Science.gov

Sample records for acidic protein revealed

  1. Super-resolution Microscopy of Clickable Amino Acids Reveals the Effects of Fluorescent Protein Tagging on Protein Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Vreja, Ingrid C; Nikić, Ivana; Göttfert, Fabian; Bates, Mark; Kröhnert, Katharina; Outeiro, Tiago F; Hell, Stefan W; Lemke, Edward A; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2015-11-24

    The advent of super-resolution microscopy (nanoscopy) has set high standards for fluorescence tagging. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are convenient tags in conventional imaging, but their use in nanoscopy has been questioned due to their relatively large size and propensity to form multimers. Here, we compared the nanoscale organization of proteins with or without FP tags by introducing the unnatural amino acid propargyl-L-lysine (PRK) in 26 proteins known to form multimolecular arrangements and into their FP-tagged variants. We revealed the proteins by coupling synthetic fluorophores to PRK via click chemistry and visualized them using ground-state depletion microscopy followed by individual molecule return, as well as stimulated emission depletion microscopy. The arrangements formed by the FP-tagged and nontagged proteins were similar. Mild, but statistically significant differences were observed for only six proteins (23% of all proteins tested). This suggests that FP-based nanoscopy is generally reliable. Unnatural amino acids should be a reliable alternative for the few proteins that are sensitive to FP tagging. PMID:26498474

  2. Revealing the amino acid composition of proteins within an expanded genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Aerni, Hans R.; Shifman, Mark A.; Rogulina, Svetlana; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Rinehart, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    The genetic code can be manipulated to reassign codons for the incorporation of non-standard amino acids (NSAA). Deletion of release factor 1 in Escherichia coli enhances translation of UAG (Stop) codons, yet may also extended protein synthesis at natural UAG terminated messenger RNAs. The fidelity of protein synthesis at reassigned UAG codons and the purity of the NSAA containing proteins produced require careful examination. Proteomics would be an ideal tool for these tasks, but conventional proteomic analyses cannot readily identify the extended proteins and accurately discover multiple amino acid (AA) insertions at a single UAG. To address these challenges, we created a new proteomic workflow that enabled the detection of UAG readthrough in native proteins in E. coli strains in which UAG was reassigned to encode phosphoserine. The method also enabled quantitation of NSAA and natural AA incorporation at UAG in a recombinant reporter protein. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the fidelity and purity of the phosphoserine orthogonal translation system (OTS) and used this information to improve its performance. Our results show a surprising diversity of natural AAs at reassigned stop codons. Our method can be used to improve OTSs and to quantify amino acid purity at reassigned codons in organisms with expanded genetic codes. PMID:25378305

  3. Revealing the amino acid composition of proteins within an expanded genetic code.

    PubMed

    Aerni, Hans R; Shifman, Mark A; Rogulina, Svetlana; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Rinehart, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    The genetic code can be manipulated to reassign codons for the incorporation of non-standard amino acids (NSAA). Deletion of release factor 1 in Escherichia coli enhances translation of UAG (Stop) codons, yet may also extended protein synthesis at natural UAG terminated messenger RNAs. The fidelity of protein synthesis at reassigned UAG codons and the purity of the NSAA containing proteins produced require careful examination. Proteomics would be an ideal tool for these tasks, but conventional proteomic analyses cannot readily identify the extended proteins and accurately discover multiple amino acid (AA) insertions at a single UAG. To address these challenges, we created a new proteomic workflow that enabled the detection of UAG readthrough in native proteins in E. coli strains in which UAG was reassigned to encode phosphoserine. The method also enabled quantitation of NSAA and natural AA incorporation at UAG in a recombinant reporter protein. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the fidelity and purity of the phosphoserine orthogonal translation system (OTS) and used this information to improve its performance. Our results show a surprising diversity of natural AAs at reassigned stop codons. Our method can be used to improve OTSs and to quantify amino acid purity at reassigned codons in organisms with expanded genetic codes. PMID:25378305

  4. Amino acid racemization reveals differential protein turnover in osteoarthritic articular and meniscal cartilages

    PubMed Central

    Stabler, Thomas V; Byers, Samuel S; Zura, Robert D; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Certain amino acids within proteins have been reported to change from the L form to the D form over time. This process is known as racemization and is most likely to occur in long-lived low-turnover tissues such as normal cartilage. We hypothesized that diseased tissue, as found in an osteoarthritic (OA) joint, would have increased turnover reflected by a decrease in the racemized amino acid content. Methods Using high-performance liquid chromatography methods, we quantified the L and D forms of amino acids reported to racemize in vivo on a biological timescale: alanine, aspartate (Asp), asparagine (Asn), glutamate, glutamine, isoleucine, leucine (Leu), and serine (Ser). Furthermore, using a metabolically inactive control material (tooth dentin) and a control material with normal metabolism (normal articular cartilage), we developed an age adjustment in order to make inferences about the state of protein turnover in cartilage and meniscus. Results In the metabolically inactive control material (n = 25, ages 13 to 80 years) and the normal metabolizing control material (n = 19, ages 17 to 83 years), only Asp + Asn (Asx), Ser, and Leu showed a significant change (increase) in racemization with age (P < 0.01). The age-adjusted proportions of racemized to total amino acid (D/D+L expressed as a percentage of the control material) for Asx, Ser, and Leu when compared with the normal articular cartilage control were 97%, 74%, and 73% in OA meniscal cartilage and 97%, 70%, and 78% in OA articular cartilage. We also observed lower amino acid content in OA articular and meniscal cartilages compared with normal articular cartilage as well as a loss of total amino acids with age in the OA meniscal but not the OA articular cartilage. Conclusions These data demonstrate comparable anabolic responses for non-lesioned OA articular cartilage and OA meniscal cartilage but an excess of catabolism over anabolism for the meniscal cartilage. PMID:19267899

  5. Neuroinformatics analyses reveal GABAt and SSADH as major proteins involved in anticonvulsant activity of valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Piplani, Sakshi; Verma, Prabhakar Kumar; Kumar, Ajit

    2016-07-01

    The unequivocal hypotheses about anticonvulsant activity of valproic acid (VPA) have always been a basic hurdle in designing next generation neurotherapeutics, particularly the anti-epileptic drugs. The present study reports about a comprehensive in-silico investigation into qualitative and quantitative binding of VPA and corresponding natural ligands of four major enzymes involved in neurotransmissions, namely-GABA transaminase (GABAt), α-keto glutarate dehydrogenase (α-KGDH), Succinate Semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) and Glutamate Decarboxylase (GAD), respectively. The molecular docking analyses revealed that VPA inhibits GABAt and α-KGDH through allosteric while SSADH through competitive mode of binding. There is an observed elevation in binding of glutamate over GAD in the presence of VPA. The docking inhibition constant (Ki) of VPA to all the studied enzymatic receptors were observed to be well below the therapeutic concentration of VPA in blood, except for α-KGDH, thus favouring GABAergic over glutamatergic mode of anticonvulsant activity of VPA. The report is probably the first comprehensive in-silico molecular study about VPA action. PMID:27261619

  6. NMR studies reveal the role of biomembranes in modulating ligand binding and release by intracellular bile acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pedò, Massimo; Löhr, Frank; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Assfalg, Michael; Dötsch, Volker; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-12-18

    Bile acid molecules are transferred vectorially between basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and enterocytes in the context of the enterohepatic circulation, a process regulating whole body lipid homeostasis. This work addresses the role of the cytosolic lipid binding proteins in the intracellular transfer of bile acids between different membrane compartments. We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data describing the ternary system composed of the bile acid binding protein, bile acids, and membrane mimetic systems, such as anionic liposomes. This work provides evidence that the investigated liver bile acid binding protein undergoes association with the anionic membrane and binding-induced partial unfolding. The addition of the physiological ligand to the protein-liposome mixture is capable of modulating this interaction, shifting the equilibrium towards the free folded holo protein. An ensemble of NMR titration experiments, based on nitrogen-15 protein and ligand observation, confirm that the membrane and the ligand establish competing binding equilibria, modulating the cytoplasmic permeability of bile acids. These results support a mechanism of ligand binding and release controlled by the onset of a bile salt concentration gradient within the polarized cell. The location of a specific protein region interacting with liposomes is highlighted. PMID:19836400

  7. Crystal Structure of the Human Fatty Acid Synthase Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein-Reductase Domain Complexed with Triclosan Reveals Allosteric Protein-Protein Interface Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Sippel, Katherine H.; Vyas, Nand K.; Zhang, Wei; Sankaran, Banumathi; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2014-01-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a large, multidomain protein that synthesizes long chain fatty acids. Because these fatty acids are primarily provided by diet, FAS is normally expressed at low levels; however, it is highly up-regulated in many cancers. Human enoyl-acyl carrier protein-reductase (hER) is one of the FAS catalytic domains, and its inhibition by drugs like triclosan (TCL) can increase cytotoxicity and decrease drug resistance in cancer cells. We have determined the structure of hER in the presence and absence of TCL. TCL was not bound in the active site, as predicted, but rather at the protein-protein interface (PPI). TCL binding induces a dimer orientation change that causes downstream structural rearrangement in critical active site residues. Kinetics studies indicate that TCL is capable of inhibiting the isolated hER domain with an IC50 of ∼55 μm. Given the hER-TCL structure and the inhibition observed in the hER domain, it seems likely that TCL is observed in the physiologically relevant binding site and that it acts as an allosteric PPI inhibitor. TCL may be a viable scaffold for the development of anti-cancer PPI FAS inhibitors. PMID:25301948

  8. Mutational Studies on Resurrected Ancestral Proteins Reveal Conservation of Site-Specific Amino Acid Preferences throughout Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Valeria A.; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Local protein interactions (“molecular context” effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  9. Mutational studies on resurrected ancestral proteins reveal conservation of site-specific amino acid preferences throughout evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A; Gaucher, Eric A; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2015-02-01

    Local protein interactions ("molecular context" effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  10. Proteomic Dissection of Endosperm Starch Granule Associated Proteins Reveals a Network Coordinating Starch Biosynthesis and Amino Acid Metabolism and Glycolysis in Rice Endosperms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huatao; Wang, Tai

    2016-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis and starch granule packaging in cereal endosperms involve a coordinated action of starch biosynthesis enzymes and coordination with other metabolisms. Because directly binding to starch granules, starch granule-associated proteins (SGAPs) are essential to understand the underlying mechanisms, however the information on SGAPs remains largely unknown. Here, we dissected developmentally changed SGAPs from developing rice endosperms from 10 to 20 days after flowering (DAF). Starch granule packaging was not completed at 10 DAF, and was finished in the central endosperm at 15 DAF and in the whole endosperm at 20 DAF. Proteomic analysis with two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed 115 developmentally changed SGAPs, representing 37 unique proteins. 65% of the unique proteins had isoforms. 39% of the identified SGAPs were involved in starch biosynthesis with main functions in polyglucan elongation and granule structure trimming. Almost all proteins involved in starch biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, glycolysis, protein folding, and PPDK pathways increased abundance as the endosperm developed, and were predicted in an interaction network. The network represents an important mechanism to orchestrate carbon partitioning among starch biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis and glycolysis for efficient starch and protein storage. These results provide novel insights into mechanisms of starch biosynthesis and its coordination with amino acid metabolisms and glycolysis in cereal endosperms. PMID:27252723

  11. Proteomic Dissection of Endosperm Starch Granule Associated Proteins Reveals a Network Coordinating Starch Biosynthesis and Amino Acid Metabolism and Glycolysis in Rice Endosperms

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huatao; Wang, Tai

    2016-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis and starch granule packaging in cereal endosperms involve a coordinated action of starch biosynthesis enzymes and coordination with other metabolisms. Because directly binding to starch granules, starch granule-associated proteins (SGAPs) are essential to understand the underlying mechanisms, however the information on SGAPs remains largely unknown. Here, we dissected developmentally changed SGAPs from developing rice endosperms from 10 to 20 days after flowering (DAF). Starch granule packaging was not completed at 10 DAF, and was finished in the central endosperm at 15 DAF and in the whole endosperm at 20 DAF. Proteomic analysis with two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed 115 developmentally changed SGAPs, representing 37 unique proteins. 65% of the unique proteins had isoforms. 39% of the identified SGAPs were involved in starch biosynthesis with main functions in polyglucan elongation and granule structure trimming. Almost all proteins involved in starch biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis, glycolysis, protein folding, and PPDK pathways increased abundance as the endosperm developed, and were predicted in an interaction network. The network represents an important mechanism to orchestrate carbon partitioning among starch biosynthesis, amino acid biosynthesis and glycolysis for efficient starch and protein storage. These results provide novel insights into mechanisms of starch biosynthesis and its coordination with amino acid metabolisms and glycolysis in cereal endosperms. PMID:27252723

  12. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A.; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A.; Kay, Steve A.; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases. PMID:26175513

  13. Identification of Open Stomata1-Interacting Proteins Reveals Interactions with Sucrose Non-fermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 and with Type 2A Protein Phosphatases That Function in Abscisic Acid Responses.

    PubMed

    Waadt, Rainer; Manalansan, Bianca; Rauniyar, Navin; Munemasa, Shintaro; Booker, Matthew A; Brandt, Benjamin; Waadt, Christian; Nusinow, Dmitri A; Kay, Steve A; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schumacher, Karin; DeLong, Alison; Yates, John R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-09-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) controls growth and development and regulates plant water status through an established signaling pathway. In the presence of ABA, pyrabactin resistance/regulatory component of ABA receptor proteins inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). This, in turn, enables the activation of Sucrose Nonfermenting1-Related Protein Kinases2 (SnRK2). Open Stomata1 (OST1)/SnRK2.6/SRK2E is a major SnRK2-type protein kinase responsible for mediating ABA responses. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing an epitope-tagged OST1 in the recessive ost1-3 mutant background was used for the copurification and identification of OST1-interacting proteins after osmotic stress and ABA treatments. These analyses, which were confirmed using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and coimmunoprecipitation, unexpectedly revealed homo- and heteromerization of OST1 with SnRK2.2, SnRK2.3, OST1, and SnRK2.8. Furthermore, several OST1-complexed proteins were identified as type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A) subunits and as proteins involved in lipid and galactolipid metabolism. More detailed analyses suggested an interaction network between ABA-activated SnRK2-type protein kinases and several PP2A-type protein phosphatase regulatory subunits. pp2a double mutants exhibited a reduced sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and stomatal closure and an enhanced ABA sensitivity in root growth regulation. These analyses add PP2A-type protein phosphatases as another class of protein phosphatases to the interaction network of SnRK2-type protein kinases. PMID:26175513

  14. Intracellular traffic of the lysine and glutamic acid rich protein KERP1 reveals features of endomembrane organization in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Doranda; Manich, Maria; Syan, Sylvie; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Dufour, Alexandre C; Guillén, Nancy

    2016-08-01

    The development of amoebiasis is influenced by the expression of the lysine and glutamic acid rich protein 1 (KERP1), a virulence factor involved in Entamoeba histolytica adherence to human cells. Up to date, it is unknown how the protein transits the parasite cytoplasm towards the plasma membrane, specially because this organism lacks a well-defined endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus. In this work we demonstrate that KERP1 is present at the cell surface and in intracellular vesicles which traffic in a pathway that is independent of the ER-Golgi anterograde transport. The intracellular displacement of vesicles enriched in KERP1 relies on the actin-rich cytoskeleton activities. KERP1 is also present in externalized vesicles deposited on the surface of human cells. We further report the interactome of KERP1 with its association to endomembrane components and lipids. The model for KERP1 traffic here proposed hints for the first time elements of the endocytic and exocytic paths of E. histolytica. PMID:26857352

  15. Evolutionary analyses of the 12-kDa acidic ribosomal P-proteins reveal a distinct protein of higher plant ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Szick, Kathleen; Springer, Mark; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    1998-01-01

    The P-protein complex of eukaryotic ribosomes forms a lateral stalk structure in the active site of the large ribosomal subunit and is thought to assist in the elongation phase of translation by stimulating GTPase activity of elongation factor-2 and removal of deacylated tRNA. The complex in animals, fungi, and protozoans is composed of the acidic phosphoproteins P0 (35 kDa), P1 (11–12 kDa), and P2 (11–12 kDa). Previously we demonstrated by protein purification and microsequencing that ribosomes of maize (Zea mays L.) contain P0, one type of P1, two types of P2, and a distinct P1/P2 type protein designated P3. Here we implemented distance matrices, maximum parsimony, and neighbor-joining analyses to assess the evolutionary relationships between the 12 kDa P-proteins of maize and representative eukaryotic species. The analyses identify P3, found to date only in mono- and dicotyledonous plants, as an evolutionarily distinct P-protein. Plants possess three distinct groups of 12 kDa P-proteins (P1, P2, and P3), whereas animals, fungi, and protozoans possess only two distinct groups (P1 and P2). These findings demonstrate that the P-protein complex has evolved into a highly divergent complex with respect to protein composition despite its critical position within the active site of the ribosome. PMID:9482893

  16. Diversity in the structures and ligand-binding sites of nematode fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins revealed by Na-FAR-1 from Necator americanus.

    PubMed

    Rey-Burusco, M Florencia; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Gabrielsen, Mads; Franchini, Gisela R; Roe, Andrew J; Griffiths, Kate; Zhan, Bin; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O

    2015-11-01

    Fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins (FARs) comprise a family of unusual α-helix rich lipid-binding proteins found exclusively in nematodes. They are secreted into host tissues by parasites of plants, animals and humans. The structure of a FAR protein from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is available, but this protein [C. elegans FAR-7 (Ce-FAR-7)] is from a subfamily of FARs that does not appear to be important at the host/parasite interface. We have therefore examined [Necator americanus FAR-1 (Na-FAR-1)] from the blood-feeding intestinal parasite of humans, N. americanus. The 3D structure of Na-FAR-1 in its ligand-free and ligand-bound forms, determined by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography respectively, reveals an α-helical fold similar to Ce-FAR-7, but Na-FAR-1 possesses a larger and more complex internal ligand-binding cavity and an additional C-terminal α-helix. Titration of apo-Na-FAR-1 with oleic acid, analysed by NMR chemical shift perturbation, reveals that at least four distinct protein-ligand complexes can be formed. Na-FAR-1 and possibly other FARs may have a wider repertoire for hydrophobic ligand binding, as confirmed in the present study by our finding that a range of neutral and polar lipids co-purify with the bacterially expressed recombinant protein. Finally, we show by immunohistochemistry that Na-FAR-1 is present in adult worms with a tissue distribution indicative of possible roles in nutrient acquisition by the parasite and in reproduction in the male. PMID:26318523

  17. Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx)-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism revealed by 1H-NMR-based metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Dan Yue; Zhang, Yuwei; Cheng, Liuliu; Ma, Jinhu; Xi, Yufeng; Yang, Liping; Su, Chao; Shao, Bin; Huang, Anliang; Xiang, Rong; Cheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays an important role in HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis; however, mechanisms underlying HBx-mediated carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach was applied to systematically investigate the effects of HBx on cell metabolism. EdU incorporation assay was conducted to examine the effects of HBx on DNA synthesis, an important feature of nucleic acid metabolism. The results revealed that HBx disrupted metabolism of glucose, lipids, and amino acids, especially nucleic acids. To understand the potential mechanism of HBx-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism, gene expression profiles of HepG2 cells expressing HBx were investigated. The results showed that 29 genes involved in DNA damage and DNA repair were differentially expressed in HBx-expressing HepG2 cells. HBx-induced DNA damage was further demonstrated by karyotyping, comet assay, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analyses. Many studies have previously reported that DNA damage can induce abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism. Thus, our results implied that HBx initially induces DNA damage, and then disrupts nucleic acid metabolism, which in turn blocks DNA repair and induces the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These findings further contribute to our understanding of the occurrence of HCC. PMID:27075403

  18. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  19. Diversity in the structures and ligand-binding sites of nematode fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins revealed by Na-FAR-1 from Necator americanus

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Burusco, M. Florencia; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Gabrielsen, Mads; Franchini, Gisela R.; Roe, Andrew J.; Griffiths, Kate; Zhan, Bin; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins (FARs) comprise a family of unusual α-helix rich lipid-binding proteins found exclusively in nematodes. They are secreted into host tissues by parasites of plants, animals and humans. The structure of a FAR protein from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is available, but this protein [C. elegans FAR-7 (Ce-FAR-7)] is from a subfamily of FARs that does not appear to be important at the host/parasite interface. We have therefore examined [Necator americanus FAR-1 (Na-FAR-1)] from the blood-feeding intestinal parasite of humans, N. americanus. The 3D structure of Na-FAR-1 in its ligand-free and ligand-bound forms, determined by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography respectively, reveals an α-helical fold similar to Ce-FAR-7, but Na-FAR-1 possesses a larger and more complex internal ligand-binding cavity and an additional C-terminal α-helix. Titration of apo-Na-FAR-1 with oleic acid, analysed by NMR chemical shift perturbation, reveals that at least four distinct protein–ligand complexes can be formed. Na-FAR-1 and possibly other FARs may have a wider repertoire for hydrophobic ligand binding, as confirmed in the present study by our finding that a range of neutral and polar lipids co-purify with the bacterially expressed recombinant protein. Finally, we show by immunohistochemistry that Na-FAR-1 is present in adult worms with a tissue distribution indicative of possible roles in nutrient acquisition by the parasite and in reproduction in the male. PMID:26318523

  20. Quantitative Proteomics by SWATH-MS Reveals Altered Expression of Nucleic Acid Binding and Regulatory Proteins in HIV-1-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains a worldwide epidemic, and innovative therapies to combat the virus are needed. Developing a host-oriented antiviral strategy capable of targeting the biomolecules that are directly or indirectly required for viral replication may provide advantages over traditional virus-centric approaches. We used quantitative proteomics by SWATH-MS in conjunction with bioinformatic analyses to identify host proteins, with an emphasis on nucleic acid binding and regulatory proteins, which could serve as candidates in the development of host-oriented antiretroviral strategies. Using SWATH-MS, we identified and quantified the expression of 3608 proteins in uninfected and HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived macrophages. Of these 3608 proteins, 420 were significantly altered upon HIV-1 infection. Bioinformatic analyses revealed functional enrichment for RNA binding and processing as well as transcription regulation. Our findings highlight a novel subset of proteins and processes that are involved in the host response to HIV-1 infection. In addition, we provide an original and transparent methodology for the analysis of label-free quantitative proteomics data generated by SWATH-MS that can be readily adapted to other biological systems. PMID:24564501

  1. Direct comparison of mice null for liver or intestinal fatty acid-binding proteins reveals highly divergent phenotypic responses to high fat feeding.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Angela M; Zhou, Yin Xiu; Agellon, Luis B; Fried, Susan K; Kodukula, Sarala; Fortson, Walter; Patel, Khamoshi; Storch, Judith

    2013-10-18

    The enterocyte expresses two fatty acid-binding proteins (FABP), intestinal FABP (IFABP; FABP2) and liver FABP (LFABP; FABP1). LFABP is also expressed in liver. Despite ligand transport and binding differences, it has remained uncertain whether these intestinally coexpressed proteins, which both bind long chain fatty acids (FA), are functionally distinct. Here, we directly compared IFABP(-/-) and LFABP(-/-) mice fed high fat diets containing long chain saturated or unsaturated fatty acids, reasoning that providing an abundance of dietary lipid would reveal unique functional properties. The results showed that mucosal lipid metabolism was indeed differentially modified, with significant decreases in FA incorporation into triacylglycerol (TG) relative to phospholipid (PL) in IFABP(-/-) mice, whereas LFABP(-/-) mice had reduced monoacylglycerol incorporation in TG relative to PL, as well as reduced FA oxidation. Interestingly, striking differences were found in whole body energy homeostasis; LFABP(-/-) mice fed high fat diets became obese relative to WT, whereas IFABP(-/-) mice displayed an opposite, lean phenotype. Fuel utilization followed adiposity, with LFABP(-/-) mice preferentially utilizing lipids, and IFABP(-/-) mice preferentially metabolizing carbohydrate for energy production. Changes in body weight and fat may arise, in part, from altered food intake; mucosal levels of the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol and arachidonoylethanolamine were elevated in LFABP(-/-), perhaps contributing to increased energy intake. This direct comparison provides evidence that LFABP and IFABP have distinct roles in intestinal lipid metabolism; differential intracellular functions in intestine and in liver, for LFABP(-/-) mice, result in divergent downstream effects at the systemic level. PMID:23990461

  2. Direct Comparison of Mice Null for Liver or Intestinal Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Reveals Highly Divergent Phenotypic Responses to High Fat Feeding*

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Angela M.; Zhou, Yin Xiu; Agellon, Luis B.; Fried, Susan K.; Kodukula, Sarala; Fortson, Walter; Patel, Khamoshi; Storch, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The enterocyte expresses two fatty acid-binding proteins (FABP), intestinal FABP (IFABP; FABP2) and liver FABP (LFABP; FABP1). LFABP is also expressed in liver. Despite ligand transport and binding differences, it has remained uncertain whether these intestinally coexpressed proteins, which both bind long chain fatty acids (FA), are functionally distinct. Here, we directly compared IFABP−/− and LFABP−/− mice fed high fat diets containing long chain saturated or unsaturated fatty acids, reasoning that providing an abundance of dietary lipid would reveal unique functional properties. The results showed that mucosal lipid metabolism was indeed differentially modified, with significant decreases in FA incorporation into triacylglycerol (TG) relative to phospholipid (PL) in IFABP−/− mice, whereas LFABP−/− mice had reduced monoacylglycerol incorporation in TG relative to PL, as well as reduced FA oxidation. Interestingly, striking differences were found in whole body energy homeostasis; LFABP−/− mice fed high fat diets became obese relative to WT, whereas IFABP−/− mice displayed an opposite, lean phenotype. Fuel utilization followed adiposity, with LFABP−/− mice preferentially utilizing lipids, and IFABP−/− mice preferentially metabolizing carbohydrate for energy production. Changes in body weight and fat may arise, in part, from altered food intake; mucosal levels of the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol and arachidonoylethanolamine were elevated in LFABP−/−, perhaps contributing to increased energy intake. This direct comparison provides evidence that LFABP and IFABP have distinct roles in intestinal lipid metabolism; differential intracellular functions in intestine and in liver, for LFABP−/− mice, result in divergent downstream effects at the systemic level. PMID:23990461

  3. Analysis of Amino Acid Variation in the P2 Domain of the GII-4 Norovirus VP1 Protein Reveals Putative Variant-Specific Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Allen, David J.; Gray, Jim J.; Gallimore, Chris I.; Xerry, Jacqueline; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2008-01-01

    Background Human noroviruses are a highly diverse group of viruses classified into three of the five currently recognised Norovirus genogroups, and contain numerous genotypes or genetic clusters. Noroviruses are the major aetiological agent of endemic gastroenteritis in all age groups, as well as the cause of periodic epidemic gastroenteritis. The noroviruses most commonly associated with outbreaks of gastroenteritis are genogroup II genotype 4 (GII-4) strains. The relationship between genotypes of noroviruses with their phenotypes and antigenic profile remains poorly understood through an inability to culture these viruses and the lack of a suitable animal model. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a study of the diversity of amino acid sequences of the highly variable P2 region in the major capsid protein, VP1, of the GII-4 human noroviruses strains using sequence analysis and homology modelling techniques. Conclusions/Significance Our data identifies two sites in this region, which show significant amino acid substitutions associated with the appearance of variant strains responsible for epidemics with major public health impact. Homology modelling studies revealed the exposed nature of these sites on the capsid surface, providing supportive structural data that these two sites are likely to be associated with putative variant-specific epitopes. Furthermore, the patterns in the evolution of these viruses at these sites suggests that noroviruses follow a neutral network pattern of evolution. PMID:18213393

  4. Impaired Acid Catalysis by Mutation of a Protein Loop Hinge Residue in a YopH Mutant Revealed by Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Brandao, T.; Robinson, H; Johnson, S; Hengge, A

    2009-01-01

    Catalysis by the Yersinia protein-tyrosine phosphatase YopH is significantly impaired by the mutation of the conserved Trp354 residue to Phe. Though not a catalytic residue, this Trp is a hinge residue in a conserved flexible loop (the WPD-loop) that must close during catalysis. To learn why this seemingly conservative mutation reduces catalysis by 2 orders of magnitude, we have solved high-resolution crystal structures for the W354F YopH in the absence and in the presence of tungstate and vanadate. Oxyanion binding to the P-loop in W354F is analogous to that observed in the native enzyme. However, the WPD-loop in the presence of oxyanions assumes a half-closed conformation, in contrast to the fully closed state observed in structures of the native enzyme. This observation provides an explanation for the impaired general acid catalysis observed in kinetic experiments with Trp mutants. A 1.4 Angstroms structure of the W354F mutant obtained in the presence of vanadate reveals an unusual divanadate species with a cyclic [VO]2 core, which has precedent in small molecules but has not been previously reported in a protein crystal structure.

