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Sample records for acidic protein expression

  1. Abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of Arabidopsis SR protein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Tiago M D; Carvalho, Raquel F; Richardson, Dale N; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  2. Abscisic Acid (ABA) Regulation of Arabidopsis SR Protein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Tiago M. D.; Carvalho, Raquel F.; Richardson, Dale N.; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  3. Expression of the whey acidic protein in transgenic pigs impairs mammary development.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Pursel, V G; Wilkinson, E; Wall, R J; Hennighausen, L

    1992-05-01

    The whey acidic protein has been found in milk of mice, rats, rabbits and camels, and its gene is expressed specifically in mammary tissue at late pregnancy and throughout lactation. A characteristic of whey acidic protein is the 'four-disulfide-core' signature which is also present in proteins involved in organ development. We have generated six lines of transgenic pigs which carry a mouse whey acidic protein transgene and express it at high levels in their mammary glands. Transgenic sows from three lines could not produce sufficient quantities of milk to support normal development of healthy offspring. This phenotype appears to be similar, if not identical, to the milchlos phenotype exhibited by mice expressing whey acidic protein transgenes. Mammary tissue from post-partum milchlos sows had an immature histological appearance, which was distinct from that observed during normal development or involution. Expression of the whey acidic protein transgene was found in mammary tissue from sexually immature pigs from milchlos lines, but not in sows from lines that appeared to lactate normally. We suggest that precocious synthesis of whey acidic protein impairs mammary development and function. Impaired mammary development due to inappropriate timing of whey acidic protein expression is consistent with the notion that proteins with the 'four-disulfide-core' signature participate in tissue formation. PMID:1284481

  4. RNA-binding protein QKI regulates Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Radomska, Katarzyna J; Halvardson, Jonatan; Reinius, Björn; Lindholm Carlström, Eva; Emilsson, Lina; Feuk, Lars; Jazin, Elena

    2013-04-01

    Linkage, association and expression studies previously pointed to the human QKI, KH domain containing, RNA-binding (QKI) as a candidate gene for schizophrenia. Functional studies of the mouse orthologue Qk focused mainly on its role in oligodendrocyte development and myelination, while its function in astroglia remained unexplored. Here, we show that QKI is highly expressed in human primary astrocytes and that its splice forms encode proteins targeting different subcellular localizations. Uncovering the role of QKI in astrocytes is of interest in light of growing evidence implicating astrocyte dysfunction in the pathogenesis of several disorders of the central nervous system. We selectively silenced QKI splice variants in human primary astrocytes and used RNA sequencing to identify differential expression and splice variant composition at the genome-wide level. We found that an mRNA expression of Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), encoding a major component of astrocyte intermediate filaments, was down-regulated after QKI7 splice variant silencing. Moreover, we identified a potential QKI-binding site within the 3' untranslated region of human GFAP. This sequence was not conserved between mice and humans, raising the possibility that GFAP is a target for QKI in humans but not rodents. Haloperidol treatment of primary astrocytes resulted in coordinated increases in QKI7 and GFAP expression. Taken together, our results provide the first link between QKI and GFAP, two genes with alterations previously observed independently in schizophrenic patients. Our findings for QKI, together with its well-known role in myelination, suggest that QKI is a hub regulator of glia function in humans.

  5. Regulation of collagenase gene expression by okadaic acid, an inhibitor of protein phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S J; Lafyatis, R; Kim, K Y; Angel, P; Fujiki, H; Karin, M; Sporn, M B; Roberts, A B

    1990-01-01

    Human collagenase gene expression is regulated transcriptionally and is inducible by various mitogens in many cell types. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of this response, we examined the effects on collagenase gene expression of okadaic acid, a non-12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type tumor promoter, which induces apparent "activation" of protein kinases by inhibition of protein phosphatases. Steady state levels of collagenase mRNA were markedly increased by okadaic acid treatment. We show that the AP-1 consensus sequence in the collagenase promoter is required for the induction of collagenase gene expression by okadaic acid, even though sequences upstream of the AP-1 consensus site have an additive effect. We also examined the regulation by okadaic acid of expression of the components of the AP-1 complex, c-fos and c-jun. c-fos expression is dramatically stimulated by okadaic acid, whereas c-jun expression is stimulated to a lesser extent. Induction of c-fos gene mRNA occurs through a region known to contain multiple regulatory elements. These results suggest that phosphorylation regulates collagenase gene expression mediated by an AP-1 binding site. Images PMID:1966042

  6. Calcium affecting protein expression in longan under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tengfei; Li, Yongyu; Ma, Cuilan; Qiu, Dongliang

    2015-08-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longana Lour. cv. Wulongling) of uniform one-aged seedlings grown in pots were selected to study specific proteins expressed in leaves under simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress and exogenous Ca(2+) regulation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results showed that there was a protein band specifically expressed under SiAR of pH 2.5 stress for 15 days with its molecular weight of about 23 kD. A 17 kD protein band specifically expressed after SiAR stress 5 days. Compared with pH 2.5, the pH 3.5 of SiAR made a less influence to protein expression. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) results showed that six new specific proteins including C4 (20.2 kD pI 6.0), F (24 kD pI 6.35), B3 (22.3 kD pI 6.35), B4 (23.5 kD pI 6.5), C5 (21.8 kD pI 5.6), and C6 (20.2 kD pI 5.6) specifically expressed. C4 always expressed during SiAR stress. F expressed under the stress of pH 2.5 for 15 days and expressed in all pH SiAR stress for 20 days. The expression of proteins including B3, C5, and C6 was related to pH value and stress intensity of SiAR. The expression of B4 resulted from synergistic effects of SiAR and Ca. The expression of G1 (Mr 19.3 kD, pI 4.5), G2 (Mr 17.8 kD, pI 4.65), G3 (Mr 16.6 kD, pI 4.6), and G4 (Mr 14.7 kD, pI 4.4) enhanced under the treatment of 5 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 2 mM chlorpromazine (CPZ). These proteins showed antagonistic effects and might be relative to the Ca-calmodulin (Ca-CaM) system of longan in response to SiAR stress.

  7. Calcium affecting protein expression in longan under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tengfei; Li, Yongyu; Ma, Cuilan; Qiu, Dongliang

    2015-08-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longana Lour. cv. Wulongling) of uniform one-aged seedlings grown in pots were selected to study specific proteins expressed in leaves under simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress and exogenous Ca(2+) regulation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results showed that there was a protein band specifically expressed under SiAR of pH 2.5 stress for 15 days with its molecular weight of about 23 kD. A 17 kD protein band specifically expressed after SiAR stress 5 days. Compared with pH 2.5, the pH 3.5 of SiAR made a less influence to protein expression. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) results showed that six new specific proteins including C4 (20.2 kD pI 6.0), F (24 kD pI 6.35), B3 (22.3 kD pI 6.35), B4 (23.5 kD pI 6.5), C5 (21.8 kD pI 5.6), and C6 (20.2 kD pI 5.6) specifically expressed. C4 always expressed during SiAR stress. F expressed under the stress of pH 2.5 for 15 days and expressed in all pH SiAR stress for 20 days. The expression of proteins including B3, C5, and C6 was related to pH value and stress intensity of SiAR. The expression of B4 resulted from synergistic effects of SiAR and Ca. The expression of G1 (Mr 19.3 kD, pI 4.5), G2 (Mr 17.8 kD, pI 4.65), G3 (Mr 16.6 kD, pI 4.6), and G4 (Mr 14.7 kD, pI 4.4) enhanced under the treatment of 5 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and 2 mM chlorpromazine (CPZ). These proteins showed antagonistic effects and might be relative to the Ca-calmodulin (Ca-CaM) system of longan in response to SiAR stress. PMID:25893616

  8. Effect of Psidium cattleianum leaf extract on Streptococcus mutans viability, protein expression and acid production.

    PubMed

    Brighenti, F L; Luppens, S B I; Delbem, A C B; Deng, D M; Hoogenkamp, M A; Gaetti-Jardim, E; Dekker, H L; Crielaard, W; ten Cate, J M

    2008-01-01

    Plants naturally produce secondary metabolites that can be used as antimicrobials. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Psidium cattleianum leaf extract on Streptococcus mutans. The extract (100%) was obtained by decoction of 100 g of leaves in 600 ml of deionized water. To assess killing, S. mutans biofilms were treated with water (negative control) or various extract dilutions [100, 50, 25% (v/v) in water] for 5 or 60 min. To evaluate the effect on protein expression, biofilms were exposed to water or 1.6% (v/v) extract for 120 min, proteins were extracted and submitted to 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. The effect of 1.6% (v/v) extract on acid production was determined by pH measurements and compared to a water control. Viability was similar after 5 min of treatment with the 100% extract or 60 min with the 50% extract (about 0.03% survival). There were no differences in viability between the biofilms exposed to the 25 or 50% extract after 60 min of treatment (about 0.02% survival). Treatment with the 1.6% extract significantly changed protein expression. The abundance of 24 spots was decreased compared to water (p < 0.05). The extract significantly inhibited acid production (p < 0.05). It is concluded that P. cattleianum leaf extract kills S. mutans grown in biofilms when applied at high concentrations. At low concentrations it inhibits S. mutans acid production and reduces the expression of proteins involved in general metabolism, glycolysis and lactic acid production.

  9. Induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in astrocytes by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Brahmachari, Saurav; Fung, Yiu K; Pahan, Kalipada

    2006-05-01

    Increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) represents astroglial activation and gliosis during neurodegeneration. However, the molecular mechanism behind increased expression of GFAP in astrocytes is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to explore the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the expression of GFAP. Bacterial lipopolysachharides (LPSs) induced the production of NO and the expression of GFAP in mouse primary astrocytes. Either a scavenger of NO [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO)] or an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase [l-N6-(I-iminoethyl)-lysine hydrochloride] blocked this induction of GFAP expression. Similarly, other inducers of NO production such as interferon-gamma, interleukin-1beta, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120, fibrillar amyloid beta peptides, and double-stranded RNA (polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid) also induced the expression of GFAP through NO. The role of NO in the expression of GFAP was supported further by increased expression of GFAP by S-nitroso glutathione (GSNO), an NO donor. Interestingly, inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) suppressed LPS- but not GSNO-induced expression of GFAP, suggesting that NO does not require NF-kappaB to induce GFAP and that NF-kappaB functions upstream of NO production. However, inhibition of LPS- and GSNO-induced expression of GFAP either by NS-2028 [a specific inhibitor of guanylate cyclase (GC)] or by KT5823 [a specific inhibitor of cGMP-activated protein kinase (PKG)], and induction of GFAP expression by either 8-Br cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP analog) or MY-5445 (a specific inhibitor of cGMP phosphodiesterase) suggests that NO induces GFAP via GC-cGMP-PKG. This study illustrates a novel biological role of NO in regulating the expression of GFAP in astrocytes through the GC-cGMP-PKG pathway that may participate in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Effects of Salvianolic Acid B on Protein Expression in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsong-Min; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Wu, Hua-Lin; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Su, Yan-Di; Wang, Hui-Lin; Wen, Hsin-Yun; Huang, Huey-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a pure water-soluble compound extracted from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae, has been reported to possess potential cardioprotective efficacy. To identify proteins or pathways by which Sal B might exert its protective activities on the cardiovascular system, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based comparative proteomics was performed, and proteins altered in their expression level after Sal B treatment were identified by MALDI-TOF MS/MS. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated at Sal B concentrations that can be reached in human plasma by pharmacological intervention. Results indicated that caldesmon, an actin-stabilizing protein, was downregulated in Sal B-exposed HUVECs. Proteins that showed increased expression levels upon Sal B treatment were vimentin, T-complex protein 1, protein disulfide isomerase, tropomyosin alpha, heat shock protein beta-1, UBX domain-containing protein 1, alpha enolase, and peroxiredoxin-2. Additionally, Sal B leads to increased phosphorylation of nucleophosmin in a dose-dependent manner and promotes proliferation of HUVECs. We found that Sal B exhibited a coordinated regulation of enzymes and proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, oxidative stress, and cell growth. Our investigation would provide understanding to the endothelium protection information of Sal B. PMID:21423689

  11. Expression Pattern of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Celiac Disease Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bottasso Arias, Natalia M.; García, Marina; Bondar, Constanza; Guzman, Luciana; Redondo, Agustina; Chopita, Nestor; Córsico, Betina; Chirdo, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals following exposure to dietary gluten. Severe changes at the intestinal mucosa observed in untreated CD patients are linked to changes in the level and in the pattern of expression of different genes. Fully differentiated epithelial cells express two isoforms of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs): intestinal and liver, IFABP and LFABP, respectively. These proteins bind and transport long chain fatty acids and also have other important biological roles in signaling pathways, particularly those related to PPARγ and inflammatory processes. Herein, we analyze the serum levels of IFABP and characterize the expression of both FABPs at protein and mRNA level in small intestinal mucosa in severe enteropathy and normal tissue. As a result, we observed higher levels of circulating IFABP in untreated CD patients compared with controls and patients on gluten-free diet. In duodenal mucosa a differential FABPs expression pattern was observed with a reduction in mRNA levels compared to controls explained by the epithelium loss in severe enteropathy. In conclusion, we report changes in FABPs' expression pattern in severe enteropathy. Consequently, there might be alterations in lipid metabolism and the inflammatory process in the small intestinal mucosa. PMID:26346822

  12. Isotopomer distributions in amino acids from a highly expressed protein as a proxy for those from total protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Afshan; Shaikh, Afshan S.; Tang, Yinjie; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D.

    2008-06-27

    {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis provides valuable information about bacterial physiology. Though many biological processes rely on the synergistic functions of microbial communities, study of individual organisms in a mixed culture using existing flux analysis methods is difficult. Isotopomer-based flux analysis typically relies on hydrolyzed amino acids from a homogeneous biomass. Thus metabolic flux analysis of a given organism in a mixed culture requires its separation from the mixed culture. Swift and efficient cell separation is difficult and a major hurdle for isotopomer-based flux analysis of mixed cultures. Here we demonstrate the use of a single highly-expressed protein to analyze the isotopomer distribution of amino acids from one organism. Using the model organism E. coli expressing a plasmid-borne, his-tagged Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), we show that induction of GFP does not affect E. coli growth kinetics or the isotopomer distribution in nine key metabolites. Further, the isotopomer labeling patterns of amino acids derived from purified GFP and total cell protein are indistinguishable, indicating that amino acids from a purified protein can be used to infer metabolic fluxes of targeted organisms in a mixed culture. This study provides the foundation to extend isotopomer-based flux analysis to study metabolism of individual strains in microbial communities.

  13. Isotopomer distributions in amino acids from a highly expressed protein as a proxy for those from total protein.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Afshan S; Tang, Yinjie J; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-02-01

    13C-Based metabolic flux analysis provides valuable information about bacterial physiology. Though many biological processes rely on the synergistic functions of microbial communities, study of individual organisms in a mixed culture using existing flux analysis methods is difficult. Isotopomer-based flux analysis typically relies on hydrolyzed amino acids from a homogeneous biomass. Thus, metabolic flux analysis of a given organism in a mixed culture requires its separation from the mixed culture. Swift and efficient cell separation is difficult and a major hurdle for isotopomer-based flux analysis of mixed cultures. Here we demonstrate the use of a single highly expressed protein to analyze the isotopomer distribution of amino acids from one organism. Using the model organism Escherichia coli expressing a plasmid-borne, His-tagged green fluorescent protein (GFP), we show that induction of GFP does not affect E. coli growth kinetics or the isotopomer distribution in nine key metabolites. Further, the isotopomer labeling patterns of amino acids derived from purified GFP and total cell protein are indistinguishable, indicating that amino acids from a purified protein can be used to infer metabolic fluxes of targeted organisms in a mixed culture. This study provides the foundation to extend isotopomer-based flux analysis to study metabolism of individual strains in microbial communities.

  14. Oleic acid enhances G protein coupled receptor 43 expression in bovine intramuscular adipocytes but not in subcutaneous adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Chung, K Y; Smith, S B; Choi, S H; Johnson, B J

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesized that fatty acids would differentially affect G protein coupled receptor (GPR) 43 mRNA expression and GPR43 protein concentrations in bovine intramuscular (IM) and subcutaneous (SC) adipocytes. The GPR43 protein was detected in bovine liver, pancreas, and semimembranosus (MUS) muscle in samples taken at slaughter. Similarly, GPR43 protein levels were similar in IM adipose tissue and SM muscle but was barely detectable in SC adipose tissue. Primary cultures of IM and SC stromal vascular cells were isolated from bovine adipose tissues. Oleic acid (100 μ) stimulated PPARγ gene expression and decreased stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) gene expression but had no effect on GPR43 gene expression, which was readily detectable in both IM and SC adipocytes. Differentiation cocktail (Diff; 10 μ insulin, 4 μ dexamethasone, and 10 μ ciglitizone) stimulated CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and PPARγ gene expression in SC but not IM adipocytes, but Diff increased SCD gene expression in both cell types. Linoleic acid (10 µ) increased PPARγ gene expression relative to Diff cocktail in SC adipocytes, whereas linoleic acid and α-linolenic decreased SCD gene expression relative to control adipocytes and adipocytes incubated with Diff ( < 0.05). Increasing concentrations of oleic acid (1, 10, 100, and 500 μM) increased GPR43 protein and mRNA expression in IM but not SC adipocytes. These data indicated that oleic acid alters mRNA and protein concentrations of GPR43 in bovine IM adipocytes. PMID:27285685

  15. Disrupting protein expression with Peptide Nucleic Acids reduces infection by obligate intracellular Rickettsia.

    PubMed

    Pelc, Rebecca S; McClure, Jennifer C; Kaur, Simran J; Sears, Khandra T; Rahman, M Sayeedur; Ceraul, Shane M

    2015-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs) are single-stranded synthetic nucleic acids with a pseudopeptide backbone in lieu of the phosphodiester linked sugar and phosphate found in traditional oligos. PNA designed complementary to the bacterial Shine-Dalgarno or start codon regions of mRNA disrupts translation resulting in the transient reduction in protein expression. This study examines the use of PNA technology to interrupt protein expression in obligate intracellular Rickettsia sp. Their historically intractable genetic system limits characterization of protein function. We designed PNA targeting mRNA for rOmpB from Rickettsia typhi and rickA from Rickettsia montanensis, ubiquitous factors important for infection. Using an in vitro translation system and competitive binding assays, we determined that our PNAs bind target regions. Electroporation of R. typhi and R. montanensis with PNA specific to rOmpB and rickA, respectively, reduced the bacteria's ability to infect host cells. These studies open the possibility of using PNA to suppress protein synthesis in obligate intracellular bacteria.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in β-aminobutyric acid enhanced Arabidopsis thaliana tolerance to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingwu; Jiang, Xinwu; Shi, Wuliang; Chen, Juan; Pei, Zhenming; Zheng, Hailei

    2011-05-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental issue that has seriously destroyed forest ecosystems. As a highly effective and broad-spectrum plant resistance-inducing agent, β-aminobutyric acid could elevate the tolerance of Arabidopsis when subjected to simulated acid rain. Using comparative proteomic strategies, we analyzed 203 significantly varied proteins of which 175 proteins were identified responding to β-aminobutyric acid in the absence and presence of simulated acid rain. They could be divided into ten groups according to their biological functions. Among them, the majority was cell rescue, development and defense-related proteins, followed by transcription, protein synthesis, folding, modification and destination-associated proteins. Our conclusion is β-aminobutyric acid can lead to a large-scale primary metabolism change and simultaneously activate antioxidant system and salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid signaling pathways. In addition, β-aminobutyric acid can reinforce physical barriers to defend simulated acid rain stress.

  17. Structure and expression of an unusually acidic matrix protein of pearl oyster shells.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Daiki; Sarashina, Isao; Endo, Kazuyoshi

    2004-08-01

    We report identification and characterization of the unusually acidic molluscan shell matrix protein Aspein, which may have important roles in calcium carbonate biomineralization. The Aspein gene (aspein) encodes a sequence of 413 amino acids, including a high proportion of Asp (60.4%), Gly (16.0%), and Ser (13.2%), and the predicted isoelectric point is 1.45; this is the most acidic of all the molluscan shell matrix proteins sequenced so far, or probably even of all known proteins on earth. The main body of Aspein is occupied by (Asp)(2-10) sequences punctuated with Ser-Gly dipeptides. RT-PCR demonstrated that the transcript of aspein is expressed at the outer edge of the mantle, corresponding to the calcitic prismatic layer, but not at the inner part of the mantle, corresponding to the aragonitic nacreous layer. Our findings and previous in vitro experiments taken together suggest that Aspein is responsible for directed formation of calcite in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata.

  18. Onchocerca spp: a "family" of secreted acidic proteins expressed by infective larvae in blackflies.

    PubMed

    Bianco, A E; Wu, Y; Jenkins, R E

    1995-11-01

    Biosynthetic labeling of developing larvae of Onchocerca in blackflies has been used to characterize a group of stage-specific, secreted proteins produced by vector-stage parasites. These are highly acidic molecules (pI 4.4-5.1) present in at least three members of the genus (O. volvulus, O. lienalis, O. ochengi) that exhibit minor heterogeneity among species in apparent molecular mass (between 18 and 23 kDa). In O. volvulus, there are two polypeptides that run as a doublet of 18 and 20 kDa. In O. lienalis and O. ochengi, single polypeptides of 23 and 20 kDa were detected. The processes of synthesis and secretion appear to be temperature-sensitive and dissociated events. Experiments with O. volvulus in Simulium damnosum sl revealed that synthesis is initiated in second stage larvae and increases in infective-stage parasites: Secretion occurs when larvae leave the vector and enter the phase of development associated with the vertebrate host. Third-stage larvae of O. lienalis were shown to continue to express and accumulate the 23-kDa protein with age. The primary organ of secretion, as indicated by dissection, was the glandular esophagus. These data point to an important biological role for this group of molecules and suggest that they may belong to a family of related products. Because they have the distinctive characteristics of being secreted larval acidic proteins, we propose the acronym SLAP pending further insights into their functional properties.

  19. Structure and expression of the Drosophila ubiquitin-52-amino-acid fusion-protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, H L; Barrio, R; Arribas, C

    1992-01-01

    Ubiquitin belongs to a multigene family. In Drosophila two members of this family have been previously described. We report here the organization and expression of a third member, the DUb52 gene, isolated by screening a Drosophila melanogaster genomic library. This gene encodes an ubiquitin monomer fused to a 52-amino acid extension protein. There are no introns interrupting the coding sequence. Recently, it has been described that this extension encodes a ribosomal protein in Saccharomyces, Dictyostelium, and Arabidopsis. The present results show that the 5' regulatory region of DUb52 shares common features with the ribosomal protein genes of Drosophila, Xenopus and mouse, including GC- and pyrimidine-rich regions. Moreover, sequences similar to the consensus Ribo-box in Neurospora crassa have been identified. Furthermore, a sequence has been found that is similar to the binding site for the TFIIIA distal element factor from Xenopus laevis. The DUb52 gene is transcribed to a 0.9 kb mRNA that is expressed constitutively throughout development and is particularly abundant in ovaries. In addition, the DUb52 gene has been found to be preferentially transcribed in exponentially growing Drosophila cells. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1381584

  20. Glial fibrillary acidic protein isoform expression in plaque related astrogliosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Willem; Middeldorp, Jinte; Kooijman, Lieneke; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Kooi, Evert-Jan; Moeton, Martina; Freriks, Michel; Mizee, Mark R; Hol, Elly M

    2014-03-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Different GFAP isoforms have been identified that are differentially expressed by specific subpopulations of astrocytes and that impose different properties to the intermediate filament network. We studied transcript levels and protein expression patterns of all known GFAP isoforms in human hippocampal AD tissue at different stages of the disease. Ten different transcripts for GFAP isoforms were detected at different abundancies. Transcript levels of most isoforms increased with AD progression. GFAPδ-immunopositive astrocytes were observed in subgranular zone, hilus, and stratum-lacunosum-moleculare. GFAPδ-positive cells also stained for GFAPα. In AD donors, astrocytes near plaques displayed increased staining of both GFAPα and GFAPδ. The reading-frame-shifted isoform, GFAP(+1), staining was confined to a subset of astrocytes with long processes, and their number increased in the course of AD. In conclusion, the various GFAP isoforms show differential transcript levels and are upregulated in a concerted manner in AD. The GFAP(+1) isoform defines a unique subset of astrocytes, with numbers increasing with AD progression. These data indicate the need for future exploration of underlying mechanisms concerning the functions of GFAPδ and GFAP(+1) isoforms in astrocytes and their possible role in AD pathology.

  1. Protein A-mouse acidic mammalian chitinase-V5-His expressed in periplasmic space of Escherichia coli possesses chitinase functions comparable to CHO-expressed protein.

    PubMed

    Kashimura, Akinori; Okawa, Kazuaki; Ishikawa, Kotarou; Kida, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Kokoro; Matsushima, Yudai; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) has been shown to be associated with asthma in mouse models, allergic inflammation and food processing. Here, we describe an E. coli-expression system that allows for the periplasmic production of active AMCase fused to Protein A at the N-terminus and V5 epitope and (His)6 tag (V5-His) at the C-terminus (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His) in E. coli. The mouse AMCase cDNA was cloned into the vector pEZZ18, which is an expression vector containing the Staphylococcus Protein A promoter, with the signal sequence and truncated form of Protein A for extracellular expression in E. coli. Most of the Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was present in the periplasmic space with chitinolytic activity, which was measured using a chromogenic substrate, 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside. The Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was purified from periplasmic fractions using an IgG Sepharose column followed by a Ni Sepharose chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a robust peak of activity with a maximum observed activity at pH 2.0, where an optimal temperature was 54°C. When this protein was preincubated between pH 1.0 and pH 11.0 on ice for 1 h, full chitinolytic activity was retained. This protein was also heat-stable till 54°C, both at pH 2.0 and 7.0. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant AMCase against 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. Furthermore, the recombinant AMCase bound to chitin beads, cleaved colloidal chitin and released mainly N,N'-diacetylchitobiose fragments. Thus, the E. coli-expressed Protein A-mouse AMCase-V5-His fusion protein possesses chitinase functions comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. This recombinant protein can be used to elucidate detailed biomedical functions of the mouse AMCase.

  2. Protein A-Mouse Acidic Mammalian Chitinase-V5-His Expressed in Periplasmic Space of Escherichia coli Possesses Chitinase Functions Comparable to CHO-Expressed Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Yuta; Iwabuchi, Kokoro; Matsushima, Yudai; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2013-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) has been shown to be associated with asthma in mouse models, allergic inflammation and food processing. Here, we describe an E. coli-expression system that allows for the periplasmic production of active AMCase fused to Protein A at the N-terminus and V5 epitope and (His)6 tag (V5-His) at the C-terminus (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His) in E. coli. The mouse AMCase cDNA was cloned into the vector pEZZ18, which is an expression vector containing the Staphylococcus Protein A promoter, with the signal sequence and truncated form of Protein A for extracellular expression in E. coli. Most of the Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was present in the periplasmic space with chitinolytic activity, which was measured using a chromogenic substrate, 4-nitrophenyl N,N′-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside. The Protein A-AMCase-V5-His was purified from periplasmic fractions using an IgG Sepharose column followed by a Ni Sepharose chromatography. The recombinant protein showed a robust peak of activity with a maximum observed activity at pH 2.0, where an optimal temperature was 54°C. When this protein was preincubated between pH 1.0 and pH 11.0 on ice for 1 h, full chitinolytic activity was retained. This protein was also heat-stable till 54°C, both at pH 2.0 and 7.0. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant AMCase against 4-nitrophenyl N,N′-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. Furthermore, the recombinant AMCase bound to chitin beads, cleaved colloidal chitin and released mainly N,N′-diacetylchitobiose fragments. Thus, the E. coli-expressed Protein A-mouse AMCase-V5-His fusion protein possesses chitinase functions comparable to the CHO-expressed AMCase. This recombinant protein can be used to elucidate detailed biomedical functions of the mouse AMCase. PMID:24244337

  3. Uncoupling protein 3 expression levels influence insulin sensitivity, fatty acid oxidation, and related signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Senese, Rosalba; Valli, Vivien; Moreno, Maria; Lombardi, Assunta; Busiello, Rosa Anna; Cioffi, Federica; Silvestri, Elena; Goglia, Fernando; Lanni, Antonia; de Lange, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Controversy exists on whether uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) positively or negatively influences insulin sensitivity in vivo, and the underlying signaling pathways have been scarcely studied. We studied how a progressive reduction in UCP3 expression (using UCP3 +/+, UCP3 +/-, and UCP3 -/- mice) modulates insulin sensitivity and related metabolic parameters. In order to further validate our observations, we also studied animals in which insulin resistance was induced by administration of a high-fat diet (HFD). In UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice, gastrocnemius muscle Akt/protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) (serine 473) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (threonine 171) phosphorylation, and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) membrane levels were reduced compared to UCP3 +/+ mice. The HOMA-IR index (insulin resistance parameter) was increased both in the UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice. In these mice, insulin administration normalized Akt/PKB phosphorylation between genotypes while AMPK phosphorylation was further reduced, and sarcolemmal GLUT4 levels were induced but did not reach control levels. Furthermore, non-insulin-stimulated muscle fatty acid oxidation and the expression of several involved genes both in muscle and in liver were reduced. HFD administration induced insulin resistance in UCP3 +/+ mice and the aforementioned parameters resulted similar to those of chow-fed UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice. In conclusion, high-fat-diet-induced insulin resistance in wild-type mice mimics that of chow-fed UCP3 +/- and UCP3 -/- mice showing that progressive reduction of UCP3 levels results in insulin resistance. This is accompanied by decreased fatty acid oxidation and a less intense Akt/PKB and AMPK signaling.

  4. Structure and expression of the Drosophila ubiquitin-80-amino-acid fusion-protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, R; del Arco, A; Cabrera, H L; Arribas, C

    1994-01-01

    In the fruitfly Drosophila, as in all eukaryotes examined so far, some ubiquitin-coding sequences appear fused to unrelated open reading frames. Two of these fusion genes have been previously described (the homologues of UBI1-UBI2 and UBI4 in yeast), and we report here the organization and expression of a third one, the DUb80 gene (the homologue of UBI3 in yeast). This gene encodes a ubiquitin monomer fused to an 80-amino-acid extension which is homologous with the ribosomal protein encoded by the UB13 gene. The 5' regulatory region of DUb80 shares common features with another ubiquitin fusion gene, DUb52, and with the ribosomal protein genes of Drosophila, Xenopus and mouse. We also find helix-loop-helix protein-binding sequences (E-boxes). The DUb80 gene is transcribed to a 0.9 kb mRNA which is particularly abundant under conditions of high protein synthesis, such as in ovaries and exponentially growing cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8068011

  5. Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression during HSV-1 infection in mouse cornea.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ge; Chen, Hao; Song, Zicheng; Yin, Hongmei; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Min

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the dynamic expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a common neural factor, in cornea and stromal cells during herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection. For each anesthetized BALB/c mouse, the cornea in one eye was inoculated with 1 × 10(5) plaque forming unit (PFU) of HSV-1, while the contralateral cornea was mock-infected as the control. At different timepoints post-infection, corneal lesion examination by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, corneal histology and HSV-1 DNA detection by real-time PCR were performed to estimate the different stage of HSV-1 infection. The expression of GFAP was examined using real-time PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. After infected with HSV-1 for 15 days, the mouse corneas began to become clear, the corneal pathology recovered to normal, and HSV-1 DNA almost could not be detected, indicating that HSV-1 was entering a relative quiescent state from the acute infection. The expression of GFAP in HSV-1-infected corneas was comparatively low on day 3, increased slightly on day 7, and further increased thereafter, higher than that in mock-infected corneas on day 15. GFAP detection on the cellular level also indicated that the expression was downregulated in acute HSV-1 infection. GFAP was found to be downregulated in HSV-1 acute infection in cornea and upregulated in late stage, suggesting that GFAP might play some role during HSV-1 infection in cornea.

  6. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Induces Hepatic Steatosis by Enhancing the Expression of Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun-li; Peng, Xian-e; Zhu, Yi-bing; Yan, Xiao-li; Chen, Wan-nan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been implicated as a potential trigger of hepatic steatosis although molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of HBV-associated hepatic steatosis still remain elusive. Our prior work has revealed that the expression level of liver fatty acid binding protein 1 (FABP1), a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was elevated in HBV-producing hepatoma cells. In this study, the effects of HBV X protein (HBx) mediated FABP1 regulation on hepatic steatosis and the underlying mechanism were determined. mRNA and protein levels of FABP1 were measured by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) and Western blotting. HBx-mediated FABP1 regulation was evaluated by luciferase assay, coimmunoprecipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Hepatic lipid accumulation was measured by using Oil-Red-O staining and the triglyceride level. It was found that expression of FABP1 was increased in HBV-producing hepatoma cells, the sera of HBV-infected patients, and the sera and liver tissues of HBV-transgenic mice. Ectopic overexpression of HBx resulted in upregulation of FABP1 in HBx-expressing hepatoma cells, whereas HBx abolishment reduced FABP1 expression. Mechanistically, HBx activated the FABP1 promoter in an HNF3β-, C/EBPα-, and PPARα-dependent manner, in which HBx increased the gene expression of HNF3β and physically interacted with C/EBPα and PPARα. On the other hand, knockdown of FABP1 remarkably blocked lipid accumulation both in long-chain free fatty acids treated HBx-expressing HepG2 cells and in a high-fat diet-fed HBx-transgenic mice. Therefore, FABP1 is a key driver gene in HBx-induced hepatic lipid accumulation via regulation of HNF3β, C/EBPα, and PPARα. FABP1 may represent a novel target for treatment of HBV-associated hepatic steatosis. IMPORTANCE Accumulating evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies has indicated that chronic HBV infection is associated with hepatic steatosis. However, the molecular mechanism

  7. Increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Avola, Roberto; Di Tullio, Maria Antonietta; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Vitaioli, Lucia; Amenta, Francesco

    2004-05-01

    Astrogliosis, consisting in astroglial proliferation and increased expression of the specific cytoskeletal protein glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) is common in several situations of brain damage. Arterial hypertension, which induces cerebrovascular changes, can cause also brain damage, neurodegeneration and dementia (vascular dementia). This study was designed to assess astroglial reaction in different brain areas (frontal cortex, occipital cortex, hippocampus and striatum) of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) in the pre-hypertensive phase (2 months of age), in the developing phase of hypertension (4 months of age) and in established hypertension (6 months of age). SHR were compared to age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Analysis included reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of GFAP mRNA, GFAP immunochemistry (Western blot analysis) and immunohistochemistry. A significant increase of GFAP mRNA and an increase of GFAP immunoreactivity were noticeable in different brain areas of SHR compared to normotensive WKY rats at 6, but not at 2 or 4 months of age. Immunohistochemistry revealed a numerical augmentation (hyperplasia) and an increase in size (hypertrophy) of GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes in frontal cortex, occipital cortex and striatum of SHR. In the hippocampus of SHR only a numerical increase of GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes was found. These finding demonstrating the occurrence of astrogliosis in the brain of SHR with established hypertension suggest that hypertension induces a condition of brain suffering enough to increase biosynthesis and expression of GFAP similarly as reported in several neurodegenerative disorders and in brain ischemia.

  8. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-Expressing Glia in the Mouse Lung.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Mier, Gabriela B; Buckwalter, Marion S

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic nerves regulate important functions in visceral organs, including the lung. The postganglionic portion of these nerves is ensheathed by glial cells known as non-myelinating Schwann cells. In the brain, glia play important functional roles in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, and maintenance of the blood brain barrier. Similarly, enteric glia are now known to have analogous roles in gastrointestinal neurotransmission, inflammatory response, and barrier formation. In contrast to this, very little is known about the function of glia in other visceral organs. Like the gut, the lung forms a barrier between airborne pathogens and the bloodstream, and autonomic lung innervation is known to affect pulmonary inflammation and lung function. Lung glia are described as non-myelinating Schwann cells but their function is not known, and indeed no transgenic tools have been validated to study them in vivo. The primary goal of this research was, therefore, to investigate the relationship between non-myelinating Schwann cells and pulmonary nerves in the airways and vasculature and to validate existing transgenic mouse tools that would be useful for studying their function. We focused on the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, which is a cognate marker of astrocytes that is expressed by enteric glia and non-myelinating Schwann cells. We describe the morphology of non-myelinating Schwann cells in the lung and verify that they express glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100, a classic glial marker. Furthermore, we characterize the relationship of non-myelinating Schwann cells to pulmonary nerves. Finally, we report tools for studying their function, including a commercially available transgenic mouse line.

  9. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-Expressing Glia in the Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Mier, Gabriela B.

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic nerves regulate important functions in visceral organs, including the lung. The postganglionic portion of these nerves is ensheathed by glial cells known as non-myelinating Schwann cells. In the brain, glia play important functional roles in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, and maintenance of the blood brain barrier. Similarly, enteric glia are now known to have analogous roles in gastrointestinal neurotransmission, inflammatory response, and barrier formation. In contrast to this, very little is known about the function of glia in other visceral organs. Like the gut, the lung forms a barrier between airborne pathogens and the bloodstream, and autonomic lung innervation is known to affect pulmonary inflammation and lung function. Lung glia are described as non-myelinating Schwann cells but their function is not known, and indeed no transgenic tools have been validated to study them in vivo. The primary goal of this research was, therefore, to investigate the relationship between non-myelinating Schwann cells and pulmonary nerves in the airways and vasculature and to validate existing transgenic mouse tools that would be useful for studying their function. We focused on the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, which is a cognate marker of astrocytes that is expressed by enteric glia and non-myelinating Schwann cells. We describe the morphology of non-myelinating Schwann cells in the lung and verify that they express glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100, a classic glial marker. Furthermore, we characterize the relationship of non-myelinating Schwann cells to pulmonary nerves. Finally, we report tools for studying their function, including a commercially available transgenic mouse line. PMID:26442852

  10. Effect of retinoic acid and ethanol on retinoic acid receptor beta and glial fibrillary acidic protein mRNA expression in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Salih, Z N; Zachman, R D

    2000-11-17

    This work explores the hypothesis that perturbations caused by ethanol on the regulatory role of retinoids in brain development may be a mechanism involved in the neuropathology of fetal alcohol syndrome. The interaction of ethanol and retinoic acid (RA) on RA receptor (RAR) beta and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNA expression is evaluated. In the U-373 MG astrocytoma, mRNA expression of RAR beta was increased and GFAP was decreased by RA. Ethanol decreased the expression of RAR beta mRNA, but increased that of GFAP. The RA-stimulated increase in RAR beta was not affected by the presence of ethanol. RA prevented the ethanol-induced increase in GFAP mRNA. Cycloheximide abolished only the GFAP response to ethanol. This work shows that an interrelationship between ethanol and RA exists in the astrocyte. PMID:11058790

  11. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-09-07

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel synthetase molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lipidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  12. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-07-10

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel synthetase molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lipidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  13. Involvement of the G-protein-coupled receptor 4 in RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Okito, Asuka; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Akiyama, Masako; Ono, Takashi; Morita, Ikuo

    2015-03-06

    Osteoclast activity is enhanced in acidic environments following systemic or local inflammation. However, the regulatory mechanism of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in osteoblasts under acidic conditions is not fully understood. In the present paper, we detected the mRNA expression of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR) proton sensors GPR4 and GPR65 (T-cell death-associated gene 8, TDAG8), in osteoblasts. RANKL expression and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) level in osteoblasts were up-regulated under acidic culture conditions. Acidosis-induced up-regulation of RANKL was abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89. To clarify the role of GPR4 in RANKL expression, GPR4 gain and loss of function experiments were performed. Gene knockdown and forced expression of GPR4 caused reduction and induction of RANKL expression, respectively. These results suggested that, at least in part, RANKL expression by osteoblasts in an acidic environment was mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling resulting from GPR4 activation. A comprehensive microarray analysis of gene expression of osteoblasts revealed that, under acidic conditions, the phenotype of osteoblasts was that of an osteoclast supporting cell rather than that of a mineralizing cell. These findings will contribute to a molecular understanding of bone disruption in an acidic environment. - Highlights: • RANKL expression was increased in osteoblasts under acidosis via cAMP/PKA pathway. • GRP4 knockdown resulted in decrease of RANKL expression. • GRP4 overexpression resulted in increase of RANKL expression. • Osteoblast mineralization was reduced under acidic condition.

  14. Genetically programmed expression of proteins containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jiangyun; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-03-12

    The invention relates to orthogonal pairs of tRNAs and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that can incorporate the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine into proteins produced in eubacterial host cells such as E. coli. The invention provides, for example but not limited to, novel orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, polynucleotides encoding the novel sythetases molecules, methods for identifying and making the novel synthetases, methods for producing containing the unnatural amino acid phenylselenocysteine and translation systems. The invention further provides methods for producing modified proteins (e.g., lapidated proteins) through targeted modification of the phenylselenocysteine residue in a protein.

  15. Expression of α1-acid glycoprotein and lipopolysaccharide binding protein in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue of dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mizanur M; Lecchi, Cristina; Sauerwein, Helga; Mielenz, Manfred; Häußler, Susanne; Restelli, Laura; Giudice, Chiara; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Adipose tissue is an endocrine compartment that plays an important role in immune defence by producing and releasing a wide range of proteins, including acute phase proteins (APPs). The liver is the main organ of APP synthesis, although extrahepatic production has also been reported. In the present study, expression of two APPs in dairy cattle, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), was determined in four visceral (pericardial, mesenteric, omental and retroperitoneal) and three subcutaneous (withers, tail head and sternum) adipose tissue depots. mRNA expression was evaluated using qualitative and quantitative PCR, protein profiles were assessed by Western blot analysis and cellular localisation was determined by immunohistochemistry. The presence of LBP and AGP was demonstrated at mRNA and protein levels in all seven adipose tissue depots. Expression of AGP and LBP suggests that they may have roles as local and systemic inflammatory adipokines. PMID:25542063

  16. Cytoplasmic localization of wild-type p53 in glioblastomas correlates with expression of vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sembritzki, Olivier; Hagel, Christian; Lamszus, Katrin; Deppert, Wolfgang; Bohn, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Cytoplasmic accumulation of wild-type p53 in tumor cells indicates that the tumor suppressor is inactive with regard to growth suppressive functions. Whether this occurs randomly during tumor development or characterizes a certain tumor cell subset is not known. Here we assayed primary glioblastomas for expression and subcellular localization of p53 and determined a correlation with expression of intermediate filament proteins characterizing glial cell development. Sixty-nine percent of the tumors were p53 positive in immunohistochemistry. A significant number of tumors (23%) accumulated wild-type p53 in the cytoplasm, which correlated with the presence of vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein, except for 1 case. Tumors with exclusive nuclear p53 contained none or only one of these intermediate filament proteins. In an alternative approach, tumors positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein were screened for expression of p53 and vimentin. Thirty-eight percent of these tumors showed cytoplasmic p53, and all of those also expressed vimentin. Tumors with only nuclear p53 were vimentin negative, except for 1 case. No mutation was detected in p53 exons 5 to 8 in tumors with cytoplasmic p53, suggesting that they express wild-type p53. The data indicate that a cytoplasmic accumulation of wild-type p53 in human primary glioblastomas correlates with a certain intermediate filament protein expression, suggesting that it identifies a certain subset of tumors. PMID:12084347

  17. Olive oils modulate fatty acid content and signaling protein expression in apolipoprotein E knockout mice brain.

    PubMed

    Alemany, Regina; Navarro, María A; Vögler, Oliver; Perona, Javier S; Osada, Jesús; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis contributes to disruption of neuronal signaling pathways by producing lipid-dependent modifications of brain plasma membranes, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated whether long-term (11 weeks) consumption of refined- (ROO) and pomace- (POO) olive oil modulated the fatty acid composition and the levels of membrane signaling proteins in the brain of apolipoprotein E (apoE) knockout (KO) mice, an animal model of atherosclerosis. Both of these oils are rich in bioactive molecules with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. ROO and POO long-term consumption increased the proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), particularly of oleic acid, while reducing the level of the saturated fatty acids (SFAs) palmitic and stearic acid. As a result, the MUFA:SFA ratio was higher in apoE KO mice brain fed with ROO and POO. Furthermore, both oils reduced the level of arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid, suggesting a decrease in the generation of pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids. Finally, ROO and POO induced an increase in the density of membrane proteins implicated in both the Galphas/PKA and Galphaq/PLCbeta1/PKCalpha signaling pathways. The combined effects of long-term ROO and POO consumption on fatty acid composition and the level of signaling proteins involved in PKA and PKC activation, suggest positive effects on neuroinflammation and brain function in apoE KO mice brain, and convert these oils into promising functional foods in diseases involving apoE deficiency.

  18. Rational design of translational pausing without altering the amino acid sequence dramatically promotes soluble protein expression: a strategic demonstration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Jin, Jingjie; Gu, Wei; Wei, Bo; Lei, Yun; Xiong, Sheng; Zhang, Gong

    2014-11-10

    The production of many pharmaceutical and industrial proteins in prokaryotic hosts is hindered by the insolubility of industrial expression products resulting from misfolding. Even with a correct primary sequence, an improper translation elongation rate in a heterologous expression system is an important cause of misfolding. In silico analysis revealed that most of the endogenous Escherichia coli genes display translational pausing sites that promote correct folding, and almost 1/5 genes have pausing sites at the 3'-termini of their coding sequence. Therefore, we established a novel strategy to efficiently promote the expression of soluble and active proteins without altering the amino acid sequence or expression conditions. This strategy uses the rational design of translational pausing based on structural information solely through synonymous substitutions, i.e. no change on the amino acids sequence. We demonstrated this strategy on a promising antiviral candidate, Cyanovirin-N (CVN), which could not be efficiently expressed in any previously reported system. By introducing silent mutations, we increased the soluble expression level in E. coli by 2000-fold without altering the CVN protein sequence, and the specific activity was slightly higher for the optimized CVN than for the wild-type variant. This strategy introduces new possibilities for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins.

  19. Expression of Pokeweed Antiviral Protein in Transgenic Plants Induces Virus Resistance in Grafted Wild-Type Plants Independently of Salicylic Acid Accumulation and Pathogenesis-Related Protein Synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, S.; Shulaev, V.; Tumer, N. E.

    1997-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a 29-kD protein isolated from Phytolacca americana, inhibits translation by catalytically removing a specific adenine residue from the large rRNA of the 60S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing PAP or a variant (PAP-v) were shown to be resistant to a broad spectrum of plant viruses. Expression of PAP-v in transgenic plants induces synthesis of pathogenesis-related proteins and a very weak (<2-fold) increase in salicylic acid levels. Using reciprocal grafting experiments, we demonstrate here that transgenic tobacco rootstocks expressing PAP-v induce resistance to tobacco mosaic virus infection in both N. tabacum NN and nn scions. Increased resistance to potato virus X was also observed in N. tabacum nn scions grafted on transgenic rootstocks. PAP expression was not detected in the wild-type scions or rootstocks that showed virus resistance, nor was there any increase in salicylic acid levels or pathogenesis-related protein synthesis. Grafting experiments with transgenic plants expressing an inactive PAP mutant demonstrated that an intact active site of PAP is necessary for induction of virus resistance in wild-type scions. These results indicate that enzymatic activity of PAP is responsible for generating a signal that renders wild-type scions resistant to virus infection in the absence of increased salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related protein synthesis. PMID:12223762

  20. Retinoic acid induced growth arrest of human breast carcinoma cells requires protein kinase C alpha expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y; Tighe, A P; Talmage, D A

    1997-09-01

    Retinoic acid inhibits proliferation of hormone-dependent, but not hormone-independent breast cancer cells. Retinoic acid-induced changes in cellular proliferation and differentiation are associated with disturbances in growth factor signaling and frequently with changes in protein kinase C expression. PKC delta, epsilon, and zeta are expressed in both hormone-dependent (T-47D) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231) cell lines. Retinoic acid arrested T-47D proliferation, induced PKC alpha expression and concomitantly repressed PKC zeta expression. The changes in PKC alpha and PKC zeta reflect retinoic acid-induced changes in mRNA. In contrast, retinoic acid had no effect on growth, or PKC expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Growth arrest and the induction of PKC alpha, but not the reduction in PKC zeta, resulted from selective activation of RAR alpha. In total, these results support an important role for PKC alpha in mediating the anti-proliferative action of retinoids on human breast carcinoma cells.

  1. Dataset on inflammatory proteins expressions and sialic acid levels in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice with administration of N-acetylneuraminic acid and/or quercetin.

    PubMed

    Dong, Rongrong; Li, Fahui; Qin, Shucun; Wang, Yi; Si, Yanhong; Xu, Xuelian; Tian, Hua; Zhai, Lei; Zhang, Guangjie; Li, Yongjun; Zhou, Yawei; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Nan; Guo, Shoudong

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article describe an effect of N-acetylneuraminic acid and/or quercetin on the inflammatory proteins expressions (TNF-α, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and MOMA-2) and the N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) levels of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice that are given a high-fat diet. Protein expression was performed by immunohistochemical imaging and NANA was quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) or semi-quantified using Image-Pro Plus software after ligation with fluorescein-5-thiosemicarbazide (FTSC). Further interpretation and discussion could be found at our research article entitled "Exogenous supplement of N-acetylneuraminic acid ameliorates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice" (Guo et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27419199

  2. Implementing bacterial acid resistance into cell-free protein synthesis for buffer-free expression and screening of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Cheol; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Kang, Taek-Jin; Choi, Jong Hyun; Song, Jae Jun; Choi, Yun Hee; Kim, Byung-Gee; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2015-12-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis utilizes translational machinery isolated from the cells for in vitro expression of template genes. Because it produces proteins without gene cloning and cell cultivation steps, cell-free protein synthesis can be used as a versatile platform for high-throughput expression of enzyme libraries. Furthermore, the open nature of cell-free protein synthesis allows direct integration of enzyme synthesis with subsequent screening steps. However, the presence of high concentration of chemical buffers in the conventional reaction mixture makes it difficult to streamline cell-free protein synthesis with pH-based assay of the synthesized enzymes. In this study, we have implemented an enzyme-assisted bacterial acid resistance mechanism into an Escherichia coli (E.coli) extract-based cell-free protein synthesis system in place of chemical buffers. When deployed in the reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis of enzymes, through proton-consuming conversion of glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an engineered glutamate decarboxylase (GADβ) was able to maintain the pH of reaction mixture during enzyme synthesis. Because the reaction mixture becomes free of buffering capacity upon the depletion of glutamate, synthesized enzyme could be directly assayed without purification steps. The designed method was successfully applied to the screening of mutant library of sialyltransferase genes to identify mutants with improved enzymatic activity.

  3. Effect of pig breed and dietary protein level on selected fatty acids and stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase protein expression in longissimus muscle and subcutaneous fat.

    PubMed

    Bessa, R J B; Hughes, R A; Jeronimo, E; Moreira, O C; Prates, J A M; Doran, O

    2013-09-01

    The aims of the study were 1) to investigate effects of a low protein diet on fatty acids content and composition of the LM and subcutaneous adipose tissue in 3 genetically diverse breeds, Large White × Landrace, Alentejano, and Bizaro, and 2) to determine whether the effect of the low protein diet of fatty acid composition is associated with dietary modulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) protein expression. The experiments were conducted on 12 Large White × Landrace, 12 Alentejano, and 10 Bízaro female and male pigs. The average animal BW at the beginning of experiments was 40.8, 40.7, and 38.3 kg for Large White × Landrace, Alentejano, and Bízaro, respectively, and the BW of animals at slaughter was 90 kg. The diets contained 202 or 169 g/kg DM of CP (high and low protein diets, respectively) and were balanced in essential AA. The diets were fed until the animals reached 90 kg BW (approximately 73 d). It was established that Large White × Landrace pigs had a less (P = 0.001) total fatty acid content in subcutaneous adipose tissue when compared with Alentejano and Bízaro and less (P < 0.001) intramuscular fat (IMF) content when compared with Alentejano. There was a positive relationship between SCD protein expression in the LM and MUFA content (r = 0.627, P = 0.029) and SCD protein expression and total muscle fatty acids content (r = 0.725, P = 0.008) in Large White × Landrace but not in Alentejano and Bizaro breeds. It has been suggested that SCD protein expression is associated with regulation of fat deposition only in breeds with genetic predisposition to a low IMF content.

  4. Identification of hyaluronic acid-binding proteins and their expressions in porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Masaki; Miyahayashi, Yasunori; Naganuma, Takako; Kimura, Naoko; Sasada, Hiroshi; Sato, Eimei

    2002-10-01

    Hyaluronic acid-binding proteins (HABPs) are necessary for expansion of the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC) during oocyte maturation. In this study, to obtain the detailed information of HABPs during cumulus expansion, we examined the expression of HABPs in porcine COCs during in vitro maturation (IVM). After maturation culture, proteins were extracted from porcine COCs and separated by SDS-PAGE and then transferred to polyvinylidene fluoride membranes. After transfer, the membranes were subjected to ligand blotting with biotinylated hyaluronic acid (bHA) or fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled hyaluronic acid (FITC-HA). Furthermore, the extracted proteins were subjected to immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis to dissect the HABPs. Ligand blotting with FITC-HA could detect HABPs. Using this ligand-blotting method, 13 and 14 bands of HABPs were detected in porcine COCs after 0 and 48 h in culture, respectively. Of these, the level of expression of 85-kDa HABP increased with cumulus expansion during IVM and was newly detected after culture. Immunoprecipitation, Western blotting, and immunofluorescent analysis confirmed that the 85-kDa HABP corresponded to CD44 and that it existed on/in the membrane of cumulus cells. The present results indicated that HABP expressed in porcine COCs during IVM, particularly CD44, may form a network of the matrices in the extracellular space of the oocyte with cumulus expansion during IVM.

  5. Temporal profile of intestinal tissue expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in a rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Ana Leda Bertoncini; Figueira, Rebeca Lopes; Gonçalves, Frances Lilian Lanhellas; Mitidiero, Luís Felipe Tsuyoshi; Silva, Orlando Castro e; Peiró, José Luis; Sbragia, Lourenço

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Necrotizing enterocolitis is a severe multifactorial intestinal disorder that primarily affects preterm newborns, causing 20-40% mortality and morbidity. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein has been reported to be a biomarker for the detection of intestinal injuries. Our aim was to assess intestinal tissue injury and the molecular expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein over time in a necrotizing enterocolitis model. METHODS: A total of 144 Newborn rats were divided into two groups: 1) Control, which received breastfeeding (n=72) and 2) Necrotizing Enterocolitis, which received formula feeding and underwent hypoxia and hypothermia (n=72). A total of six time points of ischemia (2 times a day for 3 days; 12 pups for each time point) were examined. Samples were collected for analysis of body weight, morphological and histological characteristics, intestinal weight, intestinal weight/body weight ratio, injury grade, and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein levels. RESULTS: Body and intestinal weights were lower in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005 and p<0.0005, respectively). The intestinal weight/body weight ratio was higher in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005) only at the sixth ischemia time point. The Necrotizing Enterocolitis group displayed higher expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (p<0.0005) and showed greater tissue damage than the Control group. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein was an efficient marker of ischemic injury to the intestine and a good correlation was demonstrated between the time of ischemic injury and the grade of intestinal injury. PMID:27464299

  6. Effect of vitamin C and lipoic acid on streptozotocin-induced diabetes gene expression: mRNA and protein expressions of Cu-Zn SOD and catalase.

    PubMed

    Sadi, Gökhan; Yilmaz, Okkes; Güray, Tülin

    2008-02-01

    The involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus has been confirmed by numerous studies. In this study, the expression of two antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase which are involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species was studied in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat liver tissues. The enzyme assays showed a significant decrease in both enzymes activities compared to control animals. The RT-PCR and Western-blot analysis results demonstrated that this decrease in activity is regulated at the level of gene expression, as both catalase and Cu-Zn SOD mRNA and protein expressions were also suppressed. Supplementing the animals with vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant increased both SOD and catalase activities with no change in both mRNA and protein expressions suggesting a role of post-translational modification. However, even though mRNA expressions of both catalase and Cu-Zn SOD were not changed, the protein levels increased in parallel to activities in the case of another antioxidant, alpha-lipoic acid. An increase in the rate of translation, without changing the rate of transcription indicates a translational effect of lipoic acid in changing the activities of antioxidant enzymes to prevent the oxidative damage in diabetes.

  7. Incorporation of Unnatural Amino Acids into Proteins Expressed in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Serfling, R; Coin, I

    2016-01-01

    The site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids (Uaas) via genetic code expansion provides a powerful method to introduce synthetic moieties into specific positions of a protein directly in the live cell. The technique, first developed in bacteria, is nowadays widely applicable in mammalian cells. In general, different Uaas are incorporated with different efficiency. By comparing the incorporation efficiency of several Uaas recently designed for bioorthogonal chemistry, we present here a facile dual-fluorescence assay to evaluate relative yields of Uaa incorporation. Several biological questions can be addressed using Uaas tools. In recent years, photo-cross-linking Uaas have been extensively applied to map ligand-binding sites on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We describe a simple and efficient two-plasmid system to incorporate a photoactivatable Uaa into a class B GPCR, and demonstrate cross-linking to its nonmodified natural ligand. PMID:27586329

  8. Molecular characterization, functional expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Illescas, Oscar; Carrero, Julio C; Bobes, Raúl J; Flisser, Ana; Rosas, Gabriela; Laclette, Juan P

    2012-12-01

    The fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) comprise a family of proteins that are widely expressed in animal cells and perform a variety of vital functions. Here, we report the identification, characterization, recombinant expression, tissue localization and protective potential of a Taenia solium FABP (TsFABP1). The TsFABP1 primary structure showed all the conserved residues characteristic of the subfamily iv of the intracellular Lipid-Binding Proteins (iLBPs), including those involved in the binding stabilization of the fatty acid molecule. Through a competitive binding assay we found that TsFABP1 is able to bind at least six different fatty acids with preference toward palmitic and stearic acid, suggesting that TsFABP1 is a member of the iLBP subfamily iv. Immunolocalization assays carried out on larval and adult tissues of four species of taeniids using anti-TsFABP1 hyperimmune sera produced in mice and rabbit, showed intense labeling in the tegument of the spiral canal and in subtegumental cytons of the larvae. These findings suggest that the spiral canal might be a major place for FA uptake in the developing scolex. In contrast, only subtegumental cytons in the adult worms stained positive. We propose that TsFABP1 is involved in the mechanism to mobilize fatty acids between compartments in the extensive syncytial tissue of taeniids. Protection assays carried out in a murine model of cysticercosis showed that subcutaneous immunization with TsFABP1 resulted in about 45% reduction of parasite load against an intraperitoneal challenge with Taenia crassiceps cysts. This reduction in parasite load correlated with the level of cellular and humoral immune responses against TsFABP1, as determined in spleen lymphocyte proliferation and ELISA testing.

  9. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Alice; Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute to body weight regulation. Adult mice were fed either a normal fat (NF, 12% kJ content as fat) or a high-fat (HF, 43% kJ content as fat) diet. In the latter case, half of the animals received daily oral supplementation of CLA. Expression and content of stomach proteins and specific bacterial populations from caecum were analysed. CLA supplementation was associated with an increase in stomach protein expression, and exerted a prebiotic action on both Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and Akkermansia muciniphila. However, CLA supplementation was not able to override the negative effects of HF diet on Bifidobacterium spp., which was decreased in both HF and HF+CLA groups. Our data show that CLA are able to modulate stomach protein expression and exert a prebiotic effect on specific gut bacterial species. PMID:25915857

  10. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation under a High-Fat Diet Modulates Stomach Protein Expression and Intestinal Microbiota in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Alice; Parra, Pilar; Serra, Francisca; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract constitutes a physiological interface integrating nutrient and microbiota-host metabolism. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) have been reported to contribute to decreased body weight and fat accretion. The modulation by dietary CLA of stomach proteins related to energy homeostasis or microbiota may be involved, although this has not been previously analysed. This is examined in the present study, which aims to underline the potential mechanisms of CLA which contribute to body weight regulation. Adult mice were fed either a normal fat (NF, 12% kJ content as fat) or a high-fat (HF, 43% kJ content as fat) diet. In the latter case, half of the animals received daily oral supplementation of CLA. Expression and content of stomach proteins and specific bacterial populations from caecum were analysed. CLA supplementation was associated with an increase in stomach protein expression, and exerted a prebiotic action on both Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and Akkermansia muciniphila. However, CLA supplementation was not able to override the negative effects of HF diet on Bifidobacterium spp., which was decreased in both HF and HF+CLA groups. Our data show that CLA are able to modulate stomach protein expression and exert a prebiotic effect on specific gut bacterial species.

  11. A putative amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, NMB1612, from Neisseria meningitidis, induces murine bactericidal antibodies against meningococci expressing heterologous NMB1612 proteins.

    PubMed

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Humbert, María Victoria; Laver, Jay R; Phillips, Renee; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-08-26

    The nmb1612 (NEIS1533) gene encoding the ~27-kDa putative amino acid ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, periplasmic substrate-binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) strain MC58 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant (r)NMB1612 was used for animal immunization studies. Immunization of mice with rNMB1612 adsorbed to Al(OH)3 and in liposomes with and without MPLA, induced antiserum with bactericidal activity in an assay using baby rabbit complement, against the homologous strain MC58 (encoding protein representative of Allele 62) and killed heterologous strains encoding proteins of three other alleles (representative of Alleles 1, 64 and 68), with similar SBA titres. However, strain MC58 was not killed (titre <4) in a human serum bactericidal assay (hSBA) using anti-rNMB1612 sera, although another strain (MC168) expressing the same protein was killed (median titres of 16-64 in the hSBA). Analysis of the NMB1612 amino acid sequences from 4351 meningococcal strains in the pubmlst.org/Neisseria database and a collection of 13 isolates from colonized individuals and from patients, showed that antibodies raised against rNMB1612 could potentially kill at least 72% of the MenB strains in the complete sequence database. For MenB disease occurring specifically in the UK from 2013 to 2015, >91% of the isolates causing disease in this recent period expressed NMB1612 protein encoded by Allele 1 and could be potentially killed by sera raised to the recombinant antigen in the current study. The NMB1612 protein was surface-accessible and expressed by different meningococcal strains. In summary, the properties of (i) NMB1612 protein conservation and expression, (ii) limited amino acid sequence variation between proteins encoded by different alleles, and (iii) the ability of a recombinant protein to induce cross-strain bactericidal antibodies, would all suggest a promising antigen for consideration for inclusion in new

  12. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption. PMID:27611307

  13. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Qin, Chun Fu; Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption.

