Harare, Zimbabwe. It produces nickel from iron, iron-nickel and copper-nickel sulphides and disposes of waste rock in a rock dump. Surface water samples were taken at 11 points selected from a stream which drains the rock dump, a stream carrying underground water and the river into which these streams discharge. Samples were analysed for metals using atomic absorption spectrometry, for sulphates by gravitation and for carbonates and bicarbonates by back titration. Ninteen rock samples were collected from the dump and static tests were performed using the Sobek acid base accounting method. The results show that near neutral runoff (pH 7.0-8.5) with high concentrations of sulphate (over 100 mg/L) and some metals (Pb > 1.0 mg/L and Ni > 0.2 mg/L) emanates from the dump. This suggests that acid mine drainage is buffered in the dump (probably by carbonates). This is supported by the static tests, which show that the fine fraction of dump material neutralises acid. Runoff from the dump flows into a pond. Concentrations of sulphates and metals decrease after the dump runoff enters the pond, but sufficient remains to increase levels of calcium, sulphate, bicarbonate, iron and lead in the Pote River. The drop in concentrations at the pond indicates that the settling process has a positive effect on water quality. This could be enhanced by treating the pond water to raise pH, thus precipitating out metals and decreasing their concentrations in water draining from the pond.

  12. Protracted late magmatic stage of the Caleu pluton (central Chile) as a consequence of heat redistribution by diking: Insights from zircon data and thermal modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Pablo G.; Parada, Miguel A.; Gutiérrez, Francisco J.; Ma, Changqian; Li, Jianwei; Yuanyuan, Liu; Reich, Martin; Aravena, Álvaro

    2015-06-01

    Zircon U-Pb geochronology and geochemistry are combined with whole-rock composition and thermal modeling to decipher the late magmatic stage of the composite Cretaceous Caleu pluton, which consists of four lithological zones: Gabbro-Diorite Zone (GDZ), Quartz Monzodiorite Zone (QMDZ), Granodiorite Zone (GZ) and Monzogranite Zone (MGZ). The four lithological zones include felsic dikes and veins of variable thickness and distribution. Zircons of four representative samples, each from the mentioned zones, were dated and chemically analyzed. The U-Pb ages exhibit sample-scale scatter derived from protracted zircon crystallization. At pluton scale the ages are substantially overlapped with a subtle decrease of ages from mafic to felsic sample; the latter has a normal age span distribution with a mean age of 94.68 ± 0.71 (2σ confidence) and a MSWD of 0.95. Zircon grains from the uppermost zone of the pluton, where the QMDZ is emplaced, have the highest REE and HFSE contents. Zircon crystallization temperatures oscillate between 680 and 850 °C, regardless of the zircon age and sample composition. Differences in temperature and age of zircon crystallization of up to 185 °C and 2.6 Myr were identified at sample scale, respectively. Numerical modeling indicates that the melts from which zircon crystallized are highly crystalline (mostly higher than 60% crystal) and resemble MGZ in compositions. Time-dependent thermal models were performed to account for preservation of the system above solidus temperature for long time intervals consistent with those of zircon crystallization. Two non-exclusive scenarios for the late-stage development of Caleu pluton were considered: (i) pluton construction by magma pulses assembled incrementally and (ii) upward transport of residual melts by diking through a mush system to yield heat redistribution to the levels where the samples collected. The first scenario does not preserve residual melts for intervals as long as 2.6 Myr unless an

  13. Geochemistry and subsequent deformation of the Triassic Longtan pluton in South China: Implications for the origin of the Indosinian tectonomagmatic event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, L.; Yan, D.; Zhou, M.; Arndt, N.; Tang, S.; Qi, L.

    2012-12-01

    The tectonic configuration of present-day Southeast Asia is the consequence of the amalgamation of microcontinents during the Triassic. The Indosinian tectonic event was recorded by Triassic angular unconformities in Vietnam and South China. Widely distributed Indosinian granitoids and the associated deformation are the key to understanding the tectonic evolution of the region. These granitoids form three tectonomagmatic belts. The Longtan pluton in the northwest belt has a zircon U-Pb age of 218±0.8 Ma, recording the termination of the extensive Indosinian magmatism. This pluton is composed of high-K calc-alkaline granodiorites and granites (64.6-71.8% SiO2 and 3.2-4.7% K2O). The rocks have high initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.7275-0.7468) and negative ɛNd (t) (-11.93 to -9.08), and were crustally derived by melting of Precambrian metasedimentary rocks. Wide spread granitoids in the South China Block have petrological and geochemical features similar to the Longtan pluton and are also considered to have formed in a similar manner. However, there is a younging trend from the southeast belt with ages of 260-240 Ma, to the middle belt at 240-230 Ma and the northwest belt at 230-210 Ma. This younging trend is consistent with EW-trending fold axes in the intruded country rocks, and northward development during the Late Permian to Late Triassic of the assemblage of the tectonic belts and the foreland basins. Therefore, we propose a model involving partial melting of crustal materials to explain the origin of granitoids and progressive northward development of the tectonomagmatic belts. The development of the tectonomagmatic belts was probably linked with the collision between the Indochina and South China Blocks during the Triassic.

  14. Crustal thickening prior to 220 Ma in the East Kunlun Orogenic Belt: Insights from the Late Triassic granitoids in the Xiao-Nuomuhong pluton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Rui; Wang, Changming; Deng, Jun; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; Li, Wenliang; Qing, Min

    2014-10-01

    The East Kunlun Orogenic Belt (EKOB) played an important role in plate tectonics, magma generation, and crustal evolution. Late Triassic granodiorites and their mafic micro-granular enclaves (MMEs) from Xiao-Nuomuhong in the EKOB were studied for geochemistry and geochronology to constrain their petrogenesis. Zircon LA-ICP-MS dating indicates that the Xiao-Nuomuhong granodiorites are coeval with their MMEs (∼222 Ma). The granodiorites are high-K calc-alkaline rocks that are enriched in Rb, Th, U and LREE, and depleted in Cr, Ni and HFSE, with high Sr/Y ratios (82.2-85.3) and geochemically resemble the lower crust-derived adakites. The MMEs are also high-K calc-alkaline rocks, with high Al2O3 (16.8-18.8 wt.%), low Mg# (30-40), Nb, Zr and Hf, with weak negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu# = 0.8-0.9). We suggest the MMEs are mafic magmatic globules that were injected into the felsic host magma. The adakitic rocks from the Xiao-Nuomuhong pluton were generated by partial melting of thickened crust, while the primitive compositions of the MMEs were most likely from the lithospheric mantle beneath the EKOB. The Late Triassic Xiao-Nuomuhong pluton is important evidence that crustal thickening in the EKOB occurred prior to 220 Ma. The pluton is interpreted as the result of mixing between thickened lower crust-derived melts and lithospheric mantle-derived mafic melts and the protracted magmatic response to the break-off of the Paleo-Tethys oceanic slab at ∼232 Ma.

  15. Young cumulate complex beneath Veniaminof caldera, Aleutian arc, dated by zircon in erupted plutonic blocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Sison, T.W.; Mazdab, F.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mount Veniaminof volcano, Alaska Peninsula, provides an opportunity to relate Quaternary volcanic rocks to a coeval intrusive complex. Veniaminof erupted tholeiitic basalt through dacite in the past ???260 k.y. Gabbro, diorite, and miarolitic granodiorite blocks, ejected 3700 14C yr B.P. in the most recent caldera-forming eruption, are fragments of a shallow intrusive complex of cumulate mush and segregated vapor-saturated residual melts. Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) analyses define 238U-230Th isochron ages of 17.6 ?? 2.7 ka, 5+11/-10 ka, and 10.2 ?? 4.0 ka (2??) for zircon in two granodiorites and a diorite, respectively. Sparse zircons from two gabbros give 238-230Th model ages of 36 ?? 8 ka and 26 ?? 7 ka. Zircons from granodiorite and diorite crystallized in the presence of late magmatic aqueous fluid. Although historic eruptions have been weakly explosive Strombolian fountaining and small lava effusions, the young ages of plutonic blocks, as well as late Holocene dacite pumice, are evidence that the intrusive complex remains active and that evolved magmas can segregate at shallow levels to fuel explosive eruptions. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Phase equilibria of a fluorine-rich leucogranite from the St. Austell pluton, Cornwall

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, J.R.; Martin, R.F.

    1987-06-01

    Highly evolved leucogranitic rocks in the St. Austell pluton, Cornwall, of Hercynian age, contain accessory muscovite, topaz and fluorite. The authors have studied the H/sub 2/O-saturated melting behavior of one representative sample. Its solidus and liquidus pass through the points 663 and 725/sup 0/C, respectively, at 1 kbar, 640 and 665/sup 0/C at 2 kbar, 610 and 717/sup 0/C at 4 kbar, and 608 and 700+/sup 0/C at 8 kbar. Plagioclase is on the liquidus at low pressure, and topaz is on the liquidus at 4 kbar. The fluorite is consumed in the formation of the first-formed liquid. Calcium can partition into an evolved granitic melt if complexed by fluorine. The fluorite appears to be largely primary in fresh fluorite granite at St. Austell, and not to reflect the albitization of oligoclase in the surrounding biotite granite. Such fluorine-rich leucogranites can be expected to be of subsolvus character.

  17. Petrogenesis of A-type granites and origin of vertical zoning in the Katharina pluton, Gebel Mussa (Mt. Moses) area, Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzir, Y.; Eyal, M.; Litvinovsky, B. A.; Jahn, B. M.; Zanvilevich, A. N.; Valley, J. W.; Beeri, Y.; Pelly, I.; Shimshilashvili, E.

    2007-05-01

    The central pluton within the Neoproterozoic Katharina Ring Complex (area of Gebel Mussa, traditionally believed to be the biblical Mt. Sinai) shows a vertical compositional zoning: syenogranite makes up the bulk of the pluton and grades upwards to alkali-feldspar granites. The latters form two horizontal subzones, an albite-alkali feldspar (Ab-Afs) granite and an uppermost perthite granite. These two varieties are chemically indistinguishable. Syenogranite, as compared with alkali-feldspar granites, is richer in Ca, Sr, K, Ba and contains less SiO 2, Rb, Y, Nb and U; Eu/Eu* values are 0.22-0.33 for syenogranite and 0.08-0.02 for alkali-feldspar granites. The δ18O (Qtz) is rather homogeneous throughout the pluton, 8.03-8.55‰. The δ18O (Afs) values in the syenogranite are appreciably lower relative to those in the alkali-feldspar granites: 7.59-8.75‰ vs. 8.31-9.12‰. A Rb-Sr isochron ( n = 9) yields an age of 593 ± 16 Ma for the Katharina Ring Complex (granite pluton and ring dikes). The alkali-feldspar granites were generated mainly by fractional crystallization of syenogranite magma. The model for residual melt extraction and accumulation is based on the estimated extent of crystallization (˜ 50 wt.%), which approximates the rigid percolation threshold for silicic melts. The fluid-rich residual melt could be separated efficiently by its upward flow through the rigid clusters of crystal phase. Crystallization of the evolved melt started with formation of hypersolvus granite immediately under the roof. Fluid influx from the inner part of the pluton to its apical zone persisted and caused increase of PH2O in the magma below the perthite granite zone. Owing to the presence of F and Ca in the melt, PH2O of only slightly more than 1 kbar allows crystallization of subsolvus Ab-Afs granite. Abundance of turbid alkali feldspars and their 18O/ 16O enrichment suggest that crystallization of alkali-feldspar granites was followed by subsolvus fluid-rock interaction

  18. An investigation of caldera-forming magma chambers using the timing of ignimbrite eruptions and pluton emplacement at the Mt. Aetna caldera complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerer, Matthew J.; McIntosh, William C.