  5. Identification of a Lipoteichoic Acid Glycosyltransferase Enzyme Reveals that GW-Domain-Containing Proteins Can Be Retained in the Cell Wall of Listeria monocytogenes in the Absence of Lipoteichoic Acid or Its Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Percy, Matthew G.; Karinou, Eleni; Webb, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne Gram-positive bacterial pathogen, and many of its virulence factors are either secreted proteins or proteins covalently or noncovalently attached to the cell wall. Previous work has indicated that noncovalently attached proteins with GW (glycine-tryptophan) domains are retained in the cell wall by binding to the cell wall polymer lipoteichoic acid (LTA). LTA is a glycerol phosphate polymer, which is modified in L. monocytogenes with galactose and d-alanine residues. We identified Lmo0933 as the cytoplasmic glycosyltransferase required for the LTA glycosylation process and renamed the protein GtlA, for glycosyltransferase LTA A. Using L. monocytogenes mutants lacking galactose or d-alanine modifications or the complete LTA polymer, we show that GW domain proteins are retained within the cell wall, indicating that other cell wall polymers are involved in the retention of GW domain proteins. Further experiments revealed peptidoglycan as the binding receptor as a purified GW domain fusion protein can bind to L. monocytogenes cells lacking wall teichoic acid (WTA) as well as purified peptidoglycan derived from a wild-type or WTA-negative strain. With this, we not only identify the first enzyme involved in the LTA glycosylation process, but we also provide new insight into the binding mechanism of noncovalently attached cell wall proteins. IMPORTANCE Over the past 20 years, a large number of bacterial genome sequences have become available. Computational approaches are used for the genome annotation and identification of genes and encoded proteins. However, the function of many proteins is still unknown and often cannot be predicted bioinformatically. Here, we show that the previously uncharacterized Listeria monocytogenes gene lmo0933 likely codes for a glycosyltransferase required for the decoration of the cell wall polymer lipoteichoic acid (LTA) with galactose residues. Using L. monocytogenes mutants lacking LTA

  6. NMR unfolding studies on a liver bile acid binding protein reveal a global two-state unfolding and localized singular behaviors.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ragona, Laura; Fessas, Dimitrios; Signorelli, Marco; Ugolini, Raffaella; Pedò, Massimo; Assfalg, Michael; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-01-01

    The folding properties of a bile acid binding protein, belonging to a subfamily of the fatty acid binding proteins, have been here investigated both by hydrogen exchange measurements, using the SOFAST NMR approach, and urea denaturation experiments. The urea unfolding profiles of individual residues, acting as single probes, were simultaneously analyzed through a global fit, according to a two-state unfolding model. The resulting conformational stability DeltaG(U)(H(2)O)=7.2+/-0.25kcal mol(-1) is in good agreement with hydrogen exchange stability DeltaG(op). While the majority of protein residues satisfy this model, few amino-acids display a singular behavior, not directly amenable to the presence of a folding intermediate, as reported for other fatty acid binding proteins. These residues are part of a protein patch characterized by enhanced plasticity. To explain this singular behavior a tentative model has been proposed which takes into account the interplay between the dynamic features and the formation of transient aggregates. A functional role for this plasticity, related to translocation across the nuclear membrane, is discussed. PMID:18977333

  7. Label-Free LC-MS Profiling of Skeletal Muscle Reveals Heart-Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein as a Candidate Biomarker of Aerobic Capacity.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zulezwan Ab; Cobley, James N; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L; Edwards, Ben J; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Burniston, Jatin G

    2013-12-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis provides robust comparative analysis of skeletal muscle, but this technique is laborious and limited by its inability to resolve all proteins. In contrast, orthogonal separation by SDS-PAGE and reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) affords deep mining of the muscle proteome, but differential analysis between samples is challenging due to the greater level of fractionation and the complexities of quantifying proteins based on the abundances of their tryptic peptides. Here we report simple, semi-automated and time efficient (i.e., 3 h per sample) proteome profiling of skeletal muscle by 1-dimensional RPLC electrospray ionisation tandem MS. Solei were analysed from rats (n = 5, in each group) bred as either high- or low-capacity runners (HCR and LCR, respectively) that exhibited a 6.4-fold difference (1,625 ± 112 m vs. 252 ± 43 m, p < 0.0001) in running capacity during a standardized treadmill test. Soluble muscle proteins were extracted, digested with trypsin and individual biological replicates (50 ng of tryptic peptides) subjected to LC-MS profiling. Proteins were identified by triplicate LC-MS/MS analysis of a pooled sample of each biological replicate. Differential expression profiling was performed on relative abundances (RA) of parent ions, which spanned three orders of magnitude. In total, 207 proteins were analysed, which encompassed almost all enzymes of the major metabolic pathways in skeletal muscle. The most abundant protein detected was type I myosin heavy chain (RA = 5,843 ± 897) and the least abundant protein detected was heat shock 70 kDa protein (RA = 2 ± 0.5). Sixteen proteins were significantly (p < 0.05) more abundant in HCR muscle and hierarchal clustering of the profiling data highlighted two protein subgroups, which encompassed proteins associated with either the respiratory chain or fatty acid oxidation. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein (FABPH) was 1.54-fold (p

  8. Overexpression of human fatty acid transport protein 2/very long chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (FATP2/Acsvl1) reveals distinct patterns of trafficking of exogenous fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, Elaina M.; Cerny, Ronald L.; DiRusso, Concetta C.; Black, Paul N.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Roles of FATP2 in fatty acid transport/activation contribute to lipid homeostasis. •Use of 13C- and D-labeled fatty acids provide novel insights into FATP2 function. •FATP2-dependent trafficking of FA into phospholipids results in distinctive profiles. •FATP2 functions in the transport and activation pathways for exogenous fatty acids. -- Abstract: In mammals, the fatty acid transport proteins (FATP1 through FATP6) are members of a highly conserved family of proteins, which function in fatty acid transport proceeding through vectorial acylation and in the activation of very long chain fatty acids, branched chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids. FATP1, 2 and 4, for example directly function in fatty acid transport and very long chain fatty acids activation while FATP5 does not function in fatty acid transport but activates secondary bile acids. In the present work, we have used stable isotopically labeled fatty acids differing in carbon length and saturation in cells expressing FATP2 to gain further insights into how this protein functions in fatty acid transport and intracellular fatty acid trafficking. Our previous studies showed the expression of FATP2 modestly increased C16:0-CoA and C20:4-CoA and significantly increased C18:3-CoA and C22:6-CoA after 4 h. The increases in C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA suggest FATP2 must necessarily partner with a long chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl) to generate C16:0-CoA and C18:3-CoA through vectorial acylation. The very long chain acyl CoA synthetase activity of FATP2 is consistent in the generation of C20:4-CoA and C22:6-CoA coincident with transport from their respective exogenous fatty acids. The trafficking of exogenous fatty acids into phosphatidic acid (PA) and into the major classes of phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidyserine (PS)) resulted in distinctive profiles, which changed with the expression of FATP2. The

  9. Crystal Structure of the Mp1p Ligand Binding Domain 2 Reveals Its Function as a Fatty Acid-binding Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shuang; Tung, Edward T. K.; Zheng, Wei; Chong, Ken; Xu, Yuanyuan; Dai, Peng; Guo, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Rao, Zihe

    2010-01-01

    Penicillium marneffei is a dimorphic, pathogenic fungus in Southeast Asia that mostly afflicts immunocompromised individuals. As the only dimorphic member of the genus, it goes through a phase transition from a mold to yeast form, which is believed to be a requisite for its pathogenicity. Mp1p, a cell wall antigenic mannoprotein existing widely in yeast, hyphae, and conidia of the fungus, plays a vital role in host immune response during infection. To understand the function of Mp1p, we have determined the x-ray crystal structure of its ligand binding domain 2 (LBD2) to 1.3 Å. The structure reveals a dimer between the two molecules. The dimer interface forms a ligand binding cavity, in which electron density was observed for a palmitic acid molecule interacting with LBD2 indirectly through hydrogen bonding networks via two structural water molecules. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments measured the ligand binding affinity (Kd) of Mp1p at the micromolar level. Mutations of ligand-binding residues, namely S313A and S332A, resulted in a 9-fold suppression of ligand binding affinity. Analytical ultracentrifugation assays demonstrated that both LBD2 and Mp1p are mostly monomeric in vitro, no matter with or without ligand, and our dimeric crystal structure of LBD2 might be the result of crystal packing. Based on the conformation of the ligand-binding pocket in the dimer structure, a model for the closed, monomeric form of LBD2 is proposed. Further structural analysis indicated the biological importance of fatty acid binding of Mp1p for the survival and pathogenicity of the conditional pathogen. PMID:20053994

  10. Structural and Enzymatic Analysis of TarM Glycosyltransferase from Staphylococcus aureus Reveals an Oligomeric Protein Specific for the Glycosylation of Wall Teichoic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Koç, Cengiz; Gerlach, David; Beck, Sebastian; Peschel, Andreas; Xia, Guoqing; Stehle, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    Anionic glycopolymers known as wall teichoic acids (WTAs) functionalize the peptidoglycan layers of many Gram-positive bacteria. WTAs play central roles in many fundamental aspects of bacterial physiology, and they are important determinants of pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. A number of enzymes that glycosylate WTA in Staphylococcus aureus have recently been identified. Among these is the glycosyltransferase TarM, a component of the WTA de novo biosynthesis pathway. TarM performs the synthesis of α-O-N-acetylglycosylated poly-5′-phosphoribitol in the WTA structure. We have solved the crystal structure of TarM at 2.4 Å resolution, and we have also determined a structure of the enzyme in complex with its substrate UDP-GlcNAc at 2.8 Å resolution. The protein assembles into a propeller-like homotrimer in which each blade contains a GT-B-type glycosyltransferase domain with a typical Rossmann fold. The enzymatic reaction retains the stereochemistry of the anomeric center of the transferred GlcNAc-moiety on the polyribitol backbone. TarM assembles into a trimer using a novel trimerization domain, here termed the HUB domain. Structure-guided mutagenesis experiments of TarM identify residues critical for enzyme activity, assign a putative role for the HUB in TarM function, and allow us to propose a likely reaction mechanism. PMID:25697358

  11. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  12. Multifunctional proteins revealed by overlapping clustering in protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Charles E.; Guénoche, Alain; Brun, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Multifunctional proteins perform several functions. They are expected to interact specifically with distinct sets of partners, simultaneously or not, depending on the function performed. Current graph clustering methods usually allow a protein to belong to only one cluster, therefore impeding a realistic assignment of multifunctional proteins to clusters. Results: Here, we present Overlapping Cluster Generator (OCG), a novel clustering method which decomposes a network into overlapping clusters and which is, therefore, capable of correct assignment of multifunctional proteins. The principle of OCG is to cover the graph with initial overlapping classes that are iteratively fused into a hierarchy according to an extension of Newman's modularity function. By applying OCG to a human protein–protein interaction network, we show that multifunctional proteins are revealed at the intersection of clusters and demonstrate that the method outperforms other existing methods on simulated graphs and PPI networks. Availability: This software can be downloaded from http://tagc.univ-mrs.fr/welcome/spip.php?rubrique197 Contact: brun@tagc.univ-mrs.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22080466

  13. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. PMID:26796095

  14. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    ScienceCinema

    Greg Hura

    2010-01-08

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  15. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    ScienceCinema

    Hura, Greg

    2013-05-29

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  16. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    SciTech Connect

    Hura, Greg

    2009-01-01

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  17. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Hura

    2009-07-09

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  18. Protein biosynthesis with conformationally restricted amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Ellman, J.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1993-05-19

    The incorporation of conformationally constrained amino acids into peptides is a powerful approach for generating structurally defined peptides as conformational probes and bioactive agents. The ability to site-specifically introduce constrained amino acids into large polypeptide chains would provide a similar opportunity to probe the flexibility, conformation, folding and stability of proteins. To this end, we have examined the competence of the Escherichia coli protein biosynthetic machinery to incorporate a number of these unnatural amino acids into the 164 residue protein T4 lysozyme (T4L). Results clearly demonstrate that the protein biosynthetic machinery can accommodate a wide variety of conformationally constrained amino acids. The expansion of structural motifs that can be biosynthetically incorporated into proteins to include a large number of conformationally constrained amino acids significantly increases the power of mutagenesis methods as probes of protein structure and function and provides additional insights into the steric requirements of the translational machinery. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  20. Revealing protein dynamics by photobleaching techniques.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, Frank; Peter, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are widely used tools to visualize proteins and study their intracellular distribution. One feature of working with GFP variants, photobleaching, has recently been combined with an older technique known as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to study protein kinetics in vivo. During photobleaching, fluorochromes get destroyed irreversibly by repeated excitation with an intensive light source. When the photobleaching is applied to a restricted area or structure, recovery of fluorescence will be the result of active or passive diffusion from fluorescent molecules from unbleached surrounding areas. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) is a variant of FRAP where an area is bleached, and loss of fluorescence in surrounding areas is observed. FLIP can be used to study the dynamics of different pools of a protein or can show how a protein diffuses, or is transported through a cell or cellular structure. Here, we discuss these photobleaching fluorescent imaging techniques, illustrated with examples of these techniques applied to proteins of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheromone response MAPK pathway. PMID:15173624

  1. Innovations in host and microbial sialic acid biosynthesis revealed by phylogenomic prediction of nonulosonic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Amanda L.; Desa, Nolan; Hansen, Elizabeth E.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Gagneux, Pascal; Nizet, Victor; Varki, Ajit

    2009-01-01

    Sialic acids (Sias) are nonulosonic acid (NulO) sugars prominently displayed on vertebrate cells and occasionally mimicked by bacterial pathogens using homologous biosynthetic pathways. It has been suggested that Sias were an animal innovation and later emerged in pathogens by convergent evolution or horizontal gene transfer. To better illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying the phenomenon of Sia molecular mimicry, we performed phylogenomic analyses of biosynthetic pathways for Sias and related higher sugars derived from 5,7-diamino-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxynon-2-ulosonic acids. Examination of ≈1,000 sequenced microbial genomes indicated that such biosynthetic pathways are far more widely distributed than previously realized. Phylogenetic analysis, validated by targeted biochemistry, was used to predict NulO types (i.e., neuraminic, legionaminic, or pseudaminic acids) expressed by various organisms. This approach uncovered previously unreported occurrences of Sia pathways in pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria and identified at least one instance in which a human archaeal symbiont tentatively reported to express Sias in fact expressed the related pseudaminic acid structure. Evaluation of targeted phylogenies and protein domain organization revealed that the “unique” Sia biosynthetic pathway of animals was instead a much more ancient innovation. Pathway phylogenies suggest that bacterial pathogens may have acquired Sia expression via adaptation of pathways for legionaminic acid biosynthesis, one of at least 3 evolutionary paths for de novo Sia synthesis. Together, these data indicate that some of the long-standing paradigms in Sia biology should be reconsidered in a wider evolutionary context of the extended family of NulO sugars. PMID:19666579

  2. Manipulating Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Microalgae for Biofuel through Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Blatti, Jillian L.; Beld, Joris; Behnke, Craig A.; Mendez, Michael; Mayfield, Stephen P.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for renewable fuels, and algal metabolic engineering can lead to crop improvement, thus accelerating the development of commercially viable biodiesel production from algae biomass. We demonstrate that protein-protein interactions between the fatty acid acyl carrier protein (ACP) and thioesterase (TE) govern fatty acid hydrolysis within the algal chloroplast. Using green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr) as a model, a structural simulation of docking CrACP to CrTE identifies a protein-protein recognition surface between the two domains. A virtual screen reveals plant TEs with similar in silico binding to CrACP. Employing an activity-based crosslinking probe designed to selectively trap transient protein-protein interactions between the TE and ACP, we demonstrate in vitro that CrTE must functionally interact with CrACP to release fatty acids, while TEs of vascular plants show no mechanistic crosslinking to CrACP. This is recapitulated in vivo, where overproduction of the endogenous CrTE increased levels of short-chain fatty acids and engineering plant TEs into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast did not alter the fatty acid profile. These findings highlight the critical role of protein-protein interactions in manipulating fatty acid biosynthesis for algae biofuel engineering as illuminated by activity-based probes. PMID:23028438

  3. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  4. Molecular Dynamic Simulations Reveal the Structural Determinants of Fatty Acid Binding to Oxy-Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chintapalli, Sree V.; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Patel, Reema; Shah, Natasha; Patterson, Randen L.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Anishkin, Andriy; Adams, Sean H.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolites; however, the binding pocket and regulation of the interaction remains to be established. In this study, we employed a computational strategy to elucidate the structural determinants of fatty acids (palmitic & oleic acid) binding to Mb. Sequence analysis and docking simulations with a horse (Equus caballus) structural Mb reference reveals a fatty acid-binding site in the hydrophobic cleft near the heme region in Mb. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid attain a “U” shaped structure similar to their conformation in pockets of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Specifically, we found that the carboxyl head group of palmitic acid coordinates with the amino group of Lys45, whereas the carboxyl group of oleic acid coordinates with both the amino groups of Lys45 and Lys63. The alkyl tails of both fatty acids are supported by surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu29, Leu32, Phe33, Phe43, Phe46, Val67, Val68 and Ile107. In the saturated palmitic acid, the hydrophobic tail moves freely and occasionally penetrates deeper inside the hydrophobic cleft, making additional contacts with Val28, Leu69, Leu72 and Ile111. Our simulations reveal a dynamic and stable binding pocket in which the oxygen molecule and heme group in Mb are required for additional hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which Mb acts as a muscle transporter for fatty acid when it is in the oxygenated state and releases fatty acid when Mb converts to deoxygenated state. PMID:26030763

  5. Molecular dynamic simulations reveal the structural determinants of Fatty Acid binding to oxy-myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Chintapalli, Sree V; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Patel, Reema; Shah, Natasha; Patterson, Randen L; van Rossum, Damian B; Anishkin, Andriy; Adams, Sean H

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolites; however, the binding pocket and regulation of the interaction remains to be established. In this study, we employed a computational strategy to elucidate the structural determinants of fatty acids (palmitic & oleic acid) binding to Mb. Sequence analysis and docking simulations with a horse (Equus caballus) structural Mb reference reveals a fatty acid-binding site in the hydrophobic cleft near the heme region in Mb. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid attain a "U" shaped structure similar to their conformation in pockets of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Specifically, we found that the carboxyl head group of palmitic acid coordinates with the amino group of Lys45, whereas the carboxyl group of oleic acid coordinates with both the amino groups of Lys45 and Lys63. The alkyl tails of both fatty acids are supported by surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu29, Leu32, Phe33, Phe43, Phe46, Val67, Val68 and Ile107. In the saturated palmitic acid, the hydrophobic tail moves freely and occasionally penetrates deeper inside the hydrophobic cleft, making additional contacts with Val28, Leu69, Leu72 and Ile111. Our simulations reveal a dynamic and stable binding pocket in which the oxygen molecule and heme group in Mb are required for additional hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which Mb acts as a muscle transporter for fatty acid when it is in the oxygenated state and releases fatty acid when Mb converts to deoxygenated state. PMID:26030763

  6. Real-time Measurements of Amino Acid and Protein Hydroperoxides Using Coumarin Boronic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Radoslaw; Zielonka, Jacek; Gapys, Ewa; Marcinek, Andrzej; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2014-01-01

    Hydroperoxides of amino acid and amino acid residues (tyrosine, cysteine, tryptophan, and histidine) in proteins are formed during oxidative modification induced by reactive oxygen species. Amino acid hydroperoxides are unstable intermediates that can further propagate oxidative damage in proteins. The existing assays (oxidation of ferrous cation and iodometric assays) cannot be used in real-time measurements. In this study, we show that the profluorescent coumarin boronic acid (CBA) probe reacts with amino acid and protein hydroperoxides to form the corresponding fluorescent product, 7-hydroxycoumarin. 7-Hydroxycoumarin formation was catalase-independent. Based on this observation, we have developed a fluorometric, real-time assay that is adapted to a multiwell plate format. This is the first report showing real-time monitoring of amino acid and protein hydroperoxides using the CBA-based assay. This approach was used to detect protein hydroperoxides in cell lysates obtained from macrophages exposed to visible light and photosensitizer (rose bengal). We also measured the rate constants for the reaction between amino acid hydroperoxides (tyrosyl, tryptophan, and histidine hydroperoxides) and CBA, and these values (7–23 m−1 s−1) were significantly higher than that measured for H2O2 (1.5 m−1 s−1). Using the CBA-based competition kinetics approach, the rate constants for amino acid hydroperoxides with ebselen, a glutathione peroxidase mimic, were also determined, and the values were within the range of 1.1–1.5 × 103 m−1 s−1. Both ebselen and boronates may be used as small molecule scavengers of amino acid and protein hydroperoxides. Here we also show formation of tryptophan hydroperoxide from tryptophan exposed to co-generated fluxes of nitric oxide and superoxide. This observation reveals a new mechanism for amino acid and protein hydroperoxide formation in biological systems. PMID:24928516

  7. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  8. p53-Regulated Networks of Protein, mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA Expression Revealed by Integrated Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling With Amino Acids in Cell Culture (pSILAC) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) Analyses.

    PubMed

    Hünten, Sabine; Kaller, Markus; Drepper, Friedel; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Bonfert, Thomas; Erhard, Florian; Dueck, Anne; Eichner, Norbert; Friedel, Caroline C; Meister, Gunter; Zimmer, Ralf; Warscheid, Bettina; Hermeking, Heiko

    2015-10-01

    We determined the effect of p53 activation on de novo protein synthesis using quantitative proteomics (pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture/pSILAC) in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480. This was combined with mRNA and noncoding RNA expression analyses by next generation sequencing (RNA-, miR-Seq). Furthermore, genome-wide DNA binding of p53 was analyzed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-Seq). Thereby, we identified differentially regulated proteins (542 up, 569 down), mRNAs (1258 up, 415 down), miRNAs (111 up, 95 down) and lncRNAs (270 up, 123 down). Changes in protein and mRNA expression levels showed a positive correlation (r = 0.50, p < 0.0001). In total, we detected 133 direct p53 target genes that were differentially expressed and displayed p53 occupancy in the vicinity of their promoter. More transcriptionally induced genes displayed occupied p53 binding sites (4.3% mRNAs, 7.2% miRNAs, 6.3% lncRNAs, 5.9% proteins) than repressed genes (2.4% mRNAs, 3.2% miRNAs, 0.8% lncRNAs, 1.9% proteins), suggesting indirect mechanisms of repression. Around 50% of the down-regulated proteins displayed seed-matching sequences of p53-induced miRNAs in the corresponding 3'-UTRs. Moreover, proteins repressed by p53 significantly overlapped with those previously shown to be repressed by miR-34a. We confirmed up-regulation of the novel direct p53 target genes LINC01021, MDFI, ST14 and miR-486 and showed that ectopic LINC01021 expression inhibits proliferation in SW480 cells. Furthermore, KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT mRNAs were confirmed as direct targets of the p53-induced miR-34a, miR-205 and miR-486-5p, respectively. In line with the loss of p53 function during tumor progression, elevated expression of KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT was detected in advanced stages of cancer. In conclusion, the integration of multiple omics methods allowed the comprehensive identification of direct and indirect effectors of p53 that provide new insights and leads into the

  9. Specific high-affinity binding of fatty acids to epidermal cytosolic proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, H.; Chung, W.L.; Mukhtar, H. )

    1991-08-01

    Cytosol from rat, mouse, and human skin or rat epidermis was incubated with (3H)arachidonic acid, (14C)retinoic acid, (14C)oleic acid, (3H)leukotriene A4, (3H)prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or (3H) 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), and protein-bound ligands were separated using Lipidex-1000 at 4C to assess the binding specificity. The binding of oleic acid and arachidonic acid with rat epidermal cytosol was rapid, saturable, and reversible. Binding of oleic acid was competed out with the simultaneous addition of other ligands and found to be in the following order: arachidonic acid greater than oleic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than lauric acid greater than leukotriene A4 greater than 15-HETE = PGE1 greater than PGE2 = PGF2. Scatchard analysis of the binding with arachidonic acid, oleic acid, and retinoic acid revealed high-affinity binding sites with the dissociation constant in the nM range. SDS-PAGE analysis of the oleic acid-bound epidermal cytosolic protein(s) revealed maximum binding at the 14.5 kDa region. The presence of the fatty acid-binding protein in epidermal cytosol and its binding to fatty acids and retinoic acid may be of significance both in the trafficking and the metabolism of fatty acids and retinoids across the skin.