  14. Protein Restriction with Amino Acid-Balanced Diets Shrinks Circulating Pool Size of Amino Acid by Decreasing Expression of Specific Transporters in the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kai; Qin, Chun Fu; Luo, Min; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Wen Juan; Jiao, Ning; Li, De Fa; Yin, Jing Dong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction is not only beneficial to health and longevity in humans, but also protects against air pollution and minimizes feeding cost in livestock production. However, its impact on amino acid (AA) absorption and metabolism is not quite understood. Therefore, the study aimed to explore the effect of protein restriction on nitrogen balance, circulating AA pool size, and AA absorption using a pig model. In Exp.1, 72 gilts weighting 29.9 ± 1.5 kg were allocated to 1 of the 3 diets containing 14, 16, or 18% CP for a 28-d trial. Growth (n = 24), nitrogen balance (n = 6), and the expression of small intestinal AA and peptide transporters (n = 6) were evaluated. In Exp.2, 12 barrows weighting 22.7 ± 1.3 kg were surgically fitted with catheters in the portal and jejunal veins as well as the carotid artery and assigned to a diet containing 14 or 18% CP. A series of blood samples were collected before and after feeding for determining the pool size of circulating AA and AA absorption in the portal vein, respectively. Protein restriction did not sacrifice body weight gain and protein retention, since nitrogen digestibility was increased as dietary protein content reduced. However, the pool size of circulating AA except for lysine and threonine, and most AA flux through the portal vein were reduced in pigs fed the low protein diet. Meanwhile, the expression of peptide transporter 1 (PepT-1) was stimulated, but the expression of the neutral and cationic AA transporter systems was depressed. These results evidenced that protein restriction with essential AA-balanced diets, decreased AA absorption and reduced circulating AA pool size. Increased expression of small intestinal peptide transporter PepT-1 could not compensate for the depressed expression of jejunal AA transporters for AA absorption. PMID:27611307

  15. Molecular characterization, tissue expression, and polymorphism analysis of liver-type fatty acid binding protein in Landes geese.

    PubMed

    Song, Z; Shao, D; Sun, X X; Niu, J W; Gong, D Q

    2015-01-01

    Liver weight is an important economic trait in the fatty goose liver industry. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is involved in the formation and metabolism of fatty acids. Thus, we hypothesized that sequence polymorphisms in L-FABP were associated with fatty liver weight in goose. We first isolated, sequenced, and characterized the goose L-FABP gene, which had not been previously reported. The goose L-FABP gene was 2490 bp and included 4 exons coding for a 126-amino acid protein. Analysis of expression levels of the goose L-FABP gene in different tissues showed that the expression level in the liver tissue was higher than in other tissues, and was significantly higher in the liver tissue of overfed geese than in control geese. Moreover, a single nucleotide polymorphism located at 774 bp in the gene was identified in a Landes goose population. To test whether this single nucleotide polymorphism was associated with fatty liver production, liver weight and the ratio of liver to carcass weights were determined for the 3 genotypes with this single nucleotide polymorphism (TT, TG, GG) in overfed Landes geese. Our data indicate that individuals with the GG genotype had higher values for the variables measured than those with the other 2 genotypes, suggesting that L-FABP can be a selection marker for the trait of fatty liver production in goose. PMID:25729971

  16. Molecular characterization, tissue expression, and polymorphism analysis of liver-type fatty acid binding protein in Landes geese.

    PubMed

    Song, Z; Shao, D; Sun, X X; Niu, J W; Gong, D Q

    2015-01-23

    Liver weight is an important economic trait in the fatty goose liver industry. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is involved in the formation and metabolism of fatty acids. Thus, we hypothesized that sequence polymorphisms in L-FABP were associated with fatty liver weight in goose. We first isolated, sequenced, and characterized the goose L-FABP gene, which had not been previously reported. The goose L-FABP gene was 2490 bp and included 4 exons coding for a 126-amino acid protein. Analysis of expression levels of the goose L-FABP gene in different tissues showed that the expression level in the liver tissue was higher than in other tissues, and was significantly higher in the liver tissue of overfed geese than in control geese. Moreover, a single nucleotide polymorphism located at 774 bp in the gene was identified in a Landes goose population. To test whether this single nucleotide polymorphism was associated with fatty liver production, liver weight and the ratio of liver to carcass weights were determined for the 3 genotypes with this single nucleotide polymorphism (TT, TG, GG) in overfed Landes geese. Our data indicate that individuals with the GG genotype had higher values for the variables measured than those with the other 2 genotypes, suggesting that L-FABP can be a selection marker for the trait of fatty liver production in goose.

  17. Expression of Heat Shock Protein (Hsp90) Paralogues Is Regulated by Amino Acids in Skeletal Muscle of Atlantic Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Garcia de la serrana, Daniel; Johnston, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins 90 (Hsp90) have an essential role in sarcomere formation and differentiation in skeletal muscle and also act as molecular chaperones during protein folding impacting a wide range of physiological processes. We characterised and provided a phylogenetically consistent nomenclature for the complete repertoire of six Hsp90 paralogues present in duplicated salmonid fish genomes (Hsp90α1a, Hsp90α1b, Hsp90α2a, Hsp90α2b, Hsp90ß1a and Hsp90ß1b). The expression of paralogues in fast skeletal muscle was investigated using in vivo fasting-feeding experiments and primary myogenic cultures. Fasted juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) showed a transient 2 to 8-fold increase in the expression of all 4 Hsp90α paralogues within 24h of satiation feeding. Hsp90α1a and hsp90α1b also showed a pronounced secondary increase in expression after 10 days, concomitant with muscle differentiation and the expression of myogenin and sarcomeric proteins (mlc2, myhc). Hsp90ß1b was constitutively expressed whereas Hsp90ß1a expression was downregulated 10-fold between fasted and fed individuals. Hsp90α1a and Hsp90α1b were upregulated 10 to 15-fold concomitant with myotube formation and muscle differentiation in vitro whereas other Hsp90 paralogues showed no change in expression. In cells starved of amino acid (AA) and serum for 72h the addition of AA, but not insulin-like growth factor 1, increased phosphorylation of mTor and expression of all 4 hsp90α paralogues and associated co-chaperones including hsp30, tbcb, pdia4, pdia6, stga and fk504bp1, indicating a general activation of the protein folding response. In contrast, Hsp90ß1a expression in vitro was unresponsive to AA treatment indicating that some other as yet uncharacterised signal(s) regulate its expression in response to altered nutritional state. PMID:24040223

  18. Expression of heat shock protein (Hsp90) paralogues is regulated by amino acids in skeletal muscle of Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Garcia de la Serrana, Daniel; Johnston, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins 90 (Hsp90) have an essential role in sarcomere formation and differentiation in skeletal muscle and also act as molecular chaperones during protein folding impacting a wide range of physiological processes. We characterised and provided a phylogenetically consistent nomenclature for the complete repertoire of six Hsp90 paralogues present in duplicated salmonid fish genomes (Hsp90α1a, Hsp90α1b, Hsp90α2a, Hsp90α2b, Hsp90ß1a and Hsp90ß1b). The expression of paralogues in fast skeletal muscle was investigated using in vivo fasting-feeding experiments and primary myogenic cultures. Fasted juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) showed a transient 2 to 8-fold increase in the expression of all 4 Hsp90α paralogues within 24h of satiation feeding. Hsp90α1a and hsp90α1b also showed a pronounced secondary increase in expression after 10 days, concomitant with muscle differentiation and the expression of myogenin and sarcomeric proteins (mlc2, myhc). Hsp90ß1b was constitutively expressed whereas Hsp90ß1a expression was downregulated 10-fold between fasted and fed individuals. Hsp90α1a and Hsp90α1b were upregulated 10 to 15-fold concomitant with myotube formation and muscle differentiation in vitro whereas other Hsp90 paralogues showed no change in expression. In cells starved of amino acid (AA) and serum for 72h the addition of AA, but not insulin-like growth factor 1, increased phosphorylation of mTor and expression of all 4 hsp90α paralogues and associated co-chaperones including hsp30, tbcb, pdia4, pdia6, stga and fk504bp1, indicating a general activation of the protein folding response. In contrast, Hsp90ß1a expression in vitro was unresponsive to AA treatment indicating that some other as yet uncharacterised signal(s) regulate its expression in response to altered nutritional state. PMID:24040223

  19. [Protein expression and purification].

    PubMed

    Růčková, E; Müller, P; Vojtěšek, B

    2014-01-01

    Production of recombinant proteins is essential for many applications in both basic research and also in medicine, where recombinant proteins are used as pharmaceuticals. This review summarizes procedures involved in recombinant protein expression and purification, including molecular cloning of target genes into expression vectors, selection of the appropriate expression system, and protein purification techniques. Recombinant DNA technology allows protein engineering to modify protein stability, activity and function or to facilitate protein purification by affinity tag fusions. A wide range of cloning systems enabling fast and effective design of expression vectors is currently available. A first choice of protein expression system is usually the bacteria Escherichia coli. The main advantages of this prokaryotic expression system are low cost and simplicity; on the other hand this system is often unsuitable for production of complex mammalian proteins. Protein expression mediated by eukaryotic cells (yeast, insect and mammalian cells) usually produces properly folded and posttranslationally modified proteins. How-ever, cultivation of insect and, especially, mammalian cells is time consuming and expensive. Affinity tagged recombinant proteins are purified efficiently using affinity chromatography. An affinity tag is a protein or peptide that mediates specific binding to a chromatography column, unbound proteins are removed during a washing step and pure protein is subsequently eluted. PMID:24945544

  20. Expression of two soybean vegetative storage protein genes during development and in response to water deficit, wounding, and jasmonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, H S; Mullet, J E

    1990-01-01

    The expression of vspA and vspB genes encoding soybean vegetative storage proteins was studied during seedling development and in response to water deficit, tissue wounding, and jasmonic acid treatment. vspA and vspB encode VSP-alpha and VSP-beta, 28-kilodalton and 31-kilodalton vacuole-localized polypeptides that are 80% homologous. vspA and vspB mRNAs could be distinguished on RNA blots using 3'-end probes. vspA mRNA was threefold to sevenfold more abundant than vspB mRNA in leaves, about equal expression was observed in stems, and vspB mRNA exceeded vspA in roots. Transcripts were not detected in dry seeds but appeared in intact or excised seedling axes between 12 hr and 24 hr after initiation of imbibition. Both transcripts were highly abundant in the meristematic region of seedling stems and in developing leaves but were rare in mature stems, leaves, and roots. In situ localization showed that vsp transcripts were found throughout the hypocotyl hook but were concentrated in cells associated with the epidermis and vascular bundles. Water deficit caused increased vsp mRNA levels in leaves and stems, which suggests that inhibition of growth necessitates temporary storage of amino acids. Wounding induced primarily vspB mRNA in etiolated seedlings, whereas both vspA and vspB mRNA levels increased in wounded leaves. Jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate were potent inducers of vsp gene expression in cell cultures, developing axes, leaves, and roots. We hypothesize that jasmonic acid levels modulate vsp mRNA abundance in vivo. PMID:2152178

  1. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 and retinoic acid trigger bovine VASA homolog expression in differentiating bovine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Sumer, Huseyin; Jain, Kanika; Verma, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the earliest identifiable and completely committed progenitors of female and male gametes. They are obvious targets for genome editing because they assure the transmission of desirable or introduced traits to future generations. PGCs are established at the earliest stages of embryo development and are difficult to propagate in vitro--two characteristics that pose a problem for their practical application. One alternative method to enrich for PGCs in vitro is to differentiate them from pluripotent stem cells derived from adult tissues. Here, we establish a reporter system for germ cell identification in bovine pluripotent stem cells based on green fluorescent protein expression driven by the minimal essential promoter of the bovine Vasa homolog (BVH) gene, whose regulatory elements were identified by orthologous modelling of regulatory units. We then evaluated the potential of bovine induced pluripotent stem cell (biPSC) lines carrying the reporter construct to differentiate toward the germ cell lineage. Our results showed that biPSCs undergo differentiation as embryoid bodies, and a fraction of the differentiating cells expressed BVH. The rate of differentiation towards BVH-positive cells increased up to tenfold in the presence of bone morphogenetic protein 4 or retinoic acid. Finally, we determined that the expression of key PGC genes, such as BVH or SOX2, can be modified by pre-differentiation cell culture conditions, although this increase is not necessarily mirrored by an increase in the rate of differentiation.

  2. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide Attenuates Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Expression via c-Jun/AP-1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Zhang, Rui; Li, Na; Yang, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Zhao, Jie; Li, Shao

    2015-11-01

    Scorpion venom has been used in the Orient to treat central nervous system diseases for many years, and the protein/peptide toxins in Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK) venom are believed to be the effective components. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is an active component of the scorpion venom extracted from BmK. In a previous study, we found that SVHRP could inhibit the formation of a glial scar, which is characterized by enhanced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, in the epileptic hippocampus. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be clarified. The results of the present study indicate that endogenous GFAP expression in primary rat astrocytes was attenuated by SVHRP. We further demonstrate that the suppression of GFAP was primarily mediated by inhibiting both c-Jun expression and its binding with AP-1 DNA binding site and other factors at the GFAP promoter. These results support that SVHRP contributes to reducing GFAP at least in part by decreasing the activity of the transcription factor AP-1. In conclusion, the effects of SVHRP on astrocytes with respect to the c-Jun/AP-1 signaling pathway in vitro provide a practical basis for studying astrocyte activation and inhibition and a scientific basis for further studies of traditional medicine.

  3. Effects of endurance exercise on expressions of glial fibrillary acidic protein and myelin basic protein in developing rats with maternal infection-induced cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kijeong; Shin, Mal-Soon; Cho, Han-Sam; Kim, Young-Pyo

    2014-02-01

    Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) is a common white matter lesion affecting the neonatal brain. PVL is closely associated with cerebral palsy (CP) and characterized by increase in the number of astrocytes, which can be detected by positivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Change in myelin basic protein (MBP) is an early sign of white matter abnormality. Maternal or placental infection can damage the neonatal brain. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill walking exercise on GFAP and MBP expressions in rats with maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PVL. Immunohistochemistry was performed for the detection of GFAP and MBP. The present results showed that intracervical maternal LPS injection during pregnancy increased GFAP expression in the striatum and decreased MBP expression in the corpus callosum of rats. The results also showed that treadmill walking exercise suppressed GFAP expression and enhanced MBP expression in the brains of rats with maternal LPS-induced PVL. The present study revealed that treadmill walking exercise is effective for the suppressing astrogliosis and hypomyelination associated with PVL. Here in this study, we showed that treadmill walking exercise may be effective therapeutic strategy for alleviating the detrimental effects of CP.

  4. Retinoic acid amplifies the host immune response to LPS through increased T lymphocytes number and LPS binding protein expression.

    PubMed

    Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Hanriot, Didier; Dailloux, Michèle; Latger-Cannard, Véronique; Zannad, Faiez; Mertes, Paul-Michel; Longrois, Dan; Devaux, Yvan

    2005-12-21

    Vitamin A deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to infection but the effects of Vitamin A supplementation on host response to pathogens are controversial. This study investigated the mechanisms by which all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) modulates the host immune response in an experimental model of Vitamin A supplementation before and after challenge with LPS in rats. We show here that a supplementation with five daily injections of 10mg/kg atRA increased the number of T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. In addition, we show that atRA increased the expression of the LPS binding protein (LBP), a component of the LPS recognition system. The retinoic acid receptor (RAR)alpha agonist Ro 4060-55 but not the pan-retinoid X receptors (RXRs) agonist Ro 2573-86 mimicked the effects of atRA on LBP expression suggesting that atRA enhances LBP expression through a RARalpha-mediated pathway. In order to investigate the significance of increased LBP expression we challenged atRA-supplemented rats with the Gram-positive bacteria Listeria monocytogenes (LM) that activates the immune response independently from LBP. In sharp contrast to our previous observations that atRA supplementation enhances IFN-gamma expression and NOS2 pathway activation in LPS-challenged rats [Devaux, Y., Grosjean, S., Seguin, C., David, C., Dousset, B., Zannad, F., Meistelman, C., de Talancé, N., Mertes, P.M., Ungureanu-Longrois, D., 2000. Retinoic acid and host-pathogen interactions: effects on inducible nitric oxide synthase in vivo. Am. J. Physiol. 279, E1045-E1053], atRA did not increase the LM-induced IFN-gamma expression and NOS2 pathway activation. Overall, these data demonstrate that although atRA induces a "priming" of the immune system characterized by increased T lymphocytes number and LBP expression, the profile of the immune response depends on the inflammatory/infectious stimulus. These results could explain why Vitamin A supplementation could have beneficial/neutral or

  5. Fatty acid binding protein 4 expression marks a population of adipocyte progenitors in white and brown adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Liu, Weiyi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissues regulate metabolism, reproduction, and life span. The development and growth of adipose tissue are due to increases of both adipocyte cell size and cell number; the latter is mediated by adipocyte progenitors. Various markers have been used to identify either adipocyte progenitors or mature adipocytes. The fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), commonly known as adipocyte protein 2 (aP2), has been extensively used as a marker for differentiated adipocytes. However, whether aP2 is expressed in adipogenic progenitors is controversial. Using Cre/LoxP-based cell lineage tracing in mice, we have identified a population of aP2-expressing progenitors in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of both white and brown adipose tissues. The aP2-lineage progenitors reside in the adipose stem cell niche and express adipocyte progenitor markers, including CD34, Sca1, Dlk1, and PDGFRα. When isolated and grown in culture, the aP2-expressing SVF cells proliferate and differentiate into adipocytes upon induction. Conversely, ablation of the aP2 lineage greatly reduces the adipogenic potential of SVF cells. When grafted into wild-type mice, the aP2-lineage progenitors give rise to adipose depots in recipient mice. Therefore, the expression of aP2 is not limited to mature adipocytes, but also marks a pool of undifferentiated progenitors associated with the vasculature of adipose tissues. Our finding adds to the repertoire of adipose progenitor markers and points to a new regulator of adipose plasticity.

  6. Increased expression of fatty acid binding protein 4 and leptin in resident macrophages characterises atherosclerotic plaque rupture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K.; Santibanez-Koref, M.; Polvikoski, T.; Birchall, D.; Mendelow, A.D.; Keavney, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Resident macrophages play an important role in atheromatous plaque rupture. The macrophage gene expression signature associated with plaque rupture is incompletely defined due to the complex cellular heterogeneity in the plaque. We aimed to characterise differential gene expression in resident plaque macrophages from ruptured and stable human atheromatous lesions. Methods and results We performed genome-wide expression analyses of isolated macrophage-rich regions of stable and ruptured human atherosclerotic plaques. Plaques present in carotid endarterectomy specimens were designated as stable or ruptured using clinical, radiological and histopathological criteria. Macrophage-rich regions were excised from 5 ruptured and 6 stable plaques by laser micro-dissection. Transcriptional profiling was performed using Affymetrix microarrays. The profiles were characteristic of activated macrophages. At a false discovery rate of 10%, 914 genes were differentially expressed between stable and ruptured plaques. The findings were confirmed in fourteen further stable and ruptured samples for a subset of eleven genes with the highest expression differences (p < 0.05). Pathway analysis revealed that components of the PPAR/Adipocytokine signaling pathway were the most significantly upregulated in ruptured compared to stable plaques (p = 5.4 × 10−7). Two key components of the pathway, fatty-acid binding-protein 4 (FABP4) and leptin, showed nine-fold (p = 0.0086) and five-fold (p = 0.0012) greater expression respectively in macrophages from ruptured plaques. Conclusions We found differences in gene expression signatures between macrophages isolated from stable and ruptured human atheromatous plaques. Our findings indicate the involvement of FABP4 and leptin in the progression of atherosclerosis and plaque rupture, and suggest that down-regulation of PPAR/adipocytokine signaling within plaques may have therapeutic potential. PMID:23122912

  7. Gastric acid induces mucosal H2S release in rats by upregulating mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine gamma lyase.

    PubMed

    Mard, Seyyed Ali; Veisi, Ali; Ahangarpour, Akram; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects the gastric mucosa against gastric acid and other noxious stimulants by several mechanisms but until now the effect of gastric acid on H2S production has not been evaluated. This study was performed to determine the effect of basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion on mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta synthase (CBS), and on mucosal release of H2S in rats. Seventy-two male rats were randomly assigned into 9 groups (8 in each)-control, distention, and pentagastrin-induced gastric acid secretion groups. The effects of 15% alcohol solution, propargylglycine (PAG), L-NAME, and pantoprazole were also investigated. Under anesthesia, animals underwent tracheostomy and midline laparotomy. A catheter was inserted into the stomach through the duodenum for gastric washout. At the end of the experiments, the animals were killed and the gastric mucosa was collected to measure H2S concentration and to quantify mRNA expression of CSE and CBS by quantitative real-time PCR, and expression of their proteins by western blot. Basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion increased mucosal levels of H2S, and mRNA and protein expression of CSE. Pantoprazole and L-NAME reversed H2S release and restored protein expression of CSE to the control level. Pantoprazole, but not propargylglycine, pretreatment inhibited the elevated level of protein expression of eNOS in response to distention-induced gastric acid secretion. Our findings indicated that NO mediated the stimulatory effect of gastric acid on H2S release and protein expression of CSE. PMID:26319795

  8. Supplementation with branched-chain amino acids to a low-protein diet regulates intestinal expression of amino acid and peptide transporters in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shihai; Qiao, Shiyan; Ren, Man; Zeng, Xiangfang; Ma, Xi; Wu, Zhenlong; Thacker, Philip; Wu, Guoyao

    2013-11-01

    This study determined the effects of dietary branched-chain amino acids (AA) (BCAA) on growth performance, expression of jejunal AA and peptide transporters, and the colonic microflora of weanling piglets fed a low-protein (LP) diet. One hundred and eight Large White × Landrace × Duroc piglets (weaned at 28 days of age) were fed a normal protein diet (NP, 20.9 % crude protein), an LP diet (LP, 17.1 % crude protein), or an LP diet supplemented with BCAA (LP + BCAA, 17.9 % crude protein) for 14 days. Dietary protein restriction reduced piglet growth performance and small-intestinal villous height, which were restored by BCAA supplementation to the LP diet to values for the NP diet. Serum concentrations of BCAA were reduced in piglets fed the LP diet while those in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet were similar to values for the NP group. mRNA levels for Na(+)-neutral AA exchanger-2, cationic AA transporter-1, b(0,+) AA transporter, and 4F2 heavy chain were more abundant in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet than the LP diet. However, mRNA and protein levels for peptide transporter-1 were lower in piglets fed the LP + BCAA diet as compared to the LP diet. The colonic microflora did not differ among the three groups of pigs. In conclusion, growth performance, intestinal development, and intestinal expression of AA transporters in weanling piglets are enhanced by BCAA supplementation to LP diets. Our findings provide a new molecular basis for further understanding of BCAA as functional AA in animal nutrition.

  9. Intravenous or luminal amino acids are insufficient to maintain pancreatic growth and digestive enzyme expression in the absence of intact dietary protein

    PubMed Central

    Baumler, Megan D.; Koopmann, Matthew C.; Thomas, Diana D. H.; Ney, Denise M.

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that rats receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) undergo significant pancreatic atrophy characterized by reduced total protein and digestive enzyme expression due to a lack of intestinal stimulation by nutrients (Baumler MD, Nelson DW, Ney DM, Groblewski GE. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 292: G857–G866, 2007). Essentially identical results were recently reported in mice fed protein-free diets (Crozier SJ, D'Alecy LG, Ernst SA, Ginsburg LE, Williams JA. Gastroenterology 137: 1093–1101, 2009), provoking the question of whether reductions in pancreatic protein and digestive enzyme expression could be prevented by providing amino acids orally or by intravenous (IV) infusion while maintaining intestinal stimulation with fat and carbohydrate. Controlled studies were conducted in rats with IV catheters including orally fed/saline infusion or TPN-fed control rats compared with rats fed a protein-free diet, oral amino acid, or IV amino acid feeding, all with oral carbohydrate and fat. Interestingly, neither oral nor IV amino acids were sufficient to prevent the pancreatic atrophy seen for TPN controls or protein-free diets. Oral and IV amino acids partially attenuated the 75–90% reductions in pancreatic amylase and trypsinogen expression; however, values remained 50% lower than orally fed control rats. Lipase expression was more modestly reduced by a lack of dietary protein but did respond to IV amino acids. In comparison, chymotrypsinogen expression was induced nearly twofold in TPN animals but was not altered in other experimental groups compared with oral control animals. In contrast to pancreas, protein-free diets had no detectable effects on jejunal mucosal villus height, total mass, protein, DNA, or sucrase activity. These data underscore that, in the rat, intact dietary protein is essential in maintaining pancreatic growth and digestive enzyme adaptation but has surprisingly little effect on small intestinal mucosa. PMID

  10. Amino acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    van Goudoever, Johannes B; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R D

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional requirements are not met, resulting in a postnatal growth restriction. However, current knowledge on adequate levels of both amino acid as well as protein intake can avoid under nutrition in the direct postnatal phase, avoid the need for subsequent catch-up growth and improve later outcome.

  11. Expression of the helix-loop-helix protein inhibitor of DNA binding-1 (ID-1) is activated by all-trans retinoic acid in normal human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Villano, C.M.; White, L.A. . E-mail: lawhite@aesop.rutgers.edu

    2006-08-01

    The ID (inhibitor of differentiation or DNA binding) helix-loop-helix proteins are important mediators of cellular differentiation and proliferation in a variety of cell types through regulation of gene expression. Overexpression of the ID proteins in normal human keratinocytes results in extension of culture lifespan, indicating that these proteins are important for epidermal differentiation. Our hypothesis is that the ID proteins are targets of the retinoic acid signaling pathway in keratinocytes. Retinoids, vitamin A analogues, are powerful regulators of cell growth and differentiation and are widely used in the prevention and treatment of a variety of cancers in humans. Furthermore, retinoic acid is necessary for the maintenance of epithelial differentiation and demonstrates an inhibitory action on skin carcinogenesis. We examined the effect of all-trans retinoic acid on expression of ID-1, -2, -3, and -4 in normal human keratinocytes and found that exposure of these cells to all-trans retinoic acid causes an increase in both ID-1 and ID-3 gene expression. Furthermore, our data show that this increase is mediated by increased transcription involving several cis-acting elements in the distal portion of the promoter, including a CREB-binding site, an Egr1 element, and an YY1 site. These data demonstrate that the ID proteins are direct targets of the retinoic acid signaling pathway. Given the importance of the ID proteins to epidermal differentiation, these results suggest that IDs may be mediating some of the effects of all-trans retinoic acid in normal human keratinocytes.

  12. Data Mining for Expressivity of Recombinant Protein Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Satoshi; Isoai, Atsushi; Yamamura, Masayuki

    We analyzed the expressivity of recombinant proteins by using data mining methods. The expression technique of recombinant protein is a key step towards elucidating the functions of genes discovered through genomic sequence projects. We have studied the productive efficiency of recombinant proteins in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S.pombe), by mining the expression results. We gathered 57 proteins whose expression levels were known roughly in the host. Correlation analysis, principal component analysis and decision tree analysis were applied to these expression data. Analysis featuring codon usage and amino acid composition clarified that the amino acid composition affected to the expression levels of a recombinant protein strongly than the effect of codon usage. Furthermore, analysis of amino acid composition showed that protein solubility and the metabolism cost of amino acids correlated with a protein expressivity. Codon usage was often interesting in the field of recombinant expressions. However, our analysis found the weak correlation codon features with expressivities. These results indicated that ready-made indices of codon bias were irrelevant ones for modeling the expressivities of recombinant proteins. Our data driven approach was an easy and powerful method to improve recombinant protein expression, and this approach should be concentrated attention with the huge amount of expression data accumulating through the post-genome era.

  13. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Güler-Gane, Gülin; Kidd, Sara; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Vaughan, Tristan J.; Wilkinson, Trevor C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine), and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine). When proteins that naturally contain these “undesirable” residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that have so far

  14. Jasmonic acid affects plant morphology and calcium-dependent protein kinase expression and activity in Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Rita M; Raíces, Marcela; MacIntosh, Gustavo C; Maldonado, Sara; Téllez-Iñón, María T

    2002-07-01

    The effect of jasmonic acid (JA) on plant growth and on calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) activity and expression was studied in non-photoperiodic potato plants, Solanum tuberosum L. var. Spunta, grown in vitro. Stem cuttings were grown for 45 days (long treatment, LT) in MS medium with increasing concentrations of JA. For short treatments (ST) adult plants grown in MS were transferred for 1, 4 and 20 h to JA containing media. During the LT, low concentrations of JA promoted cell expansion and shoot elongation while higher concentrations caused growth inhibition. Under these conditions, treated plants showed root shortening and tuber formation was not induced. Morphological and histochemical studies using light microscopy and TEM analysis of leaves from treated plants revealed that JA also affected subcellular organelles of mesophyll cells. Peroxisomes increased in size and number, and an autophagic process was triggered in response to high concentrations of the hormone. CDPK activity, determined in crude extracts of treated plants (LT), was inhibited (up to 80%). Plant growth and CDPK inhibition were reverted upon transfer of the plants to hormone-free medium. Soluble CDPK activity decreased in response to JA short treatment. Concomitantly, a decline in the steady state levels of StCDPK2 mRNA, a potato CDPK isoform that is expressed in leaves, was observed. These data suggest that the phytohormone down-regulated the expression and activity of the kinase.

  15. Abscisic acid prevents the coalescence of protein storage vacuoles by upregulating expression of a tonoplast intrinsic protein gene in barley aleurone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-eun; Yim, Hui-kyung; Lim, Mi-na; Yoon, In sun; Kim, Jeong hoe; Hwang, Yong-sic

    2015-01-01

    Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) are integral membrane proteins that are known to function in plants as aquaporins. Here, we propose another role for TIPs during the fusion of protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) in aleurone cells, a process that is promoted by gibberellic acid (GA) and prevented by abscisic acid (ABA). Studies of the expression of barley (Hordeum vulgare) TIP genes (HvTIP) showed that GA specifically decreased the abundance of HvTIP1;2 and HvTIP3;1 transcripts, while ABA strongly increased expression of HvTIP3;1. Increased or decreased expression of HvTIP3;1 interfered with the hormonal effects on vacuolation in aleurone protoplasts. HvTIP3;1 gain-of-function experiments delayed GA-induced vacuolation, whereas HvTIP3;1 loss-of-function experiments promoted vacuolation in ABA-treated aleurone cells. These results indicate that TIP plays a key role in preventing the coalescence of small PSVs in aleurone cells. Hormonal regulation of the HvTIP3;1 promoter is similar to the regulation of the endogenous gene, indicating that induction of the transcription of HvTIP3;1 by ABA is a critical factor in the prevention of PSV coalescence in response to ABA. Promoter analysis using deletions and site-directed mutagenesis of sequences identified three cis-acting elements that are responsible for ABA responsiveness in the HvTIP3;1 promoter. Promoter analysis also showed that ABA responsiveness of the HvTIP3;1 promoter is likely to occur via a unique regulatory system distinct from that involving the ABA-response promoter complexes. PMID:25477530

  16. Abscisic acid prevents the coalescence of protein storage vacuoles by upregulating expression of a tonoplast intrinsic protein gene in barley aleurone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-eun; Yim, Hui-kyung; Lim, Mi-na; Yoon, In sun; Kim, Jeong hoe; Hwang, Yong-sic

    2015-03-01

    Tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) are integral membrane proteins that are known to function in plants as aquaporins. Here, we propose another role for TIPs during the fusion of protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) in aleurone cells, a process that is promoted by gibberellic acid (GA) and prevented by abscisic acid (ABA). Studies of the expression of barley (Hordeum vulgare) TIP genes (HvTIP) showed that GA specifically decreased the abundance of HvTIP1;2 and HvTIP3;1 transcripts, while ABA strongly increased expression of HvTIP3;1. Increased or decreased expression of HvTIP3;1 interfered with the hormonal effects on vacuolation in aleurone protoplasts. HvTIP3;1 gain-of-function experiments delayed GA-induced vacuolation, whereas HvTIP3;1 loss-of-function experiments promoted vacuolation in ABA-treated aleurone cells. These results indicate that TIP plays a key role in preventing the coalescence of small PSVs in aleurone cells. Hormonal regulation of the HvTIP3;1 promoter is similar to the regulation of the endogenous gene, indicating that induction of the transcription of HvTIP3;1 by ABA is a critical factor in the prevention of PSV coalescence in response to ABA. Promoter analysis using deletions and site-directed mutagenesis of sequences identified three cis-acting elements that are responsible for ABA responsiveness in the HvTIP3;1 promoter. Promoter analysis also showed that ABA responsiveness of the HvTIP3;1 promoter is likely to occur via a unique regulatory system distinct from that involving the ABA-response promoter complexes.

  17. Effects of abscisic acid and high osmoticum on storage protein gene expression in microspore embryos of Brassica napus

    SciTech Connect

    Wilen, R.W.; Mandel, R.M.; Pharis, R.P.; Moloney, M.M. ); Holbrook, L.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Storage protein gene expression, characteristic of mid- to late embryogenesis, was investigated in microspore embryos of rapeseed (Brassica napus). These embryos, derived from the immature male gametophyte, accumulate little or no detectable napin or cruciferin mRNA when cultured on hormone-free medium containing 13% sucrose. The addition of abscisic acid (ABA) to the medium results in an increase in detectable transcripts encoding both these polypeptides. Storage protein mRNA is induced at 1 micromolar ABA with maximum stimulation occurring between 5 and 50 micromolar. This hormone induction results in a level of storage protein mRNA that is comparable to that observed in zygotic embryos of an equivalent morphological stage. Effects similar to that of ABA are noted when 12.5% sorbitol is added to the microspore embryo medium (osmotic potential = 25.5 bars). Time course experiments, to study the induction of napin and cruciferin gene expression demonstrated that the ABA effect occurred much more rapidly than the high osmoticum effect, although after 48 hours, the levels of napin or cruciferin mRNA detected were similar in both treatments. This difference in the rates of induction is consistent with the idea that the osmotic effect may be mediated by ABA which is synthesized in response to the reduced water potential. Measurements of ABA (by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using ({sup 2}H{sub 6})ABA as an internal standard) present in microspore embryos during sorbitol treatment and in embryos treated with 10 micromolar ABA were performed to investigate this possibility. Within 2 hours of culture on high osmoticum the level of ABA increased substantially and significantly above control and reached a maximum concentration within 24 hours. This elevated concentration was maintained for 48 hours after culturing and represents a sixfold increase over control embryos.

  18. Prolactin and the dietary protein/carbohydrate ratio regulate the expression of SNAT2 amino acid transporter in the mammary gland during lactation.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Villegas, Laura A; López-Barradas, Adriana M; Torres, Nimbe; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Granados, Omar; Ortíz, Victor; Tovar, Armando R

    2015-05-01

    The sodium coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2/SAT2/ATA2) is expressed in the mammary gland (MG) and plays an important role in the uptake of alanine and glutamine which are the most abundant amino acids transported into this tissue during lactation. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the amount and localization of SNAT2 before delivery and during lactation in rat MG, and to evaluate whether prolactin and the dietary protein/carbohydrate ratio might influence SNAT2 expression in the MG, liver and adipose tissue during lactation. Our results showed that SNAT2 protein abundance in the MG increased during lactation and this increase was maintained along this period, while 24 h after weaning it tended to decrease. To study the effect of prolactin on SNAT2 expression, we incubated MG explants or T47D cells transfected with the SNAT2 promoter with prolactin, and we observed in both studies an increase in the SNAT2 expression or promoter activity. Consumption of a high-protein/low carbohydrate diet increased prolactin concentration, with a concomitant increase in SNAT2 expression not only in the MG during lactation, but also in the liver and adipose tissue. There was a correlation between SNAT2 expression and serum prolactin levels depending on the amount of dietary protein/carbohydrate ratio consumed. These findings suggest that prolactin actively supports lactation providing amino acids to the gland through SNAT2 for the synthesis of milk proteins.

  19. Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Is Expressed in Spermatogenic Cells, and It Altered the Expression of Several Nucleic-Acid-Binding and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Germ Cell 1 Spermatogonial (GC1-spg) Cells.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Karthika; Bhagya, Kongattu P; Kumar, Anil Tr; Devi, Anandavalli N; Sengottaiyan, Jeeva; Kumar, Pradeep G

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a gene associated with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). AIRE is expressed heavily in the thymic epithelial cells and is involved in maintaining self-tolerance through regulating the expression of tissue-specific antigens. The testes are the most predominant extrathymic location where a heavy expression of AIRE is reported. Homozygous Aire-deficient male mice were infertile, possibly due to impaired spermatogenesis, deregulated germ cell apoptosis, or autoimmunity. We report that AIRE is expressed in the testes of neonatal, adolescent, and adult mice. AIRE expression was detected in glial cell derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha (GFRα)(+) (spermatogonia), GFRα(-)/synaptonemal complex protein (SCP3)(+) (meiotic), and GFRα(-)/Phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2)(+) (postmeiotic) germ cells in mouse testes. GC1-spg, a germ-cell-derived cell line, did not express AIRE. Retinoic acid induced AIRE expression in GC1-spg cells. Ectopic expression of AIRE in GC1-spg cells using label-free LC-MS/MS identified a total of 371 proteins that were differentially expressed. 100 proteins were up-regulated, and 271 proteins were down-regulated. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002511. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed proteins showed increased levels of various nucleic-acid-binding proteins and transcription factors and a decreased level of various cytoskeletal and structural proteins in the AIRE overexpressing cells as compared with the empty vector-transfected controls. The transcripts of a select set of the up-regulated proteins were also elevated. However, there was no corresponding decrease in the mRNA levels of the down-regulated set of proteins. Molecular function network analysis indicated that AIRE influenced gene expression in GC1-spg cells by acting at multiple levels, including transcription, translation, RNA processing, protein transport, protein

  20. Effects of reducing dietary protein on the expression of nutrition sensing genes (amino acid transporters) in weaned piglets*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; He, Liu-qin; Cui, Zhi-jie; Liu, Gang; Yao, Kang; Wu, Fei; Li, Jun; Li, Tie-jun

    2015-01-01

    The effects of crude protein (CP) levels in the diet on the mRNA expression of amino acid (AA) transporters were studied in a 45-d trial. Eighteen piglets with an initial body weight (BW) of 9.57 kg were assigned to three groups (14%, 17%, and 20% CP in the diet) in a completely randomized design (six replicates per treatment). Diets were supplemented with crystalline AA to achieve equal standardized ileal digestible contents of Lys, Met plus Cys, Thr, and Trp, and were provided ad libitum. After 45 d, all piglets were slaughtered to collect small intestine samples. Compared with the values in the 14% CP group, the expressions of ASCT2, 4F2hc, and ATB0 mRNA in the jejunum were increased by 23.00%, 12.00%, 6.00% and 48.00%, 47.00%, 56.00% in the 17% and 20% CP groups, respectively. These results indicate that a 14% CP diet supplemented with crystalline AA may not transport enough AA into the body and maintain growth performance of piglets. However, a reduction of dietary 17% CP may reduce the excretion of nitrogen into the environment while supporting the development of piglets. Therefore, the 17% CP level is more suitable than 14% CP level. PMID:26055911

  1. Integration of Ethylene and Jasmonic Acid Signaling Pathways in the Expression of Novel Maize Defense Protein Mir1-CP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, ethylene (ET) and jasmonate (JA) control the defense responses to multiple stressors, including insect predation. Among the defense proteins known to be regulated by ET, is maize insect resistance 1-cysteine protease (Mir1-CP). This protein is constitutively expressed in the insect resi...

  2. Electron microscopic features of brain edema in rodent cerebral malaria in relation to glial fibrillary acidic protein expression.

    PubMed

    Ampawong, Sumate; Chaisri, Urai; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Nontprasert, Apichart; Grau, Georges E; Pongponratn, Emsri

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to cerebral malaria (CM) are not completely understood. Brain edema has been suggested as having an important role in experimental CM. In this study, CBA/CaH mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood-stage and when typical symptoms of CM developed on day 7, brain tissues were processed for electron-microscopic and immunohistochemical studies. The study demonstrated ultrastructural hallmarks of cerebral edema by perivascular edema and astroglial dilatation confirming existing evidence of vasogenic and cytogenic edema. This correlates closely with the clinical features of CM. An adaptive response of astrocytic activity, represented by increasing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the perivascular area and increasing numbers of large astrocyte clusters were predominately found in the CM mice. The presence of multivesicular and lamellar bodies indicates the severity of cerebral damage in experimental CM. Congestion of the microvessels with occluded white blood cells (WBCs), parasitized red blood cells (PRBCs) and platelets is also a crucial covariate role for CM pathogenesis.

  3. Naturally occurring single amino acid replacements in a regulatory protein alter streptococcal gene expression and virulence in mice

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Ronan K.; Shelburne, Samuel A.; Olsen, Randall J.; Suber, Bryce; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Beres, Stephen B.; Shea, Patrick R.; Flores, Anthony R.; Musser, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with different strains of the same species of bacteria often results in vastly different clinical outcomes. Despite extensive investigation, the genetic basis of microbial strain-specific virulence remains poorly understood. Recent whole-genome sequencing has revealed that SNPs are the most prevalent form of genetic diversity among different strains of the same species of bacteria. For invasive serotype M3 group A streptococci (GAS) strains, the gene encoding regulator of proteinase B (RopB) has the highest frequency of SNPs. Here, we have determined that ropB polymorphisms alter RopB function and modulate GAS host-pathogen interactions. Sequencing of ropB in 171 invasive serotype M3 GAS strains identified 19 distinct ropB alleles. Inactivation of the ropB gene in strains producing distinct RopB variants had dramatically divergent effects on GAS global gene expression. Additionally, generation of isoallelic GAS strains differing only by a single amino acid in RopB confirmed that variant proteins affected transcript levels of the gene encoding streptococcal proteinase B, a major RopB-regulated virulence factor. Comparison of parental, RopB-inactivated, and RopB isoallelic strains in mouse infection models demonstrated that ropB polymorphisms influence GAS virulence and disease manifestations. These data detail a paradigm in which unbiased, whole-genome sequence analysis of populations of clinical bacterial isolates creates new avenues of productive investigation into the pathogenesis of common human infections. PMID:21490401

  4. Integration of ethylene and jasmonic acid signaling pathways in the expression of maize defense protein Mir1-CP.

    PubMed

    Ankala, A; Luthe, D S; Williams, W P; Wilkinson, J R

    2009-12-01

    In plants, ethylene and jasmonate control the defense responses to multiple stressors, including insect predation. Among the defense proteins known to be regulated by ethylene is maize insect resistance 1-cysteine protease (Mir1-CP). This protein is constitutively expressed in the insect-resistant maize (Zea mays) genotype Mp708; however, its abundance significantly increases during fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) herbivory. Within 1 h of herbivory by fall armyworm, Mir1-CP accumulates at the feeding site and continues to increase in abundance until 24 h without any increase in its transcript (mir1) levels. To resolve this discrepancy and elucidate the role of ethylene and jasmonate in the signaling of Mir1-CP expression, the effects of phytohormone biosynthesis and perception inhibitors on Mir1-CP expression were tested. Immunoblot analysis of Mir1-CP accumulation and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction examination of mir1 levels in these treated plants demonstrate that Mir1-CP accumulation is regulated by both transcript abundance and protein expression levels. The results also suggest that jasmonate functions upstream of ethylene in the Mir1-CP expression pathway, allowing for both low-level constitutive expression and a two-stage defensive response, an immediate response involving Mir1-CP accumulation and a delayed response inducing mir1 transcript expression.

  5. Increased placental fatty acid transporter 6 and binding protein 3 expression and fetal liver lipid accumulation in a mouse model of obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Paula; Harris, Jessica; Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    Obesity in pregnancy is associated with increased fetal growth and adiposity, which, in part, is determined by transplacental nutrient supply. Trophoblast uptake and intracellular trafficking of lipids are dependent on placental fatty acid transport proteins (FATP), translocase (FAT/CD36), and fatty acid binding proteins (FABP). We hypothesized that maternal obesity in mice leads to increased placental expression of FAT/CD36, FATPs, and FABPs, and lipid accumulation in the fetal liver. C57/BL6J female mice were fed either a control (C; n = 10) or an obesogenic (OB; n = 10) high-fat, high-sugar diet before mating and throughout pregnancy. At E18.5, placentas and fetal livers were collected. Trophoblast plasma membranes (TPM) were isolated from placental homogenates. Expression of FAT/CD36 and FATP (TPM) and FABP (homogenates) was determined by immunoblotting. Gene expression was assessed by RT-quantitative PCR. Sections of fetal livers were stained for Oil Red O, and lipid droplets were quantified. TPM protein expression of FAT/CD36, FATP 2, and FATP 4 was comparable between C and OB groups. Conversely, TPM FATP 6 expression was increased by 35% in OB compared with C placentas without changes in mRNA expression. FABPs 1, 3-5 and PPARγ were expressed in homogenates, and FABP 3 expression increased 27% in OB compared with C placentas; however, no changes were observed in mRNA expression. Lipid droplet accumulation was 10-fold higher in the livers of fetuses from OB compared with C group. We propose that increased lipid transport capacity in obese mice promotes transplacental fatty acid transport and contributes to excess lipid accumulation in the fetal liver.

  6. Expression of a collagen-binding domain fusion protein: effect of amino acid supplementation, inducer type, and culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Fruchtl, McKinzie; Sakon, Joshua; Beitle, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Collagen binding domain fusion proteins are of significant importance because of their potential as therapeutic biomaterials. In this paper, we investigate the production of such therapeutic proteins via fermentation of Escherichia coli on both an undefined medium and a defined medium. Defined media with amino acid supplementation provided higher amounts of therapeutic protein than undefined media with no supplementation. Additionally, utilizing lactose instead of isopropyl-β-d-thio-galactoside (IPTG) for induction and extending batch time yielded higher amounts of the model therapeutic.

  7. High Doses of Ursodeoxycholic Acid Up-Regulate the Expression of Placental Breast Cancer Resistance Protein in Patients Affected by Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Azzaroli, Francesco; Raspanti, Maria Elena; Simoni, Patrizia; Montagnani, Marco; Lisotti, Andrea; Cecinato, Paolo; Arena, Rosario; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Farina, Antonio; Rizzo, Nicola; Mazzella, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Background Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) administration in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) induces bile acids (BA) efflux from the foetal compartment, but the molecular basis of this transplacental transport is only partially defined. Aim To determine if placental breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), able to transport BA, is regulated by UDCA in ICP. Methods 32 pregnant women with ICP (14 untreated, 34.9±5.17 years; 18 treated with UDCA - 25 mg/Kg/day, 32.7±4.62 years,) and 12 healthy controls (33.4±3.32 years) agreed to participate in the study. Placentas were obtained at delivery and processed for membrane extraction. BCRP protein expression was evaluated by immunoblotting techniques and chemiluminescence quantified with a luminograph measuring emitted photons; mRNA expression with real time PCR. Statistical differences between groups were evaluated by ANOVA with Dunn’s Multiple Comparison test. Results BCRP was expressed only on the apical membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast. A significant difference was observed among the three groups both for mRNA (ANOVA, p = 0.0074) and protein (ANOVA, p<0.0001) expression. BCRP expression was similar in controls and in the untreated ICP group. UDCA induced a significant increase in placental BCRP mRNA and protein expression compared to controls (350.7±106.3 vs 100±18.68% of controls, p<0.05 and 397.8±56.02 vs 100±11.44% of controls, p<0.001, respectively) and untreated ICP (90.29±17.59% of controls, p<0.05 and 155.0±13.87%, p<0.01). Conclusion Our results confirm that BCRP is expressed only on the apical membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast and show that ICP treatment with high dose UDCA significantly upregulates placental BCRP expression favouring BA efflux from the foetal compartment. PMID:23717540

  8. Discovery of EST-SSRs in lung cancer: tagged ESTs with SSRs lead to differential amino acid and protein expression patterns in cancerous tissues.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2011-01-01

    Tandem repeats are found in both coding and non-coding sequences of higher organisms. These sequences can be used in cancer genetics and diagnosis to unravel the genetic basis of tumor formation and progression. In this study, a possible relationship between SSR distributions and lung cancer was studied by comparative analysis of EST-SSRs in normal and lung cancerous tissues. While the EST-SSR distribution was similar between tumorous tissues, this distribution was different between normal and tumorous tissues. Trinucleotides tandem repeats were highly different; the number of trinucleotides in ESTs of lung cancer was 3 times higher than normal tissue. Significant negative correlation between normal and cancerous tissue showed that cancerous tissue generates different types of trinucleotides. GGC and CGC were the more frequent expressed trinucleotides in cancerous tissue, but these SSRs were not expressed in normal tissue. Similar to the EST level, the expression pattern of EST-SSRs-derived amino acids was significantly different between normal and cancerous tissues. Arg, Pro, Ser, Gly, and Lys were the most abundant amino acids in cancerous tissues, and Leu, Cys, Phe, and His were significantly more abundant in normal tissues than in cancerous tissues. Next, the putative functions of triplet SSR-containing genes were analyzed. In cancerous tissue, EST-SSRs produce different types of proteins. Chromodomain helicase DNA binding proteins were one of the major protein products of EST-SSRs in the cancerous library, while these proteins were not produced from EST-SSRs in normal tissue. For the first time, the findings of this study confirmed that EST-SSRs in normal lung tissues are different than in unhealthy tissues, and tagged ESTs with SSRs cause remarkable differences in amino acid and protein expression patterns in cancerous tissue. We suggest that EST-SSRs and EST-SSRs differentially expressed in cancerous tissue may be suitable candidate markers for lung cancer

  9. Differential Expression of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Genes during Orchid Flower Senescence Induced by the Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor Okadaic Acid1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning Ning; Yang, Shang Fa; Charng, Yee-yung

    2001-01-01

    Applying 10 pmol of okadaic acid (OA), a specific inhibitor of type 1 or type 2A serine/threonine protein phosphatases, to the orchid (Phalaenopsis species) stigma induced a dramatic increase in ethylene production and an accelerated senescence of the whole flower. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine or silver thiosulfate, inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or action, respectively, effectively inhibited the OA-induced ethylene production and retarded flower senescence, suggesting that the protein phosphatase inhibitor induced orchid flower senescence through an ethylene-mediated signaling pathway. OA treatment induced a differential expression pattern for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase multigene family. Accumulation of Phal-ACS1 transcript in the stigma, labelum, and ovary induced by OA were higher than those induced by pollination as determined by “semiquantitative” reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, the transcript levels of Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3 induced by OA were much lower than those induced by pollination. Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, on the other hand, inhibited the OA-induced Phal-ACS1 expression in the stigma and delayed flower senescence. Our results suggest that a hyper-phosphorylation status of an unidentified protein(s) is involved in up-regulating the expression of Phal-ACS1 gene resulting in increased ethylene production and accelerated the senescence process of orchid flower. PMID:11351088

  10. Unique and selective expression of L-amino acid transporter 1 in human tissue as well as being an aspect of oncofetal protein.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Norihiro; Mikami, Tetuo; Hana, Kiyomi; Ichinoe, Masaaki; Yanagisawa, Nobuyuki; Yoshida, Tsutomu; Endou, Hitoshi; Okayasu, Isao

    2014-02-01

    Dysregulated expression of L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), which transports large neutral amino acids, is a characteristic of various human cancers and possibly offers a molecular target for chemotherapy. LAT2, in contrast, shows lower expression in neoplasms. LAT1 is presumed to be a biomarker of many cancers, suggesting a kind of oncoprotein. However, no precise analysis of LAT1 and LAT2 expression has been performed in systemic normal tissues. To see characteristics of LAT1 and LAT2, immunohistochemical expression of LAT1 and LAT2 was assessed and compared in normal human systemic organs and tissues from 3 adults, 3 children and 3 fetuses in the present study. Cardiac muscles, hepatocytes, thymic epithelial cells and primitive neuroectodermal cells in fetus were positive with LAT1, whereas no expression was found in the respective adult tissues, indicating an aspect of oncofetal protein. In adult tissues, LAT1 was found to be expressed proximal to proliferative zones in gastrointestinal mucosa by double immunostaining of LAT1 and Ki-67. Testicular Sertoli cells, ovarian follicular cells, and pancreatic islet cells showed strong expression. Although the systemic capillary endothelium did not express LAT1, but did express LAT2, capillaries corresponding to the blood-brain, blood-follicle, and blood-retinal barriers demonstrated strong LAT1 immunoreactions. In conclusion, LAT1 was expressed in gonad tissues and several kinds of cells having special functions, as well as being discovered to be an aspect of oncofetal protein. In addition, ubiquitous LAT2 expression was confirmed immunohistochemically in systemic tissues, indicating constitutional function.

  11. Coevolution of gene expression among interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Wall, Dennis P.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-03-01

    Physically interacting proteins or parts of proteins are expected to evolve in a coordinated manner that preserves proper interactions. Such coevolution at the amino acid-sequence level is well documented and has been used to predict interacting proteins, domains, and amino acids. Interacting proteins are also often precisely coexpressed with one another, presumably to maintain proper stoichiometry among interacting components. Here, we show that the expression levels of physically interacting proteins coevolve. We estimate average expression levels of genes from four closely related fungi of the genus Saccharomyces using the codon adaptation index and show that expression levels of interacting proteins exhibit coordinated changes in these different species. We find that this coevolution of expression is a more powerful predictor of physical interaction than is coevolution of amino acid sequence. These results demonstrate previously uncharacterized coevolution of gene expression, adding a different dimension to the study of the coevolution of interacting proteins and underscoring the importance of maintaining coexpression of interacting proteins over evolutionary time. Our results also suggest that expression coevolution can be used for computational prediction of protein protein interactions.

  12. Investigation of potential mechanisms regulating protein expression of hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms 2 and 4 by fatty acids and thyroid hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Holness, Mark J; Bulmer, Karen; Smith, Nicholas D; Sugden, Mary C

    2003-01-01

    Liver contains two pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), namely PDK2 and PDK4, which regulate glucose oxidation through inhibitory phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). Starvation increases hepatic PDK2 and PDK4 protein expression, the latter occurring, in part, via a mechanism involving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha). High-fat feeding and hyperthyroidism, which increase circulating lipid supply, enhance hepatic PDK2 protein expression, but these increases are insufficient to account for observed increases in hepatic PDK activity. Enhanced expression of PDK4, but not PDK2, occurs in part via a mechanism involving PPAR-alpha. Heterodimerization partners for retinoid X receptors (RXRs) include PPARalpha and thyroid-hormone receptors (TRs). We therefore investigated the responses of hepatic PDK protein expression to high-fat feeding and hyperthyroidism in relation to hepatic lipid delivery and disposal. High-fat feeding increased hepatic PDK2, but not PDK4, protein expression whereas hyperthyroidism increased both hepatic PDK2 and PDK4 protein expression. Both manipulations decreased the sensitivity of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) to suppression by malonyl-CoA, but only hyperthyrodism elevated plasma fatty acid and ketone-body concentrations and CPT I maximal activity. Administration of the selective PPAR-alpha activator WY14,643 significantly increased PDK4 protein to a similar extent in both control and high-fat-fed rats, but WY14,643 treatment and hyperthyroidism did not have additive effects on hepatic PDK4 protein expression. PPARalpha activation did not influence hepatic PDK2 protein expression in euthyroid rats, suggesting that up-regulation of PDK2 by hyperthyroidism does not involve PPARalpha, but attenuated the effect of hyperthyroidism to increase hepatic PDK2 expression. The results indicate that hepatic PDK4 up-regulation can be achieved by heterodimerization of either PPARalpha or

  13. Investigation of potential mechanisms regulating protein expression of hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms 2 and 4 by fatty acids and thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Holness, Mark J; Bulmer, Karen; Smith, Nicholas D; Sugden, Mary C

    2003-02-01

    Liver contains two pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), namely PDK2 and PDK4, which regulate glucose oxidation through inhibitory phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). Starvation increases hepatic PDK2 and PDK4 protein expression, the latter occurring, in part, via a mechanism involving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha). High-fat feeding and hyperthyroidism, which increase circulating lipid supply, enhance hepatic PDK2 protein expression, but these increases are insufficient to account for observed increases in hepatic PDK activity. Enhanced expression of PDK4, but not PDK2, occurs in part via a mechanism involving PPAR-alpha. Heterodimerization partners for retinoid X receptors (RXRs) include PPARalpha and thyroid-hormone receptors (TRs). We therefore investigated the responses of hepatic PDK protein expression to high-fat feeding and hyperthyroidism in relation to hepatic lipid delivery and disposal. High-fat feeding increased hepatic PDK2, but not PDK4, protein expression whereas hyperthyroidism increased both hepatic PDK2 and PDK4 protein expression. Both manipulations decreased the sensitivity of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I) to suppression by malonyl-CoA, but only hyperthyrodism elevated plasma fatty acid and ketone-body concentrations and CPT I maximal activity. Administration of the selective PPAR-alpha activator WY14,643 significantly increased PDK4 protein to a similar extent in both control and high-fat-fed rats, but WY14,643 treatment and hyperthyroidism did not have additive effects on hepatic PDK4 protein expression. PPARalpha activation did not influence hepatic PDK2 protein expression in euthyroid rats, suggesting that up-regulation of PDK2 by hyperthyroidism does not involve PPARalpha, but attenuated the effect of hyperthyroidism to increase hepatic PDK2 expression. The results indicate that hepatic PDK4 up-regulation can be achieved by heterodimerization of either PPARalpha or

  14. The expression of a mitochondria-localized glutamic acid-rich protein (MGARP/OSAP) is under the regulation of the HPG axis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxue; Wang, Yifeng; Qi, Shaoling; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Shuping

    2011-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis exerts a profound effect on animal development, reproduction, and response to stress, and new insights into its complicated functional activities are continuously being made. In the present study, by using immunohistochemical studies and different mouse models (ovariectomy and ob/ob mice), we systemically analyzed the expression of a novel mitochondria-localized glutamic acid-rich protein (MGARP)/ovary-specific acid protein and demonstrated that MGARP is under the regulation of the HPG axis. MGARP is highly enriched in steroidogenic tissues and the visual system. Interestingly, its expression increases as mice develop. Early in development, MGARP is mainly detected in the retina and adrenal gland. At this early developmental stage, its expression is not detectable in the gonads, but its expression in the gonads dramatically increases during the first 2-4 wk after birth. Importantly, MGARP levels correlate with estrogen levels in the ovaries during the estrous cycle, and estrogen regulates the expression of MGARP in a tissue-specific manner and through a feedback regulatory mechanism. Functional inhibition of GnRH with an antagonist strongly reduces MGARP levels, and knockout of leptin (ob/ob) significantly reduces the MGARP expression in follicular granular cells. We proposed a model that elucidates the role MGARP plays in the HPG axis. Within the HPG axis loop, MGARP participates in hormone biosynthesis while being under the regulation of the hormones derived from the HPG axis.

  15. Immunohistochemical characterization of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells in a rat liver cirrhosis model induced by repeated injections of thioacetamide (TAA).

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, Anusha Hemamali; Izawa, Takeshi; Wijesundera, Kavindra Kumara; Murakami, Hiroshi; Katou-Ichikawa, Chisa; Tanaka, Miyuu; Golbar, Hossain M; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells, the principal fibrogenic cell type in the liver, are known to express the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, the exact role of GFAP-expressing cells in liver fibrosis remains to be elucidated. In this study, cellular properties of GFAP-expressing cells were investigated in a rat model of liver cirrhosis. Six-week-old male F344 rats were injected intraperitoneally with thioacetamide (100 mg/kg BW, twice a week) and examined at post first injection weeks 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25. Appearance of GFAP-expressing myofibroblasts peaked at week 15, associated with fibrosis progression. The majority of GFAP-expressing myofibroblasts co-expressed vimentin, desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin. Some GFAP-positive myofibroblasts co-expressed nestin (neural stem cell marker), while a few co-expressed A3 (mesenchymal stem cell marker) and Thy-1 (immature mesenchymal cell marker). A few GFAP expressing cells underwent both mitosis and apoptosis. These results indicate that there is a dynamic participation of GFAP-expressing myofibroblasts in rat liver cirrhosis, and that they are mainly derived from hepatic stellate cells, and partly from cells in the stem cell lineage. These findings, which were shown for the first time in detail, would be useful to understand the role of GFAP-expressing myofibroblasts in the pathogenesis of chemically induced liver cirrhosis.