    2012-11-01

    The temporal and chemical relationships of volcanic and plutonic rocks exposed at the Mt. Aetna caldera complex, central Colorado, provide insight into the emplacement history of pre-, syn-, and postcaldera plutons and the origin of caldera-related silicic magmas. 40Ar/39Ar sanidine ages indicate the rhyolitic Wall Mountain Tuff erupted at 37.3 Ma. LA-ICP-MS U/Pb zircon ages of the compositionally zoned Mt. Princeton batholith, which has been interpreted by several previous studies to be the nonerupted, less-fractionated residuum of the Wall Mountain Tuff magma chamber, indicate that it was emplaced between 35.9 and 35.2 Ma during postcaldera magmatism. Nested within the Mt. Princeton batholith is the Mt. Aetna caldera. The dacitic Badger Creek Tuff erupted at 34.3 Ma during Mt. Aetna caldera collapse. The Badger Creek Tuff is deposited on some of the Mt. Princeton intrusive units, demonstrating that the Wall Mountain Tuff caldera was obliterated during exhumation and erosion prior to 34.3 Ma. Shortly after the Mt. Aetna caldera collapse, the intracaldera ignimbrite and caldera ring faults were intruded by magma that is compositionally and temporally similar to the Badger Creek Tuff, suggesting that these intrusions represent a nonerupted, geochemically equivalent portion of the magma chamber. Emplacement of postcaldera luecogranites at ~ 31 Ma caused localized thermal resetting of biotite and K-feldspar in older, adjacent intrusions. Most samples contain antecrystic zircon. Antecrystic zircon populations range from 38.8 to 33.6 Ma, indicating that open system magmatic processes operated throughout the history of the caldera complex. The temporal, chemical, and spatial relationships of plutonic and volcanic rocks at the Mt. Aetna caldera complex indicate that the majority of the exposed plutons were emplaced during pre- and/or postcaldera magmatism. None of the exposed plutons represent the less-fractionated, mafic residuum of either caldera-forming magma

  19. Peritectic phase entrainment and magma mixing in the late Miocene Elba Island laccolith-pluton-dyke complex (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Federico; Stevens, Gary; Dini, Andrea; Rocchi, Sergio

    2012-11-01

    The comparison between the major element chemical variability exhibited by the granitic rocks of the Elba Island laccolith-pluton-dyke complex (Italy) and the composition of relevant fluid-absent experimental melts, indicate that Elba rocks have Fe, Mg, Ti and Ca contents that are too high to represent crustal melts derived from sources considered typical for granitic magmas and likely to be abundant in the Earth's crust. Therefore, the origin of the Elba Island laccolith-pluton-dyke complex demands the addition of a ferromagnesian, Ti- and Ca-rich component to the melt. Various authors, on the basis of textural and chemical data, have interpreted the chemical variability exhibited by the Elba Island granitic rocks as reflecting progressive hybridization of an original crustal melt with mantle-derived magma(s). However, a simple mantle-crustal magma mixing hypothesis is challenged by the observation that some elements (e.g. Ti and Ca) are highly correlated with Fe + Mg, while others (e.g. Sr, K2O, Na2O) are not, as well as by the scattered major and trace element composition exhibited by both mafic microgranular enclaves and dykes cutting all the other units of the complex. This contribution focuses on reconsidering the role of mantle-derived magmas in the petrogenesis of the Elba Island intrusive system from the perspective of the constraints imposed by crustal melt compositions. On the basis of the major- and trace element geochemical data we propose that at least part of the compositional variations displayed by the Elba Island intrusive complex is primary, i.e. it reflects the magma composition that ascended directly from the source. Following this hypothesis, the final composition of magmas may be controlled by two main factors: (i) the stoichiometry of the melting reaction(s) and the composition of reactant phases in the source, that control the composition of the anatectic melt; (ii) the degree of entrainment of the peritectic assemblage, the character of

  20. Magnetic and magmatic structures of the Emas granodioritic pluton (Cachoeirinha belt, NE Brazil). relationships with Pan-African strike-slip fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Ph.; Archanjo, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Emas granodiorite was intruded during the Brasiliano (Pan-African) orogeny into the metapelites of the Cachoeirinha belt (NE Brazil). This pluton was chosen for a petrofabric study of magmatic emplacement structures using magnetic anisotropy, because of its conspicuous position in the junction area between the large E-W-trending Patos shear zone and the NE-SW-trending Cachoeira da Mina strike-slip fault. The magnetic behavior of this calc-alkaline granite is dominated by paramagnetic minerals which is optimal for the application of the Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility technique used for this study. Almost all microstructures correspond to the magmatic state, so the measured magnetic lineations and foliations may be interpreted, respectively, as directions and planes of magmatic flow. These magnetic/magmatic lineations and foliations are dominantly N-S and NE-SW oriented, and are gently to moderately dipping. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility ratios range from 1 to 5.4%, most of these values corresponding to magmatic alignment. The lowest ratios are located chiefly in the centre of the pluton and the highest on the northern and western margins. From these data we propose that the emplacement of the Emas pluton was controlled by a NE-SW-trending left-lateral strike-slip zone, parallel to the Cachoeira da Mina fault, giving rise to openings in the metapelitic country rocks infilled by two succesive magmas. The principal result of this study is the unexpected independence between the emplacement of the Emas pluton and the functioning of the Patos dextral shear zone.

  1. Mid-Neoproterozoic ridge subduction and magmatic evolution in the northeastern margin of the Indochina block: Evidence from geochronology and geochemistry of calc-alkaline plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xuexiang; Santosh, M.; Zhao, Yuhao; Hu, Zhaocuo; Zhang, Chao; Ji, Fengbao; Wei, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Neoproterozoic medium- to high-K calc-alkaline magmatic rocks in the northeastern margin of the Indochina block, SW China, provide important insights into the relationship of the Indochina block with the Gondwana supercontinent. Here we report zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb data from the early and late stage plutons which yield weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 765 Ma and 732-739 Ma suggesting mid-Neoproterozoic emplacement. The zircon εHf(t) values show a range of - 3.2 to + 2.4 (average + 0.1 ± 0.9) with TDMC of 1510 to 1870 Ma for the early plutons, and - 5.4 to + 5.1 (average + 2.1 to - 3.9) with TDMC of 1366 to 1985 Ma for late plutons. Both groups show similar geochemical characteristics including high Mg#, enrichment of LILE and LREE, slight negative Eu anomalies, and strongly negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies, with all the samples falling within the continental/island arc field in tectonic discrimination diagrams. These features suggest that the early and late stage magmas were produced by the mixing of mantle-derived magma and crust-derived magma in different proportion within an active continental margin, in subduction-related continental-arc tectonic setting. The linear zoning and roughly parallel distribution of the two generations of intrusions with a hiatus of 20 Ma might suggest an episode of ridge subduction with asthenosphere upwelling through the slab window that generated the second phase of plutons.

  2. Discrimination of alkalinity in granitoid Rocks: A potential TIMS application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Steven W.

    1995-01-01

    In mineral exploration, the ability to distinguish and map petrochemical variations of magmatic rocks can be a useful reconnaissance tool. Alkalinity is one such petrochemical parameter and is used in the characterization of granitoid rocks. In quartz normative plutonic rocks, alkalinity is related to the composition and abundance of feldspars. Together with quartz abundance, knowledge of feldspar modes allows the classification of these igneous rocks according to the Streckeisen diagram. Alternative classification schemes rely on whole rock geochemistry instead of mineral identifications. The relative ease of obtaining whole rock analyses means that geochemical classifications tend to be favored in exploration geology. But the technique of thermal infrared spectroscopy of rocks yields information on mineralogy and is one that can be applied remotely. The goal of the current work then is to establish whether data from TIMS can be used to distinguish the mineralogical variations that relate to alkalinity. An ideal opportunity to test this thesis arises from the work presented in a paper by Dewitt (1989). This paper contains the results of mapping and analysis of Proterozoic plutonic rocks in north-central Arizona. The map resulting from this work delineates plutons according to alkalinity in an effort to establish a trend or polarity in the regional magmatism. Also contained within this paper are brief descriptions of the mineralogy of half of the region's plutons. This combination of mineralogical and geochemical information was the rationale behind choosing this area as a site for TIMS over flights. A portion of the region centered on the northern Bradshaw Mountains was selected because it contains plutons of all three alkalinity classifications (alkali-calcic, calc-alkalic, and calic) present on DeWitt's map within a relatively small area. The site was flown in August of 1994 and the data received a few days before the writing of this manuscript. Most of this

  3. Tectono-magmatic evolution of sheeted plutonic bodies along the north Giudicarie line (northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Prosser, G.; Morten, L.

    1993-04-01

    Tectonized slices of foliated quartz-diorite/ quartz-gabbro rocks are exposed along the north Giudicarie line between Dimaro and Rumo (Western Trentino region, north-east Italy). They show geochemical and mineralogical similarities with the north-east corner of the Adamello batholith (Presanella pluton) and may be regarded as a northern apophysis lamella of Adamello. The intrusive bodies were emplaced within the Adria crust at a relatively shallow depth (approximatelyP_{{text{H}}_{text{2}} {text{O}}} equal to 3 kbar) along a proto-Giudicarie line under transtensive conditions during late Oligocene. Only near Rumo has contact metamorphism on the Austroalpine basement been observed, whereas in other outcrops it has been tectonically removed by later movements along the Giudicarie line. In the Samoclevo lamella a magmatic flow texture, which developed during the emplacement of a crystal mush at shallow depth, is recorded by the preferred alignment of plagioclase and hornblende. A solid state foliation, outlined by quartz crystal aggregates, green hornblende and biotite, has been observed mostly in the Rumo lamella. This indicates that a later ductile deformation, which developed under decreasing temperatures, overprinted the intrusive rocks. This deformation probably reflects late Oligocene strike-slip movements along the Tonale and Giudicarie lines. Finally semi-brittle to brittle deformation overprints the foliated igneous lamellae producing cataclasites and pseudotachylites. Sometimes these structures are subsequently cut by prehnite and epidote bearing veins. During this event, the intrusive lamellae were decoupled from their contact aureole and carried over the Insubric Flysch of the southern Alps. This last tectonic phase may be correlated to the Upper Miocene neo-Alpine transpressive event along the Giudicarie Line.

  4. Age and intrusive relations of the Lamarck granodiorite and associated mafic plutons, Sierra Nevada, California

    SciTech Connect

    Joye, J.L.; Bachl, C.A.; Miller, J.S.; Glazner, A.F. . Dept. of Geology); Frost, T.P. ); Coleman, D.S. . Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The compositionally zoned Late Cretaceous Lamarck granodiorite, west of Bishop, hosts numerous mafic intrusions ranging from hornblende gabbro to mafic granodiorite. Frost and Mahood (1987) suggested from field relations that the Lamarck and the associated mafic plutons were co-intrusive. Contact relations between the Lamarck host and the mafic intrusions are variable (sharp to diffuse) and in places suggest commingling. In order to constrain the intrusive relationships between the Lamarck and its associated mafic plutons, the authors have analyzed feldspars from the Mt. Gilbert pluton and the Lamarck granodiorite to see if feldspar compositions in the Mt. Gilbert overlap those in the Lamarck host and determined U-Pb zircon ages for the Mt. Gilbert and Lake Sabrina plutons to see if they have the same age as the Lamarck granodiorite. Feldspars from the Lamarck granodiorite are normally zoned and range compositionally from An[sub 38--32]; those in the Mt. Gilbert diorite are also normally zoned but range compositionally from An[sub 49--41] and do not overlap the Lamarck host. Four to five zircon fractions from each pluton were handpicked and dated using U-Pb methods. The Mt. Gilbert mafic diorite has a concordant age of 92.5 Ma and the Lake Sabrina diorite has a concordant age of 91.5 Ma. Ages for the two plutons overlap within error, but multiple fractions from each suggest that the Lake Sabrina pluton is slightly younger than the Mt. Gilbert pluton. These data and field relationships indicate: (1) plagioclase phenocrysts in the Mt. Gilbert pluton were not derived from the Lamarck granodiorite despite their textural similarity; but (2) the Lamarck granodiorite and its associated mafic plutons are co-intrusive as supported by the close agreement of the ages with the crystallization age obtained by Stern and others for the Lamarck granodiorite.