  10. Detection of non-protein amino acids in the presence of protein amino acids. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapshak, P.; Okaji, M.

    1972-01-01

    Studies conducted with the JEOL 5AH amino acid analyzer are described. This instrument makes possible the programming of the chromatographic process. Data are presented showing the separations of seventeen non-protein amino acids in the presence of eighteen protein amino acids. It is pointed out that distinct separations could be obtained in the case of a number of chemically similar compounds, such as ornithine and lysine, N-amidino alanine and arginine, and iminodiacetic acid and S-carboxymethyl cysteine and aspartic acid.

  11. Protein and amino Acid supplementation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Armsey, Thomas D; Grime, Todd E

    2002-08-01

    Amino acid supplementation is practiced by numerous individuals with the hope of increasing muscle mass and function by increasing available proteins. Theoretically, this makes a great deal of sense; the scientific facts, however, fail to conclusively prove that ingesting more than the recommended dietary allowance of protein has any effect on otherwise healthy adults. Athletes may be the exception to this rule. This review examines the most current literature pertaining to amino acid supplementation, and reports on the potential benefits and risks of this common practice. PMID:12831703

  12. Nucleic acids, proteins, and chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usher, D. A.; Profy, A. T.; Walstrum, S. A.; Needels, M. C.; Bulack, S. C.; Lo, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with experimental results related, in one case, to the chirality of nucleotides, and, in another case, to the possibility of a link between the chirality of nucleic acids, and that of peptides. It has been found that aminoacylation of the 'internal' hydroxyl group of a dinucleoside monophosphate can occur stereoselectively. However, this reaction has not yet been made a part of a working peptide synthesis scheme. The formation and cleavage of oligonucleotides is considered. In the event of the formation of a helical complex between the oligonucleotide and the polymer, 1-prime,5-prime-bonds in the oligomer are found to become more resistant towards cleavage. The conditions required for peptide bond formation are examined, taking into account the known structures of RNA and possible mechanisms for prebiotic peptide bond formation. The possibility is considered that the 2-prime,5-prime-internucleotide linkage could have played an important part in the early days of biological peptide synthesis.

  13. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl transferase binds acidic and basic amino acid substrates.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Aman; Clifton, Ian J; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Ivison, David; Domene, Carmen; Schofield, Christopher J

    2011-09-21

    Structural and biochemical analyses reveal how ornithine acetyl-transferases catalyse the reversible transfer of an acetyl-group from a basic (ornithine) to an acidic (glutamate) amino acid by employing a common mechanism involving an acetyl-enzyme intermediate but using different side chain binding modes. PMID:21796301

  14. Interaction of Ku protein and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit with nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Dynan, W S; Yoo, S

    1998-01-01

    The Ku protein-DNA-dependent protein kinase system is one of the major pathways by which cells of higher eukaryotes respond to double-strand DNA breaks. The components of the system are evolutionarily conserved and homologs are known from a number of organisms. The Ku protein component binds directly to DNA ends and may help align them for ligation. Binding of Ku protein to DNA also nucleates formation of an active enzyme complex containing the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). The interaction between Ku protein, DNA-PKcs and nucleic acids has been extensively investigated. This review summarizes the results of these biochemical investigations and relates them to recent molecular genetic studies that reveal highly characteristic repair and recombination defects in mutant cells lacking Ku protein or DNA-PKcs. PMID:9512523

  15. Dihydrolipoic acid reduces cytochrome b561 proteins.

    PubMed

    Bérczi, Alajos; Zimányi, László; Asard, Han

    2013-03-01

    Cytochrome b561 (Cyt-b561) proteins constitute a family of trans-membrane proteins that are present in a wide variety of organisms. Two of their characteristic properties are the reducibility by ascorbate (ASC) and the presence of two distinct b-type hemes localized on two opposite sides of the membrane. Here we show that the tonoplast-localized and the putative tumor suppressor Cyt-b561 proteins can be reduced by other reductants than ASC and dithionite. A detailed spectral analysis of the ASC-dependent and dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA)-dependent reduction of these two Cyt-b561 proteins is also presented. Our results are discussed in relation to the known antioxidant capability of DHLA as well as its role in the regeneration of other antioxidant compounds of cells. These results allow us to speculate on new biological functions for the trans-membrane Cyt-b561 proteins. PMID:22526465

  16. Osmolyte perturbation reveals conformational equilibria in spin-labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    López, Carlos J; Fleissner, Mark R; Guo, Zhefeng; Kusnetzow, Ana K; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that proteins at equilibrium can exist in a manifold of conformational substates, and that these substates play important roles in protein function. Therefore, there is great interest in identifying regions in proteins that are in conformational exchange. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of spin-labeled proteins containing the nitroxide side chain (R1) often consist of two (or more) components that may arise from slow exchange between conformational substates (lifetimes > 100 ns). However, crystal structures of proteins containing R1 have shown that multicomponent spectra can also arise from equilibria between rotamers of the side chain itself. In this report, it is shown that these scenarios can be distinguished by the response of the system to solvent perturbation with stabilizing osmolytes such as sucrose. Thus, site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) emerges as a new tool to explore slow conformational exchange in proteins of arbitrary size, including membrane proteins in a native-like environment. Moreover, equilibrium between substates with even modest differences in conformation is revealed, and the simplicity of the method makes it suitable for facile screening of multiple proteins. Together with previously developed strategies for monitoring picosecond to millisecond backbone dynamics, the results presented here expand the timescale over which SDSL can be used to explore protein flexibility. PMID:19585559

  17. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, Christopher P.; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A. J.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach, termed “RNA Tagging,” that identifies protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or crosslinking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA using high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The method revealed that while RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also “sample” RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We exploited the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. The RNA Tagging approach is well-suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  18. Osmolyte perturbation reveals conformational equilibria in spin-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    López, Carlos J; Fleissner, Mark R; Guo, Zhefeng; Kusnetzow, Ana K; Hubbell, Wayne L

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that proteins at equilibrium can exist in a manifold of conformational substates, and that these substates play important roles in protein function. Therefore, there is great interest in identifying regions in proteins that are in conformational exchange. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of spin-labeled proteins containing the nitroxide side chain (R1) often consist of two (or more) components that may arise from slow exchange between conformational substates (lifetimes > 100 ns). However, crystal structures of proteins containing R1 have shown that multicomponent spectra can also arise from equilibria between rotamers of the side chain itself. In this report, it is shown that these scenarios can be distinguished by the response of the system to solvent perturbation with stabilizing osmolytes such as sucrose. Thus, site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) emerges as a new tool to explore slow conformational exchange in proteins of arbitrary size, including membrane proteins in a native-like environment. Moreover, equilibrium between substates with even modest differences in conformation is revealed, and the simplicity of the method makes it suitable for facile screening of multiple proteins. Together with previously developed strategies for monitoring picosecond to millisecond backbone dynamics, the results presented here expand the timescale over which SDSL can be used to explore protein flexibility. PMID:19585559

  19. Evolution of acyl-ACP-thioesterases and β-ketoacyl-ACP-synthases revealed by protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Blatti, Jillian L.; Behnke, Craig; Mendez, Michael; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a conserved primary metabolic enzyme complex capable of tolerating cross-species engineering of domains for the development of modified and overproduced fatty acids. In eukaryotes, acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (TEs) off-load mature cargo from the acyl carrier protein (ACP), and plants have developed TEs for short/medium-chain fatty acids. We showed that engineering plant TEs into the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii does not result in the predicted shift in fatty acid profile. Since fatty acid biosynthesis relies on substrate recognition and protein-protein interactions between the ACP and its partner enzymes, we hypothesized that plant TEs and algal ACP do not functionally interact. Phylogenetic analysis revealed major evolutionary differences between FAS enzymes, including TEs and ketoacyl synthases (KSs), in which the former is present only in some species, whereas the latter is present in all, and has a common ancestor. In line with these results, TEs appeared to be selective towards their ACP partners whereas KSs showed promiscuous behavior across bacterial, plant and algal species. Based on phylogenetic analyses, in silico docking, in vitro mechanistic crosslinking and in vivo algal engineering, we propose that phylogeny can predict effective interactions between ACPs and partner enzymes. PMID:25110394

  20. Global Profiling of Protein Lysine Malonylation in Escherichia coli Reveals Its Role in Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lili; Nie, Litong; Chen, Ming; Liu, Ping; Zhu, Jun; Zhai, Linhui; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhao, Yingming; Tan, Minjia

    2016-06-01

    Protein lysine malonylation is a recently identified post-translational modification (PTM), which is evolutionarily conserved from bacteria to mammals. Although analysis of lysine malonylome in mammalians suggested that this modification was related to energy metabolism, the substrates and biological roles of malonylation in prokaryotes are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed qualitative and quantitative analyses to globally identify lysine malonylation substrates in Escherichia coli. We identified 1745 malonylation sites in 594 proteins in E. coli, representing the first and largest malonylome data set in prokaryotes up to date. Bioinformatic analyses showed that lysine malonylation was significantly enriched in protein translation, energy metabolism pathways and fatty acid biosynthesis, implying the potential roles of protein malonylation in bacterial physiology. Quantitative proteomics by fatty acid synthase inhibition in both auxotrophic and prototrophic E. coli strains revealed that lysine malonylation is closely associated with E. coli fatty acid metabolism. Protein structural analysis and mutagenesis experiment suggested malonylation could impact enzymatic activity of citrate synthase, a key enzyme in citric acid (TCA) cycle. Further comparative analysis among lysine malonylome, succinylome and acetylome data showed that these three modifications could participate in some similar enriched metabolism pathways, but they could also possibly play distinct roles such as in fatty acid synthesis. These data expanded our knowledge of lysine malonylation in prokaryotes, providing a resource for functional study of lysine malonylation in bacteria. PMID:27183143

  1. Crystal Structures of the Staphylococcal Toxin SSL5 in Complex With Sialyl-Lewis X Reveal a Conserved Binding Site That Shares Common Features With Viral And Bacterial Sialic Acid-Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, H.M.; Basu, I.; Chung, M.C.; Caradoc-Davies, T.; Fraser, J.D.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-06-02

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  2. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L; Angel, Thomas E; Holmes, William E; Li, Kelvin W; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C; Turner, Scott M; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L; Miller, Benjamin F; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  3. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L.; Angel, Thomas E.; Holmes, William E.; Li, Kelvin W.; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C.; Turner, Scott M.; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  4. The Exchangeability of Amino Acids in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Lev Y.; Stoltzfus, Arlin

    2005-01-01

    The comparative analysis of protein sequences depends crucially on measures of amino acid similarity or distance. Many such measures exist, yet it is not known how well these measures reflect the operational exchangeability of amino acids in proteins, since most are derived by methods that confound a variety of effects, including effects of mutation. In pursuit of a pure measure of exchangeability, we present (1) a compilation of data on the effects of 9671 amino acid exchanges engineered and assayed in a set of 12 proteins; (2) a statistical procedure to combine results from diverse assays of exchange effects; (3) a matrix of “experimental exchangeability” values EXij derived from applying this procedure to the compiled data; and (4) a set of three tests designed to evaluate the power of an exchangeability measure to (i) predict the effects of amino acid exchanges in the laboratory, (ii) account for the disease-causing potential of missense mutations in the human population, and (iii) model the probability of fixation of missense mutations in evolution. EX not only captures useful information on exchangeability while remaining free of other effects, but also outperforms all measures tested except for the best-performing alignment scoring matrix, which is comparable in performance. PMID:15944362

  5. Protein and Amino Acid Requirements during Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Elango, Rajavel; Ball, Ronald O

    2016-07-01

    Protein forms an essential component of a healthy diet in humans to support both growth and maintenance. During pregnancy, an exceptional stage of life defined by rapid growth and development, adequate dietary protein is crucial to ensure a healthy outcome. Protein deposition in maternal and fetal tissues increases throughout pregnancy, with most occurring during the third trimester. Dietary protein intake recommendations are based on factorial estimates because the traditional method of determining protein requirements, nitrogen balance, is invasive and undesirable during pregnancy. The current Estimated Average Requirement and RDA recommendations of 0.88 and 1.1 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), respectively, are for all stages of pregnancy. The single recommendation does not take into account the changing needs during different stages of pregnancy. Recently, with the use of the minimally invasive indicator amino acid oxidation method, we defined the requirements to be, on average, 1.2 and 1.52 g · kg(-1) · d(-1) during early (∼16 wk) and late (∼36 wk) stages of pregnancy, respectively. Although the requirements are substantially higher than current recommendations, our values are ∼14-18% of total energy and fit within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range. Using swine as an animal model we showed that the requirements for several indispensable amino acids increase dramatically during late gestation compared with early gestation. Additional studies should be conducted during pregnancy to confirm the newly determined protein requirements and to determine the indispensable amino acid requirements during pregnancy in humans. PMID:27422521

  6. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  7. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P.; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  8. Silk protein aggregation kinetics revealed by Rheo-IR.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Terry, Ann E; Vollrath, Fritz; Holland, Chris

    2014-02-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of silk fibres stem from a multi-scale hierarchical structure created when an aqueous protein "melt" is converted to an insoluble solid via flow. To directly relate a silk protein's structure and function in response to flow, we present the first application of a Rheo-IR platform, which couples cone and plate rheology with attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy. This technique provides a new window into silk processing by linking shear thinning to an increase in molecular alignment, with shear thickening affecting changes in the silk protein's secondary structure. Additionally, compared to other static characterization methods for silk, Rheo-IR proved particularly useful at revealing the intrinsic difference between natural (native) and reconstituted silk feedstocks. Hence Rheo-IR offers important novel insights into natural silk processing. This has intrinsic academic merit, but it might also be useful when designing reconstituted silk analogues alongside other polymeric systems, whether natural or synthetic. PMID:24200713

  9. Membrane protein properties revealed through data-rich electrostatics calculations

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Grabe, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The electrostatic properties of membrane proteins often reveal many of their key biophysical characteristics, such as ion channel selectivity and the stability of charged membrane-spanning segments. The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is the gold standard for calculating protein electrostatics, and the software APBSmem enables the solution of the PB equation in the presence of a membrane. Here, we describe significant advances to APBSmem including: full automation of system setup, per-residue energy decomposition, incorporation of PDB2PQR, calculation of membrane induced pKa shifts, calculation of non-polar energies, and command-line scripting for large scale calculations. We highlight these new features with calculations carried out on a number of membrane proteins, including the recently solved structure of the ion channel TRPV1 and a large survey of 1,614 membrane proteins of known structure. This survey provides a comprehensive list of residues with large electrostatic penalties for being embedded in the membrane potentially revealing interesting functional information. PMID:26118532

  10. Advances in protein-amino acid nutrition of poultry.

    PubMed

    Baker, David H

    2009-05-01

    The ideal protein concept has allowed progress in defining requirements as well as the limiting order of amino acids in corn, soybean meal, and a corn-soybean meal mixture for growth of young chicks. Recent evidence suggests that glycine (or serine) is a key limiting amino acid in reduced protein [23% crude protein (CP) reduced to 16% CP] corn-soybean meal diets for broiler chicks. Research with sulfur amino acids has revealed that small excesses of cysteine are growth depressing in chicks fed methionine-deficient diets. Moreover, high ratios of cysteine:methionine impair utilization of the hydroxy analog of methionine, but not of methionine itself. A high level of dietary L: -cysteine (2.5% or higher) is lethal for young chicks, but a similar level of DL: -methionine, L: -cystine or N-acetyl-L: -cysteine causes no mortality. A supplemental dietary level of 3.0% L: -cysteine (7x requirement) causes acute metabolic acidosis that is characterized by a striking increase in plasma sulfate and decrease in plasma bicarbonate. S-Methylmethionine, an analog of S-adenosylmethionine, has been shown to have choline-sparing activity, but it only spares methionine when diets are deficient in choline and(or) betaine. Creatine, or its precursor guanidinoacetic acid, can spare dietary arginine in chicks. PMID:19009229

  11. Designed protein reveals structural determinants of extreme kinetic stability

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Aron; Ma, S. Martha; Xia, Ke; Rafalia, Hitesh; Trainor, Kyle; Colón, Wilfredo; Gosavi, Shachi; Meiering, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    The design of stable, functional proteins is difficult. Improved design requires a deeper knowledge of the molecular basis for design outcomes and properties. We previously used a bioinformatics and energy function method to design a symmetric superfold protein composed of repeating structural elements with multivalent carbohydrate-binding function, called ThreeFoil. This and similar methods have produced a notably high yield of stable proteins. Using a battery of experimental and computational analyses we show that despite its small size and lack of disulfide bonds, ThreeFoil has remarkably high kinetic stability and its folding is specifically chaperoned by carbohydrate binding. It is also extremely stable against thermal and chemical denaturation and proteolytic degradation. We demonstrate that the kinetic stability can be predicted and modeled using absolute contact order (ACO) and long-range order (LRO), as well as coarse-grained simulations; the stability arises from a topology that includes many long-range contacts which create a large and highly cooperative energy barrier for unfolding and folding. Extensive data from proteomic screens and other experiments reveal that a high ACO/LRO is a general feature of proteins with strong resistances to denaturation and degradation. These results provide tractable approaches for predicting resistance and designing proteins with sufficient topological complexity and long-range interactions to accommodate destabilizing functional features as well as withstand chemical and proteolytic challenge. PMID:26554002

  12. Boolean modeling of transcriptome data reveals novel modes of heterotrimeric G-protein action.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sona; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Wilson, Liza; Li, Song; Zhao, Zhixin; Gookin, Timothy E; Assmann, Sarah M; Albert, Réka

    2010-06-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins mediate crucial and diverse signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Here, we generate and analyze microarray data from guard cells and leaves of G-protein subunit mutants of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, with or without treatment with the stress hormone, abscisic acid. Although G-protein control of the transcriptome has received little attention to date in any system, transcriptome analysis allows us to search for potentially uncommon yet significant signaling mechanisms. We describe the theoretical Boolean mechanisms of G-protein x hormone regulation, and then apply a pattern matching approach to associate gene expression profiles with Boolean models. We find that (1) classical mechanisms of G-protein signaling are well represented. Conversely, some theoretical regulatory modes of the G-protein are not supported; (2) a new mechanism of G-protein signaling is revealed, in which Gbeta regulates gene expression identically in the presence or absence of Galpha; (3) guard cells and leaves favor different G-protein modes in transcriptome regulation, supporting system specificity of G-protein signaling. Our method holds significant promise for analyzing analogous 'switch-like' signal transduction events in any organism. PMID:20531402

  13. Boolean modeling of transcriptome data reveals novel modes of heterotrimeric G-protein action

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sona; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Wilson, Liza; Li, Song; Zhao, Zhixin; Gookin, Timothy E; Assmann, Sarah M; Albert, Réka

    2010-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins mediate crucial and diverse signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Here, we generate and analyze microarray data from guard cells and leaves of G-protein subunit mutants of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, with or without treatment with the stress hormone, abscisic acid. Although G-protein control of the transcriptome has received little attention to date in any system, transcriptome analysis allows us to search for potentially uncommon yet significant signaling mechanisms. We describe the theoretical Boolean mechanisms of G-protein × hormone regulation, and then apply a pattern matching approach to associate gene expression profiles with Boolean models. We find that (1) classical mechanisms of G-protein signaling are well represented. Conversely, some theoretical regulatory modes of the G-protein are not supported; (2) a new mechanism of G-protein signaling is revealed, in which Gβ regulates gene expression identically in the presence or absence of Gα; (3) guard cells and leaves favor different G-protein modes in transcriptome regulation, supporting system specificity of G-protein signaling. Our method holds significant promise for analyzing analogous ‘switch-like' signal transduction events in any organism. PMID:20531402

  14. Structure determination of archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a reveals a novel protein fold

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yingang; Song, Xiaxia; Lin, Jinzhong; Xuan, Jinsong; Cui, Qiu; Wang, Jinfeng

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a has no homology to known proteins. • Three dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of L46a were determined by NMR. • The structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. • A potential rRNA-binding surface on L46a was identified. • The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed. - Abstract: Three archaea-specific ribosomal proteins recently identified show no sequence homology with other known proteins. Here we determined the structure of L46a, the most conserved one among the three proteins, from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 using NMR spectroscopy. The structure presents a twisted β-sheet formed by the N-terminal part and two helices at the C-terminus. The L46a structure has a positively charged surface which is conserved in the L46a protein family and is the potential rRNA-binding site. Searching homologous structures in Protein Data Bank revealed that the structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. The backbone dynamics identified by NMR relaxation experiments reveal significant flexibility at the rRNA binding surface. The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed by fitting the structure into a previous electron microscopy map of the ribosomal 50S subunit, which indicated that L46a contacts to domain I of 23S rRNA near a multifunctional ribosomal protein L7ae.

  15. Fluorinated amino acids: compatibility with native protein structures and effects on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Salwiczek, Mario; Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Gerling, Ulla I M; Ye, Shijie; Koksch, Beate

    2012-03-21

    Fluorinated analogues of the canonical α-L-amino acids have gained widespread attention as building blocks that may endow peptides and proteins with advantageous biophysical, chemical and biological properties. This critical review covers the literature dealing with investigations of peptides and proteins containing fluorinated analogues of the canonical amino acids published over the course of the past decade including the late nineties. It focuses on side-chain fluorinated amino acids, the carbon backbone of which is identical to their natural analogues. Each class of amino acids--aliphatic, aromatic, charged and polar as well as proline--is presented in a separate section. General effects of fluorine on essential properties such as hydrophobicity, acidity/basicity and conformation of the specific side chains and the impact of these altered properties on stability, folding kinetics and activity of peptides and proteins are discussed (245 references). PMID:22130572

  16. The acid tolerance response of Salmonella typhimurium involves transient synthesis of key acid shock proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, J W

    1993-01-01

    Although Salmonella typhimurium prefers neutral-pH environments, it can adapt to survive conditions of severe low-pH stress (pH 3.3). The process, termed the acid tolerance response (ATR), includes two distinct stages. The first stage, called pre-acid shock, is induced at pH 5.8 and involves the production of an inducible pH homeostasis system functional at external pH values below 4.0. The second stage occurs following an acid shock shift to pH 4.5 or below and is called the post-acid shock stage. During this stage of the ATR, 43 acid shock proteins (ASPs) are synthesized. The present data reveal that several ASPs important for pH 3.3 acid tolerance are only transiently produced. Their disappearance after 30 to 40 min of pH 4.4 acid shock coincides with an inability to survive subsequent pH 3.3 acid challenge. Clearly, an essential feature of inducible acid tolerance is an ability to synthesize these key ASPs. The pre-acid shock stage, with its inducible pH homeostasis system, offers the cell an enhanced ability to synthesize ASPs following rapid shifts to conditions below pH 4.0, an external pH that normally prevents ASP synthesis. The data also address possible signals for ASP synthesis. The inducing signal for 22 ASPs appears to be internal acidification, while external pH serves to induce 13 others. Of the 14 transient ASPs, 10 are induced in response to changes in internal pH. Mutations in the fur (ferric uptake regulator) locus that produce an Atr- acid-sensitive phenotype also eliminate induction of six transiently induced ASPs. Images PMID:8458840

  17. Genome-wide search for eliminylating domains reveals novel function for BLES03-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Khater, Shradha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial phosphothreonine lyases catalyze a novel posttranslational modification involving formation of dehydrobutyrine/dehyroalanine by β elimination of the phosphate group of phosphothreonine or phosphoserine residues in their substrate proteins. Though there is experimental evidence for presence of dehydro amino acids in human proteins, no eukaryotic homologs of these lyases have been identified as of today. A comprehensive genome-wide search for identifying phosphothreonine lyase homologs in eukaryotes was carried out. Our fold-based search revealed structural and catalytic site similarity between bacterial phosphothreonine lyases and BLES03 (basophilic leukemia-expressed protein 03), a human protein with unknown function. Ligand induced conformational changes similar to bacterial phosphothreonine lyases, and movement of crucial arginines in the loop region to the catalytic pocket upon binding of phosphothreonine-containing peptides was seen during docking and molecular dynamics studies. Genome-wide search for BLES03 homologs using sensitive profile-based methods revealed their presence not only in eukaryotic classes such as chordata and fungi but also in bacterial and archaebacterial classes. The synteny of these archaebacterial BLES03-like proteins was remarkably similar to that of type IV lantibiotic synthetases which harbor LanL-like phosphothreonine lyase domains. Hence, context-based analysis reinforced our earlier sequence/structure-based prediction of phosphothreonine lyase catalytic function for BLES03. Our in silico analysis has revealed that BLES03-like proteins with previously unknown function are novel eukaryotic phosphothreonine lyases involved in biosynthesis of dehydro amino acids, whereas their bacterial and archaebacterial counterparts might be involved in biosynthesis of natural products similar to lantibiotics. PMID:25062915

  18. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability. PMID:26056817

  19. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kyla J.; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. PMID:26712829

  20. Hyperdimensional analysis of amino acid pair distributions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Svend B; Mortensen, Rasmus J; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik M; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; Arnason, Omar; Söring, Jón; Petersen, Steffen B

    2011-01-01

    Our manuscript presents a novel approach to protein structure analyses. We have organized an 8-dimensional data cube with protein 3D-structural information from 8706 high-resolution non-redundant protein-chains with the aim of identifying packing rules at the amino acid pair level. The cube contains information about amino acid type, solvent accessibility, spatial and sequence distance, secondary structure and sequence length. We are able to pose structural queries to the data cube using program ProPack. The response is a 1, 2 or 3D graph. Whereas the response is of a statistical nature, the user can obtain an instant list of all PDB-structures where such pair is found. The user may select a particular structure, which is displayed highlighting the pair in question. The user may pose millions of different queries and for each one he will receive the answer in a few seconds. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the data cube as well as the programs, we have selected well known structural features, disulphide bridges and salt bridges, where we illustrate how the queries are posed, and how answers are given. Motifs involving cysteines such as disulphide bridges, zinc-fingers and iron-sulfur clusters are clearly identified and differentiated. ProPack also reveals that whereas pairs of Lys residues virtually never appear in close spatial proximity, pairs of Arg are abundant and appear at close spatial distance, contrasting the belief that electrostatic repulsion would prevent this juxtaposition and that Arg-Lys is perceived as a conservative mutation. The presented programs can find and visualize novel packing preferences in proteins structures allowing the user to unravel correlations between pairs of amino acids. The new tools allow the user to view statistical information and visualize instantly the structures that underpin the statistical information, which is far from trivial with most other SW tools for protein structure analysis. PMID:22174733

  1. DNA binding proteins that alter nucleic acid flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Micah; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Maher, L. J., III; Williams, Mark C.