  16. Effect of the ratios of unsaturated fatty acids on the expressions of genes related to fat and protein in the bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sheng, R; Yan, S M; Qi, L Z; Zhao, Y L

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the different ratios of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) (oleic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid) on the cell viability and triacylglycerol (TAG) content, as well as the mRNA expression of the genes related to lipid and protein synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). Primary cells were isolated from the mammary glands of Holstein dairy cows and were passaged twice. Afterward, the cells were randomly allocated to six treatments, five UFA-treated groups, and one control group. For all of the treatments, the the fetal bovine serum in the culture solution was replaced with fatty acid-free BSA (1 g/L), and the cells were treated with different ratios of oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids (0.75:4:1, 1.5:10:1, 2:13.3:1, 3:20:1, and 4:26.7:1) for 48 h, which were group 1 to group 5. The control culture solution contained only fatty acid-free BSA without UFAs (0 μM). The results indicated that the cell viability was not affected by adding different ratios of UFAs, but the accumulation of TAG was significantly influenced by supplementing with different ratios of UFAs. Adding different ratios of UFAs suppressed the expression of ACACA and FASN but had the opposite effect on the abundances of FABP3 and CD36 mRNA. The expression levels of PPARG, SPEBF1, CSN1S1, and CSN3 mRNA in the BMECs were affected significantly after adding different ratios of UFAs. Our results suggested that groups 1, 2, and 3 (0.75:4:1, 1.5:10:1, and 2:13.3:1) had stronger auxo-action on fat synthesis in the BMECs, where group 3 (2:13.3:1) was the best, followed by group 4 (3:20:1). However, group 5 (4:26.7:1) was the worst. Genes related to protein synthesis in the BMECs were better promoted in groups 2 and 3, and group 3 had the strongest auxo-action, whereas the present study only partly examined the regulation of protein synthesis at the transcriptional level; more studies on translation level are needed in the future

  17. The fatty acid binding protein 6 gene (Fabp6) is expressed in murine granulosa cells and is involved in ovulatory response to superstimulation

    PubMed Central

    DUGGAVATHI, Raj; SIDDAPPA, Dayananda; SCHUERMANN, Yasmin; PANSERA, Melissa; MENARD, Isabelle J.; PRASLICKOVA, Dana; AGELLON, Luis B.

    2015-01-01

    The fatty acid binding protein 6 (Fabp6) is commonly regarded as a bile acid binding protein found in the distal portion of the small intestine and has been shown to be important in maintaining bile acid homeostasis. Previous studies have also reported the presence of Fabp6 in human, rat and fish ovaries, but the significance of Fabp6 in this organ is largely unknown. Therefore, we surveyed murine ovaries for Fabp6 gene expression and evaluated its role in ovarian function using mice with whole body Fabp6 deficiency. Here we show that the Fabp6 gene is expressed in granulosa and luteal cells of the mouse ovary. Treatment with gonadotropins stimulated Fabp6 gene expression in large antral follicles. The ovulation rate in response to superovulatory treatment in Fabp6-deficient mice was markedly decreased compared to wildtype (C57BL/6) mice. The results of this study suggest that expression of Fabp6 gene in granulosa cells serves an important and previously unrecognized function in fertility. PMID:25754072

  18. Linoleic acid and its metabolites, hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids, stimulate c-Fos, c-Jun, and c-Myc mRNA expression, mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, and growth in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, G N; Alexander, R W; Runge, M S

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies from other laboratories suggest that linoleic acid and its metabolites, hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids, play an important role in modulating the growth of some cells. A correlation has been demonstrated between hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids and conditions characterized by abnormal cell growth such as atherosclerosis and psoriasis. To determine if linoleic acid and its metabolites modulate cell growth in atherosclerosis, we measured DNA synthesis, protooncogene mRNA expression, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Linoleic acid induces DNA synthesis, c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc mRNA expression and MAPK activation in VSMC. Furthermore, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a potent inhibitor of the lipoxygenase system, significantly reduced the growth-response effects of linoleic acid in VSMC, suggesting that conversion of linoleic acid to hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acids (HPODEs) is required for these effects. HPODEs also caused significant induction of DNA synthesis, protooncogene mRNA expression, and MAPK activation in growth-arrested VSMC, suggesting that linoleic acid and its metabolic products, HPODEs, are potential mitogens in VSMC, and that conditions such as oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation which provoke the production of these substances may alter VSMC growth. Images PMID:7635978

  19. Heightened expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 alpha, and glial fibrillary acidic protein in experimental Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kordek, R; Nerurkar, V R; Liberski, P P; Isaacson, S; Yanagihara, R; Gajdusek, D C

    1996-01-01

    The ultrastructural pathology of myelinated axons in mice infected experimentally with the Fujisaki strain of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) virus is characterized by myelin sheath vacuolation that closely resembles that induced in murine spinal cord organotypic cultures by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine produced by astrocytes and macrophages. To clarify the role of TNF-alpha in experimental CJD, we investigated the expression of TNF-alpha in brain tissues from CJD virus-infected mice at weekly intervals after inoculation by reverse transcription-coupled PCR, Northern and Western blot analyses, and immunocytochemical staining. Neuropathological findings by electron microscopy, as well as expression of interleukin 1 alpha and glial fibrillary acidic protein, were concurrently monitored. As determined by reverse transcription-coupled PCR, the expression of TNF-alpha, interleukin 1 alpha, and glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased by approximately 200-fold in the brains of CJD virus-inoculated mice during the course of disease. By contrast, beta-actin expression remained unchanged. Progressively increased expression of TNF-alpha in CJD virus-infected brain tissues was verified by Northern and Western blot analyses, and astrocytes in areas with striking myelin sheath vacuolation were intensely stained with an antibody against murine TNF-alpha. The collective findings of TNF-alpha overexpression during the course of clinical disease suggest that TNF-alpha may mediate the myelin sheath vacuolation observed in experimental CJD. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790403

  20. Effects of Saturated Long-chain Fatty Acid on mRNA Expression of Genes Associated with Milk Fat and Protein Biosynthesis in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lizhi; Yan, Sumei; Sheng, Ran; Zhao, Yanli; Guo, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of saturated long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) on cell proliferation and triacylglycerol (TAG) content, as well as mRNA expression of αs1-casein (CSN1S1) and genes associated with lipid and protein synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). Primary cells were isolated from the mammary glands of Holstein dairy cows, and were passaged twice. Then cells were cultured with different levels of palmitate or stearate (0, 200, 300, 400, 500, and 600 μM) for 48 h and fetal bovine serum in the culture solution was replaced with fatty acid-free BSA (1 g/L). The results showed that cell proliferation tended to be increased quadratically with increasing addition of stearate. Treatments with palmitate or stearate induced an increase in TAG contents at 0 to 600 μM in a concentration-dependent manner, and the addition of 600 μM was less effective in improving TAG accumulation. The expression of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase alpha, fatty acid synthase and fatty acid-binding protein 3 was inhibited when palmitate or stearate were added in culture medium, whereas cluster of differentiation 36 and CSN1S1 mRNA abundance was increased in a concentration-dependent manner. The mRNA expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, mammalian target of rapamycin and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 with palmitate or stearate had no significant differences relative to the control. These results implied that certain concentrations of saturated LCFA could stimulate cell proliferation and the accumulation of TAG, whereas a reduction may occur with the addition of an overdose of saturated LCFA. Saturated LCFA could up-regulate CSN1S1 mRNA abundance, but further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanism for regulating milk fat and protein synthesis. PMID:25049969

  1. Glial fibrillary acidic protein is differentially expressed across cortical and subcortical regions in healthy brains and downregulated in the thalamus and caudate nucleus of depressed suicides.

    PubMed

    Torres-Platas, S G; Nagy, C; Wakid, M; Turecki, G; Mechawar, N

    2016-04-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest aberrant astrocytic function in depression and suicide. Independent studies have reported astrocytic abnormalities in certain brain regions, but it remains unclear whether this is a brain-wide phenomenon. The present study examined this question by measuring glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in postmortem brain samples from suicide completers and matched non-psychiatric controls. Suicide completers were selected based on their recent characterization as low GFAP expressors in the prefrontal cortex, (Brodmann areas 8/9 and 10). Real-time PCR and immunoblotting were used to measure GFAP gene expression and protein levels in BA4 (primary motor cortex), BA17 (primary visual cortex), cerebellar cortex, mediodorsal thalamus and caudate nucleus. We found downregulation of GFAP mRNA and protein in the mediodorsal thalamus and caudate nucleus of depressed suicides compared with controls, whereas GFAP expression in other brain regions was similar between groups. Furthermore, a regional comparison including all samples revealed that GFAP expression in both subcortical regions was, on average, between 11- and 15-fold greater than in cerebellum and neocortex. Examining astrocyte morphology by immunohistochemistry showed that astrocytes in both thalamus and caudate displayed larger cell bodies and extended more ramified processes across larger domains than the previously described cortical astrocytes. This study reveals that astrocytic abnormalities are not brain wide and suggests that they are restricted to cortical and subcortical networks known to be affected in mood disorders. Additionally, our results show a greater diversity in human astrocytic phenotypes than previously thought.

  2. Dietary ascorbic acid modulates the expression profile of stress protein genes in hepatopancreas of adult Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenglong; Wang, Jia; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbing; Mai, Kangsen

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary ascorbic acid (AA) on transcriptional expression patterns of antioxidant proteins, heat shock proteins (HSP) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the hepatopancreas of Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino (initial average length: 84.36 ± 0.24 mm) using real-time quantitative PCR assays. L-ascorbyl-2-molyphosphate (LAMP) was added to the basal diet to formulate four experimental diets containing 0.0, 70.3, 829.8 and 4967.5 mg AA equivalent kg(-1) diets, respectively. Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of adult abalone in acrylic tanks (200 L) in a flow-through seawater system. Each tank was stocked with 15 abalone. Animals were fed once daily (17:00) to apparent satiation for 24 weeks. The results showed that the dietary AA (70.3 mg kg(-1)) could significantly up-regulate the expression levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), feritin (FT) and heat shock protein 26 (HSP26) in the hepatopancreas of abalone in this treatment compared to the controls. However, the expression levels of Mn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), selenium-binding protein (SEBP), HSP70 and HSP90 were significantly down-regulated. Compared with those in the group with 70.3 mg kg(-1) dietary AA, the expression levels of CAT, GST and HSP26 were decreased in abalone fed with very high dietary AA (4967.5 mg kg(-1)). In addition, significant up-regulations of expression levels of Mn-SOD, GPX, TPx, SEBP, FT, HSP70, HSP90 and NF-κB were observed in abalone fed with apparently excessive dietary AA (829.8 and 4967.5 mg kg(-1)) as compared to those fed 70.3 mg kg(-1) dietary AA. These findings showed that dietary AA influenced the expression levels of antioxidant proteins, heat shock proteins and NF-κB in the hepatopancreas of abalone at transcriptional level. Levels of dietary AA that appeared adequate (70.3 mg kg(-1)) reduced the oxidative stress

  3. Dietary ascorbic acid modulates the expression profile of stress protein genes in hepatopancreas of adult Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenglong; Wang, Jia; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbing; Mai, Kangsen

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary ascorbic acid (AA) on transcriptional expression patterns of antioxidant proteins, heat shock proteins (HSP) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the hepatopancreas of Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino (initial average length: 84.36 ± 0.24 mm) using real-time quantitative PCR assays. L-ascorbyl-2-molyphosphate (LAMP) was added to the basal diet to formulate four experimental diets containing 0.0, 70.3, 829.8 and 4967.5 mg AA equivalent kg(-1) diets, respectively. Each diet was fed to triplicate groups of adult abalone in acrylic tanks (200 L) in a flow-through seawater system. Each tank was stocked with 15 abalone. Animals were fed once daily (17:00) to apparent satiation for 24 weeks. The results showed that the dietary AA (70.3 mg kg(-1)) could significantly up-regulate the expression levels of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), feritin (FT) and heat shock protein 26 (HSP26) in the hepatopancreas of abalone in this treatment compared to the controls. However, the expression levels of Mn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), selenium-binding protein (SEBP), HSP70 and HSP90 were significantly down-regulated. Compared with those in the group with 70.3 mg kg(-1) dietary AA, the expression levels of CAT, GST and HSP26 were decreased in abalone fed with very high dietary AA (4967.5 mg kg(-1)). In addition, significant up-regulations of expression levels of Mn-SOD, GPX, TPx, SEBP, FT, HSP70, HSP90 and NF-κB were observed in abalone fed with apparently excessive dietary AA (829.8 and 4967.5 mg kg(-1)) as compared to those fed 70.3 mg kg(-1) dietary AA. These findings showed that dietary AA influenced the expression levels of antioxidant proteins, heat shock proteins and NF-κB in the hepatopancreas of abalone at transcriptional level. Levels of dietary AA that appeared adequate (70.3 mg kg(-1)) reduced the oxidative stress

  4. Primary structure and developmental expression of Bufo arenarum cellular nucleic acid-binding protein: changes in subcellular localization during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Armas, P; Cabada, M O; Calcaterra, N B

    2001-02-01

    A Bufo arenarum cellular nucleic acid-binding protein (bCNBP) full-length cDNA was cloned. bCNBP is a 19.4 kDa protein containing seven CCHC zinc finger motifs, an RGG box and a Ser-rich region. Amino acid comparisons showed high values of homology in vertebrates and smaller values in insects or inferior eukaryotes. Northern blot analysis during oogenesis and early development revealed two transcripts with different expressions of pattern behavior. One of them is present in all stages analyzed, whereas the other is only detected from the beginning of zygotic transcription. Immunocytochemistry assays carried out on sections of ovary and early embryos showed that there was no specific staining of previtellogenic oocytes. In early vitellogenic oocytes, in oocytes at stages V/VI and in embryos at early blastula stage, reaction was observed inside the cytoplasm. At mid-blastula stage, CNBP was mainly detected in the epiblast. At the late gastrula stage, two layers of cells were stained in the archenteron roof, in which the internal one presented as strong staining. Nuclei in this layer were stained even stronger than the cytoplasm. Changes in mRNA expression patterns, accompanied by changes in subcellular localization, suggest that CNBP might interact with both nuclear and cytoplasmic nucleic acids.

  5. Effects of supplementation with branched-chain amino acids to low-protein diets on expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yehui; Duan, Yangmiao; Li, Fengna; Li, Yinghui; Guo, Qiuping; Ji, Yujiao; Tan, Bie; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2016-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), including leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile), and valine (Val), play critical roles in energy homeostasis and lipid metabolism in addition to their other functions, such as in protein metabolism. This study investigated the effects of different dietary BCAA ratios on the intramuscular fat (IMF) content and fatty acid composition in different location of skeletal muscles, including the longissimus dorsi (LD), biceps femoris (BF), and psoas major (PM) muscles of growing pigs, and also examined the mRNA expression levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism in these muscle tissues. The experiment was performed on 40 growing pigs (Large White × Landrace) with a similar initial weight (9.85 ± 0.35 kg). The pigs were randomly assigned to one of five diets: diet A was a positive control and contained 20 % crude protein (CP) with a Leu:Ile:Val ratio of 1:0.51:0.63 according to the recommendation of the National Research Council (NRC); for diets B to E, the CP level was reduced to 17 %, and the Leu:Ile:Val ratios were 1:1:1, 1:0.75:0.75, 1:0.51:0.63, and 1:0.25:0.25, respectively. No significant difference was observed in the average feed intake and feed efficiency of the pigs fed the low protein diet (17 % CP) with BCAA treatments relative to the positive control. However, there was a tendency for increased feed efficiency of the 1:0.75:0.75 group compared with the 1:1:1 group (P = 0.09). The BCAA ratio of 1:0.75:0.75 (17 % CP) increased the IMF content of BF muscle (P < 0.01). Moreover, varied dietary BCAA supplementation with a reduced protein level had different effects on the fatty acid composition of the LD, BF, and PM muscles. The BCAA ratio of 1:0.51:0.63-1:0.75:0.75 (17 % CP) significantly lowered the ratio of n-6 to n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in these muscles compared with the positive control group (20 % CP). This effect was associated with an increase in mRNA expression levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase

  6. Effect of aldosterone and glycyrrhetinic acid on the protein expression of PAI-1 and p22(phox) in human mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Zaghetto, Francesca; Pagnin, Elisa; Davis, Paul A; De Mozzi, Paola; Sartorato, Paola; Martire, Giuseppe; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio

    2004-04-01

    Aldosterone excess can produce heart and kidney fibrosis, which seem to be related to a direct effect of aldosterone at the level of specific receptors. We report a direct, mineralocorticoid-mediated effect on the protein expression of two markers of oxidative stress after incubation of mononuclear leukocytes with 1 x 10(-8) M aldosterone (p22(phox)/beta-actin = 1.38 +/- 0.05 and PAI-1/beta-actin = 1.80 +/- 0.05). The same effect was also found with 3 x 10(-5) M glycyrrhetinic acid, the principal constituent of licorice root (p22(phox)/beta-actin = 1.37 +/- 0.97 and PAI-1/beta-actin = 1.80 +/- 0.04). The effect of both aldosterone and glycyrrhetinic acid is blocked by incubation with added 1 x 10(-6) M of receptor-antagonist canrenone. Canrenone alone did not show any effect. PAI-1 related protein was also found using 4 x 10(-9) M aldosterone. Incubations with 1 x 10(-9) M for 3 hours as well as 1 x 10(-8) M aldosterone for 5, 10, and 20 minutes were ineffective for both proteins. These data support the previous finding of an involvement of mononuclear leukocytes in the pathogenesis of the oxidative stress induced by hyperaldosteronism. In addition, the results confirm our previous data on a direct effect of glycyrrhetinic acid at the level of mineralocorticoid receptors. PMID:15070972

  7. Aquaporin 4-dependent expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and tenascin-C in activated astrocytes in stab wound mouse brain and in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Ikeshima-Kataoka, Hiroko; Abe, Yoichiro; Yasui, Masato

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that aquaporin 4 (AQP4) has a neuroimmunological function via astrocytes and microglial cells involving osteopontin. AQP4 is a water channel localized in the endofoot of astrocytes in the brain, and its expression is upregulated after a stab wound to the mouse brain or the injection of methylmercury in common marmosets. In this study, the correlation between the expression of AQP4 and the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or tenascin-C (TN-C) in reactive astrocytes was examined in primary cultures and brain tissues of AQP4-deficient mice (AQP4/KO). In the absence of a stab wound to the brain or of any stimulation of the cells, the expressions of both GFAP and TN-C were lower in astrocytes from AQP4/KO mice than in those from wild-type (WT) mice. High levels of GFAP and TN-C expression were observed in activated astrocytes after a stab wound to the brain in WT mice; however, the expressions of GFAP and TN-C were insignificant in AQP4/KO mice. Furthermore, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation activated primary culture of astrocytes and upregulated GFAP and TN-C expression in cells from WT mice, whereas the expressions of GFAP and TN-C were slightly upregulated in cells from AQP4/KO mice. Moreover, the stimulation of primary culture of astrocytes with LPS also upregulated inflammatory cytokines in cells from WT mice, whereas modest increases were observed in cells from AQP4/KO mice. These results suggest that AQP4 expression accelerates GFAP and TN-C expression in activated astrocytes induced by a stab wound in the mouse brain and LPS-stimulated primary culture of astrocytes.

  8. Characterization of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing hepatic stellate cells and myofibroblasts in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced rat liver injury.

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, Anusha Hemamali; Izawa, Takeshi; Wijesundera, Kavindra Kumara; Golbar, Hossain M; Tanaka, Miyuu; Ichikawa, Chisa; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2013-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which can express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in normal rat livers, play important roles in hepatic fibrogenesis through the conversion into myofibroblasts (MFs). Cellular properties and possible derivation of GFAP-expressing MFs were investigated in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced rat liver injury and subsequent fibrosis. Seven-week-old male F344 rats were injected with TAA (300mg/kg BW, once, intraperitoneally), and were examined on post single injection (PSI) days 1-10 by the single and double immunolabeling with MF and stem cell marker antibodies. After hepatocyte injury in the perivenular areas on PSI days 1 and 2, the fibrotic lesion consisting of MF developed at a peak on PSI day 3, and then recovered gradually by PSI day 10. MFs expressed GFAP, and also showed co-expressions such cytoskeletons (MF markers) as vimentin, desmin and α-SMA in varying degrees. Besides MFs co-expressing vimentin/desmin, desmin/α-SMA or α-SMA/vimentin, some GFAP positive MFs co-expressed with nestin or A3 (both, stem cell markers), and there were also MFs co-expressing nestin/A3. However, there were no GFAP positive MFs co-expressing RECA-1 (endothelial marker) or Thy-1 (immature mesenchymal cell marker). GFAP positive MFs showed the proliferating activity, but they did not undergo apoptosis. However, α-SMA positive MFs underwent apoptosis. These findings indicate that HSCs can proliferate and then convert into MFs with co-expressing various cytoskeletons for MF markers, and that the converted MFs may be derived partly from the stem cell lineage. Additionally, well-differentiated MFs expressing α-SMA may disappear by apoptosis for healing. These findings shed some light on the pathogenesis of chemically induced hepatic fibrosis.

  9. Long-Term Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid Feeding on Lipid Composition and Brain Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Expression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elsherbiny, Marwa E.; Goruk, Susan; Monckton, Elizabeth A.; Richard, Caroline; Brun, Miranda; Emara, Marwan; Field, Catherine J.; Godbout, Roseline

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) brain accretion is essential for brain development. The impact of DHA-rich maternal diets on offspring brain fatty acid composition has previously been studied up to the weanling stage; however, there has been no follow-up at later stages. Here, we examine the impact of DHA-rich maternal and weaning diets on brain fatty acid composition at weaning and three weeks post-weaning. We report that DHA supplementation during lactation maintains high DHA levels in the brains of pups even when they are fed a DHA-deficient diet for three weeks after weaning. We show that boosting dietary DHA levels for three weeks after weaning compensates for a maternal DHA-deficient diet during lactation. Finally, our data indicate that brain fatty acid binding protein (FABP7), a marker of neural stem cells, is down-regulated in the brains of six-week pups with a high DHA:AA ratio. We propose that elevated levels of DHA in developing brain accelerate brain maturation relative to DHA-deficient brains. PMID:26506385

  10. Leptospira Protein Expression During Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are characterizing protein expression in vivo during experimental leptospirosis using immunofluorescence microscopy. Coding regions for several proteins were identified through analysis of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni and L. borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo genomes. In addition, codi...

  11. Repressing the expression of the SUCROSE NONFERMENTING-1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE gene in pea embryo causes pleiotropic defects of maturation similar to an abscisic acid-insensitive phenotype.

    PubMed

    Radchuk, Ruslana; Radchuk, Volodymyr; Weschke, Winfriede; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Weber, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The classic role of SUCROSE NONFERMENTING-1 (Snf1)-like kinases in eukaryotes is to adapt metabolism to environmental conditions such as nutrition, energy, and stress. During pea (Pisum sativum) seed maturation, developmental programs of growing embryos are adjusted to changing physiological and metabolic conditions. To understand regulation of the switch from cell proliferation to differentiation, SUCROSE NONFERMENTING-1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE (SnRK1) was antisense repressed in pea seeds. Transgenic seeds show maturation defects, reduced conversion of sucrose into storage products, lower globulin content, frequently altered cotyledon surface, shape, and symmetry, as well as occasional precocious germination. Gene expression analysis of embryos using macroarrays of 5,548 seed-specific genes revealed 183 differentially expressed genes in two clusters, either delayed down-regulated or delayed up-regulated during transition. Delayed down-regulated genes are related to mitotic activity, gibberellic acid/brassinosteroid synthesis, stress response, and Ca2+ signal transduction. This specifies a developmentally younger status and conditional stress. Higher gene expression related to respiration/gluconeogenesis/fermentation is consistent with a role of SnRK1 in repressing energy-consuming processes in maturing cotyledons under low oxygen/energy availability. Delayed up-regulated genes are mainly related to storage protein synthesis and stress tolerance. Most of the phenotype resembles abscisic acid (ABA) insensitivity and may be explained by reduced Abi-3 expression. This may cause a reduction in ABA functions and/or a disconnection between metabolic and ABA signals, suggesting that SnRK1 is a mediator of ABA functions during pea seed maturation. SnRK1 repression also impairs gene expression associated with differentiation, independent from ABA functions, like regulation and signaling of developmental events, chromatin reorganization, cell wall synthesis, biosynthetic

  12. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-02-26

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  13. Identification of a membrane protein, LAT-2, that Co-expresses with 4F2 heavy chain, an L-type amino acid transport activity with broad specificity for small and large zwitterionic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pineda, M; Fernández, E; Torrents, D; Estévez, R; López, C; Camps, M; Lloberas, J; Zorzano, A; Palacín, M

    1999-07-01

    We have identified a new human cDNA, L-amino acid transporter-2 (LAT-2), that induces a system L transport activity with 4F2hc (the heavy chain of the surface antigen 4F2, also named CD98) in oocytes. Human LAT-2 is the fourth member of the family of amino acid transporters that are subunits of 4F2hc. The amino acid transport activity induced by the co-expression of 4F2hc and LAT-2 was sodium-independent and showed broad specificity for small and large zwitterionic amino acids, as well as bulky analogs (e.g. BCH (2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid)). This transport activity was highly trans-stimulated, suggesting an exchanger mechanism of transport. Expression of tagged N-myc-LAT-2 alone in oocytes did not induce amino acid transport, and the protein had an intracellular location. Co-expression of N-myc-LAT-2 and 4F2hc gave amino acid transport induction and expression of N-myc-LAT-2 at the plasma membrane of the oocytes. These data suggest that LAT-2 is an additional member of the family of 4F2 light chain subunits, which associates with 4F2hc to express a system L transport activity with broad specificity for zwitterionic amino acids. Human LAT-2 mRNA is expressed in kidney > placenta > brain, liver > spleen, skeletal muscle, heart, small intestine, and lung. Human LAT-2 gene localizes at chromosome 14q11.2-13 (13 cR or approximately 286 kb from marker D14S1349). The high expression of LAT-2 mRNA in epithelial cells of proximal tubules, the basolateral location of 4F2hc in these cells, and the amino acid transport activity of LAT-2 suggest that this transporter contributes to the renal reabsorption of neutral amino acids in the basolateral domain of epithelial proximal tubule cells.

  14. Differential gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase and type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in basal ganglia, thalamus, and hypothalamus of the monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.L.; Isackson, P.J.; Hendry, S.H.; Jones, E.G. )

    1991-06-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry, using cRNA probes, revealed a complementarity in the distributions of cells in the basal ganglia, basal nucleus of Meynert, thalamus, hypothalamus, and rostral part of the midbrain that showed gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or the alpha-subunit of type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAM II kinase-alpha). Cells in certain nuclei such as the thalamic reticular nucleus, globus pallidus, and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra show GAD gene expression only; others in nuclei such as the basal nucleus of Meynert, medial mamillary nuclei, and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei show CAM II kinase-alpha gene expression only. A few nuclei, for example, the pars compacta of the substantia nigra and the greater part of the subthalamic nucleus, display gene expression for neither GAD nor CAM II kinase-alpha. In other nuclei, notably those of the dorsal thalamus, and possibly in the striatum, GAD- and CAM II kinase-expressing cells appear to form two separate populations that, in most thalamic nuclei, together account for the total cell population. In situ hybridization reveals large amounts of CAM II kinase-alpha mRNA in the neuropil of most nuclei containing CAM II kinase-alpha-positive cells, suggesting its association with dendritic polyribosomes. The message may thus be translated at those sites, close to the synapses with which the protein is associated. The in situ hybridization results, coupled with those from immunocytochemical staining for CAM II kinase-alpha protein, indicate that CAM II kinase-alpha is commonly found in certain non-GABAergic afferent fiber systems but is not necessarily present in the postsynaptic cells on which they terminate. It appears to be absent from most GABAergic fiber systems but can be present in the cells on which they terminate.

  15. PPARα (Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor α) Activation Reduces Hepatic CEACAM1 Protein Expression to Regulate Fatty Acid Oxidation during Fasting-refeeding Transition.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Khuder, Saja S; Al-Share, Qusai Y; Russo, Lucia; Abdallah, Simon L; Patel, Payal R; Heinrich, Garrett; Muturi, Harrison T; Mopidevi, Brahma R; Oyarce, Ana Maria; Shah, Yatrik M; Sanchez, Edwin R; Najjar, Sonia M

    2016-04-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is expressed at high levels in the hepatocyte, consistent with its role in promoting insulin clearance in liver. CEACAM1 also mediates a negative acute effect of insulin on fatty acid synthase activity. Western blot analysis reveals lower hepatic CEACAM1 expression during fasting. Treating of rat hepatoma FAO cells with Wy14,643, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), rapidly reduces Ceacam1 mRNA and CEACAM1 protein levels within 1 and 2 h, respectively. Luciferase reporter assay shows a decrease in the promoter activity of both rat and mouse genes by Pparα activation, and 5'-deletion and block substitution analyses reveal that the Pparα response element between nucleotides -557 and -543 is required for regulation of the mouse promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrates binding of liganded Pparα toCeacam1promoter in liver lysates ofPparα(+/+), but notPparα(-/-)mice fed a Wy14,643-supplemented chow diet. Consequently, Wy14,643 feeding reduces hepatic Ceacam1 mRNA and CEACAM1 protein levels, thus decreasing insulin clearance to compensate for compromised insulin secretion and maintain glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in wild-type mice. Together, the data show that the low hepatic CEACAM1 expression at fasting is mediated by Pparα-dependent mechanisms. Changes in CEACAM1 expression contribute to the coordination of fatty acid oxidation and insulin action in the fasting-refeeding transition.

  16. Non-esterified fatty acids promote expression and secretion of angiopoietin-like protein 4 in calf hepatocytes cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhe; Yao, Junhu; Zhao, Baoyu; Liu, Guowen

    2015-03-01

    An elevated plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) concentration is an important indicator of negative energy balance, which is often associated with metabolic diseases such as fatty liver and ketosis. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is a hepatokine that plays important roles in the regulation of lipid metabolism. However, the direct effects of high concentrations of NEFA on ANGPTL4 expression and secretion in hepatocytes from cows are not entirely clear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different NEFA concentrations on ANGPTL4 expression and secretion in calf hepatocytes cultured in vitro. NEFA was added to the culture solution at final concentrations of 0.6, 1.2, 1.8, and 2.4 mmol/L. After 24 h of continuous culture, ANGPTL4 mRNA and protein expression levels in the hepatocytes were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively. ANGPTL4 secretion in the supernatant was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed similar levels of ANGPTL4 expression and secretion following treatment with 0.6 and 1.2 mmol/L NEFA, which were higher than those observed for the controls (P < 0.05). ANGPTL4 expression and secretion were also similar at 1.8 and 2.4 mmol/L NEFA and significantly higher than those observed for controls (P < 0.01). These data suggest that high concentrations of NEFA significantly promote ANGPTL4 expression and secretion in bovine hepatocytes. In particular, this promotion occurs in a dose-dependent manner and may be involved in the pathological processes of energy metabolism disorders of dairy cows in the peripartum period.

  17. Expression pattern conferred by a glutamic acid-rich protein gene promoter in field-grown transgenic cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Beltrán, J; Prías, M; Al-Babili, S; Ladino, Y; López, D; Beyer, P; Chavarriaga, P; Tohme, J

    2010-05-01

    A major constraint for incorporating new traits into cassava using biotechnology is the limited list of known/tested promoters that encourage the expression of transgenes in the cassava's starchy roots. Based on a previous report on the glutamic-acid-rich protein Pt2L4, indicating a preferential expression in roots, we cloned the corresponding gene including promoter sequence. A promoter fragment (CP2; 731 bp) was evaluated for its potential to regulate the expression of the reporter gene GUSPlus in transgenic cassava plants grown in the field. Intense GUS staining was observed in storage roots and vascular stem tissues; less intense staining in leaves; and none in the pith. Consistent with determined mRNA levels of the GUSPlus gene, fluorometric analyses revealed equal activities in root pulp and stems, but 3.5 times less in leaves. In a second approach, the activity of a longer promoter fragment (CP1) including an intrinsic intron was evaluated in carrot plants. CP1 exhibited a pronounced tissue preference, conferring high expression in the secondary phloem and vascular cambium of roots, but six times lower expression levels in leaf vascular tissues. Thus, CP1 and CP2 may be useful tools to improve nutritional and agronomical traits of cassava by genetic engineering. To date, this is the first study presenting field data on the specificity and potential of promoters for transgenic cassava.

  18. Fatty acid represses insulin receptor gene expression by impairing HMGA1 through protein kinase C{epsilon}

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Debleena; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Roy, SibSankar; Bhattacharya, Samir . E-mail: smrbhattacharya@gmail.com

    2007-06-01

    It is known that free fatty acid (FFA) contributes to the development of insulin resistance and type2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism in FFA-induced insulin resistance is still unclear. In the present investigation we have demonstrated that palmitate significantly (p < 0.001) inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of PDK1, the key insulin signaling molecule. Consequently, PDK1 phosphorylation of plasma membrane bound PKC{epsilon} was also inhibited. Surprisingly, phosphorylation of cytosolic PKC{epsilon} was greatly stimulated by palmitate; this was then translocated to the nuclear region and associated with the inhibition of insulin receptor (IR) gene transcription. A PKC{epsilon} translocation inhibitor peptide, {epsilon}V1, suppressed this inhibitory effect of palmitate, suggesting requirement of phospho-PKC{epsilon} migration to implement palmitate effect. Experimental evidences indicate that phospho-PKC{epsilon} adversely affected HMGA1. Since HMGA1 regulates IR promoter activity, expression of IR gene was impaired causing reduction of IR on cell surface and that compromises with insulin sensitivity.

  19. Okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, blocks calcium changes, gene expression, and cell death induced by gibberellin in wheat aleurone cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, A; Cappelluti, S; Cervantes-Cervantes, M; Rodriguez, M; Bush, D S

    1996-01-01

    The cereal aleurone functions during germination by secreting hydrolases, mainly alpha-amylase, into the starchy endosperm. Multiple signal transduction pathways exist in cereal aleurone cells that enable them to modulate hydrolase production in response to both hormonal and environmental stimuli. Gibberellic acid (GA) promotes hydrolase production, whereas abscisic acid (ABA), hypoxia, and osmotic stress reduce amylase production. In an effort to identify the components of transduction pathways in aleurone cells, we have investigated the effect of okadaic acid (OA), a protein phosphatase inhibitor, on stimulus-response coupling for GA, ABA, and hypoxia. We found that OA (100 nM) completely inhibited all the GA responses that we measured, from rapid changes in cytosolic Ca2+ through changes in gene expression and accelerated cell death. OA (100 nM) partially inhibited ABA responses, as measured by changes in the level of PHAV1, a cDNA for an ABA-induced mRNA in barley. In contrast, OA had no effect on the response to hypoxia, as measured by changes in cytosolic Ca2+ and by changes in enzyme activity and RNA levels of alcohol dehydrogenase. Our data indicate that OA-sensitive protein phosphatases act early in the transduction pathway of GA but are not involved in the response to hypoxia. These data provide a basis for a model of multiple transduction pathways in which the level of cytosolic Ca2+ is a key point of convergence controlling changes in stimulus-response coupling. PMID:8742711

  20. Low-protein amino acid-supplemented diets for growing pigs: effect on expression of amino acid transporters, serum concentration, performance, and carcass composition.

    PubMed

    Morales, A; Buenabad, L; Castillo, G; Arce, N; Araiza, B A; Htoo, J K; Cervantes, M

    2015-05-01

    Pigs fed protein-bound AA appear to have a higher abundance of AA transporters for their absorption in the jejunum compared with the duodenum. However, there is limited data about the effect of dietary free AA, readily available in the duodenum, on the duodenal abundance of AA transporters and its impact on pig performance. Forty-eight pigs (24.3 kg initial BW) distributed in 4 treatments were used to evaluate the effect of the CP level and form (free vs. protein bound) in which AA are added to diets on the expression of AA transporters in the 3 small intestine segments, serum concentration of AA, and performance. Dietary treatments based on wheat and soybean meal (SBM) were 1) low-CP (14%) diet supplemented with L-Lys, L-Thr, DL-Met, L-Leu, L-Ile, L-Val, L-His, L-Trp, and L-Phe (LPAA); 2) as in the LPAA but with added L-Gly as a N source (LPAA+N); 3) intermediate CP content (16%) supplemented with L-Lys HCl, L-Thr, and DL-Met (MPAA); and 4) high-CP (22%) diet (HP) without free AA. At the end of the experiment, 8 pigs from LPAA and HP were sacrificed to collect intestinal mucosa and blood samples and to dissect the carcasses. There were no differences in ADG, ADFI, G:F, and weights of carcass components and some visceral organs between treatments. Weights of the large intestine and kidney were higher in HP pigs (P < 0.01). Expression of b(0,+) in the duodenum was higher in pigs fed the LPAA compared with the HP diet (P= 0.036) but there was no difference in the jejunum and ileum. In the ileum, y+ L expression tended to be higher in pigs fed the LPAA diet (P = 0.098). Expression of b(0,+) in LPAA pigs did not differ between the duodenum and the jejunum, but in HP pigs, the expression of all AA transporters was higher in the jejunum than in the duodenum or ileum (P < 0.05). The serum concentration of Arg, His, Ile, Leu, Phe, and Val was higher but serum Lys and Met were lower in pigs fed the HP diet (P < 0.05). These results indicate that LPAA can substitute up to 8

  1. Investigation of free fatty acid associated recombinant membrane receptor protein expression in HEK293 cells using Raman spectroscopy, calcium imaging, and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Juqiang; Xu, Han; Wu, Yangzhe; Tang, Mingjie; McEwen, Gerald D; Liu, Pin; Hansen, Dane R; Gilbertson, Timothy A; Zhou, Anhong

    2013-02-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) is a previously orphaned G-protein-coupled receptor that apparently functions as a sensor for dietary fat in the gustatory and digestive systems. In this study, a cDNA sequence encoding a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible mature peptide of GPR120 was inserted into an expression vector and transfected in HEK293 cells. We measured Raman spectra of single HEK293 cells as well as GPR120-expressing HEK293-GPR120 cells at a 48 h period following the additions of Dox at several concentrations. We found that the spectral intensity of HEK293-GPR120 cells is dependent upon the dose of Dox, which correlates with the accumulation of GPR120 protein in the cells. However, the amount of the fatty acid activated changes in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) as measured by ratiometric calcium imaging was not correlated with Dox concentration. Principal components analysis (PCA) of Raman spectra reveals that the spectra from different treatments of HEK293-GPR120 cells form distinct, completely separated clusters with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area of 1, while those spectra for the HEK293 cells form small overlap clusters with the ROC area of 0.836. It was also found that expression of GPR120 altered the physiochemical and biomechanical properties of the parental cell membrane surface, which was quantitated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). These findings demonstrate that the combination of Raman spectroscopy, calcium imaging, and AFM may provide new tools in noninvasive and quantitative monitoring of membrane receptor expression induced alterations in the biophysical and signaling properties of single living cells.

  2. Regulation of the expression and activity of glucose and lactic acid metabolism-related genes by protein kinase C in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Otake, Sho; Kobayashi, Masaki; Narumi, Katsuya; Sasaki, Shotaro; Kikutani, Yurika; Furugen, Ayako; Watanabe, Meguho; Takahashi, Natsuko; Ogura, Jiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; Iseki, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) modulators are very attractive therapeutic targets in cancer. Since most cancer cells display increased glycolysis, elucidations of the effects of PKC activation on glycolysis is necessary for the development of effective medicine. In the present study, to clarify the role of PKC in the regulation of glycolysis, we examined the effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, on the expression and activity of glucose and lactic acid metabolism-related genes in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RD cells). In parallel to increases in glucose uptake and mRNA levels of glucose transporters (GLUTs) induced by PMA treatment for 6 h, the hexokinase (HK) mRNA level and activity were also significantly increased in RD cells. On the other hand, a significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) mRNA level and activity was seen when the cells were incubated with PMA for 24 h, but not for 6 or 12 h, and was associated with lactic acid production. These effects by PMA treatment were markedly suppressed by Bisindolylmaleimide (BIM), a PKC inhibitor. Furthermore, chetomin, a hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) inhibitor, completely abrogated the increment of LDH mRNA level and activity as well as monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 4, a lactic acid efflux transporter. In conclusion, we found that HK and LDH activity induced by PKC activation was associated with the glucose uptake and lactic acid level and that LDH and MCT4 are modulated by a common factor, HIF-1.

  3. The effects of early life lead exposure on the expression of interleukin (IL) 1β, IL-6, and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the hippocampus of mouse pups.

    PubMed

    Li, N; Liu, X; Zhang, P; Qiao, M; Li, H; Li, X; Zhang, H; Yu, Z

    2015-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of maternal lead (Pb) exposure on the expression of interleukin (IL) 1β, IL 6, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in hippocampus of mice offspring. Pb exposure initiated from the beginning of gestation to weaning. Lead acetate (PbAc) administered in drinking solutions was dissolved in distilled deionized water at the concentrations of 0.1, 0.5 and 1% groups ,respectively. On the postnatal day 21, the Pb levels in their blood and hippocampus were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The expression of IL 1β, IL 6, and GFAP in hippocampus was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The Pb levels in blood and hippocampus of all Pb-exposed groups were significantly higher than that of the control group (p < 0.05). The expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and GFAP was increased in Pb-exposed groups in comparison with the control group (p < 0.05). The high expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and GFAP in the hippocampus of pups may contribute to the neurotoxicity associated with maternal Pb exposure.

  4. Jersey calf performance in response to high-protein, high-fat liquid feeds with varied fatty acid profiles: blood metabolites and liver gene expression.

    PubMed

    Swank, V A; Yoho, W S Bowen; O'Diam, K M; Eastridge, M L; Niehaus, A J; Daniels, K M

    2013-06-01

    Most available Jersey calf milk replacers (CMR) use edible lard as the primary fat source, which lacks medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA). However, Jersey cow milk consists of over 10% MCFA. The objective of this trial was to determine whether altering the fatty acid profile of CMR by increasing the amount of MCFA would alter liver lipid infiltration, liver gene expression, and blood metabolites when fed to Jersey calves. Fifty Jersey calves were fed 1 of 4 diets: pasteurized saleable whole milk (pSWM) from Jersey cows [27.9% crude protein (CP), 33.5% fat, dry matter (DM) basis]; CMR containing 100% of fat as edible lard (100:00; 29.3% CP, 29.1% fat, DM basis); CMR containing 20% of fat as coconut oil (CO; 80:20; 28.2% CP, 28.0% fat); or CMR containing 40% of fat as CO (60:40; 28.2% CP, 28.3% fat). Liquid diet DM intake averaged 0.523, 0.500, 0.498, and 0.512 kg/d for pSWM, 100:00, 80:20, and 60:40, respectively. Calves were fed their assigned liquid diet daily at 0600 and 1800 h from 2 d of age until 7 wk of age, and once daily until 8 wk of age. Calves were taken off trial at 9 wk of age. Calves had access to water and grain (23.8% CP, 2.71% fat, DM basis). Grain DM intake averaged 0.386, 0.439, 0.472, and 0.454 kg/d for pSWM, 100:00, 80:20, and 60:40, respectively. Liver biopsy cores were obtained from 15 calves at 42 d of age (pSWM, n=4; 100:00, n=4; 80:20, n=3; 60:40, n=4) and from 4 baseline calves <2d of age. Liver biopsy cores were used for histological appraisal of lipid infiltration and gene expression analyses of short-, medium-, and long- chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenases, sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1, acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase. Lipid infiltration and expression of selected genes were not different among diets. After an overnight fast, weekly blood samples were taken immediately before feeding at 0600 h via jugular venipuncture in all calves. Serum and plasma obtained from blood samples were used

  5. Jersey calf performance in response to high-protein, high-fat liquid feeds with varied fatty acid profiles: blood metabolites and liver gene expression.

    PubMed

    Swank, V A; Yoho, W S Bowen; O'Diam, K M; Eastridge, M L; Niehaus, A J; Daniels, K M

    2013-06-01

    Most available Jersey calf milk replacers (CMR) use edible lard as the primary fat source, which lacks medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA). However, Jersey cow milk consists of over 10% MCFA. The objective of this trial was to determine whether altering the fatty acid profile of CMR by increasing the amount of MCFA would alter liver lipid infiltration, liver gene expression, and blood metabolites when fed to Jersey calves. Fifty Jersey calves were fed 1 of 4 diets: pasteurized saleable whole milk (pSWM) from Jersey cows [27.9% crude protein (CP), 33.5% fat, dry matter (DM) basis]; CMR containing 100% of fat as edible lard (100:00; 29.3% CP, 29.1% fat, DM basis); CMR containing 20% of fat as coconut oil (CO; 80:20; 28.2% CP, 28.0% fat); or CMR containing 40% of fat as CO (60:40; 28.2% CP, 28.3% fat). Liquid diet DM intake averaged 0.523, 0.500, 0.498, and 0.512 kg/d for pSWM, 100:00, 80:20, and 60:40, respectively. Calves were fed their assigned liquid diet daily at 0600 and 1800 h from 2 d of age until 7 wk of age, and once daily until 8 wk of age. Calves were taken off trial at 9 wk of age. Calves had access to water and grain (23.8% CP, 2.71% fat, DM basis). Grain DM intake averaged 0.386, 0.439, 0.472, and 0.454 kg/d for pSWM, 100:00, 80:20, and 60:40, respectively. Liver biopsy cores were obtained from 15 calves at 42 d of age (pSWM, n=4; 100:00, n=4; 80:20, n=3; 60:40, n=4) and from 4 baseline calves <2d of age. Liver biopsy cores were used for histological appraisal of lipid infiltration and gene expression analyses of short-, medium-, and long- chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenases, sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1, acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase. Lipid infiltration and expression of selected genes were not different among diets. After an overnight fast, weekly blood samples were taken immediately before feeding at 0600 h via jugular venipuncture in all calves. Serum and plasma obtained from blood samples were used

  6. Protein expression strategies for identification of novel target proteins.

    PubMed

    Schuster, M; Wasserbauer, E; Einhauer, A; Ortner, C; Jungbauer, A; Hammerschmid, F; Werner, G

    2000-04-01

    Identification of new target proteins is a novel paradigm in drug discovery. A major bottleneck of this strategy is the rapid and simultaneous expression of proteins from differential gene expression to identify eligible candidates. By searching for a generic system enabling high throughput expression analysis and purification of unknown cDNAs, we evaluated the YEpFLAG-1 yeast expression system. We have selected cDNAs encoding model proteins (eukaryotic initiation factor-5A [eIF-5A] and Homo sapiens differentiation-dependent protein-A4) and cDNA encoding an unknown protein (UP-1) for overexpression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using fusions with a peptide that changes its conformation in the presence of Ca2+ ions, the FLAG tag (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY). The cDNAs encoding unknown proteins originating from a directionally cloned cDNA library were expressed in all three possible reading frames. The expressed proteins were detected by an antibody directed against the FLAG tag and/or by antibodies against the model proteins. The alpha-leader sequence, encoding a yeast mating pheromone, upstream of the gene fusion site facilitates secretion into the culture supernatant. EIF-5A could be highly overexpressed and was secreted into the culture supernatant. In contrast, the Homo sapiens differentiation-dependent protein-A4 as well as the protein UP-1, whose cDNA did not match to any known gene, could not be detected in the culture supernatant. The expression product of the correct frame remained in the cells, whereas the FLAG-tagged proteins secreted into the supernatant were short, out-of-frame products. The presence of transmembrane domains or patches of hydrophobic amino acids may preclude secretion of these proteins into the culture supernatant. Subsequently, isolation and purification of the various proteins was accomplished by affinity chromatography or affinity extraction using magnetizable beads coated with the anti-FLAG monoclonal antibody. The purity of

  7. Analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing ductular cells in a rat liver cirrhosis model induced by repeated injections of thioacetamide (TAA).

    PubMed

    Tennakoon, Anusha H; Izawa, Takeshi; Wijesundera, Kavindra K; Katou-Ichikawa, Chisa; Tanaka, Miyuu; Golbar, Hossain M; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2015-06-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a type III intermediate filament protein, is expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the principal fibrogenic cell type in the liver. Further, GFAP could be a marker for hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs). In this study, the participation of GFAP-expressing cells in HPC expansion/ductular reaction was investigated in a rat model of liver cirrhosis. Six-week-old male F344 rats were injected intraperitoneally with thioacetamide (100mg/kg BW, twice a week) and examined at post-first injection weeks 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25. Fibrosis-related proliferation of ductular cells was observed as demonstrated by CK19 immunostaining. Some of these cells were stained with GFAP. No co-staining was observed between CK19 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA; myofibroblast marker). There were proliferating ductular cells stained with α-fetoprotein or β-catenin; the ductular reaction was related to increased expression of hepatocarcinogenesis-related factors (Wnt2, Wnt4 and glypican-3). These results for the first time show the participation of GFAP-positive HPCs in ductular reaction in a chemically induced rodent model. Though the ductular cells were chaperoned by myofibroblasts, they show no direct evidence for epithelial to mesenchymal transition. These findings shed new light in understanding the roles of GFAP-expressing HPCs in liver cirrhosis and provide further evidence of interaction between newly-formed bile ductules and HSCs, suggesting that both cells could be in the common lineage of HPCs.

  8. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    PubMed

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. PMID:26918308

  9. Palmitic acid exerts pro-inflammatory effects on vascular smooth muscle cells by inducing the expression of C-reactive protein, inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Liu, Juntian; Pang, Xiaoming; Wang, Shuyue; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaolu; Feng, Liuxin

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease in the vessel, and inflammatory cytokines play an important role in the inflammatory process of atherosclerosis. A high level of free fatty acids (FFAs) produced in lipid metabolism disorders are known to participate in the formation of atherosclerosis through multiple bioactivities. As the main saturated fatty acid in FFAs, palmitic acid stimulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. However, it is unclear whether palmitic acid exerts a pro-inflammatory effect on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The purpose of the present study was to observe the effect of palmitic acid on the expression of C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in VSMCs. Rat VSMCs were cultured, and palmitic acid was used as a stimulant for CRP, TNF-α and iNOS expression. mRNA expression was assayed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression was detected with western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. The results showed that palmitic acid significantly stimulated mRNA and protein expression of CRP, TNF-α and iNOS in VSMCs in time- and concentration-dependent manners, and therefore, palmitic acid is able to exert a pro-inflammatory effect on VSMCs via stimulating CRP, TNF-α and iNOS expression. The findings provide a novel explanation for the direct pro-inflammatory and atherogenic effects of palmitic acid, and for the association with metabolic syndrome, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity and atherosclerosis. Therefore, the intervention with anti-inflammatory agents may effectively delay the formation and progression of atherosclerosis in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  10. The effect of acid treatment on survival and protein expression of a laboratory K-12 strain Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Paul, Barbara; Hirshfield, Irvin

    2003-03-01

    Pre-exposure of log phase enteric bacteria to nonlethal acidic pH induces phenotypic changes that protect the organisms against subsequent lethal acidity. Studies have revealed that when Salmonella typhimurium is grown in minimal medium at pH 5.5 and 4.3 the organism develops a biphasic acid tolerance. This two-stage response has not been reported at present in Escherichia coli; rather it is thought that when this organism is grown in rich medium there is a single stress response throughout the pH range of 4 to 6. We believe that the evidence for such a report is lacking; therefore, in this study the acid response of log phase E. coli was examined in rich medium (LB). The pH 3.0 acid survival assays of a laboratory strain of E. coli K-12 MG1655, after cultures had been exposed to LB acidified to pH 5.5 or pH 4.3 indicate that like S. typhimurium, E. coli shows both an acid tolerance and an acid-shock response to pH 5.5 and 4.3 exposure, respectively. It was consistently found, however, that longer pre-exposure (60 min rather than 15 min) at either pH afforded better protection against the lethal pH 3.0 challenge. Analysis of polypeptide induction at pH 5.5 and 4.3 by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis clearly shows different profiles. Together the results show that in E. coli, pre-treatment between pH 4 and 6 does not result in a flat protective response.

  11. Evaluation of cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 gene expression through the retinoic acid pathway by co-incubation of Blastocystis ST-1 with HT29 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Chieh; Song, Eing-Ju; Chang, Tsuey-Yu; Lin, Wei-Chen; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Chen, Lih-Ren; Huang, Lynn L H; Shin, Jyh-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Blastocystis is a parasitic protist with a worldwide distribution that is commonly found in patients with colon and gastrointestinal pathological symptoms. Blastocystis infection has also commonly been reported in colorectal cancer and HIV/AIDS patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. To understand the pathway networks of gene regulation and the probable mechanisms influencing functions of HT-29 host cells in response to parasite infection, we examined the expression of 163 human oncogenes and kinases in human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells co-incubated with Blastocystis by in-house cDNA microarray and PCR analysis. At least 10 genes were shown to be modified following Blastocystis co-incubation, including those with immunological, tumorigenesis, and antitumorigenesis functions. The expression of genes encoding cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was markedly upregulated and downregulated, respectively. Reverse transcriptase-PCR validated the modified transcript expression of CRABP2 and other associated genes such as retinoic acid (RA)-related nuclear-receptor (RARα). Together, our data indicate that CRABP2, RARα, and PCNA expressions are involved in RA signaling regulatory networks that affect the growth, proliferation, and inflammation of HT-29 cells. PMID:26911149

  12. Correlation between Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein Gene Polymorphism and mRNA Expression with Intramuscular Fat in Baicheng-oil Chicken.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; He, Jianzhong; Yang, Wenxuan; Muhantay, Gemenggul; Chen, Ying; Xing, Jinming; Liu, Jianzhu

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to determine the polymorphism and mRNA expression pattern of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) gene and their association with intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the breast and leg muscles of Baicheng oil chicken (BOC). A total of 720 chickens, including 240 black Baicheng oil chicken (BBOC), 240 silky Baicheng oil chicken (SBOC), and 240 white Baicheng oil chicken (WBOC) were raised. Three genotypes of H-FABP gene second extron following AA, AB, and BB were detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) strategy. The G939A site created AA genotype and G956A site created BB genotype. The content of IMF in AA genotype in breast muscle of BBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0176) and the genotype in leg muscle of WBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0145). The G939A site could be taken as genetic marker for higher IMF content selecting for breast muscle of BBOC and leg muscle of WBOC. The relative mRNA expression of H-FABP was measured by real-time PCR at 30, 60, 90, and 120 d. The IMF content significantly increased with age in both muscles. The mRNA expression level of H-FABP significantly decreased with age in both muscles of the three types of chickens. Moreover, a significant negative correlation between H-FABP abundance and IMF content in the leg muscles of WBOC (p = 0.035) was observed. The mRNA expression of H-FABP negatively correlated with the IMF content in both breast and leg muscles of BOC sat slaughter time.

  13. Correlation between Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein Gene Polymorphism and mRNA Expression with Intramuscular Fat in Baicheng-oil Chicken.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; He, Jianzhong; Yang, Wenxuan; Muhantay, Gemenggul; Chen, Ying; Xing, Jinming; Liu, Jianzhu

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to determine the polymorphism and mRNA expression pattern of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) gene and their association with intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the breast and leg muscles of Baicheng oil chicken (BOC). A total of 720 chickens, including 240 black Baicheng oil chicken (BBOC), 240 silky Baicheng oil chicken (SBOC), and 240 white Baicheng oil chicken (WBOC) were raised. Three genotypes of H-FABP gene second extron following AA, AB, and BB were detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) strategy. The G939A site created AA genotype and G956A site created BB genotype. The content of IMF in AA genotype in breast muscle of BBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0176) and the genotype in leg muscle of WBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0145). The G939A site could be taken as genetic marker for higher IMF content selecting for breast muscle of BBOC and leg muscle of WBOC. The relative mRNA expression of H-FABP was measured by real-time PCR at 30, 60, 90, and 120 d. The IMF content significantly increased with age in both muscles. The mRNA expression level of H-FABP significantly decreased with age in both muscles of the three types of chickens. Moreover, a significant negative correlation between H-FABP abundance and IMF content in the leg muscles of WBOC (p = 0.035) was observed. The mRNA expression of H-FABP negatively correlated with the IMF content in both breast and leg muscles of BOC sat slaughter time. PMID:26323394

  14. Correlation between Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein Gene Polymorphism and mRNA Expression with Intramuscular Fat in Baicheng-oil Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; He, Jianzhong; Yang, Wenxuan; Muhantay, Gemenggul; Chen, Ying; Xing, Jinming; Liu, Jianzhu

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the polymorphism and mRNA expression pattern of the heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) gene and their association with intramuscular fat (IMF) content in the breast and leg muscles of Baicheng oil chicken (BOC). A total of 720 chickens, including 240 black Baicheng oil chicken (BBOC), 240 silky Baicheng oil chicken (SBOC), and 240 white Baicheng oil chicken (WBOC) were raised. Three genotypes of H-FABP gene second extron following AA, AB, and BB were detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) strategy. The G939A site created AA genotype and G956A site created BB genotype. The content of IMF in AA genotype in breast muscle of BBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0176) and the genotype in leg muscle of WBOC was significantly higher than that of AB (p = 0.0145). The G939A site could be taken as genetic marker for higher IMF content selecting for breast muscle of BBOC and leg muscle of WBOC. The relative mRNA expression of H-FABP was measured by real-time PCR at 30, 60, 90, and 120 d. The IMF content significantly increased with age in both muscles. The mRNA expression level of H-FABP significantly decreased with age in both muscles of the three types of chickens. Moreover, a significant negative correlation between H-FABP abundance and IMF content in the leg muscles of WBOC (p = 0.035) was observed. The mRNA expression of H-FABP negatively correlated with the IMF content in both breast and leg muscles of BOC sat slaughter time. PMID:26323394

  15. Membrane protein expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    King, Martin S; Boes, Christoph; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for the overproduction of membrane proteins in a functional form. Growth of lactococci is rapid, proceeds to high cell densities, and does not require aeration, which facilitates large-scale fermentation. The available promoter systems are strong and tightly regulated, allowing expression of toxic gene products in a controlled manner. Expressed membrane proteins are targeted exclusively to the cytoplasmic membrane, allowing the use of ionophores, ligands, and inhibitors to study activity of the membrane protein in whole cells. Constructed plasmids are stable and expression levels are highly reproducible. The relatively small genome size of the organism causes little redundancy, which facilitates complementation studies and allows for easier purification. The produced membrane proteins are often stable, as the organism has limited proteolytic capability, and they are readily solubilized from the membrane with mild detergents. Lactococci are multiple amino acid auxotrophs, allowing the incorporation of labels, such as selenomethionine. Among the few disadvantages are the low transformation frequency, AT-rich codon usage, and resistance to lysis by mechanical means, but these problems can be overcome fairly easily. We will describe in detail the protocols used to express membrane proteins in L. lactis, from cloning of the target gene to the isolation of membrane vesicles for the determination of expression levels. PMID:25857778

  16. Expression of Src-like adapter protein mRNA is induced by all-trans retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, T; Hatake, K; Ikeda, M; Tomizuka, H; Terui, Y; Uwai, M; Miura, Y

    1997-01-01

    By using a differential display method, specific bands were selected from ladder PCR products derived from ATRA-dependent differentiated U937 cells, in comparison with those of untreated U937. By screening the cDNA library of ATRA-dependent differentiated U937 cells with one of the PCR products, we cloned the src-like adapter protein (SLAP). Northern blot analysis of U937 cells with or without ATRA treatment indicated that the SLAP mRNA was clearly induced by ATRA. The induction was inhibited by the addition of cycloheximide, indicating that ATRA acted indirectly through synthesis of other proteins. The SLAP mRNA was induced in HL60 and NB-4 but not in K562 or THP-1. Interestingly, these cells in which SLAP mRNA was induced by ATRA all showed ATRA-dependent cell differentiation. The relationship between SLAP and cell differentiation is unclear, but SLAP may transduce a signal for cell differentiation.

  17. Effects of lithium and valproic acid on BDNF protein and gene expression in an in vitro human neuron-like model of degeneration.

    PubMed

    Croce, Nicoletta; Mathé, Aleksander A; Gelfo, Francesca; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bernardini, Sergio; Angelucci, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    One of the common effects of lithium (Li) and valproic acid (VPA) is their ability to protect against excitotoxic insults. Neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases may be also associated with altered trophic support of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the most widely distributed neurotrophin in the central nervous system. However, despite these evidences, the effect of Li-VPA combination on BDNF after excitoxic insult has been inadequately investigated. We address this issue by exposing a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to neurotoxic concentration of L-glutamate and exploring whether the neuroprotective action of Li-VPA on these cells is associated with changes in BDNF protein and mRNA levels. The results showed that pre-incubation of Li-VPA abolished the toxic effect of glutamate on SH-SY5Y cell survival and this neuroprotective effect was associated with increased synthesis and mRNA expression of BDNF after 24 and 48 h of incubation. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the neuroprotective effects of Li-VPA against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells is associated with increased synthesis and mRNA expression of BDNF. These data further support the idea that these two drugs can be used for prevention and/or treatment of glutamate-related neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Palmitic acid increases pro-oxidant adaptor protein p66Shc expression and affects vascularization factors in angiogenic mononuclear cells: Action of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Favre, Julie; Yildirim, Cansu; Leyen, Thomas A; Chen, Weena J Y; van Genugten, Renate E; van Golen, Larissa W; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan-Jesus; Musters, Rene; Baggen, Josefien; Fontijn, Ruud; van der Pouw Kraan, Tineke; Serné, Erik; Koolwijk, Pieter; Diamant, Michaela; Horrevoets, Anton J G

    2015-12-01

    A defect in neo-vascularization process involving circulating angiogenic mononuclear cells (CACs) dysfunction is associated with diabetes. We showed that oxidative stress was elevated in CACs cultured from blood of individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and diabetes. We then assessed the action of palmitic acid (PA), a deregulated and increased NEFA in metabolic disorders, focusing on its oxidant potential. We observed that the phyto-polyphenol resveratrol normalized oxidative stress both in CACs isolated from MetS patients or treated with PA. Resveratrol further decreased the deleterious action of PA on gene expression of vascularization factors (TNFα, VEGF-A, SDF1α, PECAM-1, VEGFR2, Tie2 and CXCR4) and improved CAC motility. Particularly, resveratrol abolished the PA-induced over-expression of the pro-oxidant protein p66Shc. Neither KLF2 nor SIRT1, previously shown in resveratrol and p66Shc action, was directly involved. Silencing p66Shc normalized PA action on VEGF-A and TNFα specifically, without abolishing the PA-induced oxidative stress, which suggests a deleterious role of p66Shc independently of any major modulation of the cellular oxidative status in a high NEFA levels context. Besides showing that resveratrol reverses PA-induced harmful effects on human CAC function, certainly through profound cellular modifications, we establish p66Shc as a major therapeutic target in metabolic disorders, independent from glycemic control. PMID:26254104

  19. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis genes encoding salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-related proteins confers partial resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) in transgenic soybean roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Extensive studies using the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to elucidate plant defense signaling and pathway networks indicate that salicylic acid (SA) is the key hormone triggering the plant defense response against biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens, while jasmonic acid (JA) an...