  5. Significant Enrichment of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) in the Lipids Extracted by Supercritical CO2 from the Livers of Australian Rock Lobsters (Jasus edwardsii).

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trung T; Zhang, Wei; Barber, Andrew R; Su, Peng; He, Shan

    2015-05-13

    Australian rock lobster (Jasus edwardsii) liver contains approximately 24.3% (w/w) lipids, which can contain a high amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). However, this material has been found to be contaminated with arsenic (240 mg/kg) and cadmium (8 mg/kg). The high level of contaminants in the raw material and the large amount of PUFAs in the lipids prove a significant challenge in the extraction of high-quality lipids from this byproduct by conventional methods. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction is a highly promising technology for lipid extraction with advantages including low contamination and low oxidation. The technique was optimized to achieve nearly 94% extraction of lipids relative to conventional Soxhlet extraction in Australian rock lobster liver at conditions of 35 MPa and 50 °C for 4 h. The extracted lipids are significantly enriched in PUFAs at 31.3% of total lipids, 4 times higher than those in the lipids recovered by Soxhlet extraction (7.8%). Specifically, the concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in SC-CO2 extraction are 7 times higher than those obtained by Soxhlet extraction. Moreover, very small amounts of toxic heavy metals such as lead (Pb), arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), and cadmium (Cd) were detected in the SC-CO2-extracted lipids, 0.5-27 times lower than those in the Soxhlet-extracted lipids, which are 40-200 times lower than the regulatory limit maximum values. The low levels of contaminants and the high proportion of PUFAs (dominated by DHA and EPA) found in the SC-CO2-extracted lipids from Australian rock lobster liver suggest that the material could potentially be used as a valuable source of essential fatty acids for human consumption. PMID:25905456

  6. Decompressional metamorphic P-T paths from kyanite-sillimanite-andalusite bearing rocks in north-central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, C.G.; Thompson, A.G.; Grambling, J.A. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Proterozoic rocks in six uplifts in northern and central New mexico display decompressional metamorphic P-T paths, apparently, related to crustal extension at a time near 1,440 Ma. Metamorphic P-T paths from the Picuris, Rincon, Truchas, Rio Mora, Sandia and southern Manzano Mountains are constrained by three independent techniques: (1) Al[sub 2]SiO[sub 5] and other mineral parageneses; (2) the Gibbs method applied to compositional zoning in garnet and plagioclase; and (3) a new technique based upon Fe[sup 3+] and Mn[sup 3+] zoning in andalusite. Aluminum silicate textures suggest that kyanite and subsequent sillimanite (commonly aligned parallel to the regional foliation and lineation) are earlier than andalusite, which overprints foliation. The decompressional P-T paths are interpreted to reflect crustal extension. Contact metamorphic aureoles associated with the Priest pluton in the southern Manzano and the Sandia Granite in the Sandia Mountains place constraints upon the timing of the Ky-Sil-And metamorphism. In the southern Manzano Mountains metamorphic isograds marking the first appearance of staurolite and (closer to the pluton) sillimanite are parallel to the margin of the 1,440 Ma Priest quartz monzonite pluton. Similarly, isograds also surround the NW margin of the 1,420 Ma Sandia pluton. The regional metamorphism appears to have coincided with and to have been enhanced by the emplacement of the plutons. Because plutonism and regional metamorphism appear to have been synchronous, pluton emplacement occurred during decompression.

  7. The Paradox of the Axial Melt Lens: Petrology and Geochemistry of the Upper Plutonics at Hess Deep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissenberg, C. J.; Loocke, M. P.; MacLeod, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The axial melt lens (AML) is a steady-state magma-rich body located at the dyke-gabbro transition at intermediate- and fast-spreading ridges. It is widely believed to be the reservoir from which mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) is erupted. The paradox of the axial melt lens is that the plutonic rocks that occur at this level are far too evolved to be in equilibrium with MORB, which is basaltic by definition; hence, the plutonic and volcanic records do not match. We explore this paradox by study of the first comprehensive sample suite of the uppermost plutonics of a fast-spreading ridge, taken by remotely-operated vehicle from the Hess Deep rift during cruise JC21. 23 samples (8 dolerites, 14 gabbronorites, and 1 gabbro) were collected from a section containing the transition from the uppermost gabbroic section into sheeted dykes. We present the results of a detailed petrographic and microanalytical investigation of these samples. They are dominated by evolved, varitextured (both in hand sample and thin section) oxide gabbronorites; olivine occurs in only one sample. A preponderance of the samples have positive Eu/Eu* and Sr/Sr*, indicating a cumulate origin. However, the minerals have evolved compositions, and are in equilibrium with melts significantly more evolved than East Pacific Rise MORB. Furthermore, the trace element contents of clinopyroxene differ significantly from clinopyroxene in equilibrium with MORB, being more enriched in incompatible elements. To account for both the evidence of derivation of MORB from the AML and the evolved nature of its rock record, we posit that the AML must be fed by melts on two different timescales: continual low-volume feeding by evolved interstitial melt from the cumulus pile below is augmented episodically by delivery of high volumes of more primitive melt. The latter episodes may trigger eruptions; hence the primitive melts are held in the magma chamber for only short periods, and erupt on the seafloor before significant

  8. Laboratory duplication of comb layering in the Rhum pluton. [igneous rocks with comb layered texture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    A description is provided of the texture of harrisite comb layers, taking into account the results of crystallization experiments at controlled cooling rates, which have reproduced the textural change from 'cumulate' to comb-layered harrisite. Melted samples of harrisite were used in the dynamic crystallization experiments considered. The differentiation of a cooling rate run with respect to olivine grain size and shape is shown and three possible origins of hopper olivine in differentiated crystallization runs are considered. It is found that olivine nucleation occurred throughout cooling, except for the incubation period during early cooling. The elongate combed olivines in harrisite apparently grew as the magma locally supercooled to at least 30 C. It is suggested that the branching crystals in most comb layers, including comb-layered harrisite, probably grew along thermal gradients.

  9. Europium mass balance in polymict samples and implications for plutonic rocks of the lunar crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, Randy L.; Haskin, Larry A.

    1988-01-01

    The mean concentrations of Sm and Eu in the lunar surface crust were analyzed by correlating the Sm concentration and the Sm/Eu ratio with Th concentration obtained from published data on a large number of polymict samples from various locations in the lunar highlands, and using the value of 0.91 microg/g for the mean Th concentration of the highlands surface crust obtained by the orbiting gamma-ray experiments. The mean concentration of Sm in the lunar surface crust was found to be between 2 and 3 microg/g, and that of Eu between 0.7 and 1.2 microg/g. The results indicate that there is no significant enrichment or depletion of Eu, compared to Sm, relative to chondritic abundances; i.e., there is no significant 'Eu anomaly' in average upper crust, contrary to predictions by some earlier investigators.

  10. Temporal Evolution of Volcanic and Plutonic Magmas Related to Porphyry Copper Ores Based on Zircon Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, J. H.; Lee, R. G.; Wooden, J. L.; Koleszar, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Porphyry Cu (Mo-Au) and epithermal Au-Ag ores are globally associated with shallow hydrous, strongly oxidized, and sulfur-rich arc intrusions. In many localities, long-lived magmatism includes evolution from early andesitic volcanic (v) and plutonic (p) rocks to later dacitic or rhyolitic compositions dominated by plutons. We compare zircon compositions from three igneous suites with different time spans: Yerington, USA (1 m.y., p>v), El Salvador, Chile (4 m.y., p>v), and Yanacocha, Peru (6 m.y., v>p). At Yerington granite dikes and ores formed in one event, at ES in 2 to 3 events spanning 3 m.y., and at Yanacocha in 6 events spanning 5 m.y. At both ES and Yanacocha, high-Al amphiboles likely crystallized at high temperature in the mid-crust and attest to deep magmas that periodically recharged the shallow chambers. At Yanacocha, these amphiboles contain anhydrite inclusions that require magmas were sulfur-rich and strongly oxidized (~NNO+2). The Ti-in-zircon geothermometer provides estimates of 920º to 620º C for zircon crystallization, and records both core to rim cooling and locally high temperature rim overgrowths. Ore-related silicic porphyries yield near-solidus crystallization temperatures of 750-650°C consistent with low zircon saturation temperatures. The latter zircons have large positive Ce/Ce* and small negative Eu/Eu*≥0.4 anomalies attesting to strongly oxidized conditions (Ballard et al., 2001), which we propose result from crystallization and SO2 loss to the magmatic-hydrothermal ore fluid (Dilles et al., 2015). The Hf, REE, Y, U, and Th contents of zircons are diverse in the magma suites, and Th/U vs Yb/Gd plots suggest a dominant role of crystal fractionation with lesser roles for both crustal contamination and mixing with high temperature deep-sourced mafic magma. Ce/Sm vs Yb/Gd plots suggest that magma REE contents at <900°C are dominated by early crystallization of hornblende and apatite, and late crystallization (~<780°C) of titanite

  11. Late Proterozoic and Silurian alkaline plutons within the southeastern New England Avalon zone

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, O.D. ); Zartman, R.E. )

    1992-07-01

    Distinct pulses of quartz-bearing, alkaline plutonism and volcanism are known to have occurred in the Avalon zone of southeastern New England during the Late Ordovician, Early Silurian, Devonian, and Carboniferous. Zircon separates from the Franklin and Dartmouth plutons demonstrate that two additional, previously unrecognized periods of alkaline magmatism occurred. The Franklin pluton yields an age of 417 {plus minus} 6 Ma (Late Silurian), whereas the Dartmouth pluton is Late Proterozoic (595 {plus minus} 5 Ma) and markedly older than the other plutons of alkaline affinity. The new ages further emphasize the episodic nature and long-term duration of such alkaline igneous events within the southeastern New England Avalon zone. The Dartmouth pluton may represent a post-collisional alkaline granite emplaced in the Late Proterozoic, almost immediately after a major period of calcalkaline igneous activity that accompanied plate convergence and continental accretion. The abrupt change from orogenic calcalkaline igneous activity to post-collisional alkaline granite, followed by younger episodes of anorogenic emplacement, is remarkably similar to igneous events reported from pan-African mobile belts widespread throughout Africa. In addition, parts of the Dartmouth pluton exhibit features indicative of mixing and commingling of felsic and mafic melts that are associated with coevally formed mylonitic fabrics. Because these fabrics are conformable to those in adjacent gneisses, but discordant with Alleghanian fabrics in the nearby Carboniferous Narragansett basin, they represent some of the best candidates for pre-Alleghanian structures thus far identified in the southeastern New England Avalon zone.