    2007-09-01

    Dual - beam optical tweezers experiments subject single molecules of DNA to high forces (~ 300 pN) with 0.1 pN accuracy, probing the energy and specificity of nucleic acid - ligand structures. Stretching phage λ-DNA reveals an increase in the applied force up to a critical force known as the overstretching transition. In this region, base pairing and stacking are disrupted as double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is melted. Proteins that bind to the double strand will tend to stabilize dsDNA, and melting will occur at higher forces. Proteins that bind to single stranded DNA (ssDNA) destabilize melting, provided that the rate of association is comparable to the pulling rate of the experiment. Many proteins, however, exhibit some affinity for both dsDNA and ssDNA. We describe experiments upon DNA + HMGB2 (box A), a nuclear protein that is believed to facilitate transcription. By characterizing changes in the structure of dsDNA with a polymer model of elasticity, we have determined the equilibrium association constant for HMGB2 to be K ds = 0.15 +/- 0.7 10 9 M -1 for dsDNA binding. Analysis of the melting transition reveals an equilibrium association constant for HMGB2 to ssDNA to be K ss = 0.039 +/- 0.019 10 9 M -1 for ssDNA binding.

  2. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  3. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  4. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  5. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2008-10-07

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  6. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  7. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei

    2009-04-28

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  8. Tsetse Salivary Gland Proteins 1 and 2 Are High Affinity Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins with Residual Nuclease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Caljon, Guy; Ridder, Karin De; Stijlemans, Benoît; Coosemans, Marc; Magez, Stefan; De Baetselier, Patrick; Van Den Abbeele, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of the tsetse fly salivary gland EST database revealed the presence of a highly enriched cluster of putative endonuclease genes, including tsal1 and tsal2. Tsal proteins are the major components of tsetse fly (G. morsitans morsitans) saliva where they are present as monomers as well as high molecular weight complexes with other saliva proteins. We demonstrate that the recombinant tsetse salivary gland proteins 1&2 (Tsal1&2) display DNA/RNA non-specific, high affinity nucleic acid binding with KD values in the low nanomolar range and a non-exclusive preference for duplex. These Tsal proteins exert only a residual nuclease activity with a preference for dsDNA in a broad pH range. Knockdown of Tsal expression by in vivo RNA interference in the tsetse fly revealed a partially impaired blood digestion phenotype as evidenced by higher gut nucleic acid, hematin and protein contents. PMID:23110062

  9. Re-examination of Dietary Amino Acid Sensing Reveals a GCN2-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Leib, David E; Knight, Zachary A

    2015-11-10

    Animals cannot synthesize nine essential amino acids (EAAs) and must therefore obtain them from food. Mice reportedly reject food lacking a single EAA within the first hour of feeding. This remarkable phenomenon is proposed to involve post-ingestive sensing of amino acid imbalance by the protein kinase GCN2 in the brain. Here, we systematically re-examine dietary amino acid sensing in mice. In contrast to previous results, we find that mice cannot rapidly identify threonine- or leucine-deficient food in common feeding paradigms. However, mice attain the ability to identify EAA-deficient food following 2 days of EAA deprivation, suggesting a requirement for physiologic need. In addition, we report that mice can rapidly identify lysine-deficient food without prior EAA deficit, revealing a distinct sensing mechanism for this amino acid. These behaviors are independent of the proposed amino acid sensor GCN2, pointing to the existence of an undescribed mechanism for rapid sensing of dietary EAAs. PMID:26526991

  10. Re-examination of Dietary Amino Acid Sensing Reveals a GCN2-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Leib, David E.; Knight, Zachary A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Animals cannot synthesize nine essential amino acids (EAAs) and must therefore obtain them from food. Mice reportedly reject food lacking a single EAA within the first hour of feeding. This remarkable phenomenon is proposed to involve post-ingestive sensing of amino acid imbalance by the protein kinase GCN2 in the brain. Here, we systematically re-examine dietary amino acid sensing in mice. In contrast to previous results, we find that mice cannot rapidly identify threonine- or leucine-deficient food in common feeding paradigms. However, mice attain the ability to identify EAA-deficient food following 2 days of EAA deprivation, suggesting a requirement for physiologic need. In addition, we report that mice can rapidly identify lysine-deficient food without prior EAA deficit, revealing a distinct sensing mechanism for this amino acid. These behaviors are independent of the proposed amino acid sensor GCN2, pointing to the existence of an undescribed mechanism for rapid sensing of dietary EAAs. PMID:26526991

  11. Effect of Pre-Stressing on the Acid-Stress Response in Bifidobacterium Revealed Using Proteomic and Physiological Approaches.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junhua; Qin, Qian; Guo, Huiyuan; Liu, Songling; Ge, Shaoyang; Zhang, Hongxing; Cui, Jianyun; Ren, Fazheng

    2015-01-01

    Weak acid resistance limits the application of Bifidobacteria as a probiotic in food. The acid tolerance response (ATR), caused by pre-stressing cells at a sublethal pH, could improve the acid resistance of Bifidobacteria to subsequent acid stress. In this study, we used Bifidobacterium longum sub. longum BBMN68 to investigate the effect of the ATR on the acid stress response (ASR), and compared the difference between the ATR and the ASR by analyzing the two-dimensional-PAGE protein profiles and performing physiological tests. The results revealed that a greater abundance of proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism and protein protection was present after the ASR than after the ATR in Bifidobacterium. Pre-stressing cells increased the abundance of proteins involved in energy production, amino acid metabolism, and peptidoglycan synthesis during the ASR of Bifidobacterium. Moreover, after the ASR, the content of ATP, NH3, thiols, and peptidoglycan, the activity of H+-ATPase, and the maintenance of the intracellular pH in the pre-stressed Bifidobacterium cells was significantly higher than in the uninduced cells. These results provide the first explanation as to why the resistance of Bifidobacterium to acid stress improved after pre-stressing. PMID:25689631

  12. Microspectrophotometric quantitation of nucleic acid and protein in irradiated epidermis.

    PubMed

    Conti, C J; Giménez, I B; Cabrini, R L

    1976-03-01

    Nucleic acid and proteins of newborn rat tail subjected to local X-irradiation were microspectrophotometrically studied. Feulgen, gallocyanine chrom-alum and naphthol yellow S methods were performed for demonstration of DNA, total nucleic acid and proteins respectively. The amount of proteins and total nucleic acid increases concomitantly with reactional acanthosis. However, the proteins and nucleic acid decrease as from day 3 post-irradiation. A tentative interpretation of the results would point to a giantization of the epidermic cells not only caused by aqueous imbition but also by an actual increase of the cellular protoplasm. PMID:1258094

  13. Relatedness of acyl carrier proteins shown by amino acid compositions.

    PubMed

    Walker, T A; Ernst-Fonberg, M L

    1982-01-01

    1. Relatedness among the following carrier proteins was assessed on the basis of amino acid compositions: eight acyl carrier proteins (ACP's) associated with fatty acid synthesis, ACP's associated with citrate lyase and citramalate lyase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein and cytochrome 552. Two independent indices of amino acid composition were used. 2. The fatty acid synthesis-associated ACP's of many organisms and the lyase-associated ACP's show a high degree of relatedness among one another. 3. The ACP's show no relatedness to biotin carboxyl carrier protein or cytochrome 552. PMID:7128903

  14. Microheterogeneity of odorant-binding proteins in the porcupine revealed by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ganni, M; Garibotti, M; Scaloni, A; Pucci, P; Pelosi, P

    1997-06-01

    Several odorant-binding proteins (OBP) have been previously purified from the nasal mucosa of the old world porcupine Hystrix cristata. In this paper, we report their N-terminal amino-acid sequences and accurate molecular weights, as measured by electrospray mass spectrometry. The partial amino acid sequences reveal significant similarity with OBPs of other mammalian species and segregate the eight proteins purified into two subclasses. Mass spectrometry has revealed microheterogeneity among the proteins belonging to each of these two groups, suggesting a total number of OBPs of at least nine. The molecular weight differences between OBPs cannot be readily accounted for by common post-translation modifications and indicate different gene products. Such a large number of different OBPs may represent further support to an odour discriminating role for these proteins. PMID:9226887

  15. Revealing Surface Waters on an Antifreeze Protein by Fusion Protein Crystallography Combined with Molecular Dynamic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianjun; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2015-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to ice through an extensive, flat, relatively hydrophobic surface. It has been suggested that this ice-binding site (IBS) organizes surface waters into an ice-like clathrate arrangement that matches and fuses to the quasi-liquid layer on the ice surface. On cooling, these waters join the ice lattice and freeze the AFP to its ligand. Evidence for the generality of this binding mechanism is limited because AFPs tend to crystallize with their IBS as a preferred protein-protein contact surface, which displaces some bound waters. Type III AFP is a 7 kDa globular protein with an IBS made up two adjacent surfaces. In the crystal structure of the most active isoform (QAE1), the part of the IBS that docks to the primary prism plane of ice is partially exposed to solvent and has clathrate waters present that match this plane of ice. The adjacent IBS, which matches the pyramidal plane of ice, is involved in protein-protein crystal contacts with few surface waters. Here we have changed the protein-protein contacts in the ice-binding region by crystallizing a fusion of QAE1 to maltose-binding protein. In this 1.9 Å structure, the IBS that fits the pyramidal plane of ice is exposed to solvent. By combining crystallography data with MD simulations, the surface waters on both sides of the IBS were revealed and match well with the target ice planes. The waters on the pyramidal plane IBS were loosely constrained, which might explain why other isoforms of type III AFP that lack the prism plane IBS are less active than QAE1. The AFP fusion crystallization method can potentially be used to force the exposure to solvent of the IBS on other AFPs to reveal the locations of key surface waters. PMID:26371748

  16. Characterization of Drosophila CMP-sialic acid synthetase activity reveals unusual enzymatic properties.

    PubMed

    Mertsalov, Ilya B; Novikov, Boris N; Scott, Hilary; Dangott, Lawrence; Panin, Vladislav M

    2016-07-01

    CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSAS) is a key enzyme of the sialylation pathway. CSAS produces the activated sugar donor, CMP-sialic acid, which serves as a substrate for sialyltransferases to modify glycan termini with sialic acid. Unlike other animal CSASs that normally localize in the nucleus, Drosophila melanogaster CSAS (DmCSAS) localizes in the cell secretory compartment, predominantly in the Golgi, which suggests that this enzyme has properties distinct from those of its vertebrate counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we purified recombinant DmCSAS and characterized its activity in vitro Our experiments revealed several unique features of this enzyme. DmCSAS displays specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid as a substrate, shows preference for lower pH and can function with a broad range of metal cofactors. When tested at a pH corresponding to the Golgi compartment, the enzyme showed significant activity with several metal cations, including Zn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+) and Mn(2+), whereas the activity with Mg(2+) was found to be low. Protein sequence analysis and site-specific mutagenesis identified an aspartic acid residue that is necessary for enzymatic activity and predicted to be involved in co-ordinating a metal cofactor. DmCSAS enzymatic activity was found to be essential in vivo for rescuing the phenotype of DmCSAS mutants. Finally, our experiments revealed a steep dependence of the enzymatic activity on temperature. Taken together, our results indicate that DmCSAS underwent evolutionary adaptation to pH and ionic environment different from that of counterpart synthetases in vertebrates. Our data also suggest that environmental temperatures can regulate Drosophila sialylation, thus modulating neural transmission. PMID:27114558

  17. Strained cycloalkynes as new protein sulfenic acid traps.

    PubMed

    Poole, Thomas H; Reisz, Julie A; Zhao, Weiling; Poole, Leslie B; Furdui, Cristina M; King, S Bruce

    2014-04-30

    Protein sulfenic acids are formed by the reaction of biologically relevant reactive oxygen species with protein thiols. Sulfenic acid formation modulates the function of enzymes and transcription factors either directly or through the subsequent formation of protein disulfide bonds. Identifying the site, timing, and conditions of protein sulfenic acid formation remains crucial to understanding cellular redox regulation. Current methods for trapping and analyzing sulfenic acids involve the use of dimedone and other nucleophilic 1,3-dicarbonyl probes that form covalent adducts with cysteine-derived protein sulfenic acids. As a mechanistic alternative, the present study describes highly strained bicyclo[6.1.0]nonyne (BCN) derivatives as concerted traps of sulfenic acids. These strained cycloalkynes react efficiently with sulfenic acids in proteins and small molecules yielding stable alkenyl sulfoxide products at rates more than 100× greater than 1,3-dicarbonyl reagents enabling kinetic competition with physiological sulfur chemistry. Similar to the 1,3-dicarbonyl reagents, the BCN compounds distinguish the sulfenic acid oxoform from the thiol, disulfide, sulfinic acid, and S-nitrosated forms of cysteine while displaying an acceptable cell toxicity profile. The enhanced rates demonstrated by these strained alkynes identify them as new bioorthogonal probes that should facilitate the discovery of previously unknown sulfenic acid sites and their parent proteins. PMID:24724926

  18. Echinococcus granulosus fatty acid binding proteins subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2016-05-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins, EgFABP1 and EgFABP2, were isolated from the parasitic platyhelminth Echinococcus granulosus. These proteins bind fatty acids and have particular relevance in flatworms since de novo fatty acids synthesis is absent. Therefore platyhelminthes depend on the capture and intracellular distribution of host's lipids and fatty acid binding proteins could participate in lipid distribution. To elucidate EgFABP's roles, we investigated their intracellular distribution in the larval stage by a proteomic approach. Our results demonstrated the presence of EgFABP1 isoforms in cytosolic, nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions, suggesting that these molecules could be involved in several cellular processes. PMID:26873273

  19. The crystal structure of choline kinase reveals a eukaryotic protein kinase fold

    SciTech Connect

    Peisach, D.; Gee, P.; Kent, K.; Xu, Z.

    2010-03-08

    Choline kinase catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of choline, the first committed step in the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of a choline kinase from C. elegans (CKA-2) reveals that the enzyme is a homodimeric protein with each monomer organized into a two-domain fold. The structure is remarkably similar to those of protein kinases and aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, despite no significant similarity in amino acid sequence. Comparisons to the structures of other kinases suggest that ATP binds to CKA-2 in a pocket formed by highly conserved and catalytically important residues. In addition, a choline binding site is proposed to be near the ATP binding pocket and formed by several structurally flexible loops.

  20. Amino Acid Proximities in Two Sup35 Prion Strains Revealed by Chemical Cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shenq-Huey; King, Chih-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Strains of the yeast prion [PSI] are different folding patterns of the same Sup35 protein, which stacks up periodically to form a prion fiber. Chemical cross-linking is employed here to probe different fiber structures assembled with a mutant Sup35 fragment. The photo-reactive cross-linker, p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine (pBpa), was biosynthetically incorporated into bacterially prepared recombinant Sup(1-61)-GFP, containing the first 61 residues of Sup35, followed by the green fluorescent protein. Four methionine substitutions and two alanine substitutions were introduced at fixed positions in Sup(1-61) to allow cyanogen bromide cleavage to facilitate subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Amyloid fibers of pBpa and Met/Ala-substituted Sup(1-61)-GFP were nucleated from purified yeast prion particles of two different strains, namely VK and VL, and shown to faithfully transmit specific strain characteristics to yeast expressing the wild type Sup35 protein. Intra- and intermolecular cross-linking were distinguished by tandem mass spectrometry analysis on fibers seeded from solutions containing equal amounts of (14)N- and (15)N-labeled protein. Fibers propagating the VL strain type exhibited intra- and intermolecular cross-linking between amino acid residues 3 and 28, as well as intra- and intermolecular linking between 32 and 55. Inter- and intramolecular cross-linking between residues 32 and 55 were detected in fibers propagating the VK strain type. Adjacencies of amino acid residues in space revealed by cross-linking were used to constrain possible chain folds of different [PSI] strains. PMID:26265470

  1. Photoaffinity labeling of retinoic acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, P S; Choi, S Y; Ho, Y C; Rando, R R

    1995-01-01

    Retinoid-binding proteins are essential mediators of vitamin A function in vertebrate organisms. They solubilize and stabilize retinoids, and they direct the intercellular and intracellular trafficking, transport, and metabolic function of vitamin A compounds in vision and in growth and development. Although many soluble retinoid-binding proteins and receptors have been purified and extensively characterized, relatively few membrane-associated enzymes and other proteins that interact with retinoids have been isolated and studied, due primarily to their inherent instabilities during purification. In an effort to identify and purify previously uncharacterized retinoid-binding proteins, it is shown that radioactively labeled all-trans-retinoic acid can be used as a photoaffinity labeling reagent to specifically tag two known retinoic acid-binding proteins, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein and albumin, in complex mixtures of cytosolic proteins. Additionally, a number of other soluble and membrane-associated proteins that bind all-trans-[11,12-3H]retinoic acid with high specificity are labeled utilizing the same photoaffinity techniques. Most of these labeled proteins have molecular weights that do not correspond to any known retinoid-binding proteins. Thus, photoaffinity labeling with all-trans-retinoic acid and related photoactivatable retinoids is a method that should prove extremely useful in the identification and purification of novel soluble and membrane-associated retinoid-binding proteins from ocular and nonocular tissues. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7846032

  2. Kinetic Measurements Reveal Enhanced Protein-Protein Interactions at Intercellular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Shashikanth, Nitesh; Kisting, Meridith A.; Leckband, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    The binding properties of adhesion proteins are typically quantified from measurements with soluble fragments, under conditions that differ radically from the confined microenvironment of membrane bound proteins in adhesion zones. Using classical cadherin as a model adhesion protein, we tested the postulate that confinement within quasi two-dimensional intercellular gaps exposes weak protein interactions that are not detected in solution binding assays. Micropipette-based measurements of cadherin-mediated, cell-cell binding kinetics identified a unique kinetic signature that reflects both adhesive (trans) bonds between cadherins on opposing cells and lateral (cis) interactions between cadherins on the same cell. In solution, proposed lateral interactions were not detected, even at high cadherin concentrations. Mutations postulated to disrupt lateral cadherin association altered the kinetic signatures, but did not affect the adhesive (trans) binding affinity. Perturbed kinetics further coincided with altered cadherin distributions at junctions, wound healing dynamics, and paracellular permeability. Intercellular binding kinetics thus revealed cadherin interactions that occur within confined, intermembrane gaps but not in solution. Findings further demonstrate the impact of these revealed interactions on the organization and function of intercellular junctions. PMID:27009566

  3. Kinetic Measurements Reveal Enhanced Protein-Protein Interactions at Intercellular Junctions.

    PubMed

    Shashikanth, Nitesh; Kisting, Meridith A; Leckband, Deborah E

    2016-01-01

    The binding properties of adhesion proteins are typically quantified from measurements with soluble fragments, under conditions that differ radically from the confined microenvironment of membrane bound proteins in adhesion zones. Using classical cadherin as a model adhesion protein, we tested the postulate that confinement within quasi two-dimensional intercellular gaps exposes weak protein interactions that are not detected in solution binding assays. Micropipette-based measurements of cadherin-mediated, cell-cell binding kinetics identified a unique kinetic signature that reflects both adhesive (trans) bonds between cadherins on opposing cells and lateral (cis) interactions between cadherins on the same cell. In solution, proposed lateral interactions were not detected, even at high cadherin concentrations. Mutations postulated to disrupt lateral cadherin association altered the kinetic signatures, but did not affect the adhesive (trans) binding affinity. Perturbed kinetics further coincided with altered cadherin distributions at junctions, wound healing dynamics, and paracellular permeability. Intercellular binding kinetics thus revealed cadherin interactions that occur within confined, intermembrane gaps but not in solution. Findings further demonstrate the impact of these revealed interactions on the organization and function of intercellular junctions. PMID:27009566

  4. Enterocyte Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs): Different Functions of Liver- and Intestinal- FABPs in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, Angela M.; Storch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are highly abundant cytosolic proteins that are expressed in most mammalian tissues. In the intestinal enterocyte, both Liver- (LFABP; FABP1) and Intestinal-fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP; FABP2) are expressed. These proteins display high affinity binding for long chain fatty acids (FA) and other hydrophobic ligands, thus they are believed to be involved with uptake and trafficking of lipids in the intestine. In vitro studies have identified differences in ligand binding stoichiometry and specificity, and in mechanisms of FA transfer to membranes, and it has been hypothesized that LFABP and IFABP have difference functions in the enterocyte. Studies directly comparing LFABP- and IFABP-null mice have revealed markedly different phenotypes, indicating that these proteins indeed have different functions in intestinal lipid metabolism and whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the evolving knowledge of the functions of LFABP and IFABP in the intestinal enterocyte. PMID:25458898

  5. Mutational scanning reveals the determinants of protein insertion and association energetics in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan; Biran, Ido; Fridman, Yearit; Bibi, Eitan; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Insertion of helix-forming segments into the membrane and their association determines the structure, function, and expression levels of all plasma membrane proteins. However, systematic and reliable quantification of membrane-protein energetics has been challenging. We developed a deep mutational scanning method to monitor the effects of hundreds of point mutations on helix insertion and self-association within the bacterial inner membrane. The assay quantifies insertion energetics for all natural amino acids at 27 positions across the membrane, revealing that the hydrophobicity of biological membranes is significantly higher than appreciated. We further quantitate the contributions to membrane-protein insertion from positively charged residues at the cytoplasm-membrane interface and reveal large and unanticipated differences among these residues. Finally, we derive comprehensive mutational landscapes in the membrane domains of Glycophorin A and the ErbB2 oncogene, and find that insertion and self-association are strongly coupled in receptor homodimers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12125.001 PMID:26824389

  6. Amino acid metabolism and protein synthesis in malarial parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, I. W.

    1977-01-01

    Malaria-infected red cells and free parasites have limited capabilities for the biosynthesis of amino acids. Therefore, the principal amino acid sources for parasite protein synthesis are the plasma free amino acids and host cell haemoglobin. Infected cells and plasmodia incorporate exogenously supplied amino acids into protein. However, the hypothesis that amino acid utilization (from an external source) is related to availability of that amino acid in haemoglobin is without universal support: it is true for isoleucine and for Plasmodium knowlesi and P. falciparum, but not for methionine, cysteine, and other amino acids, and it does not apply to P. lophurae. More by default than by direct evidence, haemoglobin is believed to be the main amino acid reservoir available to the intraerythrocytic plasmodium. Haemoglobin, ingested via the cytostome, is held in food vacuoles where auto-oxidation takes place. As a consequence, haem is released and accumulates in the vacuole as particulate haemozoin (= malaria pigment). Current evidence favours the view that haemozoin is mainly haematin. Acid and alkaline proteases (identified in crude extracts from mammalian and avian malarias) are presumably secreted directly into the food vacuole. They then digest the denatured globin and the resulting amino acids are incorporated into parasite protein. Cell-free protein synthesizing systems have been developed using P. knowlesi and P. lophurae ribosomes. In the main these systems are typically eukaryotic. Studies of amino acid metabolism are exceedingly limited. Arginine, lysine, methionine, and proline are incorporated into protein, whereas glutamic acid is metabolized via an NADP-specific glutamic dehydrogenase. Glutamate oxidation generates NADPH and auxiliary energy (in the form of α-ketoglutarate). The role of red cell glutathione in the economy of the parasite remains obscure. Important goals for future research should be: quantitative assessment of the relative importance of

  7. Phosphate acceptor amino acid residues in structural proteins of rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, F; Tan, K B; McFalls, M L; Madore, P

    1974-07-01

    Partial acid hydrolysates of the [(32)P]phosphate- or [(3)H]serine-labeled proteins of purified vesicular stomatitis, rabies, Lagos bat, Mokola, or spring viremia of carp virions and of purified intracellular nucleocapsids of these viruses have been analyzed by paper electrophoresis for the presence of phosphorylated amino acids. Both phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, with the former predominant, were present in virion and nucleocapsid preparations that contained phosphoproteins. An exception was the fish rhabdovirus, which contained only phosphoserine. When vesicular stomatitis or rabies virus proteins were phosphorylated in a cell-free system by the virion-associated protein kinase and analyzed for the presence of phosphorylated amino acid residues, phosphoserine was again found to be more abundant than phosphothreonine. After in vitro protein phosphorylation, another phospho-compound, possibly a third phosphoamino acid, was detected in the partial acid hydrolysates of these viruses. PMID:4365328

  8. Protein and amino acid metabolism and requirements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells of the body. Enzymes, membrane carriers, blood transport molecules, intracellular matrix, and even hair and fingernails are proteins, as are many hormones. Proteins also constitute a major portion of all membranes, and the cons...

  9. Interaction of milk whey protein with common phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Dandan; Sun, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Ding, Qingbo; Liu, Ruihai; Ren, Fazheng

    2014-01-01

    Phenolics-rich foods such as fruit juices and coffee are often consumed with milk. In this study, the interactions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin with the phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and coumalic acid) were examined. Fluorescence, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies were used to analyze the binding modes, binding constants, and the effects of complexation on the conformation of whey protein. The results showed that binding constants of each whey protein-phenolic acid interaction ranged from 4 × 105 to 7 × 106 M-n and the number of binding sites n ranged from 1.28 ± 0.13 to 1.54 ± 0.34. Because of these interactions, the conformation of whey protein was altered, with a significant reduction in the amount of α-helix and an increase in the amounts of β-sheet and turn structures.