  20. Differentiation, early response gene expression, and apoptosis induction in human breast tumor cells by Okadaic Acid and related inhibitors of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A. Okadaic acid effects on human breast tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kiguchi, K.; Giometti, C.; Chubb, C.H.; Huberman, E.; Fujiki, H.

    1992-08-20

    Okadaic acid (OA), a tumor promoter and an inhibitor of protein phosphatases (PPH) 1 and 2A, was tested for its ability to induce events associated with differentiation and apoptosis induction in the human MCF-7, AU-565, and MB-231 breast tumor cells. Differentiation in these cells was characterized by inhibition of cell multiplication, reactivity with monoclonal antibodies to {alpha}-lactalbumin and {beta}-casein, and the appearance of large lipid droplets; apoptosis was characterized by the appearance of cells with segmented and fragmented nuclei. In the MCF-7 cell line, OA at nanomolar concentrations elicited within 5 min an increase in the phosphorylation of a set of cellular proteins, within hours expression of the early response genes, junB, c-jun, and c-fos and within days manifestation of differentiation and apoptosis markers. Differentiation and apoptosis were also induced by dinophysistoxin-1 and calyculin A, two other tumor promoters and inhibitors of PPH 1 and 2A, but not by OA tetramethyl ether, an inactive OA derivative, or microcystin LR, a PPH 1 and 2A inhibitor that penetrates epithelial cells poorly. OA induced both differentiation and apoptosis in MB-231 cells and MCF-7, but only differentiation in AU-565 cells. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a tumor promoter that is not an inhibitor of PPH 1 and 2A but rather an activator of protein kinase C, also induced within minutes the phosphorylation of proteins, within hours the expression of early response genes, and within days differentiation, but not apoptosis; yet PMA was able to attenuate apoptosis induced by the okadaic acid class of tumor promoters. These results indicate that OA and related agents can induce processes that result in tumor breast cell differentiation and apoptosis, and this induction is associated with their ability to inhibit PPH 1 and 2A. Yet apoptosis is not necessarily required for differentiation induction by these agents.

  1. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1: Expression and action in brain.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Husø; Puchades, Maja; Holm-Hansen, Signe; Andersson, Krister; Gjedde, Albert; Attramadal, Håvard; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda Hildegard

    2015-07-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a "volume transmitter" in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes the cerebral neocortex and the hippocampus, where it can be stimulated by physiological concentrations of lactate and by the HCAR1 agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate to reduce cAMP levels. Cerebral HCAR1 is concentrated on the postsynaptic membranes of excitatory synapses and also is enriched at the blood-brain barrier. In synaptic spines and in adipocytes, HCAR1 immunoreactivity is also located on subplasmalemmal vesicular organelles, suggesting trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Through activation of HCAR1, lactate can act as a volume transmitter that links neuronal activity, cerebral blood flow, energy metabolism, and energy substrate availability, including a glucose- and glycogen-saving response. HCAR1 may contribute to optimizing the cAMP concentration. For instance, in the prefrontal cortex, excessively high cAMP levels are implicated in impaired cognition in old age, fatigue, stress, and schizophrenia and in the deposition of phosphorylated tau protein in Alzheimer's disease. HCAR1 could serve to ameliorate these conditions and might also act through downstream mechanisms other than cAMP. Lactate exits cells through monocarboxylate transporters in an equilibrating manner and through astrocyte anion channels activated by depolarization. In addition to locally produced lactate, lactate produced by exercising muscle as well as exogenous HCAR1 agonists, e.g., from fruits and berries, might activate the receptor on cerebral blood vessels and brain cells. PMID:25881750

  2. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1: Expression and action in brain.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Husø; Puchades, Maja; Holm-Hansen, Signe; Andersson, Krister; Gjedde, Albert; Attramadal, Håvard; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda Hildegard

    2015-07-01

    We have proposed that lactate is a "volume transmitter" in the brain and underpinned this by showing that the lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81 (GPR81, also known as HCA1 or HCAR1), which promotes lipid storage in adipocytes, is also active in the mammalian brain. This includes the cerebral neocortex and the hippocampus, where it can be stimulated by physiological concentrations of lactate and by the HCAR1 agonist 3,5-dihydroxybenzoate to reduce cAMP levels. Cerebral HCAR1 is concentrated on the postsynaptic membranes of excitatory synapses and also is enriched at the blood-brain barrier. In synaptic spines and in adipocytes, HCAR1 immunoreactivity is also located on subplasmalemmal vesicular organelles, suggesting trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Through activation of HCAR1, lactate can act as a volume transmitter that links neuronal activity, cerebral blood flow, energy metabolism, and energy substrate availability, including a glucose- and glycogen-saving response. HCAR1 may contribute to optimizing the cAMP concentration. For instance, in the prefrontal cortex, excessively high cAMP levels are implicated in impaired cognition in old age, fatigue, stress, and schizophrenia and in the deposition of phosphorylated tau protein in Alzheimer's disease. HCAR1 could serve to ameliorate these conditions and might also act through downstream mechanisms other than cAMP. Lactate exits cells through monocarboxylate transporters in an equilibrating manner and through astrocyte anion channels activated by depolarization. In addition to locally produced lactate, lactate produced by exercising muscle as well as exogenous HCAR1 agonists, e.g., from fruits and berries, might activate the receptor on cerebral blood vessels and brain cells.

  3. Differential effects of low-fat and high-fat diets on fed-state hepatic triacylglycerol secretion, hepatic fatty acid profiles, and DGAT-1 protein expression in obese-prone Sprague–Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Heden, Timothy D.; Morris, E. Matthew; Kearney, Monica L.; Liu, Tzu-Wen; Park, Young-min; Kanaley, Jill A.; Thyfault, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of short-term low-fat (LF) and high-fat (HF) diets on fed-state hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) secretion, the content of proteins involved in TAG assembly and secretion, fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and the fatty acid profile of stored TAG. Using selectively bred obese-prone Sprague–Dawley rats, we directly measured fed-state hepatic TAG secretion, using Tyloxapol (a lipoprotein lipase inhibitor) and a standardized oral mixed meal (45% carbohydrate, 40% fat, 15% protein) bolus in animals fed a HF or LF diet for 2 weeks, after which the rats were maintained on their respective diet for 1 week (washout) prior to the liver being excised to measure protein content, FAO, and TAG fatty acid profiles. Hepatic DGAT-1 protein expression was ~27% lower in HF- than in LF-fed animals (p < 0.05); the protein expression of all other molecules was similar in the 2 diets. The fed-state hepatic TAG secretion rate was ~39% lower (p < 0.05) in HF- (4.62 ± 0.18 mmol·h−1) than in LF- (7.60 ± 0.57 mmol·h−1) fed animals. Hepatic TAG content was ~2-fold higher (p < 0.05) in HF- (1.07 ± 0.15 nmol·g−1 tissue) than in LF- (0.50 ± 0.16 nmol·g−1 tissue) fed animals. In addition, the fatty acid profile of liver TAG in HF-fed animals closely resembled the diet, whereas in LF-fed animals, the fatty acid profile consisted of mostly de novo synthesized fatty acids. FAO was not altered by diet. LF and HF diets differentially alter fed-state hepatic TAG secretion, hepatic fatty acid profiles, and DGAT-1 protein expression. PMID:24669989

  4. Modeling Protein Expression and Protein Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donatello; Müller, Peter; Kornblau, Steven M.; Suchard, Marc A.; Ji, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput functional proteomic technologies provide a way to quantify the expression of proteins of interest. Statistical inference centers on identifying the activation state of proteins and their patterns of molecular interaction formalized as dependence structure. Inference on dependence structure is particularly important when proteins are selected because they are part of a common molecular pathway. In that case, inference on dependence structure reveals properties of the underlying pathway. We propose a probability model that represents molecular interactions at the level of hidden binary latent variables that can be interpreted as indicators for active versus inactive states of the proteins. The proposed approach exploits available expert knowledge about the target pathway to define an informative prior on the hidden conditional dependence structure. An important feature of this prior is that it provides an instrument to explicitly anchor the model space to a set of interactions of interest, favoring a local search approach to model determination. We apply our model to reverse-phase protein array data from a study on acute myeloid leukemia. Our inference identifies relevant subpathways in relation to the unfolding of the biological process under study. PMID:26246646

  5. Increased in vitro glial fibrillary acidic protein expression, telomerase activity, and telomere length after productive human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in murine astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Diego; López-Costa, Juan José; Sede, Mariano; López, Ester María; Berria, María Isabel; Quarleri, Jorge

    2014-02-01

    Although HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) result from injury and loss of neurons, productive infection routinely takes place in cells of macrophage lineage. In such a complex context, astrocytosis induced by local chemokines/cytokines is one of the hallmarks of HIV neuropathology. Whether this sustained astrocyte activation is able to alter telomere-aging process is unknown. We hypothesized that interaction of HIV with astrocytes may impact astrocyte telomerase activity (TA) and telomere length in a scenario of astrocytic activation measured by expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). To test this hypothesis, cultured murine astrocytes were challenged with pseudotyped HIV/vesicular stomatitis virus (HIV/VSV) to circumvent the absence of viral receptors; and GFAP, telomerase activity, and telomere length were quantified. As an early and transient event after HIV infection, both TA activity and telomere length were significantly augmented (P < 0.001). Later, a strong negative correlation (-0.8616, P < 0.0001) between virus production and telomerase activity was demonstrated. Once HIV production had reached a peak (7 dpi), the TA decreased, showing levels similar to those of noninfected cells. In contrast, the astrocyte became activated, exhibiting significantly increased levels of GFAP expression directly related to the level of HIV/VSV replication (P < 0.0001). Our results suggest that HIV-infected astrocytes exhibit early disturbance in their cellular functions, such as telomerase activity and telomere length, that may attenuate cell proliferation and enhance the astrocyte dysregulation, contributing to HIV neuropathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in HIV-mediated persistence by altering the telomere-related aging processes could aid in the development of therapeutic modalities for neurological complications of HIV infection.

  6. Glial fibrillary acidic protein promoters direct adenovirus early 1A gene and human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoters direct sodium iodide symporter expression for malignant glioma radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tan, Jian; Wang, Peng; Li, Ning; Li, Chengxia

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma can be treated with radioiodine following transfection with human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene. Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS is engineered with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoters to express early region 1A (E1A) and hNIS genes, which may be useful in targeted gene therapy. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS was constructed and purified using the E1A and hNIS genes regulated by the hTERT and GFAP promoters, respectively. Glioma cells were infected by Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS. Selective replication ability of Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS was then evaluated by plaque forming assay, transgene expression by Western blot, (125)I-iodide uptake and efflux, clonogenicity following (131)I-iodide treatment in the tumor cells, and radioiodine therapy using nude mouse model. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS could selectively replicate; the hNIS gene was successfully expressed under the GFAP promoter. Western blot analyses using E1A- and hNIS-specific antibodies revealed two bands of approximately 40 and 70 kDa. In addition, the cells showed about 93.4 and 107.1 times higher (125)I uptake in U251 and U87 cells than in the control cells, respectively. Clonogenic assay indicated that >90% of cells transfected with Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS were killed. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS-transfected and 2 mCi (131)I-injected U87 xenograft nude mice survived the longest among the three groups. Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS has a good ability of selective replication and strong antitumor selectivity. An effective therapy of (131)I was achieved activity in malignant glioma cells after induction of tumor-specific iodide uptake activity by GFAP promoter-directed hNIS gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Enhanced citric acid production in aspergillus with inactivated asparagine-linked glycosylation protein 3 (ALG3), and/or increased laeA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.

    2015-12-08

    Provided herein are fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, having a dolichyl-P-Man:Man(5)GlcNAc(2)-PP-dolichyl mannosyltransferase (Alg3) gene genetic inactivation, increased expression of a loss of aflR expression A (Lae), or both. In some examples, such mutants have several phenotypes, including an increased production of citric acid relative to the parental strain. Methods of using the disclosed fungi to make citric acid are also provided, as are compositions and kits including the disclosed fungi.

  8. Effects of immunosuppressive treatment on protein expression in rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kędzierska, Karolina; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Sindrewicz, Krzysztof; Bober, Joanna; Domański, Leszek; Parafiniuk, Mirosław; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Domański, Maciej; Smektała, Tomasz; Masiuk, Marek; Skrzypczak, Wiesław; Ożgo, Małgorzata; Kabat-Koperska, Joanna; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    The structural proteins of renal tubular epithelial cells may become a target for the toxic metabolites of immunosuppressants. These metabolites can modify the properties of the proteins, thereby affecting cell function, which is a possible explanation for the mechanism of immunosuppressive agents’ toxicity. In our study, we evaluated the effect of two immunosuppressive strategies on protein expression in the kidneys of Wistar rats. Fragments of the rat kidneys were homogenized after cooling in liquid nitrogen and then dissolved in lysis buffer. The protein concentration in the samples was determined using a protein assay kit, and the proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The obtained gels were then stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue, and their images were analyzed to evaluate differences in protein expression. Identification of selected proteins was then performed using mass spectrometry. We found that the immunosuppressive drugs used in popular regimens induce a series of changes in protein expression in target organs. The expression of proteins involved in drug, glucose, amino acid, and lipid metabolism was pronounced. However, to a lesser extent, we also observed changes in nuclear, structural, and transport proteins’ synthesis. Very slight differences were observed between the group receiving cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and glucocorticoids (CMG) and the control group. In contrast, compared to the control group, animals receiving tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and glucocorticoids (TMG) exhibited higher expression of proteins responsible for renal drug metabolism and lower expression levels of cytoplasmic actin and the major urinary protein. In the TMG group, we observed higher expression of proteins responsible for drug metabolism and a decrease in the expression of respiratory chain enzymes (thioredoxin-2) and markers of distal renal tubular damage (heart fatty acid-binding protein) compared to expression in the CMG

  9. Proteins and acids from petroleum.

    PubMed

    Zaki, D; el-Badrawy, S

    1978-01-01

    The wax distillate fraction (boiling range 300 up to 400 degrees C) from the crude oil "El-Alameen" was found to be a good substrate for the biosynthesis of proteins and/or amino acids by bacteria under special culture conditions. The fermentation processes were accompanied by a refining effect to the oil fraction, elevating its refraction index and lowering its melting point, giving dewaxing effect to the oil fraction. PMID:735504

  10. Prenatal ethanol consumption alters the expression of cellular retinol binding protein and retinoic acid receptor mRNA in fetal rat embryo and brain.

    PubMed

    Grummer, M A; Zachman, R D

    1995-12-01

    The mechanism by which prenatal ethanol ingestion causes fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is unknown. We hypothesize that ethanol disrupts the normal function of retinoids in embryogenesis and differentiation, resulting in FAS. The present work was designed to determine if prenatal ethanol ingestion affects the expression of cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP) and nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Paired timed pregnant rats were fed a liquid diet, one group treated with 36% of carbohydrate calories replaced with ethanol. Maternal serum retinol concentrations during pregnancy peaked on the 6th day of pregnancy, but no difference was noted between the ethanol and control group. At the 12th and 20th day of gestation, embryos or fetal brain were removed, and RNA was isolated for Northern hybridization. The abundance of CRBP mRNA was significantly elevated by ethanol consumption. In both the 12-day embryo (relative density of control: 1.00 +/- 0.10; vs. ethanol: 1.87 +/- 0.30, p < 0.05) and 20-day fetal brain (relative density of control: 1.00 +/- 0.09; vs. ethanol: 1.46 +/- 0.09, p < 0.01). In the embryo, ethanol ingestion resulted in a decrease in the level of RAR-beta mRNA (control: 1.00 +/- 0.05; vs. ethanol: 0.71 +/- 0.07, p < 0.01), but had no effect on RAR-alpha or RAR-gamma mRNA. In contrast to the embryo, the expression of both the 3.7- and 2.7-kb RAR-alpha transcripts was significantly greater in day 20 fetal brain of ethanol-treated rats (3.7-kb RAR-alpha control: 1.00 +/- 0.11; vs. ethanol: 1.65 +/- 0.06; p < 0.001; 2.7-kb RAR-alpha control: 1.00 +/- 0.14; vs. ethanol: 1.74 +/- 0.27, p < 0.05), whereas RAR-beta and RAR-gamma expression were not altered. These observations suggest that altered vitamin A function is a potential factor in the embryopathy of prenatal ethanol exposure. PMID:8749798

  11. Increased adenosine levels in mice expressing mutant glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes result in failure of induction of LTP reversal (depotentiation) in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenji F; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko

    2014-08-26

    Astrocytes regulate the activity of neighboring neurons by releasing chemical transmitters, including ATP. Adenosine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of mice that express a mutant human glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes are slightly elevated compared to those in wild type mice and this might result from the observed increased release by mutant astrocytes of ATP, which can be used to produce adenosine. Using hippocampal slices from these mutant mice, we examined whether the increased endogenous adenosine levels in the hippocampus modulate the reversal of long-term potentiation (LTP), i.e. depotentiation (DP), in CA1 neurons. In hippocampal slices from wild type mice, a stable LTP was induced by tetanic stimulation consisting of 100 pulses at 100 Hz, and this was reversed by a train of low frequency stimulation (LFS) of 500 pulses at 1 Hz applied 30 min later. This induction of DP was inhibited by application of either 100 nM adenosine or 0.5 nM N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, during LFS, indicating that the increase in extracellular adenosine levels attenuated DP induction by acting on adenosine A1 receptors. In contrast, although a stable LTP was also induced in hippocampal slices from mutant mice, induction of DP was inhibited, but DP could be induced by application, during LFS, of 50 nM 8-cyclopentyltheophylline, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that a small increase in extracellular adenosine levels resulting from increased ATP release by astrocytes results in attenuation of DP in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the mutant mice.

  12. Increased adenosine levels in mice expressing mutant glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes result in failure of induction of LTP reversal (depotentiation) in hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kenji F; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko

    2014-08-26

    Astrocytes regulate the activity of neighboring neurons by releasing chemical transmitters, including ATP. Adenosine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of mice that express a mutant human glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes are slightly elevated compared to those in wild type mice and this might result from the observed increased release by mutant astrocytes of ATP, which can be used to produce adenosine. Using hippocampal slices from these mutant mice, we examined whether the increased endogenous adenosine levels in the hippocampus modulate the reversal of long-term potentiation (LTP), i.e. depotentiation (DP), in CA1 neurons. In hippocampal slices from wild type mice, a stable LTP was induced by tetanic stimulation consisting of 100 pulses at 100 Hz, and this was reversed by a train of low frequency stimulation (LFS) of 500 pulses at 1 Hz applied 30 min later. This induction of DP was inhibited by application of either 100 nM adenosine or 0.5 nM N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, during LFS, indicating that the increase in extracellular adenosine levels attenuated DP induction by acting on adenosine A1 receptors. In contrast, although a stable LTP was also induced in hippocampal slices from mutant mice, induction of DP was inhibited, but DP could be induced by application, during LFS, of 50 nM 8-cyclopentyltheophylline, an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist. These results suggest that a small increase in extracellular adenosine levels resulting from increased ATP release by astrocytes results in attenuation of DP in hippocampal CA1 neurons in the mutant mice. PMID:25017946

  13. Conjugated linoleic acid supplementation enhances insulin sensitivity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and glucose transporter type 4 protein expression in the skeletal muscles of rats during endurance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kangok; Song, Youngju; Kwon, Daekeun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study examined whether conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) supplementation affects insulin sensitivity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT-4) protein expressions in the skeletal muscles of rats during endurance exercise. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into HS (high-fat diet (HFD) sedentary group, n = 8), CS (1.0% CLA supplemented HFD sedentary group, n = 8), and CE (1.0% CLA supplemented HFD exercise group, n = 8). The rats in the CE swam for 60 min a day, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. Results: The serum glucose and insulin contents and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) value of the CS and CE were significantly decreased compared to those of the HS. The PPAR-γ protein expressions in the soleus muscle (SOM) and extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) were significantly higher in the CE than in the HS. In addition, the PPAR-γ protein expression in the SOM of the CS was significantly higher than that in the HS. On the other hand, the GLUT-4 protein expression of the SOM in the CE was significantly higher compared to that in the HS. However, there was no significant difference in GLUT-4 protein expression in the EDL among the groups. Conclusion: CLA supplementation with/without endurance exercise has role in improvement of insulin sensitivity. Moreover, when CLA supplementation was accompanied by endurance exercise, the PPAR-γ protein expression in SOM and EDL and the GLUT-4 protein expression in SOM were enhanced compared with the control group. PMID:27096060

  14. Expression of Estrogen Receptor Coactivator Proline-, Glutamic Acid- and Leucine-Rich Protein 1 within Paraspinal Muscles in Adolescents with Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Skibinska, Izabela; Tomaszewski, Marek; Andrusiewicz, Miroslaw; Urbaniak, Paulina; Czarnecka-Klos, Roza; Shadi, Milud; Kotwicki, Tomasz; Kotwicka, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to detect and assess the estrogen receptor (ESR) coactivator PELP1 expression within human paraspinal skeletal muscles in patients suffering from idiopathic scoliosis. Methods During surgical correction of scoliosis the muscle biopsies harvested in 29 females. Presence of PELP1, ESR1 and ESR2 genes transcripts was studied using RT-qPCR technique while immunohistochemistry and western blot methods were used to detect the PEPL1 protein presence. Results PELP1 expression in deep paraspinal muscles revealed higher than in superficial back muscles (p = 0.005). Positive immunohistochemical staining for PELP1 was observed in the nuclei of the paraspinal muscle cells. Western blot revealed PELP1 protein in all samples. No significant difference in PELP1 expression between the convex and the concave scoliosis side (p>0.05) was found. In deep paraspinal back muscles, a significant correlation between the PELP1 expression level on the concave side and the Cobb angle (r = 0.4; p<0.05) was noted as well as between the PELP1 and ESR1 expression level (r = 0.7; p<0.05) while no correlation between PELP1 and ESR2 expression level was found. Conclusion To our knowledge, three techniques for the first time demonstrated the presence of the PELP1 in paraspinal muscles of patients with idiopathic scoliosis. The PELP1 potential regulatory impact on back muscle function is to be further investigated. PMID:27045366

  15. Abscisic acid-dependent regulation of small rubber particle protein gene expression in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum is mediated by TbbZIP1.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Julia; Hillebrand, Andrea; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Natural rubber is a high-molecular-mass biopolymer found in the latex of >2,500 plant species, including Hevea brasiliensis, Parthenium argentatum and Taraxacum spp. The active sites of rubber biosynthesis are rubber particles, which comprise a hydrophobic rubber core surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer membrane containing species-dependent lipids and associated proteins. Small rubber particle proteins are the most abundant rubber particle-associated proteins in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum (TbSRPPs) and may promote rubber biosynthesis by stabilizing the rubber particle architecture. We investigated the transcriptional regulation of genes encoding SRPPs and identified a bZIP transcription factor (TbbZIP.1) similar to the Arabidopsis thaliana ABI5-ABF-AREB subfamily, which is thought to include downstream targets of ABA and/or abiotic stress-inducible protein kinases. The TbbZIP.1 gene was predominantly expressed in laticifers and regulates the expression of TbSRPP genes in an ABA-dependent manner. The individual TbSRPP genes showed distinct induction profiles, suggesting diverse roles in rubber biosynthesis and stress adaptation. The potential involvement of TbSRPPs in the adaptation of T. brevicorniculatum plants to environmental stress is discussed based on our current knowledge of the stress-response roles of SRPPs and their homologs, and the protective function of latex and rubber against pathogens. Our data suggest that TbSRPPs contribute to stress tolerance in T. brevicorniculatum and that their effects are mediated by TbbZIP.1.

  16. Retinoic acid-mediated gene expression in transgenic reporter zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Perz-Edwards, A; Hardison, N L; Linney, E

    2001-01-01

    Retinoic acid-mediated gene activation is important for normal vertebrate development. The size and nature of retinoic acid make it difficult to identify the precise cellular location of this signaling molecule throughout an embryo. Additionally, retinoic acid (RA) signaling is regulated by a complex combination of receptors, coactivators, and antagonizing proteins. Thus, in order to integrate these signals and identify regions within a whole developing embryo where cells can respond transcriptionally to retinoic acid, we have used a reporter transgenic approach. We have generated several stable lines of transgenic zebrafish which use retinoic acid response elements to drive fluorescent protein expression. In these zebrafish lines, transgene expression is localized to regions of the neural tube, retina, notochord, somites, heart, pronephric ducts, branchial arches, and jaw muscles in embryos and larvae. Transgene expression can be induced in additional regions of the neural tube and retina as well as the immature notochord, hatching gland, enveloping cell layer, and fin by exposing embryos to retinoic acid. Treatment with retinoic acid synthase inhibitors, citral and diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB), during neurulation, greatly reduces transgene expression. DEAB treatment of embryos at gastrulation phenocopies the embryonic effects of vitamin A deprivation or targeted disruption of the RA synthase retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 in other vertebrates. Together these data suggest that the reporter expression we see in zebrafish is dependent upon conserved vertebrate pathways of RA synthesis.

  17. Variation in Protein Intake Induces Variation in Spider Silk Expression

    PubMed Central

    Blamires, Sean J.; Wu, Chun-Lin; Tso, I-Min

    2012-01-01

    Background It is energetically expensive to synthesize certain amino acids. The proteins (spidroins) of spider major ampullate (MA) silk, MaSp1 and MaSp2, differ in amino acid composition. Glutamine and proline are prevalent in MaSp2 and are expensive to synthesize. Since most orb web spiders express high proline silk they might preferentially attain the amino acids needed for silk from food and shift toward expressing more MaSp1 in their MA silk when starved. Methodology/Principal Findings We fed three spiders; Argiope aetherea, Cyrtophora moluccensis and Leucauge blanda, high protein, low protein or no protein solutions. A. aetherea and L. blanda MA silks are high in proline, while C. moluccesnsis MA silks are low in proline. After 10 days of feeding we determined the amino acid compositions and mechanical properties of each species' MA silk and compared them between species and treatments with pre-treatment samples, accounting for ancestry. We found that the proline and glutamine of A. aetherea and L. blanda silks were affected by protein intake; significantly decreasing under the low and no protein intake treatments. Glutmaine composition in C. moluccensis silk was likewise affected by protein intake. However, the composition of proline in their MA silk was not significantly affected by protein intake. Conclusions Our results suggest that protein limitation induces a shift toward different silk proteins with lower glutamine and/or proline content. Contradictions to the MaSp model lie in the findings that C. moluccensis MA silks did not experience a significant reduction in proline and A. aetherea did not experience a significant reduction in serine on low/no protein. The mechanical properties of the silks could not be explained by a MaSp1 expressional shift. Factors other than MaSp expression, such as the expression of spidroin-like orthologues, may impact on silk amino acid composition and spinning and glandular processes may impact mechanics. PMID:22363691

  18. The hydroxymethyldihydropterin pyrophosphokinase domain of the multifunctional folic acid synthesis Fas protein of Pneumocystis carinii expressed as an independent enzyme in Escherichia coli: refolding and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ballantine, S P; Volpe, F; Delves, C J

    1994-08-01

    The folic acid synthesis (Fas) protein of Pneumocystis carinii is a multifunctional enzyme containing dihydroneopterin aldolase, 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase (PPPK), and dihydropteroate synthase activities. Isolation of the stretch of fas cDNA shown by amino acid similarity to the bacterial counterparts to code for PPPK activity (fasC domain) is described. FasC was expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli inclusion bodies using an inducible tac promoter expression system. Solubilization of the inclusion bodies in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride and refolding of the recombinant protein yielded enzymatically active PPPK which was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. Sequence analysis showed that the first 13 amino acids of the purified protein were in agreement with those predicted from the DNA sequence and, furthermore, that the amino-terminal methionine had been removed. The enzyme is active in the monomeric form, exhibiting maximum activity at around pH 8.0. Isoelectric focusing gave a pI of 9.1. The Km value for 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin was 3.6 microM in 50 mM Tris buffer, pH 8.2. The production of independently folded, active P. carinii PPPK will allow detailed biochemical and structural studies, increasing our understanding of this enzyme domain.

  19. All-trans retinoic acid enhances the transport of phase II metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene by inducing the Breast Cancer Resistance Protein expression in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Stefanie; Lampen, Alfonso

    2010-08-16

    All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is the most active metabolite of vitamin A. It is a ligand of retinoic acid receptors (RAR) as well as of retinoid X receptors (RXR) and effectively stimulates the RAR/RXR signalling pathway. In this study effects of atRA on the detoxification of the food contaminant benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) was elucidated by using the Caco-2 cell line as model system for the human small intestine. Caco-2 cells express a number of phase I and II xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes as well as several transport proteins of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. Pre-treatment of the cells with atRA resulted in enhanced apical excretion of B[a]P-3-sulfate, a phase II metabolite of B[a]P. Gene expression analysis revealed that the Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP), an ABC-transporter known to be involved in B[a]P-3-sulfate excretion, was strongly stimulated already at low concentrations of atRA. Furthermore co-incubation of the intestinal cell with RAR agonist and RXR agonist resulted in a strong additive induction of mRNA expression of BCRP. Thus, atRA was shown to induce BCRP gene expression probably via the RAR/RXR signalling pathway, resulting in effective removal of B[a]P metabolites from intestinal cells.

  20. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    DOEpatents

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  1. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R

    2016-02-04

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression.

  2. Protein biosynthesis with conformationally restricted amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Ellman, J.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-05-19

    The incorporation of conformationally constrained amino acids into peptides is a powerful approach for generating structurally defined peptides as conformational probes and bioactive agents. The ability to site-specifically introduce constrained amino acids into large polypeptide chains would provide a similar opportunity to probe the flexibility, conformation, folding and stability of proteins. To this end, we have examined the competence of the Escherichia coli protein biosynthetic machinery to incorporate a number of these unnatural amino acids into the 164 residue protein T4 lysozyme (T4L). Results clearly demonstrate that the protein biosynthetic machinery can accommodate a wide variety of conformationally constrained amino acids. The expansion of structural motifs that can be biosynthetically incorporated into proteins to include a large number of conformationally constrained amino acids significantly increases the power of mutagenesis methods as probes of protein structure and function and provides additional insights into the steric requirements of the translational machinery. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Chemical derivatization combined with capillary LC or MALDI-TOF MS for trace determination of lipoic acid in cosmetics and integrated protein expression profiling in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ju; Lin, Ying-Chi; Chen, Yen-Ling; Feng, Chia-Hsien

    2014-12-01

    Lipoic acid (LA) is an essential cofactor in mitochondrial enzymes and an ideal antioxidant in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Capillary liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detection (CapLC-UV) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) are two environmentally friendly methods for determining LA. In this study, a pre-column microwave-assisted derivatization with 4-bromomethyl-6,7-dimethoxycoumarin enhanced the UV absorbance of LA and was monitored at 345 nm by CapLC-UV. Gradient separation was performed using a reversed-phase C18 column with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid solution. The ionization of LA was increased, and the LA derivative was detected by MALDI-TOF MS at m/z 683 with an α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid matrix. The linear response ranged from 0.1 to 40 μM with a correlation coefficient of 0.999. The CapLC-UV and MALDI-TOF MS had detection limits of 5 and 4 fmol, respectively. These methods effectively detected LA in dietary supplements and cosmetics. Cellular proteomes of a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) irradiated with UV radiation were also compared with and without LA treatment. The cellular proteomes were identified by nanoultra performance LC with LTQ Orbitrap system after trypsin digestion. Protein identification was performed by simultaneous peptide sequencing and MASCOT search. The analysis revealed changes in several proteins, including CDC42, TPI1, HNRPA2B1, PRDX1, PTGES3 and MYL6.

  4. Distinguishing proteins from arbitrary amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Yau, Stephen S-T; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  5. Expression of heteromeric amino acid transporters along the murine intestine.

    PubMed

    Dave, Mital H; Schulz, Nicole; Zecevic, Marija; Wagner, Carsten A; Verrey, Francois

    2004-07-15

    Members of the new heterodimeric amino acid transporter family are composed of two subunits, a catalytic multitransmembrane spanning protein (light chain) and a type II glycoprotein (heavy chain). These transporters function as exchangers and thereby extend the transmembrane amino acid transport selectivity to specific amino acids. The heavy chain rBAT associates with the light chain b degrees (,+)AT to form a cystine and cationic amino acid transporter. The other heavy chain, 4F2hc, can interact with seven different light chains to form various transporters corresponding to systems L, y(+)L, asc or x(-)(c). The importance of some of these transporters in intestinal and renal (re)absorption of amino acids is highlighted by the fact that mutations in either the rBAT or b degrees (,+)AT subunit result in cystinuria whereas a defect in the y(+)-LAT1 light chain causes lysinuric protein intolerance. Here we investigated the localization of these transporters in intestine since both diseases are also characterized by altered intestinal amino acid absorption. Real time PCR showed organ-specific expression patterns for all transporter subunit mRNAs along the intestine and Western blotting confirmed these findings on the protein level. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated basolateral coexpression of 4F2hc, LAT2 and y(+)-LAT1 in stomach and small intestine, whereas rBAT and b degrees (,+)AT were found colocalizing on the apical side of small intestine epithelium. In stomach, 4F2hc and LAT2 were localized in H(+)/K(+)-ATPase-expressing parietal cells. The abundant expression of several members of the heterodimeric transporter family along the murine small intestine suggests their involvement in amino acids absorption. Furthermore, strong expression of rBAT, b degrees (,+)AT and y(+)-LAT1 in the small intestine explains the reduced intestinal absorption of some amino acid in patients with cystinuria or lysinuric protein intolerance.

  6. Expressed protein ligation-mediated template protein extension.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Ayako; Hauser, Paul S; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Weers, Paul M M; Ryan, Robert O

    2012-06-01

    Expressed protein ligation (EPL) was performed to investigate sequence requirements for a variant human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) to adopt a folded structure. A C-terminal truncated apoA-I, corresponding to residues 1-172, was expressed and isolated from Escherichia coli. Compared to full length apoA-I (243 amino acids), apoA-I(1-172) displayed less α-helix secondary structure and lower stability in solution. To determine if extension of this polypeptide would confer secondary structure content and/or stability, 20 residues were added to the C-terminus of apoA-I(1-172) by EPL, creating apoA-I(Milano)(1-192). The EPL product displayed biophysical properties similar to full-length apoA-I(Milano). The results provide a general protein engineering strategy to modify the length of a recombinant template polypeptide using synthetic peptides as well as a convenient, cost effective way to investigate the structure/function relations in apolipoprotein fragments or domains of different size.

  7. Gene Expressions for Signal Transduction under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fukamachi, Toshihiko; Ikeda, Syunsuke; Wang, Xin; Saito, Hiromi; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Although it is now well known that some diseased areas, such as cancer nests, inflammation loci, and infarction areas, are acidified, little is known about cellular signal transduction, gene expression, and cellular functions under acidic conditions. Our group showed that different signal proteins were activated under acidic conditions compared with those observed in a typical medium of around pH 7.4 that has been used until now. Investigations of gene expression under acidic conditions may be crucial to our understanding of signal transduction in acidic diseased areas. In this study, we investigated gene expression in mesothelioma cells cultured at an acidic pH using a DNA microarray technique. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 379 genes were increased more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5. Genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors numbered 35, 32, and 17 among the 379 genes, respectively. Since the functions of 78 genes are unknown, it can be argued that cells may have other genes for signaling under acidic conditions. The expressions of 37 of the 379 genes were observed to increase after as little as 2 h. After 24 h culture at pH 6.7, expressions of 412 genes were repressed more than twofold compared with those in cells cultured at pH 7.5, and the 412 genes contained 35, 76, and 7 genes encoding receptors, signal proteins including transcription factors, and cytokines including growth factors, respectively. These results suggest that the signal pathways in acidic diseased areas are different, at least in part, from those examined with cells cultured at a pH of around 7.4. PMID:24705103

  8. Blood folate status and expression of proteins involved in immune function, inflammation, and coagulation: biochemical and proteomic changes in the plasma of humans in response to long-term synthetic folic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Susan J; Horgan, Graham; de Roos, Baukje; Rucklidge, Garry; Reid, Martin; Duncan, Gary; Pirie, Lynn; Basten, Graham P; Powers, Hilary J

    2010-04-01

    We used plasma proteomics to identify human proteins responsive to folate status. Plasma was collected from subjects treated with placebo or 1.2 mg of folic acid daily for 12 weeks in a randomized controlled trial. Homocysteine and folate were measured by immunoassay and uracil misincorporation by electrophoresis. The plasma proteome was assessed by 2-D gel electrophoresis, and proteins were identified by LC MS/MS. 5-methylTHF increased 5-fold (P = 0.000003) in response to intervention. Red cell folate doubled (P = 0.013), and lymphocyte folate increased 44% (P = 0.0001). Hcy and uracil dropped 22% (P = 0.0005) and 25% (P = 0.05), respectively. ApoE A-1, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, antithrombin, and serum amyloid P were downregulated, while albumin, IgM C, and complement C3 were upregulated (P < 0.05). More than 60 proteins were significantly associated with folate pre- and postintervention (P < 0.01). These were categorized into metabolic pathways related to complement fixation (e.g., C1, C3, C4, Factor H, Factor 1, Factor B, clusterin), coagulation (e.g., antithrombin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, kininogen) and mineral transport (e.g., transthyretin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin). Low folate status pre- and post-treatment were associated with lower levels of proteins involved in activation and regulation of immune function and coagulation. Supplementation with synthetic folic acid increased expression of these proteins but did not substantially disrupt the balance of these pathways.

  9. Co-dependence of genotype and dietary protein intake to affect expression on amino acid/peptide transporters in porcine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kong, X; Li, F; Tan, B; Li, Y; Duan, Y; Yin, Y; He, J; Hu, C; Blachier, F; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    A total of 96 barrows (48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs representing fatty genotype, and 48 Landrace pigs representing lean genotype) were randomly assigned to either a low- or adequate-protein treatment diet. The experimental period commenced at 5 weeks of age and extended to the finishing period. After euthanasia, blood and skeletal muscle samples were collected from pigs at the nursery, growing, and finishing phases. Our results indicate that the concentrations of free AAs in the plasma and muscle decreased as the age of the pigs increased. In addition, a strain × growth phase interaction (P < 0.05) was observed for the free AA pool in the plasma and muscle. The low-protein diet upregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for T1R1/T1R3 involved in glutamate binding, but downregulated (P < 0.05) the mRNA levels for PAT1, PAT2, and ASCT2, which transport neutral AAs into muscles. Bama mini-pigs had higher (P < 0.05) mRNA levels for LAT1, SNAT2, and EAAC1, but a lower (P < 0.05) mRNA level for PepT1, compared with Landrace pigs. Collectively, our findings indicate that adequate provision of dietary protein plays an important role in regulating profiles of free AA pools and expression of key AA/peptide transporters/transceptors in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner.

  10. A new acidic protein in porcine brain.

    PubMed

    Ishioka, N; Isobe, T; Okuyama, T; Numata, Y; Wada, H

    1980-10-21

    An extremely acidic protein has been isolated in a purified form from porcine rain extract, by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation followed by column chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and on Sephadex G-75. The purified protein was tentatively named as glutamic acid-rich protein because it was characterized by its remarkably high content of glutamic acid which accounted for 49% of the total amino acid composition. The protein appeared to be a single polypeptide chain with a molecular weight of 56 000-58 000, and had an isoelectric point of 4.6. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was Asp-Glu-Pro-Pro-Ser-Glu-Gly. The immunochemical analysis using rabbit antiserum prepared to the porcine protein has suggested that it is present in the brain of human, cow, cat, dog and goat as well as in various goat organs including liver, kidney, heart, small intestine and spleen.

  11. Interleukin-22 binding protein (IL-22BP) is constitutively expressed by a subset of conventional dendritic cells and is strongly induced by retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Martin, JCJ; Bériou, G; Heslan, M; Chauvin, C; Utriainen, L; Aumeunier, A; Scott, CL; Mowat, A; Cerovic, V; Houston, SA; Leboeuf, M; Hubert, FX; Hémont, C; Merad, M; Milling, S; Josien, R

    2014-01-01

    IL-22 is mainly produced at barrier surfaces by T cells and innate lymphoid cells and is crucial to maintain epithelial integrity. However, dysregulated IL-22 action leads to deleterious inflammation and is involved in diseases such as psoriasis, intestinal inflammation and cancer. IL-22BP is a soluble inhibitory IL-22 receptor and may represent a crucial regulator of IL-22. We show both in rats and mice that, in the steady state, the main source of IL-22BP is constituted by a subset of conventional dendritic cells (DC) in lymphoid and non lymphoid tissues. In mouse intestine, IL-22BP was specifically expressed in lamina propria CD103+CD11b+ DC. In humans, IL-22BP was expressed in immature monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) and strongly induced by retinoic acid (RA) but dramatically reduced upon maturation. Our data suggest that a subset of immature DC may actively participate in the regulation of IL-22 activity in the gut by producing high levels of IL-22BP. PMID:23653115

  12. Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Atshaves, B.P.; Martin, G.G.; Hostetler, H.A.; McIntosh, A.L.; Kier, A.B.; Schroeder, F.

    2010-01-01

    While low levels of unesterified long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are normal metabolic intermediates of dietary and endogenous fat, LCFAs are also potent regulators of key receptors/enzymes, and at high levels become toxic detergents within the cell. Elevated levels of LCFAs are associated with diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Consequently, mammals evolved fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind/sequester these potentially toxic free fatty acids in the cytosol and present them for rapid removal in oxidative (mitochondria, peroxisomes) or storage (endoplasmic reticulum, lipid droplets) organelles. Mammals have a large (15 member) family of FABPs with multiple members occurring within a single cell type. The first described FABP, liver-FABP (L-FABP, or FABP1), is expressed in very high levels (2-5% of cytosolic protein) in liver as well as intestine and kidney. Since L-FABP facilitates uptake and metabolism of LCFAs in vitro and in cultured cells, it was expected that abnormal function or loss of L-FABP would reduce hepatic LCFA uptake/oxidation and thereby increase LCFAs available for oxidation in muscle and/or storage in adipose. This prediction was confirmed in vitro with isolated liver slices and cultured primary hepatocytes from L-FABP gene-ablated mice. Despite unaltered food consumption when fed a control diet ad libitum, the L-FABP null mice exhibited age- and sex-dependent weight gain and increased fat tissue mass. The obese phenotype was exacerbated in L-FABP null mice pair-fed a high fat diet. Taken together with other findings, these data suggest that L-FABP could have an important role in preventing age- or diet-induced obesity. PMID:20537520

  13. Repressing the Expression of the SUCROSE NONFERMENTING-1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE Gene in Pea Embryo Causes Pleiotropic Defects of Maturation Similar to an Abscisic Acid-Insensitive Phenotype1[W

    PubMed Central

    Radchuk, Ruslana; Radchuk, Volodymyr; Weschke, Winfriede; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Weber, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The classic role of SUCROSE NONFERMENTING-1 (Snf1)-like kinases in eukaryotes is to adapt metabolism to environmental conditions such as nutrition, energy, and stress. During pea (Pisum sativum) seed maturation, developmental programs of growing embryos are adjusted to changing physiological and metabolic conditions. To understand regulation of the switch from cell proliferation to differentiation, SUCROSE NONFERMENTING-1-RELATED PROTEIN KINASE (SnRK1) was antisense repressed in pea seeds. Transgenic seeds show maturation defects, reduced conversion of sucrose into storage products, lower globulin content, frequently altered cotyledon surface, shape, and symmetry, as well as occasional precocious germination. Gene expression analysis of embryos using macroarrays of 5,548 seed-specific genes revealed 183 differentially expressed genes in two clusters, either delayed down-regulated or delayed up-regulated during transition. Delayed down-regulated genes are related to mitotic activity, gibberellic acid/brassinosteroid synthesis, stress response, and Ca2+ signal transduction. This specifies a developmentally younger status and conditional stress. Higher gene expression related to respiration/gluconeogenesis/fermentation is consistent with a role of SnRK1 in repressing energy-consuming processes in maturing cotyledons under low oxygen/energy availability. Delayed up-regulated genes are mainly related to storage protein synthesis and stress tolerance. Most of the phenotype resembles abscisic acid (ABA) insensitivity and may be explained by reduced Abi-3 expression. This may cause a reduction in ABA functions and/or a disconnection between metabolic and ABA signals, suggesting that SnRK1 is a mediator of ABA functions during pea seed maturation. SnRK1 repression also impairs gene expression associated with differentiation, independent from ABA functions, like regulation and signaling of developmental events, chromatin reorganization, cell wall synthesis, biosynthetic

  14. p53-Regulated Networks of Protein, mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA Expression Revealed by Integrated Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling With Amino Acids in Cell Culture (pSILAC) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Hünten, Sabine; Kaller, Markus; Drepper, Friedel; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Bonfert, Thomas; Erhard, Florian; Dueck, Anne; Eichner, Norbert; Friedel, Caroline C.; Meister, Gunter; Zimmer, Ralf; Warscheid, Bettina; Hermeking, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effect of p53 activation on de novo protein synthesis using quantitative proteomics (pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture/pSILAC) in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480. This was combined with mRNA and noncoding RNA expression analyses by next generation sequencing (RNA-, miR-Seq). Furthermore, genome-wide DNA binding of p53 was analyzed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-Seq). Thereby, we identified differentially regulated proteins (542 up, 569 down), mRNAs (1258 up, 415 down), miRNAs (111 up, 95 down) and lncRNAs (270 up, 123 down). Changes in protein and mRNA expression levels showed a positive correlation (r = 0.50, p < 0.0001). In total, we detected 133 direct p53 target genes that were differentially expressed and displayed p53 occupancy in the vicinity of their promoter. More transcriptionally induced genes displayed occupied p53 binding sites (4.3% mRNAs, 7.2% miRNAs, 6.3% lncRNAs, 5.9% proteins) than repressed genes (2.4% mRNAs, 3.2% miRNAs, 0.8% lncRNAs, 1.9% proteins), suggesting indirect mechanisms of repression. Around 50% of the down-regulated proteins displayed seed-matching sequences of p53-induced miRNAs in the corresponding 3′-UTRs. Moreover, proteins repressed by p53 significantly overlapped with those previously shown to be repressed by miR-34a. We confirmed up-regulation of the novel direct p53 target genes LINC01021, MDFI, ST14 and miR-486 and showed that ectopic LINC01021 expression inhibits proliferation in SW480 cells. Furthermore, KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT mRNAs were confirmed as direct targets of the p53-induced miR-34a, miR-205 and miR-486–5p, respectively. In line with the loss of p53 function during tumor progression, elevated expression of KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT was detected in advanced stages of cancer. In conclusion, the integration of multiple omics methods allowed the comprehensive identification of direct and indirect effectors of p53 that provide new insights and leads into the

  15. p53-Regulated Networks of Protein, mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA Expression Revealed by Integrated Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling With Amino Acids in Cell Culture (pSILAC) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) Analyses.

    PubMed

    Hünten, Sabine; Kaller, Markus; Drepper, Friedel; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Bonfert, Thomas; Erhard, Florian; Dueck, Anne; Eichner, Norbert; Friedel, Caroline C; Meister, Gunter; Zimmer, Ralf; Warscheid, Bettina; Hermeking, Heiko

    2015-10-01

    We determined the effect of p53 activation on de novo protein synthesis using quantitative proteomics (pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture/pSILAC) in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480. This was combined with mRNA and noncoding RNA expression analyses by next generation sequencing (RNA-, miR-Seq). Furthermore, genome-wide DNA binding of p53 was analyzed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-Seq). Thereby, we identified differentially regulated proteins (542 up, 569 down), mRNAs (1258 up, 415 down), miRNAs (111 up, 95 down) and lncRNAs (270 up, 123 down). Changes in protein and mRNA expression levels showed a positive correlation (r = 0.50, p < 0.0001). In total, we detected 133 direct p53 target genes that were differentially expressed and displayed p53 occupancy in the vicinity of their promoter. More transcriptionally induced genes displayed occupied p53 binding sites (4.3% mRNAs, 7.2% miRNAs, 6.3% lncRNAs, 5.9% proteins) than repressed genes (2.4% mRNAs, 3.2% miRNAs, 0.8% lncRNAs, 1.9% proteins), suggesting indirect mechanisms of repression. Around 50% of the down-regulated proteins displayed seed-matching sequences of p53-induced miRNAs in the corresponding 3'-UTRs. Moreover, proteins repressed by p53 significantly overlapped with those previously shown to be repressed by miR-34a. We confirmed up-regulation of the novel direct p53 target genes LINC01021, MDFI, ST14 and miR-486 and showed that ectopic LINC01021 expression inhibits proliferation in SW480 cells. Furthermore, KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT mRNAs were confirmed as direct targets of the p53-induced miR-34a, miR-205 and miR-486-5p, respectively. In line with the loss of p53 function during tumor progression, elevated expression of KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT was detected in advanced stages of cancer. In conclusion, the integration of multiple omics methods allowed the comprehensive identification of direct and indirect effectors of p53 that provide new insights and leads into the

  16. Enhanced membrane protein expression by engineering increased intracellular membrane production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane protein research is frequently hampered by the low natural abundance of these proteins in cells and typically relies on recombinant gene expression. Different expression systems, like mammalian cells, insect cells, bacteria and yeast are being used, but very few research efforts have been directed towards specific host cell customization for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. Here we show that by increasing the intracellular membrane production by interfering with a key enzymatic step of lipid synthesis, enhanced expression of membrane proteins in yeast is achieved. Results We engineered the oleotrophic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, by deleting the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, PAH1, which led to massive proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. For all eight tested representatives of different integral membrane protein families, we obtained enhanced protein accumulation levels and in some cases enhanced proteolytic integrity in the ∆pah1 strain. We analysed the adenosine A2AR G-protein coupled receptor case in more detail and found that concomitant induction of the unfolded protein response in the ∆pah1 strain enhanced the specific ligand binding activity of the receptor. These data indicate an improved quality control mechanism for membrane proteins accumulating in yeast cells with proliferated ER. Conclusions We conclude that redirecting the metabolic flux of fatty acids away from triacylglycerol- and sterylester-storage towards membrane phospholipid synthesis by PAH1 gene inactivation, provides a valuable approach to enhance eukaryotic membrane protein production. Complementary to this improvement in membrane protein quantity, UPR co-induction further enhances the quality of the membrane protein in terms of its proper folding and biological activity. Importantly, since these pathways are conserved in all eukaryotes, it will be of interest to investigate similar engineering approaches in other cell types of

  17. Influence of betaine and arginine supplementation of reduced protein diets on fatty acid composition and gene expression in the muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue of cross-bred pigs.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Marta S; Rolo, Eva S; Alfaia, Cristina M; Pires, Virgínia R; Luxton, Richard; Doran, Olena; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José A M

    2016-03-28

    The isolated or combined effects of betaine and arginine supplementation of reduced protein diets (RPD) on fat content, fatty acid composition and mRNA levels of genes controlling lipid metabolism in pig m. longissimus lumborum and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were assessed. The experiment was performed on forty intact male pigs (Duroc×Large White×Landrace cross-breed) with initial and final live weights of 60 and 93 kg, respectively. Pigs were randomly assigned to one of the following five diets (n 8): 16·0 % of crude protein (control), 13·0 % of crude protein (RPD), RPD supplemented with 0·33 % of betaine, RPD supplemented with 1·5 % of arginine and RPD supplemented with 0·33 % of betaine and 1·5 % of arginine. Data confirmed that RPD increase intramuscular fat (IMF) content and total fat content in SAT. The increased total fat content in SAT was accompanied by higher GLUT type 4, lipoprotein lipase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase mRNA expression levels. In addition, the supplementation of RPD with betaine and/or arginine did not affect either IMF or total fat in SAT. However, dietary betaine supplementation slightly affected fatty acid composition in both muscle and SAT. This effect was associated with an increase of carnitine O-acetyltransferase mRNA levels in SAT but not in muscle, which suggests that betaine might be involved in the differential regulation of some key genes of lipid metabolism in pig muscle and SAT. Although the arginine-supplemented diet decreased the mRNA expression level of PPARG in muscle and SAT, it did not influence fat content or fatty acid composition in any of these pig tissues.

  18. Aging differentially affects human skeletal muscle amino acid transporter expression when essential amino acids are ingested after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Jared M.; Drummond, Micah J.; Coben, Jennifer R.; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Amino acid transporters have been proposed as regulators of protein synthesis. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether amino acid transporter expression is increased in human muscle following resistance exercise (RE) coupled with essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion, and whether a differential response occurs with aging. Secondly, we aimed to compare this response to a previous study examining RE alone. Methods Young (n=7, 30±2yr) and older men (n=6, 70±2yr) ingested EAA 1h after RE. Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest and 3 and 6h postexercise to examine amino acid transporter mRNA and protein expression. Results In both age groups, RE+EAA increased mRNA of L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1)/solute linked carrier (SLC)7A5, sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2)/SLC38A2, and cationic amino acid transporter 1/SLC7A1 (p<0.05). SNAT2 protein increased in young at 3 and 6h (p<0.05), whereas old maintained higher LAT1 protein (p<0.05). Compared to RE alone, RE+EAA enhanced amino acid transporter expression only in young (p<0.05). Conclusions RE increases muscle amino acid transporter expression in young and older adults, however, postexercise EAA ingestion enhances amino acid transporter expression only in young indicating that aging may influence the function of specific amino acid transporters. PMID:22889597

  19. Tannic acid facilitates expression of the polypyrimidine tract binding protein and alleviates deleterious inclusion of CHRNA1 exon P3A due to an hnRNP H-disrupting mutation in congenital myasthenic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Yang; Masuda, Akio; Matsuura, Tohru; Ito, Mikako; Okushin, Kazuya; Engel, Andrew G.; Ohno, Kinji

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that the intronic splice-site mutation IVS3-8G>A of CHRNA1 that encodes the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α subunit disrupts binding of a splicing repressor, hnRNP H. This, in turn, results in exclusive inclusion of the downstream exon P3A. The P3A(+) transcript encodes a non-functional α subunit that comprises 50% of the transcripts in normal human skeletal muscle, but its functional significance remains undetermined. In an effort to search for a potential therapy, we screened off-label effects of 960 bioactive chemical compounds and found that tannic acid ameliorates the aberrant splicing due to IVS3-8G>A but without altering the expression of hnRNP H. Therefore, we searched for another splicing trans-factor. We found that the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) binds close to the 3′ end of CHRNA1 intron 3, that PTB induces skipping of exon P3A and that tannic acid increases the expression of PTB in a dose-dependent manner. Deletion assays of the PTB promoter region revealed that the tannic acid-responsive element is between positions −232 and −74 from the translation initiation site. These observations open the door to the discovery of novel therapies based on PTB overexpression and to detecting possible untoward effects of the overexpression. PMID:19147685

  20. Protective effect of chronic caffeine intake on gene expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor signaling and the immunoreactivity of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Ki-67 in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Fatma M; Khalaf, Hanaa A; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; Abo El-Khair, Salwa M; Helaly, Ahmed M N; Mahmoud, El-Hassanin M; Elshafey, Saad H

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with progressive degeneration of the hippocampal and cortical neurons. This study was designed to demonstrate the protective effect of caffeine on gene expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor neural receptor protein-tyrosine kinase-β (TrkB) as well as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Ki-67 immunoreactivity in Aluminum chloride (AlCl3) induced animal model of AD. Fifty adult rats included in this study were classified into 5 group (10 rats each); negative and positive control groups (I&II), AD model group (III), group treated with caffeine from the start of AD induction (IV) and group treated with caffeine two weeks before AD induction (V). Hippocampal tissue BDNF and its receptor (TrkB) gene expression by real time RT-PCR in addition to immunohistochemical study of GFAP and Ki67 immunoreactivity were performed for all rats in the study. The results of this study revealed that caffeine has protective effect through improving the histological and immunohistochemical findings induced by AlCl3 as well as BDNF and its receptor gene expression. It could be concluded from the current study, that chronic caffeine consumption in a dose of 1.5 mg/kg body weight daily has a potentially good protective effect against AD.

  1. Protective effect of chronic caffeine intake on gene expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor signaling and the immunoreactivity of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Ki-67 in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghoneim, Fatma M; Khalaf, Hanaa A; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; Abo El-khair, Salwa M; Helaly, Ahmed MN; Mahmoud, El-Hassanin M; Elshafey, Saad H

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with progressive degeneration of the hippocampal and cortical neurons. This study was designed to demonstrate the protective effect of caffeine on gene expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor neural receptor protein-tyrosine kinase-β (TrkB) as well as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Ki-67 immunoreactivity in Aluminum chloride (AlCl3) induced animal model of AD. Fifty adult rats included in this study were classified into 5 group (10 rats each); negative and positive control groups (I&II), AD model group (III), group treated with caffeine from the start of AD induction (IV) and group treated with caffeine two weeks before AD induction (V). Hippocampal tissue BDNF and its receptor (TrkB) gene expression by real time RT-PCR in addition to immunohistochemical study of GFAP and Ki67 immunoreactivity were performed for all rats in the study. The results of this study revealed that caffeine has protective effect through improving the histological and immunohistochemical findings induced by AlCl3 as well as BDNF and its receptor gene expression. It could be concluded from the current study, that chronic caffeine consumption in a dose of 1.5 mg/kg body weight daily has a potentially good protective effect against AD. PMID:26339337

  2. Expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and the transcription factor ZO-1-associated nucleic acid-binding protein (ZONAB)-MsY3 in glial cells and colocalization at oligodendrocyte and astrocyte gap junctions in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Penes, Mihai C; Li, Xinbo; Nagy, James I

    2005-07-01

    The PDZ domain-containing protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) interacts with several members of the connexin (Cx) family of gap junction-forming proteins and has been localized to gap junctions, including those containing Cx47 in oligodendrocytes. We now provide evidence for ZO-1 expression in astrocytes in vivo and association with astrocytic connexins by confocal immunofluorescence demonstration of ZO-1 colocalization with astrocytic Cx30 and Cx43, and by ZO-1 coimmunoprecipitation with Cx30 and Cx43. Evidence for direct interaction of Cx30 with ZO-1 was obtained by pull-down assays that indicated binding of Cx30 to the second of the three PDZ domains in ZO-1. Further, we investigated mouse Y-box transcription factor MsY3, the canine ortholog of which has been termed ZO-1-associated nucleic acid-binding protein (ZONAB) and previously reported to interact with ZO-1. By immunofluorescence using specific antimouse ZONAB antibody, ZONAB was found to be associated with oligodendrocytes throughout mouse brain and spinal cord, and to be colocalized with oligodendrocytic Cx47 and Cx32 as well as with astrocytic Cx43. Our results extend the CNS cell types that express the multifunctional protein ZO-1, demonstrate an additional connexin (Cx30) that directly interacts with ZO-1, and show for the first time the association of a transcription factor (ZONAB) with ZO-1 localized to oligodendrocyte and astrocyte gap junctions. Given previous observations that ZONAB and ZO-1 in combination regulate gene expression, our results suggest roles of glial gap junction-mediated anchoring of signalling molecules in a wide variety of glial homeostatic processes. PMID:16045494

  3. BIOPOLYMERS FROM POLYLACTIC ACID AND MILK PROTEINS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a commercially available biodegradable polymer derived from lactic acid and is used in many nonfood products as an alternative to petrochemical-derived polymers. However, its physical properties limit its use in many applications. Using dairy proteins to substitute for por...