  12. Plutonism, oblique subduction, and continental growth: An example from the Mesozoic of California

    SciTech Connect

    Glazner, A.F. )

    1991-08-01

    Major episodes of Mesozoic plutonism in California correlate with periods of oblique subduction and trench-parallel transport of western California along intrabatholithic faults. Major episodes of plutonism occurred in the Late Jurassic, during left-oblique convergence, and in the mid-Cretaceous, during right-oblique convergence. In contrast, a conspicuous lull in plutonism (but continuation of volcanism) in the earliest Cretaceous coincides with a time when the North America-Farallon convergence vector, although large in magnitude, was oriented perpendicular to the trench. This correlation suggests that plutonism is facilitated by strike-slip faulting within the batholithic belt; one explanation, which helps to solve the plutonic room problem, is that plutons are passively emplaced at releasing bends in the strike-slip faults, and volume is conserved by thrusting at the trench. If this correlation is generally applicable, then it implies that mid-crustal plutonism is limited beneath areas in which the convergence vector is subperpendicular to the trench. Continental growth in such areas may occur dominantly by volcanism.

  13. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar thermochronology and thermobarometry of metamorphism, plutonism, and tectonic denudation in the Old Woman Mountains area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D.A.; Miller, C.F.; Harrison, T.M.; Hoisch, T.D.

    1992-02-01

    Discrimination of individual tectonometamorphic events in polymetamorphosed terranes requires a comprehensive understanding of the relative timing and conditions of metamorphism and plutonism. We have applied a combination of {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39} Ar thermochronology, petrology, and thermobarometry to reconstruct the complex Early Proterozoic through early Cenozoic tectonic and metamorphic evolution of continental crust in the Old Woman Mountains area, southeastern California. Strong Mesozoic thermal events obscure the earlier history in much of the Old Woman Mountains area. In those areas where Early Proterozoic rocks underwent only lower-greenschist-facies metamorphism during the Mesozoic, thermobarometry of pelitic schists indicates that Proterozoic metamorphism occurred at 9 to 11 kbar and {approximately}700 {degrees}C. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages of hornblende from samples of interbedded Proterozoic amphibolite indicate that this high-grade metamorphism took place before 1600 Ma. The relatively high-pressure conditions of Early Proterozoic metamorphism in the Old Woman Mountains area contrast with the low-pressure granulite-facies metamorphism that occurred elsewhere in the Mojave Desert at this time. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses of hornblende from Proterozoic rocks within Mesozoic shear zones and hornblende barometry from Jurassic intrusive rocks suggest that tectonism and burial of Paleozoic strata to >10 km began between 170 and 150 Ma. This tectonism resulted in regional greenschist-facies metamorphism. Late-stage mineral assemblages in Proterozoic and Paleozoic pelitic rocks in the Old Woman Mountains area indicate an increase in metamorphic grade from greenschist to upper amphibolite facies toward Later Cretaceous Plutons of the 73 Ma Old Woman-Piute batholith. Barometric calculations from garnet-bearing metamorphic rocks suggest that this Cretaceous metamorphism took place at 3.5 to 5.0 kbar in the Old Woman Mountains. 68 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The link between volcanism and plutonism in epizonal magma systems; high-precision U–Pb zircon geochronology from the Organ Mountains caldera and batholith, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rioux, Matthew; Farmer, Lang; Bowring, Samuel; Wooton, Kathleen M.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Coleman, Drew S.; Verplanck, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    The Organ Mountains caldera and batholith expose the volcanic and epizonal plutonic record of an Eocene caldera complex. The caldera and batholith are well exposed, and extensive previous mapping and geochemical analyses have suggested a clear link between the volcanic and plutonic sections, making this an ideal location to study magmatic processes associated with caldera volcanism. Here we present high-precision thermal ionization mass spectrometry U–Pb zircon dates from throughout the caldera and batholith, and use these dates to test and improve existing petrogenetic models. The new dates indicate that Eocene volcanic and plutonic rocks in the Organ Mountains formed from ~44 to 34 Ma. The three largest caldera-related tuff units yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates of 36.441 ± 0.020 Ma (Cueva Tuff), 36.259 ± 0.016 Ma (Achenback Park tuff), and 36.215 ± 0.016 Ma (Squaw Mountain tuff). An alkali feldspar granite, which is chemically similar to the erupted tuffs, yielded a synchronous weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 36.259 ± 0.021 Ma. Weighted mean 206Pb/238U dates from the larger volume syenitic phase of the underlying Organ Needle pluton range from 36.130 ± 0.031 to 36.071 ± 0.012 Ma, and the youngest sample is 144 ± 20 to 188 ± 20 ka younger than the Squaw Mountain and Achenback Park tuffs, respectively. Younger plutonism in the batholith continued through at least 34.051 ± 0.029 Ma. We propose that the Achenback Park tuff, Squaw Mountain tuff, alkali feldspar granite and Organ Needle pluton formed from a single, long-lived magma chamber/mush zone. Early silicic magmas generated by partial melting of the lower crust rose to form an epizonal magma chamber. Underplating of the resulting mush zone led to partial melting and generation of a high-silica alkali feldspar granite cap, which erupted to form the tuffs. The deeper parts of the chamber underwent continued recharge and crystallization for 144 ± 20 ka after the

  15. Reassessment of the Role of Magmatism in the Evolution of the Catalina MCC: Evidence for a Felsic-Intermediate Pluton at Shallow Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, J. J.; Finn, C. A.; Baldwin, S. L.

    2005-12-01

    the pluton is ~ 30 km wide and ~ 100 km long. The exact timing of pluton emplacement is presently unknown, although available thermochronologic data indicates it has to be >14 Ma. The aeromagnetic map patterns show the body is cut by the Basin and Range high angle Pirate fault, which cuts the NW side of the Santa Catalina Mountains and is assumed to be 12-6 Ma. The NW-SE-trending profile exhibits topographic valleys that cut the top boundary surface of the pluton and correspond to drainages at the surface, interpreted as corrugation surfaces. The axes of the corrugation surfaces trend SW-NE and thus suggests the timing of pluton emplacement is related to the extension along the Catalina detachment fault. Future work will include modeling the heat flow for the region. Several heat flow models will be considered using crystallization ages of magmatic rocks exposed at the surface as initial conditions.

  16. Petrographic and crystallographic study of silicate minerals in lunar rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, I. S. E.; Turner, F. J.; Wenk, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    Optical U-stage measurements, chemical microprobe data, and X-ray procession photographs of a bytownite twin group from rock 12032,44 are compared. Sharp but weak b and no c-reflections were observed for this An89 bytownite indicating a partly disordered structure. Euler angles, used to characterize the orientation of the optical indicatrix, compare better with values for plutonic than for volcanic plagioclase. This indicates that structural and optical properties cannot be directly correlated.

  17. Kilbuck terrane: oldest known rocks in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Box, S.E.; Moll-Stalcup, E. J.; Wooden, J.L.; Bradshaw, J.Y.

    1990-01-01

    The Kilbuck terrane in southwestern Alaska is a narrow, thin crustal sliver or flake of amphibolite facies orthogneiss. The igneous protolith of this gneiss was a suite of subduction-related plutonic rocks. U-Pb data on zircons from trondhjemitic and granitic samples yield upper-intercept (igneous) ages of 2070 ?? 16 and 2040 ?? 74 Ma, respectively. Nd isotope data from these rocks suggest that a diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite suite (??Nd[T] = +2.1 to +2.7; T is time of crystallization) evolved from partial melts of depleted mantle with no discernible contamination by older crust, whereas a coeval granitic pluton (??Nd[T] = -5.7) contains a significant component derived from Archean crust. Orthogneisses with similar age and Nd isotope characteristics are found in the Idono complex 250 km to the north. Early Proterozoic rocks are unknown elsewhere in Alaska. The possibility that the Kilbuck terrane was displaced from provinces of similar age in other cratons (e.g., Australian, Baltic, Guiana, and west African shields), or from the poorly dated Siberian craton, cannot be excluded. -from Authors

  18. Co-Cu-Au deposits in metasedimentary rocks-A preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Causey, J.D.; Eppinger, R.G.; Gray, J.E.; Johnson, C.A.; Lund, K.I.; Schulz, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    A compilation of data on global Co-Cu-Au deposits in metasedimentary rocks refines previous descriptive models for their occurrence and provides important information for mineral resource assessments and exploration programs. This compilation forms the basis for a new classification of such deposits, which is speculative at this early stage of research. As defined herein, the Co-Cu-Au deposits contain 0.1 percent or more by weight of Co in ore or mineralized rock, comprising disseminated to semi-massive Co-bearing sulfide minerals with associated Fe- and Cu-bearing sulfides, and local gold, concentrated predominantly within rift-related, siliciclastic metasedimentary rocks of Proterozoic age. Some deposits have appreciable Ag ? Bi ? W ? Ni ? Y ? rare earth elements ? U. Deposit geometry includes stratabound and stratiform layers, lenses, and veins, and (or) discordant veins and breccias. The geometry of most deposits is controlled by stratigraphic layering, folds, axial-plane cleavage, shear zones, breccias, or faults. Ore minerals are mainly cobaltite, skutterudite, glaucodot, and chalcopyrite, with minor gold, arsenopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, bismuthinite, and bismuth; some deposits have appreciable tetrahedrite, uraninite, monazite, allanite, xenotime, apatite, scheelite, or molybdenite. Magnetite can be abundant in breccias, veins, or stratabound lenses within ore or surrounding country rocks. Common gangue minerals include quartz, biotite, muscovite, K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, and scapolite; many deposits contain minor to major amounts of tourmaline. Altered wall rocks generally have abundant biotite or albite. Mesoproterozoic metasedimentary successions constitute the predominant geologic setting. Felsic and (or) mafic plutons are spatially associated with many deposits and at some localities may be contemporaneous with, and involved in, ore formation. Geoenvironmental data for the Blackbird mining district in central Idaho indicate that weathering of

  19. An Archean Geomagnetic Reversal in the Kaap Valley Pluton, South Africa

    PubMed

    Layer; Kroner; McWilliams

    1996-08-16

    The Kaap Valley pluton in South Africa is a tonalite intrusion associated with the Archean Barberton Greenstone Belt. Antipodal paleomagnetic directions determined from the central and marginal parts of the pluton record a geomagnetic reversal that occurred as the pluton cooled. The age of the reversal is constrained by an 40Ar/39Ar plateau age from hornblende at 3214 +/- 4 million years, making it the oldest known reversal. The data presented here suggest that Earth has had a reversing, perhaps dipolar, magnetic field since at least 3.2 billion years ago. PMID:8688075

  20. Subsurface Geology of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Site

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, Schon S.

    2010-12-01

    The Precambrian rock penetrated by wells EE-2A and -3A belongs to one or more granitic to granodioritic plutons. The plutonic rock contains two major xenolith zones of amphibolite, locally surrounded by fine-grained mafic rock of hybrid igneous origin. The granodiorite is cut by numerous leucogranite dikes that diminish in abundance with depth. The most prominent structural feature is the main breccia zone, in which the rock is highly fractured and moderately altered. This zone is at least 75 m thick and is of uncertain but near-horizontal orientation. Fracture abundance decreases with increasing depth below the main breccia zone, and fractures tend to be associated with leucogranite dikes. This association suggests that at least some of the fractures making up the geothermal reservoir are of Precambrian age or have long-range orientations controlled by the presence of Precambrian-age granitic dikes.

  1. Structure and chemistry of bacterially populated acidic microenvironments found on naturally colonized and weathered circumneutral pH unsaturated waste rock from the Antamina Mine, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockrey, J. W.; Mayer, K. U.; Beckie, R. D.; Southam, G.