  10. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Christopher P; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A J; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-12-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach termed RNA Tagging that enables the user to identify protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or cross-linking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA via high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The results showed that although RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also 'sample' RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We used the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. RNA Tagging is well suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  11. Measuring protein-protein and protein-nucleic Acid interactions by biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Azmiri; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer interferometry (BLI) is a simple, optical dip-and-read system useful for measuring interactions between proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, small molecules, and/or lipids in real time. In BLI, a biomolecular bait is immobilized on a matrix at the tip of a fiber-optic sensor. The binding between the immobilized ligand and another molecule in an analyte solution produces a change in optical thickness at the tip and results in a wavelength shift proportional to binding. BLI provides direct binding affinities and rates of association and dissociation. This unit describes an efficient approach using streptavidin-based BLI to analyze DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. A quantitative set of equilibrium binding affinities (K(d)) and rates of association and dissociation (k(a)/k(d)) can be measured in minutes using nanomole quantities of sample. PMID:25640894

  12. Proteomic Investigation of Aphid Honeydew Reveals an Unexpected Diversity of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Haubruge, Eric; Hance, Thierry; Thonart, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin; Francis, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Aphids feed on the phloem sap of plants, and are the most common honeydew-producing insects. While aphid honeydew is primarily considered to comprise sugars and amino acids, its protein diversity has yet to be documented. Here, we report on the investigation of the honeydew proteome from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Using a two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-Dige) approach, more than 140 spots were isolated, demonstrating that aphid honeydew also represents a diverse source of proteins. About 66% of the isolated spots were identified through mass spectrometry analysis, revealing that the protein diversity of aphid honeydew originates from several organisms (i.e. the host aphid and its microbiota, including endosymbiotic bacteria and gut flora). Interestingly, our experiments also allowed to identify some proteins like chaperonin, GroEL and Dnak chaperones, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and flagellin that might act as mediators in the plant-aphid interaction. In addition to providing the first aphid honeydew proteome analysis, we propose to reconsider the importance of this substance, mainly acknowledged to be a waste product, from the aphid ecology perspective. PMID:24086359

  13. Revealing Higher Order Protein Structure Using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chait, Brian T.; Cadene, Martine; Olinares, Paul Dominic; Rout, Michael P.; Shi, Yi

    2016-04-01

    The development of rapid, sensitive, and accurate mass spectrometric methods for measuring peptides, proteins, and even intact protein assemblies has made mass spectrometry (MS) an extraordinarily enabling tool for structural biology. Here, we provide a personal perspective of the increasingly useful role that mass spectrometric techniques are exerting during the elucidation of higher order protein structures. Areas covered in this brief perspective include MS as an enabling tool for the high resolution structural biologist, for compositional analysis of endogenous protein complexes, for stoichiometry determination, as well as for integrated approaches for the structural elucidation of protein complexes. We conclude with a vision for the future role of MS-based techniques in the development of a multi-scale molecular microscope.

  14. Principles of assembly reveal a periodic table of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Ahnert, Sebastian E; Marsh, Joseph A; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-12-11

    Structural insights into protein complexes have had a broad impact on our understanding of biological function and evolution. In this work, we sought a comprehensive understanding of the general principles underlying quaternary structure organization in protein complexes. We first examined the fundamental steps by which protein complexes can assemble, using experimental and structure-based characterization of assembly pathways. Most assembly transitions can be classified into three basic types, which can then be used to exhaustively enumerate a large set of possible quaternary structure topologies. These topologies, which include the vast majority of observed protein complex structures, enable a natural organization of protein complexes into a periodic table. On the basis of this table, we can accurately predict the expected frequencies of quaternary structure topologies, including those not yet observed. These results have important implications for quaternary structure prediction, modeling, and engineering. PMID:26659058

  15. Revealing Higher Order Protein Structure Using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chait, Brian T.; Cadene, Martine; Olinares, Paul Dominic; Rout, Michael P.; Shi, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The development of rapid, sensitive, and accurate mass spectrometric methods for measuring peptides, proteins, and even intact protein assemblies has made mass spectrometry (MS) an extraordinarily enabling tool for structural biology. Here, we provide a personal perspective of the increasingly useful role that mass spectrometric techniques are exerting during the elucidation of higher order protein structures. Areas covered in this brief perspective include MS as an enabling tool for the high resolution structural biologist, for compositional analysis of endogenous protein complexes, for stoichiometry determination, as well as for integrated approaches for the structural elucidation of protein complexes. We conclude with a vision for the future role of MS-based techniques in the development of a multi-scale molecular microscope.

  16. Revealing Higher Order Protein Structure Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chait, Brian T; Cadene, Martine; Olinares, Paul Dominic; Rout, Michael P; Shi, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The development of rapid, sensitive, and accurate mass spectrometric methods for measuring peptides, proteins, and even intact protein assemblies has made mass spectrometry (MS) an extraordinarily enabling tool for structural biology. Here, we provide a personal perspective of the increasingly useful role that mass spectrometric techniques are exerting during the elucidation of higher order protein structures. Areas covered in this brief perspective include MS as an enabling tool for the high resolution structural biologist, for compositional analysis of endogenous protein complexes, for stoichiometry determination, as well as for integrated approaches for the structural elucidation of protein complexes. We conclude with a vision for the future role of MS-based techniques in the development of a multi-scale molecular microscope. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27080007

  17. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1's role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  18. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1’s role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  19. Cation–Anion Interactions within the Nucleic Acid Ion Atmosphere Revealed by Ion Counting

    PubMed Central

    Gebala, Magdalena; Giambasu, George M.; Lipfert, Jan; Bisaria, Namita; Bonilla, Steve; Li, Guangchao; York, Darrin M.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The ion atmosphere is a critical structural, dynamic, and energetic component of nucleic acids that profoundly affects their interactions with proteins and ligands. Experimental methods that “count” the number of ions thermodynamically associated with the ion atmosphere allow dissection of energetic properties of the ion atmosphere, and thus provide direct comparison to theoretical results. Previous experiments have focused primarily on the cations that are attracted to nucleic acid polyanions, but have also showed that anions are excluded from the ion atmosphere. Herein, we have systematically explored the properties of anion exclusion, testing the zeroth-order model that anions of different identity are equally excluded due to electrostatic repulsion. Using a series of monovalent salts, we find, surprisingly, that the extent of anion exclusion and cation inclusion significantly depends on salt identity. The differences are prominent at higher concentrations and mirror trends in mean activity coefficients of the electrolyte solutions. Salts with lower activity coefficients exhibit greater accumulation of both cations and anions within the ion atmosphere, strongly suggesting that cation–anion correlation effects are present in the ion atmosphere and need to be accounted for to understand electrostatic interactions of nucleic acids. To test whether the effects of cation–anion correlations extend to nucleic acid kinetics and thermodynamics, we followed the folding of P4–P6, a domain of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, via single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer in solutions with different salts. Solutions of identical concentration but lower activity gave slower and less favorable folding. Our results reveal hitherto unknown properties of the ion atmosphere and suggest possible roles of oriented ion pairs or anion-bridged cations in the ion atmosphere for electrolyte solutions of salts with reduced activity. Consideration of these new

  20. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  1. The distinct C-terminal acidic domains of HMGB proteins are functionally relevant in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    de Abreu da Silva, Isabel Caetano; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; Vicentino, Amanda Roberta Revoredo; Aguilera, Estefania Anahi; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Thiengo, Silvana; Fernandez, Monica Ammon; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado

    2016-04-01

    The Schistosoma mansoni High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) proteins SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 share highly conserved HMG box DNA binding domains but have significantly different C-terminal acidic tails. Here, we used three full-length and tailless forms of the S. mansoni HMGB proteins to examine the functional roles of their acidic tails. DNA binding assays revealed that the different lengths of the acidic tails among the three SmHMGB proteins significantly and distinctively influenced their DNA transactions. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the longest acidic tail of SmHMGB3 contributes to the structural stabilisation of this protein. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we showed distinct patterns of SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 expression in different tissues of adult worms. RNA interference approaches indicated a role for SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 in the reproductive system of female worms, whereas for SmHMGB1 no clear phenotype was observed. Schistosome HMGB proteins can be phosphorylated, acetylated and methylated. Importantly, the acetylation and methylation of schistosome HMGBs were greatly enhanced upon removal of the acidic tail. These data support the notion that the C-terminal acidic tails dictate the differences in the structure, expression and function of schistosome HMGB proteins. PMID:26820302

  2. Absorption spectral analysis of proteins and free amino acids in Pleurotus ostreatus fruiting body extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyshyn, S.; Gorshynska, I.; Guminetsky, S. G.

    2002-02-01

    The paper deals with the results of spectrophotometric studies of the extracts of Pleurotus ostreatus fruiting bodies, grown in natural conditions in different habitats of Chernivtsy region, in the spectral interval of 215 - 340 nm. It is shown that the samples reveal considerable difference both in free amino acid content and reserved protein content of albumins, globulins, prolamins, glutelins.

  3. Ribosomal History Reveals Origins of Modern Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world. PMID:22427882

  4. Graphlet-based edge clustering reveals pathogen-interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Solava, R. W.; Michaels, R. P.; Milenković, T.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Prediction of protein function from protein interaction networks has received attention in the post-genomic era. A popular strategy has been to cluster the network into functionally coherent groups of proteins and assign the entire cluster with a function based on functions of its annotated members. Traditionally, network research has focused on clustering of nodes. However, clustering of edges may be preferred: nodes belong to multiple functional groups, but clustering of nodes typically cannot capture the group overlap, while clustering of edges can. Clustering of adjacent edges that share many neighbors was proposed recently, outperforming different node clustering methods. However, since some biological processes can have characteristic ‘signatures’ throughout the network, not just locally, it may be of interest to consider edges that are not necessarily adjacent. Results: We design a sensitive measure of the ‘topological similarity’ of edges that can deal with edges that are not necessarily adjacent. We cluster edges that are similar according to our measure in different baker's yeast protein interaction networks, outperforming existing node and edge clustering approaches. We apply our approach to the human network to predict new pathogen-interacting proteins. This is important, since these proteins represent drug target candidates. Availability: Software executables are freely available upon request. Contact: tmilenko@nd.edu Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22962470

  5. Non-protein amino acids and neurodegeneration: the enemy within.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Kenneth J

    2014-03-01

    Animals, in common with plants and microorganisms, synthesise proteins from a pool of 20 protein amino acids (plus selenocysteine and pyrolysine) (Hendrickson et al., 2004). This represents a small proportion (~2%) of the total number of amino acids known to exist in nature (Bell, 2003). Many 'non-protein' amino acids are synthesised by plants, and in some cases constitute part of their chemical armoury against pathogens, predators or other species competing for the same resources (Fowden et al., 1967). Microorganisms can also use selectively toxic amino acids to gain advantage over competing organisms (Nunn et al., 2010). Since non-protein amino acids (and imino acids) are present in legumes, fruits, seeds and nuts, they are ubiquitous in the diets of human populations around the world. Toxicity to humans is unlikely to have been the selective force for their evolution, but they have the clear potential to adversely affect human health. In this review we explore the links between exposure to non-protein amino acids and neurodegenerative disorders in humans. Environmental factors play a major role in these complex disorders which are predominantly sporadic (Coppede et al., 2006). The discovery of new genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases, many of which code for aggregation-prone proteins, continues at a spectacular pace but little progress is being made in identifying the environmental factors that impact on these disorders. We make the case that insidious entry of non-protein amino acids into the human food chain and their incorporation into protein might be contributing significantly to neurodegenerative damage. PMID:24374297

  6. Heat capacities of amino acids, peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Makhatadze, G I

    1998-04-20

    The heat capacity is one of the fundamental parameters describing thermodynamic properties of a system. It has wide applications in a number of areas such as polymer chemistry, protein folding and DNA stability. To aid the scientific community in the analysis of such data, I have compiled a database on the experimentally measured heat capacities of amino acids, polyamino acids, peptides, and proteins in solid state and in aqueous solutions. PMID:9648205

  7. Analysis of protein-protein interactions in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines using phthalic acid chemical probes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of plasticizers that have been characterized as endocrine disrupters, and are associated with genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity in the GeneOntology gene/protein database. In this study, we synthesized phthalic acid chemical probes and demonstrated differing protein-protein interactions between MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Phthalic acid chemical probes were synthesized using silicon dioxide particle carriers, which were modified using the silanized linker 3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane (APTES). Incubation with cell lysates from breast cancer cell lines revealed interactions between phthalic acid and cellular proteins in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Subsequent proteomics analyses indicated 22 phthalic acid-binding proteins in both cell types, including heat shock cognate 71-kDa protein, ATP synthase subunit beta, and heat shock protein HSP 90-beta. In addition, 21 MCF-7-specific and 32 MDA-MB-231 specific phthalic acid-binding proteins were identified, including related proteasome proteins, heat shock 70-kDa protein, and NADPH dehydrogenase and ribosomal correlated proteins, ras-related proteins, and members of the heat shock protein family, respectively. PMID:25402641

  8. Phthalic acid chemical probes synthesized for protein-protein interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Liao, Wei-Ting; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Chou, Chi-Hsien; Wu, Chin-Jen; Wang, Hui-Min

    2013-01-01

    Plasticizers are additives that are used to increase the flexibility of plastic during manufacturing. However, in injection molding processes, plasticizers cannot be generated with monomers because they can peel off from the plastics into the surrounding environment, water, or food, or become attached to skin. Among the various plasticizers that are used, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (phthalic acid) is a typical precursor to generate phthalates. In addition, phthalic acid is a metabolite of diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). According to Gene_Ontology gene/protein database, phthalates can cause genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, etc. In this study, a silanized linker (3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane, APTES) was deposited on silicon dioxides (SiO2) particles and phthalate chemical probes were manufactured from phthalic acid and APTES-SiO2. These probes could be used for detecting proteins that targeted phthalic acid and for protein-protein interactions. The phthalic acid chemical probes we produced were incubated with epithelioid cell lysates of normal rat kidney (NRK-52E cells) to detect the interactions between phthalic acid and NRK-52E extracted proteins. These chemical probes interacted with a number of chaperones such as protein disulfide-isomerase A6, heat shock proteins, and Serpin H1. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software showed that these chemical probes were a practical technique for protein-protein interaction analysis. PMID:23797655

  9. HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    HALOACETIC ACIDS PERTURB PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION IN MOUSE EMBRYOS IN VITRO. MR Blanton and ES Hunter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Sponsor: JM Rogers.
    Haloacetic Acids (HAAs) formed during the disinfection process are present in drin...

  10. Conformational Entropy of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins from Amino Acid Triads

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Anupaul; Rani, Pooja; Biswas, Parbati

    2015-01-01

    This work quantitatively characterizes intrinsic disorder in proteins in terms of sequence composition and backbone conformational entropy. Analysis of the normalized relative composition of the amino acid triads highlights a distinct boundary between globular and disordered proteins. The conformational entropy is calculated from the dihedral angles of the middle amino acid in the amino acid triad for the conformational ensemble of the globular, partially and completely disordered proteins relative to the non-redundant database. Both Monte Carlo (MC) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used to characterize the conformational ensemble of the representative proteins of each group. The results show that the globular proteins span approximately half of the allowed conformational states in the Ramachandran space, while the amino acid triads in disordered proteins sample the entire range of the allowed dihedral angle space following Flory’s isolated-pair hypothesis. Therefore, only the sequence information in terms of the relative amino acid triad composition may be sufficient to predict protein disorder and the backbone conformational entropy, even in the absence of well-defined structure. The predicted entropies are found to agree with those calculated using mutual information expansion and the histogram method. PMID:26138206

  11. Evolution and Functional Implications of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle as Revealed by Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, João Henrique Frota; Esteves-Ferreira, Alberto A.; Quinhones, Carla G.S.; Pereira-Lima, Italo A.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Araújo, Wagner L.

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a crucial component of respiratory metabolism, is composed of a set of eight enzymes present in the mitochondrial matrix. However, most of the TCA cycle enzymes are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes. In addition, evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. For this reason, we here analyzed the evolutionary history of all TCA cycle enzymes in attempt to better understand the origin of these nuclear-encoded proteins. Our results indicate that prior to endosymbiotic events the TCA cycle seemed to operate only as isolated steps in both the host (eubacterial cell) and mitochondria (alphaproteobacteria). The origin of isoforms present in different cell compartments might be associated either with gene-transfer events which did not result in proper targeting of the protein to mitochondrion or with duplication events. Further in silico analyses allow us to suggest new insights into the possible roles of TCA cycle enzymes in different tissues. Finally, we performed coexpression analysis using mitochondrial TCA cycle genes revealing close connections among these genes most likely related to the higher efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in this specialized organelle. Moreover, these analyses allowed us to identify further candidate genes which might be used for metabolic engineering purposes given the importance of the TCA cycle during development and/or stress situations. PMID:25274566

  12. Evolutionary biochemistry: revealing the historical and physical causes of protein properties

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Michael J.; Thornton, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    The repertoire of proteins and nucleic acids in the living world is determined by evolution; their properties are determined by the laws of physics and chemistry. Explanations of these two kinds of causality — the purviews of evolutionary biology and biochemistry, respectively — are typically pursued in isolation, but many fundamental questions fall squarely at the interface of fields. Here we articulate the paradigm of evolutionary biochemistry, which aims to dissect the physical mechanisms and evolutionary processes by which biological molecules diversified and to reveal how their physical architecture facilitates and constrains their evolution. We show how an integration of evolution with biochemistry moves us towards a more complete understanding of why biological molecules have the properties that they do. PMID:23864121

  13. A single amino acid substitution results in a retinoblastoma protein defective in phosphorylation and oncoprotein binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, F.J.; Gerster, J.L. Uniformed Services Univ. of Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD ); Kratzke, R.A. ); Horowitz, J.M. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors have previously identified a small-cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H209) that expresses an aberrant, underphosphorylated form of the retinoblastoma protein RB1. Molecular analysis of RB1 mRNA from this cell line revealed a single point mutation within exon 21 that resulted in a nonconservative amino acid substitution (cysteine to phenylalanine) at codon 706. Stable expression of this mutant RB1 cDNA in a human cell line lacking endogenous RB1 demonstrated that this amino acid change was sufficient to inhibit phosphorylation. In addition, this cysteine-to-phenylalanine substitution also resulted in loss of RB1 binding to the simian virus 40 large tumor and adenovirus E1A transforming proteins. These results confirm the importance of exon 21 coding sequences and suggest that the cysteine residue at codon 706 may play a role in achieving a specific protein conformation essential for protein-protein interactions.

  14. Protein interactome reveals converging molecular pathways among autism disorders.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yasunari; Shaw, Chad A; Dawson, Brian C; Dugas, Diana V; Al-Mohtaseb, Zaina; Hill, David E; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2011-06-01

    To uncover shared pathogenic mechanisms among the highly heterogeneous autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), we developed a protein interaction network that identified hundreds of new interactions among proteins encoded by ASD-associated genes. We discovered unexpectedly high connectivity between SHANK and TSC1, previously implicated in syndromic autism, suggesting that common molecular pathways underlie autistic phenotypes in distinct syndromes. ASD patients were more likely to harbor copy number variations that encompass network genes than were control subjects. We also identified, in patients with idiopathic ASD, three de novo lesions (deletions in 16q23.3 and 15q22 and one duplication in Xq28) that involve three network genes (NECAB2, PKM2, and FLNA). The protein interaction network thus provides a framework for identifying causes of idiopathic autism and for understanding molecular pathways that underpin both syndromic and idiopathic ASDs. PMID:21653829

  15. A Soluble, Folded Protein without Charged Amino Acid Residues.

    PubMed

    Højgaard, Casper; Kofoed, Christian; Espersen, Roall; Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe; Villa, Mara; Willemoës, Martin; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Teilum, Kaare; Winther, Jakob R

    2016-07-19

    Charges are considered an integral part of protein structure and function, enhancing solubility and providing specificity in molecular interactions. We wished to investigate whether charged amino acids are indeed required for protein biogenesis and whether a protein completely free of titratable side chains can maintain solubility, stability, and function. As a model, we used a cellulose-binding domain from Cellulomonas fimi, which, among proteins of more than 100 amino acids, presently is the least charged in the Protein Data Bank, with a total of only four titratable residues. We find that the protein shows a surprising resilience toward extremes of pH, demonstrating stability and function (cellulose binding) in the pH range from 2 to 11. To ask whether the four charged residues present were required for these properties of this protein, we altered them to nontitratable ones. Remarkably, this chargeless protein is produced reasonably well in Escherichia coli, retains its stable three-dimensional structure, and is still capable of strong cellulose binding. To further deprive this protein of charges, we removed the N-terminal charge by acetylation and studied the protein at pH 2, where the C-terminus is effectively protonated. Under these conditions, the protein retains its function and proved to be both soluble and have a reversible folding-unfolding transition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a soluble, functional protein with no titratable side chains has been produced. PMID:27307139

  16. Molecular dynamic simulations reveal the structural determinants of fatty acid binding to oxy-myoglobin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolite...

  17. Okadaic acid-sensitive protein phosphatases constrain phrenic long-term facilitation after sustained hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Julia E R; Satriotomo, Irawan; Baker-Herman, Tracy L; Watters, Jyoti J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2008-03-12

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a serotonin-dependent form of pattern-sensitive respiratory plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia (IH), but not sustained hypoxia (SH). The mechanism(s) underlying pLTF pattern sensitivity are unknown. SH and IH may differentially regulate serine/threonine protein phosphatase activity, thereby inhibiting relevant protein phosphatases uniquely during IH and conferring pattern sensitivity to pLTF. We hypothesized that spinal protein phosphatase inhibition would relieve this braking action of protein phosphatases, thereby revealing pLTF after SH. Anesthetized rats received intrathecal (C4) okadaic acid (25 nm) before SH (25 min, 11% O(2)). Unlike (vehicle) control rats, SH induced a significant pLTF in okadaic acid-treated rats that was indistinguishable from rats exposed to IH (three 5 min episodes, 11% O(2)). IH and SH with okadaic acid may elicit pLTF by similar, serotonin-dependent mechanisms, because intravenous methysergide blocks pLTF in rats receiving IH or okadaic acid plus SH. Okadaic acid did not alter IH-induced pLTF. In summary, pattern sensitivity in pLTF may reflect differential regulation of okadaic acid-sensitive serine/threonine phosphatases; presumably, these phosphatases are less active during/after IH versus SH. The specific okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase(s) constraining pLTF and their spatiotemporal dynamics during and/or after IH and SH remain to be determined. PMID:18337426

  18. Predicting protein disorder by analyzing amino acid sequence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu

    2008-01-01

    Background Many protein regions and some entire proteins have no definite tertiary structure, presenting instead as dynamic, disorder ensembles under different physiochemical circumstances. These proteins and regions are known as Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUP). IUP have been associated with a wide range of protein functions, along with roles in diseases characterized by protein misfolding and aggregation. Results Identifying IUP is important task in structural and functional genomics. We exact useful features from sequences and develop machine learning algorithms for the above task. We compare our IUP predictor with PONDRs (mainly neural-network-based predictors), disEMBL (also based on neural networks) and Globplot (based on disorder propensity). Conclusion We find that augmenting features derived from physiochemical properties of amino acids (such as hydrophobicity, complexity etc.) and using ensemble method proved beneficial. The IUP predictor is a viable alternative software tool for identifying IUP protein regions and proteins. PMID:18831799

  19. IR-UV photochemistry of protein-nucleic acid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, J.; Edwards, G.

    1995-12-31

    UV light has often been used to induce the formation of covalent bonds between DNA (or RNA) and tightly-bound protein molecules. However, the internal photoreactions of nucleic acids and proteins limit the yield and complicate the analysis of intermolecular crosslinks. In an ongoing search for improved reaction specificity or new photoreactions in these systems, we have employed UV photons from a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser and mid-IR photons from the Vanderbilt FEL. Having crosslinked several protein-nucleic acid systems with nanosecond UV laser pulses, we are currently studying the effect of various IR wavelengths on a model system (gene 32 protein and poly[dT]). We have found that irradiation with sufficiently intense FEL macropulses creates an altered form of gene 32 protein which was not observed with UV-only irradiation. The electrophoretic nobility of the product is consistent with the formation of a specific protein-protein crosslink. No evidence of the non-specific protein damage typically induced by UV light is found. The yield of the new photoproduct is apparently enhanced by exposure to FEL macropulses which are synchronized with UV laser pulses. With ideal exposure parameters, the two-color reaction effectively competes with UV-only reactions. Experiments designed to determine the reaction mechanism and to demonstrate FEL-induced reactions in other protein-nucleic acid systems are currently underway.

  20. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts.

  1. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    PubMed Central

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts. PMID:10639127

  2. Massively parallel sampling of lattice proteins reveals foundations of thermal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Venev, Sergey V; Zeldovich, Konstantin B

    2015-08-01

    Evolution of proteins in bacteria and archaea living in different conditions leads to significant correlations between amino acid usage and environmental temperature. The origins of these correlations are poorly understood, and an important question of protein theory, physics-based prediction of types of amino acids overrepresented in highly thermostable proteins, remains largely unsolved. Here, we extend the random energy model of protein folding by weighting the interaction energies of amino acids by their frequencies in protein sequences and predict the energy gap of proteins designed to fold well at elevated temperatures. To test the model, we present a novel scalable algorithm for simultaneous energy calculation for many sequences in many structures, targeting massively parallel computing architectures such as graphics processing unit. The energy calculation is performed by multiplying two matrices, one representing the complete set of sequences, and the other describing the contact maps of all structural templates. An implementation of the algorithm for the CUDA platform is available at http://www.github.com/kzeldovich/galeprot and calculates protein folding energies over 250 times faster than a single central processing unit. Analysis of amino acid usage in 64-mer cubic lattice proteins designed to fold well at different temperatures demonstrates an excellent agreement between theoretical and simulated values of energy gap. The theoretical predictions of temperature trends of amino acid frequencies are significantly correlated with bioinformatics data on 191 bacteria and archaea, and highlight protein folding constraints as a fundamental selection pressure during thermal adaptation in biological evolution. PMID:26254668

  3. The dark energy of proteins comes to light: conformational entropy and its role in protein function revealed by NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wand, A Joshua

    2013-02-01

    Historically it has been virtually impossible to experimentally determine the contribution of residual protein entropy to fundamental protein activities such as the binding of ligands. Recent progress has illuminated the possibility of employing NMR relaxation methods to quantitatively determine the role of changes in conformational entropy in molecular recognition by proteins. The method rests on using fast internal protein dynamics as a proxy. Initial results reveal a large and variable role for conformational entropy in the binding of ligands by proteins. Such a role for conformational entropy in molecular recognition has significant implications for enzymology, signal transduction, allosteric regulation and the development of protein-directed pharmaceuticals. PMID:23246280

  4. [Amino acid composition of rice grain proteins].