  4. Differential effects of reduced protein diets on fatty acid composition and gene expression in muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue of Alentejana purebred and Large White × Landrace × Pietrain crossbred pigs.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Marta S; Pires, Virgínia M R; Alfaia, Cristina M; Costa, Ana S H; Luxton, Richard; Doran, Olena; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José A M

    2013-07-28

    The present study assessed the effect of pig genotype (fatty v. lean) and dietary protein and lysine (Lys) levels (normal v. reduced) on intramuscular fat (IMF) content, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) deposition, fatty acid composition and mRNA levels of genes controlling lipid metabolism. The experiment was conducted on sixty intact male pigs (thirty Alentejana purebred and thirty Large White × Landrace × Pietrain crossbred), from 60 to 93 kg of live weight. Animals were divided into three groups fed with the following diets: control diet equilibrated for Lys (17·5 % crude protein (CP) and 0·7 % Lys), reduced protein diet (RPD) equilibrated for Lys (13·2 % CP and 0·6 % Lys) and RPD not equilibrated for Lys (13·1 % CP and 0·4 % Lys). It was shown that the RPD increased fat deposition in the longissimus lumborum muscle in the lean but not in the fatty pig genotype. It is strongly suggested that the effect of RPD on the longissimus lumborum muscle of crossbred pigs is mediated via Lys restriction. The increase in IMF content under the RPD was accompanied by increased stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and PPARG mRNA levels. RPD did not alter backfat thickness, but increased the total fatty acid content in both lean and fatty pig genotype. The higher amount of SAT in fatty pigs, when compared with the lean ones, was associated with the higher expression levels of ACACA, CEBPA, FASN and SCD genes. Taken together, the data indicate that the mechanisms regulating fat deposition in pigs are genotype and tissue specific, and are associated with the expression regulation of the key lipogenic genes. PMID:23286604

  5. Barley malt increases hindgut and portal butyric acid, modulates gene expression of gut tight junction proteins and Toll-like receptors in rats fed high-fat diets, but high advanced glycation end-products partially attenuate the effects.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yadong; Teixeira, Cristina; Marungruang, Nittaya; Sae-Lim, Watina; Tareke, Eden; Andersson, Roger; Fåk, Frida; Nyman, Margareta

    2015-09-01

    Barley malt, a product of controlled germination, has been shown to produce high levels of butyric acid in the cecum and portal serum of rats and may therefore have anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of the study was to investigate how four barley malts, caramelized and colored malts, 50-malt and 350-malt, differing in functional characteristics concerning beta-glucan content and color, affect short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), barrier function and inflammation in the hindgut of rats fed high-fat diets. Male Wistar rats were given malt-supplemented high-fat diets for four weeks. Low and high-fat diets containing microcrystalline cellulose were incorporated as controls. All diets contained 70 g kg(-1) dietary fiber. The malt-fed groups were found to have had induced higher amounts of butyric and propionic acids in the hindgut and portal serum compared with controls, while cecal succinic acid only increased to a small extent. Fat increased the mRNA expression of tight junction proteins and Toll-like receptors (TLR) in the small intestine and distal colon of the rats, as well as the concentration of some amino acids in the portal plasma, but malt seemed to counteract these adverse effects to some extent. However, the high content of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) in caramelized malt tended to prohibit the positive effects on occludin in the small intestine and plasma amino acids seen with the other malt products. In conclusion, malting seems to be an interesting process for producing foods with positive health effects, but part of these effects may be destroyed if the malt contains a high content of AGE. PMID:26227569

  6. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  7. MOPED: Model Organism Protein Expression Database.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Eugene; Higdon, Roger; Haynes, Winston; Welch, Dean; Broomall, William; Lancet, Doron; Stanberry, Larissa; Kolker, Natali

    2012-01-01

    Large numbers of mass spectrometry proteomics studies are being conducted to understand all types of biological processes. The size and complexity of proteomics data hinders efforts to easily share, integrate, query and compare the studies. The Model Organism Protein Expression Database (MOPED, htttp://moped.proteinspire.org) is a new and expanding proteomics resource that enables rapid browsing of protein expression information from publicly available studies on humans and model organisms. MOPED is designed to simplify the comparison and sharing of proteomics data for the greater research community. MOPED uniquely provides protein level expression data, meta-analysis capabilities and quantitative data from standardized analysis. Data can be queried for specific proteins, browsed based on organism, tissue, localization and condition and sorted by false discovery rate and expression. MOPED empowers users to visualize their own expression data and compare it with existing studies. Further, MOPED links to various protein and pathway databases, including GeneCards, Entrez, UniProt, KEGG and Reactome. The current version of MOPED contains over 43,000 proteins with at least one spectral match and more than 11 million high certainty spectra.

  8. Dehydroeburicoic Acid from Antrodia camphorata Prevents the Diabetic and Dyslipidemic State via Modulation of Glucose Transporter 4, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Expression and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation in High-Fat-Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Shih, Chun-Ching

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the potential effects of dehydroeburicoic acid (TT), a triterpenoid compound from Antrodia camphorata, in vitro and examined the effects and mechanisms of TT on glucose and lipid homeostasis in high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed mice. The in vitro study examined the effects of a MeOH crude extract (CruE) of A. camphorata and Antcin K (AnK; the main constituent of fruiting body of this mushroom) on membrane glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and phospho-Akt in C2C12 myoblasts cells. The in vitro study demonstrated that treatment with CruE, AnK and TT increased the membrane levels of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and phospho-Akt at different concentrations. The animal experiments were performed for 12 weeks. Diabetic mice were randomly divided into six groups after 8 weeks of HFD-induction and treated with daily oral gavage doses of TT (at three dose levels), fenofibrate (Feno) (at 0.25 g/kg body weight), metformin (Metf) (at 0.3 g/kg body weight) or vehicle for another 4 weeks while on an HFD diet. HFD-fed mice exhibited increased blood glucose levels. TT treatment dramatically lowered blood glucose levels by 34.2%~43.4%, which was comparable to the antidiabetic agent-Metf (36.5%). TT-treated mice reduced the HFD-induced hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Membrane levels of GLUT4 were significantly higher in CruE-treated groups in vitro. Skeletal muscle membrane levels of GLUT4 were significantly higher in TT-treated mice. These groups of mice also displayed lower mRNA levels of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6 Pase), an inhibitor of hepatic glucose production. The combination of these agents produced a net hypoglycemic effect in TT-treated mice. TT treatment enhanced the expressions of hepatic and skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in mice. TT-treated mice exhibited enhanced expression of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes, including peroxisome proliferator

  9. Dehydroeburicoic Acid from Antrodia camphorata Prevents the Diabetic and Dyslipidemic State via Modulation of Glucose Transporter 4, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Expression and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation in High-Fat-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Shih, Chun-Ching

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the potential effects of dehydroeburicoic acid (TT), a triterpenoid compound from Antrodia camphorata, in vitro and examined the effects and mechanisms of TT on glucose and lipid homeostasis in high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed mice. The in vitro study examined the effects of a MeOH crude extract (CruE) of A. camphorata and Antcin K (AnK; the main constituent of fruiting body of this mushroom) on membrane glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and phospho-Akt in C2C12 myoblasts cells. The in vitro study demonstrated that treatment with CruE, AnK and TT increased the membrane levels of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and phospho-Akt at different concentrations. The animal experiments were performed for 12 weeks. Diabetic mice were randomly divided into six groups after 8 weeks of HFD-induction and treated with daily oral gavage doses of TT (at three dose levels), fenofibrate (Feno) (at 0.25 g/kg body weight), metformin (Metf) (at 0.3 g/kg body weight) or vehicle for another 4 weeks while on an HFD diet. HFD-fed mice exhibited increased blood glucose levels. TT treatment dramatically lowered blood glucose levels by 34.2%~43.4%, which was comparable to the antidiabetic agent-Metf (36.5%). TT-treated mice reduced the HFD-induced hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Membrane levels of GLUT4 were significantly higher in CruE-treated groups in vitro. Skeletal muscle membrane levels of GLUT4 were significantly higher in TT-treated mice. These groups of mice also displayed lower mRNA levels of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6 Pase), an inhibitor of hepatic glucose production. The combination of these agents produced a net hypoglycemic effect in TT-treated mice. TT treatment enhanced the expressions of hepatic and skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in mice. TT-treated mice exhibited enhanced expression of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes, including peroxisome proliferator

  10. Tuberal hypothalamic expression of the glial intermediate filaments, glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin across the turkey hen (Meleagris gallopavo) reproductive cycle: Further evidence for a role of glial structural plasticity in seasonal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Michael Q; Valenzuela, Anthony E; Siopes, Thomas D; Millam, James R

    2013-11-01

    Glia regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in birds and mammals. This is accomplished mechanically by ensheathing gonadotrophin-releasing hormone I (GnRH) nerve terminals thereby blocking access to the pituitary blood supply, or chemically in a paracrine manner. Such regulation requires appropriate spatial associations between glia and nerve terminals. Female turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) use day length as a primary breeding cue. Long days activate the HPG-axis until the hen enters a photorefractory state when previously stimulatory day lengths no longer support HPG-axis activity. Hens must then be exposed to short days before reactivation of the reproductive axis occurs. As adult hens have discrete inactive reproductive states in addition to a fertile state, they are useful for examining the glial contribution to reproductive function. We immunostained tuberal hypothalami from short and long-day photosensitive hens, plus long-day photorefractory hens to examine expression of two intermediate filaments that affect glial morphology: glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin. GFAP expression was drastically reduced in the central median eminence of long day photosensitive hens, especially within the internal zone. Vimentin expression was similar among groups. However, vimentin-immunoreactive fibers abutting the portal vasculature were significantly negatively correlated with GFAP expression in the median eminence, which is consistent with our hypothesis for a reciprocal relationship between GFAP and vimentin expression. It appears that up-regulation of GFAP expression in the central median eminence of turkey hens is associated with periods of reproductive quiescence and that photofractoriness is associated with the lack of a glial cytoskeletal response to long days.

  11. Combining in Vitro Folding with Cell Free Protein Synthesis for Membrane Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Focke, Paul J; Hein, Christopher; Hoffmann, Beate; Matulef, Kimberly; Bernhard, Frank; Dötsch, Volker; Valiyaveetil, Francis I

    2016-08-01

    Cell free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a promising methodology for protein expression. While polypeptide production is very reliable and efficient using CFPS, the correct cotranslational folding of membrane proteins during CFPS is still a challenge. In this contribution, we describe a two-step protocol in which the integral membrane protein is initially expressed by CFPS as a precipitate followed by an in vitro folding procedure using lipid vesicles for converting the protein precipitate to the correctly folded protein. We demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach for the K(+) channels KcsA and MVP and the amino acid transporter LeuT. We determine the crystal structure of the KcsA channel obtained by CFPS and in vitro folding to show the structural similarity to the cellular expressed KcsA channel and to establish the feasibility of using this two-step approach for membrane protein production for structural studies. Our studies show that the correct folding of these membrane proteins with complex topologies can take place in vitro without the involvement of the cellular machinery for membrane protein biogenesis. This indicates that the folding instructions for these complex membrane proteins are contained entirely within the protein sequence. PMID:27384110

  12. Expression of clock proteins in developing tooth.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li; Papagerakis, Silvana; Schnell, Santiago D; Hoogerwerf, Willemijntje A; Papagerakis, Petros

    2011-01-01

    Morphological and functional changes during ameloblast and odontoblast differentiation suggest that enamel and dentin formation is under circadian control. Circadian rhythms are endogenous self-sustained oscillations with periods of 24h that control diverse physiological and metabolic processes. Mammalian clock genes play a key role in synchronizing circadian functions in many organs. However, close to nothing is known on clock genes expression during tooth development. In this work, we investigated the expression of four clock genes during tooth development. Our results showed that circadian clock genes Bmal1, clock, per1, and per2 mRNAs were detected in teeth by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry showed that clock protein expression was first detected in teeth at the bell stage (E17), being expressed in EOE and dental papilla cells. At post-natal day four (PN4), all four clock proteins continued to be expressed in teeth but with different intensities, being strongly expressed within the nucleus of ameloblasts and odontoblasts and down-regulated in dental pulp cells. Interestingly, at PN21 incisor, expression of clock proteins was down-regulated in odontoblasts of the crown-analogue side but expression was persisting in root-analogue side odontoblasts. In contrast, both crown and root odontoblasts were strongly stained for all four clock proteins in first molars at PN21. Within the periodontal ligament (PDL) space, epithelial rests of Malassez (ERM) showed the strongest expression among other PDL cells. Our data suggests that clock genes might be involved in the regulation of ameloblast and odontoblast functions, such as enamel and dentin protein secretion and matrix mineralization.

  13. Transient Protein Expression by Agroinfiltration in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Dent, Matthew; Hurtado, Jonathan; Stahnke, Jake; McNulty, Alyssa; Leuzinger, Kahlin; Lai, Huafang

    2016-01-01

    Current systems of recombinant protein production include bacterial, insect, and mammalian cell culture. However, these platforms are expensive to build and operate at commercial scales and/or have limited abilities to produce complex proteins. In recent years, plant-based expression systems have become top candidates for the production of recombinant proteins as they are highly scalable, robust, safe, and can produce complex proteins due to having a eukaryotic endomembrane system. Newly developed "deconstructed" viral vectors delivered via Agrobacterium tumefaciens (agroinfiltration) have enabled robust plant-based production of proteins with a wide range of applications. The leafy Lactuca sativa (lettuce) plant with its strong foundation in agriculture is an excellent host for pharmaceutical protein production. Here, we describe a method for agroinfiltration of lettuce that can rapidly produce high levels of recombinant proteins in a matter of days and has the potential to be scaled up to an agricultural level. PMID:26614281

  14. Biotechnology Protein Expression and Purification Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the Project Scientist Core Facility is to provide purified proteins, both recombinant and natural, to the Biotechnology Science Team Project Scientists and the NRA-Structural Biology Test Investigators. Having a core facility for this purpose obviates the need for each scientist to develop the necessary expertise and equipment for molecular biology, protein expression, and protein purification. Because of this, they are able to focus their energies as well as their funding on the crystallization and structure determination of their target proteins.

  15. An amino acid depleted cell-free protein synthesis system for the incorporation of non-canonical amino acid analogs into proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh-Blom, Amrita; Hughes, Randall A; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-05-20

    Residue-specific incorporation of non-canonical amino acids into proteins is usually performed in vivo using amino acid auxotrophic strains and replacing the natural amino acid with an unnatural amino acid analog. Herein, we present an efficient amino acid depleted cell-free protein synthesis system that can be used to study residue-specific replacement of a natural amino acid by an unnatural amino acid analog. This system combines a simple methodology and high protein expression titers with a high-efficiency analog substitution into a target protein. To demonstrate the productivity and efficacy of a cell-free synthesis system for residue-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids in vitro, we use this system to show that 5-fluorotryptophan and 6-fluorotryptophan substituted streptavidin retain the ability to bind biotin despite protein-wide replacement of a natural amino acid for the amino acid analog. We envisage this amino acid depleted cell-free synthesis system being an economical and convenient format for the high-throughput screening of a myriad of amino acid analogs with a variety of protein targets for the study and functional characterization of proteins substituted with unnatural amino acids when compared to the currently employed in vivo methodologies.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of muscle fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, J O; Neufer, P D; Farrar, R P; Veerkamp, J H; Dohm, G L

    1994-01-01

    Heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is present in a wide variety of tissues but is found in the highest concentration in cardiac and red skeletal muscle. It has been proposed that the expression of H-FABP correlates directly with the fatty acid-oxidative capacity of the tissue. In the present study, the expression of H-FABP was measured in red and white skeletal muscle under two conditions in which fatty acid utilization is known to be increased: streptozotocin-induced diabetes and fasting. Protein concentration, mRNA concentration and transcription rate were measured under both conditions. The level of both protein and mRNA increased approximately 2-fold under each condition. The transcription rate was higher in red skeletal muscle than in white muscle, was increased 2-fold during fasting, but was unchanged by streptozotocin-induced diabetes. In addition to supporting the hypothesis that H-FABP is induced during conditions of increased fatty acid utilization, these findings demonstrate that the regulation of H-FABP expression may or may not be at the level of transcription depending on the stimulus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8141774

  17. Profiling of dynamically changed gene expression in dorsal root ganglia post peripheral nerve injury and a critical role of injury-induced glial fibrillary acidic protein in maintenance of pain behaviors [corrected].

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo-Sik; Figueroa, Katherine W; Li, Kang-Wu; Boroujerdi, Amin; Yolo, Tim; Luo, Z David

    2009-05-01

    To explore cellular changes in sensory neurons after nerve injury and to identify potential target genes contributing to different stages of neuropathic pain development, we used Affymetrix oligo arrays to profile gene expression patterns in L5/6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from the neuropathic pain model of left L5/6 spinal nerve ligation at different stages of neuropathic pain development. Our data indicated that nerve injury induced changes in expression of genes with similar biological functions in a temporal specific manner that correlates with particular stages of neuropathic pain development, indicating dynamic neuroplasticity in the DRG in response to peripheral nerve injury and during neuropathic pain development. Data from post-array validation indicated that there was a temporal correlation between injury-induced expression of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker for activated astrocytes, and neuropathic pain development. Spinal nerve ligation injury in GFAP knockout mice resulted in neuropathic pain states with similar onset, but a shortened duration compared with that in age, and gender-matched wild-type littermates. Intrathecal GFAP antisense oligonucleotide treatment in injured rats with neuropathic pain states reversed injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity and GFAP upregulation in DRG and spinal cord. Together, these findings indicate that injury-induced GFAP upregulation not only serves as a marker for astrocyte activation, but it may also play a critical, but yet identified, role in the maintenance of neuropathic pain states. PMID:19307059

  18. Protein expression in the baculovirus system.

    PubMed

    Bernard, A; Payton, M; Radford, K R

    2001-05-01

    Insect cell-recombinant baculovirus co-cultures offer a protein production system that complements microbial systems by providing recombinant proteins in soluble form and with most post-translational modifications. Moreover, the large size of the viral genome enables cloning of large segments of DNA and consequent expression of complex protein aggregates. This unit describes methods associated with the large-scale production of recombinant proteins in the baculovirus expression system. A method for large-scale production of viral stocks is described and methods for titration of virus are provided (a plaque assay and an end-point assay). Once viral stocks have been prepared and titered, a protocol for testing the virus in small-scale cultures is provided to determine the kinetics of expression, which allows evaluation of various cell culture and infection conditions aimed at developing optimal levels of protein production (e.g., comparisons of different host cell lines, media, and environmental parameters). Support protocols provide instructions for preparing culture samples for protein analysis by SDS-PAGE and discuss analytical methods for monitoring nutrient levels in cell culture fluids. Once optimal process parameters are identified, protocols describe production of the target protein on a large scale in fermentors using either regular batch production in bioreactors or a fed-batch procedure of production in perfusion cultures. Techniques for harvesting cultures from bioreactors are also provided.

  19. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  20. Expression data on liver metabolic pathway genes and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Raja Gopal Reddy, Mooli; Pavan Kumar, Chodisetti; Mahesh, Malleswarapu; Sravan Kumar, Manchiryala; Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the expression data on various metabolic pathways of liver with special emphasize on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesis, both at gene and protein levels. The data were obtained to understand the effect of vitamin A deficiency on the expression status (both gene and protein levels) of some of the key factors involved in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, triglyceride secretion, long chain PUFA, resolvin D1 synthesis, glucose transport and glycogen synthesis of liver, using modern biology tools, such as quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting techniques. This data article provides the supporting evidence to the article “Vitamin A deficiency suppresses high fructose-induced triglyceride synthesis and elevates resolvin D1 levels” [1] and therefore, these data may be referred back, for comprehensive understanding and interpretations and for future studies. PMID:26909377

  1. Regulation of hepatic bile acid transporters Ntcp and Bsep expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingguo; Buckley, David; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2009-01-01

    Sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) and bile salt export pump (Bsep) are two key transporters for hepatic bile acid uptake and excretion. Alterations in Ntcp and Bsep expression have been reported in pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, the effects of age, gender, and various chemicals on the regulation of these two transporters were characterized in mice. Ntcp and Bsep mRNA levels in mouse liver were low in the fetus, but increased to its highest expression at parturition. After birth, mouse Ntcp and Bsep mRNA decreased by more than 50%, and then gradually increased to adult levels by day 30. Expression of mouse Ntcp mRNA and protein exhibit higher levels in female than male livers, which is consistent with the trend of human NTCP mRNA expression between men and women. No gender difference exists in BSEP/Bsep expression in human and mouse livers. Hormone replacements conducted in gonadectomized, hypophysectomized, and lit/lit mice indicate that female-predominant Ntcp expression in mouse liver is due to the inhibitory effect of male-pattern GH secretion, but not sex hormones. Ntcp and Bsep expression are in general resistant to induction by a large battery of microsomal enzyme inducers. Administration of cholestyramine increased Ntcp, whereas chenodeoxycholic acid increased Bsep mRNA expression. In silico analysis indicates that female-predominant mouse and human Ntcp/NTCP expression may be due to GH. In conclusion, mouse Ntcp and Bsep are regulated by age, gender, cholestyramine, and bile acid, but resistant to induction by most microsomal enzyme inducers. PMID:17897632

  2. Nucleic acids, proteins, and chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, D. A.; Profy, A. T.; Walstrum, S. A.; Needels, M. C.; Bulack, S. C.; Lo, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with experimental results related, in one case, to the chirality of nucleotides, and, in another case, to the possibility of a link between the chirality of nucleic acids, and that of peptides. It has been found that aminoacylation of the 'internal' hydroxyl group of a dinucleoside monophosphate can occur stereoselectively. However, this reaction has not yet been made a part of a working peptide synthesis scheme. The formation and cleavage of oligonucleotides is considered. In the event of the formation of a helical complex between the oligonucleotide and the polymer, 1-prime,5-prime-bonds in the oligomer are found to become more resistant towards cleavage. The conditions required for peptide bond formation are examined, taking into account the known structures of RNA and possible mechanisms for prebiotic peptide bond formation. The possibility is considered that the 2-prime,5-prime-internucleotide linkage could have played an important part in the early days of biological peptide synthesis.

  3. Expression of human milk proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2002-06-01

    Human milk proteins are believed to have a multitude of biological activities benefiting the newborn infant. Such functions include antibacterial and antiviral activities, enhancement of the immune system and increased nutrient absorption. To date, only breast-fed infants have been exposed to these proteins. However, by using genetic engineering it is now possible to express these proteins in plants, such as rice, at very high levels. Recombinant human milk proteins can subsequently be added to infant formula and baby foods. Prior to such addition, safety tests and efficacy trials need to be conducted. The safety tests will initially be done in rats and then in humans. The efficacy trials should also evaluate stability against heat treatment (processing), pH (stomach conditions) and proteolytic enzymes (digestion). To date, we have expressed recombinant human lactoferrin, lysozyme and alpha1-antitrypsin in rice at very high expression levels. These recombinant proteins showed a stability and activities similar to those of the native milk proteins, suggesting that they may be able to exert biological activities in infants when added to formula or baby foods.

  4. Enhanced expression of adenovirus transforming proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, R B; Tsukamoto, A; Montell, C; Berk, A J

    1982-01-01

    Proteins encoded in regions EIA and EIB of human adenoviruses cause transformation of rodent cells. One protein from EIA also stimulates transcription of other early regions at early times in a productive infection. In the past, direct analysis of these proteins synthesized in vivo has been difficult because of the low levels produced in both transformed cells and productively infected cells. We present a simple method which leads to expression of EIA and EIB mRNAs and proteins at 30-fold greater levels than those observed during the early phase of a standard productive infection. Under these conditions, these proteins are among the most prominent translation products of infected cells. This allowed direct visualization of EIA and EIB proteins on two-dimensional gels of pulse-labeled total cell protein. Experiments with EIA and EIB mutants confirm that the identified proteins are indeed encoded in these regions. Two EIA proteins are observed, one translated from each of the major early EIA mRNAs. Both of these EIA proteins are phosphorylated. Images PMID:7143568

  5. Expressed protein ligation for metalloprotein design and engineering.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin M; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Lu, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Metalloproteins contain highly specialized metal-binding sites that are designed to accept specific metal ions to maintain correct function. Although many of the sites have been modified with success, the relative paucity of functional group availability within proteinogenic amino acids can sometimes leave open questions about specific functions of the metal binding ligands. Attaining a more thorough analysis of individual amino acid function within metalloproteins has been realized using expressed protein ligation (EPL). Here we describe our recent efforts using EPL to incorporate nonproteinogenic cysteine and methionine analogues into the type 1 copper site found in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin.

  6. Modulation of extracellular signal-related kinase, cyclin D1, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and vimentin expression in estradiol-pretreated astrocyte cultures treated with competence and progression growth factors.

    PubMed

    Bramanti, Vincenzo; Grasso, Sonia; Tibullo, Daniele; Giallongo, Cesarina; Raciti, Giuseppina; Viola, Maria; Avola, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The present study seeks to elucidate the interactions between the "competence" growth factor basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and/or estrogen 17β-estradiol and the "progression" growth factors epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and insulin (INS) on DNA labeling and also cyclin D1, extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and vimentin expression in astroglial cultures under different experimental conditions. Pretreatment for 24 hr with bFGF and subsequent exposure for 36 hr to estradiol (E2 ) and EGF, IGF-I, or INS stimulated DNA labeling in the last 12 hr, especially when the cultures were treated with progression growth factors. bFGF pretreatment and subsequent treatment with E2 for 36 hr stimulated DNA labeling. The 36-hr E2 treatment alone did not significantly decrease DNA labeling, but contemporary addition of E2 with two or three growth factors stimulated DNA labeling remarkably. When E2 was coadded with growth factors, a significantly increased DNA labeling was observed, demonstrating an astroglial synergistic mitogenic effect evoked by contemporary treatment with growth factors in the presence of estrogens. Cyclin D1 expression was markedly increased when astrocyte cultures were pretreated for 36 hr with E2 and subsequently treated with two or three competence and progression growth factors. A highly significant increase of ERK1/2 expression was observed after all the treatments (EGF, bFGF, INS, IGF-I alone or in combination with two or three growth factors). GFAP and vimentin expression was markedly increased when the cultures were treated with two or three growth factors. In conclusion, our data demonstrate estradiol-growth factor cross-talk during astroglial cell proliferation and differentiation in culture.

  7. Alimentary proteins, amino acids and cholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Blachier, François; Lancha, Antonio H; Boutry, Claire; Tomé, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Numerous data from both epidemiological and experimental origins indicate that some alimentary proteins and amino acids in supplements can modify the blood LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and total cholesterol. After an initial approval of the health claim for soy protein consumption for the prevention of coronary heart disease, more recently it has been concluded from an overall analysis of literature that isolated soy protein with isoflavones only slightly decrease LDL and total cholesterol. Other plant extracts and also some proteins from animal origin have been reported to exert a lowering effect on blood cholesterol when compared with a reference protein (often casein). The underlying mechanisms are still little understood. Individual amino acids and mixture of amino acids have also been tested (mostly in animal studies) for their effects on cholesterol parameters and on cholesterol metabolism. Methionine, lysine, cystine, leucine, aspartate and glutamate have been tested individually and in combination in different models of either normo or hypercholesterolemic animals and found to be able to modify blood cholesterol and/or LDL cholesterol and/or HDL cholesterol. It is however not known if these results are relevant to human nutrition.

  8. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  9. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of an orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and characterization of its expression response to nodavirus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Young-Mao; Kuo, Cham-En; Huang, Yi-Ling; Shie, Pei-Shiuan; Liao, Jhong-Jian; Yang, Yuan-Chih; Chen, Tzong-Yueh

    2011-08-01

    Mammalian secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is the primary regulator of cell shape and cell adhesion to fibronectin. We, for the first time, report the complete sequencing of SPARC cDNA from orange-spotted grouper. Despite the difference in the lengths of the SPARC transcripts, all of the SPARC molecules encoded a signal peptide, follistain-like copper binding sequence (KGHK) domain, and extracellular domain. The grouper SPARC gene was differentially expressed in vivo and contributed differently to high-level expression of SPARC in muscle. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated a decreased level of SPARC in nodavirus-infected grouper compared with healthy grouper. Comparative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses of eye tissues of viral nervous necrosis grouper and healthy grouper were performed. Recombinant SPARC produced changes in grouper cell shape 24 h after treatment. The results provide new insight into the pathogenesis of nodavirus, and demonstrate an experimental rationale for SPARC characterization in nodavirus-infected grouper. PMID:21609765

  10. Genomic and expression analysis of transition proteins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Alvi, Zain A; Chu, Tin-Chun; Schawaroch, Valerie; Klaus, Angela V

    2015-01-01

    The current study was aimed at analyzing putative protein sequences of the transition protein-like proteins in 12 Drosophila species based on the reference sequences of transition protein-like protein (Tpl (94D) ) expressed in Drosophila melanogaster sperm nuclei. Transition proteins aid in transforming chromatin from a histone-based nucleosome structure to a protamine-based structure during spermiogenesis - the post-meiotic stage of spermatogenesis. Sequences were obtained from NCBI Ref-Seq database using NCBI ORF-Finder (PSI-BLAST). Sequence alignments and analysis of the amino acid content indicate that orthologs for Tpl (94D) are present in the melanogaster species subgroup (D. simulans, D. sechellia, D. erecta, and D. yakuba), D. ananassae, and D. pseudoobscura, but absent in D. persmilis, D. willistoni, D. mojavensis, D. virilis, and D. grimshawi. Transcriptome next generation sequence (RNA-Seq) data for testes and ovaries was used to conduct differential gene expression analysis for Tpl (94D) in D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D. yakuba, D. ananassae, and D. pseudoobscura. The identified Tpl (94D) orthologs show high expression in the testes as compared to the ovaries. Additionally, 2 isoforms of Tpl (94D) were detected in D. melanogaster with isoform A being much more highly expressed than isoform B. Functional analyses of the conserved region revealed that the same high mobility group (HMG) box/DNA binding region is conserved for both Drosophila Tpl (94D) and Drosophila protamine-like proteins (MST35Ba and MST35Bb). Based on the rigorous bioinformatic approach and the conservation of the HMG box reported in this work, we suggest that the Drosophila Tpl (94D) orthologs should be classified as their own transition protein group.

  11. Is CMV a target in pediatric glioblastoma? Expression of CMV proteins, pp65 and IE1-72 and CMV nucleic acids in a cohort of pediatric glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Amanda; Pignata, Antonella; Ghazi, Alexia; Ashoori, Aidin; Hegde, Meenakshi; Landi, Daniel; Gray, Tara; Scheurer, Michael E; Chintagumpala, Murali; Adesina, Adekunle; Gottschalk, Stephen; Hicks, John; Powell, Suzanne Z; Ahmed, Nabil

    2015-11-01

    While the 5-year overall survival is better in pediatric than in adult patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), outcomes in children remain very poor. Understanding the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and tumor propagation can identify therapeutic targets to improve these outcomes. Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) proteins and nucleic acids are present in the majority of adult GBM. Indeed, CMV is emerging as a potential glioma-associated target for anti-CMV agents and cellular therapeutics. Furthermore, CMV appears to contribute to GBM's malignant phenotype, although its role in tumorigenesis is less certain. In this cohort of 25 serially diagnosed pediatric GBMs, the largest described cohort to date, we used immunohistochemical staining and in situ hybridization to show the presence of CMV antigens pp65 and IE1-72 as well as CMV nucleic acids, respectively. Our cohort indicated either CMV antigen pp65 or IE1-72 was present in approximately 67 % of pediatric GBM samples. The majority of samples stained positive for either CMV antigen showing a cytoplasmic pattern in 25-50 % of cells within the sample at a moderate intensity, while a few samples showed nuclear staining and higher grade/intensity. Of 16 samples where in situ hybridization was performed, 13 (81 %) showed specific staining using a CMV genome specific probe cocktail. ISH positive samples showed high concordance with being pp65 or IE1-72 positive. These findings, paired with the association of CMV expression with poor prognosis and overall survival, indicate the need to further investigate how these antigens are promoting tumor growth and preventing cell death. Also, the expression of these antigens in a majority of tumor tissues should be considered for immunotherapeutic targets in cases of pediatric GBM. PMID:26341370

  12. Expression, purification, and crystallisationof membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Bernadette

    Approximately, 29,000 protein structures are deposited in the Protein Databank (January 2005), but only about 90 of which are independent membrane protein structures. This represents a significant increase in knowledge compared with a matter of only 5 years ago when a mere handful of membrane protein structures were available. Despite the advances, our understanding of the structure-function relationships and mechanism of action of many membrane proteins is still lacking. This is particularly true of many of the more clinically relevant membrane proteins, such as the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The GPCRs regulate cellular responses to a wide range of biologically active molecules including hormones and drugs and are thus important targets for therapeutic intervention in a number of disease states. However, the increasing number of membrane protein structures has provided a critical mass of information which has yielded a more rational approach to the process of obtaining diffraction quality crystals. It is the different stages of this process; expression, solubilisation, purification, and crystallisation that will be covered in this lecture.

  13. N-Lauroylation during the Expression of Recombinant N-Myristoylated Proteins: Implications and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Andrea Gabriele; Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Mateos, Borja; Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Storch, Barbara; Breuker, Kathrin; Konrat, Robert; Pons, Miquel; Coudevylle, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of myristic acid onto the N terminus of a protein is a crucial modification that promotes membrane binding and correct localization of important components of signaling pathways. Recombinant expression of N-myristoylated proteins in Escherichia coli can be achieved by co-expressing yeast N-myristoyltransferase and supplementing the growth medium with myristic acid. However, undesired incorporation of the 12-carbon fatty acid lauric acid can also occur (leading to heterogeneous samples), especially when the available carbon sources are scarce, as it is the case in minimal medium for the expression of isotopically enriched samples. By applying this method to the brain acid soluble protein 1 and the 1-185 N-terminal region of c-Src, we show the significant, and protein-specific, differences in the membrane binding properties of lauroylated and myristoylated forms. We also present a robust strategy for obtaining lauryl-free samples of myristoylated proteins in both rich and minimal media.

  14. Optimization of translation profiles enhances protein expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5'-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein.

  15. Optimization of Translation Profiles Enhances Protein Expression and Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Anne-Katrin; Saffert, Paul; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs) and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5’-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein. PMID:25965266

  16. A surface-associated retinol- and fatty acid-binding protein (Gp-FAR-1) from the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida: lipid binding activities, structural analysis and expression pattern.

    PubMed Central

    Prior, A; Jones, J T; Blok, V C; Beauchamp, J; McDermott, L; Cooper, A; Kennedy, M W

    2001-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes produce at least two structurally novel classes of small helix-rich retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins that have no counterparts in their plant or animal hosts and thus represent potential targets for new nematicides. Here we describe a protein (Gp-FAR-1) from the plant-parasitic nematode Globodera pallida, which is a member of the nematode-specific fatty-acid- and retinol-binding (FAR) family of proteins but localizes to the surface of this species, placing it in a strategic position for interaction with the host. Recombinant Gp-FAR-1 was found to bind retinol, cis-parinaric acid and the fluorophore-tagged lipids 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid and dansyl-D,L-alpha-amino-octanoic acid. The fluorescence emission characteristics of the dansylated analogues indicated that the entire ligand enters the binding cavity. Fluorescence competition experiments showed that Gp-FAR-1 binds fatty acids in the range C(11) to C(24), with optimal binding at C(15). Intrinsic fluorescence analysis of a mutant protein into which a tryptophan residue had been inserted supported computer-based predictions of the position of this residue at the protein's interior and possibly also at the binding site. Of direct relevance to plant defence systems was the observation that Gp-FAR-1 binds two lipids (linolenic and linoleic acids) that are precursors of plant defence compounds and the jasmonic acid signalling pathway. Moreover, Gp-FAR-1 was found to inhibit the lipoxygenase-mediated modification of these substrates in vitro. Thus not only does Gp-FAR-1 function as a broad-spectrum retinol- and fatty-acid-binding protein, the results are consistent with the idea that Gp-FAR-1 is involved in the evasion of primary host plant defence systems. PMID:11368765

  17. Protein and Amino Acid Requirements during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O

    2016-07-01

    Protein forms an essential component of a healthy diet in humans to support both growth and maintenance. During pregnancy, an exceptional stage of life defined by rapid growth and development, adequate dietary protein is crucial to ensure a healthy outcome. Protein deposition in maternal and fetal tissues increases throughout pregnancy, with most occurring during the third trimester. Dietary protein intake recommendations are based on factorial estimates because the traditional method of determining protein requirements, nitrogen balance, is invasive and undesirable during pregnancy. The current Estimated Average Requirement and RDA recommendations of 0.88 and 1.1 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), respectively, are for all stages of pregnancy. The single recommendation does not take into account the changing needs during different stages of pregnancy. Recently, with the use of the minimally invasive indicator amino acid oxidation method, we defined the requirements to be, on average, 1.2 and 1.52 g · kg(-1) · d(-1) during early (∼16 wk) and late (∼36 wk) stages of pregnancy, respectively. Although the requirements are substantially higher than current recommendations, our values are ∼14-18% of total energy and fit within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range. Using swine as an animal model we showed that the requirements for several indispensable amino acids increase dramatically during late gestation compared with early gestation. Additional studies should be conducted during pregnancy to confirm the newly determined protein requirements and to determine the indispensable amino acid requirements during pregnancy in humans. PMID:27422521

  18. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears.

  19. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears. PMID:20347821

  20. Expression Differentiation Is Constrained to Low-Expression Proteins over Ecological Timescales.

    PubMed

    Margres, Mark J; Wray, Kenneth P; Seavy, Margaret; McGivern, James J; Herrera, Nathanael D; Rokyta, Darin R

    2016-01-01

    Protein expression level is one of the strongest predictors of protein sequence evolutionary rate, with high-expression protein sequences evolving at slower rates than low-expression protein sequences largely because of constraints on protein folding and function. Expression evolutionary rates also have been shown to be negatively correlated with expression level across human and mouse orthologs over relatively long divergence times (i.e., ∼100 million years). Long-term evolutionary patterns, however, often cannot be extrapolated to microevolutionary processes (and vice versa), and whether this relationship holds for traits evolving under directional selection within a single species over ecological timescales (i.e., <5000 years) is unknown and not necessarily expected. Expression is a metabolically costly process, and the expression level of a particular protein is predicted to be a tradeoff between the benefit of its function and the costs of its expression. Selection should drive the expression level of all proteins close to values that maximize fitness, particularly for high-expression proteins because of the increased energetic cost of production. Therefore, stabilizing selection may reduce the amount of standing expression variation for high-expression proteins, and in combination with physiological constraints that may place an upper bound on the range of beneficial expression variation, these constraints could severely limit the availability of beneficial expression variants. To determine whether rapid-expression evolution was restricted to low-expression proteins owing to these constraints on highly expressed proteins over ecological timescales, we compared venom protein expression levels across mainland and island populations for three species of pit vipers. We detected significant differentiation in protein expression levels in two of the three species and found that rapid-expression differentiation was restricted to low-expression proteins. Our

  1. Trichohyalin-like 1 protein, a member of fused S100 proteins, is expressed in normal and pathologic human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakoshi, Takako; Makino, Teruhiko; Ur Rehman, Mati; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Sugimori, Michiya; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► Trichohyalin-like 1 protein is a member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. ► Specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein were generated. ► TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. ► TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in tumor nests of BCC and SCC. ► The expression of TCHHL1 proteins increased in epidermis of psoriasis vulgaris. - Abstract: Trichohyalin-like 1 (TCHHL1) protein is a novel member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCHHL1 contains an EF-hand domain in the N-terminus, one trans-membrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. We generated specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein and examined the expression of TCHHL1 proteins in normal and pathological human skin. An immunohistochemical study showed that TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. In addition, signals of TCHHL1 proteins were observed around the nuclei of cultured growing keratinocytes. Accordingly, TCHHL1 mRNA has been detected in normal skin and cultured growing keratinocytes. Furthermore, TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in the peripheral areas of tumor nests in basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. A dramatic increase in the number of Ki67 positive cells was observed in TCHHL1-expressing areas. The expression of TCHHL1 proteins also increased in non-cancerous hyperproliferative epidermal tissues such as those of psoriasis vulgaris and lichen planus. These findings highlight the possibility that TCHHL1 proteins are expressed in growing keratinocytes of the epidermis and might be associated with the proliferation of keratinocytes.

  2. Microgravity alters the expression of salivary proteins.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, Maija; Khatri, Aditi; Rubenstein, Renee; Burleson, Joseph A; Hand, Arthur R

    2014-06-01

    Spaceflight provides a unique opportunity to study how physiologic responses are influenced by the external environment. Microgravity has been shown to alter the function of a number of tissues and organ systems. Very little, however, is known about how microgravity affects the oral cavity. The rodent model is useful for study in that their salivary gland morphology and physiology is similar to that of humans. Useful also is the fact that saliva, a product of the salivary glands with a major role in maintaining oral health, can be easily collected in humans whereas the glands can be studied in experimental animals. Our working hypothesis is that expression of secretory proteins in saliva will respond to microgravity and will be indicative of the nature of physiologic reactions to travel in space. This study was designed to determine which components of the salivary proteome are altered in mice flown on the US space shuttle missions and to determine if a subset with predictive value can be identified using microscopy and biochemistry methods. The results showed that the expression of secretory proteins associated with beta-adrenergic hormone regulated responses and mediated via the cyclic AMP pathway was significantly altered, whereas that of a number of unrelated proteins was not. The findings are potentially applicable to designing a biochemical test system whereby specific salivary proteins can be biomarkers for stress associated with travel in space and eventually for monitoring responses to conditions on earth.

  3. Microgravity alters the expression of salivary proteins.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, Maija; Khatri, Aditi; Rubenstein, Renee; Burleson, Joseph A; Hand, Arthur R

    2014-06-01

    Spaceflight provides a unique opportunity to study how physiologic responses are influenced by the external environment. Microgravity has been shown to alter the function of a number of tissues and organ systems. Very little, however, is known about how microgravity affects the oral cavity. The rodent model is useful for study in that their salivary gland morphology and physiology is similar to that of humans. Useful also is the fact that saliva, a product of the salivary glands with a major role in maintaining oral health, can be easily collected in humans whereas the glands can be studied in experimental animals. Our working hypothesis is that expression of secretory proteins in saliva will respond to microgravity and will be indicative of the nature of physiologic reactions to travel in space. This study was designed to determine which components of the salivary proteome are altered in mice flown on the US space shuttle missions and to determine if a subset with predictive value can be identified using microscopy and biochemistry methods. The results showed that the expression of secretory proteins associated with beta-adrenergic hormone regulated responses and mediated via the cyclic AMP pathway was significantly altered, whereas that of a number of unrelated proteins was not. The findings are potentially applicable to designing a biochemical test system whereby specific salivary proteins can be biomarkers for stress associated with travel in space and eventually for monitoring responses to conditions on earth. PMID:24984624

  4. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability. PMID:26056817

  5. Expression and Targeting of Secreted Proteins from Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Bauler, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen that replicates in a vacuole termed the inclusion. Many of the interactions of chlamydiae with the host cell are dependent upon bacterial protein synthesis and presumably exposure of these proteins to the cytosol. Because of the dearth of genetic tools for chlamydiae, previous studies examining secreted proteins required the use of heterologous bacterial systems. Recent advances in genetic manipulation of chlamydia now allow for transformation of the bacteria with plasmids. We describe here a shuttle vector system, pBOMB4, that permits expression of recombinant proteins under constitutive or conditional promoter control. We show that the inclusion membrane protein IncD is secreted in a type III-dependent manner from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and also secreted from C. trachomatis in infected cells where it localizes appropriately to the inclusion membrane. IncD truncated of the first 30 amino acids containing the secretion signal is no longer secreted and is retained by the bacteria. Cytosolic exposure of secreted proteins can be confirmed by using CyaA, GSK, or microinjection assays. A protein predicted to be retained within the bacteria, NrdB is indeed localized to the chlamydia. In addition, we have shown that the chlamydial effector protein, CPAF, which is secreted into the host cell cytosol by a Sec-dependent pathway, also accesses the cytosol when expressed from this system. These assays should prove useful to assess the secretion of other chlamydial proteins that are potentially exposed to the cytosol of the host cell. PMID:24443531

  6. Amino Acid Recycling in Relation to Protein Turnover 1

    PubMed Central

    Davies, David D.; Humphrey, Thomas J.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of measuring amino acid recycling in Lemna minor are described. The extent to which the recycling of individual amino acids may underestimate protein turnover has been measured for a number of amino acids. The methods have been used to study the relationship between protein turnover and amino acid recycling during nitrogen starvation. It is concluded that following the removal of nitrate from the environment, protein turnover is enhanced, the partitioning of amino acids between protein synthesis and amino acid metabolism is relatively constant, but the total amount of amino acids recycling is increased. PMID:16660236

  7. Role of fatty acid binding protein on hepatic palmitate uptake.

    PubMed

    Burczynski, F J; Zhang, M N; Pavletic, P; Wang, G Q

    1997-12-01

    Expression of hepatic fatty acid binding protein (FABP) mRNA is regulated by growth hormone. In the absence of growth hormone, there is a 60% reduction in FABP mRNA levels (S.A. Berry, J.-B Yoon, U. List, and S. Seelig. J. Am. Coll. Nutr. 12:638-642. 1995). Previous work in our laboratory focused on the role of extracellular binding proteins in the hepatic uptake of long chain fatty acids. In the present study we were interested to determine the role of FABP in the transmembrane flux of long chain fatty acids. Using hepatocyte monolayers from control (n = 9) and hypophysectomized (n = 6) rats, we investigated the uptake of [3H]palmitate in the presence and absence of albumin. In the absence of albumin, total hepatocyte [3H]palmitate clearance rates from control (17.2 +/- 1.5 microL.mg-1 protein.s-1; mean +/- SEM; n = 9) and hypophysectomized (15.5 +/- 2.1 microL.mg-1 protein.s-1; n = 6) animals were similar (p > 0.05). In the presence of 2 microM albumin the total [3H]palmitate clearance rate from control hepatocytes (1.63 +/- 0.11 microL.mg-1 protein.s-1; n = 9) was significantly larger (40%) than from hepatocytes obtained from hypophysectomized (0.97 +/- 0.15 microL.mg-1 protein.s-1; n = 6; p < 0.01) animals. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis revealed that plasma membrane FABP levels from control and hypophysectomized animals were similar. However, there was a 49% decrease in the cytosolic FABP levels of hepatocytes isolated from hypophysectomized as compared with control animals. The decreased cytosolic FABB levels paralleled the decrease in palmitate uptake. We conclude that in the absence of extracellular binding proteins the rate-limiting step in the overall uptake of long chain fatty acids is diffusion to the cell surface. However, in the presence of albumin, the rate of palmitate uptake is determined primarily by cytosolic FABP levels.

  8. Jussara (Euterpe edulis Mart.) Supplementation during Pregnancy and Lactation Modulates the Gene and Protein Expression of Inflammation Biomarkers Induced by trans-Fatty Acids in the Colon of Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Almeida Morais, Carina; Oyama, Lila Missae; de Oliveira, Juliana Lopez; Carvalho Garcia, Márcia; de Rosso, Veridiana Vera; Sousa Mendes Amigo, Laís; do Nascimento, Claudia Maria Oller; Pisani, Luciana Pellegrini

    2014-01-01

    Maternal intake of trans-fatty acids (TFAs) in the perinatal period triggers a proinflammatory state in offspring. Anthocyanins contained in fruit are promising modulators of inflammation. This study investigated the effect of Jussara supplementation in the maternal diet on the proinflammatory state of the colon in offspring exposed to perinatal TFAs. On the first day of pregnancy rats were divided into four groups: control diet (C), control diet with 0.5% Jussara supplementation (CJ), diet enriched with hydrogenated vegetable fat, rich in TFAs (T), or T diet supplemented with 0.5% Jussara (TJ) during pregnancy and lactation. We showed that Jussara supplementation in maternal diet (CJ and TJ groups) reduced carcass lipid/protein ratios, serum lipids, glucose, IL-6, TNF-α, gene expression of IL-6R, TNF-αR (P < 0.05), TLR-4 (P < 0.01), and increase Lactobacillus spp. (P < 0.05) in the colon of offspring compared to the T group. The IL-10 (P = 0.035) and IL-10/TNF-α ratio (P < 0.01) was higher in the CJ group than in the T group. The 0.5% Jussara supplementation reverses the adverse effects of perinatal TFAs, improving lipid profiles, glucose levels, body composition, and gut microbiota and reducing low-grade inflammation in the colon of 21-day-old offspring, and could contribute to reducing chronic disease development. PMID:25276060

  9. Production of soluble mammalian proteins in Escherichia coli: identification of protein features that correlate with successful expression

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Michael R; Shadbolt, S Paul; Vincent, Karen J; Perera, Rajika L; McCafferty, John

    2004-01-01

    Background In the search for generic expression strategies for mammalian protein families several bacterial expression vectors were examined for their ability to promote high yields of soluble protein. Proteins studied included cell surface receptors (Ephrins and Eph receptors, CD44), kinases (EGFR-cytoplasmic domain, CDK2 and 4), proteases (MMP1, CASP2), signal transduction proteins (GRB2, RAF1, HRAS) and transcription factors (GATA2, Fli1, Trp53, Mdm2, JUN, FOS, MAD, MAX). Over 400 experiments were performed where expression of 30 full-length proteins and protein domains were evaluated with 6 different N-terminal and 8 C-terminal fusion partners. Expression of an additional set of 95 mammalian proteins was also performed to test the conclusions of this study. Results Several protein features correlated with soluble protein expression yield including molecular weight and the number of contiguous hydrophobic residues and low complexity regions. There was no relationship between successful expression and protein pI, grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY), or sub-cellular location. Only small globular cytoplasmic proteins with an average molecular weight of 23 kDa did not require a solubility enhancing tag for high level soluble expression. Thioredoxin (Trx) and maltose binding protein (MBP) were the best N-terminal protein fusions to promote soluble expression, but MBP was most effective as a C-terminal fusion. 63 of 95 mammalian proteins expressed at soluble levels of greater than 1 mg/l as N-terminal H10-MBP fusions and those that failed possessed, on average, a higher molecular weight and greater number of contiguous hydrophobic amino acids and low complexity regions. Conclusions By analysis of the protein features identified here, this study will help predict which mammalian proteins and domains can be successfully expressed in E. coli as soluble product and also which are best targeted for a eukaryotic expression system. In some cases proteins may be truncated

  10. Transcriptomics profiling study of breast cancer from Kingdom of Saudi Arabia revealed altered expression of Adiponectin and Fatty Acid Binding Protein4: Is lipid metabolism associated with breast cancer?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer incidence rates are increasing at an alarming rate among Saudi Arabian females. Most molecular genetic discoveries on breast cancer and other cancers have arisen from studies examining European and American patients. However, possibility of specific changes in molecular signature among cancer patients of diverse ethnic groups remains largely unexplored. We performed transcriptomic profiling of surgically-resected breast tumors from 45 patients based in the Western region of Saudi Arabia using Affymetrix Gene 1.0 ST chip. Pathway and biological function-based clustering was apparent across the tissue samples. Results Pathway analysis revealed canonical pathways that had not been previously implicated in breast cancer. Biological network analysis of differentially regulated genes revealed that Fatty acid binding protein 4, adipocyte (FABP4), adiponectin (ADIPOQ), and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) were most down regulated genes, sharing strong connection with the other molecules of lipid metabolism pathway. The marked biological difference in the signatures uncovered between the USA and Saudi samples underpins the importance of this study. Connectivity Map identified compounds that could reverse an observed gene expression signature Conclusions This study describes, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide profiling of breast cancer from Saudi ethnic females. We demonstrate the involvement of the lipid metabolism pathway in the pathogenesis of breast cancer from this region. This finding also highlights the need for strategies to curb the increasing rates of incidence of this disease by educating the public about life-style risk factors such as unhealthy diet and obesity. PMID:25923423

  11. Adalimumab (tumor necrosis factor-blocker) reduces the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity increased by exogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha in an organotypic culture of porcine neuroretina

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gutierrez, M.T.; Srivastava, G.K.; Gayoso, M.J.; Gonzalo-Orden, J.M.; Pastor, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine if exogenous addition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) exacerbates retinal reactive gliosis in an organotypic culture of porcine neuroretina and to evaluate if concomitant adalimumab, a TNF-blocker, diminishes it. Methods Porcine retinal explants from 20 eyeballs were cultured. Cultures with 100 pg/ml TNFα, 10 µg/ml adalimumab, 100 pg/ml TNFα plus 10 µg/ml adalimumab, or controls without additives were maintained for 9 days. Freshly detached retinas were processed in parallel. TNFα levels in control culture supernatants were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cryostat sections were doubly immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker for reactive gliosis, and cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP), a marker for Müller cells. Sections were also labeled with the isolectin IB4, a label for microglia/macrophages. Results TNFα in control culture supernatants was detected only at day 1. Compared to the fresh neuroretinal samples, upregulation of GFAP and downregulation of CRALBP occurred during the 9 days of culture. Exogenous TNFα stimulated glial cells to upregulate GFAP and downregulate CRALBP immunoreactivity. TNFα-treated cultures also initiated the growth of gliotic membranes and underwent retinal disorganization. Adalimumab inhibited the spontaneous increases in GFAP and maintained CRALBP. In combination with TNFα, adalimumab reduced GFAP expression and conserved CRALBP, with only slight retinal disorganization. No appreciable changes in IB4 labeling were observed under the different culture conditions. Conclusions In cultured porcine neuroretina, spontaneous reactive gliosis and retinal disorganization were exacerbated by exogenous TNFα. Adalimumab reduced spontaneous changes and those induced by TNFα. Therefore, inhibiting TNFα may represent a novel approach to controlling retinal fibrosis observed in some human diseases. PMID:23687426

  12. Molecular evolution of monotreme and marsupial whey acidic protein genes.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julie A; Lefèvre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP), a major whey protein present in milk of a number of mammalian species has characteristic cysteine-rich domains known as four-disulfide cores (4-DSC). Eutherian WAP, expressed in the mammary gland throughout lactation, has two 4-DSC domains, (DI-DII) whereas marsupial WAP, expressed only during mid-late lactation, contains an additional 4-DSC (DIII), and has a DIII-D1-DII configuration. We report the expression and evolution of echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and platypus (Onithorhynchus anatinus) WAP cDNAs. Predicted translation of monotreme cDNAs showed echidna WAP contains two 4-DSC domains corresponding to DIII-DII, whereas platypus WAP contains an additional domain at the C-terminus with homology to DII and has the configuration DIII-DII-DII. Both monotreme WAPs represent new WAP protein configurations. We propose models for evolution of the WAP gene in the mammalian lineage either through exon loss from an ancient ancestor or by rapid evolution via the process of exon shuffling. This evolutionary outcome may reflect differences in lactation strategy between marsupials, monotremes, and eutherians, and give insight to biological function of the gene products. WAP four-disulfide core domain 2 (WFDC2) proteins were also identified in echidna, platypus and tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) lactating mammary cells. WFDC2 proteins are secreted proteins not previously associated with lactation. Mammary gland expression of tammar WFDC2 during the course of lactation showed WFDC2 was elevated during pregnancy, reduced in early lactation and absent in mid-late lactation.

  13. Expression and purification of recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein and its interactions with polyomavirus proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, X.; Chang, D.; Rottinghaus, S.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448), using the recombinant expression system pFPYV2. Recombinant VP2 was purified to near homogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electroelution, and Extracti-Gel chromatography. Polyclonal serum to this protein which reacted specifically with recombinant VP2 as well as polyomavirus virion VP2 and VP3 on Western blots (immunoblots) was produced. Purified VP2 was used to establish an in vitro protein-protein interaction assay with polyomavirus structural proteins and purified recombinant VP1. Recombinant VP2 interacted with recombinant VP1, virion VP1, and the four virion histones. Recombinant VP1 coimmunoprecipitated with recombinant VP2 or truncated VP2 (delta C12VP2), which lacked the carboxy-terminal 12 amino acids. These experiments confirmed the interaction between VP1 and VP2 and revealed that the carboxyterminal 12 amino acids of VP2 and VP3 were not necessary for formation of this interaction. In vivo VP1-VP2 interaction study accomplished by cotransfection of COS-7 cells with VP2 and truncated VP1 (delta N11VP1) lacking the nuclear localization signal demonstrated that VP2 was capable of translocating delta N11VP1 into the nucleus. These studies suggest that complexes of VP1 and VP2 may be formed in the cytoplasm and cotransported to the nucleus for virion assembly to occur.

  14. Reliable protein production in a Pseudomonas fluorescens expression system.

    PubMed

    Retallack, Diane M; Jin, Hongfan; Chew, Lawrence

    2012-02-01

    A bottleneck to product development can be reliable expression of active target protein. A wide array of recombinant proteins in development, including an ever growing number of non-natural proteins, is being expressed in a variety of expression systems. A Pseudomonas fluorescens expression platform has been developed specifically for recombinant protein production. The development of an integrated molecular toolbox of expression elements and host strains, along with automation of strain screening is described. Examples of strain screening and scale-up experiments show rapid development of expression strains producing a wide variety of proteins in a soluble active form.

  15. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  16. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter protein levels are down-regulated through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation induced by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-15

    The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2) has a crucial role in intestinal bile acid absorption. We previously reported that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid conversion was involved in the alteration of ileal ASBT expression levels. In the present study, to investigate the hypothesis that ileal ASBT protein levels are post-translationally regulated by enterobacteria-associated bile acids, alteration of ileal ASBT protein levels was analysed in mice 12 h and 24 h after anti-bacterial drug ampicillin (ABPC) treatment (100 mg/kg, single shot) that altered bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. In ABPC-treated mice, enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and cholic acid (CA) levels were decreased, whereas taurocholic acid (TCA) and tauro-β-muricholic acid levels were increased in the intestinal lumen. Ileal ASBT protein levels in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs), but not ileal Asbt mRNA levels, were significantly increased in the ABPC-treated mice, and the extent of ubiquitination of the ileal ASBT protein was reduced in the ABPC-treated mice. Treatment of ABPC-pretreated mice with CA or TDCA, but not TCA, significantly decreased ileal ASBT protein levels and increased the extent of ubiquitination of ileal ASBT protein. Treatment of mice with the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine, or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, increased ileal ASBT protein levels in BBMVs. CA-mediated reduction of ASBT protein levels in the ABPC-pretreated mice was attenuated by co-treatment with chloroquine or MG132. These results suggest that ileal ASBT protein is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent pathway in response to enterobacteria-associated bile acids. PMID:23872411

  17. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    SciTech Connect

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-15

    }E4, these kinases regulate one of the E1{sup ∧}E4 proteins main functions, the association with the cellular keratin network, and eventually also its cleavage by the protease calpain which allows assembly into amyloid-like fibres and reorganisation of the keratin network. Although the E4 proteins of different HPV types appear divergent at the level of their primary amino acid sequence, they share a recognisable modular organisation and pattern of expression, which may underlie conserved functions and regulation. Assembly into higher-order multimers and suppression of cell proliferation are common to all E4 proteins examined. Although not yet formally demonstrated, a role in virus release and transmission remains a likely function for E4. - Highlights: • E4 gene products have a modular structure, and are expressed from the E1{sup ∧}E4 spliced mRNA. • E4 proteins are modified during epithelial differentiation by phosphorylation and proteolysis. • The E4 proteins contribute to genome amplification-efficiency and virus synthesis. • E4 proteins are abundantly expressed and may facilitate efficient virus release and transmission. • High-risk E4 proteins are deposited as amyloid fibres and can be used as infection biomarkers.

  18. Protein and Amino Acid Profiles of Different Whey Protein Supplements.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cristine C; Alvares, Thiago S; Costa, Marion P; Conte-Junior, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) supplements have received increasing attention by consumers due to the high nutritional value of the proteins and amino acids they provide. However, some WP supplements may not contain the disclosed amounts of the ingredients listed on the label, compromising the nutritional quality and the effectiveness of these supplements. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the contents of total protein (TP), α-lactalbumin (α-LA), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), free essential amino acids (free EAA), and free branched-chain amino acids (free BCAA), amongst different WP supplements produced by U.S. and Brazilian companies. Twenty commercial brands of WP supplements were selected, ten manufactured in U.S. (WP-USA) and ten in Brazil (WP-BRA). The TP was analyzed using the Kjeldahl method, while α-LA, β-LG, free EAA, and free BCAA were analyzed using HPLC system. There were higher (p < 0.05) concentrations of TP, α-LA, β-LG, and free BCAA in WP-USA supplements, as compared to the WP-BRA supplements; however, there was no difference (p > 0.05) in the content of free EAA between WP-USA and WP-BRA. Amongst the 20 brands evaluated, four WP-USA and seven WP-BRA had lower (p < 0.05) values of TP than those specified on the label. In conclusion, the WP-USA supplements exhibited better nutritional quality, evaluated by TP, α-LA, β-LG, and free BCAA when compared to WP-BRA.

  19. Improved protein quality in transgenic soybean expressing a de novo synthetic protein, MB-16.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfang; Schernthaner, Johann; Labbé, Natalie; Hefford, Mary A; Zhao, Jiping; Simmonds, Daina H

    2014-06-01

    To improve soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seed nutritional quality, a synthetic gene, MB-16 was introduced into the soybean genome to boost seed methionine content. MB-16, an 11 kDa de novo protein enriched in the essential amino acids (EAAs) methionine, threonine, lysine and leucine, was originally developed for expression in rumen bacteria. For efficient seed expression, constructs were designed using the soybean codon bias, with and without the KDEL ER retention sequence, and β-conglycinin or cruciferin seed specific protein storage promoters. Homozygous lines, with single locus integrations, were identified for several transgenic events. Transgene transmission and MB-16 protein expression were confirmed to the T5 and T7 generations, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of developing seed showed that the transcript peaked in growing seed, 5-6 mm long, remained at this peak level to the full-sized green seed and then was significantly reduced in maturing yellow seed. Transformed events carrying constructs with the rumen bacteria codon preference showed the same transcription pattern as those with the soybean codon preference, but the transcript levels were lower at each developmental stage. MB-16 protein levels, as determined by immunoblots, were highest in full-sized green seed but the protein virtually disappeared in mature seed. However, amino acid analysis of mature seed, in the best transgenic line, showed a significant increase of 16.2 and 65.9 % in methionine and cysteine, respectively, as compared to the parent. This indicates that MB-16 elevated the sulfur amino acids, improved the EAA seed profile and confirms that a de novo synthetic gene can enhance the nutritional quality of soybean.

  20. Expressed Protein Ligation: A Resourceful Tool to Study Protein Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Berrade, Luis; Camarero, Julio A.

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the use of expressed protein ligation (EPL) to study protein structure, function and stability. EPL is a chemoselective ligation method that allows the selective ligation of unprotected polypeptides from synthetic and recombinant origin for the production of semi-synthetic protein samples of well-defined and homogeneous chemical composition. This method has been extensively used for the site-specific introduction of biophysical probes, unnatural amino acids, and increasingly complex post-translational modifications. Since it was introduced 10 years ago, EPL applications have grown increasingly more sophisticated in order to address even more complex biological questions. In this review we highlight how this powerful technology combined with standard biochemical analysis techniques has been used to improve our ability to understand protein structure and function. PMID:19685006

  1. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  2. An essential role of the CAAT/enhancer binding protein-alpha in the vitamin D-induced expression of the human steroid/bile acid-sulfotransferase (SULT2A1).