    2009-12-01

    The microbial community present in geochemically well characterized field cells and experimental waste rock piles at the Antamina Mine, were examined using electron microscopy, culture dependent, and culture independent techniques. Relatively large populations of up to 10^8 bacteria per gram were found, despite the young age of the waste rock (1.5 years). Most samples were at alkaline pH and dominated by bacteria capable of neutral pH thiosulfate oxidation. One sample from a field cell producing drainage at a pH of 6.5 was dominated by acidophilic bacteria capable of Fe^2+ and S^0 oxidation. A weathered massive sulfide from this sample was thoroughly examined using a field emission gun scanning electron microscope equipped with a focused ion beam (FE-SEM-FIB). Bacteria were abundant as monolayer and agglomerate biofilms upon and within a porous schwertmannite precipitate, while no bacteria were found directly attached to clean sulfide surfaces. Pitting of pyrrhotite was observed beneath the microbially inhabited schwertmannite, while no pitting was observed in adjacent clean pyrrhotite surfaces indicating greater oxidation of the pyrrhotite surface beneath the schwertmannite. Some waste rock that has been exposed to natural surface weathering conditions for more than twice the amount of time, possessed larger total populations of bacteria, but did not support significant populations of acidophiles, suggesting a succession from neutrophiles to acidophiles takes place prior to the development of acid mine drainage. The development of the porous iron oxide film may be prerequisite for acidophilic bacteria to flourish, creating acidic microenvironments within a neutral bulk, ambient pH mine waste.

  2. Assessment of zinc loading in an acid rock drainage alpine catchment using a tracer-injection and synoptic-sampling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, C. M.; McKnight, D. M.; Todd, A.

    2010-12-01

    Seasonal low flow conditions in acid rock drainage (ARD) streams result in increased acidity and metal ion concentrations - changes that have been shown to become more pronounced with longer dry periods. These resulting increases in acidity and metals concentrations may pose an increasing danger to aquatic ecosystems and drinking water supplies. For example, in many ARD-impacted mountain streams, fish populations are not self-sustaining. The study site in the Upper Snake River watershed in Colorado is an alpine catchment impacted by acid rock drainage thought to originate from the natural weathering of pyrite whereas the main stem of the Snake River and its other tributaries are impacted by accelerated ARD resulting from historic mining activities. Because concentrations toxic to aquatic life persist well downstream of the ARD inputs, dissolved zinc is the primary metal of concern in this study. A compilation of historic data from the Snake River Watershed during the low flow months of September and October indicates that zinc concentrations have increased four-fold over the past 30 years. We hypothesize that this increase is due to changes in groundwater flow patterns caused by climate change and associated earlier peak snowmelt (by 2-3 weeks), resulting in lower stream flows and drier soils in late summer. The observed increase in background metals concentrations has implications for mitigation of former mining sites. A synoptic study to identify discrete surface water sources of zinc loading indicated a significant input from a tributary on the north side of the catchment. Zinc concentrations here measured an order of magnitude higher than in the main stem of the stream, and were correlated with increases in sulfate, hardness, and total metals, supporting our contention that increasing zinc concentrations are driven by the acceleration of ARD in the watershed. The current research further investigates sources of metal-rich inflows to the tributary using a tracer

  3. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  4. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  5. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  6. Iron variation within a granitic pluton as determined by near-infrared reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    One-hundred fifty-one previously chemically analyzed samples of tonalite from the Lakeview Mountains pluton, southern California batholith, were analyzed for their iron content using near-infrared spectrophotometry. Compared to the earlier analyses of the same sample set by X-ray fluorescence spectrography, the infrared data have higher analytical variance but clearly define patterns of compositional zonation in the pluton which are closely similar to those patterns obtained from X-ray data; petrogenetic interpretations for the pluton would be the same from either data set. Infrared spectral data can be obtained directly in the field with relatively simple instruments and field measurements can be made to average local heterogeneities that often mask significant plutonic variations.

  7. Strain Localization Within a Syn-Tectonic Pluton in a Back-Arc Extensional Context: the Naxos granodiorite (Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessiere, Eloïse; Rabillard, Aurélien; Arbaret, Laurent; Jolivet, Laurent; Augier, Romain; Menant, Armel

    2016-04-01

    Naxos Island is part of the central Cyclades (Aegean Sea, Greece) where a series of migmatite-cored metamorphic domes were exhumed below large-scale detachment systems during a Cenozoic back-arc extension. On Naxos, the Miocene exhumation history of the high-temperature metamorphic dome was notably achieved through two anastomosing and closely spaced top-to-the-north detachments belonging to the Naxos-Paros detachment system. According to previous contributions, the late exhumation stages were accompanied by the emplacement of a syn-kinematic I-type granodiorite that intruded a ductile-then-brittle detachment. Later the detachment migrated at the interface between the pluton and the metamorphic unit under ductile-to-brittle conditions. To clarify how extensional deformation was precisely distributed within the pluton, a multi-scale approach from field observations to laboratory investigations was undertaken. Through macro- to micro-structural observations, we show a continuous deformation history from magmatic to solid-state ductile/brittle conditions under an overall north-directed shearing deformation. The early magmatic or sub-solidus deformation is evidenced in a large part of the granodiorite, notably in its southern part where the original intrusive contact is still preserved. Solid-state deformation is recorded further north when approaching the detachment zone, highlighted by a thicker cataclastic zone and numerous pseudotachylite veins. From these field observations, we defined six strain facies, leading us to propose a qualitative strain map of the Naxos granodiorite. Based on field pictures and X-ray tomography of oriented samples collected along the strain gradient, we quantified the intensity of mineralogical fabrics in 2D and 3D. This step required the treatment of 600 rocks samples and pictures using SPO2003 (Shape Preferred Orientation) and Intercepts2003. Measured shape variations of the strain ellipsoid thus corroborate the large-scale strain

  8. Late magmatic stage of the zoned Caleu pluton (Central Chile): insights from zircon crystallization conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, P. G.; Parada, M.; Gutierrez, F. J.; Chang-Qiang, M.; Jianwei, L.; Yuanyuan, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Caleu pluton consists of three N-S elongated lithological zones: Gabbro-Diorite Zone (GDZ), Tonalite Zone (TZ) and Granodiorite Zone (GZ); western, middle and eastern portions of the pluton, respectively. The zones are thought to be previously differentiated in a common, isotopically depleted (Sr-Nd), subjacent magma reservoir at a 4 kbar equivalent depth. The emplacement should have occurred at the climax of the Cretaceous rifting. We present preliminary results of U238/Pb206 zircon geochronology; zircon saturation, Tsat(Zrn), and crystallization temperatures (Ti-in-Zrn); as well as relative oxidation states at time of crystallization, based on: (i) the sluggish REE and HFSE subsolidus diffusivities in zircon; (ii) the behavior of Ti4+↔Si4+ and Ce4+↔Zr4+ isovalent replacement, in addition to a constrained TiO2 activity in almost all typical crustal rocks; and (iii) relative oxidation states at time of crystallization, respectively. The latter are obtained by interpolation of the partition coefficients of trivalent (REE) and tetravalent (HFSE) curves in Onuma diagrams for each zircon, and then estimating relative Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ratios. Results obtained from 4 samples (a total of 77 zircon grains) collected from the three mentioned lithological zones indicate U/Pb ages of approximately 99.5 ±1.5 Ma, 96.8 ±0.6 Ma, and 94.4 +2.2 -0.8 Ma; and Ti-in Zrn ranges of ca. 720-870°C, ca. 680-820°C and ca. 750-840°C, for the GDZ, TZ and GZ samples, respectively. On the other hand Tsat(Zrn) of ca. 750-780°C in the TZ, and ca. 830-890°C in the GZ, were obtained. As expected saturation temperatures are similar or higher than Ti-in-Zrn obtained in zircon grains of TZ and GZ, respectively. Cathodoluminiscence images in zircon suggest a magmatic origin, due to absence of complex zoning patterns and fairly well conserved morphologies. Exceptionally the GDZ sample zircons show evidence of inheritance, indicating a xenocrystic and/or antecrystic origin. A relative Ce

  9. Whole-Rock Geochemistry and Zircon U-Pb Isotopes of the Late Cretaceous Granitoids of the Eastern Taurus (turkey): Implications for Petrogenesis and Geodynamic Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyarslan, Melahat; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chung, Sun-Lin; Feyzi Bingol, Ahmet; Yildirim, Esra

    2015-04-01

    The granitoid plutons out crop largely in the Eastern Taurus, in Turkey. New data, including a combination of field relation, U-Pb zircon geochronology and rock geochemistry on the granitoids in the Eastern Taurus of the Tethyan orogen in Turkey, come from four plutons ( Pertek, Baskil, Göksun and Şifrin). Pertek, Baskil and Göksun plutons consist mainly of diorite, quartz-diorites, tonalite, granodiorites and granites of I-type, with minor monzonite, the Şifrin pluton consists of syenogranite, syenite, monzogranite, monzonite. U-Pb zircon geochronology of four samples of diorite and granite from Pertek and Baskil plutons indicate ages of 86±2 - 79 ± 1Ma. U-Pb zircon geochronology of four samples from the Şifrin granitoid yield ages 77±1-72±1 Ma. Considering these ages, emplacement of the plutons took place during Late Cretaceous (Santonian-Campanian), from 86 to 72 Ma. Although the SiO2 of rocks forming granitoids varies in wide range ( 46.792- 74.092 wt%), they show arc and syn-collision geochemical affinity, with enrichment of LILE (K, Rb, Sr and Ba) and depletion of HFSE (Nb, Ta and Ti) and P. Geochemical data indice that the diorite, tonalite and granodiorite are low-K tholeiite, monzodiorite, monzogranite, granite and K-granite are calc-alkaline and high-K calc-alkaline and monzonite, syenomonzonite and syenite of Şifrin pluton and some samples of the Pertek pluton are shoshonitic. The Eastern Taurus granitoids would be formed by partial melting of possible juvenile arc-derived rocks during subduction of the South Branch of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust and subsequent arc-continent collision.

  10. Ancient oceanic crust in island arc lower crust: Evidence from oxygen isotopes in zircons from the Tanzawa Tonalitic Pluton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazue; Kitajima, Kouki; Sawaki, Yusuke; Hattori, Kentaro; Hirata, Takafumi; Maruyama, Shigenori

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the lithological variability and genesis of island arc crust is important for understanding continental growth. Although the volcanic architecture of island arcs is comparatively well known, the nature of island arc middle- and lower-crust remains uncertain owing to limited exposure. One of the best targets for deciphering the evolution of an island arc system is the Tanzawa Tonalites (4-9 Ma), in the intra-oceanic Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc. These tonalities which occupied a mid-crustal position were generated by partial melting of lower crust. To constrain protoliths of the plutonic rocks in the island arc lower crust, in-situ O-isotopic analysis using an IMS-1280 Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer was carried out on 202 zircon grains separated from 4 plutons in the Tanzawa Tonalite. δ18O value of the zircons ranges from 4.1‰ to 5.5‰ and some zircons have δ18O slightly lower than the mantle range. The low zircon δ18O values from the Tanzawa Tonalite suggest that their protoliths involved materials with lower δ18O values than those of the mantle. Hydrothermally altered gabbros in the lower oceanic crust often have lower δ18O values than mantle and can be primary components of arc lower crust. The Tanzawa Tonalite is interpreted to have been formed by partial melting of island arc lower crust. Thus the low δ18O values in zircons from the Tanzawa Tonalites may originate by melting of the hydrothermally altered gabbro. Ancient oceanic crustal material was likely present in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc lower crust, at the time of formation of the Tanzawa Tonalites.