    PubMed

    Peruanskiĭ, Iu V; Savich, I M

    1976-01-01

    The composition of the major reserve proteins of rice grain--globulins, prolamines and glutelins--was examined in four rice varieties (Dubovsky 129, Kuban 3, Alakul, Ushtobinsky). Globulins proved to be most heterogeneous whereas glutelins appeared to be least heterogeneous. In regards to the ratio of components globulins showed high variability and glutelins displayed high stability. PMID:1005365

  5. Nucleic acid compositions and the encoding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Preston, III, James F.; Chow, Virginia; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D.; St. John, Franz J.

    2014-09-02

    The subject invention provides at least one nucleic acid sequence encoding an aldouronate-utilization regulon isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, a bacterium which efficiently utilizes xylan and metabolizes aldouronates (methylglucuronoxylosaccharides). The subject invention also provides a means for providing a coordinately regulated process in which xylan depolymerization and product assimilation are coupled in Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 to provide a favorable system for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biobased products. Additionally, the nucleic acid sequences encoding the aldouronate-utilization regulon can be used to transform other bacteria to form organisms capable of producing a desired product (e.g., ethanol, 1-butanol, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,3-propanediol, succinate, lactate, acetate, malate or alanine) from lignocellulosic biomass.

  6. Distinct single amino acid replacements in the control of virulence regulator protein differentially impact streptococcal pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Nicola; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Suber, Bryce; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Olsen, Randall J; Flores, Anthony; Musser, James M; Brennan, Richard G; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2011-10-01

    Sequencing of invasive strains of group A streptococci (GAS) has revealed a diverse array of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding the control of virulence regulator (CovR) protein. However, there is limited information regarding the molecular mechanisms by which CovR single amino acid replacements impact GAS pathogenesis. The crystal structure of the CovR C-terminal DNA-binding domain was determined to 1.50 Å resolution and revealed a three-stranded β-sheet followed by a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. Modeling of the CovR protein-DNA complex indicated that CovR single amino acid replacements observed in clinical GAS isolates could directly alter protein-DNA interaction and impact protein structure. Isoallelic GAS strains that varied by a single amino acid replacement in the CovR DNA binding domain had significantly different transcriptomes compared to wild-type and to each other. Similarly, distinct recombinant CovR variants had differential binding affinity for DNA from the promoter regions of several virulence factor-encoding genes. Finally, mice that were challenged with GAS CovR isoallelic strains had significantly different survival times, which correlated with the transcriptome and protein-DNA binding studies. Taken together, these data provide structural and functional insights into the critical and distinct effects of variation in the CovR protein on GAS pathogenesis. PMID:22028655

  7. Distinct Single Amino Acid Replacements in the Control of Virulence Regulator Protein Differentially Impact Streptococcal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Nicola; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Suber, Bryce; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Olsen, Randall J.; Flores, Anthony; Musser, James M.; Brennan, Richard G.; Shelburne, Samuel A.

    2011-01-01

    Sequencing of invasive strains of group A streptococci (GAS) has revealed a diverse array of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding the control of virulence regulator (CovR) protein. However, there is limited information regarding the molecular mechanisms by which CovR single amino acid replacements impact GAS pathogenesis. The crystal structure of the CovR C-terminal DNA-binding domain was determined to 1.50 Å resolution and revealed a three-stranded β-sheet followed by a winged helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. Modeling of the CovR protein-DNA complex indicated that CovR single amino acid replacements observed in clinical GAS isolates could directly alter protein-DNA interaction and impact protein structure. Isoallelic GAS strains that varied by a single amino acid replacement in the CovR DNA binding domain had significantly different transcriptomes compared to wild-type and to each other. Similarly, distinct recombinant CovR variants had differential binding affinity for DNA from the promoter regions of several virulence factor-encoding genes. Finally, mice that were challenged with GAS CovR isoallelic strains had significantly different survival times, which correlated with the transcriptome and protein-DNA binding studies. Taken together, these data provide structural and functional insights into the critical and distinct effects of variation in the CovR protein on GAS pathogenesis. PMID:22028655

  8. FLU, an amino acid substitution model for influenza proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The amino acid substitution model is the core component of many protein analysis systems such as sequence similarity search, sequence alignment, and phylogenetic inference. Although several general amino acid substitution models have been estimated from large and diverse protein databases, they remain inappropriate for analyzing specific species, e.g., viruses. Emerging epidemics of influenza viruses raise the need for comprehensive studies of these dangerous viruses. We propose an influenza-specific amino acid substitution model to enhance the understanding of the evolution of influenza viruses. Results A maximum likelihood approach was applied to estimate an amino acid substitution model (FLU) from ~113, 000 influenza protein sequences, consisting of ~20 million residues. FLU outperforms 14 widely used models in constructing maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees for the majority of influenza protein alignments. On average, FLU gains ~42 log likelihood points with an alignment of 300 sites. Moreover, topologies of trees constructed using FLU and other models are frequently different. FLU does indeed have an impact on likelihood improvement as well as tree topologies. It was implemented in PhyML and can be downloaded from ftp://ftp.sanger.ac.uk/pub/1000genomes/lsq/FLU or included in PhyML 3.0 server at http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/phyml/. Conclusions FLU should be useful for any influenza protein analysis system which requires an accurate description of amino acid substitutions. PMID:20384985

  9. Acid Cleavable Surface enhanced Raman Tagging for Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongmao; Vangala, Karthikeshwar; Li, Shaoyong; Yanney, Michael; Xia, Hao; Zou, Sige; Sygula, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Dye conjugation is a common strategy improving the surface enhanced Raman detection sensitivity of biomolecules. Reported is a proof-of-concept study of a novel surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic tagging strategy termed as acid-cleavable SERS tag (ACST) method. Using Rhodamine B as the starting material, we prepared the first ACST prototype that consisted of, from the distal end, a SERS tag moiety (STM), an acid-cleavable linker, and a protein reactive moiety. Complete acid cleavage of the ACST tags was achieved at a very mild condition that is 1.5% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) aqueous solution at room temperature. SERS detection of this ACST tagged protein was demonstrated using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the model protein. While the SERS spectrum of intact ACST-BSA was entirely dominated by the fluorescent signal of STM, quality SERS spectra can be readily obtained with the acid cleaved ACST-BSA conjugates. Separation of the acid cleaved STM from protein further enhances the SERS sensitivity. Current SERS detection sensitivity, achieved with the acid cleaved ACST-BSA conjugate is ~5 nM in terms of the BSA concentration and ~1.5 nM in ACST content. The linear dynamic range of the cleaved ACST-BSA conjugate spans four orders of magnitudes from ~10 nM to ~100 μM in protein concentrations. Further improvement in the SERS sensitivity can be achieved with resonance Raman acquisition. This cleavable tagging strategy may also be used for elimination of protein interference in fluorescence based biomolecule detection. PMID:21109888

  10. Uniformly sup 13 C-labeled algal protein used to determine amino acid essentiality in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Berthold, H.K.; Hachey, D.L.; Reeds, P.J.; Klein, P.D. ); Thomas, O.P. ); Hoeksema, S. )

    1991-09-15

    The edible alga Spirulina platensis was uniformly labeled with {sup 13}C by growth in an atmosphere of pure {sup 13}CO{sub 2}. The labeled biomass was then incorporated into the diet of a laying hen for 27 days. The isotopic enrichment of individual amino acids in egg white and yolk proteins, as well as in various tissues of the hen at the end of the feeding period, was analyzed by negative chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The amino acids of successive eggs showed one of two exclusive enrichment patterns: complete preservation of the intact carbon skeleton or extensive degradation and resynthesis. The same observation was made in tissue proteins. These patterns were cleanly divided according to known nutritional amino acid essentiality/nonessentiality but revealed differences in labeling among the nonessential amino acids: most notable was that proline accretion was derived entirely from the diet. Feeding uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled algal protein and recovering and analyzing de novo-synthesized protein provides a useful method to examine amino acid metabolism and determine conditional amino acid essentially in vivo.

  11. Uniformly 13C-labeled algal protein used to determine amino acid essentiality in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Berthold, H K; Hachey, D L; Reeds, P J; Thomas, O P; Hoeksema, S; Klein, P D

    1991-01-01

    The edible alga Spirulina platensis was uniformly labeled with 13C by growth in an atmosphere of pure 13CO2. The labeled biomass was then incorporated into the diet of a laying hen for 27 days. The isotopic enrichment of individual amino acids in egg white and yolk proteins, as well as in various tissues of the hen at the end of the feeding period, was analyzed by negative chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The amino acids of successive eggs showed one of two exclusive enrichment patterns: complete preservation of the intact carbon skeleton or extensive degradation and resynthesis. The same observation was made in tissue proteins. These patterns were cleanly divided according to known nutritional amino acid essentiality/nonessentiality but revealed differences in labeling among the nonessential amino acids: most notable was that proline accretion was derived entirely from the diet. Feeding uniformly 13C-labeled algal protein and recovering and analyzing de novo-synthesized protein provides a useful method to examine amino acid metabolism and determine conditional amino acid essentially in vivo. Images PMID:11607211

  12. Quantitative proteomics analysis reveals glutamine deprivation activates fatty acid β-oxidation pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Baisheng; Muhamad, Rodiallah; Yan, Guokai; Yu, Jie; Fan, Qiwen; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xiuzhi; Purnomoadi, Agung; Achmadi, Joelal; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-05-01

    Glutamine, a multifunctional amino acid, functions in nutrient metabolism, energy balance, apoptosis, and cell proliferation. Lipid is an important nutrient and controls a broad range of physiological processes. Previous studies have demonstrated that glutamine can affect lipolysis and lipogenesis, but the effect of glutamine on the detailed lipid metabolism remains incompletely understood. Here, we applied the quantitative proteomics approach to estimate the relative abundance of proteins in HepG2 cells treated by glutamine deprivation. The results showed that there were 212 differentially abundant proteins in response to glutamine deprivation, including 150 significantly increased proteins and 62 significantly decreased proteins. Interestingly, functional classification showed that 43 differentially abundant proteins were related to lipid metabolism. Further bioinformatics analysis and western blotting validation revealed that lipid accumulation may be affected by β-oxidation of fatty acid induced by glutamine deprivation in HepG2 cells. Together, our results may provide the potential for regulating lipid metabolism by glutamine in animal production and human nutrition. The MS data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with identifier PXD003387. PMID:26837383

  13. Interaction of perfluoroalkyl acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Nan; Li, Juan; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Aiqian; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are highly persistent and bioaccumulative, resulting in their broad distribution in humans and the environment. The liver is an important target for PFAAs, but the mechanisms behind PFAAs interaction with hepatocyte proteins remain poorly understood. We characterized the binding of PFAAs to human liver fatty acid-binding protein (hL-FABP) and identified critical structural features in their interaction. The binding interaction of PFAAs with hL-FABP was determined by fluorescence displacement and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assay. Molecular simulation was conducted to define interactions at the binding sites. ITC measurement revealed that PFOA/PFNA displayed a moderate affinity for hL-FABP at a 1:1 molar ratio, a weak binding affinity for PFHxS and no binding for PFHxA. Moreover, the interaction was mainly mediated by electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bonding. Substitution of Asn111 with Asp caused loss of binding affinity to PFAA, indicating its crucial role for the initial PFAA binding to the outer binding site. Substitution of Arg122 with Gly caused only one molecule of PFAA to bind to hL-FABP. Molecular simulation showed that substitution of Arg122 increased the volume of the outer binding pocket, making it impossible to form intensive hydrophobic stacking and hydrogen bonds with PFOA, and highlighting its crucial role in the binding process. The binding affinity of PFAAs increased significantly with their carbon number. Arg122 and Asn111 played a pivotal role in these interactions. Our findings may help understand the distribution pattern, bioaccumulation, elimination, and toxicity of PFAAs in humans. PMID:25370009

  14. Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Role in Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Nutten, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are polymers composed of 30 or more amino acids; some of them are essential dietary components, since they are not synthetized by human metabolic processes. They are crucial for healthy growth and development and influence major functions of the body. The infant's first year is a critical time of rapid growth and development, which must be supported by a high rate of protein synthesis. Breast milk, as a single specific food source in the first months of life, is providing the total protein and essential amino acids required. Infant formulas have been designed for infants who cannot be breastfed. They should be similar to breast milk in their composition and their functional outcomes, insuring appropriate growth, optimal development, maturation of the immune system, easy digestion and healthy metabolic programming. By modifying their protein components, specific infant formulas have also been developed for specific needs. For example, partially hydrolyzed (prevention of atopic dermatitis) and extensively hydrolyzed or amino-acid-based infant formulas (reduction in allergy symptoms) have been designed for the management of cow's milk protein allergy. In conclusion, proteins provided via breast milk or infant formula are essential components of the infant's diet; therefore, the specific quality, quantity and conformation of proteins are of utmost importance for healthy growth and development. PMID:27336588

  15. Fatty acid induced remodeling within the human liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani; Sharma, Amit

    2011-09-01

    We crystallized human liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) in apo, holo, and intermediate states of palmitic acid engagement. Structural snapshots of fatty acid recognition, entry, and docking within LFABP support a heads-in mechanism for ligand entry. Apo-LFABP undergoes structural remodeling, where the first palmitate ingress creates the atomic environment for placement of the second palmitate. These new mechanistic insights will facilitate development of pharmacological agents against LFABP. PMID:21757748

  16. Real-time Redox Measurements during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Reveal Interlinked Protein Folding Functions

    PubMed Central

    Merksamer, Philip I.; Trusina, Ala; Papa, Feroz R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Disruption of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes unfolded proteins to accumulate, triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR outputs in turn decrease ER unfolded proteins to close a negative feedback loop. However, because it is infeasible to directly measure the concentration of unfolded proteins in vivo, cells are generically described as experiencing “ER stress” whenever the UPR is active. Because ER redox potential is optimized for oxidative protein folding, we reasoned that measureable redox changes should accompany unfolded protein accumulation. To test this concept, we employed fluorescent protein reporters to dynamically measure ER redox status and UPR activity in single cells. Using these tools, we show that diverse stressors, both experimental and physiological, compromise ER protein oxidation when UPR-imposed homeostatic control is lost. Using genetic analysis we uncovered redox heterogeneities in isogenic cell populations, and revealed functional interlinks between ER protein folding, modification, and quality control systems. PMID:19026441

  17. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  18. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  19. Phosphoproteomic Profiling Reveals Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Kinase Integration of DNA Damage Response and Mitotic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Renfeng; Pinto, Sneha M.; Shaw, Patrick G.; Huang, Tai-Chung; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Gowda, Harsha; Wu, Xinyan; Lv, Dong-Wen; Zhang, Kun; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hayward, S. Diane

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically linked to infectious mononucleosis and several human cancers. EBV encodes a conserved protein kinase BGLF4 that plays a key role in the viral life cycle. To provide new insight into the host proteins regulated by BGLF4, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to compare site-specific phosphorylation in BGLF4-expressing Akata B cells. Our analysis revealed BGLF4-mediated hyperphosphorylation of 3,046 unique sites corresponding to 1,328 proteins. Frequency analysis of these phosphosites revealed a proline-rich motif signature downstream of BGLF4, indicating a broader substrate recognition for BGLF4 than its cellular ortholog cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Further, motif analysis of the hyperphosphorylated sites revealed enrichment in ATM, ATR and Aurora kinase substrates while functional analyses revealed significant enrichment of pathways related to the DNA damage response (DDR), mitosis and cell cycle. Phosphorylation of proteins associated with the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) indicated checkpoint activation, an event that inactivates the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGLF4 binds to and directly phosphorylates the key cellular proteins PP1, MPS1 and CDC20 that lie upstream of SAC activation and APC/C inhibition. Consistent with APC/C inactivation, we found that BGLF4 stabilizes the expression of many known APC/C substrates. We also noted hyperphosphorylation of 22 proteins associated the nuclear pore complex, which may contribute to nuclear pore disassembly and SAC activation. A drug that inhibits mitotic checkpoint activation also suppressed the accumulation of extracellular EBV virus. Taken together, our data reveal that, in addition to the DDR, manipulation of mitotic kinase signaling and SAC activation are mechanisms associated with lytic EBV replication. All MS data have been deposited in

  20. Phosphoproteomic Profiling Reveals Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Kinase Integration of DNA Damage Response and Mitotic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Renfeng; Liao, Gangling; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Pinto, Sneha M; Shaw, Patrick G; Huang, Tai-Chung; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Gowda, Harsha; Wu, Xinyan; Lv, Dong-Wen; Zhang, Kun; Manda, Srikanth S; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hayward, S Diane

    2015-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically linked to infectious mononucleosis and several human cancers. EBV encodes a conserved protein kinase BGLF4 that plays a key role in the viral life cycle. To provide new insight into the host proteins regulated by BGLF4, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to compare site-specific phosphorylation in BGLF4-expressing Akata B cells. Our analysis revealed BGLF4-mediated hyperphosphorylation of 3,046 unique sites corresponding to 1,328 proteins. Frequency analysis of these phosphosites revealed a proline-rich motif signature downstream of BGLF4, indicating a broader substrate recognition for BGLF4 than its cellular ortholog cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Further, motif analysis of the hyperphosphorylated sites revealed enrichment in ATM, ATR and Aurora kinase substrates while functional analyses revealed significant enrichment of pathways related to the DNA damage response (DDR), mitosis and cell cycle. Phosphorylation of proteins associated with the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) indicated checkpoint activation, an event that inactivates the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGLF4 binds to and directly phosphorylates the key cellular proteins PP1, MPS1 and CDC20 that lie upstream of SAC activation and APC/C inhibition. Consistent with APC/C inactivation, we found that BGLF4 stabilizes the expression of many known APC/C substrates. We also noted hyperphosphorylation of 22 proteins associated the nuclear pore complex, which may contribute to nuclear pore disassembly and SAC activation. A drug that inhibits mitotic checkpoint activation also suppressed the accumulation of extracellular EBV virus. Taken together, our data reveal that, in addition to the DDR, manipulation of mitotic kinase signaling and SAC activation are mechanisms associated with lytic EBV replication. All MS data have been deposited in

  1. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrovsky, Pavel; Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection. PMID:27160295

  2. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein’s affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states. PMID:26162682

  3. Phenolic Profiling of Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase-Deficient Poplar Reveals Novel Benzodioxane Oligolignols1

    PubMed Central

    Morreel, Kris; Ralph, John; Lu, Fachuang; Goeminne, Geert; Busson, Roger; Herdewijn, Piet; Goeman, Jan L.; Van der Eycken, Johan; Boerjan, Wout; Messens, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyzes preferentially the methylation of 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde to sinapaldehyde in monolignol biosynthesis. Here, we have compared HPLC profiles of the methanol-soluble phenolics fraction of xylem tissue from COMT-deficient and control poplars (Populus spp.), using statistical analysis of the peak heights. COMT down-regulation results in significant concentration differences for 25 of the 91 analyzed peaks. Eight peaks were exclusively detected in COMT-deficient poplar, of which four could be purified for further identification using mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and spiking of synthesized reference compounds. These new compounds were derived from 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol or 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde and were characterized by benzodioxane moieties, a structural type that is also increased in the lignins of COMT-deficient plants. One of these four benzodioxanes amounted to the most abundant oligolignol in the HPLC profile. Furthermore, all of the differentially accumulating oligolignols involving sinapyl units were either reduced in abundance or undetectable. The concentration levels of all identified oligolignols were in agreement with the relative supply of monolignols and with their chemical coupling propensities, which supports the random coupling hypothesis. Chiral HPLC analysis of the most abundant benzodioxane dimer revealed the presence of both enantiomers in equal amounts, indicating that they were formed by radical coupling reactions under simple chemical control rather than guided by dirigent proteins. PMID:15563622

  4. Proteomic Approach to Reveal the Proteins Associated with Encystment of the Ciliate Euplotes encysticus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiwu; Gao, Xiuxia; Wang, Bangzheng; Chen, Fenfen; Wu, Na; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify and reveal the proteins related to encystment of the ciliate Euplotes encysticus, we analyzed variation in the abundance of the proteins isolated from the resting cyst comparing with proteins in the vegetative cell. 2-D electrophoresis, MALDI-TOF MS techniques and Bioinformatics were used for proteome separation, quantification and identification. The comparative proteomics studies revealed 26 proteins with changes on the expression in the resting cysts, including 12 specific proteins and 14 differential proteins. 12 specific proteins and 10 out of the 14 differential proteins were selected and identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The identified specific proteins with known functions included type II cytoskeletal 1, keratin, Nop16 domain containing protein, protein arginine n-methyltransferase, epsilon-trimethyllysine hydroxylase and calpain-like protein. The identified differential proteins with known functions included Lysozyme C, keratinocyte growth factor, lysozyme homolog AT-2, formate acetyltransferase, alpha S1 casein and cold-shock protein. We discussed the functions of these proteins as well as their contribution in the process of encystment. These identified proteins covered a wide range of molecular functions, including gene regulation, RNA regulation, proteins degradation and oxidation resistance, stress response, material transport and cytoskeleton organization. Therefore, differential expression of these proteins was essential for cell morphological and physiological changes during encystment. This suggested that the peculiar proteins and differential proteins might play important roles in the process of the vegetative cells transforming into the resting cysts. These observations may be novel findings that bring new insights into the detailed mechanisms of dormancy. PMID:24837719

  5. A macromolecular delivery vehicle for protein-based vaccines: Acid-degradable protein-loaded microgels

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Niren; Xu, Mingcheng; Schuck, Stephany; Kunisawa, Jun; Shastri, Nilabh; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2003-01-01

    The development of protein-based vaccines remains a major challenge in the fields of immunology and drug delivery. Although numerous protein antigens have been identified that can generate immunity to infectious pathogens, the development of vaccines based on protein antigens has had limited success because of delivery issues. In this article, an acid-sensitive microgel material is synthesized for the development of protein-based vaccines. The chemical design of these microgels is such that they degrade under the mildly acidic conditions found in the phagosomes of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The rapid cleavage of the microgels leads to phagosomal disruption through a colloid osmotic mechanism, releasing protein antigens into the APC cytoplasm for class I antigen presentation. Ovalbumin was encapsulated in microgel particles, 200–500 nm in diameter, prepared by inverse emulsion polymerization with a synthesized acid-degradable crosslinker. Ovalbumin is released from the acid-degradable microgels in a pH-dependent manner; for example, microgels containing ovalbumin release 80% of their encapsulated proteins after 5 h at pH 5.0, but release only 10% at pH 7.4. APCs that phagocytosed the acid-degradable microgels containing ovalbumin were capable of activating ovalbumin-specific cytoxic T lymphocytes. The acid-degradable microgels developed in this article should therefore find applications as delivery vehicles for vaccines targeted against viruses and tumors, where the activation of cytoxic T lymphocytes is required for the development of immunity. PMID:12704236

  6. Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array: A Just-In-Time Multiplexed Protein Expression and Purification Platform

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Systematic study of proteins requires the availability of thousands of proteins in functional format. However, traditional recombinant protein expression and purification methods have many drawbacks for such study at the proteome level. We have developed an innovative in situ protein expression and capture system, namely NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array), where C-terminal tagged proteins are expressed using an in vitro expression system and efficiently captured/purified by antitag antibodies coprinted at each spot. The NAPPA technology presented in this chapter enable researchers to produce and display fresh proteins just in time in a multiplexed high-throughput fashion and utilize them for various downstream biochemical researches of interest. This platform could revolutionize the field of functional proteomics with it ability to produce thousands of spatially separated proteins in high density with narrow dynamic rand of protein concentrations, reproducibly and functionally. PMID:21943897

  7. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M.; Exner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3–0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r2) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  8. Accurate ab initio prediction of NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and nucleic acids/protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Victora, Andrea; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2014-12-16

    NMR chemical shift predictions based on empirical methods are nowadays indispensable tools during resonance assignment and 3D structure calculation of proteins. However, owing to the very limited statistical data basis, such methods are still in their infancy in the field of nucleic acids, especially when non-canonical structures and nucleic acid complexes are considered. Here, we present an ab initio approach for predicting proton chemical shifts of arbitrary nucleic acid structures based on state-of-the-art fragment-based quantum chemical calculations. We tested our prediction method on a diverse set of nucleic acid structures including double-stranded DNA, hairpins, DNA/protein complexes and chemically-modified DNA. Overall, our quantum chemical calculations yield highly/very accurate predictions with mean absolute deviations of 0.3-0.6 ppm and correlation coefficients (r(2)) usually above 0.9. This will allow for identifying misassignments and validating 3D structures. Furthermore, our calculations reveal that chemical shifts of protons involved in hydrogen bonding are predicted significantly less accurately. This is in part caused by insufficient inclusion of solvation effects. However, it also points toward shortcomings of current force fields used for structure determination of nucleic acids. Our quantum chemical calculations could therefore provide input for force field optimization. PMID:25404135

  9. Amino acid repeats and the structure and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Albà, M M; Tompa, P; Veitia, R A

    2007-01-01

    Many proteins have repeats or runs of single amino acids. The pathogenicity of some repeat expansions has fueled proteomic, genomic and structural explorations of homopolymeric runs not only in human but in a wide variety of other organisms. Other types of amino acid repetitive structures exhibit more complex patterns than homopeptides. Irrespective of their precise organization, repetitive sequences are defined as low complexity or simple sequences, as one or a few residues are particularly abundant. Prokaryotes show a relatively low frequency of simple sequences compared to eukaryotes. In the latter the percentage of proteins containing homopolymeric runs varies greatly from one group to another. For instance, within vertebrates, amino acid repeat frequency is much higher in mammals than in amphibians, birds or fishes. For some repeats, this is correlated with the GC-richness of the regions containing the corresponding genes. Homopeptides tend to occur in disordered regions of transcription factors or developmental proteins. They can trigger the formation of protein aggregates, particularly in 'disease' proteins. Simple sequences seem to evolve more rapidly than the rest of the protein/gene and may have a functional impact. Therefore, they are good candidates to promote rapid evolutionary changes. All these diverse facets of homopolymeric runs are explored in this review. PMID:18753788

  10. (-)-Hydroxycitric Acid Nourishes Protein Synthesis via Altering Metabolic Directions of Amino Acids in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Ningning; Li, Longlong; Peng, Mengling; Ma, Haitian

    2016-08-01

    (-)-Hydroxycitric acid (HCA), a major active ingredient of Garcinia Cambogia extracts, had shown to suppress body weight gain and fat accumulation in animals and humans. While, the underlying mechanism of (-)-HCA has not fully understood. Thus, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of long-term supplement with (-)-HCA on body weight gain and variances of amino acid content in rats. Results showed that (-)-HCA treatment reduced body weight gain and increased feed conversion ratio in rats. The content of hepatic glycogen, muscle glycogen, and serum T4 , T3 , insulin, and Leptin were increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Protein content in liver and muscle were significantly increased in (-)-HCA treatment groups. Amino acid profile analysis indicated that most of amino acid contents in serum and liver, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were higher in (-)-HCA treatment groups. However, most of the amino acid contents in muscle, especially aromatic amino acid and branched amino acid, were reduced in (-)-HCA treatment groups. These results indicated that (-)-HCA treatment could reduce body weight gain through promoting energy expenditure via regulation of thyroid hormone levels. In addition, (-)-HCA treatment could promote protein synthesis by altering the metabolic directions of amino acids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27145492

  11. Suppression of muscle protein turnover and amino acid degradation by dietary protein deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    To define the adaptations that conserve amino acids and muscle protein when dietary protein intake is inadequate, rats (60-70 g final wt) were fed a normal or protein-deficient (PD) diet (18 or 1% lactalbumin), and their muscles were studied in vitro. After 7 days on the PD diet, both protein degradation and synthesis fell 30-40% in skeletal muscles and atria. This fall in proteolysis did not result from reduced amino acid supply to the muscle and preceded any clear decrease in plasma amino acids. Oxidation of branched-chain amino acids, glutamine and alanine synthesis, and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyrate also fell by 30-50% in muscles and adipose tissue of PD rats. After 1 day on the PD diet, muscle protein synthesis and amino acid uptake decreased by 25-40%, and after 3 days proteolysis and leucine oxidation fell 30-45%. Upon refeeding with the normal diet, protein synthesis also rose more rapidly (+30% by 1 day) than proteolysis, which increased significantly after 3 days (+60%). These different time courses suggest distinct endocrine signals for these responses. The high rate of protein synthesis and low rate of proteolysis during the first 3 days of refeeding a normal diet to PD rats contributes to the rapid weight gain ("catch-up growth") of such animals.