    PubMed

    Song, Chung S; Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Seo, Young-Kyo; Oh, Taesung; Kim, Soyoung; Kim, Sung-A; Cho, Sunghwan; Shi, Liheng; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2006-04-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) regulates steroid and drug metabolism by inducing the genes encoding phase I and phase II enzymes. SULT2A1 is a liver- and intestine-expressed sulfo-conjugating enzyme that converts the alcohol-OH of neutral steroids, bile acids, and drugs to water-soluble sulfated metabolites. 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] induces SULT2A1 gene transcription after the recruitment of VDR to the vitamin D-responsive chromatin region of SULT2A1. A composite element in human SULT2A1 directs the 1,25-(OH)2D3-mediated induction of natural and heterologous promoters. This element combines a VDR/retinoid X receptor-alpha-binding site [vitamin D response element (VDRE)], which is an imperfect inverted repeat 2 of AGCTCA, and a CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)-binding site located 9 bp downstream to VDRE. The binding sites were identified by EMSA, antibody supershift, and deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. C/EBP-alpha at the composite element plays an essential role in the VDR regulation of SULT2A1, because 1) induction was lost for promoters with inactivating mutations at the VDRE or C/EBP element; 2) SULT2A1 induction by 1,25-(OH)2D3 in C/EBP-alpha-deficient cells required the expression of cotransfected C/EBP-alpha; and 3) C/EBP-beta did not substitute for C/EBP-alpha in this regulation. VDR and C/EBP-alpha were recruited concurrently to the composite element along with the coactivators p300, steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1), and SRC-2, but not SRC-3. VDR and C/EBP-alpha associated endogenously as a DNA-dependent, coimmunoprecipitable complex, which was detected at a markedly higher level in 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated cells. These results provide the first example of the essential role of the interaction in cis between C/EBP-alpha and VDR in directing 1,25-(OH)2D3-induced expression of a VDR target gene.

  3. Expression cloning of genes encoding human peroxisomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Spathaky, J.M.; Tate, A.W.; Cox, T.M.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous metabolic disorders associated with diverse peroxisomal defects have been identified but their molecular characterization has been hampered by difficulties associated with the purification of proteins from this fragile organelle. We have utilized antibodies directed against the C-terminal tripeptide peroxisomal targeting signal to detect hitherto unknown peroxisomal proteins in tissue fractions and to isolate genes encoding peroxisonal proteins from human expression libraries. We immunized rabbits with a peptide conjugate encompassing the C-terminal nine amino acids of rat peroxisomal acyl CoA oxidase. Immunoprecipitation assays using radio-labelled peptide showed that the antibody specifically recognizes the terminal SKL motif as well as C-terminal SHL and SRL but not SHL at an internal position. Affinity-purified antibody was used to probe Western blots of crude and peroxisome-enriched monkey liver preparations and detected 8-10 proteins specifically in the peroxisome fractions. 100 positive clones were identified on screening a human liver cDNA expression library in {lambda}-gt11. Sequence analysis has confirmed the identity of cDNA clones for human acyl CoA oxidase and epoxide hydrolase. Four clones show no sequence identity and their putative role in the human peroxisome is being explored.

  4. Trichohyalin-like 1 protein, a member of fused S100 proteins, is expressed in normal and pathologic human skin.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Takako; Makino, Teruhiko; Ur Rehman, Mati; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Sugimori, Michiya; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2013-03-01

    Trichohyalin-like 1 (TCHHL1) protein is a novel member of the fused-type S100 protein gene family. The deduced amino acid sequence of TCHHL1 contains an EF-hand domain in the N-terminus, one trans-membrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. We generated specific antibodies against the C-terminus of the TCHHL1 protein and examined the expression of TCHHL1 proteins in normal and pathological human skin. An immunohistochemical study showed that TCHHL1 proteins were expressed in the basal layer of the normal epidermis. In addition, signals of TCHHL1 proteins were observed around the nuclei of cultured growing keratinocytes. Accordingly, TCHHL1 mRNA has been detected in normal skin and cultured growing keratinocytes. Furthermore, TCHHL1 proteins were strongly expressed in the peripheral areas of tumor nests in basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. A dramatic increase in the number of Ki67 positive cells was observed in TCHHL1-expressing areas. The expression of TCHHL1 proteins also increased in non-cancerous hyperproliferative epidermal tissues such as those of psoriasis vulgaris and lichen planus. These findings highlight the possibility that TCHHL1 proteins are expressed in growing keratinocytes of the epidermis and might be associated with the proliferation of keratinocytes. PMID:23376073

  5. On the Mechanism by which Alkaline pH Prevents Expression of an Acid-Expressed Gene

    PubMed Central

    Espeso, Eduardo A.; Arst, Herbert N.

    2000-01-01

    Previous work has shown that zinc finger transcription factor PacC mediates the regulation of gene expression by ambient pH in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. This regulation ensures that the syntheses of molecules functioning in the external environment, such as permeases, secreted enzymes, and exported metabolites, are tailored to the pH of the growth environment. A direct role for PacC in activating the expression of an alkaline-expressed gene has previously been demonstrated, but the mechanism by which alkaline ambient pH prevents the expression of any eukaryotic acid-expressed gene has never been reported. Here we show that a double PacC binding site in the promoter of the acid-expressed gabA gene, encoding γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) permease, overlaps the binding site for the transcriptional activator IntA, which mediates ω-amino acid induction. Using bacterially expressed fusion proteins, we have shown that PacC competes with IntA for DNA binding in vitro at this site. Thus, PacC repression of GABA permease synthesis is direct and occurs by blocking induction. A swap of IntA sites between promoters for gabA and amdS, a gene not subject to pH regulation, makes gabA expression pH independent and amdS acid expressed. PMID:10779325

  6. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  7. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  8. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  9. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  10. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  11. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  12. Enterocyte Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs): Different Functions of Liver- and Intestinal- FABPs in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Angela M.; Storch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are highly abundant cytosolic proteins that are expressed in most mammalian tissues. In the intestinal enterocyte, both Liver- (LFABP; FABP1) and Intestinal-fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP; FABP2) are expressed. These proteins display high affinity binding for long chain fatty acids (FA) and other hydrophobic ligands, thus they are believed to be involved with uptake and trafficking of lipids in the intestine. In vitro studies have identified differences in ligand binding stoichiometry and specificity, and in mechanisms of FA transfer to membranes, and it has been hypothesized that LFABP and IFABP have difference functions in the enterocyte. Studies directly comparing LFABP- and IFABP-null mice have revealed markedly different phenotypes, indicating that these proteins indeed have different functions in intestinal lipid metabolism and whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the evolving knowledge of the functions of LFABP and IFABP in the intestinal enterocyte. PMID:25458898

  13. Modelling and Characterization of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Hemchandra; Sarmah, Rajeev; Sharma, Ankita; Biswas, Sagarika

    2015-01-01

    Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) is an intermediate-filament (IF) protein that maintains the astrocytes of the Central Nervous System in Human. This is differentially expressed during serological studies in inflamed condition such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Therefore, it is of interest to glean molecular insight using a model of GFAP (49.88 kDa) due to its crystallographic nonavailability. The present study has been taken into consideration to construct computational protein model using Modeller 9.11. The structural relevance of the protein was verified using Gromacs 4.5 followed by validation through PROCHECK, Verify 3D, WHAT-IF, ERRAT and PROVE for reliability. The constructed three dimensional (3D) model of GFAP protein had been scrutinized to reveal the associated functions by identifying ligand binding sites and active sites. Molecular level interaction study revealed five possible surface cavities as active sites. The model finds application in further computational analysis towards drug discovery in order to minimize the effect of inflammation. PMID:26420920

  14. [42K protein of shallot X virus is expressed in infected Allium species plants].

    PubMed

    Arshava, N V; Kondareva, T N; Riabov, E V; Zavriev, S K

    1995-01-01

    The main difference between genome structures of shallot virus X (ShVX) and related potex- and carlaviruses is the unique gene of ShVX coding for a 42K protein. The amino acid sequence of this protein was analyzed and compared with those of similar proteins from several newly characterised viruses of garlic. Using antibodies against the recombinant 42K protein, expression of the 42K protein of ShVX was detected in most of plants where the ShVX coat protein is present.

  15. Phytanic acid, a novel activator of uncoupling protein-1 gene transcription and brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Agatha; Barberá, Maria José; Iglesias, Roser; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a phytol-derived branched-chain fatty acid present in dietary products. Phytanic acid increased uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) mRNA expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in culture. Phytanic acid induced the expression of the UCP1 gene promoter, which was enhanced by co-transfection with a retinoid X receptor (RXR) expression vector but not with other expression vectors driving peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPARgamma or a form of RXR devoid of ligand-dependent sensitivity. The effect of phytanic acid on the UCP1 gene required the 5' enhancer region of the gene and the effects of phytanic acid were mediated in an additive manner by three binding sites for RXR. Moreover, phytanic acid activates brown adipocyte differentiation: long-term exposure of brown preadipocytes to phytanic acid promoted the acquisition of the brown adipocyte morphology and caused a co-ordinate induction of the mRNAs for gene markers of brown adipocyte differentiation, such as UCP1, adipocyte lipid-binding protein aP2, lipoprotein lipase, the glucose transporter GLUT4 or subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, phytanic acid is a natural product of phytol metabolism that activates brown adipocyte thermogenic function. It constitutes a potential nutritional signal linking dietary status to adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:11829740

  16. A second rhodopsin-like protein in Cyanophora paradoxa: gene sequence and protein expression in a cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Frassanito, Anna Maria; Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    Here we report the identification and expression of a second rhodopsin-like protein in the alga Cyanophora paradoxa (Glaucophyta), named Cyanophopsin_2. This new protein was identified due to a serendipity event, since the RACE reaction performed to complete the sequence of Cyanophopsin_1, (the first rhodopsin-like protein of C. paradoxa identified in 2009 by our group), amplified a 619 bp sequence corresponding to a portion of a new gene of the same protein family. The full sequence consists of 1175 bp consisting of 849 bp coding DNA sequence and 4 introns of 326 bp. The protein is characterized by an N-terminal region of 47 amino acids, followed by a region with 7 α-helices of 213 amino acids and a C-terminal region of 22 amino acids. This protein showed high identity with Cyanophopsin_1 and other rhodopsin-like proteins of Archea, Bacteria, Fungi and Algae. Cyanophosin_2 (CpR2) was expressed in a cell-free expression system, and characterized by means of absorption spectroscopy. PMID:23851421

  17. Effect of the feeding system on the fatty acid composition, expression of the Δ9-desaturase, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha, Gamma, and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1 genes in the semitendinous muscle of light lambs of the Rasa Aragonesa breed

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are receiving increasing attention because of their beneficial effects on human health, with milk and meat products derived from ruminants as important sources of CLA in the human diet. SCD gene is responsible for some of the variation in CLA concentration in adipose tissues, and PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 genes are regulator of SCD gene. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the feeding system on fatty acid composition, CLA content and relative gene expression of Δ9-desaturase (SCD), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ), Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha, (PPARα) and Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (SREBP1) in Rasa Aragonesa light lambs in semitendinous muscle. Forty-four single-born male lambs were used to evaluate the effect of the feeding system, varying on an intensity gradient according to the use of concentrates: 1. grazing alfalfa, 2. grazing alfalfa with a supplement for lambs, 3. indoor lambs with grazing ewes and 4. drylot. Results Both grazing systems resulted in a higher concentration of vaccenic acid (VA), CLA, CLA/VA acid ratio, and a lower oleic content, oleic acid (C18:1)/stearic acid (C18:0) ratio, PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio and SCD expression compared to other diets. In addition feeding system affected the fatty acid composition and SCD expression, possibly due to CLA concentration or the PUFA n-6/n-3 ratio. Both expression of the SCD gene and the feeding system were important factors affecting CLA concentration in the animal's semitendinous muscle. PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 expression seemed to be unaffected by the feeding system. Although no significant results were found, PPARγ, PPARα and SREBP1 showed similar expression pattern as SCD. Moreover, the correlation results between SCD expression and PPARγ (p < 0.01), as well as SREBP1 (p < 0.01) expression, may suggest that these genes were affecting SCD expression in a different way. Conclusions

  18. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  19. Expression of recombinant green fluorescent protein in Bacillus methanolicus.

    PubMed

    Nilasari, Dewi; Dover, Nir; Rech, Sabine; Komives, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Microbial biocatalysts are used in a wide range of industries to produce large scale quantities of proteins, amino acids, and commodity chemicals. While the majority of these processes use glucose or other low-cost sugars as the substrate, Bacillus methanolicus is one example of a biocatalyst that has shown sustained growth on methanol as a carbon source at elevated temperature (50-53°C optimum) resulting in reduced feed and utility costs. Specifically, the complete chemical process enabled by this approach takes methane from natural gas, and following a low-cost conversion to methanol, can be used for the production of high value products. In this study, production of recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) by B. methanolicus is explored. A plasmid was constructed that incorporates the methanol dehydrogenase (mdh) promoter of B. methanolicus MGA3 together with the GFPuv gene. The plasmid, pNW33N, was shown to be effective for expression in other Bacillus strains, although not previously in B. methanolicus. A published electroporation protocol for transformation of B. methanolicus was modified to result in expression of GFP using plasmid pNW33N-mdh-GFPuv (pNmG). Transformation was confirmed by both agarose gel electrophoresis and by observation of green fluorescence under UV light exposure. The mass yield of cells and protein were measured in shake flask experiments. The optimum concentration of methanol for protein production was found to be at 200 mM. Higher concentrations than 200 mM resulted in slightly higher biomass production but lower amounts of recombinant protein. PMID:22275315

  20. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Facilitates the Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Docosahexaenoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Owada, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yui; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    The brain has a limited ability to synthesize the essential polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from its omega-3 fatty acid precursors. Therefore, to maintain brain concentrations of this PUFA at physiological levels, plasma-derived DHA must be transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). While DHA is able to partition into the luminal membrane of brain endothelial cells, its low aqueous solubility likely limits its cytosolic transfer to the abluminal membrane, necessitating the requirement of an intracellular carrier protein to facilitate trafficking of this PUFA across the BBB. As the intracellular carrier protein fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) is expressed at the human BBB, the current study assessed the putative role of FABP5 in the brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of DHA in vitro and in vivo, respectively. hFAPB5 was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli C41(DE3) cells and the binding affinity of DHA to hFABP5 assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry. The impact of FABP5 siRNA on uptake of (14)C-DHA into immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cells was assessed. An in situ transcardiac perfusion method was optimized in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently used to compare the BBB influx rate (Kin) of (14)C-DHA between FABP5-deficient (FABP5(-/-)) and wild-type (FABP5(+/+)) C57BL/6 mice. DHA bound to hFABP5 with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 155 ± 8 nM (mean ± SEM). FABP5 siRNA transfection decreased hCMEC/D3 mRNA and protein expression of FABP5 by 53.2 ± 5.5% and 44.8 ± 13.7%, respectively, which was associated with a 14.1 ± 2.7% reduction in (14)C-DHA cellular uptake. By using optimized conditions for the in situ transcardiac perfusion (a 1 min preperfusion (10 mL/min) followed by perfusion of (14)C-DHA (1 min)), the Kin of (14)C-DHA was 0.04 ± 0.01 mL/g/s. Relative to FABP5(+/+) mice, the Kin of (14)C-DHA decreased 36.7 ± 12.4% in FABP5(-/-) mice

  1. Selective Methyl Labeling of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins Using Cell-Free Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structural characterization of membrane proteins and other large proteins with NMR relies increasingly on perdeuteration combined with incorporation of specifically protonated amino acid moieties, such as methyl groups of isoleucines, valines, or leucines. The resulting proton dilution reduces dipolar broadening producing sharper resonance lines, ameliorates spectral crowding, and enables measuring of crucial distances between and to methyl groups. While incorporation of specific methyl labeling is now well established for bacterial expression using suitable precursors, corresponding methods are still lacking for cell-free expression, which is often the only choice for producing labeled eukaryotic membrane proteins in mg quantities. Here we show that we can express methyl-labeled human integral membrane proteins cost-effectively by cell-free expression based of crude hydrolyzed ILV-labeled OmpX inclusion bodies. These are obtained in Escherichia coli with very high quantity and represent an optimal intermediate to channel ILV precursors into the eukaryotic proteins. PMID:24937763

  2. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  3. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in Chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-01-13

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery of proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  4. Robust expression of a bioactive mammalian protein in chlamydomonas chloroplast

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2010-03-16

    Methods and compositions are disclosed to engineer chloroplast comprising heterologous mammalian genes via a direct replacement of chloroplast Photosystem II (PSII) reaction center protein coding regions to achieve expression of recombinant protein above 5% of total protein. When algae is used, algal expressed protein is produced predominantly as a soluble protein where the functional activity of the peptide is intact. As the host algae is edible, production of biologics in this organism for oral delivery or proteins/peptides, especially gut active proteins, without purification is disclosed.

  5. [Glial fibrillary acidic protein: the component of intermediate filaments in the vertebrate brain astrocytes].

    PubMed

    Sukhorukova, E G; Kruzhevskiĭ, D É; Alekseeva, O S

    2015-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) refers to the type III intermediate filament proteins and is the essential component of the cytoskeleton in astrocytes of all vertebrates. This review presents current data on the molecular organization of GFAP in a comparative aspect. The results of most relevant studies using immunocytochemical labeling of the protein are summarized. The data on the changes in expression of GFAP in Alexander disease caused by the primary pathology of astrocytes are presented.

  6. mRNA expression and protein localization of dentin matrix protein 1 during dental root formation.

    PubMed

    Toyosawa, S; Okabayashi, K; Komori, T; Ijuhin, N

    2004-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is an acidic phosphoprotein. DMP1 was initially detected in dentin and later in other mineralized tissues including cementum and bone, but the DMP1 expression pattern in tooth is still controversial. To determine the precise localization of DMP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and the protein in the tooth, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses using rat molars and incisors during various stages of root formation. During root dentin formation of molars, DMP1 mRNA was detected in root odontoblasts in parallel with mineralization of the dentin. However, the level of DMP1 mRNA expression in root odontoblasts decreased near the coronal part and was absent in coronal odontoblasts. DMP1 protein was localized along dentinal tubules and their branches in mineralized root dentin, and the distribution of DMP1 shifted from the end of dentinal tubules to the base of the tubules as dentin formation progressed. During the formation of the acellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementoblasts lining the acellular cementum where its protein was localized. During the formation of the cellular cementum, DMP1 mRNA was detected in cementocytes embedded in the cellular cementum but not in cementoblasts, and its protein was localized in the pericellular cementum of cementocytes including their processes. During dentin formation of incisors, DMP1 mRNA was detected in odontoblasts on the cementum-related dentin, where its protein was localized along dentinal tubules near the mineralization front. The localization of DMP1 mRNA and protein in dentin and cementum was related to their mineralization, suggesting that one of the functions of DMP1 may be involved in the mineralization of dentin and cementum during root formation. PMID:14751569

  7. 5-Caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid orally administered suppress P-selectin expression on mouse platelets.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae B

    2009-10-01

    Caffeic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid are naturally occurring phenolic acid and its quinic acid ester found in plants. In this article, potential effects of 5-caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid on P-selectin expression were investigated due to its significant involvement in platelet activation. First, the effects of 5-caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid on cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes were determined due to their profound involvement in regulating P-selectin expression on platelets. At the concentration of 0.05 microM, 5-caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid were both able to inhibit COX-I enzyme activity by 60% (P<.013) and 57% (P<.017), respectively. At the same concentration, 5-caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid were also able to inhibit COX-II enzyme activity by 59% (P<.012) and 56% (P<.015), respectively. As expected, 5-caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid were correspondingly able to inhibit P-selectin expression on the platelets by 33% (P<.011) and 35% (P<.018), at the concentration of 0.05 microM. In animal studies, 5-caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid orally administered to mice were detected as intact forms in the plasma. Also, P-selectin expression was respectively reduced by 21% (P<.016) and 44% (P<.019) in the plasma samples from mice orally administered 5-caffeoylquinic acid (400 microg per 30 g body weight) and caffeic acid (50 microg per 30 g body weight). These data suggest that both 5-caffeoylquinic acid and caffeic acid orally administered can be absorbed and suppress P-selectin expression on mouse platelets.

  8. Purify First: rapid expression and purification of proteins from XMRV.

    PubMed

    Gillette, William K; Esposito, Dominic; Taylor, Troy E; Hopkins, Ralph F; Bagni, Rachel K; Hartley, James L

    2011-04-01

    Purifying proteins from recombinant sources is often difficult, time-consuming, and costly. We have recently instituted a series of improvements in our protein purification pipeline that allows much more accurate choice of expression host and conditions and purification protocols. The key elements are parallel cloning, small scale parallel expression and lysate preparation, and small scale parallel protein purification. Compared to analyzing expression data only, results from multiple small scale protein purifications predict success at scale-up with greatly improved reliability. Using these new procedures we purified eight of nine proteins from xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) on the first attempt at large scale. PMID:21146612

  9. Expression and localization of the omega-3 fatty acid receptor GPR120 in human term placenta.

    PubMed

    Lager, S; Ramirez, V I; Gaccioli, F; Jansson, T; Powell, T L

    2014-07-01

    Fatty acids can function as signaling molecules, acting through receptors in the cytosol or on the cell surface. G-Protein Receptor (GPR)120 is a membrane-bound receptor mediating anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects of the omega-3 fatty acid docohexaenoic acid (DHA). GPR120 dysfunction is associated with obesity in humans. Cellular localization of GPR120 and the influence of maternal obesity on GPR120 protein expression in the placenta are unknown. Herein we demonstrate that GPR120 is predominantly expressed in the microvillous membrane (MVM) of human placenta and that the expression level of this receptor in MVM is not altered by maternal body mass index (BMI).

  10. Optimizing Scoring Function of Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions with Both Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid (protein-DNA and protein-RNA) recognition is fundamental to the regulation of gene expression. Determination of the structures of the protein-nucleic acid recognition and insight into their interactions at molecular level are vital to understanding the regulation function. Recently, quantitative computational approach has been becoming an alternative of experimental technique for predicting the structures and interactions of biomolecular recognition. However, the progress of protein-nucleic acid structure prediction, especially protein-RNA, is far behind that of the protein-ligand and protein-protein structure predictions due to the lack of reliable and accurate scoring function for quantifying the protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this work, we developed an accurate scoring function (named as SPA-PN, SPecificity and Affinity of the Protein-Nucleic acid interactions) for protein-nucleic acid interactions by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. Specificity and affinity are two requirements of highly efficient and specific biomolecular recognition. Previous quantitative descriptions of the biomolecular interactions considered the affinity, but often ignored the specificity owing to the challenge of specificity quantification. We applied our concept of intrinsic specificity to connect the conventional specificity, which circumvents the challenge of specificity quantification. In addition to the affinity optimization, we incorporated the quantified intrinsic specificity into the optimization strategy of SPA-PN. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions validated that SPA-PN performs well on both the prediction of binding affinity and identification of native conformation. In terms of its performance, SPA-PN can be widely used to predict the protein-nucleic acid structures and quantify their interactions. PMID:24098651

  11. Protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression maps of ARFs and Aux/IAAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Sarbottam; Shrestha, Sandesh K.; Binder, Brad; Stewart, C. Neal; Hewezi, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development. Based on the current model in Arabidopsis thaliana, Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins repress auxin-inducible genes by inhibiting auxin response transcription factors (ARFs). Experimental evidence suggests that heterodimerization between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins are related to their unique biological functions. The objective of this study was to generate the Aux/IAA-ARF protein-protein interaction map using full length sequences and locate the interacting protein pairs to specific gene co-expression networks in order to define tissue-specific responses of the Aux/IAA-ARF interactome. Pairwise interactions between 19 ARFs and 29 Aux/IAAs resulted in the identification of 213 specific interactions of which 79 interactions were previously unknown. The incorporation of co-expression profiles with protein-protein interaction data revealed a strong correlation of gene co-expression for 70% of the ARF-Aux/IAA interacting pairs in at least one tissue/organ, indicative of the biological significance of these interactions. Importantly, ARF4-8 and 19, which were found to interact with almost all Aux-Aux/IAA showed broad co-expression relationships with Aux/IAA genes, thus, formed the central hubs of the co-expression network. Our analyses provide new insights into the biological significance of ARF-Aux/IAA associations in the morphogenesis and development of various plant tissues and organs. PMID:25566309

  12. The value of short amino acid sequence matches for prediction of protein allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Silvanovich, Andre; Nemeth, Margaret A; Song, Ping; Herman, Rod; Tagliani, Laura; Bannon, Gary A

    2006-03-01

    Typically, genetically engineered crops contain traits encoded by one or a few newly expressed proteins. The allergenicity assessment of newly expressed proteins is an important component in the safety evaluation of genetically engineered plants. One aspect of this assessment involves sequence searches that compare the amino acid sequence of the protein to all known allergens. Analyses are performed to determine the potential for immunologically based cross-reactivity where IgE directed against a known allergen could bind to the protein and elicit a clinical reaction in sensitized individuals. Bioinformatic searches are designed to detect global sequence similarity and short contiguous amino acid sequence identity. It has been suggested that potential allergen cross-reactivity may be predicted by identifying matches as short as six to eight contiguous amino acids between the protein of interest and a known allergen. A series of analyses were performed, and match probabilities were calculated for different size peptides to determine if there was a scientifically justified search window size that identified allergen sequence characteristics. Four probability modeling methods were tested: (1) a mock protein and a mock allergen database, (2) a mock protein and genuine allergen database, (3) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database, and (4) a genuine allergen and genuine protein database combined with a correction for repeating peptides. These analyses indicated that searches for short amino acid sequence matches of eight amino acids or fewer to identify proteins as potential cross-reactive allergens is a product of chance and adds little value to allergy assessments for newly expressed proteins.

  13. Heterologous expression of Translocated promoter region protein, Tpr, identified as a transcription factor from Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shivani; Yadav, Sunita Kumari; Dixit, Aparna

    2011-05-01

    Our earlier studies have demonstrated that the 35 kDa isoform of Translocated promoter region protein (Tpr) of Rattus norvegicus was able to augment c-jun transcription efficiently. Identification of direct targets that may in part downregulate c-jun transcription might prove to be an ideal target to curtail the proliferation of normal cells under pathophysiological conditions. In order to evaluate its potential as a pharmaceutical target, the protein must be produced and purified in sufficiently high yields. In the present study, we report the high level expression of Tpr protein of R. norvegicus employing heterologous host, Escherichia coli, to permit its structural characterization in great detail. We here demonstrate that the Tpr protein was expressed in soluble form and approximately 90 mg/L of the purified protein at the shake flask level could be achieved to near homogeneity using single step-metal chelate affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence of the protein was confirmed by mass spectroscopic analysis. The highly unstable and disordered Tpr protein was imparted structural and functional stability by the addition of glycerol and it has been shown that the natively unfolded Tpr protein retains DNA binding ability under these conditions only. Thus, the present study emphasizes the significance of an efficient prokaryotic system, which results in a high level soluble expression of a DNA binding protein of eukaryotic origin. Thus, the present strategy employed for purification of the R. norvegicus Tpr protein bypasses the need for the tedious expression strategies associated with the eukaryotic expression systems.

  14. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kokoro; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-11-01

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis.

  15. Post-expression strategies for structural investigations of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Currently, membrane proteins only comprise 1.5% of the protein data bank and, thus, still remain a challenge for structural biologists. Expression, stabilization in membrane mimics (e.g. detergent), heterogeneity (conformational and chemical), and crystallization in the presence of a membrane mimic are four major bottlenecks encountered. In response, several post-expression protein modifications have been utilized to facilitate structure determination of membrane proteins. This review highlights four approaches: limited proteolysis, deglycosylation, cysteine alkylation, and lysine methylation. Combined these approaches have facilitated the structure determination of more than 40 membrane proteins and, therefore, are a useful addition to the membrane protein structural biologist's toolkit.

  16. Directed evolution increases desaturation of a cyanobacterial fatty acid desaturase in eukaryotic expression systems.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shuangyi; Wallis, James G; Denolf, Peter; Browse, John

    2016-07-01

    Directed evolution of a cyanobacterial Δ9 fatty acid desaturase (DSG) from Synechococcus elongatus, PCC6301 created new, more productive desaturases and revealed the importance of certain amino acid residues to increased desaturation. A codon-optimized DSG open reading frame with an endoplasmic-reticulum retention/retrieval signal appended was used as template for random mutagenesis. Increased desaturation was detected using a novel screen based on complementation of the unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophy of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant ole1Δ. Amino acid residues whose importance was discovered by the random processes were further examined by saturation mutation to determine the best amino acid at each identified location in the peptide chain and by combinatorial analysis. One frequently-detected single amino acid change, Q240R, yielded a nearly 25-fold increase in total desaturation in S. cerevisiae. Several other variants of the protein sequence with multiple amino acid changes increased total desaturation more than 60-fold. Many changes leading to increased desaturation were in the vicinity of the canonical histidine-rich regions known to be critical for electron transfer mediated by these di-iron proteins. Expression of these evolved proteins in the seed of Arabidopsis thaliana altered the fatty acid composition, increasing monounsaturated fatty acids and decreasing the level of saturated fatty acid, suggesting a potential application of these desaturases in oilseed crops. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1522-1530. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26724425

  17. Protein, amino acids and the control of food intake.

    PubMed

    Tome, Daniel

    2004-08-01

    The influence of protein and amino acid on the control of food intake and the specific control of protein and amino acid intakes remains incompletely understood. The most commonly accepted conclusions are: (1) the existence of an aversive response to diets deficient in or devoid of protein or deficient in at least one essential amino acid; (2) the existence of a mechanism that enables attainment of the minimum requirement for N and essential amino acids by increasing intake of a low-protein diet; (3) a decrease in the intake of a high-protein diet is associated with different processes, including the high satiating effect of protein. Ingested proteins are believed to generate pre- and post-absorptive signals that contribute to the control of gastric kinetics, pancreatic secretion and food intake. At the brain level, two major afferent pathways are involved in protein and amino acid monitoring: the indirect neuro-mediated (mainly vagus-mediated) pathway and the direct blood pathway. The neuro-mediated pathway transfers pre-absorptive and visceral information. This information is for the main part transferred through the vagus nerve that innervates part of the oro-sensory zone: the stomach, the duodenum and the liver. Other information is directly monitored in the blood. It is likely that the system responds precisely when protein and essential amino acid intake is inadequate, but in contrast allows a large range of adaptive capacities through amino acid degradation and substrate interconversion.

  18. Echinococcus granulosus fatty acid binding proteins subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, EgFABP1 and EgFABP2, were isolated from the parasitic platyhelminth Echinococcus granulosus. These proteins bind fatty acids and have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo fatty acids synthesis is absent. Therefore platyhelminthes depend on the capture and intracellular distribution of host's lipids and fatty acid binding proteins could participate in lipid distribution. To elucidate EgFABP's roles, we investigated their intracellular distribution in the larval stage by a proteomic approach. Our results demonstrated the presence of EgFABP1 isoforms in cytosolic, nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions, suggesting that these molecules could be involved in several cellular processes.

  19. Data presenting a modified bacterial expression vector for expressing and purifying Nus solubility-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Heng; Terman, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria are the predominant source for producing recombinant proteins but while many exogenous proteins are expressed, only a fraction of those are soluble. We have found that a new actin regulatory enzyme Mical is poorly soluble when expressed in bacteria but the use of a Nus fusion protein tag greatly increases its solubility. However, available vectors containing a Nus tag have been engineered in a way that hinders the separation of target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. We have now used recombinant DNA approaches to overcome these issues and reengineer a Nus solubility tag-containing bacterial expression vector. The data herein present a modified bacterial expression vector useful for expressing proteins fused to the Nus solubility tag and separating such target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. PMID:27547802

  20. Study of Stationary Phase Metabolism Via Isotopomer Analysis of Amino Acids from an Isolated Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, AfshanS.; Tang, YinjieJ.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martin, Hector Garcia; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-09-14

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully 13C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  1. Requirement for the heart-type fatty acid binding protein in cardiac fatty acid utilization.

    PubMed

    Binas, B; Danneberg, H; McWhir, J; Mullins, L; Clark, A J

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic cytosolic fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are abundantly expressed in many animal tissues with high rates of fatty acid metabolism. No physiological role has been demonstrated for any FABP, although these proteins have been implicated in transport of free long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) and protection against LCFA toxicity. We report here that mice lacking heart-type FABP (H-FABP) exhibit a severe defect of peripheral (nonhepatic, non-fat) LCFA utilization. In these mice, the heart is unable to efficiently take up plasma LCFAs, which are normally its main fuel, and switches to glucose usage. Altered plasma levels of LCFAs, glucose, lactate and beta-hydroxybutyrate are consistent with depressed peripheral LCFA utilization, intensified carbohydrate usage, and increased hepatic LCFA oxidation; these changes are most pronounced under conditions favoring LCFA oxidation. H-FABP deficiency is only incompletely compensated, however, causing acute exercise intolerance and, at old age, a localized cardiac hypertrophy. These data establish a requirement for H-FABP in cardiac intracellular lipid transport and fuel selection and a major role in metabolic homeostasis. This new animal model should be particularly useful for investigating the significance of peripheral LCFA utilization for heart function, insulin sensitivity, and blood pressure.

  2. Discrete phosphorylated Retinoblastoma protein isoform expression in mouse tooth development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weibo; Vazquez, Betsy; Andreeva, Viktoria; Spear, Daisy; Kong, Elizabeth; Hinds, Philip W.; Yelick, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that Retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation plays a central role in mediating cell cycle G1/S stage transition, together with E2 promoter-binding factors (E2F). The binding of pRb to E2F is controlled by the sequential and cumulative phosphorylation of pRb at various amino acids. In addition to the well characterized roles for pRb as a tumor suppressor, pRb has more recently been implicated in osteoprogenitor and other types of stem cell maintenance, proliferation and differentiation, thereby influencing the morphogenesis of developing organs. In this study, we present data characterizing the expression of three phosphorylated pRb (ppRb) isoforms - ppRbS780, ppRbS795, and ppRbS807/811- in developing mouse molar and incisor tooth buds. Also, we analyzed the co-localization of pRb isoforms and histone H3 expression in incisor tooth buds. Our results reveal distinct developmental expression patterns for individual ppRb isoforms in differentiating dental epithelial and dental mesenchymal cells, suggesting discrete functions for each in tooth development. PMID:22476877

  3. Optimized expression, solubilization and purification of nuclear inclusion protein b of cardamom mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, T; Jacob, T; Shah, M; Das, D; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2008-04-01

    All RNA viruses encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) that is required for replication of the viral genome. Nuclear inclusion b (NIb) gene codes for the RdRp in Potyviridae viruses. In this study, expression, solubilization and purification of NIb protein of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is reported. The objective of the present study was to express and purify the NIb protein of CdMV on a large scale for structural characterization, as the structure of the RdRp from a plant virus is yet to be determined. However, the expression of NIb protein with hexa-histidine tag in Escherichia coli led to insoluble aggregates. Out of all the approaches [making truncated versions to reduce the size of protein; replacing an amino acid residue likely to be involved in hydrophobic intermolecular interactions with a hydrophilic one; expressing the protein along with chaperones; expression in Origami cells for proper disulphide bond formation, in E. coli as a fusion with maltose-binding protein (MBP) and in Nicotiana tabacum] to obtain the RdRp in a soluble form, only expression in E. coli as a fusion with MBP and its expression in N. tabacum were successful. The NIb expressed in plant or as a fusion with MBP in E. coli can be scaled up for further work.

  4. Highly efficient extraction of cellular nucleic acid associated proteins in vitro with magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hu, Zhengyan; Qin, Hongqiang; Wei, Xiaoluan; Cheng, Kai; Liu, Fangjie; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2012-12-01

    Nucleic acid associated proteins (NAaP) play the essential roles in gene regulation and protein expression. The global analysis of cellular NAaP would give a broad insight to understand the interaction between nucleic acids and the associated proteins, such as the important proteinous regulation factors on nucleic acids. Proteomic analysis presents a novel strategy to investigate a group of proteins. However, the large scale analysis of NAaP is yet impossible due to the lack of approaches to harvest target protein groups with a high efficiency. Herein, a simple and efficient method was developed to collect cellular NAaP using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes based on the strong interaction between carbon nanotubes and nucleic acids along with corresponding associated proteins. We found that the magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes demonstrated a nearly 100% extraction efficiency for intracellular nucleic acids from cells in vitro. Importantly, the proteins associated on nucleic acids could be highly efficiently harvested using magnetic oxidized carbon nanotubes due to the binding of NAaP on nucleic acids. 1594 groups of nuclear NAaP and 2595 groups of cellular NAaP were extracted and identified from about 1,000,000 cells, and 803 groups of NAaP were analyzed with only about 10,000 cells, showing a promising performance for the proteomic analysis of NAaP from minute cellular samples. This highly efficient extraction strategy for NAaP is a simple approach to identify cellular nucleic acid associated proteome, and we believed this strategy could be further applied in systems biology to understand the gene expression and regulation.

  5. Cloning and expression of special F protein from human liver

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-Ye; Yu, Xin-Da; Song, Chun-Juan; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Shi, Xin-Rong; Duan, Ying; Zhang, Ju

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To clone human liver special F protein and to express it in a prokaryotic system. METHODS: Total RNA was isolated from human liver tissue and first-strand cDNA was reverse transcribed using the PCR reverse primer. Following this, cDNA of the F protein was ligated into the clone vector pUCm-T. The segment of F protein’s cDNA was subcloned into the expression vector pET-15b and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) pLyss. Isopropy-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was then used to induce expression of the target protein. RESULTS: The cDNA clone of human liver special F protein (1134bp) was successfully produced, with the cDNA sequence being published in Gene-bank: DQ188836. We confirmed the expression of F protein by Western blot with a molecular weight of 43 kDa. The expressed protein accounted for 40% of the total protein extracted. CONCLUSION: F protein expresses cDNA clone in a prokaryotic system, which offers a relatively simple way of producing sufficient quantities of F protein and contributes to understanding the principal biological functions of this protein. PMID:17465469

  6. Relating protein adduction to gene expression changes: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Shi, Zhiao; Duncan, Dexter T; Prodduturi, Naresh; Marnett, Lawrence J; Liebler, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Modification of proteins by reactive electrophiles such as the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) plays a critical role in oxidant-associated human diseases. However, little is known about protein adduction and the mechanism by which protein damage elicits adaptive effects and toxicity. We developed a systems approach for relating protein adduction to gene expression changes through the integration of protein adduction, gene expression, protein-DNA interaction, and protein-protein interaction data. Using a random walk strategy, we expanded a list of responsive transcription factors inferred from gene expression studies to upstream signaling networks, which in turn allowed overlaying protein adduction data on the network for the prediction of stress sensors and their associated regulatory mechanisms. We demonstrated the general applicability of transcription factor-based signaling network inference using 103 known pathways. Applying our workflow on gene expression and protein adduction data from HNE-treatment not only rediscovered known mechanisms of electrophile stress but also generated novel hypotheses regarding protein damage sensors. Although developed for analyzing protein adduction data, the framework can be easily adapted for phosphoproteomics and other types of protein modification data. PMID:21594272

  7. The human ubiquitin-52 amino acid fusion protein gene shares several structural features with mammalian ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R T; Board, P G

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding ubiquitin fused to a 52 amino acid tail protein were isolated from human placental and adrenal gland cDNA libraries. The deduced human 52 amino acid tail protein is very similar to the homologous protein from other species, including the conservation of the putative metal-binding, nucleic acid-binding domain observed in these proteins. Northern blot analysis with a tail-specific probe indicated that the previously identified UbA mRNA species most likely represents comigrating transcripts of the 52 amino acid tail (UbA52) and 80 amino acid tail (UbA80) ubiquitin fusion genes. The UbA52 gene was isolated from a human genomic library and consists of five exons distributed over 3400 base pairs. One intron is in the 5' non-coding region, two interrupt the single ubiquitin coding unit, and the fourth intron is within the tail coding region. Several members of the Alu family of repetitive DNA are associated with the gene. The UbA52 promoter has several features in common with mammalian ribosomal protein genes, including its location in a CpG-rich island, initiation of transcription within a polypyrimidine tract, the lack of a consensus TATA motif, and the presence of Sp1 binding sites, observations that are consistent with the recent identification of the ubiquitin-free tail proteins as ribosomal proteins. Thus, in spite of its unusual feature of being translationally fused to ubiquitin, the 52 amino acid tail ribosomal protein is expressed from a structurally typical ribosomal protein gene. Images PMID:1850507

  8. Transient Expression of Viral Proteins in Plants Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Hitzeroth, Inga I; van Zyl, Albertha R

    2016-01-01

    Transient expression of viral proteins in plants is a novel alternative to other expression platforms. The viral proteins can be used as potential vaccines or in diagnostics. Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or whole plants are infiltrated with recombinant Agrobacterium that harbor the gene of interest. Protein expression in the plants is rapid and results are obtained within 2-7 days. Here we describe how to make electrocompetent Agrobacterium, how to transform Agrobacterium, how to infiltrate leaves or plants with the recombinant Agrobacterium, and lastly how to extract the protein for analysis by gel electrophoresis. PMID:27076324

  9. Effect of filaggrin breakdown products on growth of and protein expression by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Miajlovic, Helen; Fallon, Padraic G.; Irvine, Alan D.; Foster, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Colonization of the skin by Staphylococcus aureus in individuals with atopic dermatitis exacerbates inflammation. Atopic dermatitis is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin (FLG) gene, accompanied by reduced levels of filaggrin breakdown products on the skin. Objective To assess the affect of growth in the presence of the filaggrin breakdown products urocanic acid (UCA) and pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA) on fitness of and protein expression by S aureus. Methods S aureus was grown for 24 hours in the presence of UCA and PCA, and the density of the cultures was monitored by recording OD600 values. Cell wall extracts and secreted proteins of S aureus were isolated and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Cell wall–associated proteins known to be involved in colonization and immune evasion including clumping factor B, fibronectin binding proteins, protein A, iron-regulated surface determinant A, and the serine-aspartate repeat proteins were examined by Western immunoblotting. Results Acidification of growth media caused by the presence of UCA and PCA resulted in reduced growth rates and reduced final cell density of S aureus. At the lower pH, reduced expression of secreted and cell wall–associated proteins, including proteins involved in colonization (clumping factor B, fibronectin binding protein A) and immune evasion (protein A), was observed. Decreased expression of iron-regulated surface determinant A due to growth with filaggrin breakdown products appeared to be independent of the decreased pH. Conclusion S aureus grown under mildly acidic conditions such as those observed on healthy skin expresses reduced levels of proteins that are known to be involved in immune evasion. PMID:21036388

  10. Channel forming outer membrane porin protein in halophile: expressed as a soluble form in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Hiroko; Furukawa, Masafumi; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2013-03-01

    We have previously found that the N-terminal sequence of the outer membrane protein from moderate halophile is similar to the sequence of the well-known pore forming porin proteins from other Gram-negative bacteria. This highly expressed outer membrane protein was purified from Halomonas sp. 40 and reconstituted into liposome. It showed a permeability activity in the liposome swelling assay. Based on the N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences of this major outer membrane, we have cloned here the porin gene, hopP (halophilic outer membrane protein), from Halomonas sp. 40. The hopP gene encodes the porin precursor comprising 366 amino acid residues that include a 21 amino acid signal peptide. Mature porin (345 amino acids, 37,611 Da) is a highly acidic protein, just as is so for many halophilic proteins and was soluble when expressed in Escherichia coli with N-terminal His-tag. Purified recombinant His-porin was soluble even after heat-treatment at 95 °C for 5 min in the absence of salt. Circular dichroism analysis of His-porin showed conversion into a β-sheet rich structure by the addition of NaCl at 0.9-2.7 M.

  11. Purification of the M flax-rust resistance protein expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Simon A; Williams, Simon J; Wang, Ching-I A; Sornaraj, Pradeep; James, Ben; Kobe, Bostjan; Dodds, Peter N; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Anderson, Peter A

    2007-06-01

    The M flax-rust resistance (R) gene is predicted to encode a 150-kDa protein of the Toll-interleukin-like receptor-nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR) class of plant disease resistance proteins and provides resistance against the Melampsora lini (flax rust) fungus carrying the AvrM avirulence gene. The extremely low level of this class of R proteins found in plant tissue has precluded their biochemical and structural analysis, and the study of these proteins has been largely restricted to genetic analyses and in vivo investigations. Here we report the production and purification of the M protein in the methalotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. Expression trials with five different constructs reveals optimum levels of soluble native M protein can be obtained as an N-terminally 9x His-tagged protein, in which the first 21 amino acids of the predicted wild-type protein are deleted. Expression was achieved using a high cell density fed-batch bioreactor culture at low temperature. M protein was purified to near homogeneity from whole-cell lysates using cation exchange, immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography and gel filtration with a final yield of approximately 3 mg of protein/1000 g wet weight of yeast cells lysed. The successful expression and purification of soluble M protein opens the way for biochemical and structural analysis of this class of important plant proteins.

  12. Amino acid sequences of proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona.

    PubMed

    Alves, S F; Lefebvre, R B; Probert, W

    2000-01-01

    This report describes a partial amino acid sequences from three putative outer envelope proteins from Leptospira serovar pomona. In order to obtain internal fragments for protein sequencing, enzymatic and chemical digestion was performed. The enzyme clostripain was used to digest the proteins 32 and 45 kDa. In situ digestion of 40 kDa molecular weight protein was accomplished using cyanogen bromide. The 32 kDa protein generated two fragments, one of 21 kDa and another of 10 kDa that yielded five residues. A fragment of 24 kDa that yielded nineteen residues of amino acids was obtained from 45 kDa protein. A fragment with a molecular weight of 20 kDa, yielding a twenty amino acids sequence from the 40 kDa protein.

  13. Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP), a Secretion-Enhancing Tag for Mammalian Protein Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Reuten, Raphael; Nikodemus, Denise; Oliveira, Maria B; Patel, Trushar R; Brachvogel, Bent; Breloy, Isabelle; Stetefeld, Jörg; Koch, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in eukaryotic expression systems to ensure the formation of disulfide bridges and proper glycosylation. Although many proteins can be expressed easily, some proteins, sub-domains, and mutant protein versions can cause problems. Here, we investigated expression levels of recombinant extracellular, intracellular as well as transmembrane proteins tethered to different polypeptides in mammalian cell lines. Strikingly, fusion of proteins to the prokaryotic maltose-binding protein (MBP) generally enhanced protein production. MBP fusion proteins consistently exhibited the most robust increase in protein production in comparison to commonly used tags, e.g., the Fc, Glutathione S-transferase (GST), SlyD, and serum albumin (ser alb) tag. Moreover, proteins tethered to MBP revealed reduced numbers of dying cells upon transient transfection. In contrast to the Fc tag, MBP is a stable monomer and does not promote protein aggregation. Therefore, the MBP tag does not induce artificial dimerization of tethered proteins and provides a beneficial fusion tag for binding as well as cell adhesion studies. Using MBP we were able to secret a disease causing laminin β2 mutant protein (congenital nephrotic syndrome), which is normally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. In summary, this study establishes MBP as a versatile expression tag for protein production in eukaryotic expression systems. PMID:27029048

  14. Benzoic Acid-Inducible Gene Expression in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dragset, Marte S.; Barczak, Amy K.; Kannan, Nisha; Mærk, Mali; Flo, Trude H.; Valla, Svein; Rubin, Eric J.; Steigedal, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression is a powerful tool to investigate the role of bacterial genes. Here, we adapt the Pseudomonas putida-derived positively regulated XylS/Pm expression system to control inducible gene expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis. By making simple changes to a Gram-negative broad-host-range XylS/Pm-regulated gene expression vector, we prove that it is possible to adapt this well-studied expression system to non-Gram-negative species. With the benzoic acid-derived inducer m-toluate, we achieve a robust, time- and dose-dependent reversible induction of Pm-mediated expression in mycobacteria, with low background expression levels. XylS/Pm is thus an important addition to existing mycobacterial expression tools, especially when low basal expression is of particular importance. PMID:26348349

  15. Expression strategies for structural studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Paulsen, Peter Aasted; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Integral membrane proteins in eukaryotes are central to various cellular processes and key targets in structural biology, biotechnology and drug development. However, the number of available structures for eukaryotic membrane protein belies their physiological importance. Recently, the number of available eukaryotic membrane protein structures has been steadily increasing due to the development of novel strategies in construct design, expression and structure determination. Here, we examine the major expression systems exploited for eukaryotic membrane proteins. Additionally we strive to tabulate and describe the recent expression strategies in eukaryotic membrane protein structural biology. We find that a majority of targets have been expressed in advanced host systems and modified from their wild-type form with distinct focus on conformation and thermostabilisation. However, strategies for native protein purification should also be considered where possible, particularly in light of the recent advances in single particle cryo electron microscopy.

  16. Expression strategies for structural studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Paulsen, Peter Aasted; Pedersen, Bjørn Panyella; Nissen, Poul

    2016-06-01

    Integral membrane proteins in eukaryotes are central to various cellular processes and key targets in structural biology, biotechnology and drug development. However, the number of available structures for eukaryotic membrane protein belies their physiological importance. Recently, the number of available eukaryotic membrane protein structures has been steadily increasing due to the development of novel strategies in construct design, expression and structure determination. Here, we examine the major expression systems exploited for eukaryotic membrane proteins. Additionally we strive to tabulate and describe the recent expression strategies in eukaryotic membrane protein structural biology. We find that a majority of targets have been expressed in advanced host systems and modified from their wild-type form with distinct focus on conformation and thermostabilisation. However, strategies for native protein purification should also be considered where possible, particularly in light of the recent advances in single particle cryo electron microscopy. PMID:27362979

  17. Core Amino Acid Residues in the Morphology-Regulating Protein, Mms6, for Intracellular Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Narumiya, Kaori; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms produce finely tuned biomineral architectures with the aid of biomineral-associated proteins. The functional amino acid residues in these proteins have been previously identified using in vitro and in silico experimentation in different biomineralization systems. However, the investigation in living organisms is limited owing to the difficulty in establishing appropriate genetic techniques. Mms6 protein, isolated from the surface of magnetite crystals synthesized in magnetotactic bacteria, was shown to play a key role in the regulation of crystal morphology. In this study, we have demonstrated a defect in the specific region or substituted acidic amino acid residues in the Mms6 protein for observing their effect on magnetite biomineralization in vivo. Analysis of the gene deletion mutants and transformants of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 expressing partially truncated Mms6 protein revealed that deletions in the N-terminal or C-terminal regions disrupted proper protein localization to the magnetite surface, resulting in a change in the crystal morphology. Moreover, single amino acid substitutions at Asp123, Glu124, or Glu125 in the C-terminal region of Mms6 clearly indicated that these amino acid residues had a direct impact on magnetite crystal morphology. Thus, these consecutive acidic amino acid residues were found to be core residues regulating magnetite crystal morphology. PMID:27759096

  18. Identification and characterization of an amino acid transporter expressed differentially in liver

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sumin; Roderick, Hywel Llewelyn; Camacho, Patricia; Jiang, Jean X.

    2000-01-01

    Cellular metabolic needs are fulfilled by transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane by means of specialized transporter proteins. Although many of the classical amino acid transporters have been characterized functionally, less than half of these proteins have been cloned. In this report, we identify and characterize a cDNA encoding a plasma membrane amino acid transporter. The deduced amino acid sequence is 505 residues and is highly hydrophobic with the likely predicted structure of 9 transmembrane domains, which putatively place the amino terminus in the cytoplasm and the carboxy terminus on the cell surface. Expression of the cRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes revealed strong transport activities specific for histidine and glutamine. This protein is a Na+- and pH-dependent transporter and tolerates substitution of Na+ by Li+. Furthermore, this transporter is not an obligatory exchanger because efflux occurs in the absence of influx. This transporter is expressed predominantly in the liver, although it is also present in the kidney, brain, and heart. In the liver, it is located in the plasma membrane of hepatocytes, and the strongest expression was detected in those adjacent to the central vein, gradually decreasing towards the portal tract. Because this protein displays functional similarities to the N-system amino acid transport, we have termed it mNAT, for murine N-system amino acid transporter. This is the first transporter gene identified within the N-system, one of the major amino acid transport systems in the body. The expression pattern displayed by mNAT suggests a potential role in hepatocyte physiology. PMID:10716701

  19. Astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme) displays 3 subtypes with unique expression profiles of intermediate filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Skalli, Omar; Wilhelmsson, Ulrika; Orndahl, Charlotte; Fekete, Boglarka; Malmgren, Kristina; Rydenhag, Bertil; Pekny, Milos

    2013-10-01

    Astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme) is the most common and most malignant tumor of the central nervous system and is currently noncurable. Here, we have examined a population-based cohort of 47 patients with grade IV astrocytoma, who underwent tumor surgery at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden and who survived after surgery for less than 200 days (short survivors, 28 patients) and more than 500 days (long survivors, 19 patients). For each tumor, we ascertained information on patient age, sex, tumor location, oncological treatment, and survival after surgery. The analysis of the tumor volume and the extent of tumor resection (incomplete versus complete resection of the macroscopic tumor) was made retrospectively from the preoperative radiological investigations and, when available, also from postoperative radiology. We performed semiquantitative immunohistochemical evaluation of the presence of intermediate filament (nanofilament) proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, nestin, and synemin in tumor cells. The intermediate filament system helps cells and tissues to cope with various types of stress, and thus, it might affect the malignant potential of grade IV astrocytoma. We propose a subclassification of astrocytomas grade IV with respect to the expression of the intermediate filament proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, nestin, and synemin, namely, type A, B, and C. Our results suggest that the expression of the intermediate filament proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, nestin, and synemin is coregulated in grade IV astrocytomas. The expression patterns of the intermediate filament proteins in astrocytoma type A, B, and C might have biological and clinical significance. PMID:23791210

  20. Protein quality of supplements and meal replacements. Amino acids and calculated indicators of protein quality.

    PubMed

    Marable, N L; Hinners, M L; Hardison, N W; Kehrberg, N L

    1980-09-01

    The amino acid composition of several types of dietary supplements and meal replacements was measured and compared with label values when available and to published values for egg. Calculated indicators of protein quality, such as chemical score, protein calorie:total calorie ratio, individual essential amino acid:total essential amino acid ratio, and total essential amino acid:total amino acid ratio were also compared for products, egg, and the estimated pattern of adult requirements. Predigested liquid protein products were notably lower in protein quality than other products. All non-predigested products compared favorably with egg in terms of protein quality, but were more expensive and had no advantages over regular meals in terms of protein quality as reducing aids or protein supplements.

  1. [Antinociceptive effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) through long fatty acid receptor G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40)].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kazuo; Nishinaka, Takashi; Sato, Naoya; Mankura, Mitsumasa; Koyama, Yutaka; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids, one class of essential nutrients for humans, are an important source of energy and an essential component of cell membranes. They also function as signal transduction molecules in a variety of biological phenomena. The important functional role of fatty acids in both onset and suppression of pain has become increasingly apparent in recent years. Recently, we have also demonstrated that the release of an endogenous opioid peptide, β-endorphin, plays an important role in the induction of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-induced antinociception. It is well known that fatty acids affect intracellular and intercellular signaling as well as the membrane fluidity of neurons. In addition to intracellular actions, unbound free fatty acids (FFAs) can also carry out extracellular signaling by stimulating the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Among these receptors, G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) has been reported to be activated by long-chain fatty acids such as DHA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and arachidonic acid. In the peripheral area, GPR40 is preferentially expressed in pancreatic β-cells and is known to relate to the secretion of hormone and peptides. On the other hand, even though this receptor is widely distributed in the central nervous system, reports studying the role and functions of GPR40 in the brain have not been found. In this review, we summarize the findings of our recent study about the long-chain fatty acid receptor GPR40 as a novel pain regulatory system. PMID:24584021

  2. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, William C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium doedocyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  3. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  4. Protein and amino acid metabolism and requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells of the body. Enzymes, membrane carriers, blood transport molecules, intracellular matrix, and even hair and fingernails are proteins, as are many hormones. Proteins also constitute a major portion of all membranes, and the cons...

  5. Expression of heat shock protein genes in insect stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs) that are abundantly expressed in insects are important modulators of insect survival. Expression of HSP genes in insects is not only developmentally regulated, but also induced by various stressors in order to confer protection against such stressors. The expression o...

  6. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  7. Measuring protein-protein and protein-nucleic Acid interactions by biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Azmiri; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is a simple, optical dip-and-read system useful for measuring interactions between proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, small molecules, and/or lipids in real time. In BLI, a biomolecular bait is immobilized on a matrix at the tip of a fiber-optic sensor. The binding between the immobilized ligand and another molecule in an analyte solution produces a change in optical thickness at the tip and results in a wavelength shift proportional to binding. BLI provides direct binding affinities and rates of association and dissociation. This unit describes an efficient approach using streptavidin-based BLI to analyze DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. A quantitative set of equilibrium binding affinities (K(d)) and rates of association and dissociation (k(a)/k(d)) can be measured in minutes using nanomole quantities of sample.

  8. Dissociation between gene and protein expression of metabolic enzymes in a rodent model of heart failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in advanced heart failure show down-regulation of fatty acid oxidation genes, possibly due to decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factors peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha). We assessed mRNA and protein expressi...

  9. Interaction of milk whey protein with common phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Dandan; Sun, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Ding, Qingbo; Liu, Ruihai; Ren, Fazheng

    2014-01-01

    Phenolics-rich foods such as fruit juices and coffee are often consumed with milk. In this study, the interactions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin with the phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and coumalic acid) were examined. Fluorescence, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies were used to analyze the binding modes, binding constants, and the effects of complexation on the conformation of whey protein. The results showed that binding constants of each whey protein-phenolic acid interaction ranged from 4 × 105 to 7 × 106 M-n and the number of binding sites n ranged from 1.28 ± 0.13 to 1.54 ± 0.34. Because of these interactions, the conformation of whey protein was altered, with a significant reduction in the amount of α-helix and an increase in the amounts of β-sheet and turn structures.

  10. Evolution, diversification, and expression of KNOX proteins in plants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Yang, Xue; Zhao, Wei; Lang, Tiange; Samuelsson, Tore

    2015-01-01

    The KNOX (KNOTTED1-like homeobox) transcription factors play a pivotal role in leaf and meristem development. The majority of these proteins are characterized by the KNOX1, KNOX2, ELK, and homeobox domains whereas the proteins of the KNATM family contain only the KNOX domains. We carried out an extensive inventory of these proteins and here report on a total of 394 KNOX proteins from 48 species. The land plant proteins fall into two classes (I and II) as previously shown where the class I family seems to be most closely related to the green algae homologs. The KNATM proteins are restricted to Eudicots and some species have multiple paralogs of this protein. Certain plants are characterized by a significant increase in the number of KNOX paralogs; one example is Glycine max. Through the analysis of public gene expression data we show that the class II proteins of this plant have a relatively broad expression specificity as compared to class I proteins, consistent with previous studies of other plants. In G. max, class I protein are mainly distributed in axis tissues and KNATM paralogs are overall poorly expressed; highest expression is in the early plumular axis. Overall, analysis of gene expression in G. max demonstrates clearly that the expansion in gene number is associated with functional diversification. PMID:26557129

  11. Effect of boric acid supplementation of ostrich water on the expression of Foxn1 in thymus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ke; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Rehman, Zia Ur; Khaliq, Haseeb; Song, Hui; Tang, Juan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Sun, Peng-Peng; Zhong, Juming; Peng, Ke-Mei

    2015-11-01

    Foxn1 is essential for thymus development. The relationship between boric acid and thymus development, optimal dose of boric acid in ostrich diets, and the effects of boric acid on the expression of Foxn1 were investigated in the present study. Thirty healthy ostriches were randomly divided into six groups: Group I, II, III, IV, V, VI, and supplemented with boric acid at the concentration of 0 mg/L, 40 mg/L, 80 mg/L, 160 mg/L, 320 mg/L, 640 mg/L, respectively. The histological changes in thymus were observed by HE staining, and the expression of Foxn1 analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. TUNEL method was used to label the apoptotic cells. Ostrich Foxn1 was sequenced by Race method. The results were as following: Apoptosis in ostrich thymus was closely related with boric acid concentrations. Low boric acid concentration inhibited apoptosis in thymus, but high boric acid concentration promoted apoptosis. Foxn1-positive cells were mainly distributed in thymic medulla and rarely in cortex. Foxn1 is closely related to thymus growth and development. The nucleotide sequence and the encoded protein of Foxn1 were 2736 bases and 654 amino acids in length. It is highly conserved as compared with other species. These results demonstrated that the appropriate boric acid supplementation in water would produce positive effects on the growth development of ostrich thymus by promoting Foxn1 expression, especially at 80 mg/L, and the microstructure of the thymus of ostrich fed 80 mg/L boric acid was well developed. The supplementation of high dose boron (>320 mg/L) damaged the microstructure of thymus and inhibited the immune function by inhibiting Foxn1 expression, particularly at 640 mg/L. The optimal dose of boric acid supplementation in ostrich diets is 80 mg/L boric acid. The genomic full-length of African ostrich Foxn1 was cloned for the first time in the study.