  11. Comprehensive Pb-Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic, trace element, and mineralogical characterization of mafic to ultramafic rock reference materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourny, Anaïs.; Weis, Dominique; Scoates, James S.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the accuracy and precision of geochemical analyses requires the use of characterized reference materials with matrices similar to those of the unknown samples being analyzed. We report a comprehensive Pb-Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic and trace element concentration data set, combined with quantitative phase analysis by XRD Rietveld refinement, for a wide range of mafic to ultramafic rock reference materials analyzed at the Pacific Centre for Isotopic and Geochemical Research, University of British Columbia. The samples include a pyroxenite (NIM-P), five basalts (BHVO-2, BIR-1a, JB-3, BE-N, GSR-3), a diabase (W-2), a dolerite (DNC-1), a norite (NIM-N), and an anorthosite (AN-G); results from a leucogabbro (Stillwater) are also reported. Individual isotopic ratios determined by MC-ICP-MS and TIMS, and multielement analyses by HR-ICP-MS are reported with 4-12 complete analytical duplicates for each sample. The basaltic reference materials have coherent Sr and Nd isotopic ratios with external precision below 50 ppm (2SD) and below 100 ppm for Hf isotopes (except BIR-1a). For Pb isotopic reproducibility, several of the basalts (JB-3, BHVO-2) require acid leaching prior to dissolution. The plutonic reference materials also have coherent Sr and Nd isotopic ratios (<50 ppm), however, obtaining good reproducibility for Pb and Hf isotopic ratios is more challenging for NIM-P, NIM-N, and AN-G due to a variety of factors, including postcrystallization Pb mobility and the presence of accessory zircon. Collectively, these results form a comprehensive new database that can be used by the geochemical community for evaluating the radiogenic isotope and trace element compositions of volcanic and plutonic mafic-ultramafic rocks.

  12. The role of the mantle in Variscan post-collisional magmatism - insights from Muntele Mic and Culmea Cernei plutons (Romanian Southern Carpathians)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stremtan, Ciprian; Balica, Constantin; Savov, Ivan; Ryan, Jeffrey; Balintoni, Ioan

    2013-04-01

    The Danubian domain of the Romanian Southern Carpathians corresponds to the lowest nappe system pertaining to the Alpine stack and it is composed of pre-Alpine basement assemblages covered by low-grade Mesozoic metamorphic rocks. The pre-Alpine components of the Danubian terranes are two continental fragments of Avalonian origin (the Lainici-Păius; and Drăgsan) sutured by the Tisovina-Iuni ophiolite complex. Both basement terranes are heavily intruded by granitoid plutons, some of them dated as late Carboniferous to early Permian [1,3]. While significant progress has been achieved in dating the emplacement of Variscan plutons [1,2,3] intruding the Neoproterozoic basement of the Danubian domain (Romanian Southern Carpathians), little work has been carried out in understanding the processes and sources that led to the formation of these plutons. We present new geochemical and geo-thermometry data for two of the Danubian Variscan plutons (Muntele Mic and Culmea Cernei, of 326±5 Ma and 286±2.9 Ma, respectively - zircon U/Pb age data[1,3]) that help constrain their sources as well as tectonic setting. Muntele Mic (MM) and Culmea Cernei (CC) are two relatively small granitoid bodies intruding both of the Danubian basement terranes. CC is a composite pluton with lithologies ranging from hornblende-granodiorite to (hornblende)biotite-granite and diorite, while MM is composed mainly of biotite-hornblende granodiorite and subordinate biotite-granite. Both plutons are metaluminous to peraluminous. CC granitoids have calc-alkaline affinities, while MM is high-K calc-alkaline (with some shoshonitic samples). MM granitoids have overall lower ΣREE (ranging from 550 to 746 ppm) and less fractionated, concave upward chondrite-normalized REE trends (LaN/YbN from 5 to 9.5). CC samples have higher ΣREE (720 to 1150), more fractionated REE patterns (LaN/YbN from 10 to 14.5) and show little evidence in their patterns for the involvement of amphibole. Modest differences in their Eu

  13. Novel long-chain anteiso-alkanes and anteiso-alkanoic acids in Antarctic rocks colonized by living and fossil cryptoendolithic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, G. I.; Friedmann, E. I.; Watanuki, K.; Ocampo-Friedmann, R.

    1992-01-01

    Saponified extracts of rock samples colonized by cryptoendolithic microbial communities from the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, were separated into hydrocarbon and fatty acid fractions by silica gel column chromatography. Hydrocarbons and methyl esters of fatty acids were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Unusually, a suite of long-chain anteiso-alkanes (a-C20 to a-C30) and anteiso-alkanoic acids (a-C20 to a-C30) were detected in many samples, together with straight-chain, branched and/or cyclic and acyclic isoprenoid compounds. These novel compounds are probably derived from unidentified heterotrophic bacteria or symbiotic processes in a unique microbial community in the Antarctic cold desert and suggest the occurrence of a special biosynthetic pathway. Long-chain anteiso-alkanes are probably formed through microbial decarboxylation of corresponding anteiso-alkanoic acids. They may serve as new biomarkers in environmental and geochemical studies.

  14. Effects of low molecular weight organic acids on the immobilization of aqueous Pb(II) using phosphate rock and different crystallized hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Cui, Jing; Wei, Zhenggui

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the effects of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the transformation of Pb(II) to geochemically stable pyromorphite (PY) by apatite materials (AMs), has considerable benefits for risk assessment and remediation strategies for contaminated water and soil. In this study, we systematically investigated the immobilization of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by natural phosphate rock (PR) and different crystallized hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the absence and presence of LMWOAs (oxalic, malic and citric acids). The results indicated that the effectiveness of PR and HAp in immobilizing Pb(II) followed in descending order by HAp2 (the poorly crystallized HAp), HAp1 (the well crystallized HAp) and PR, regardlessof the presence of LMWOAs. The presence of malic and citric acids significantly decreased the immobilizationefficiency of Pb(II) by HAp1 and PR, clarifying the lower adsorption affinities of Pb(II)-organic acid complexes on HAp1 and PR rather than Pb(II) ion. On thecontrary, oxalic acid could markedly enhance the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by HAp1 and PR through the formation of lead oxalate, which was confirmed by FT-IR and XRDanalysis. Results also showed that LMWOAs had little promoting or inhibiting effect on the immobilization of Pb(II) by HAp2. This study suggested that the ubiquity of LMWOAs in natural environments could retard the transformation efficiency of Pb(II) to PY by AMs, especiallyin thepresenceof oxalic acid, and the poorly crystallized HAp2 had great potential to remediate Pb(II)-contaminated water and soil due to its insusceptibility to LMWOAs.

  15. Petrology, geochemistry and thermobarometry of the northern area of the Flamenco pluton, Coastal Range batholith, northern Chile. A thermal approach to the emplacement processes in the Jurassic andean batholiths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Natalia; Díaz-Alvarado, Juan; Rodríguez, Carmen; Riveros, Karl; Fuentes, Paulina

    2016-04-01

    The Flamenco pluton is part of a N-S alignment of Late Triassic to Early Jurassic intrusive belt comprising the westernmost part of the Coastal Range batholith in northern Chile. The Jurassic-Cretaceous voluminous magmatism related to subduction in the western active continental margin of Gondwana is emplaced in the predominantly metasedimentary Paleozoic host-rocks of the Las Tórtolas formation, which in the northern area of the Flamenco pluton present an intense deformation, including the Chañaral mélange. Geochemically, the Flamenco pluton shows a wide compositional variability (SiO2 between 48wt % and 67wt %). Gabbros, Qtz-diorites and tonalites, mesocratic and leucocratic granodiorites are classified as calc-alkaline, calcic, magnesian and metaluminous magmatism. Flamenco granitoids define cotectic linear evolution trends, typical of magmatic fractionation processes. Geochemical trends are consistent with magmas evolved from undersaturated and low-pressure melts, even though the absence of transitional contacts between intrusive units precludes in-situ fractionation. Although some granodioritic samples show crossed geochemical trends that point to the compositional field of metasediments, and large euhedral prismatic pinnite-biotite crystals, typical Crd pseudomorph, are observed in contact magmatic facies, geochemical assimilation processes are short range, and the occurrence of host-rocks xenoliths is limited to a few meters from the pluton contact. A thermal approach to the emplacement process has been constrained through the thermobarometric results and a 2D thermo-numerical model of the contact aureole. Some Qtz-diorites and granodiorites located in the north area of the pluton exhibit granulitic textures as Hbl-Pl-Qtz triple junctions, poikiloblastic Kfs and Qtz recrystallization. The Hbl-Pl pairs have been used for the thermobarometric study of this metamorphic process, resulting granoblastic equilibrium temperatures between 770 and 790 °C, whereas

  16. Magmatic-hydrothermal fluids and volatile metals in the Spirit Lake pluton and Margaret Cu-Mo porphyry system, SW Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iveson, Alexander A.; Webster, James D.; Rowe, Michael C.; Neill, Owen K.

    2016-03-01

    The halogen-bearing minerals tourmaline, amphibole, and biotite formed during magmatic-hydrothermal processes associated with the late-stage cooling of the Spirit Lake granitoid pluton (Mt. St. Helens, WA) and with the younger sulphide-mineralised rocks of the Margaret Cu-Mo porphyry deposit located entirely within the pluton. Major- and trace-element discrimination suggests that one tourmaline population crystallised from fractionated late-stage melt pockets in granodiorite-monzogranitic dykes of the pluton. These coarse, euhedral, oscillatory, and complexly sector-zoned uvite tourmalines span a limited range in Mg/(Mg + Fe) [Mg#] space (0.4-0.7 apfu) and show the highest Ti, Ca, F, Nb, and Ta contents, and low X-site vacancies (<0.1 apfu), suggesting slow, ordered crystallisation. Conversely, smaller, microcrystalline, pluton-related vein tourmalines show higher X-site vacancies (>0.6 apfu), lower Ca and F contents, and the highest Li, As, and HREE contents (>80 ppm Li, >1200 ppm As). This population appears to record direct, rapid crystallisation from magmatic ± meteoric fluid(s) bearing the signature of the breakdown of primary feldspars and pyroxenes, with fluid exsolution from fractionated melt patches likely triggered by the formation of the previous generation of tourmaline. Mineralised porphyry deposit tourmaline compositions from the stockwork span a much larger range in Mg# space (0.05-0.9 apfu) and are almost entirely Ca-free. X-sites of these schorl tourmalines are dominated by Na or vacancies, and the Y-sites are strongly Fe enriched. The highest Mn and Zn concentrations (>4000 and >1000 ppm, respectively) potentially reflect the composition of mineralising fluids during ore deposition. A number of boron isotopic analyses yield predominantly heavy boron, but δ11B values range from -5.2 to 6.2 ‰ and average 1.4 ‰. Whilst most plutonic tourmalines conform to reported a- and c-sector element partitioning models, those from the mineralised porphyry

  17. Calcic myrmekite in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffries, C.M.; Dymek, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Myrmekite is a common feature of granitic plutonic rocks and quartzo-feldspathic gneisses, but it is rarely reported in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks. The authors have identified myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and calcic plagioclase in a variety of plagioclase-rich cumulate rocks, including samples from a number of massif anorthosites and layered igneous intrusions. It appears that calcic myrmekite has been frequently overlooked, and is a common accessory feature in these rock types. Chemical and textural characteristics of myrmekite in the St-Urbain massif anorthosite (Quebec) and the Bushveld Igneous Complex (South Africa) have several features in common, but this myrmekite appears to be fundamentally different from that described by most previous investigators. Whereas myrmekite typically consists of a vermicular intergrowth of sodic plagioclase and quartz that occurs adjacent to alkali feldspar, the intergrowths in these rocks contain highly calcic plagioclase and lack the intervening alkali feldspar. In addition, the plagioclase in the myrmekite is more calcic than that in the surrounding rock. The boundary between the myrmekite and the host material is generally extremely sharp, although reverse zoning of host plagioclase may obscure the contact in some cases. The textural and chemical evidence is consistent with a replacement origin for these intergrowths; the proportion of quartz in the myrmekite is in close agreement with the predicted amount of silica that is generated by the theoretical replacement reaction. It appears that water played a key role in the replacement process.