  12. Structural Assessment of the Effects of Amino Acid Substitutions on Protein Stability and Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shaolei; Wang, Liangjiang; Srivastava, Anand K.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    A structure-based approach is described for predicting the effects of amino acid substitutions on protein function. Structures were predicted using a homology modelling method. Folding and binding energy differences between wild-type and mutant structures were computed to quantitatively assess the effects of amino acid substitutions on protein stability and protein–protein interaction, respectively. We demonstrated that pathogenic mutations at the interaction interface could affect binding energy and destabilise protein complex, whereas mutations at the non-interface might reduce folding energy and destabilise monomer structure. The results suggest that the structure-based analysis can provide useful information for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases. PMID:21297231

  13. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals the Flooding-Tolerance Mechanism in Mutant and Abscisic Acid-Treated Soybean.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaojian; Nishimura, Minoru; Hajika, Makita; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-06-01

    Flooding negatively affects the growth of soybean, and several flooding-specific stress responses have been identified; however, the mechanisms underlying flooding tolerance in soybean remain unclear. To explore the initial flooding tolerance mechanisms in soybean, flooding-tolerant mutant and abscisic acid (ABA)-treated plants were analyzed. In the mutant and ABA-treated soybeans, 146 proteins were commonly changed at the initial flooding stress. Among the identified proteins, protein synthesis-related proteins, including nascent polypeptide-associated complex and chaperonin 20, and RNA regulation-related proteins were increased in abundance both at protein and mRNA expression. However, these proteins identified at the initial flooding stress were not significantly changed during survival stages under continuous flooding. Cluster analysis indicated that glycolysis- and cell wall-related proteins, such as enolase and polygalacturonase inhibiting protein, were increased in abundance during survival stages. Furthermore, lignification of root tissue was improved even under flooding stress. Taken together, these results suggest that protein synthesis- and RNA regulation-related proteins play a key role in triggering tolerance to the initial flooding stress in soybean. Furthermore, the integrity of cell wall and balance of glycolysis might be important factors for promoting tolerance of soybean root to flooding stress during survival stages. PMID:27132649

  14. Characterization and amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart.

    PubMed

    Offner, G D; Brecher, P; Sawlivich, W B; Costello, C E; Troxler, R F

    1988-05-15

    The complete amino acid sequence of a fatty acid-binding protein from human heart was determined by automated Edman degradation of CNBr, BNPS-skatole [3'-bromo-3-methyl-2-(2-nitrobenzenesulphenyl)indolenine], hydroxylamine, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, tryptic and chymotryptic peptides, and by digestion of the protein with carboxypeptidase A. The sequence of the blocked N-terminal tryptic peptide from citraconylated protein was determined by collisionally induced decomposition mass spectrometry. The protein contains 132 amino acid residues, is enriched with respect to threonine and lysine, lacks cysteine, has an acetylated valine residue at the N-terminus, and has an Mr of 14768 and an isoelectric point of 5.25. This protein contains two short internal repeated sequences from residues 48-54 and from residues 114-119 located within regions of predicted beta-structure and decreasing hydrophobicity. These short repeats are contained within two longer repeated regions from residues 48-60 and residues 114-125, which display 62% sequence similarity. These regions could accommodate the charged and uncharged moieties of long-chain fatty acids and may represent fatty acid-binding domains consistent with the finding that human heart fatty acid-binding protein binds 2 mol of oleate or palmitate/mol of protein. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the peptides has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50143 (23 pages) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained as indicated in Biochem. J. (1988) 249, 5. PMID:3421901

  15. INCAP studies of energy, amino acids, and protein.

    PubMed

    Viteri, Fernando E

    2010-03-01

    This Special Issue summarizes the results of several studies aimed at providing information on a series of questions related to the adequate protein and energy intakes that allow adequate growth and function in children and work performance and productivity in adults. The effect of different sources of protein on nitrogen balance and the requirements of essential amino acids in young children were also explored in fully recovered, previously malnourished children housed in the Metabolic Ward of the Biomedical Division of INCAP. The following are the main results of these investigations: Animal experiments and studies in children recovering from protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) strongly suggest that even when requirements of all nutrients are satisfied, inactivity reduces the rate of linear growth and physical activity improves it as well as lean body mass repletion. The effects of different energy intakes on nitrogen balance demonstrated how energy intake modifies the need to ingest different amounts of protein to satisfy protein requirements. Insensible nitrogen losses in preschool children and their relation to protein intake was demonstrated. The quality of even "good protein sources" modifies the amount needed to satisfy nitrogen requirements, and corn and bean-based diets can satisfy protein needs for health and even growth of young children. Essential amino acid requirements of 2-year-old children was assessed by diverse measurements of nitrogen metabolism and amino acid levels in blood, and were found lower than those recommended by FAO-WHO. In rural adult populations the relationship between energy and protein intake, productivity and body composition, and the impact of environmental hygiene on nitrogen balance was demonstrated and measured. PMID:20461903

  16. Studies on fatty acid-binding proteins. The diurnal variation shown by rat liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, T C; Wilton, D C

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of fatty acid-binding protein in rat liver was examined by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, by Western blotting and by quantifying the fluorescence enhancement achieved on the binding of the fluorescent probe 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid. A 2-3-fold increase in the concentration of this protein produced by treatment of rats with the peroxisome proliferator tiadenol was readily detected; however, only a small variation in the concentration of the protein due to a diurnal rhythm was observed. This result contradicts the 7-10-fold variation previously reported for this protein [Hargis, Olson, Clarke & Dempsey (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 1988-1991]. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:3593284

  17. Dietary requirements of synthesizable amino acids by animals: a paradigm shift in protein nutrition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids are building blocks for proteins in all animals. Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for mammals, birds and fish. It was assumed that all the "nutritionally nonessential amino acids (NEAA)" were synthesized sufficiently in the body to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. However, careful analysis of the scientific literature reveals that over the past century there has not been compelling experimental evidence to support this assumption. NEAA (e.g., glutamine, glutamate, proline, glycine and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, fertility, neurotransmission, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine to maintain its digestive function and to protect the integrity of the intestinal mucosa. Thus, diets for animals must contain all NEAA to optimize their survival, growth, development, reproduction, and health. Furthermore, NEAA should be taken into consideration in revising the "ideal protein" concept that is currently used to formulate swine and poultry diets. Adequate provision of all amino acids (including NEAA) in diets enhances the efficiency of animal production. In this regard, amino acids should not be classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential in animal or human nutrition. The new Texas A&M University's optimal ratios of dietary amino acids for swine and chickens are expected to beneficially reduce dietary protein content and improve the efficiency of their nutrient utilization, growth, and production performance. PMID:24999386

  18. Crystal Structures of Flax Rust Avirulence Proteins AvrL567-A and -D Reveal Details of the Structural Basis for Flax Disease Resistance Specificity[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching-I A.; Gunčar, Gregor; Forwood, Jade K.; Teh, Trazel; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Loughlin, Fionna E.; Mackay, Joel P.; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Anderson, Peter A.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.; Kobe, Boštjan

    2007-01-01

    The gene-for-gene mechanism of plant disease resistance involves direct or indirect recognition of pathogen avirulence (Avr) proteins by plant resistance (R) proteins. Flax rust (Melampsora lini) AvrL567 avirulence proteins and the corresponding flax (Linum usitatissimum) L5, L6, and L7 resistance proteins interact directly. We determined the three-dimensional structures of two members of the AvrL567 family, AvrL567-A and AvrL567-D, at 1.4- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The structures of both proteins are very similar and reveal a β-sandwich fold with no close known structural homologs. The polymorphic residues in the AvrL567 family map to the surface of the protein, and polymorphisms in residues associated with recognition differences for the R proteins lead to significant changes in surface chemical properties. Analysis of single amino acid substitutions in AvrL567 proteins confirm the role of individual residues in conferring differences in recognition and suggest that the specificity results from the cumulative effects of multiple amino acid contacts. The structures also provide insights into possible pathogen-associated functions of AvrL567 proteins, with nucleic acid binding activity demonstrated in vitro. Our studies provide some of the first structural information on avirulence proteins that bind directly to the corresponding resistance proteins, allowing an examination of the molecular basis of the interaction with the resistance proteins as a step toward designing new resistance specificities. PMID:17873095

  19. Protein and amino acid metabolism in the human newborn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birth and adaptation to extrauterine life involve major shifts in the protein and energy metabolism of the human newborn. These include a shift from a state of continuous supply of nutrients including amino acids from the mother to cyclic periodic oral intake, a change in the redox state of organs, ...

  20. Network Analysis of Circular Permutations in Multidomain Proteins Reveals Functional Linkages for Uncharacterized Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Adjeroh, Donald; Jiang, Yue; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Lin, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have implicated different multidomain proteins in cancer. However, there has been little or no detailed study on the role of circular multidomain proteins in the general problem of cancer or on specific cancer types. This work represents an initial attempt at investigating the potential for predicting linkages between known cancer-associated proteins with uncharacterized or hypothetical multidomain proteins, based primarily on circular permutation (CP) relationships. First, we propose an efficient algorithm for rapid identification of both exact and approximate CPs in multidomain proteins. Using the circular relations identified, we construct networks between multidomain proteins, based on which we perform functional annotation of multidomain proteins. We then extend the method to construct subnetworks for selected cancer subtypes, and performed prediction of potential link-ages between uncharacterized multidomain proteins and the selected cancer types. We include practical results showing the performance of the proposed methods. PMID:25741177

  1. Conversion of amino-acid sequence in proteins to classical music: search for auditory patterns

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We have converted genome-encoded protein sequences into musical notes to reveal auditory patterns without compromising musicality. We derived a reduced range of 13 base notes by pairing similar amino acids and distinguishing them using variations of three-note chords and codon distribution to dictate rhythm. The conversion will help make genomic coding sequences more approachable for the general public, young children, and vision-impaired scientists. PMID:17477882

  2. Nucleic acid-protein interactions: Wedding for love or circumstances?

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Christophe; Buckle, Malcolm

    2009-08-01

    The sixth Figeac meeting on nucleic acid-protein interactions was held in Figeac, France, from September 26th to October 1st, 2008. It was organized by the working group "nucleic acid-protein interactions and gene expression" from the French Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This report briefly summarizes the presentations by 40 speakers during the four plenary sessions, which were organised as follows: (1) nucleic acids: targets and tools, (2) RNA superstar, (3) nuclear structure and dynamics, and (4) new concepts - new approaches. A total of 22 plenary lectures, 18 oral communications and 40 posters were presented over the 5 days, providing a highly stimulating environment for scientific exchange between the approximately 80 participants (biochemists, physicists, bio-informaticians and molecular and cellular biologists). PMID:19422875

  3. Massively parallel sampling of lattice proteins reveals foundations of thermal adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venev, Sergey V.; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.

    2015-08-01

    Evolution of proteins in bacteria and archaea living in different conditions leads to significant correlations between amino acid usage and environmental temperature. The origins of these correlations are poorly understood, and an important question of protein theory, physics-based prediction of types of amino acids overrepresented in highly thermostable proteins, remains largely unsolved. Here, we extend the random energy model of protein folding by weighting the interaction energies of amino acids by their frequencies in protein sequences and predict the energy gap of proteins designed to fold well at elevated temperatures. To test the model, we present a novel scalable algorithm for simultaneous energy calculation for many sequences in many structures, targeting massively parallel computing architectures such as graphics processing unit. The energy calculation is performed by multiplying two matrices, one representing the complete set of sequences, and the other describing the contact maps of all structural templates. An implementation of the algorithm for the CUDA platform is available at http://www.github.com/kzeldovich/galeprot and calculates protein folding energies over 250 times faster than a single central processing unit. Analysis of amino acid usage in 64-mer cubic lattice proteins designed to fold well at different temperatures demonstrates an excellent agreement between theoretical and simulated values of energy gap. The theoretical predictions of temperature trends of amino acid frequencies are significantly correlated with bioinformatics data on 191 bacteria and archaea, and highlight protein folding constraints as a fundamental selection pressure during thermal adaptation in biological evolution.

  4. Mass Spectrometric and Spectrofluorometric Studies of the Interaction of Aristolochic Acids with Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiwei; Hu, Qin; Chan, Wan

    2015-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent carcinogen and nephrotoxin and is associated with the development of “Chinese herb nephropathy” and Balkan endemic nephropathy. Despite decades of research, the specific mechanism of the observed nephrotoxicity has remained elusive and the potential effects on proteins due to the observed toxicity of AA are not well-understood. To better understand the pharmacotoxicological features of AA, we investigated the non-covalent interactions of AA with proteins. The protein-binding properties of AA with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme were characterized using spectrofluorometric and mass spectrometric (MS) techniques. Moreover, the protein-AA complexes were clearly identified by high-resolution MS analyses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence of non-covalently bound protein-AA complexes. An analysis of the spectrofluorometric data by a modified Stern−Volmer plot model also revealed that both aristolochic acid I (AAI) and aristolochic acid II (AAII) were bound to BSA and lysozyme in 1:1 stoichiometries. A significantly stronger protein binding property was observed in AAII than in AAI as evidenced by the spectrofluorometric and MS analyses, which may explain the observed higher mutagenicity of AAII. PMID:26471474

  5. Mass Spectrometric and Spectrofluorometric Studies of the Interaction of Aristolochic Acids with Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiwei; Hu, Qin; Chan, Wan

    2015-10-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent carcinogen and nephrotoxin and is associated with the development of “Chinese herb nephropathy” and Balkan endemic nephropathy. Despite decades of research, the specific mechanism of the observed nephrotoxicity has remained elusive and the potential effects on proteins due to the observed toxicity of AA are not well-understood. To better understand the pharmacotoxicological features of AA, we investigated the non-covalent interactions of AA with proteins. The protein-binding properties of AA with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme were characterized using spectrofluorometric and mass spectrometric (MS) techniques. Moreover, the protein-AA complexes were clearly identified by high-resolution MS analyses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct evidence of non-covalently bound protein-AA complexes. An analysis of the spectrofluorometric data by a modified Stern-Volmer plot model also revealed that both aristolochic acid I (AAI) and aristolochic acid II (AAII) were bound to BSA and lysozyme in 1:1 stoichiometries. A significantly stronger protein binding property was observed in AAII than in AAI as evidenced by the spectrofluorometric and MS analyses, which may explain the observed higher mutagenicity of AAII.

  6. Simulations of HIV Capsid Protein Dimerization Reveal the Effect of Chemistry and Topography on the Mechanism of Hydrophobic Protein Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Naiyin; Hagan, Michael F.

    2012-09-01

    Recent work has shown that the hydrophobic protein surfaces in aqueous solution sit near a drying transition. The tendency for these surfaces to expel water from their vicinity leads to self assembly of macromolecular complexes. In this article we show with a realistic model for a biologically pertinent system how this phenomenon appears at the molecular level. We focus on the association of the C-terminal domain (CA-C) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) capsid protein. By combining all-atom simulations with specialized sampling techniques we measure the water density distribution during the approach of two CA-C proteins as a function of separation and amino acid sequence in the interfacial region. The simulations demonstrate that CA-C protein-protein interactions sit at the edge of a dewetting transition and that this mesoscopic manifestation of the underlying liquid-vapor phase transition can be readily manipulated by biology or protein engineering to significantly affect association behavior. While the wild type protein remains wet until contact, we identify a set of in silico mutations, in which three hydrophilic amino acids are replaced with nonpolar residues, that leads to dewetting prior to association. The existence of dewetting depends on the size and relative locations of substituted residues separated by nm length scales, indicating long range cooperativity and a sensitivity to surface topography. These observations identify important details which are missing from descriptions of protein association based on buried hydrophobic surface area.

  7. Interference of N-hydroxysuccinimide with bicinchoninic acid protein assay.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Sandeep Kumar; Dixit, Chandra Kumar

    2011-07-29

    We report here substantial interference from N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay. NHS is one of the most commonly used crosslinking agents in bioanalytical sciences, which can lead to serious potential errors in the BCA protein assay based protein estimation if it is present in the protein analyte solution. It was identified to be a reducing substance, which interferes with the BCA protein assay by reducing Cu(2+) in the BCA working reagent. The absorbance peak and absorbance signal of NHS were very similar to those of bovine serum albumin (BSA), thereby indicating a similar BCA reaction mechanism for NHS and protein. However, the combined absorbance of NHS and BSA was not additive. The time-response measurements of the BCA protein assay showed consistent single-phase kinetics for NHS and gradually decreasing kinetics for BSA. The error in protein estimation due to the presence of NHS was counteracted effectively by plotting additional BCA standard curve for BSA with a fixed concentration of NHS. The difference between the absorbance values of BSA and BSA with a fixed NHS concentration provided the absorbance contributed by NHS, which was then subtracted from the total absorbance of analyte sample to determine the actual absorbance of protein in the analyte sample. PMID:21762678

  8. Endogenous fatty acids in olfactory hairs influence pheromone binding protein structure and function in Lymantria dispar.

    PubMed

    Nardella, Jason; Terrado, Mailyn; Honson, Nicolette S; Plettner, Erika

    2015-08-01

    The gypsy moth utilizes a pheromone, (7R,8S)-2-methyl-7,8-epoxyoctadecane, for mate location. The pheromone is detected by sensory hairs (sensilla) on the antennae of adult males. Sensilla contain the dendrites of olfactory neurons bathed in lymph, which contains pheromone binding proteins (PBPs). We have extracted and identified free fatty acids from lymph of sensory hairs, and we demonstrate that these function as endogenous ligands for gypsy moth PBP1 and PBP2. Homology modeling of both PBPs, and docking of fatty acids reveal multiple binding sites: one internal, the others external. Pheromone binding assays suggest that these fatty acids increase PBP-pheromone binding affinity. We show that fatty acid binding causes an increase in α-helix content in the N-terminal domain, but not in the C-terminal peptide of both proteins. The C-terminal peptide was shown to form a α-helix in a hydrophobic, homogeneous environment, but not in the presence of fatty acid micelles. Through partition assays we show that the fatty acids prevent adsorption of the pheromone on hydrophobic surfaces and facilitate pheromone partition into an aqueous phase. We propose that lymph is an emulsion of fatty acids and PBP that influence each other and thereby control the partition equilibria of hydrophobic odorants. PMID:26032337

  9. Solution NMR Structure of Lin0431 Protein from Listeria innocua Reveals High Structural Similarity with Domain II of Bacterial Transcription Antitermination Protein NusG

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuefeng; Xiao, Rong; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Janjua, Haleema; Lee, Dong Yup; Everett, John K.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Acton, Thomas B.; Rost, Burkhard; Montelione, Gaetano T.

    2010-01-01

    Lin0431 protein from Listeria innocua (UniProtKB/TrEMBL ID Q92EM7/Q92EM7_LISIN) was selected as a target of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (target ID: LkR112). Here, we present the high-quality NMR solution structure of this protein which is the first representative for a member of DUF1312 domain family. Lin0431 protein exhibits a β-sandwich topology. Four anti-parallel β-strands form one face of the sandwich and the other three anti-parallel β-strands together with a short α-helix form the other face of the sandwich. Structure alignment by Dali reveals an unexpected structural similarity with domain II of NusG from Aquifex aeolicus. Analyses of the electrostatic protein surface potential and searches for protein surface cavities reveal the conserved basic charged surface cavities of both the Lin0431 and domain II of AaeNusG, suggesting they may bind the negatively charged nucleic acids and/or and other binding partners. The high structural similarity and similar surface features, despite the lack of recognizable sequence similarity, between Lin0431 and AaeNusG domain II suggest that the domain II of NusG and DUF1312 domains have a homologous relationship and may share similar biochemical functions. PMID:20602357

  10. Acid extraction and purification of recombinant spider silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Mello, Charlene M; Soares, Jason W; Arcidiacono, Steven; Butler, Michelle M

    2004-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for the isolation of recombinant spider silk proteins based upon their unique stability and solubilization characteristics. Three recombinant silk proteins, (SpI)7, NcDS, and [(SpI)4/(SpII)1]4, were purified by extraction with organic acids followed by affinity or ion exchange chromatography resulting in 90-95% pure silk solutions. The protein yield of NcDS (15 mg/L culture) and (SpI)7 (35 mg/L) increased 4- and 5-fold, respectively, from previously reported values presumably due to a more complete solubilization of the expressed recombinant protein. [(SpI)4/(SpII)1]4, a hybrid protein based on the repeat sequences of spidroin I and spidroin II, had a yield of 12.4 mg/L. This method is an effective, reproducible technique that has broad applicability for a variety of silk proteins as well as other acid stable biopolymers. PMID:15360297

  11. Lipid Interaction Networks of Peripheral Membrane Proteins Revealed by Data-Driven Micelle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Dancea, Felician; Kami, Keiichiro; Overduin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Many signaling and trafficking proteins contain modular domains that bind reversibly to cellular membranes. The structural basis of the intermolecular interactions which mediate these membrane-targeting events remains elusive since protein-membrane complexes are not directly accessible to standard structural biology techniques. Here we report a fast protein-micelle docking methodology that yields three-dimensional model structures of proteins inserted into micelles, revealing energetically favorable orientations, convergent insertion angles, and an array of protein-lipid interactions at atomic resolution. The method is applied to two peripheral membrane proteins, the early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) FYVE (a zinc finger domain found in the proteins Fab1, YOTB/ZK632.12, Vac1, and EEA1) and Vam7p phagocyte oxidase homology domains, which are revealed to form extensive networks of interactions with multiple phospholipid headgroups and acyl chains. The resulting structural models explain extensive published mutagenesis data and reveal novel binding determinants. The docking restraints used here were based on NMR data, but can be derived from any technique that detects insertion of protein residues into a membrane, and can be applied to virtually any peripheral membrane protein or membrane-like structure. PMID:17890395

  12. Improved Proteomic Analysis Following Trichloroacetic Acid Extraction of Bacillus anthracis Spore Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Brooke LD; Wunschel, David S.; Sydor, Michael A.; Warner, Marvin G.; Wahl, Karen L.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2015-08-07

    Proteomic analysis of bacterial samples provides valuable information about cellular responses and functions under different environmental pressures. Proteomic analysis is dependent upon efficient extraction of proteins from bacterial samples without introducing bias toward extraction of particular protein classes. While no single method can recover 100% of the bacterial proteins, selected protocols can improve overall protein isolation, peptide recovery, or enrich for certain classes of proteins. The method presented here is technically simple and does not require specialized equipment such as a mechanical disrupter. Our data reveal that for particularly challenging samples, such as B. anthracis Sterne spores, trichloroacetic acid extraction improved the number of proteins identified within a sample compared to bead beating (714 vs 660, respectively). Further, TCA extraction enriched for 103 known spore specific proteins whereas bead beating resulted in 49 unique proteins. Analysis of C. botulinum samples grown to 5 days, composed of vegetative biomass and spores, showed a similar trend with improved protein yields and identification using our method compared to bead beating. Interestingly, easily lysed samples, such as B. anthracis vegetative cells, were equally as effectively processed via TCA and bead beating, but TCA extraction remains the easiest and most cost effective option. As with all assays, supplemental methods such as implementation of an alternative preparation method may provide additional insight to the protein biology of the bacteria being studied.