  12. Effect of boric acid supplementation of ostrich water on the expression of Foxn1 in thymus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ke; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Rehman, Zia Ur; Khaliq, Haseeb; Song, Hui; Tang, Juan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Sun, Peng-Peng; Zhong, Juming; Peng, Ke-Mei

    2015-11-01

    Foxn1 is essential for thymus development. The relationship between boric acid and thymus development, optimal dose of boric acid in ostrich diets, and the effects of boric acid on the expression of Foxn1 were investigated in the present study. Thirty healthy ostriches were randomly divided into six groups: Group I, II, III, IV, V, VI, and supplemented with boric acid at the concentration of 0 mg/L, 40 mg/L, 80 mg/L, 160 mg/L, 320 mg/L, 640 mg/L, respectively. The histological changes in thymus were observed by HE staining, and the expression of Foxn1 analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. TUNEL method was used to label the apoptotic cells. Ostrich Foxn1 was sequenced by Race method. The results were as following: Apoptosis in ostrich thymus was closely related with boric acid concentrations. Low boric acid concentration inhibited apoptosis in thymus, but high boric acid concentration promoted apoptosis. Foxn1-positive cells were mainly distributed in thymic medulla and rarely in cortex. Foxn1 is closely related to thymus growth and development. The nucleotide sequence and the encoded protein of Foxn1 were 2736 bases and 654 amino acids in length. It is highly conserved as compared with other species. These results demonstrated that the appropriate boric acid supplementation in water would produce positive effects on the growth development of ostrich thymus by promoting Foxn1 expression, especially at 80 mg/L, and the microstructure of the thymus of ostrich fed 80 mg/L boric acid was well developed. The supplementation of high dose boron (>320 mg/L) damaged the microstructure of thymus and inhibited the immune function by inhibiting Foxn1 expression, particularly at 640 mg/L. The optimal dose of boric acid supplementation in ostrich diets is 80 mg/L boric acid. The genomic full-length of African ostrich Foxn1 was cloned for the first time in the study. PMID:25665795

  13. N-Lauroylation during the Expression of Recombinant N-Myristoylated Proteins: Implications and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Andrea Gabriele; Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Mateos, Borja; Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Storch, Barbara; Breuker, Kathrin; Konrat, Robert; Pons, Miquel; Coudevylle, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of myristic acid onto the N terminus of a protein is a crucial modification that promotes membrane binding and correct localization of important components of signaling pathways. Recombinant expression of N-myristoylated proteins in Escherichia coli can be achieved by co-expressing yeast N-myristoyltransferase and supplementing the growth medium with myristic acid. However, undesired incorporation of the 12-carbon fatty acid lauric acid can also occur (leading to heterogeneous samples), especially when the available carbon sources are scarce, as it is the case in minimal medium for the expression of isotopically enriched samples. By applying this method to the brain acid soluble protein 1 and the 1-185 N-terminal region of c-Src, we show the significant, and protein-specific, differences in the membrane binding properties of lauroylated and myristoylated forms. We also present a robust strategy for obtaining lauryl-free samples of myristoylated proteins in both rich and minimal media. PMID:26522884

  14. Application of Cydia pomonella expressed sequence tags: Identification and expression of three general odorant binding proteins in codling moth

    PubMed Central

    Garczynski, Stephen F.; Coates, Brad S.; Unruh, Thomas R.; Schaeffer, Scott; Jiwan, Derick; Koepke, Tyson; Dhingra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella, is one of the most important pests of pome fruits in the world, yet the molecular genetics and the physiology of this insect remain poorly understood. A combined assembly of 8 341 expressed sequence tags was generated from Roche 454 GS-FLX sequencing of eight tissue-specific cDNA libraries. Putative chemosensory proteins (12) and odorant binding proteins (OBPs) (18) were annotated, which included three putative general OBP (GOBP), one more than typically reported for other Lepidoptera. To further characterize CpomGOBPs, we cloned cDNA copies of their transcripts and determined their expression patterns in various tissues. Cloning and sequencing of the 698 nt transcript for CpomGOBP1 resulted in the prediction of a 163 amino acid coding region, and subsequent RT-PCR indicated that the transcripts were mainly expressed in antennae and mouthparts. The 1 289 nt (160 amino acid) CpomGOBP2 and the novel 702 nt (169 amino acid) CpomGOBP3 transcripts are mainly expressed in antennae, mouthparts, and female abdomen tips. These results indicate that next generation sequencing is useful for the identification of novel transcripts of interest, and that codling moth expresses a transcript encoding for a new member of the GOBP subfamily. PMID:23956229

  15. Expression of a coriander desaturase results in petroselinic acid production in transgenic tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Ohlrogge, J.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Little is known about the metabolic origin of petroselinic acid (18:1[Delta][sup 6cis]), the principal fatty acid of the seed oil of most Umbelliferae, Araliaceae, and Garryaceae species. To examine the possibility that petroselinic acid is the product of an acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase, Western blots of coriander and other Umbelliferae seed extracts were probed with antibodies against the [Delta][sup 9]-stearoyl-ACP desaturase of avocado. In these extracts, proteins of 39 and 36 kDa were detected. Of these, only the 36-kDa peptide was specific to tissues which synthesize petroselinic acid. A cDNA encoding the 36-kDa peptide was isolated from a coriander endosperm cDNA library, placed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, and introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Expression of this cDNA in transgenic tobacco callus was accompanied by the accumulation of petroselinic acid and [Delta][sup 4]-hexadecenoic acid, both of which were absent from control callus. These results demonstrate the involvement of a 36-kDa putative acyl-ACP desaturase in the biosynthetic pathway of petroselinic acid and the ability to produce fatty acids of unusual structure in transgenic plants by the expression of the gene for this desaturase. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Expression of a coriander desaturase results in petroselinic acid production in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, E B; Shanklin, J; Ohlrogge, J B

    1992-12-01

    Little is known about the metabolic origin of petroselinic acid (18:1 delta 6cis), the principal fatty acid of the seed oil of most Umbelliferae, Araliaceae, and Garryaceae species. To examine the possibility that petroselinic acid is the product of an acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase, Western blots of coriander and other Umbelliferae seed extracts were probed with antibodies against the delta 9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase of avocado. In these extracts, proteins of 39 and 36 kDa were detected. Of these, only the 36-kDa peptide was specific to tissues which synthesize petroselinic acid. A cDNA encoding the 36-kDa peptide was isolated from a coriander endosperm cDNA library, placed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, and introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Expression of this cDNA in transgenic tobacco callus was accompanied by the accumulation of petroselinic acid and delta 4-hexadecenoic acid, both of which were absent from control callus. These results demonstrate the involvement of a 36-kDa putative acyl-ACP desaturase in the biosynthetic pathway of petroselinic acid and the ability to produce fatty acids of unusual structure in transgenic plants by the expression of the gene for this desaturase.

  17. Expression of a coriander desaturase results in petroselinic acid production in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Cahoon, E B; Shanklin, J; Ohlrogge, J B

    1992-01-01

    Little is known about the metabolic origin of petroselinic acid (18:1 delta 6cis), the principal fatty acid of the seed oil of most Umbelliferae, Araliaceae, and Garryaceae species. To examine the possibility that petroselinic acid is the product of an acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase, Western blots of coriander and other Umbelliferae seed extracts were probed with antibodies against the delta 9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase of avocado. In these extracts, proteins of 39 and 36 kDa were detected. Of these, only the 36-kDa peptide was specific to tissues which synthesize petroselinic acid. A cDNA encoding the 36-kDa peptide was isolated from a coriander endosperm cDNA library, placed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, and introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Expression of this cDNA in transgenic tobacco callus was accompanied by the accumulation of petroselinic acid and delta 4-hexadecenoic acid, both of which were absent from control callus. These results demonstrate the involvement of a 36-kDa putative acyl-ACP desaturase in the biosynthetic pathway of petroselinic acid and the ability to produce fatty acids of unusual structure in transgenic plants by the expression of the gene for this desaturase. Images PMID:1454797

  18. Automated protein hydrolysis delivering sample to a solid acid catalyst for amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akiko; Dohmae, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we developed an automatic protein hydrolysis system using strong cation-exchange resins as solid acid catalysts. Examining several kinds of inorganic solid acids and cation-exchange resins, we found that a few cation-exchange resins worked as acid catalysts for protein hydrolysis when heated in the presence of water. The most efficient resin yielded amounts of amino acids that were over 70% of those recovered after conventional hydrolysis with hydrochloric acid and resulted in amino acid compositions matching the theoretical values. The solid-acid hydrolysis was automated by packing the resin into columns, combining the columns with a high-performance liquid chromatography system, and heating them. The amino acids that constitute a protein can thereby be determined, minimizing contamination from the environment.

  19. Cloning and expression analysis of mouse Cclp1, a new gene encoding a coiled-coil-like protein.

    PubMed

    Noben-Trauth, K; Naggert, J K; Nishina, P M

    1997-05-30

    Here we describe the nucleotide sequence and expression pattern of a novel gene termed Coiled-coil-like protein 1 (Cclp1). A 2646bp open reading frame encodes a 882 amino acid protein with a predicted coiled-coil domain at the amino terminus. Cclp1 is expressed in a variety of adult tissues and during different stages of embryogenesis. The broad expression pattern suggests a general cellular function of CCLP1. PMID:9199242

  20. A novel amino acid and metabolomics signature in mice overexpressing muscle uncoupling protein 3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and is known to lower mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and promote fatty acid oxidation; however, the global impact of UCP3 activity on skeletal muscle and whole body metabolism has not been extensively studied. We utilized unt...

  1. Differential protein expression analysis following olfactory learning in Apis cerana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Zhen; Yan, Wei-Yu; Wang, Zi-Long; Guo, Ya-Hui; Yi, Yao; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zeng, Zhi-Jiang

    2015-11-01

    Studies of olfactory learning in honeybees have helped to elucidate the neurobiological basis of learning and memory. In this study, protein expression changes following olfactory learning in Apis cerana were investigated using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology. A total of 2406 proteins were identified from the trained and untrained groups. Among these proteins, 147 were differentially expressed, with 87 up-regulated and 60 down-regulated in the trained group compared with the untrained group. These results suggest that the differentially expressed proteins may be involved in the regulation of olfactory learning and memory in A. cerana. The iTRAQ data can provide information on the global protein expression patterns associated with olfactory learning, which will facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory of honeybees. PMID:26427996

  2. Differential protein expression analysis following olfactory learning in Apis cerana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Zhen; Yan, Wei-Yu; Wang, Zi-Long; Guo, Ya-Hui; Yi, Yao; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zeng, Zhi-Jiang

    2015-11-01

    Studies of olfactory learning in honeybees have helped to elucidate the neurobiological basis of learning and memory. In this study, protein expression changes following olfactory learning in Apis cerana were investigated using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology. A total of 2406 proteins were identified from the trained and untrained groups. Among these proteins, 147 were differentially expressed, with 87 up-regulated and 60 down-regulated in the trained group compared with the untrained group. These results suggest that the differentially expressed proteins may be involved in the regulation of olfactory learning and memory in A. cerana. The iTRAQ data can provide information on the global protein expression patterns associated with olfactory learning, which will facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory of honeybees.

  3. Major cancer protein amplifies global gene expression

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists may have discovered why a protein called MYC can provoke a variety of cancers. Like many proteins associated with cancer, MYC helps regulate cell growth. A new study carried out by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and colleagues

  4. Optimizing transient recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ralph F; Wall, Vanessa E; Esposito, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Transient gene expression (TGE) in mammalian cells has become a routine process for expressing recombinant proteins in cell lines such as human embryonic kidney 293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rapidly increasing need for recombinant proteins requires further improvements in TGE technology. While a great deal of focus has been directed toward optimizing the secretion of antibodies and other naturally secreted targets, much less work has been done on ways to improve cytoplasmic expression in mammalian cells. The benefits to protein production in mammalian cells, particularly for eukaryotic proteins, should be very significant - glycosylation and other posttranslational modifications will likely be native or near-native, solubility and protein folding would likely improve overexpression in heterologous hosts, and expression of proteins in their proper intracellular compartments is much more likely to occur. Improvements in this area have been slow, however, due to limited development of the cell culture processes needed for low-cost, higher-throughput expression in mammalian cells, and the relatively low diversity of DNA vectors for protein production in these systems. Here, we describe how the use of recombinational cloning, coupled with improvements in transfection protocols which increase speed and lower cost, can be combined to make mammalian cells much more amenable for routine recombinant protein expression. PMID:21987258

  5. Comparative Protein Profiling of Intraphagosomal Expressed Proteins of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Neelja; Kumar, Manish; Sharma, Divakar; Bisht, Deepa

    2016-01-01

    BCG, the only available vaccine against tuberculosis affords a variable protection which wanes with time. In this study we have analyzed and compared the proteins which are expressed differentially during broth-culture and intraphagosomal growth of M.bovis BCG. Eight proteins which showed increased expression during the intraphagosomal growth were identified by MALDI-TOF/MS. These were - a precursor of alanine and proline-rich secreted protein apa, isoforms of malate dehydrogenase, large subunit alpha (Alpha-ETF) of electron transfer flavoprotein, immunogenic protein MPB64 precursor, UPF0036 protein, and two proteins with unknown function. Based on these findings we speculate that higher expression of these proteins has a probable role in intracellular survival, adaptation and/or immunoprotective effect of BCG. Further, these proteins might also be used as gene expression markers for endosome trafficking events of BCG.

  6. Expression and one-step purification of Plasmodium proteins in dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    van Bemmelen, M X; Beghdadi-Rais, C; Desponds, C; Vargas, E; Herrera, S; Reymond, C D; Fasel, N

    2000-12-01

    Nearly full-length Circumsporozoite protein (CSP) from Plasmodium falciparum, the C-terminal fragments from both P. falciparm and P. yoelii CSP and a fragment comprising 351 amino acids of P.vivax MSPI were expressed in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Discoidin-tag expression vectors allowed both high yields of these proteins and their purification by a nearly single-step procedure. We exploited the galactose binding activity of Discoidin Ia to separate the fusion proteins by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-4B columns. Inclusion of a thrombin recognition site allowed cleavage of the Discoidin-tag from the fusion protein. Partial secretion of the protein was obtained via an ER independent pathway, whereas routing the recombinant proteins to the ER resulted in glycosylation and retention. Yields of proteins ranged from 0.08 to 3 mg l(-1) depending on the protein sequence and the purification conditions. The recognition of purified MSPI by sera from P. vivax malaria patients was used to confirm the native conformation of the protein expressed in Dictyostelium. The simple purification procedure described here, based on Sepharose-4B, should facilitate the expression and the large-scale purification of various Plasmodium polypeptides. PMID:11163444

  7. Insulin influenced expression of myelin proteins in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rachana, Kuruvanthe S; Manu, Mallahalli S; Advirao, Gopal M

    2016-08-26

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the downstream complications of diabetes. This complication is caused by the deficiency of insulin action and subsequent hyperglycemia, but the details of their pathogenesis remain unclear. Hence, it is of critical importance to understand how such hormonal variation affects the expression of myelin proteins such as myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in the peripheral nerve. An earlier report from our lab has demonstrated the expression of insulin receptors (IR) in Schwann cells (SCs) of sciatic nerve. To assess the neurotrophic role of insulin in diabetic neuropathy, we studied the expression of these myelin proteins under control, DPN and insulin treated DPN subjects at developmental stages. Further, the expression of these myelin proteins was correlated with the expression of insulin receptor. Expression of myelin proteins was significantly reduced in the diabetic model compared to normal, and upregulated in insulin treated diabetic rats. Similarly, an in vitro study was also carried out in SCs grown at high glucose and insulin treated conditions. The expression pattern of myelin proteins in SCs was comparable to that of in vivo samples. In addition, quantitative study of myelin genes by real time PCR has also showed the significant expression pattern change in the insulin treated and non-treated DPN subjects. Taken together, these results corroborate the critical importance of insulin as a neurotrophic factor in demyelinized neurons in diabetic neuropathy.

  8. Amino acids regulate expression of antizyme-1 to modulate ornithine decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ramesh M; Viar, Mary Jane; Johnson, Leonard R

    2012-02-01

    In a glucose-salt solution (Earle's balanced salt solution), asparagine (Asn) stimulates ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) potentiates the effect of Asn. However, EGF alone fails to activate ODC. Thus, the mechanism by which Asn activates ODC is important for understanding the regulation of ODC activity. Asn reduced antizyme-1 (AZ1) mRNA and protein. Among the amino acids tested, Asn and glutamine (Gln) effectively inhibited AZ1 expression, suggesting a differential role for amino acids in the regulation of ODC activity. Asn decreased the putrescine-induced AZ1 translation. The absence of amino acids increased the binding of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP1) to 5'-mRNA cap and thereby inhibited global protein synthesis. Asn failed to prevent the binding of 4EBP1 to mRNA, and the bound 4EBP1 was unphosphorylated, suggesting the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the regulation of AZ1 synthesis. Rapamycin treatment (4 h) failed to alter the expression of AZ1. However, extending the treatment (24 h) allowed expression in the presence of amino acids, indicating that AZ1 is expressed when TORC1 signaling is decreased. This suggests the involvement of cap-independent translation. However, transient inhibition of mTORC2 by PP242 completely abolished the phosphorylation of 4EBP1 and decreased basal as well as putrescine-induced AZ1 expression. Asn decreased the phosphorylation of mTOR-Ser(2448) and AKT-Ser(473), suggesting the inhibition of mTORC2. In the absence of amino acids, mTORC1 is inhibited, whereas mTORC2 is activated, leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis and increased AZ1 synthesis via a cap-independent mechanism. PMID:22157018

  9. Analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid in Acetobacter: molecular mechanisms conferring acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shigeru; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2008-06-30

    Acetic acid bacteria are used for industrial vinegar production because of their remarkable ability to oxidize ethanol and high resistance to acetic acid. Although several molecular machineries responsible for acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria have been reported, the entire mechanism that confers acetic acid resistance has not been completely understood. One of the promising methods to elucidate the entire mechanism is global analysis of proteins responsive to acetic acid by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Recently, two proteins whose production was greatly enhanced by acetic acid in Acetobacter aceti were identified to be aconitase and a putative ABC-transporter, respectively; furthermore, overexpression or disruption of the genes encoding these proteins affected acetic acid resistance in A. aceti, indicating that these proteins are involved in acetic acid resistance. Overexpression of each gene increased acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter, which resulted in an improvement in the productivity of acetic acid fermentation. Taken together, the results of the proteomic analysis and those of previous studies indicate that acetic acid resistance in acetic acid bacteria is conferred by several mechanisms. These findings also provide a clue to breed a strain having high resistance to acetic acid for vinegar fermentation.

  10. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Regulation of Adipocyte FADS1 and FADS2 Expression and Function

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Jessica C.; Matravadia, Sarthak; Gaudio, Nicholas; Holloway, Graham P.; Mutch, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) regulate fatty acid desaturase (FADS1, FADS2) expression in the liver; however, it is unknown whether PUFAs regulate FADS in adipocytes. This is important to study considering reports that link altered desaturase activity with adipose tissue PUFA profiles, body weight, and whole-body glucose homeostasis. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the direct effects of PUFAs on FADS expression in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Methods Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with either α-linolenic (ALA), linoleic (LA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), or arachidonic acid (AA). Gene expression, protein abundance, and cellular PUFA content were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting, and gas chromatography, respectively. Results Fads1 and Fads2 gene expression was reduced by EPA and AA, but not ALA or LA. Reductions in gene expression were reflected in FADS2 protein levels, but not FADS1. Treating cells with ALA and LA led to significant increases in the cellular content of downstream PUFAs. Neither ALA nor EPA changed docosahexaenoic acid content. Conclusions Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes have a functional FADS pathway that can be regulated by PUFA. Therefore, this common adipocyte model is suitable to study dietary regulation of the FADS pathway. PMID:25755223

  11. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin.

  12. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. PMID:27348124

  13. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. PMID:27348124

  14. Folic acid protects against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui-hua; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cai-Ling

    2015-11-05

    As a nutritional factor, folic acid can prevent cardiac and neural defects during embryo development. Our previous study showed that arsenic impairs embryo development by down-regulating Dvr1/GDF1 expression in zebrafish. Here, we investigated whether folic acid could protect against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity. We found that folic acid supplementation increases hatching and survival rates, decreases malformation rate and ameliorates abnormal cardiac and neural development of zebrafish embryos exposed to arsenite. Both real-time PCR analysis and whole in-mount hybridization showed that folic acid significantly rescued the decrease in Dvr1 expression caused by arsenite. Subsequently, our data demonstrated that arsenite significantly decreased cell viability and GDF1 mRNA and protein levels in HEK293ET cells, while folic acid reversed these effects. Folic acid attenuated the increase in subcellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and oxidative adaptor p66Shc protein expression in parallel with the changes in GDF1 expression and cell viability. P66Shc knockdown significantly inhibited the production of ROS and the down-regulation of GDF1 induced by arsenite. Our data demonstrated that folic acid supplementation protected against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1/GDF1, and folic acid enhanced the expression of GDF1 by decreasing p66Shc expression and subcellular ROS levels.

  15. Folic acid protects against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui-hua; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    As a nutritional factor, folic acid can prevent cardiac and neural defects during embryo development. Our previous study showed that arsenic impairs embryo development by down-regulating Dvr1/GDF1 expression in zebrafish. Here, we investigated whether folic acid could protect against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity. We found that folic acid supplementation increases hatching and survival rates, decreases malformation rate and ameliorates abnormal cardiac and neural development of zebrafish embryos exposed to arsenite. Both real-time PCR analysis and whole in-mount hybridization showed that folic acid significantly rescued the decrease in Dvr1 expression caused by arsenite. Subsequently, our data demonstrated that arsenite significantly decreased cell viability and GDF1 mRNA and protein levels in HEK293ET cells, while folic acid reversed these effects. Folic acid attenuated the increase in subcellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and oxidative adaptor p66Shc protein expression in parallel with the changes in GDF1 expression and cell viability. P66Shc knockdown significantly inhibited the production of ROS and the down-regulation of GDF1 induced by arsenite. Our data demonstrated that folic acid supplementation protected against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1/GDF1, and folic acid enhanced the expression of GDF1 by decreasing p66Shc expression and subcellular ROS levels. PMID:26537450

  16. Gene expression and protein content in relation to intramuscular fat content in Muscovy and Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Saez, G; Davail, S; Gentès, G; Hocquette, J F; Jourdan, T; Degrace, P; Baéza, E

    2009-11-01

    Independent of their nutritional condition, Pekin ducks always exhibit higher i.m. fat content than Muscovy ducks. To understand this difference between species, the expression level of genes involved in lipid metabolism was analyzed in the pectoralis major muscle of Pekin and Muscovy ducks ad libitum-fed or overfed. The lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene expression was not different between species and not influenced by overfeeding. The protein content for LPL was higher in Pekin ducks than in Muscovy ducks when birds were ad libitum-fed, whereas in overfed ducks, we found no difference between species. Adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP) gene expression and protein content were higher in Pekin ducks than in Muscovy ducks for each nutritional condition (suggesting a higher intracellular transport within i.m. adipocytes of fatty acids mainly provided by liver for this species). Overfeeding did not affect the expression of genes involved in oxidation [carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A), cytochrome-c oxidase 4 (COX4), succinyl-coenzyme A:3-ketoacid coenzyme A transferase (SCOT)] but increased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) involved in lipogenesis. For all nutritional conditions, Pekin duck exhibited higher expression levels of CPT1A, COX4, SCOT, and FAS than Muscovy ducks. Results for mRNA SCOT suggested that the muscles of Pekin ducks use ketone bodies as an energy source. In conclusion, i.m. lipogenesis could contribute to the i.m. fat, particularly in Pekin ducks.

  17. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  18. Protein Sialylation Regulates a Gene Expression Signature that Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many mechanisms have been proposed for how heightened aerobic glycolytic metabolism fuels cancer pathogenicity, but there are still many unexplored pathways. Here, we have performed metabolomic profiling to map glucose incorporation into metabolic pathways upon transformation of mammary epithelial cells by 11 commonly mutated human oncogenes. We show that transformation of mammary epithelial cells by oncogenic stimuli commonly shunts glucose-derived carbons into synthesis of sialic acid, a hexosamine pathway metabolite that is converted to CMP-sialic acid by cytidine monophosphate N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase (CMAS) as a precursor to glycoprotein and glycolipid sialylation. We show that CMAS knockdown leads to elevations in intracellular sialic acid levels, a depletion of cellular sialylation, and alterations in the expression of many cancer-relevant genes to impair breast cancer pathogenicity. Our study reveals the heretofore unrecognized role of sialic acid metabolism and protein sialylation in regulating the expression of genes that maintain breast cancer pathogenicity. PMID:27380425

  19. Protein Sialylation Regulates a Gene Expression Signature that Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Kohnz, Rebecca A; Roberts, Lindsay S; DeTomaso, David; Bideyan, Lara; Yan, Peter; Bandyopadhyay, Sourav; Goga, Andrei; Yosef, Nir; Nomura, Daniel K

    2016-08-19

    Many mechanisms have been proposed for how heightened aerobic glycolytic metabolism fuels cancer pathogenicity, but there are still many unexplored pathways. Here, we have performed metabolomic profiling to map glucose incorporation into metabolic pathways upon transformation of mammary epithelial cells by 11 commonly mutated human oncogenes. We show that transformation of mammary epithelial cells by oncogenic stimuli commonly shunts glucose-derived carbons into synthesis of sialic acid, a hexosamine pathway metabolite that is converted to CMP-sialic acid by cytidine monophosphate N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase (CMAS) as a precursor to glycoprotein and glycolipid sialylation. We show that CMAS knockdown leads to elevations in intracellular sialic acid levels, a depletion of cellular sialylation, and alterations in the expression of many cancer-relevant genes to impair breast cancer pathogenicity. Our study reveals the heretofore unrecognized role of sialic acid metabolism and protein sialylation in regulating the expression of genes that maintain breast cancer pathogenicity.

  20. The second amino acid of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein is critical for coat protein-mediated protection.

    PubMed Central

    Tumer, N E; Kaniewski, W; Haley, L; Gehrke, L; Lodge, J K; Sanders, P

    1991-01-01

    Transgenic plants expressing the coat protein (CP) of alfalfa mosaic virus (AIMV) are resistant to infection by AIMV. A mutation was introduced into the second amino acid of the cDNA for the CP of AIMV. Three different transgenic tobacco lines expressing the mutant CP and two different transgenic tobacco lines expressing the wild-type CP at similar levels were challenged with AIMV virions and viral RNA. Whereas the lines expressing the wild-type CP were highly resistant to infection by AIMV virions and viral RNA, the lines expressing the mutant CP were susceptible to infection by both. The binding affinity of the mutant and the wild-type CPs for the 3' terminal protein binding site on AIMV RNAs was similar, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. A mixture of AIMV genomic RNAs 1-3 was infectious on the plants expressing the mutant CP but not on vector control plants or plants expressing the wild-type CP, indicating that the mutant CP can activate the AIMV genomic RNAs for infection. These results demonstrate that the second amino acid of the AIMV CP is critical for protection from AIMV but not for the initial interaction between the AIMV RNA and CP, suggesting that this initial interaction does not play a major role in CP-mediated protection. Images PMID:11607167

  1. Optimized orthogonal translation of unnatural amino acids enables spontaneous protein double-labelling and FRET

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Daniel J.; Wilf, Nabil M.; Lang, Kathrin; Wallace, Stephen; Mehl, Ryan A.; Chin, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to introduce different biophysical probes into defined positions in target proteins will provide powerful approaches for interrogating protein structure, function and dynamics. However, methods for site-specifically incorporating multiple distinct unnatural amino acids are hampered by their low efficiency. Here we provide a general solution to this challenge by developing an optimized orthogonal translation system that uses amber and evolved quadruplet-decoding transfer RNAs to encode numerous pairs of distinct unnatural amino acids into a single protein expressed in Escherichia coli with a substantial increase in efficiency over previous methods. We also provide a general strategy for labelling pairs of encoded unnatural amino acids with different probes via rapid and spontaneous reactions under physiological conditions. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by genetically directing the labelling of several pairs of sites in calmodulin with fluorophores and probing protein structure and dynamics by Förster resonance energy transfer. PMID:24755590

  2. Acid environments affect biofilm formation and gene expression in isolates of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Denis; McCabe, Evonne M; McCusker, Matthew P; Martins, Marta; Fanning, Séamus; Duffy, Geraldine

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the survival and potential virulence of biofilm-forming Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 under mild acid conditions. Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 employs an acid tolerance response (ATR) allowing it to adapt to acidic environments. The threat that these acid adapted cells pose to food safety could be enhanced if they also produce biofilms in acidic conditions. The cells were acid-adapted by culturing them in 1% glucose and their ability to form biofilms on stainless steel and on the surface of Luria Bertani (LB) broth at pH7 and pH5 was examined. Plate counts were performed to examine cell survival. RNA was isolated from cells to examine changes in the expression of genes associated with virulence, invasion, biofilm formation and global gene regulation in response to acid stress. Of the 4 isolates that were examined only one (1481) that produced a rigid biofilm in LB broth at pH7 also formed this same structure at pH5. This indicated that the lactic acid severely impeded the biofilm producing capabilities of the other isolates examined under these conditions. Isolate 1481 also had higher expression of genes associated with virulence (hilA) and invasion (invA) with a 24.34-fold and 13.68-fold increase in relative gene expression respectively at pH5 compared to pH7. Although genes associated with biofilm formation had increased expression in response to acid stress for all the isolates this only resulted in the formation of a biofilm by isolate 1481. This suggests that in addition to the range of genes associated with biofilm production at neutral pH, there are genes whose protein products specifically aid in biofilm production in acidic environments. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for the use of lactic acid for the inhibition of Salmonella biofilms.

  3. Regulation of pathogenesis-related protein-1a gene expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Uknes, S; Dincher, S; Friedrich, L; Negrotto, D; Williams, S; Thompson-Taylor, H; Potter, S; Ward, E; Ryals, J

    1993-02-01

    Pathogenesis-related protein-1a (PR-1a) is a protein of unknown function that is strongly induced during the onset of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in tobacco. The expression of PR-1a is under complex regulation that is controlled at least partially by the rate of transcription. In this study, we demonstrated that 661 bp of 5' flanking DNA was sufficient to impart tobacco mosaic virus and salicylic acid inducibility to a reporter gene. The PR-1a promoter did not respond significantly to treatments with either auxin or cytokinin. Experiments with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide indicated that protein synthesis is required for salicylate-dependent mRNA accumulation. At flowering, the PR-1a gene was expressed primarily in the mesophyll and epidermal tissues of the leaf blade and the sepals of the flower. Several artifacts, most importantly ectopic expression in pollen, were associated with the use of the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene.

  4. Expression of fatty acid synthase in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Christoph; Riener, Marc-Oliver; Kirovski, Georgi; Saugspier, Michael; Steib, Kathrin; Weiss, Thomas S; Gäbele, Erwin; Kristiansen, Glen; Hartmann, Arndt; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which starts with simple hepatic steatosis and may progress toward inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis [NASH]). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the last step in fatty acid biosynthesis, and thus, it is believed to be a major determinant of the maximal hepatic capacity to generate fatty acids by de novo lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between hepatic steatosis and inflammation with FASN expression. In vitro incubation of primary human hepatocytes with fatty acids dose-dependently induced cellular lipid-accumulation and FASN expression, while stimulation with TNF did not affect FASN levels. Further, hepatic FASN expression was significantly increased in vivo in a murine model of hepatic steatosis without significant inflammation but not in a murine NASH model as compared to control mice. Also, FASN expression was not increased in mice subjected to bile duct ligation, an experimental model characterized by severe hepatocellular damage and inflammation. Furthermore, FASN expression was analyzed in 102 human control or NAFLD livers applying tissue micro array technology and immunohistochemistry, and correlated significantly with the degree of hepatic steatosis, but not with inflammation or ballooning of hepatocytes. Quantification of FASN mRNA expression in human liver samples confirmed significantly higher FASN levels in hepatic steatosis but not in NASH, and expression of SREBP1, which is the main transcriptional regulator of FASN, paralleled FASN expression levels in human and experimental NAFLD. In conclusion, the transcriptional induction of FASN expression in hepatic steatosis is impaired in NASH, while hepatic inflammation in the absence of steatosis does not affect FASN expression, suggesting that FASN may serve as a new diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for the progression of NAFLD. PMID:20606731

  5. Functional and expression pattern analysis of chemosensory proteins expressed in antennae and pheromonal gland of Mamestra brassicae.

    PubMed

    Jacquin-Joly, E; Vogt, R G; François, M C; Nagnan-Le Meillour, P

    2001-09-01

    Sequences coding for chemosensory proteins (CSP) CSPMbraA and CSPMbraB, soluble proteins of low mol. wt, have been amplified using polymerase chain reaction on antennal and pheromonal gland complementary DNAs. On the basis of their sequences, these proteins could be classed in the 'OS-D like' protein family whose first member was described in Drosophila, and that includes proteins characterized in chemosensory organs of many insect phylla, including our recent identification in Mamestra brassicae proboscis. Binding assays have shown that these proteins bind the pheromonal component (Z)-11-hexadecenyl-1-acetate (Z11-16:Ac) as well as (Z)-11-octadecenyl-1-acetate (Z11-18:Ac), an other putative component of the M. brassicae pheromonal blend. Furthermore, binding with fatty acids, but not with progesterone that is a structurally unrelated compound, leads to the hypothesis that the odorant-binding capability of the MbraCSPs may be restricted to fatty acids and/or to 16-18 carbon backbone skeletons. Thus, these proteins do not show the same highly binding specificity as the pheromone-binding proteins do. The CSP-related proteins appear homologous based on sequence identity, conserved cysteine residues and general patterns of expression. However, phylogenetic analyses suggest the presence of multiple classes of CSP within a given species and possible diversification of CSPs within different orders. This diversity perhaps contributes to the many CSP functions proposed in the literature. In M. brassicae, we localized the CSPMbraA expression to the sensilla trichodea, devoted to pheromone reception, suggesting a role in the chemosensory pathway. However, we also localized such proteins in the pheromonal gland, devoid of any chemosensory structure. This suggests that the M. brassicae CSP could be involved in transport of hydrophobic molecules through different aqueous media, such as the sensillar lymph, as well as the pheromonal gland cytosol.

  6. Dietary Influences on Tissue Concentrations of Phytanic Acid and AMACR Expression in the Benign Human Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Yachana; Wright, Margaret; Deaton, Ryan J.; Rueter, Erika Enk; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Moser, Ann B.; Ananthanrayanan, Vijayalakshmi; Gann, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) is an enzyme involved in fatty acid metabolism that is markedly over-expressed in virtually all prostate cancers (PCa), relative to benign tissue. One of AMACR’s primary substrates, phytanic acid, is derived predominately from red meat and dairy product consumption. Epidemiological evidence suggests links between dairy/red meat intake, as well as phytanic acid levels, and elevated PCa risk. This study investigates the relationships among dietary intake, serum and tissue concentrations of phytanic acid, and AMACR expression (mRNA and protein) in the histologically benign human prostate. METHODS Men undergoing radical prostatectomy for the treatment of localized disease provided a food frequency questionnaire (n = 68), fasting blood (n = 35), benign fresh frozen prostate tissue (n = 26), and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections (n = 67). Serum and tissue phytanic acid concentrations were obtained by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. We extracted RNA from epithelial cells using laser capture microdissection and quantified mRNA expression of AMACR and other genes involved in the peroxisomal phytanic acid metabolism pathway via qRT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry for AMACR was performed on FFPE sections and subsequently quantified via digital image analysis. Associations between diet, serum, and tissue phytanic acid levels, as well as AMACR and other gene expression levels were assessed by partial Spearman correlation coefficients. RESULTS High-fat dairy intake was the strongest predictor of circulating phytanic acid concentrations (r = 0.35, P = 0.04). Tissue phytanic acid concentrations were not associated with any dietary sources and were only weakly correlated with serum levels (r = 0.29, P = 0.15). AMACR gene expression was not associated with serum phytanic acid (r = 0.13, P = 0.47), prostatic phytanic acid concentrations (r = 0.03, P = 0.88), or AMACR protein expression (r = −0.16, P = 0

  7. Identification of a family of fatty acid-speciated Sonic Hedgehog proteins, whose members display differential biological properties

    PubMed Central

    Houel, Stephane; Rodgriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Singh, Samer; Schilling, Neal; J.Capobianco, Anthony; Ahn, Natalie G.; Robbins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (HH) proteins are proteolytically processed into a biologically active form, which is covalently modified by cholesterol and palmitate. However, most studies of HH biogenesis have characterized protein from cells in which HH is over-expressed. We purified Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) from cells expressing physiologically relevant levels, and showed that it was more potent than SHH isolated from over-expressing cells. Furthermore, the SHH in our preparations were modified with a diverse spectrum of fatty acids on their amino-termini, and this spectrum of fatty acids varied dramatically depending on the growth conditions of the cells. The fatty acid composition of SHH affected its trafficking to lipid rafts, as well as its potency. Our results suggest that HH proteins exist as a family of diverse lipid-speciated proteins, which might be altered in different physiological and pathological contexts to regulate distinct properties of HH proteins. PMID:25732819

  8. Developmental expression and molecular cloning of REMP, a novel retinal epithelial membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Philp, N; Chu, P; Pan, T C; Zhang, R Z; Chu, M L; Stark, K; Boettiger, D; Yoon, H; Kieber-Emmons, T

    1995-07-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), like other transport epithelia, has a polarized distribution of membrane and cytoskeletal proteins. The establishment of a polarized phenotype is an essential step in the differentiation of the RPE and the development and maintenance of visual function. Using a monoclonal antibody (MAb 3C4) we have identified a novel membrane protein that is uniquely expressed in chick RPE. We have referred to this protein as REMP for retinal epithelial membrane protein. In these studies we characterized the expression and distribution of this protein during embryonic development and determined its primary structure by cDNA cloning. The developmental expression of REMP was examined by immunocytochemical localization. REMP was first detected in the chick RPE at Embryonic Day 5 (E5) in both apical and basolateral membranes. By E14 the distribution of REMP was restricted to the basolateral surface of the RPE cells. Biochemical fractionation and surface labeling of RPE cells suggested that REMP was an integral protein. The gene encoding REMP was isolated from an E15 chick RPE cDNA library, cloned into lambda gt11, and screened with MAb 3C4. The cDNA was sequenced and found to contain one 1350-bp open reading frame encoding for a 450-amino-acid protein. The deduced amino-acid sequence of REMP shares 32.9% identity with MCT1, a monocarboxylate transporter (Garcia, Goldstein, Pathak, Anderson, and Brown, Cell, 76, 865-873, 1994). By Northern blot analysis, REMP mRNA was detected only in RPE cells. There was an increase in the expression REMP transcript during development but when RPE cells were grown in primary culture the expression of REMP was turned off. The unique expression of REMP in the RPE in vivo would suggest a role for this protein in development and maintenance of normal retinal function.

  9. Screening and large-scale expression of membrane proteins in mammalian cells for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, April; Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Wang, Kevin H.; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Claxton, Derek P.; Baconguis, Isabelle; Althoff, Thorsten; Fischer, Suzanne; Garcia, K. Christopher; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Structural, biochemical and biophysical studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins are often hampered by difficulties in over-expression of the candidate molecule. Baculovirus transduction of mammalian cells (BacMam), although a powerful method to heterologously express membrane proteins, can be cumbersome for screening and expression of multiple constructs. We therefore developed plasmid Eric Gouaux (pEG) BacMam, a vector optimized for use in screening assays, as well as for efficient production of baculovirus and robust expression of the target protein. In this protocol we show how to use small-scale transient transfection and fluorescence-detection, size-exclusion chromatography (FSEC) experiments using a GFP-His8 tagged candidate protein to screen for monodispersity and expression level. Once promising candidates are identified, we describe how to generate baculovirus, transduce HEK293S GnTI− (N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I-negative) cells in suspension culture, and over-express the candidate protein. We have used these methods to prepare pure samples of chicken acid-sensing ion channel 1a (cASIC1) and Caenorhabditis elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl), for X-ray crystallography, demonstrating how to rapidly and efficiently screen hundreds of constructs and accomplish large-scale expression in 4-6 weeks. PMID:25299155

  10. Effective isotope labeling of proteins in a mammalian expression system.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Mallika; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Isotope labeling of biologically interesting proteins is a prerequisite for structural and dynamics studies by NMR spectroscopy. Many of these proteins require mammalian cofactors, chaperons, or posttranslational modifications such as myristoylation, glypiation, disulfide bond formation, or N- or O-linked glycosylation; and mammalian cells have the necessary machinery to produce them in their functional forms. Here, we describe recent advances in mammalian expression, including an efficient adenoviral vector-based system, for the production of isotopically labeled proteins. This system enables expression of mammalian proteins and their complexes, including proteins that require posttranslational modifications. We describe a roadmap to produce isotopically labeled (15)N and (13)C posttranslationally modified proteins, such as the outer domain of HIV-1 gp120, which has four disulfide bonds and 15 potential sites of N-linked glycosylation. These methods should allow NMR spectroscopic analysis of the structure and function of posttranslationally modified and secreted, cytoplasmic, or membrane-bound proteins.

  11. Differential Expression of Potato Tuber Protein Genes 1

    PubMed Central

    Hannapel, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Patatin and the 22-kilodalton protein complex make up more than 50% of the soluble protein present in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and these two proteins are coordinately regulated during tuber development. Although genomic sequences related to these tuber genes exist in the genome of potato species that do not bear tubers, they cannot be induced into expression under the tested conditions. These genes are not expressed during substantial starch accumulation in petioles from a model petiole-leaf cutting system in nontuber-bearing plants, indicating that starch accumulation and synthesis of the major tuber proteins occur independently. Tuber protein gene expression also has been examined in hybrid potato plants that contain genomes from both tuberizing and nontuberizing species. One such triploid hybrid produced only stolons, whereas a pentaploid hybrid with an increased number of tuber genomes produced tubers. It was shown, using immunoblotting and Northern blot hybridization, that these two hybrids actively expressed both patatin and the 22-kilodalton tuber protein in induced petioles from the leaf-cutting system. The induced accumulation of patatin transcripts was consistent in all genotypes containing some tuberizing genome. The induced accumulation of the 22-kilodalton protein transcripts, however, was lower in genotypes containing some nontuberizing genome. Sucrose induction of these genes in leaves corroborates the induction patterns in petioles. A correlation exists between 22-kilodalton protein gene expression and a potato plant's ability to produce stolons or tubers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:16667872

  12. Network Clustering Revealed the Systemic Alterations of Mitochondrial Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyun-Jung; Park, Wook-Ha; Yang, Jae-Seong; Yu, Myeong-Hee; Kim, Sanguk; Pak, Youngmi Kim

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein repertoire varies depending on the cellular state. Protein component modifications caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion are related to a wide range of human diseases; however, little is known about how nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins (mt proteome) changes under such dysfunctional states. In this study, we investigated the systemic alterations of mtDNA-depleted (ρ0) mitochondria by using network analysis of gene expression data. By modularizing the quantified proteomics data into protein functional networks, systemic properties of mitochondrial dysfunction were analyzed. We discovered that up-regulated and down-regulated proteins were organized into two predominant subnetworks that exhibited distinct biological processes. The down-regulated network modules are involved in typical mitochondrial functions, while up-regulated proteins are responsible for mtDNA repair and regulation of mt protein expression and transport. Furthermore, comparisons of proteome and transcriptome data revealed that ρ0 cells attempted to compensate for mtDNA depletion by modulating the coordinated expression/transport of mt proteins. Our results demonstrate that mt protein composition changed to remodel the functional organization of mitochondrial protein networks in response to dysfunctional cellular states. Human mt protein functional networks provide a framework for understanding how cells respond to mitochondrial dysfunctions. PMID:21738461

  13. Attenuated influenza virus construct with enhanced hemagglutinin protein expression.

    PubMed

    Maamary, Jad; Pica, Natalie; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Chou, Yi-ying; Krammer, Florian; Gao, Qinshan; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Palese, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Influenza A viruses encoding an altered viral NS1 protein have emerged as promising live attenuated vaccine platforms. A carboxy-terminal truncation in the NS1 protein compromises its interferon antagonism activity, making these viruses attenuated in the host yet still able to induce protection from challenge with wild-type viruses. However, specific viral protein expression by NS1-truncated viruses is known to be decreased in infected cells. In this report, we show that recombinant H5N1 and H1N1 influenza viruses encoding a truncated NS1 protein expressed lower levels of hemagglutinin (HA) protein in infected cells than did wild-type viruses. This reduction in HA protein expression correlated with a reduction in HA mRNA levels in infected cells. NS1 truncation affected the expression of HA protein but not that of the nucleoprotein (NP). This segment specificity was mapped to the terminal sequences of their specific viral RNAs. Since the HA protein is the major immunogenic component in influenza virus vaccines, we sought to restore its expression levels in NS1-truncated viruses in order to improve their vaccine efficacy. For this purpose, we generated an NS1-truncated recombinant influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (rPR8) virus carrying the G3A C8U "superpromoter" mutations in the HA genomic RNA segment. This strategy retained the attenuation properties of the recombinant virus but enhanced the expression level of HA protein in infected cells. Finally, mice immunized with rPR8 viruses encoding a truncated NS1 protein and carrying the G3A C8U mutations in the HA segment demonstrated enhanced protection from wild-type virus challenge over that for mice vaccinated with an rPR8 virus encoding the truncated NS1 protein alone.

  14. Molecular analysis of Xenopus laevis SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, Rich in Cysteine). A highly conserved acidic calcium-binding extracellular-matrix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Damjanovski, S; Liu, F; Ringuette, M

    1992-01-01

    SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, Rich in Cysteine) is expressed as a 1.6 kb mRNA in Xenopus laevis. On the basis of cDNA sequence analysis, Xenopus SPARC has a core Mr of 32643, with one potential N-glycosylation site. Western analysis of SPARC isolated from Xenopus long bone indicates that the mature protein has an Mr of 43,000. At the amino acid level, Xenopus SPARC has 78-79% sequence similarity to mouse, bovine and human SPARC. The least-conserved region is found within the N-terminal glutamic acid-rich domain, with the C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding domain being the most conserved. Adult Xenopus tissues show the same pattern of tissue-specific distribution of SPARC mRNAs as adult mouse. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. PMID:1736898

  15. Cloning, expression analysis and recombinant expression of a gene encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengsheng; Feng, Chao; Wang, Jing; Kong, Fanyu; Sun, Wenxiu; Wang, Fenglong

    2016-05-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are major defensive proteins produced by plant cell walls that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance by reducing polygalacturonase (PG) activity. In the present study, a novel PGIP gene was isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), hereafter referred as NtPGIP. A full-length NtPGIP cDNA of 1,412 bp with a 186 bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), and 209 bp 3'-UTR was cloned from tobacco, NtPGIP is predicted to encode a protein of 338 amino acids. The NtPGIP sequence from genomic DNA showed no introns and sequence alignments of NtPGIP's deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology with known PGIPs from other plant species. Moreover, the putative NtPGIP protein was closely clustered with several Solanaceae PGIPs. Further, the expression profile of NtPGIP was examined in tobacco leaves following stimulation with the oomycete Phytophthora nicotianae and other stressors, including salicylic acid (SA), abscisic acid (ABA), salt, and cold treatment. The results showed that all of the treatments up-regulated the expression of NtPGIP at different times. To understand the biochemical activity of NtPGIP gene, a full-length NtPGIP cDNA sequence was subcloned into a pET28a vector and transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). Recombinant proteins were successfully induced by 1.0 nmol/L IPTG and the purified proteins effectively inhibited Phytophthora capsici PG activity. The results of this study suggest that NtPGIP may be a new candidate gene with properties that could be exploited in plant breeding. PMID:27441281

  16. Expression of fatty acid synthesis genes and fatty acid accumulation in haematococcus pluvialis under different stressors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biofuel has been the focus of intensive global research over the past few years. The development of 4th generation biofuel production (algae-to-biofuels) based on metabolic engineering of algae is still in its infancy, one of the main barriers is our lacking of understanding of microalgal growth, metabolism and biofuel production. Although fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis pathway genes have been all cloned and biosynthesis pathway was built up in some higher plants, the molecular mechanism for its regulation in microalgae is far away from elucidation. Results We cloned main key genes for FA biosynthesis in Haematococcus pluvialis, a green microalga as a potential biodiesel feedstock, and investigated the correlations between their expression alternation and FA composition and content detected by GC-MS under different stress treatments, such as nitrogen depletion, salinity, high or low temperature. Our results showed that high temperature, high salinity, and nitrogen depletion treatments played significant roles in promoting microalgal FA synthesis, while FA qualities were not changed much. Correlation analysis showed that acyl carrier protein (ACP), 3-ketoacyl-ACP-synthase (KAS), and acyl-ACP thioesterase (FATA) gene expression had significant correlations with monounsaturated FA (MUFA) synthesis and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA) synthesis. Conclusions We proposed that ACP, KAS, and FATA in H. pluvialis may play an important role in FA synthesis and may be rate limiting genes, which probably could be modified for the further study of metabolic engineering to improve microalgal biofuel quality and production. PMID:22448811

  17. Neuroendocrine secretory protein 7B2: structure, expression and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mbikay, M; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    2001-01-01

    7B2 is an acidic protein residing in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Its sequence has been elucidated in many phyla and species. It shows high similarity among mammals. A Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro polyproline motif is its most conserved feature, being carried by both vertebrate and invertebrate sequences. It is biosynthesized as a precursor protein that is cleaved into an N-terminal fragment and a C-terminal peptide. In neuroendocrine cells, 7B2 functions as a specific chaperone for the proprotein convertase (PC) 2. Through the sequence around its Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro motif, it binds to an inactive proPC2 and facilitates its transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to later compartments of the secretory pathway where the zymogen is proteolytically matured and activated. Its C-terminal peptide can inhibit PC2 in vitro and may contribute to keep the enzyme transiently inactive in vivo. The PC2-7B2 model defines a new neuroendocrine paradigm whereby proteolytic activation of prohormones and proneuropeptides in the secretory pathway is spatially and temporally regulated by the dynamics of interactions between converting enzymes and their binding proteins. Interestingly, unlike PC2-null mice, which are viable, 7B2-null mutants die early in life from Cushing's disease due to corticotropin ('ACTH') hypersecretion by the neurointermediate lobe, suggesting a possible involvement of 7B2 in secretory granule formation and in secretion regulation. The mechanism of this regulation is yet to be elucidated. 7B2 has been shown to be a good marker of several neuroendocrine cell dysfunctions in humans. The possibility that anomalies in its structure and expression could be aetiological causes of some of these dysfunctions warrants investigation. PMID:11439082

  18. Protein and amino acid metabolism in the human newborn.

    PubMed

    Kalhan, Satish C; Bier, Dennis M

    2008-01-01

    Birth and adaptation to extrauterine life involve major shifts in the protein and energy metabolism of the human newborn. These include a shift from a state of continuous supply of nutrients including amino acids from the mother to cyclic periodic oral intake, a change in the redox state of organs, thermogenesis, and a significant change in the mobilization and use of oxidative substrates. The development of safe, stable isotopic tracer methods has allowed the study of protein and amino acid metabolism not only in the healthy newborn but also in those born prematurely and of low birth weight. These studies have identified the unique and quantitative aspects of amino acid/protein metabolism in the neonate, thus contributing to rational nutritional care of these babies. The present review summarizes the contemporary data on some of the significant developments in essential and dispensable amino acids and their relationship to overall protein metabolism. Specifically, the recent data of kinetics of leucine, phenylalanine, glutamine, sulfur amino acid, and threonine and their relation to whole-body protein turnover are presented. Finally, the physiological rationale and the impact of nutrient (amino acids) interventions on the dynamics of protein metabolism are discussed.

  19. Free fatty acids and protein kinase C activation induce GPR120 (free fatty acid receptor 4) phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Takei, Yoshinori; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-01-15

    GPR120, free fatty acid receptor 4, is a recently deorphanized G protein-coupled receptor that seems to play cardinal roles in the regulation of metabolism and in the pathophysiology of inflammatory and metabolic disorders. In the present work a GPR120-Venus fusion protein was expressed in HEK293 Flp-In T-REx cells and its function (increase in intracellular calcium) and phosphorylation were studied. It was observed that the fusion protein migrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels as a band with a mass of ≈70-75kDa, although other bands of higher apparent weight (>130kDa) were also detected. Cell stimulation with docosahexaenoic acid or α-linolenic acid induced concentration-dependent increases in intracellular calcium and GPR120 phosphorylation. Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol esters also induced a marked receptor phosphorylation but did not alter the ability of 1µM docosahexaenoic acid to increase the intracellular calcium concentration. Phorbol ester-induced GPR120 phosphorylation, but not that induced with docosahexaenoic acid, was blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors (bis-indolyl-maleimide I and Gö 6976) suggesting that conventional kinase isoforms mediate this action. The absence of effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on agonist-induced GPR120 phosphorylation indicates that this kinase does not play a major role in agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation. Docosahexaenoic acid action was associated with marked GPR120 internalization whereas that induced with phorbol esters was smaller at early times. PMID:24239485

  20. Protein Production for Structural Genomics Using E. coli Expression

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The goal of structural biology is to reveal details of the molecular structure of proteins in order to understand their function and mechanism. X-ray crystallography and NMR are the two best methods for atomic level structure determination. However, these methods require milligram quantities of proteins. In this chapter a reproducible methodology for large-scale protein production applicable to a diverse set of proteins is described. The approach is based on protein expression in E. coli as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag that was tested on over 20,000 proteins. Specifically, a protocol for fermentation of large quantities of native proteins in disposable culture vessels is presented. A modified protocol that allows for the production of selenium-labeled proteins in defined media is also offered. Finally, a method for the purification of His6-tagged proteins on immobilized metal affinity chromatography columns that generates high-purity material is described in detail. PMID:24590711

  1. Fatty acid transfer between multilamellar liposomes and fatty acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Brecher, P; Saouaf, R; Sugarman, J M; Eisenberg, D; LaRosa, K

    1984-11-10

    A simple experimental system was developed for studying the movement of long-chain fatty acids between multilamellar liposomes and soluble proteins capable of binding fatty acids. Oleic acid was incorporated into multilamellar liposomes containing cholesterol and egg yolk lecithin and incubated with albumin or hepatic fatty acid-binding protein. It was found that the fatty acid transferred from the liposomes to either protein rapidly and selectively under conditions where phospholipid and cholesterol transfer did not occur. More than 50% of the fatty acid contained within liposomes could become protein bound, suggesting that the fatty acid moved readily between and across phospholipid bilayers. Transfer was reduced at low pH, and this reduction appeared to result from decreased dissociation of the protonated fatty acid from the bilayer. Liposomes made with dimyristoyl or dipalmitoyl lecithin and containing 1 mol per cent palmitic acid were used to show the effect of temperature on fatty acid transfer. Transfer to either protein did not occur at temperatures where the liposomes were in a gel state but occurred rapidly at temperatures at or above the transition temperatures of the phospholipid used. PMID:6490659

  2. Applications for protein sequence-function evolution data: mRNA/protein expression analysis and coding SNP scoring tools.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul D; Kejariwal, Anish; Guo, Nan; Mi, Huaiyu; Campbell, Michael J; Muruganujan, Anushya; Lazareva-Ulitsky, Betty

    2006-07-01

    The vast amount of protein sequence data now available, together with accumulating experimental knowledge of protein function, enables modeling of protein sequence and function evolution. The PANTHER database was designed to model evolutionary sequence-function relationships on a large scale. There are a number of applications for these data, and we have implemented web services that address three of them. The first is a protein classification service. Proteins can be classified, using only their amino acid sequences, to evolutionary groups at both the family and subfamily levels. Specific subfamilies, and often families, are further classified when possible according to their functions, including molecular function and the biological processes and pathways they participate in. The second application, then, is an expression data analysis service, where functional classification information can help find biological patterns in the data obtained from genome-wide experiments. The third application is a coding single-nucleotide polymorphism scoring service. In this case, information about evolutionarily related proteins is used to assess the likelihood of a deleterious effect on protein function arising from a single substitution at a specific amino acid position in the protein. All three web services are available at http://www.pantherdb.org/tools.

  3. N‐Lauroylation during the Expression of Recombinant N‐Myristoylated Proteins: Implications and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Flamm, Andrea Gabriele; Le Roux, Anabel‐Lise; Mateos, Borja; Díaz‐Lobo, Mireia; Storch, Barbara; Breuker, Kathrin; Konrat, Robert; Pons, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Incorporation of myristic acid onto the N terminus of a protein is a crucial modification that promotes membrane binding and correct localization of important components of signaling pathways. Recombinant expression of N‐myristoylated proteins in Escherichia coli can be achieved by co‐expressing yeast N‐myristoyltransferase and supplementing the growth medium with myristic acid. However, undesired incorporation of the 12‐carbon fatty acid lauric acid can also occur (leading to heterogeneous samples), especially when the available carbon sources are scarce, as it is the case in minimal medium for the expression of isotopically enriched samples. By applying this method to the brain acid soluble protein 1 and the 1–185 N‐terminal region of c‐Src, we show the significant, and protein‐specific, differences in the membrane binding properties of lauroylated and myristoylated forms. We also present a robust strategy for obtaining lauryl‐free samples of myristoylated proteins in both rich and minimal media. PMID:26522884

  4. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  5. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-07-03

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory's isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method.

  6. HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. MR Blanton and ES Hunter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Sponsor: JM Rogers.
    Haloacetic Acids (HAAs) formed during the disinfection process are present in drin...

  7. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  8. Surface protein expression in group B streptococcal invasive isolates.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, P; Flores, A E

    1997-01-01

    Results from characterization of 211 GBS isolates from early-onset disease indicated that serotypes Ia, III and V accounted for almost 80% of the isolates, and that alpha was the protein most often expressed. Each of the common polysaccharide types had a characteristic predominant protein expression pattern: alpha for Ia, R4 for type III and R1+R4 for type V isolates. Expression of alpha protein was always mutually exclusive of R proteins. The presence of more than one species of R by a given isolate was confirmed by IEP. In addition, PAGE/WB studies verified the multiple MW forms of R1, and the variation from strain to strain in the highest form of R4 that we had previously reported. Our data not only showed the great complexity of the GBS cell surface but also demonstrated the advantage of using both type polysaccharides and surface-localized proteins as markers for characterization of GBS strains.

  9. Evaluation of affinity-tagged protein expression strategies using local and global isotope ratio measurements.

    PubMed

    Hervey, W Judson; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai; Lankford, Patricia K; Owens, Elizabeth T; McKeown, Catherine K; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Foote, Linda J; Asano, Keiji G; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; McDonald, W Hayes; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory B

    2009-07-01

    Elucidation of protein-protein interactions can provide new knowledge on protein function. Enrichments of affinity-tagged (or "bait") proteins with interaction partners generally include background, nonspecific protein artifacts. Furthermore, in vivo bait expression may introduce additional artifacts arising from altered physiology or metabolism. In this study, we compared these effects for chromosome and plasmid encoding strategies for bait proteins in two microbes: Escherichia coli and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Differential metabolic labeling of strains expressing bait protein relative to the wild-type strain in each species allowed comparison by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). At the local level of the protein complex, authentic interacting proteins of RNA polymerase (RNAP) were successfully discerned from artifactual proteins by the isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted (I-DIRT, Tackett, A. J.; et al. J. Proteome Res. 2005, 4, 1752-1756). To investigate global effects of bait protein production, we compared proteomes from strains harboring a plasmid encoding an affinity-tagged subunit (RpoA) of RNAP with the corresponding wild-type strains. The RpoA abundance ratios of 0.8 for R. palustris and 1.7 for E. coli in plasmid strains versus wild-type indicated only slightly altered expression. While most other proteins also showed no appreciable difference in abundance, several that did show altered levels were involved in amino acid metabolism. Measurements at both local and global levels proved useful for evaluating in vitro and in vivo artifacts of plasmid-encoding strategies for bait protein expression.

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of proteins in response to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Fu, Bin; Niu, Li; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; He, Jun-Xian; Pei, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2011-05-01

    A proteomic study using 2-D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS was performed to characterize the responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to simulated acid rain (SiAR) stress, which is a global environmental problem and has become a serious issue in China in recent years. The emphasis of the present study was to investigate the overall protein expression changes when exposed to SiAR. Out of over 1000 protein spots reproducibly resolved, 50 of them changed their abundance by at least 2-fold. Analysis of protein expression patterns revealed that a set of proteins associated with energy production, metabolism, cell rescue, cell defense and protein folding, etc., could play important roles in mediating plant response to SiAR. In addition to this, some proteins involved in stress responses and jasmonic acid pathway are also involved in plant response to SiAR. More interestingly, the expression of several ubiquitination-related proteins changed dramatically after 32-h SiAR treatment, suggesting that they may act as a molecular marker for the injury phenotype caused by SiAR. Based on our results, we proposed a schematic model to explain the mechanisms associated with the systematic response of Arabidopsis plants to SiAR.

  11. Update of PROFEAT: a web server for computing structural and physicochemical features of proteins and peptides from amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Rao, H B; Zhu, F; Yang, G B; Li, Z R; Chen, Y Z

    2011-07-01

    Sequence-derived structural and physicochemical features have been extensively used for analyzing and predicting structural, functional, expression and interaction profiles of proteins and peptides. PROFEAT has been developed as a web server for computing commonly used features of proteins and peptides from amino acid sequence. To facilitate more extensive studies of protein and peptides, numerous improvements and updates have been made to PROFEAT. We added new functions for computing descriptors of protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions, segment descriptors for local properties of protein sequences, topological descriptors for peptide sequences and small molecule structures. We also added new feature groups for proteins and peptides (pseudo-amino acid composition, amphiphilic pseudo-amino acid composition, total amino acid properties and atomic-level topological descriptors) as well as for small molecules (atomic-level topological descriptors). Overall, PROFEAT computes 11 feature groups of descriptors for proteins and peptides, and a feature group of more than 400 descriptors for small molecules plus the derived features for protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions. Our computational algorithms have been extensively tested and used in a number of published works for predicting proteins of specific structural or functional classes, protein-protein interactions, peptides of specific functions and quantitative structure activity relationships of small molecules. PROFEAT is accessible free of charge at http://bidd.cz3.nus.edu.sg/cgi-bin/prof/protein/profnew.cgi.

  12. Expression of Yes-associated protein modulates Survivin expression in primary liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F; Lam-Himlin, Dora M; Klein, Alison P; Nayar, Suresh K; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies, the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing, and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice after genetic manipulation of Yes-associated protein, a transcription coactivator. Here, we comprehensively documented Yes-associated protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression is significantly increased in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. We found that increased Yes-associated protein levels in hepatocellular carcinoma are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification and transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We found that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress Yes-associated protein in the liver, we found that Survivin messenger RNA expression depends upon Yes-associated protein levels. Our findings suggested that Yes-associated protein contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression.