  18. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?" asked another. At this moment, a…

  19. Age and composition of igneous rocks, Edna Mountain quadrangle, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, Ralph L.; Silberman, Miles L.; Marsh, S.P.

    1978-01-01

    Six pulses of igneous activity ranging in age from Jurassic to Pliocene have been identified in the Edna Mountain quadrangle, Humboldt County, Nev. Porphyritic syenite am! quartz monzonite of Jurassic age (146-164 million years) at Buffalo Mountain are highly potassic through a wide range in SiO2 content from olivine-bearing syenite to quartz-rich monzonite, and their composition contrasts sharply with plutons elsewhere in north-central Nevada. Granodiorite and quartz monzonite plutons of Cretaceous age (88- 106 m.y.) are chemically and mineralogically similar to other calc-alkaline plutons in north-central Nevada. Four episodes of Tertiary volcanism include rhyolite ashflow tuffs and slightly younger andesitic basalt flows and tuffs of Oligocene age, rhyolite vitrophyre of late Miocene age, and olivine basalt flows of Pliocene age. Their age and mineralogical and chemical compositions are similar to other Tertiary volcanic rocks in north-central Nevada.

  20. Source of magma for Elet-Ozero pluton (NE Baltic Shield) - subduction or plume-related material?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, Igor; Kogarko, Liya

    2016-04-01

    Eletozero pluton is located in the northeastern part of the Karelian Craton, it covers an area of about 100 km2 and cuts through Archaean granite-gneisses. The complex has a concentric zoned structure, the peripheral part being composed of a layered gabbro series; the central area is occupied by nepheline syenites. Mafic and ultramafic rocks in this intrusion often contain potassium feldspar (olivine monzonites and monzonites). Gabbroids are characterized by rhythmic layering expressed in the alternation of leucocratic layers predominantly composed of plagioclase and melanocratic layers with pyroxenes, olivine, titanomagnetite and ilmenite. The rocks of the pluton are enriched in highly incompatible elements by comparison with moderately incompatible elements: average primitive mantle normalized La/Lu ratio is 18.3. At the same time, all the rocks from Elet-Ozero massif including the most primitive ones (high Mg-numbers and high Ni contents) exhibit distinct positive Ba anomaly: mean chondrite normalized Ba/Th ratio is 15.3 (both elements have similar incompatibility-[1]). Enrichment of parent magma in Ba is also confirmed by the presence of high-Ba feldspars and micas in some samples of gabbroids. The most Ba-rich feldspar contains 75% of celsian component: K0.09Na0.04Ca0.008Sr0.04Ba0.75Al1.73Fe0.14Si2.20O8. Ba is a fluid mobile incompatible lithophile element that is probably the most sensitive indicator of subduction fluid addition to the mantle wedge. Thus, positive Ba anomaly suggests input of subduction related component into the source of Elet-Ozero magma. The presence of subduction related material in the lithosphere of Karelian craton has been proposed on the basis of Os isotope studies of mantle xenoliths from Finnish kimberlites [2]. The age of this subduction event is similar to the age of Elet-Ozero pluton. On the other hand, there are certain arguments in favor of connection of Elet-Ozero intrusive complex with mantle plume activity. In particular it

  1. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  2. Assessment of acid rock drainage pollutants release in the uranium mining site of Poços de Caldas--Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, H M; Franklin, M R

    2001-01-01

    We compared three different techniques to assess acid drainage occurrence connected to pyritic waste rock piles at a uranium mining and milling site in Poços de Caldas--Brazil: (1) mass balance calculations, (2) column leaching experiments and (3) geochemical modelling. The study site was chosen because all the drainage coming from the pile is collected in one holding pond and a huge database (monitoring program) was available. The three independent methods predicted similar values for the intrinsic oxidation rate (IOR) (about 10(-9) kg m-3 s-1). We estimate the total time for consumption of all oxidizable material in the dump to be greater than 500 years. Geochemical model results showed a good agreement between predicted sulphate concentrations in relation to those found in the waste pile drainage, although the Al values were overestimated and pH values were underestimated. PMID:11379073

  3. Exploration of remediation of acid rock drainage with clinoptilolite as sorbent in a slurry bubble column for both heavy metal capture and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cui, Heping; Li, Loretta Y; Grace, John R

    2006-10-01

    Preliminary work was carried out to explore a novel process for high-efficiency high-capacity remediation of acid rock drainage. Zn and other metal ions were adsorbed and desorbed in a laboratory Plexiglas slurry bubble column with natural clinoptilolite particles as sorbent. The results indicate that both adsorption and desorption in this medium have considerable advantages over those in the packed beds and rotating columns, leading to faster batch adsorption and desorption, as well as greater uptake of zinc. The adsorption order of clinoptilolite particles to different metal ions appeared to be Fe>Al>Cu>Zn>Mg>Mn on the basis of normalized concentrations. Smaller particles had significantly higher capacity and rates of the adsorption than larger particles for the same operating conditions. PMID:16962631

  4. Geochemistry and zircon U-Pb-Hf isotopes of the granitoids of Baolidao and Halatu plutons in Sonidzuoqi area, Inner Mongolia: Implications for petrogenesis and geodynamic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuansheng; Li, Wenbo; Xu, Cheng; Zhong, Richen; Zhu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The Baolidao and Halatu plutons are located in the Northern Orogenic Belt (NOB) in Sonidzuoqi area of Inner Mongolia, which has an important significance for the tectonic evolution of Xing-Meng Orogenic Belt (XMOB). The two plutons have been intensively studied but the conclusions are still controversial. Combined with the previous study, this paper gives new geological data about the two correlative plutons for gaining a better understanding of their petrogenesis and the geodynamic setting. The Baolidao granitoids contain two different series, calc-alkaline series mainly formed in the Ordovician and high K calc-alkaline series mainly formed in the Carboniferous. The Halatu granites are formed in the Triassic and belong to high-K calc-alkaline series. This study got the zircon U-Pb ages of 316-322 Ma for the Baolidao granitoids and 233 ± 2 Ma for the Halatu syenogranites, respectively. In the tectonic discrimination diagrams, they mainly fall into the area of post-orogenic granites (POG). Hf isotopic analyses for the Baolidao granitoids (Sample BLD-1 and 3) shows εHf (t) = 3.0-14.0, with two-stage Hf model age (TDM2) of 436-1138 Ma. The Halatu syenogranite (Sample HLT-1) also shows a depleted εHf (t) = 3.8-8.2, with TDM2 of 741-1024 Ma, suggesting the major involvement of juvenile crustal components. The various εHf values of the Carboniferous Baolidao and Triassic Halatu granitoids indicates a hybrid magma source of juvenile material with old crustal component, and the εHf (t) values decrease from the Carboniferous to Triassic, suggesting the increasing proportion of old continental material during this period. Combined with the regional geology, the Carboniferous Baolidao granitoids are possibly not arc rocks, but originated from the post-collisional setting. The Triassic Halatu granites were formed in the subsequently extensional environment.

  5. Mineral potential of selected felsic plutons in the eastern and southeastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    1983-01-01

    Most of the plutons studied are similar to metallogenically specialized granites described elsewhere in the world and found associated with deposits of tin, tungsten, or molybdenum and other rare metals. Only four of the plutons, the Sitarah, Tarban, and Gaharra monzogranites and the Bwana granite, contained highly anomalous amounts of tin, tungsten, or molybdenum and altered zones- and (or) numerous quartz veins and otherwise appeared to have noteworthy mineral potential. Additional work on at least these four plutons is suggested.

  6. Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes during adsorption onto amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide: Experimental mixing of acid rock drainage and ambient river water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Borrok, D.M.; Wanty, R.B.; Ridley, W.I.

    2008-01-01

    Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes during adsorption onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide is examined in experimental mixtures of metal-rich acid rock drainage and relatively pure river water and during batch adsorption experiments using synthetic ferrihydrite. A diverse set of Cu- and Zn-bearing solutions was examined, including natural waters, complex synthetic acid rock drainage, and simple NaNO3 electrolyte. Metal adsorption data are combined with isotopic measurements of dissolved Cu (65Cu/63Cu) and Zn (66Zn/64Zn) in each of the experiments. Fractionation of Cu and Zn isotopes occurs during adsorption of the metal onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide. The adsorption data are modeled successfully using the diffuse double layer model in PHREEQC. The isotopic data are best described by a closed system, equilibrium exchange model. The fractionation factors (??soln-solid) are 0.99927 ?? 0.00008 for Cu and 0.99948 ?? 0.00004 for Zn or, alternately, the separation factors (??soln-solid) are -0.73 ?? 0.08??? for Cu and -0.52 ?? 0.04??? for Zn. These factors indicate that the heavier isotope preferentially adsorbs onto the oxyhydroxide surface, which is consistent with shorter metal-oxygen bonds and lower coordination number for the metal at the surface relative to the aqueous ion. Fractionation of Cu isotopes also is greater than that for Zn isotopes. Limited isotopic data for adsorption of Cu, Fe(II), and Zn onto amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide suggest that isotopic fractionation is related to the intrinsic equilibrium constants that define aqueous metal interactions with oxyhydroxide surface sites. Greater isotopic fractionation occurs with stronger metal binding by the oxyhydroxide with Cu > Zn > Fe(II).

  7. Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeast United States-Southern Piedmont subregion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    A literature study was conducted on the geology of the Southern Piedmont province in the states of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The purpose was to identify geologic areas potentially suitable for containment of a repository for the long-term isolation of solidified radioactive waste. The crystalline rocks of the Southern Piedmont province range in age from Precambrian to Paleozoic, and are predominantly slates, phyllites, argillites, schists, metavolcanics, gneisses, gabbros, and granites. These rock units were classified as either favorable, potentially favorable, or unfavorable as potential study areas based on an evaluation of the geologic, hydrologic, and geotechnical characteristics. No socio-economic factors were considered. Rocks subjected to multiple periods of deformation and metamorphism, or described as highly fractured, or of limited areal extent were generally ranked as unfavorable. Potentially favorable rocks are primarily the high-grade metamorphic gneisses and granites. Sixteen areas were classified as being favorable for additional study. These areas are primarily large igneous granite plutons as follows: the Petersburg granite in Virginia; the Rolesville-Castallia, Churchland, and Landis plutons in North Carolina; the Liberty Hill, Winnsboro, and Ogden plutons in South Carolina; and the Siloam, Elberton, and six unnamed granite plutons in Georgia.

  8. Geochemistry of granitoid rocks from the western Superior Province: Evidence for 2- and 3-stage crustal evolution models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beakhouse, G. P.; errane) are discussed.

    1986-01-01

    The Superior Province is divisible into subprovinces that can be classified as greenstone-tonalite, paragneiss, or batholitic terranes and are distinguished by differences in lithologic proportions, metamorphic grade, and structural style. The origin and significance of contrasting geochemical characteristics of plutonic rocks from the Winnipeg River subprovince (a batholithic terrane) and the Wabigoon subprovince (a greenstone-tonalite terrane) are discussed.

  9. Genesis of platinum-bearing ultrabasic massifs in the plutonic chambers: evidence from melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, V.; Prikhod'ko, V.

    2012-04-01

    Platinum-bearing ultramafic massifs occur as bodies of concentrically zonal inner structures due to the successive replacement of dunite with pyroxenite and gabbro from their cores to margins. A most important peculiarity of such massifs is their dunite cores, to which commercial Pt deposits are related. There are a different opinions about genesis of these massifs and geological, petrological, geochemical methods not always can solve this question. We found melt inclusions in Cr-spinel from dunites of the platinum-bearing Konder and Inagli massifs (Siberian Platform) and this provides direct evidence of the participation of magmatic systems in the crystallization of ultrabasic rocks. Contents of most major chemical components in the heated and quenched melt inclusions are close to those in biotite-pyroxene picrite and this testifies dunite crystallization from ultrabasic alkaline magma. Ion probe analyses of melt inclusions in Cr-spinel yielded relatively high water concentration in ultrabasic melts of the Konder (0.45-0.53 wt %) and Inagli (up to 0.63 wt %) massifs. These data are generally close to the water contents in magma that produced dunites of ophiolites (0.58-0.65 wt %) (Simonov et al., 2009). The REE patterns of inclusions in Cr-spinel from the Konder and Inagli dunites show a pronounced negative slope with strong enrichment of LREE relative to HREE, as is typical of plume-related magmatic systems of oceanic islands and continental hotspots. The values of such indicator ratios as Nb/U (23.4), Zr/Nb (7.20), and Th/U (3.0) of inclusions practically exactly coincide with those of glasses from areas of continental hotspots (Naumov et al., 2010). At the Nb/Y-Zr/Y diagram the data points of the inclusions plot within the field of melts with a plume source. As a whole the patterns of trace elements and REE in melt inclusions in the Cr-spinel provide evidence that mantle plumes affected the magmatic events, that produced dunites of the studied platinum

  10. Isotopic disequilibrium among commingled hybrid magmas: Evidence for a two-stage magma mixing-commingling process in the Mt. Perkins Pluton, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, R.V.; Smith, E.I.; Reed, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    The syn-extensional Miocene Mt. Perkins pluton, northwestern Arizona, cooled rapidly due to its small size (6 km{sup 2}) and shallow emplacement (7.5 km) and allows examination of commingled rocks that experienced little isotopic exchange. Within the pluton, quartz dioritic to granodioritic host rocks (58-68 wt% SiO{sub 2}) enclose dioritic enclaves (50-55 wt% SiO{sub 2}) and a portion contains enclave-free granodiorite (70-74 wt% SiO{sub 2}). Fine-grained, crenulate enclave margins and a lack of advanced mixing structures (e.g., schlieren, flow fabrics, etc.) indicate an incipient stage of commingling. Isotopic variation between enclaves and enclosing host rocks is large (6.8 to 10.6 {epsilon}{sub Nd} units; 0.0036 to 0.0046 {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr units), suggesting isotopic disequilibrium. Comparison of an enclave core and rim suggests that isotopic exchange with the host magma was limited to the enclave rim. Enclaves and hosts collectively form a calc-alkaline suite exhibiting a large range of {epsilon}{sub Nd} (+1.2 to -12.5) and initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr (0.705 to 0.71267) with a correlation among {epsilon}{sub Nd}, initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, and major and trace element compositions. Modeling suggests that the suite formed by magma hybridization involving magma mixing accompanied by fractional crystallization. The magma mixing must have predated commingling at the present exposure level and indicates a larger mixing chamber at depth. Isotopic and trace element data suggests mixing end-members were asthenospheric mantle-derived mafic and crustal-derived felsic magmas. Fractional crystallization facilitated mixing by reducing the rheological contrasts between the mafic and felsic mixing end-members. 58 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Emplacement, Deformation and Exhumation of the Çatalda? Plutonic Complex: Implications for Neotectonic Evolution of NW Anatolia (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaci, O.; Unal, A.; Altunkaynak, S.; Billor, M. Z.; Georgiev, S.; Marchev, P.

    2013-12-01

    Located in the Eastern Mediterranean region, NW Anatolia experienced widespread Cenozoic magmatism and deformation following the collision between the Sakarya continent (SC) and Anatolide-Tauride platform (ATP) in the pre-middle Eocene. This magmatic activity produced plutonic associations that emplaced into the basement rocks of SC and ATP. Among these, Çataldağ plutonic complex (ÇPC) represents a key area to constrain the magmatic and tectonic evolution of NW Anatolia because it consists of S- and I type granitic bodies of different ages (Eo-Oligocene and Early Miocene, respectively) in the same area. Two granitic bodies forming ÇPC display different textural, structural and also geochemical features. The S-type granite (STG) is a concordant granitic body, and contact metamorphism is not observed around it. STG contains garnet-bearing two mica granites, migmatitic granites, strongly deformed milonitic and gneissic leucogranites. U-Pb zircon (LA-ICPMS) ages of STG yielded emplacement ages of 34-32 Ma. By contrast, I-type granitoid body (ITG) represents a discordant, shallow level intrusive body that intruded into the neighboring STG and metamorphic basement rocks. It is formed mainly from weakly deformed K-feldspar megacryst biotite-granodiorites and associated dykes. ITG samples display commonly porphyritic and rare graphic-granophyric textures. 39Ar/40Ar and zircon SHRIMP ages obtained from ITG yield cooling and emplacement ages between 22 and 20 Ma indicating rapid cooling of the ITG immediately after its emplacement. Petrographic investigations and microscopic scale structural features indicate that deformations in STG develop in two different temperature ranges: (1) ductile deformation developed at 500-450°C and (2) brittle deformation developed at <450°C. Both ductile deformation at depth and overlying brittle deformation at shallower depths determine top-to-the-north extensional deformation. 40Ar-39Ar dating of biotite and muscovites from STG yielded

  12. Shoshonitic liquid line of descent from diorite to granite: the Late Precambrian post-collisional Tismana pluton (South Carpathians, Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesne, Jean-Clair; Berza, Tudor; Liégeois, Jean-Paul; Vander Auwera, Jacqueline

    1998-12-01

    The post-collision late-kinematic Tismana pluton belongs to the shoshonitic series. It is part of a Late Precambrian basement within the Alpine Danubian nappes of the South Carpathians (Romania). This pluton displays an exceptionally complete range of compositions from ultramafic to felsic rocks (granites). Widespread mingling/mixing relationships at all scales give rise to a variety of facies. A liquid line of descent from the diorites to the granites is reconstructed by considering the variation in major and trace elements (REE, Sr, Rb, Ba, Nb, Zr, Hf, Zn, V, Co, Cr, U, Th, Ga, Pb) from 33 selected samples as well as mineral/melt equilibrium relationships. The first step of fractional crystallization is the separation from a monzodioritic parent magma of a peridotitic cumulate similar to the ultramafic rock found in the massif. A possible contamination by lower crustal mafic component takes place at this stage. The second step marks the appearance of apatite and Fe-Ti oxide minerals as liquidus phases, and the third step, saturation of zircon. Mixing by hybridisation of magmas produced at different stages of the evolution along the liquid line of descent is also operating (endo-hybridisation). As depicted by Nd and Sr isotopes, fractional crystallization was combined to an important early contamination by a mafic lower crust in a deep-seated magma chamber and to a later and mild contamination by a felsic medium crust in an intermediate chamber. The mingling essentially occurred during the final emplacement in the high-level magma chamber. The monzodioritic parent magma, identified by major and trace element modelling, is shown by Sr and Nd isotopes to have its source in the lithospheric mantle or in a juvenile mafic lower crust derived from it. The necessarily recent enrichment in K 2O and associated elements of the lithospheric mantle is likely to be related to the preceding Pan-African subduction period. The partial melting of this newly formed deep source has

  13. Zircon U-Pb age, Lu-Hf isotope, mineral chemistry and geochemistry of Sundamalai peralkaline pluton from the Salem Block, southern India: Implications for Cryogenian adakite-like magmatism in an aborted-rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renjith, M. L.; Santosh, M.; Li, Tang; Satyanarayanan, M.; Korakoppa, M. M.; Tsunogae, T.; Subba Rao, D. V.; Kesav Krishna, A.; Nirmal Charan, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Sundamalai peralkaline pluton is one among the Cryogenian alkaline plutons occurring in the Dharmapuri Rift Zone (DRZ) of the Salem Block in the Southern Granulite Terrane (SGT) of India. Here we present zircon U-Pb age and Lu-Hf isotopic composition, mineral chemistry and geochemistry of the pluton to explore the petrogenesis and geodynamic implications. Systematic modal variation of orthoclase, Na-plagioclase, Ca-amphibole (ferro-edenite and hastingsite) and quartz developed quartz-monzonite and granite litho units in the Sundamalai pluton. Thermometry based on amphibole-plagioclase pair suggests that the pluton was emplaced and solidified at around 4.6 kbar pressure with crystallization of the major phases between 748 and 661 °C. Estimated saturation temperature of zircon (712-698 °C) is also well within this range. However, apatite saturation occurred at higher temperatures between 835 and 870 °C, in contrast with monazite saturation (718-613 °C) that continued up to the late stage of crystallization. Estimated oxygen fugacity values (log fO2: -14 to -17) indicate high oxidation state for the magma that stabilized titanite and magnetite. The magmatic zircons from Sundamalai pluton yielded a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 832.6 ± 3.2 Ma. Geochemically, the Sundamalai rocks are high-K to shoshonitic, persodic (Na2O/K2O ratio > 1), silica-saturated (SiO2:65-72 wt.%), and peralkaline in composition (aluminum saturation index, ASI < 1; Alkalinity index, AI < 0). The initial magma was mildly metaluminous which evolved to strongly peralkaline as result of fractional crystallization (plagioclase effect) controlled differentiation between quartz-monzonite and granite. Both rock types have high content of Na2O (5.1-6.3 wt.%), Ba (350-2589 ppm) and Sr (264-1036 ppm); low content of Y (8.7-17 ppm) and Yb (0.96-1.69 ppm); elevated ratios of La/Yb (11-46) and Sr/Y (46-69) and are depleted in Ti, with a positive Sr anomaly suggesting an adakite-like composition and

  14. 'Tetl' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's trek through the 'Columbia Hills' at 'Gusev Crater,' shows the horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl.' Scientists hope to investigate this rock in more detail, aiming to determine whether the rock's layering is volcanic or sedimentary in origin. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba.' Spirit took this image on its 264th martian day, or sol (Sept. 29, 2004). This is a false-color composite image generated from the panoramic camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters.

  15. Formation mechanism of the lanthanide tetrad effect for a topaz- and amazonite-bearing leucogranite pluton in eastern Xinjiang, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-zhi; Liu, Si-hai; Gu, Lian-xing; Zhang, Zun-zhong; Lei, Ru-xiong

    2011-10-01

    The Baishitouquan (BST) pluton is a topaz- and amazonite-bearing leucogranite intrusion located in the Middle Tianshan orogen of Xinjiang, northwestern China. This pluton exhibits five lithological zones gradational from the bottom upwards: leucogranite (zone-a), amazonite-bearing granite (zone-b), amazonite granite (zone-c), topaz-bearing amazonite grani