  13. Retinal functional alterations in mice lacking intermediate filament proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Kirsten A; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Grosche, Antje; Zrenner, Eberhart; Pekny, Milos; Reichenbach, Andreas; Seeliger, Mathias W; Pannicke, Thomas; Perez, Maria-Thereza

    2015-12-01

    Vimentin (Vim) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) are important components of the intermediate filament (IF) (or nanofilament) system of astroglial cells. We conducted full-field electroretinogram (ERG) recordings and found that whereas photoreceptor responses (a-wave) were normal in uninjured GFAP(-/-)Vim(-/-) mice, b-wave amplitudes were increased. Moreover, we found that Kir (inward rectifier K(+)) channel protein expression was reduced in the retinas of GFAP(-/-)Vim(-/-) mice and that Kir-mediated current amplitudes were lower in Müller glial cells isolated from these mice. Studies have shown that the IF system, in addition, is involved in the retinal response to injury and that attenuated Müller cell reactivity and reduced photoreceptor cell loss are observed in IF-deficient mice after experimental retinal detachment. We investigated whether the lack of IF proteins would affect cell survival in a retinal ischemia-reperfusion model. We found that although cell loss was induced in both genotypes, the number of surviving cells in the inner retina was lower in IF-deficient mice. Our findings thus show that the inability to produce GFAP and Vim affects normal retinal physiology and that the effect of IF deficiency on retinal cell survival differs, depending on the underlying pathologic condition.

  14. Performance benchmarking of four cell-free protein expression systems.

    PubMed

    Gagoski, Dejan; Polinkovsky, Mark E; Mureev, Sergey; Kunert, Anne; Johnston, Wayne; Gambin, Yann; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2016-02-01

    Over the last half century, a range of cell-free protein expression systems based on pro- and eukaryotic organisms have been developed and have found a range of applications, from structural biology to directed protein evolution. While it is generally accepted that significant differences in performance among systems exist, there is a paucity of systematic experimental studies supporting this notion. Here, we took advantage of the species-independent translation initiation sequence to express and characterize 87 N-terminally GFP-tagged human cytosolic proteins of different sizes in E. coli, wheat germ (WGE), HeLa, and Leishmania-based (LTE) cell-free systems. Using a combination of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis, we assessed the expression yields, the fraction of full-length translation product, and aggregation propensity for each of these systems. Our results demonstrate that the E. coli system has the highest expression yields. However, we observe that high expression levels are accompanied by production of truncated species-particularly pronounced in the case of proteins larger than 70 kDa. Furthermore, proteins produced in the E. coli system display high aggregation propensity, with only 10% of tested proteins being produced in predominantly monodispersed form. The WGE system was the most productive among eukaryotic systems tested. Finally, HeLa and LTE show comparable protein yields that are considerably lower than the ones achieved in the E. coli and WGE systems. The protein products produced in the HeLa system display slightly higher integrity, whereas the LTE-produced proteins have the lowest aggregation propensity among the systems analyzed. The high quality of HeLa- and LTE-produced proteins enable their analysis without purification and make them suitable for analysis of multi-domain eukaryotic proteins.

  15. Hyperglycemia decreases expression of 14-3-3 proteins in an animal model of stroke.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seong-Jun; Sung, Jin-Hee; Koh, Phil-Ok

    2016-07-28

    Diabetes is a severe metabolic disorder and a major risk factor for stroke. Stroke severity is worse in patients with diabetes compared to the non-diabetic population. The 14-3-3 proteins are a family of conserved acidic proteins that are ubiquitously expressed in cells and tissues. These proteins are involved in many cellular processes including metabolic pathways, signal transduction, protein trafficking, protein synthesis, and cell cycle control. This study investigated 14-3-3 proteins expression in the cerebral cortex of animals with diabetes, cerebral ischemic injury and a combination of both diabetes and cerebral ischemic injury. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (40mg/kg) in adult male rats. After 4 weeks of treatment, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was performed for the induction of focal cerebral ischemia and cerebral cortex tissue was collected 24h after MCAO. We confirmed that diabetes increases infarct volume following MCAO compared to non-diabetic animals. In diabetic animals with MCAO injury, reduction of 14-3-3 β/α, 14-3-3 ζ/δ, 14-3-3 γ, and 14-3-3 ε isoforms was detected. The expression of these proteins was significantly decreased in diabetic animals with MCAO injury compared to diabetic-only and MCAO-only animals. Moreover, Western blot analysis ascertained the decreased expression of 14-3-3 family proteins in diabetic animals with MCAO injury, including β/α, ζ/δ, γ, ε, τ, and η isoforms. These results show the changes of 14-3-3 proteins expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals with MCAO injury. Thus, these findings suggest that decreases in 14-3-3 proteins might be involved in the regulation of 14-3-3 proteins under the presence of diabetes following MCAO. PMID:27177727

  16. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  17. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  18. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories

  19. Small-scale expression of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zerbs, Sarah; Giuliani, Sarah; Collart, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Proteins participate in virtually every cellular activity, and a knowledge of protein function is essential for an understanding of biological systems. However, protein diversity necessitates the application of an array of in vivo and in vitro approaches for characterization of the functional and biochemical properties of proteins. Methods that enable production of proteins for in vitro studies are critical for determination of the molecular, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of these molecules. Ideally, proteins could be purified from the original source; however, the native host is often unsuitable for a number of reasons. Consequently, systems for heterologous protein production are commonly used to produce large amounts of protein. Heterologous expression hosts are chosen using a number of criteria, including genetic tractability, advantageous production or processing characteristics (secretion or posttranslational modifications), or economy of time and growth requirements. The subcloning process also provides an opportunity to introduce purification tags, epitope tags, fusions, truncations, and mutations into the coding sequence that may be useful in downstream purification or characterization applications. Bacterial systems for heterologous protein expression have advantages in ease of use, cost, short generation times, and scalability. These expression systems have been widely used by high-throughput protein production projects and often represent an initial experiment for any expression target. Escherichia coli has been studied for many years as a model bacterial organism and is one of the most popular hosts for heterologous protein expression (Terpe, 2006). Its protein production capabilities have been intensively studied, and the ease of genetic manipulation in this organism has led to the development of strains engineered exclusively for use in protein expression. These resources are widely available from commercial sources and public repositories

  20. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  1. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Synthase Decreases Expression of Stemness Markers in Glioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yasumoto, Yuki; Miyazaki, Hirofumi; Vaidyan, Linda Koshy; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Ebrahimi, Majid; Yamamoto, Yui; Ogata, Masaki; Katsuyama, Yu; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Owada, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolic changes, especially to lipid metabolism, have recently been recognized as a hallmark of various cancer cells. However, little is known about the significance of cellular lipid metabolism in the regulation of biological activity of glioma stem cells (GSCs). In this study, we examined the expression and role of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key lipogenic enzyme, in GSCs. In the de novo lipid synthesis assay, GSCs exhibited higher lipogenesis than differentiated non-GSCs. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses revealed that FASN is strongly expressed in multiple lines of patient-derived GSCs (G144 and Y10), but its expression was markedly reduced upon differentiation. When GSCs were treated with 20 μM cerulenin, a pharmacological inhibitor of FASN, their proliferation and migration were significantly suppressed and de novo lipogenesis decreased. Furthermore, following cerulenin treatment, expression of the GSC markers nestin, Sox2 and fatty acid binding protein (FABP7), markers of GCSs, decreased while that of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression increased. Taken together, our results indicate that FASN plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of GSC stemness, and FASN-mediated de novo lipid biosynthesis is closely associated with tumor growth and invasion in glioblastoma. PMID:26808816

  2. Retinoic acid has different effects on UCP1 expression in mouse and human adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased adipose thermogenesis is being considered as a strategy aimed at preventing or reversing obesity. Thus, regulation of the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) gene in human adipocytes is of significant interest. Retinoic acid (RA), the carboxylic acid form of vitamin A, displays agonist activity toward several nuclear hormone receptors, including RA receptors (RARs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ). Moreover, RA is a potent positive regulator of UCP1 expression in mouse adipocytes. Results The effects of all-trans RA (ATRA) on UCP1 gene expression in models of mouse and human adipocyte differentiation were investigated. ATRA induced UCP1 expression in all mouse white and brown adipocytes, but inhibited or had no effect on UCP1 expression in human adipocyte cell lines and primary human white adipocytes. Experiments with various RAR agonists and a RAR antagonist in mouse cells demonstrated that the stimulatory effect of ATRA on UCP1 gene expression was indeed mediated by RARs. Consistently, a PPARδ agonist was without effect. Moreover, the ATRA-mediated induction of UCP1 expression in mouse adipocytes was independent of PPARγ coactivator-1α. Conclusions UCP1 expression is differently affected by ATRA in mouse and human adipocytes. ATRA induces UCP1 expression in mouse adipocytes through activation of RARs, whereas expression of UCP1 in human adipocytes is not increased by exposure to ATRA. PMID:24059847

  3. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  4. Expression Profiles of Vpx/Vpr Proteins Are Co-related with the Primate Lentiviral Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yosuke; Miyake, Ariko; Doi, Naoya; Sasada, Hikari; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Adachi, Akio; Nomaguchi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Viruses of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and some simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) lineages carry a unique accessory protein called Vpx. Vpx is essential or critical for viral replication in natural target cells such as macrophages and T lymphocytes. We have previously shown that a poly-proline motif (PPM) located at the C-terminal region of Vpx is required for its efficient expression in two strains of HIV-2 and SIVmac, and that the Vpx expression levels of the two clones are significantly different. Notably, the PPM sequence is conserved and confined to Vpx and Vpr proteins derived from certain lineages of HIV-2/SIVs. In this study, Vpx/Vpr proteins from diverse primate lentiviral lineages were experimentally and phylogenetically analyzed to obtain the general expression picture in cells. While both the level and PPM-dependency of Vpx/Vpr expression in transfected cells varied among viral strains, each viral group, based on Vpx/Vpr amino acid sequences, was found to exhibit a characteristic expression profile. Moreover, phylogenetic tree analyses on Gag and Vpx/Vpr proteins gave essentially the same results. Taken together, our study described here suggests that each primate lentiviral lineage may have developed a unique expression pattern of Vpx/Vpr proteins for adaptation to its hostile cellular and species environments in the process of viral evolution. PMID:27536295

  5. IR-UV photochemistry of protein-nucleic acid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, J.; Edwards, G.

    1995-12-31

    UV light has often been used to induce the formation of covalent bonds between DNA (or RNA) and tightly-bound protein molecules. However, the internal photoreactions of nucleic acids and proteins limit the yield and complicate the analysis of intermolecular crosslinks. In an ongoing search for improved reaction specificity or new photoreactions in these systems, we have employed UV photons from a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser and mid-IR photons from the Vanderbilt FEL. Having crosslinked several protein-nucleic acid systems with nanosecond UV laser pulses, we are currently studying the effect of various IR wavelengths on a model system (gene 32 protein and poly[dT]). We have found that irradiation with sufficiently intense FEL macropulses creates an altered form of gene 32 protein which was not observed with UV-only irradiation. The electrophoretic nobility of the product is consistent with the formation of a specific protein-protein crosslink. No evidence of the non-specific protein damage typically induced by UV light is found. The yield of the new photoproduct is apparently enhanced by exposure to FEL macropulses which are synchronized with UV laser pulses. With ideal exposure parameters, the two-color reaction effectively competes with UV-only reactions. Experiments designed to determine the reaction mechanism and to demonstrate FEL-induced reactions in other protein-nucleic acid systems are currently underway.

  6. The Proteome Response to Amyloid Protein Expression In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ricardo A.; Franco, Catarina; Da Costa, Gonçalo; Planchon, Sébastien; Renaut, Jenny; Ribeiro, Raquel M.; Pinto, Francisco; Silva, Marta Sousa; Coelho, Ana Varela; Freire, Ana Ponces; Cordeiro, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Protein misfolding disorders such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and transthyretin amyloidosis are characterized by the formation of protein amyloid deposits. Although the nature and location of the aggregated proteins varies between different diseases, they all share similar molecular pathways of protein unfolding, aggregation and amyloid deposition. Most effects of these proteins are likely to occur at the proteome level, a virtually unexplored reality. To investigate the effects of an amyloid protein expression on the cellular proteome, we created a yeast expression system using human transthyretin (TTR) as a model amyloidogenic protein. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a living test tube, to express native TTR (non-amyloidogenic) and the amyloidogenic TTR variant L55P, the later forming aggregates when expressed in yeast. Differential proteome changes were quantitatively analyzed by 2D-differential in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). We show that the expression of the amyloidogenic TTR-L55P causes a metabolic shift towards energy production, increased superoxide dismutase expression as well as of several molecular chaperones involved in protein refolding. Among these chaperones, members of the HSP70 family and the peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) were identified. The latter is highly relevant considering that it was previously found to be a TTR interacting partner in the plasma of ATTR patients but not in healthy or asymptomatic subjects. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) expression is also increased. Our findings suggest that refolding and degradation pathways are activated, causing an increased demand of energetic resources, thus the metabolic shift. Additionally, oxidative stress appears to be a consequence of the amyloidogenic process, posing an enhanced threat to cell survival. PMID:23185553

  7. Molecular Evolution Directs Protein Translation Using Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Cox, Vanessa E; Gaucher, Eric A

    2015-12-02

    Unnatural amino acids have in recent years established their importance in a wide range of fields, from pharmaceuticals to polymer science. Unnatural amino acids can increase the number of chemical groups within proteins and thus expand or enhance biological function. Our ability to utilize these important building blocks, however, has been limited by the inherent difficulty in incorporating these molecules into proteins. To address this challenge, researchers have examined how the canonical twenty amino acids are incorporated, regulated, and modified in nature. This review focuses on achievements and techniques used to engineer the ribosomal protein-translation machinery, including the introduction of orthogonal translation components, how directed evolution enhances the incorporation of unnatural amino acids, and the potential utility of ancient biomolecules for this process.

  8. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts.

  9. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    PubMed Central

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts. PMID:10639127

  10. Identification of Apolipoprotein A-I as a Retinoic Acid-binding Protein in the Eye.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jody A; Harper, Angelica R; Feasley, Christa L; Van-Der-Wel, Hanke; Byrum, Jennifer N; Hermann, Marcela; West, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid may be an important molecular signal in the postnatal control of eye size. The goal of this study was to identify retinoic acid-binding proteins secreted by the choroid and sclera during visually guided ocular growth. Following photoaffinity labeling with all-trans-[11,12-(3)H]retinoic acid, the most abundant labeled protein detected in the conditioned medium of choroid or sclera had an apparent Mr of 27,000 Da. Following purification and mass spectrometry, the Mr 27,000 band was identified as apolipoprotein A-I. Affinity capture of the radioactive Mr 27,000 band by anti-chick apolipoprotein A-I antibodies confirmed its identity as apolipoprotein A-I. Photoaffinity labeling and fluorescence quenching experiments demonstrated that binding of retinoic acid to apolipoprotein A-I is 1) concentration-dependent, 2) selective for all-trans-retinoic acid, and 3) requires the presence of apolipoprotein A-I-associated lipids for retinoid binding. Expression of apolipoprotein A-I mRNA and protein synthesis were markedly up-regulated in choroids of chick eyes during the recovery from induced myopia, and apolipoprotein A-I mRNA was significantly increased in choroids following retinoic acid treatment. Together, these data suggest that apolipoprotein A-I may participate in a regulatory feedback mechanism with retinoic acid to control the action of retinoic acid on ocular targets during postnatal ocular growth.

  11. Identification of Apolipoprotein A-I as a Retinoic Acid-binding Protein in the Eye.

    PubMed

    Summers, Jody A; Harper, Angelica R; Feasley, Christa L; Van-Der-Wel, Hanke; Byrum, Jennifer N; Hermann, Marcela; West, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid may be an important molecular signal in the postnatal control of eye size. The goal of this study was to identify retinoic acid-binding proteins secreted by the choroid and sclera during visually guided ocular growth. Following photoaffinity labeling with all-trans-[11,12-(3)H]retinoic acid, the most abundant labeled protein detected in the conditioned medium of choroid or sclera had an apparent Mr of 27,000 Da. Following purification and mass spectrometry, the Mr 27,000 band was identified as apolipoprotein A-I. Affinity capture of the radioactive Mr 27,000 band by anti-chick apolipoprotein A-I antibodies confirmed its identity as apolipoprotein A-I. Photoaffinity labeling and fluorescence quenching experiments demonstrated that binding of retinoic acid to apolipoprotein A-I is 1) concentration-dependent, 2) selective for all-trans-retinoic acid, and 3) requires the presence of apolipoprotein A-I-associated lipids for retinoid binding. Expression of apolipoprotein A-I mRNA and protein synthesis were markedly up-regulated in choroids of chick eyes during the recovery from induced myopia, and apolipoprotein A-I mRNA was significantly increased in choroids following retinoic acid treatment. Together, these data suggest that apolipoprotein A-I may participate in a regulatory feedback mechanism with retinoic acid to control the action of retinoic acid on ocular targets during postnatal ocular growth. PMID:27402828

  12. Cinnamic acid production using Streptomyces lividans expressing phenylalanine ammonia lyase.

    PubMed

    Noda, Shuhei; Miyazaki, Takaya; Miyoshi, Takanori; Miyake, Michiru; Okai, Naoko; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-05-01

    Cinnamic acid production was demonstrated using Streptomyces as a host. A gene encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) from Streptomyces maritimus was introduced into Streptomyces lividans, and its expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis. After 4 days cultivation using glucose as carbon source, the maximal level of cinnamic acid reached 210 mg/L. When glycerol (30 g/L) was used as carbon source, the maximal level of produced cinnamic acid reached 450 mg/L. In addition, using raw starch, xylose or xylan as carbon source, the maximal level of cinnamic acid reached 460, 300, and 130 mg/L, respectively. We demonstrated that S. lividans has great potential to produce cinnamic acid as well as other aromatic compounds.

  13. Chemical approaches to detect and analyze protein sulfenic acids

    PubMed Central

    Furdui, Cristina M.; Poole, Leslie B.

    2013-01-01

    Orchestration of many processes relying on intracellular signal transduction is recognized to require the generation of hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger, yet relatively few molecular details of how this oxidant acts to regulate protein function are currently understood. This review describes emerging chemical tools and approaches that can be applied to study protein oxidation in biological systems, with a particular emphasis on a key player in protein redox regulation, cysteine sulfenic acid. While sulfenic acids (within purified proteins or simple mixtures) are detectable by physical approaches like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry, the propensity of these moieties to undergo further modification in complex biological systems has necessitated the development of chemical probes, reporter groups and analytical approaches to allow for their selective detection and quantification. Provided is an overview of techniques that are currently available for the study of sulfenic acids, and some of the biologically meaningful data that have been collected using such approaches. PMID:24105931

  14. Chemical approaches to detect and analyze protein sulfenic acids.

    PubMed

    Furdui, Cristina M; Poole, Leslie B

    2014-01-01

    Orchestration of many processes relying on intracellular signal transduction is recognized to require the generation of hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger, yet relatively few molecular details of how this oxidant acts to regulate protein function are currently understood. This review describes emerging chemical tools and approaches that can be applied to study protein oxidation in biological systems, with a particular emphasis on a key player in protein redox regulation, cysteine sulfenic acid. While sulfenic acids (within purified proteins or simple mixtures) are detectable by physical approaches like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry, the propensity of these moieties to undergo further modification in complex biological systems has necessitated the development of chemical probes, reporter groups and analytical approaches to allow for their selective detection and quantification. Provided is an overview of techniques that are currently available for the study of sulfenic acids, and some of the biologically meaningful data that have been collected using such approaches.

  15. Bicistronic expression plasmid for the rapid production of recombinant fused proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yero, Daniel; Pajón, Rolando; Niebla, Olivia; Sardiñas, Gretel; Vivar, Isbel; Perera, Yasser; García, Darien; Delgado, Maité; Cobas, Karem

    2006-04-01

    In the post-genomic era, every aspect of the production of proteins must be accelerated. In this way, several vectors are currently exploited for rapid production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. N-terminal fusions to the first 47 amino acids of the LpdA (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase A) protein of Neisseria meningitidis have been shown to increase the expression of recombinant proteins. Consequently, we have constructed a modified N-terminal LpdA fusion vector, introducing the blue/white colony selection by exploiting a bicistronic gene organization. In the new vector, the sequence encoding the first 47 amino acids of meningococcal LpdA and the alpha-peptide sequence of beta-galactosidase were connected via a ribosome-binding site, and two MCSs (multiple cloning sites) were located surrounding the latter, allowing efficient cloning by colour selection of recombinants. The vector was also improved with the addition of a C-terminal polyhistidine tag, and an EKS (enterokinase recognition sequence) immediately after the LpdA fusion sequence. The new plasmid was employed in the expression and purification of six different bacterial polypeptides. One of these recombinant proteins, P6 protein from Haemophilus influenzae, was used as a model and its N-terminal fusion sequence was totally removed from the recombinant version after incubation with the enterokinase protease, while the polyhistidine tail successfully allowed the purification of the unfused protein from the protease reaction. Two completely new neisserial vaccine candidates, NMB0088 and NMB1126 proteins, were cloned, expressed and purified using this system. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first report of the cloning and expression of these proteins in E. coli.

  16. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  17. Detecting protein complexes from active protein interaction networks constructed with dynamic gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein interaction networks (PINs) are known to be useful to detect protein complexes. However, most available PINs are static, which cannot reflect the dynamic changes in real networks. At present, some researchers have tried to construct dynamic networks by incorporating time-course (dynamic) gene expression data with PINs. However, the inevitable background noise exists in the gene expression array, which could degrade the quality of dynamic networkds. Therefore, it is needed to filter out contaminated gene expression data before further data integration and analysis. Results Firstly, we adopt a dynamic model-based method to filter noisy data from dynamic expression profiles. Then a new method is proposed for identifying active proteins from dynamic gene expression profiles. An active protein at a time point is defined as the protein the expression level of whose corresponding gene at that time point is higher than a threshold determined by a standard variance involved threshold function. Furthermore, a noise-filtered active protein interaction network (NF-APIN) is constructed. To demonstrate the efficiency of our method, we detect protein complexes from the NF-APIN, compared with those from other dynamic PINs. Conclusion A dynamic model based method can effectively filter out noises in dynamic gene expression data. Our method to compute a threshold for determining the active time points of noise-filtered genes can make the dynamic construction more accuracy and provide a high quality framework for network analysis, such as protein complex prediction. PMID:24565281

  18. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  19. Cell-Free Expression of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kenneth; Masure, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The large-scale production of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is one of the major bottlenecks that hamper functional and structural studies of this important class of integral membrane proteins. Heterologous overexpression of GPCRs often results in low yields of active protein, usually due to a combination of several factors, such as low expression levels, protein insolubility, host cell toxicity, and the need to use harsh and often denaturing detergents (e.g., SDS, LDAO, OG, and DDM, among others) to extract the recombinant receptor from the host cell membrane. Many of these problematic issues are inherently linked to cell-based expression systems and can therefore be circumvented by the use of cell-free systems. In this unit, we provide a range of protocols for the production of GPCRs in a cell-free expression system. Using this system, we typically obtain GPCR expression levels of ∼1 mg per ml of reaction mixture in the continuous-exchange configuration. Although the protocols in this unit have been optimized for the cell-free expression of GPCRs, they should provide a good starting point for the production of other classes of membrane proteins, such as ion channels, aquaporins, carrier proteins, membrane-bound enzymes, and even large molecular complexes.

  20. Hypoxic-induced stress protein expression in rat cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, G.; Geoghegan, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    Mammalian stress proteins can be induced in cells and tissues exposed to a variety of conditions including hyperthermia and diminished O/sub 2/ supply. The authors have previously shown that the expression of three stress proteins (71, 85, and 95 kDa) was induced in cardiac tissue from mice exposed to hypoxic conditions. The expression of mRNAs coding for the 85 and 95 kDa proteins increase with time of exposure to hypoxia, while the mRNA coding for the 71 kDa protein is transiently induced. The authors extended these studies to investigate the expression of stress proteins in isolated rat cardiac myocytes. Freshly prepared myocytes were exposed to control, hypoxic, anoxic, or heat-shock environments for up to 16 h. The proteins were then labeled for 6 hours with (/sup 35/S)methionine. Analysis of the solubilized proteins by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography showed that there was a 6-fold increase in synthesis of the 85 kDa protein upon exposure to hypoxia but not heat-shock conditions. The 71 kDa protein was present at high levels in both control and treated myocyte protein preparations, and presumably had been induced during the isolation procedure. Total RNA isolated from intact rat heart and isolated myocytes was compared by cell-free translation analysis and showed induction of RNAs coding for several stress proteins in the myocyte preparation. The induced proteins at 85 and 95 kDa have molecular weights similar to reported cell stress and/or glucose-regulated proteins.

  1. Expression of rabies virus G protein in carrots (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Olivera-Flores, Maria Teresa; Gomez-Lim, Miguel

    2009-12-01

    Antigens derived from various pathogens can readily be synthesized at high levels in plants in their authentic forms. Such antigens administered orally can induce an immune response and, in some cases, result in protection against a subsequent challenge. We here report the expression of rabies virus G protein into carrots. The G gene was subcloned into the pUCpSSrabG vector and then used to transform carrot embryogenic cells by particle bombardment. The carrot cells were selected in liquid medium, a method previously unreported. The presence of the transgene was verified by PCR, and by RT-PCR. By western blot, G protein transgene was identified in 93.3% of adult carrot roots. The G protein was quantified by densitometric analysis (range 0.4-1.2%). The expressed protein was antigenic in mice. This confirms that the carrot is an adequate system for antigen expression.

  2. Expression of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Lucie; Kugler, Valérie; Wagner, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    A key point when it comes to heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs) is the choice of the best-suited expression platform. The yeast Pichia pastoris has proven to be a very versatile system showing promising results in a growing number of cases. Indeed, its particular methylotrophic characteristics combined to the very simple handling of a eukaryotic microorganism that possesses the majority of mammalian-like machineries make it a very competitive expression system for various complex proteins, in amounts compatible with functional and structural studies. This chapter describes a set of robust methodologies routinely used for the successful expression of a variety of EMPs, going from yeast transformation with the recombinant plasmid to the analysis of the quality and quantity of the proteins produced. PMID:27485335

  3. Expression of Eukaryotic Membrane Proteins in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Lucie; Kugler, Valérie; Wagner, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    A key point when it comes to heterologous expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins (EMPs) is the choice of the best-suited expression platform. The yeast Pichia pastoris has proven to be a very versatile system showing promising results in a growing number of cases. Indeed, its particular methylotrophic characteristics combined to the very simple handling of a eukaryotic microorganism that possesses the majority of mammalian-like machineries make it a very competitive expression system for various complex proteins, in amounts compatible with functional and structural studies. This chapter describes a set of robust methodologies routinely used for the successful expression of a variety of EMPs, going from yeast transformation with the recombinant plasmid to the analysis of the quality and quantity of the proteins produced.

  4. Evaluation of Affinity-Tagged Protein Expression Strategies using Local and Global Isotope Ratio Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hervey, IV, William Judson; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Lankford, Patricia K; Owens, Elizabeth T; McKeown, Catherine K; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Foote, Linda J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; McDonald, W Hayes; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B

    2009-01-01

    Protein enrichments of engineered, affinity-tagged (or bait ) fusion proteins with interaction partners are often laden with background, non-specific proteins, due to interactions that occur in vitro as an artifact of the technique. Furthermore, the in vivo expression of the bait protein may itself affect physiology or metabolism. In this study, intrinsic affinity purification challenges were investigated in a model protein complex, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), encompassing chromosome- and plasmid-encoding strategies for bait proteins in two different microbial species: Escherichia coli and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Isotope ratio measurements of bait protein expression strains relative to native, wild-type strains were performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) to assess bait protein expression strategies in each species. Authentic interacting proteins of RNAP were successfully discerned from artifactual co-isolating proteins by the isotopic differentiation of interactions as random or targeted (I-DIRT) method (A. J. Tackett et al. J. Proteome Res. 2005, 4 (5), 1752-1756). To investigate broader effects of bait protein production in the bacteria, we compared proteomes from strains harboring a plasmid that encodes an affinity-tagged subunit (RpoA) of the RNAP complex with the corresponding wild-type strains using stable isotope metabolic labeling. The ratio of RpoA abundance in plasmid strains versus wild type was 0.8 for R. palustris and 1.7 for E. coli. While most other proteins showed no appreciable difference, proteins significantly increased in abundance in plasmid-encoded bait-expressing strains of both species included the plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance protein, GenR and proteins involved in amino acid biosynthesis. Together, these local, complex-specific and more global, whole proteome isotopic abundance ratio measurements provided a tool for evaluating both in vivo and in vitro effects of plasmid

  5. Utilizing Unnatural Amino Acids to Illustrate Protein Structure-Function Relationships: An Experiment Designed for an Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maza, Johnathan C.; Villa, Jordan K.; Landino, Lisa M.; Young, Douglas D

    2016-01-01

    The site-specific introduction of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) has been demonstrated to be a useful tool in protein engineering. Moreover, the incorporation of a UAA into a protein has become feasible with the increased commercial availability of UAAs and robust expression plasmids. In addition to the ease of incorporation, the concepts utilized…

  6. Differential Protein Expression in Congenital and Acquired Cholesteatomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Congenital cholesteatomas are epithelial lesions that present as an epithelial pearl behind an intact eardrum. Congenital and acquired cholesteatomas progress quite differently from each other and progress patterns can provide clues about the unique origin and pathogenesis of the abnormality. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms by which cholesteatomas develop remain unknown. In this study, key proteins that directly affect cholesteatoma pathogenesis are investigated with proteomics and immunohistochemistry. Congenital cholesteatoma matrices and retroauricular skin were harvested during surgery in 4 patients diagnosed with a congenital cholesteatoma. Tissue was also harvested from the retraction pocket in an additional 2 patients during middle ear surgery. We performed 2-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis to detect and analyze spots that are expressed only in congenital cholesteatoma and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) to separate proteins by molecular weight. Protein expression was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The image analysis of 2D electrophoresis showed that 4 congenital cholesteatoma samples had very similar protein expression patterns and that 127 spots were exclusively expressed in congenital cholesteatomas. Of these 127 spots, 10 major spots revealed the presence of titin, forkhead transcription activator homolog (FKH 5–3), plectin 1, keratin 10, and leucine zipper protein 5 by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that FKH 5–3 and titin were expressed in congenital cholesteatoma matrices, but not in acquired cholesteatomas. Our study shows that protein expression patterns are completely different in congenital cholesteatomas, acquired cholesteatomas, and skin. Moreover, non-epithelial proteins, including FKH 5–3 and titin, were unexpectedly expressed in congenital cholesteatoma tissue. Our data indicates that congenital cholesteatoma origins may differ

  7. Mapping protein and nucleic acid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednyakov, I. V.; Zrelov, P. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Polozov, R. V.; Sivozhelezov, V. S.; Stepanenko, V. A.; Chirgadze, Yu. N.

    2013-09-01

    Methods and algorithms to analyze surfaces of globular and fibrillar proteins, DNA, and RNA have been developed. These methods for the construction of maps of fragments of these objects in the original cylindrical projection developed herein essentially broaden the possibilities for studying the distribution of charges and surface topography of biological structures. This approach significantly supplements the qualitative characteristics of methods of visualizing biopolymer structures.

  8. Expression pattern of peptide and amino acid genes in digestive tract of transporter juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei; Song, Fei

    2016-04-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus L.), a carnivorous fish species with high dietary protein requirement, was chosen to examine the expression pattern of peptide and amino acid transporter genes along its digestive tract which was divided into six segments including stomach, pyloric caeca, rectum, and three equal parts of the remainder of the intestine. The results showed that the expression of two peptide and eleven amino acid transporters genes exhibited distinct patterns. Peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) was rich in proximal intestine while peptide transporter 2 (PepT2) was abundant in distal intestine. A number of neutral and cationic amino acid transporters expressed richly in whole intestine including B0-type amino acid transporter 1 (B0AT1), L-type amino acid transporter 2 (LAT2), T-type amino acid transporter 1 (TAT1), proton-coupled amino acid transporter 1 (PAT1), y+L-type amino acid transporter 1 (y+LAT1), and cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2) while ASC amino acid transporter 2 (ASCT2), sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2), and y+L-type amino acid transporter 2 (y+LAT2) abundantly expressed in stomach. In addition, system b0,+ transporters (rBAT and b0,+AT) existed richly in distal intestine. These findings comprehensively characterized the distribution of solute carrier family proteins, which revealed the relative importance of peptide and amino acid absorption through luminal membrane. Our findings are helpful to understand the mechanism of the utilization of dietary protein in fish with a short digestive tract.

  9. FLU, an amino acid substitution model for influenza proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The amino acid substitution model is the core component of many protein analysis systems such as sequence similarity search, sequence alignment, and phylogenetic inference. Although several general amino acid substitution models have been estimated from large and diverse protein databases, they remain inappropriate for analyzing specific species, e.g., viruses. Emerging epidemics of influenza viruses raise the need for comprehensive studies of these dangerous viruses. We propose an influenza-specific amino acid substitution model to enhance the understanding of the evolution of influenza viruses. Results A maximum likelihood approach was applied to estimate an amino acid substitution model (FLU) from ~113, 000 influenza protein sequences, consisting of ~20 million residues. FLU outperforms 14 widely used models in constructing maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees for the majority of influenza protein alignments. On average, FLU gains ~42 log likelihood points with an alignment of 300 sites. Moreover, topologies of trees constructed using FLU and other models are frequently different. FLU does indeed have an impact on likelihood improvement as well as tree topologies. It was implemented in PhyML and can be downloaded from ftp://ftp.sanger.ac.uk/pub/1000genomes/lsq/FLU or included in PhyML 3.0 server at http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/phyml/. Conclusions FLU should be useful for any influenza protein analysis system which requires an accurate description of amino acid substitutions. PMID:20384985

  10. Quorum-sensing Salmonella selectively trigger protein expression within tumors

    PubMed Central

    Swofford, Charles A.; Van Dessel, Nele; Forbes, Neil S.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella that secrete anticancer proteins have the potential to eliminate tumors, but nonspecific expression causes damage to healthy tissue. We hypothesize that Salmonella, integrated with a density-dependent switch, would only express proteins in tightly packed colonies within tumors. To test this hypothesis, we cloned the lux quorum-sensing (QS) system and a GFP reporter into nonpathogenic Salmonella. Fluorescence and bacterial density were measured in culture and in a tumor-on-a-chip device to determine the critical density necessary to initiate expression. QS Salmonella were injected into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice to quantify GFP expression in vivo using immunofluorescence. At densities below 0.6 × 1010 cfu/g in tumors, less than 3% of QS Salmonella expressed GFP. Above densities of 4.2 × 1010 cfu/g, QS Salmonella had similar expression levels to constitutive controls. GFP expression by QS colonies was dependent upon the distance to neighboring bacteria. No colonies expressed GFP when the average distance to neighbors was greater than 155 µm. Calculations of autoinducer concentrations showed that expression was sigmoidally dependent on density and inversely dependent on average radial distance. Based on bacterial counts from excised tissue, the liver density (0.0079 × 1010 cfu/g) was less than the critical density (0.11 × 1010 cfu/g) necessary to initiate expression. QS Salmonella are a promising tool for cancer treatment that will target drugs to tumors while preventing damage to healthy tissue. PMID:25737556

  11. Japanese encephalitis virus nonstructural protein NS5 interacts with mitochondrial trifunctional protein and impairs fatty acid β-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Ting; Chang, Bi-Lan; Liang, Jian-Jong; Tsai, Hang-Jen; Lee, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ren-Jye; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can induce the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cause acute encephalitis in humans. β-oxidation breaks down fatty acids for ATP production in mitochondria, and impaired β-oxidation can induce pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. To address the role of fatty-acid β-oxidation in JEV infection, we measured the oxygen consumption rate of mock- and JEV-infected cells cultured with or without long chain fatty acid (LCFA) palmitate. Cells with JEV infection showed impaired LCFA β-oxidation and increased interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expression. JEV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) interacted with hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase α and β subunits, two components of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) involved in LCFA β-oxidation, and NS5 proteins were detected in mitochondria and co-localized with MTP. LCFA β-oxidation was impaired and higher cytokines were induced in cells overexpressing NS5 protein as compared with control cells. Deletion and mutation studies showed that the N-terminus of NS5 was involved in the MTP association, and a single point mutation of NS5 residue 19 from methionine to alanine (NS5-M19A) reduced its binding ability with MTP. The recombinant JEV with NS5-M19A mutation (JEV-NS5-M19A) was less able to block LCFA β-oxidation and induced lower levels of IL-6 and TNF-α than wild-type JEV. Moreover, mice challenged with JEV-NS5-M19A showed less neurovirulence and neuroinvasiveness. We identified a novel function of JEV NS5 in viral pathogenesis by impairing LCFA β-oxidation and inducing cytokine expression by association with MTP.

  12. Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein NS5 Interacts with Mitochondrial Trifunctional Protein and Impairs Fatty Acid β-Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Yu-Ting; Chang, Bi-Lan; Liang, Jian-Jong; Tsai, Hang-Jen; Lee, Yi-Ling; Lin, Ren-Jye; Lin, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can induce the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cause acute encephalitis in humans. β-oxidation breaks down fatty acids for ATP production in mitochondria, and impaired β-oxidation can induce pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. To address the role of fatty-acid β-oxidation in JEV infection, we measured the oxygen consumption rate of mock- and JEV-infected cells cultured with or without long chain fatty acid (LCFA) palmitate. Cells with JEV infection showed impaired LCFA β-oxidation and increased interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expression. JEV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) interacted with hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase α and β subunits, two components of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) involved in LCFA β-oxidation, and NS5 proteins were detected in mitochondria and co-localized with MTP. LCFA β-oxidation was impaired and higher cytokines were induced in cells overexpressing NS5 protein as compared with control cells. Deletion and mutation studies showed that the N-terminus of NS5 was involved in the MTP association, and a single point mutation of NS5 residue 19 from methionine to alanine (NS5-M19A) reduced its binding ability with MTP. The recombinant JEV with NS5-M19A mutation (JEV-NS5-M19A) was less able to block LCFA β-oxidation and induced lower levels of IL-6 and TNF-α than wild-type JEV. Moreover, mice challenged with JEV-NS5-M19A showed less neurovirulence and neuroinvasiveness. We identified a novel function of JEV NS5 in viral pathogenesis by impairing LCFA β-oxidation and inducing cytokine expression by association with MTP. PMID:25816318

  13. Polymerization and nucleic acid-binding properties of human L1 ORF1 protein.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Kathryn E; Hickman, Alison B; Jones, Charles E; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Furano, Anthony V

    2012-01-01

    The L1 (LINE 1) retrotransposable element encodes two proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p. ORF2p is the L1 replicase, but the role of ORF1p is unknown. Mouse ORF1p, a coiled-coil-mediated trimer of ∼42-kDa monomers, binds nucleic acids and has nucleic acid chaperone activity. We purified human L1 ORF1p expressed in insect cells and made two findings that significantly advance our knowledge of the protein. First, in the absence of nucleic acids, the protein polymerizes under the very conditions (0.05 M NaCl) that are optimal for high (∼1 nM)-affinity nucleic acid binding. The non-coiled-coil C-terminal half mediates formation of the polymer, an active conformer that is instantly resolved to trimers, or multimers thereof, by nucleic acid. Second, the protein has a biphasic effect on mismatched double-stranded DNA, a proxy chaperone substrate. It protects the duplex from dissociation at 37°C before eventually melting it when largely polymeric. Therefore, polymerization of ORF1p seemingly affects its interaction with nucleic acids. Additionally, polymerization of ORF1p at its translation site could explain the heretofore-inexplicable phenomenon of cis preference-the favored retrotransposition of the actively translated L1 transcript, which is essential for L1 survival. PMID:21937507

  14. VILIP, a cognate protein of the retinal calcium binding proteins visinin and recoverin, is expressed in the developing chicken brain.

    PubMed

    Lenz, S E; Henschel, Y; Zopf, D; Voss, B; Gundelfinger, E D

    1992-09-01

    Using a selective cloning approach we previously isolated a number of cDNAs of transcripts that are newly expressed during terminal differentiation of the chicken optic tectum. Here, we have characterized one of these cDNAs (OZ1) by Northern analysis and in situ hybridization. The OZ1 cDNA hybridizes to two transcripts of 1.6 kb and 2.9 kb which are widely expressed in the brain but not detectable in liver, heart or skeletal muscle. Cloning of overlapping cDNAs revealed that both transcripts encode the same open reading frame for a polypeptide of 191 amino acids. The deduced protein contains 4 EF-hand consensus motifs characteristic of calmodulin-like Ca(2+)-binding proteins. It displays 40% and 46% sequence identity with the retinal photoreceptor-specific Ca(2+)-binding proteins visinin and recoverin, respectively, and was termed VILIP (visinin-like protein). VILIP transcripts are also expressed in the retina. However, the expression pattern does not overlap with that of visinin or recoverin. The possible functional implications of the similarity to recoverin, which regulates guanylate cyclase activity of retinal rod cells in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, are discussed.

  15. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Stefanie; Sicker, Marit; Marx, Grit; Winkler, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Volker; Hülsmann, Swen; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type. PMID:26076353

  16. A Transgenic Mouse Line Expressing the Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato in GABAergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Besser, Stefanie; Sicker, Marit; Marx, Grit; Winkler, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Volker; Hülsmann, Swen; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory neurons are a large population of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals and crucially contribute to the function of the circuitry of the brain. To identify specific cell types and investigate their functions labelling of cell populations by transgenic expression of fluorescent proteins is a powerful approach. While a number of mouse lines expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in different subpopulations of GABAergic cells are available, GFP expressing mouse lines are not suitable for either crossbreeding to other mouse lines expressing GFP in other cell types or for Ca2+-imaging using the superior green Ca2+-indicator dyes. Therefore, we have generated a novel transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in GABAergic neurons using a bacterial artificial chromosome based strategy and inserting the tdTomato open reading frame at the start codon within exon 1 of the GAD2 gene encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). TdTomato expression was observed in all expected brain regions; however, the fluorescence intensity was highest in the olfactory bulb and the striatum. Robust expression was also observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum, amacrine cells in the retina as well as in cells migrating along the rostral migratory stream. In cortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem, 80% to 90% of neurons expressing endogenous GAD65 also expressed the fluorescent protein. Moreover, almost all tdTomato-expressing cells coexpressed GAD65, indicating that indeed only GABAergic neurons are labelled by tdTomato expression. This mouse line with its unique spectral properties for labelling GABAergic neurons will therefore be a valuable new tool for research addressing this fascinating cell type. PMID:26076353

  17. Functional Analysis of Mouse G6pc1 Mutations Using a Novel In Situ Assay for Glucose-6-Phosphatase Activity and the Effect of Mutations in Conserved Human G6PC1/G6PC2 Amino Acids on G6PC2 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Boortz, Kayla A.; Syring, Kristen E.; Pound, Lynley D.; Wang, Yingda; Oeser, James K.; O’Brien, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) has been associated with increased risk for development of type 2 diabetes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in G6PC2 are the most important common determinants of variations in FBG in humans. Studies using G6pc2 knockout mice suggest that G6pc2 regulates the glucose sensitivity of insulin secretion. G6PC2 and the related G6PC1 and G6PC3 genes encode glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. This study describes a functional analysis of 22 non-synonymous G6PC2 SNPs, that alter amino acids that are conserved in human G6PC1, mouse G6pc1 and mouse G6pc2, with the goal of identifying variants that potentially affect G6PC2 activity/expression. Published data suggest strong conservation of catalytically important amino acids between all four proteins and the related G6PC3 isoform. Because human G6PC2 has very low glucose-6-phosphatase activity we used an indirect approach, examining the effect of these SNPs on mouse G6pc1 activity. Using a novel in situ functional assay for glucose-6-phosphatase activity we demonstrate that the amino acid changes associated with the human G6PC2 rs144254880 (Arg79Gln), rs149663725 (Gly114Arg) and rs2232326 (Ser324Pro) SNPs reduce mouse G6pc1 enzyme activity without affecting protein expression. The Arg79Gln variant alters an amino acid mutation of which, in G6PC1, has previously been shown to cause glycogen storage disease type 1a. We also demonstrate that the rs368382511 (Gly8Glu), rs138726309 (His177Tyr), rs2232323 (Tyr207Ser) rs374055555 (Arg293Trp), rs2232326 (Ser324Pro), rs137857125 (Pro313Leu) and rs2232327 (Pro340Leu) SNPs confer decreased G6PC2 protein expression. In summary, these studies identify multiple G6PC2 variants that have the potential to be associated with altered FBG in humans. PMID:27611587

  18. Functional Analysis of Mouse G6pc1 Mutations Using a Novel In Situ Assay for Glucose-6-Phosphatase Activity and the Effect of Mutations in Conserved Human G6PC1/G6PC2 Amino Acids on G6PC2 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Boortz, Kayla A; Syring, Kristen E; Pound, Lynley D; Wang, Yingda; Oeser, James K; O'Brien, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) has been associated with increased risk for development of type 2 diabetes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in G6PC2 are the most important common determinants of variations in FBG in humans. Studies using G6pc2 knockout mice suggest that G6pc2 regulates the glucose sensitivity of insulin secretion. G6PC2 and the related G6PC1 and G6PC3 genes encode glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. This study describes a functional analysis of 22 non-synonymous G6PC2 SNPs, that alter amino acids that are conserved in human G6PC1, mouse G6pc1 and mouse G6pc2, with the goal of identifying variants that potentially affect G6PC2 activity/expression. Published data suggest strong conservation of catalytically important amino acids between all four proteins and the related G6PC3 isoform. Because human G6PC2 has very low glucose-6-phosphatase activity we used an indirect approach, examining the effect of these SNPs on mouse G6pc1 activity. Using a novel in situ functional assay for glucose-6-phosphatase activity we demonstrate that the amino acid changes associated with the human G6PC2 rs144254880 (Arg79Gln), rs149663725 (Gly114Arg) and rs2232326 (Ser324Pro) SNPs reduce mouse G6pc1 enzyme activity without affecting protein expression. The Arg79Gln variant alters an amino acid mutation of which, in G6PC1, has previously been shown to cause glycogen storage disease type 1a. We also demonstrate that the rs368382511 (Gly8Glu), rs138726309 (His177Tyr), rs2232323 (Tyr207Ser) rs374055555 (Arg293Trp), rs2232326 (Ser324Pro), rs137857125 (Pro313Leu) and rs2232327 (Pro340Leu) SNPs confer decreased G6PC2 protein expression. In summary, these studies identify multiple G6PC2 variants that have the potential to be associated with altered FBG in humans. PMID:27611587

  19. Sex, but not maternal protein or folic acid intake, determines the fatty acid composition of hepatic phospholipids, but not of triacylglycerol, in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Burdge, G C; Slater-Jefferies, J L; Grant, R A; Chung, W-S; West, A L; Lillycrop, K A; Hanson, M A; Calder, P C

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether the protein and folic acid content of the maternal diet and the sex of the offspring alter the polyunsaturated fatty acid content of hepatic phospholipids and triacylglycerol (TAG). Pregnant rats were fed diets containing 18% or 9% protein with either 1 or 5mg/kg folic acid. Maternal diet did not alter hepatic lipid composition in the adult offspring. Data from each maternal dietary group were combined and reanalysed. The proportion of 18:0, 20:4n-6 and 22:6n-3 in liver phospholipids was higher in females than in males, while hepatic TAG composition did not differ between sexes. Delta5 Desaturase expression was higher in females than in males. Neither Delta5 nor Delta6 desaturase expression was related to polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations. These results suggest that sex differences in liver phospholipid fatty acid composition may reflect primary differences in the specificity of phospholipid biosynthesis.

  20. Review: the liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Hugo L

    2009-12-01

    The liver bile acid-binding proteins, L-BABPs, formerly called the liver "basic" fatty acid-binding proteins, are a subfamily of the fatty acid-binding proteins, FABPs. All the members of this protein group share the same fold: a 10 stranded beta barrel in which two short helices are inserted in between the first and the second strand of antiparallel beta sheet. The barrel encloses the ligand binding cavity of the protein while the two helices are believed to be involved in ligand accessibility to the binding site. The L-BABP subfamily has been found to be present in the liver of several vertebrates: fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds but not in mammals. The members of the FABP family present in mammals that appear to be more closely related to the L-BABPs are the liver FABPs and the ileal BABPs, both very extensively studied. Several L-BABP X-ray structures are available and chicken L-BABP has also been studied using NMR spectroscopy. The stoichiometry of ligand binding for bile acids, first determined by X-ray crystallography for the chicken liver protein, is of two cholates per protein molecule with the only exception of zebrafish L-BABP which, due to the presence of a disulfide bridge, has a stoichiometry of 1:1. The stoichiometry of ligand binding for fatty acids, determined with several different techniques, is 1:1. An unanswered question of great relevance is the identity of the protein that in mammals performs the function that in other vertebrates is carried out by the L-BABPS.

  1. Co-expression and co-localization of hub proteins and their partners are encoded in protein sequence.

    PubMed

    Feiglin, Ariel; Ashkenazi, Shaul; Schlessinger, Avner; Rost, Burkhard; Ofran, Yanay

    2014-04-01

    Spatiotemporal coordination is a critical factor in biological processes. Some hubs in protein-protein interaction networks tend to be co-expressed and co-localized with their partners more strongly than others, a difference which is arguably related to functional differences between the hubs. Based on numerous analyses of yeast hubs, it has been suggested that differences in co-expression and co-localization are reflected in the structural and molecular characteristics of the hubs. We hypothesized that if indeed differences in co-expression and co-localization are encoded in the molecular characteristics of the protein, it may be possible to predict the tendency for co-expression and co-localization of human hubs based on features learned from systematically characterized yeast hubs. Thus, we trained a prediction algorithm on hubs from yeast that were classified as either strongly or weakly co-expressed and co-localized with their partners, and applied the trained model to 800 human hub proteins. We found that the algorithm significantly distinguishes between human hubs that are co-expressed and co-localized with their partners and hubs that are not. The prediction is based on sequence derived features such as "stickiness", i.e. the existence of multiple putative binding sites that enable multiple simultaneous interactions, "plasticity", i.e. the existence of predicted structural disorder which conjecturally allows for multiple consecutive interactions with the same binding site and predicted subcellular localization. These results suggest that spatiotemporal dynamics is encoded, at least in part, in the amino acid sequence of the protein and that this encoding is similar in yeast and in human.

  2. Substratum Stiffness and Latrunculin B Regulate Matrix Gene and Protein Expression in Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thomasy, Sara M.; Wood, Joshua A.; Kass, Philip H.; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the impact of substratum stiffness and latrunculin-B (Lat-B), on the expression of several matrix proteins that are associated with glaucoma. Methods. Human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells were cultured on hydrogels possessing stiffness values mimicking those found in normal (5 kPa) and glaucomatous meshworks (75 kPa), or tissue culture polystyrene (TCP; >1 GPa). Cells were treated with 2.0 μM Lat-B in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or DMSO alone. RT-PCR was used to determine the impact of substratum stiffness and/or Lat-B treatment on the expression of secreted protein, acidic, cysteine rich (SPARC), myocilin, angiopoietin-like factor (ANGPTL)-7, and transglutaminase (TGM)-2. Immunofluorescence was used to assess changes in protein expression. Results. SPARC and myocilin mRNA expression were dramatically increased on the 75 kPa hydrogels and decreased on the 5 kPa hydrogels in comparison to TCP. In contrast, ANGPTL-7 mRNA and TGM-2 mRNA was decreased on the 75 kPa and 5 kPa hydrogels, respectively, in comparison with TCP. Treatment with Lat-B dramatically downregulated both SPARC and myocilin on 75 kPa hydrogels. In contrast, cells grown on TCP produced greater or similar amounts of SPARC and myocilin mRNA after Lat-B treatment. SPARC and myocilin protein expression paralleled changes in mRNA expression. Conclusions. Substratum stiffness impacts HTM matrix gene and protein expression and modulates the impact of Lat-B treatment on the expression of these matrix proteins. Integrating the use of biologically relevant substratum stiffness in the conduction of in vitro experiments gives important insights into HTM cell response to drugs that may more accurately predict responses observed in vivo. PMID:22247475

  3. [Fractional and amino acid composition of krill proteins and the potential for obtaining protein preparations].

    PubMed

    Orlova, T A; Churina, E E; Kuranova, L K

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the fractional composition of krill proteins demonstrated that the content of protein fractions changes depending on the time of krill catch. The highest amount of water-soluble proteins is contained by krill caught in December (64%), of salt-soluble by krill caught in June (12%), base-soluble by krill caught in May, September and February (34%). Krill protein contains from 50 to 60% of water- and salt-soluble fractions. Analysis of the amino acid composition of krill proteins showed that it does not differ essentially from that of adequate food proteins.

  4. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: a macroarray study.

    PubMed

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Różyńska, Krystyna; Zdunek, Małgorzata; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Wojcierowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs.

  5. Nucleomorphin. A novel, acidic, nuclear calmodulin-binding protein from dictyostelium that regulates nuclear number.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2002-05-31

    Probing of Dictyostelium discoideum cell extracts after SDS-PAGE using (35)S-recombinant calmodulin (CaM) as a probe has revealed approximately three-dozen Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding proteins. Here, we report the molecular cloning, expression, and subcellular localization of a gene encoding a novel calmodulin-binding protein (CaMBP); we have called nucleomorphin, from D. discoideum. A lambdaZAP cDNA expression library of cells from multicellular development was screened using a recombinant calmodulin probe ((35)S-VU1-CaM). The open reading frame of 1119 nucleotides encodes a polypeptide of 340 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 38.7 kDa and is constitutively expressed throughout the Dictyostelium life cycle. Nucleomorphin contains a highly acidic glutamic/aspartic acid inverted repeat (DEED) with significant similarity to the conserved nucleoplasmin domain and a putative transmembrane domain in the carboxyl-terminal region. Southern blotting reveals that nucleomorphin exists as a single copy gene. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-agarose we show that bacterially expressed nucleomorphin binds to bovine CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Amino-terminal fusion to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) showed that GFP-NumA localized to the nucleus as distinct arc-like patterns similar to heterochromatin regions. GFP-NumA lacking the acidic DEED repeat still showed arc-like accumulations at the nuclear periphery, but the number of nuclei in these cells was increased markedly compared with control cells. Cells expressing GFP-NumA lacking the transmembrane domain localized to the nuclear periphery but did not affect nuclear number or gross morphology. Nucleomorphin is the first nuclear CaMBP to be identified in Dictyostelium. Furthermore, these data present the first identification of a member of the nucleoplasmin family as a calmodulin-binding protein and suggest nucleomorphin has a role in nuclear structure in Dictyostelium. PMID:11919178

  6. Reduced toxicity and broad spectrum resistance to viral and fungal infection in transgenic plants expressing pokeweed antiviral protein II.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Zoubenko, O; Tumer, N E

    1998-12-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein II (PAPII), a 30 kDa protein isolated from leaves of Phytolacca americana, inhibits translation by catalytically removing a specific adenine residue from the large rRNA of the 60S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. The protein sequence of PAPII shows only 41% identity to PAP and PAP-S, two other antiviral proteins isolated from pokeweed. We isolated a cDNA corresponding to PAPII and introduced it into tobacco plants. PAPII expressed in transgenic tobacco was correctly processed to the mature form as in pokeweed and accumulated to at least 10-fold higher levels than wild-type PAP. We had previously observed a significant decrease in transformation frequency with PAP and recovered only two transgenic lines expressing 1-2 ng per mg protein. In contrast, eight different transgenic lines expressing up to 250 ng/mg PAPII were recovered, indicating that PAPII is less toxic than PAP. Two symptomless transgenic lines expressing PAPII were resistant to tobacco mosaic virus, potato virus X and the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. The level of viral and fungal resistance observed correlated well with the amount of PAPII protein accumulated. Pathogenesis-related protein PR1 was constitutively expressed in transgenic lines expressing PAPII. Although PR1 was constitutively expressed, no increase in salicylic acid levels was detected, indicating that PAPII may elicit a salicylic acid-independent signal transduction pathway.

  7. A Potential New Therapeutic Approach for Friedreich Ataxia: Induction of Frataxin Expression With TALE Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chapdelaine, Pierre; Coulombe, Zoé; Chikh, Amina; Gérard, Catherine; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2013-09-03

    TALEs targeting a promoter sequence and fused with a transcription activation domain (TAD) may be used to specifically induce the expression of a gene as a potential treatment for haploinsufficiency. This potential therapeutic approach was applied to increase the expression of frataxin in fibroblasts of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) patients. FRDA fibroblast cells were nucleofected with a pCR3.1 expression vector coding for TALEFrat#8 fused with VP64. A twofold increase of the frataxin mRNA (detected by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR)) associated with a similar increase of the mature form of the frataxin protein was observed. The frataxin mRNA and protein were also increased by this TALE in the fibroblasts of the YG8R mouse model. The addition of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC) or of valproic acid (VPA) to the TALE treatment did not produce significant improvement. Other TADs (i.e., p65, TFAP2α, SRF, SP1, and MyoD) fused with the TALEFrat#8 gene did not produce a significant increase in the frataxin protein. Thus the TALEFrat#8-VP64 recombinant protein targeting the frataxin promoter could eventually be used to increase the frataxin expression and alleviate the FRDA symptoms.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e119; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.41; published online 3 September 2013.

  8. Effect of crude oil petroleum hydrocarbons on protein expression of the prawn Macrobrachium borellii.

    PubMed

    Pasquevich, M Y; Dreon, M S; Gutierrez Rivera, J N; Vázquez Boucard, C; Heras, H

    2013-05-01

    Hydrocarbon pollution is a major environmental threat to ecosystems in marine and freshwater environments, but its toxicological effect on aquatic organisms remains little studied. A proteomic approach was used to analyze the effect of a freshwater oil spill on the prawn Macrobrachium borellii. To this aim, proteins were extracted from midgut gland (hepatopancreas) of male and female prawns exposed 7 days to a sublethal concentration (0.6 ppm) of water-soluble fraction of crude oil (WSF). Exposure to WSF induced responses at the protein expression level. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed by WSF exposure. Seven proteins were identified using MS/MS and de novo sequencing. Nm23 oncoprotein, arginine methyltransferase, fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase were down-regulated, whereas two glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms and a lipocalin-like crustacyanin (CTC) were up-regulated after WSF exposure. CTC mRNA levels were further analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR showing an increased expression after WSF exposure. The proteins identified are involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, detoxification, transport of hydrophobic molecules and cellular homeostasis among others. These results provide evidence for better understanding the toxic mechanisms of hydrocarbons. Moreover, some of these differentially expressed proteins would be employed as potential novel biomarkers.

  9. Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Role in Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nutten, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are polymers composed of 30 or more amino acids; some of them are essential dietary components, since they are not synthetized by human metabolic processes. They are crucial for healthy growth and development and influence major functions of the body. The infant's first year is a critical time of rapid growth and development, which must be supported by a high rate of protein synthesis. Breast milk, as a single specific food source in the first months of life, is providing the total protein and essential amino acids required. Infant formulas have been designed for infants who cannot be breastfed. They should be similar to breast milk in their composition and their functional outcomes, insuring appropriate growth, optimal development, maturation of the immune system, easy digestion and healthy metabolic programming. By modifying their protein components, specific infant formulas have also been developed for specific needs. For example, partially hydrolyzed (prevention of atopic dermatitis) and extensively hydrolyzed or amino-acid-based infant formulas (reduction in allergy symptoms) have been designed for the management of cow's milk protein allergy. In conclusion, proteins provided via breast milk or infant formula are essential components of the infant's diet; therefore, the specific quality, quantity and conformation of proteins are of utmost importance for healthy growth and development. PMID:27336588

  10. Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Role in Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nutten, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are polymers composed of 30 or more amino acids; some of them are essential dietary components, since they are not synthetized by human metabolic processes. They are crucial for healthy growth and development and influence major functions of the body. The infant's first year is a critical time of rapid growth and development, which must be supported by a high rate of protein synthesis. Breast milk, as a single specific food source in the first months of life, is providing the total protein and essential amino acids required. Infant formulas have been designed for infants who cannot be breastfed. They should be similar to breast milk in their composition and their functional outcomes, insuring appropriate growth, optimal development, maturation of the immune system, easy digestion and healthy metabolic programming. By modifying their protein components, specific infant formulas have also been developed for specific needs. For example, partially hydrolyzed (prevention of atopic dermatitis) and extensively hydrolyzed or amino-acid-based infant formulas (reduction in allergy symptoms) have been designed for the management of cow's milk protein allergy. In conclusion, proteins provided via breast milk or infant formula are essential components of the infant's diet; therefore, the specific quality, quantity and conformation of proteins are of utmost importance for healthy growth and development.

  11. High-throughput insect cell protein expression applications.

    PubMed

    Buchs, Mirjam; Kim, Ernie; Pouliquen, Yann; Sachs, Michael; Geisse, Sabine; Mahnke, Marion; Hunt, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) is one of the most efficient systems for production of recombinant proteins and consequently its application is wide-spread in industry as well as in academia. Since the early 1970s, when the first stable insect cell lines were established and the infectivity of bacu-lovirus in an in vitro culture system was demonstrated (1, 2), virtually thousands of reports have been published on the successful expression of proteins using this system as well as on method improvement. However, despite its popularity the system is labor intensive and time consuming. Moreover, adaptation of the system to multi-parallel (high-throughput) expression is much more difficult to achieve than with E. coli due to its far more complex nature. However, recent years have seen the development of strategies that have greatly enhanced the stream-lining and speed of baculovirus protein expression for increased throughput via use of automation and miniaturization. This chapter therefore tries to collate these developments in a series of protocols (which are modifications to standard procedure plus several new approaches) that will allow the user to expedite the speed and throughput of baculovirus-mediated protein expression and facilitate true multi-parallel, high-throughput protein expression profiling in insect cells. In addition we also provide a series of optimized protocols for small and large-scale transient insect cell expression that allow for both the rapid analysis of multiple constructs and the concomitant scale-up of