  13. Radiation Damage and Racemic Protein Crystallography Reveal the Unique Structure of the GASA/Snakin Protein Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Ho; Squire, Christopher J; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Panjikar, Santosh; López, Gemma; Molina, Antonio; Baker, Edward N; Harris, Paul W R; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-07-01

    Proteins from the GASA/snakin superfamily are common in plant proteomes and have diverse functions, including hormonal crosstalk, development, and defense. One 63-residue member of this family, snakin-1, an antimicrobial protein from potatoes, has previously been chemically synthesized in a fully active form. Herein the 1.5 Å structure of snakin-1, determined by a novel combination of racemic protein crystallization and radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP), is reported. Racemic crystals of snakin-1 and quasi-racemic crystals incorporating an unnatural 4-iodophenylalanine residue were prepared from chemically synthesized d- and l-proteins. Breakage of the C-I bonds in the quasi-racemic crystals facilitated structure determination by RIP. The crystal structure reveals a unique protein fold with six disulfide crosslinks, presenting a distinct electrostatic surface that may target the protein to microbial cell surfaces. PMID:27145301

  14. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins. PMID:27080133

  15. Buffer interference with protein dynamics: a case study on human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Long, Dong; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-02-18

    Selection of suitable buffer types is often a crucial step for generating appropriate protein samples for NMR and x-ray crystallographic studies. Although the possible interaction between MES buffer (2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) and proteins has been discussed previously, the interaction is usually thought to have no significant effects on the structures of proteins. In this study, we demonstrate the direct, albeit weak, interaction between MES and human liver fatty acid binding protein (hLFABP). Rather than affecting the structure of hLFABP, we found that the dynamics of hLFABP, which were previously proposed to be relevant to its functions, were significantly affected by the binding of hLFABP with MES. Buffer interference with protein dynamics was also demonstrated with Bis-Tris buffer, which is quite different from MES and fatty acids in terms of their molecular structures and properties. This result, to our knowledge, is the first published report on buffer interference with protein dynamics on a microsecond to millisecond timescale and could represent a generic problem in the studies of functionally relevant protein dynamics. Although being a fortuity, our finding of buffer-induced changes in protein dynamics offers a clue to how hLFABP accommodates its ligands. PMID:19217864

  16. Arabidopsis G-protein interactome reveals connections to cell wall carbohydrates and morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klopffleisch, Karsten; Phan, Nguyen; Chen, Jay; Panstruga, Ralph; Uhrig, Joachim; Jones, Alan M

    2011-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G-protein complex is minimally composed of G{alpha}, G{beta}, and G{gamma} subunits. In the classic scenario, the G-protein complex is the nexus in signaling from the plasma membrane, where the heterotrimeric G-protein associates with heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), to cytoplasmic target proteins called effectors. Although a number of effectors are known in metazoans and fungi, none of these are predicted to exist in their canonical forms in plants. To identify ab initio plant G-protein effectors and scaffold proteins, we screened a set of proteins from the G-protein complex using two-hybrid complementation in yeast. After deep and exhaustive interrogation, we detected 544 interactions between 434 proteins, of which 68 highly interconnected proteins form the core G-protein interactome. Within this core, over half of the interactions comprising two-thirds of the nodes were retested and validated as genuine in planta. Co-expression analysis in combination with phenotyping of loss-of-function mutations in a set of core interactome genes revealed a novel role for G-proteins in regulating cell wall modification.

  17. Analysis of protein transport in the Brassica oleracea vasculature reveals protein-specific destinations.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chenxing; Anstead, James; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the vascular transport properties of exogenously applied proteins to Brassica oleracea plants and compared their delivery to various aerial parts of the plant with carboxy fluorescein (CF) dye. We identified unique properties for each protein. Alexafluor-tagged bovine serum albumin (Alexa-BSA) and Alexafluor-tagged Histone H1 (Alexa-Histone) moved slower than CF dye throughout the plant. Interestingly, Alexa-Histone was retained in the phloem and phloem parenchyma while Alexa-BSA moved into the apoplast. One possibility is that Alexa-Histone sufficiently resembles plant endogenous proteins and is retained in the vascular stream, while Alexa-BSA is exported from the cell as a foreign protein. Both proteins diffuse from the leaf veins into the leaf lamina. Alexa-BSA accumulated in the leaf epidermis while Alexa-Histone accumulated mainly in the mesophyll layers. Fluorescein-tagged hepatitis C virus core protein (fluorescein-HCV) was also delivered to B. oleracea plants and is larger than Alexa-BSA. This protein moves more rapidly than BSA through the plant and was restricted to the leaf veins. Fluorescein-HCV failed to unload to the leaf lamina. These combined data suggest that there is not a single default pathway for the vascular transfer of exogenous proteins in B. oleracea plants. Specific protein properties appear to determine their destination and transport properties within the phloem. PMID:22476467

  18. Functional Analysis of GLRX5 Mutants Reveals Distinct Functionalities of GLRX5 Protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Yongwei; Anderson, Gregory J; Camaschella, Clara; Chang, Yanzhong; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) is a 156 amino acid mitochondrial protein that plays an essential role in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster transfer. Mutations in this protein were reported to result in sideroblastic anemia and variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia in human. Recently, we have characterized a Chinese congenital sideroblastic anemia patient who has two compound heterozygous missense mutations (c. 301 A>C and c. 443 T>C) in his GLRX5 gene. Herein, we developed a GLRX5 knockout K562 cell line and studied the biochemical functions of the identified pathogenic mutations and other conserved amino acids with predicted essential functions. We observed that the K101Q mutation (due to c. 301 A>C mutation) may prevent the binding of [Fe-S] to GLRX5 protein, while L148S (due to c. 443 T>C mutation) may interfere with [Fe-S] transfer from GLRX5 to iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), mitochondrial aconitase (m-aconitase) and ferrochelatase. We also demonstrated that L148S is functionally complementary to the K51del mutant with respect to Fe/S-ferrochelatase, Fe/S-IRP1, Fe/S-succinate dehydrogenase, and Fe/S-m-aconitase biosynthesis and lipoylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutations of highly conserved amino acid residues in GLRX5 protein can have different effects on downstream Fe/S proteins. Collectively, our current work demonstrates that GLRX5 protein is multifunctional in [Fe-S] protein synthesis and maturation and defects of the different amino acids of the protein will lead to distinct effects on downstream Fe/S biosynthesis. PMID:26100117

  19. Protein association of the neurotoxin and non-protein amino acid BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in the liver and brain following neonatal administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Andersson, Marie; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2014-04-01

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is not an amino acid that is normally found in proteins. Our previous autoradiographic study of (3)H-labeled BMAA in adult mice unexpectedly revealed a tissue distribution similar to that of protein amino acids. The aim of this study was to characterize the distribution of free and protein-bound BMAA in neonatal rat tissues following a short exposure using autoradiographic imaging and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The autoradiographic imaging of (14)C-L-BMAA demonstrated a distinct uptake of radioactivity that was retained following acid extraction in tissues with a high rate of cell turnover and/or protein synthesis. The UHPLC-MS/MS analysis conclusively demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat tissues. The level of protein-associated BMAA in the liver was more than 10 times higher than that in brain regions not fully protected by the blood-brain barrier which may be due to the higher rate of protein synthesis in the liver. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BMAA was associated with rat proteins suggesting that BMAA may be misincorporated into proteins. However, protein-associated BMAA seemed to be cleared over time, as none of the samples from adult rats had any detectable free or protein-associated BMAA. PMID:24472610

  20. Cholesterol-lowering effect of rice bran protein containing bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jilite; Shimada, Masaya; Kato, Yukina; Kusada, Mio; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Dietary plant protein is well known to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Rice bran is a by-product of rice milling and is a good source of protein. The present study examined whether feeding rats a high-cholesterol diet containing 10% rice bran protein (RBP) for 10 d affected cholesterol metabolism. Rats fed dietary RBP had lower serum total cholesterol levels and increased excretion of fecal steroids, such as cholesterol and bile acids, than those fed dietary casein. In vitro assays showed that RBP strongly bound to taurocholate, and inhibited the micellar solubility of cholesterol, compared with casein. Moreover, the bile acid-binding proteins of the RBP were eluted by a chromatographic column conjugated with cholic acid, and one of them was identified as hypothetical protein OsJ_13801 (NCBI accession No. EAZ29742) using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. These results suggest that the hypocholesterolemic action of the RBP may be caused by the bile acid-binding proteins. PMID:25374002

  1. Leukocyte Protease Binding to Nucleic Acids Promotes Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marshall P.; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein (RBP) targets, while adding RNA to recombinant RBP substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Pre-incubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CATG). During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which bind NE and CATG. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and NETs in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation. PMID:24771851

  2. Modeling nucleic acid structure in the presence of single-stranded binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forties, Robert; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2009-03-01

    There are many important proteins which bind single-stranded nucleic acids, such as the nucleocapsid protein in HIV, the RecA DNA repair protein in bacteria, and all proteins involved in mRNA splicing and translation. We extend the Vienna Package for quantitatively modeling the secondary structure of nucleic acids to include proteins which bind to unpaired portions of the nucleic acid. All parameters needed to model nucleic acid secondary structures in the absence of proteins have been previously measured. This leaves the footprint and sequence dependent binding affinity of the protein as adjustable parameters of our model. Using this model we are able to predict the probability of the protein binding at any position in the nucleic acid sequence, the impact of the protein on nucleic acid base pairing, the end-to-end distance distribution for the nucleic acid, and FRET distributions for fluorophores attached to the nucleic acid.

  3. Cloning and characterization of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid encoding haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Tsuchida, J; Tanaka, H; Koga, M; Nishina, Y; Nozaki, M; Yoshinaga, K; Toshimori, K; Matsumiya, K; Okuyama, A; Nishimune, Y

    2000-10-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a germ cell-specific protein from an expression cDNA library prepared from the mouse testis using testis-specific polyclonal antibodies. Northern blot analysis showed a transcript of 1.1 kilobases exclusively expressed in haploid germ cells of the testis. Sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed one long open reading frame consisting of 238 deduced amino acids, rich in basic amino acids in the N-terminal one-third that also contained the nuclear localization signal, and rich in acidic amino acids, including two type of acidic alanine-rich repeats, in the rest of the deduced protein. The protein having a molecular weight of approximately 55 kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 4.3-4.7 was also exclusively detected in the testis by Western blot analysis. As the cDNA was located on chromosome-X, Halap-X (haploid-specific alanine-rich acidic protein located on chromosome-X) was proposed for the name of the protein encoded by the cDNA. Immunohistochemical observation revealed that the Halap-X protein was predominantly present in the nucleoplasm of round spermatids but gradually decreased as spermatids matured, followed by the subsequent appearance in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids. Thus, the Halap-X protein was transferred from the nuclei to the cytoplasm during the spermatid maturation when the chromatin condensation and transformation of the nuclei occurred. The Halap-X may facilitate specific association of nuclear DNA with some basic chromosomal proteins and play important roles in the process of chromatin condensation. PMID:10993819

  4. Casein phosphopeptides drastically increase the secretion of extracellular proteins in Aspergillus awamori. Proteomics studies reveal changes in the secretory pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The secretion of heterologous animal proteins in filamentous fungi is usually limited by bottlenecks in the vesicle-mediated secretory pathway. Results Using the secretion of bovine chymosin in Aspergillus awamori as a model, we found a drastic increase (40 to 80-fold) in cells grown with casein or casein phosphopeptides (CPPs). CPPs are rich in phosphoserine, but phosphoserine itself did not increase the secretion of chymosin. The stimulatory effect is reduced about 50% using partially dephosphorylated casein and is not exerted by casamino acids. The phosphopeptides effect was not exerted at transcriptional level, but instead, it was clearly observed on the secretion of chymosin by immunodetection analysis. Proteomics studies revealed very interesting metabolic changes in response to phosphopeptides supplementation. The oxidative metabolism was reduced, since enzymes involved in fermentative processes were overrepresented. An oxygen-binding hemoglobin-like protein was overrepresented in the proteome following phosphopeptides addition. Most interestingly, the intracellular pre-protein enzymes, including pre-prochymosin, were depleted (most of them are underrepresented in the intracellular proteome after the addition of CPPs), whereas the extracellular mature form of several of these secretable proteins and cell-wall biosynthetic enzymes was greatly overrepresented in the secretome of phosphopeptides-supplemented cells. Another important 'moonlighting' protein (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), which has been described to have vesicle fusogenic and cytoskeleton formation modulating activities, was clearly overrepresented in phosphopeptides-supplemented cells. Conclusions In summary, CPPs cause the reprogramming of cellular metabolism, which leads to massive secretion of extracellular proteins. PMID:22234238

  5. Amino acid coevolution reveals three-dimensional structure and functional domains of insect odorant receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, Thomas A.; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ihara, Sayoko; Touhara, Kazushige; Marks, Debora S.; Benton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Insect Odorant Receptors (ORs) comprise an enormous protein family that translates environmental chemical signals into neuronal electrical activity. These heptahelical receptors are proposed to function as ligand-gated ion channels and/or to act metabotropically as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Resolving their signalling mechanism has been hampered by the lack of tertiary structural information and primary sequence similarity to other proteins. We use amino acid evolutionary covariation across these ORs to define restraints on structural proximity of residue pairs, which permit de novo generation of three-dimensional models. The validity of our analysis is supported by the location of functionally important residues in highly constrained regions of the protein. Importantly, insect OR models exhibit a distinct transmembrane domain packing arrangement to that of canonical GPCRs, establishing the structural unrelatedness of these receptor families. The evolutionary couplings and models predict odour binding and ion conduction domains, and provide a template for rationale structure-activity dissection. PMID:25584517

  6. FAX1, a Novel Membrane Protein Mediating Plastid Fatty Acid Export

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nannan; Gügel, Irene Luise; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas; Soll, Jürgen; Philippar, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis in plants occurs in plastids, and thus, export for subsequent acyl editing and lipid assembly in the cytosol and endoplasmatic reticulum is required. Yet, the transport mechanism for plastid fatty acids still remains enigmatic. We isolated FAX1 (fatty acid export 1), a novel protein, which inserts into the chloroplast inner envelope by α-helical membrane-spanning domains. Detailed phenotypic and ultrastructural analyses of FAX1 mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that FAX1 function is crucial for biomass production, male fertility and synthesis of fatty acid-derived compounds such as lipids, ketone waxes, or pollen cell wall material. Determination of lipid, fatty acid, and wax contents by mass spectrometry revealed that endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-derived lipids decreased when FAX1 was missing, but levels of several plastid-produced species increased. FAX1 over-expressing lines showed the opposite behavior, including a pronounced increase of triacyglycerol oils in flowers and leaves. Furthermore, the cuticular layer of stems from fax1 knockout lines was specifically reduced in C29 ketone wax compounds. Differential gene expression in FAX1 mutants as determined by DNA microarray analysis confirmed phenotypes and metabolic imbalances. Since in yeast FAX1 could complement for fatty acid transport, we concluded that FAX1 mediates fatty acid export from plastids. In vertebrates, FAX1 relatives are structurally related, mitochondrial membrane proteins of so-far unknown function. Therefore, this protein family might represent a powerful tool not only to increase lipid/biofuel production in plants but also to explore novel transport systems involved in vertebrate fatty acid and lipid metabolism. PMID:25646734

  7. FAX1, a novel membrane protein mediating plastid fatty acid export.

    PubMed

    Li, Nannan; Gügel, Irene Luise; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas; Soll, Jürgen; Philippar, Katrin

    2015-02-01

    Fatty acid synthesis in plants occurs in plastids, and thus, export for subsequent acyl editing and lipid assembly in the cytosol and endoplasmatic reticulum is required. Yet, the transport mechanism for plastid fatty acids still remains enigmatic. We isolated FAX1 (fatty acid export 1), a novel protein, which inserts into the chloroplast inner envelope by α-helical membrane-spanning domains. Detailed phenotypic and ultrastructural analyses of FAX1 mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that FAX1 function is crucial for biomass production, male fertility and synthesis of fatty acid-derived compounds such as lipids, ketone waxes, or pollen cell wall material. Determination of lipid, fatty acid, and wax contents by mass spectrometry revealed that endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-derived lipids decreased when FAX1 was missing, but levels of several plastid-produced species increased. FAX1 over-expressing lines showed the opposite behavior, including a pronounced increase of triacyglycerol oils in flowers and leaves. Furthermore, the cuticular layer of stems from fax1 knockout lines was specifically reduced in C29 ketone wax compounds. Differential gene expression in FAX1 mutants as determined by DNA microarray analysis confirmed phenotypes and metabolic imbalances. Since in yeast FAX1 could complement for fatty acid transport, we concluded that FAX1 mediates fatty acid export from plastids. In vertebrates, FAX1 relatives are structurally related, mitochondrial membrane proteins of so-far unknown function. Therefore, this protein family might represent a powerful tool not only to increase lipid/biofuel production in plants but also to explore novel transport systems involved in vertebrate fatty acid and lipid metabolism. PMID:25646734

  8. Structural and dynamic changes associated with beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion mutations in enhanced green fluorescent protein

    SciTech Connect

    Arpino, James A. J.; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Jones, D. Dafydd

    2014-08-01

    The beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion variants EGFP{sup D190Δ} and EGFP{sup A227Δ} have been studied. Single-amino-acid deletions are a common part of the natural evolutionary landscape but are rarely sampled during protein engineering owing to limited and prejudiced molecular understanding of mutations that shorten the protein backbone. Single-amino-acid deletion variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) have been identified by directed evolution with the beneficial effect of imparting increased cellular fluorescence. Biophysical characterization revealed that increased functional protein production and not changes to the fluorescence parameters was the mechanism that was likely to be responsible. The structure EGFP{sup D190Δ} containing a deletion within a loop revealed propagated changes only after the deleted residue. The structure of EGFP{sup A227Δ} revealed that a ‘flipping’ mechanism was used to adjust for residue deletion at the end of a β-strand, with amino acids C-terminal to the deletion site repositioning to take the place of the deleted amino acid. In both variants new networks of short-range and long-range interactions are generated while maintaining the integrity of the hydrophobic core. Both deletion variants also displayed significant local and long-range changes in dynamics, as evident by changes in B factors compared with EGFP. Rather than being detrimental, deletion mutations can introduce beneficial structural effects through altering core protein properties, folding and dynamics, as well as function.

  9. Dietary requirements of synthesizable amino acids by animals: a paradigm shift in protein nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids are building blocks for proteins in all animals. Based on growth or nitrogen balance, amino acids were traditionally classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential for mammals, birds and fish. It was assumed that all the “nutritionally nonessential amino acids (NEAA)” were synthesized sufficiently in the body to meet the needs for maximal growth and optimal health. However, careful analysis of the scientific literature reveals that over the past century there has not been compelling experimental evidence to support this assumption. NEAA (e.g., glutamine, glutamate, proline, glycine and arginine) play important roles in regulating gene expression, cell signaling, antioxidative responses, fertility, neurotransmission, and immunity. Additionally, glutamate, glutamine and aspartate are major metabolic fuels for the small intestine to maintain its digestive function and to protect the integrity of the intestinal mucosa. Thus, diets for animals must contain all NEAA to optimize their survival, growth, development, reproduction, and health. Furthermore, NEAA should be taken into consideration in revising the “ideal protein” concept that is currently used to formulate swine and poultry diets. Adequate provision of all amino acids (including NEAA) in diets enhances the efficiency of animal production. In this regard, amino acids should not be classified as nutritionally essential or nonessential in animal or human nutrition. The new Texas A&M University’s optimal ratios of dietary amino acids for swine and chickens are expected to beneficially reduce dietary protein content and improve the efficiency of their nutrient utilization, growth, and production performance. PMID:24999386

  10. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  11. Weak protein-protein interactions revealed by immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension.

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Chin, Emily N; Jackson, Shawn S; Strotman, Lindsay N; Goel, Mohit; Thompson, Nancy E; Alexander, Caroline M; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Burgess, Richard R; Beebe, David J

    2014-02-15

    Biological mechanisms are often mediated by transient interactions between multiple proteins. The isolation of intact protein complexes is essential to understanding biochemical processes and an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets and biomarkers. However, low-affinity interactions are often difficult to detect. Here, we use a newly described method called immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST) to isolate proteins under defined binding conditions. This method, which gives a near-instantaneous isolation, enables significantly higher recovery of transient complexes compared to current wash-based protocols, which require reequilibration at each of several wash steps, resulting in protein loss. The method moves proteins, or protein complexes, captured on a solid phase through one or more immiscible-phase barriers that efficiently exclude the passage of nonspecific material in a single operation. We use a previously described polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody to investigate the potential of this new method to study protein binding. In addition, difficult-to-isolate complexes involving the biologically and clinically important Wnt signaling pathway were isolated. We anticipate that this simple, rapid method to isolate intact, transient complexes will enable the discoveries of new signaling pathways, biomarkers, and drug targets. PMID:24215910

  12. Weak protein-protein interactions revealed by immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST)

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Scott M.; Chin, Emily N.; Jackson, Shawn S.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Goel, Mohit; Thompson, Nancy E.; Alexander, Caroline M.; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Burgess, Richard R.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Biological mechanisms are often mediated by transient interactions between multiple proteins. The isolation of intact protein complexes is essential to understanding biochemical processes and an important prerequisite for identifying new drug targets and biomarkers. However, low-affinity interactions are often difficult to detect. Here, we use a newly described method called immiscible filtration assisted by surface tension (IFAST) to isolate proteins under defined binding conditions. This method, that gives a near-instantaneous isolation, enables significantly higher recovery of transient complexes as compared to current wash-based protocols, which require re-equilibration at each of several wash steps, resulting in protein loss. The method moves proteins, or protein complexes, captured on a solid phase through one or more immiscible phase barriers that efficiently exclude the passage of non-specific material in a single operation. We use a previously described polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody (PR-mAb) to investigate the potential of this new method to study protein-binding. In addition, difficult-to-isolate complexes involving the biologically and clinically important Wnt signaling pathway were isolated. We anticipate that this simple, rapid method to isolate intact, transient complexes will enable the discoveries of new signaling pathways, biomarkers, and drug targets. PMID:24215910

  13. Multi-omic profiling -of EPO-producing Chinese hamster ovary cell panel reveals metabolic adaptation to heterologous protein production.

    PubMed

    Ley, Daniel; Seresht, Ali Kazemi; Engmark, Mikael; Magdenoska, Olivera; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-11-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the preferred production host for many therapeutic proteins. The production of heterologous proteins in CHO cells imposes a burden on the host cell metabolism and impact cellular physiology on a global scale. In this work, a multi-omics approach was applied to study the production of erythropoietin (EPO) in a panel of CHO-K1 cells under growth-limited and unlimited conditions in batch and chemostat cultures. Physiological characterization of the EPO-producing cells included global transcriptome analysis, targeted metabolome analysis, including intracellular pools of glycolytic intermediates, NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) , adenine nucleotide phosphates (ANP), and extracellular concentrations of sugars, organic acids, and amino acids. Potential impact of EPO expression on the protein secretory pathway was assessed at multiple stages using quantitative PCR (qPCR), reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blots (WB), and global gene expression analysis to assess EPO gene copy numbers, EPO gene expression, intracellular EPO retention, and differentially expressed genes functionally related to secretory protein processing, respectively. We found no evidence supporting the existence of production bottlenecks in energy metabolism (i.e., glycolytic metabolites, NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) and ANPs) in batch culture or in the secretory protein production pathway (i.e., gene dosage, transcription and post-translational processing of EPO) in chemostat culture at specific productivities up to 5 pg/cell/day. Time-course analysis of high- and low-producing clones in chemostat culture revealed rapid adaptation of transcription levels of amino acid catabolic genes in favor of EPO production within nine generations. Interestingly, the adaptation was followed by an increase in specific EPO productivity. PMID:25995028

  14. Energy Landscape of All-Atom Protein-Protein Interactions Revealed by Multiscale Enhanced Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Moritsugu, Kei; Terada, Tohru; Kidera, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are regulated by a subtle balance of complicated atomic interactions and solvation at the interface. To understand such an elusive phenomenon, it is necessary to thoroughly survey the large configurational space from the stable complex structure to the dissociated states using the all-atom model in explicit solvent and to delineate the energy landscape of protein-protein interactions. In this study, we carried out a multiscale enhanced sampling (MSES) simulation of the formation of a barnase-barstar complex, which is a protein complex characterized by an extraordinary tight and fast binding, to determine the energy landscape of atomistic protein-protein interactions. The MSES adopts a multicopy and multiscale scheme to enable for the enhanced sampling of the all-atom model of large proteins including explicit solvent. During the 100-ns MSES simulation of the barnase-barstar system, we observed the association-dissociation processes of the atomistic protein complex in solution several times, which contained not only the native complex structure but also fully non-native configurations. The sampled distributions suggest that a large variety of non-native states went downhill to the stable complex structure, like a fast folding on a funnel-like potential. This funnel landscape is attributed to dominant configurations in the early stage of the association process characterized by near-native orientations, which will accelerate the native inter-molecular interactions. These configurations are guided mostly by the shape complementarity between barnase and barstar, and lead to the fast formation of the final complex structure along the downhill energy landscape. PMID:25340714

  15. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.

  16. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsinmore » kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.« less

  17. Phenotypic mixing between different hepadnavirus nucleocapsid proteins reveals C protein dimerization to be cis preferential.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C; Zhou, S; Ganem, D; Standring, D N

    1994-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses encode a single core (C) protein which assembles into a nucleocapsid containing the polymerase (P) protein and pregenomic RNA during viral replication in hepatocytes. We examined the ability of heterologous hepadnavirus C proteins to cross-oligomerize. Using a two-hybrid assay in HepG2 cells, we observed cross-oligomerization among the core proteins from hepatitis B virus (HBV), woodchuck hepatitis virus, and ground squirrel hepatitis virus. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, in which hepadnavirus C proteins form capsids, the C polypeptides from woodchuck hepatitis virus and ground squirrel hepatitis virus, but not duck hepatitis B virus, can efficiently coassemble with an epitope-tagged HBV core polypeptide to form mixed capsids. However, when two different core mRNAs are coexpressed in oocytes the core monomers show a strong preference for forming homodimers rather than heterodimers. This holds true even for coexpression of two HBV C proteins differing only by an epitope tag, suggesting that core monomers are not free to diffuse and associate with other monomers. Thus, mixed capsids result from aggregation of different species of homodimers. Images PMID:7518533

  18. Conformational Selection in a Protein-Protein Interaction revealed by Dynamic Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding. PMID:26725117

  19. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Membrane Protein-Mediated Hypersaline Sensitivity and Adaptation in Halophilic Nocardiopsis xinjiangensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Li, Yanchang; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Mingzhi; Su, Na; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Lingsheng; Wei, Wei; Luo, Jing; Zhou, Yanxia; Xu, Yongru; Xu, Ping; Li, Wenjun; Tao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The genus Nocardiopsis is one of the most dominant Actinobacteria that survives in hypersaline environments. However, the adaptation mechanisms for halophilism are still unclear. Here, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification based quantitative proteomics to investigate the functions of the membrane proteome after salt stress. A total of 683 membrane proteins were identified and quantified, of which 126 membrane proteins displayed salt-induced changes in abundance. Intriguingly, bioinformatics analyses indicated that these differential proteins showed two expression patterns, which were further validated by phenotypic changes and functional differences. The majority of ABC transporters, secondary active transporters, cell motility proteins, and signal transduction kinases were up-regulated with increasing salt concentration, whereas cell differentiation, small molecular transporter (ions and amino acids), and secondary metabolism proteins were significantly up-regulated at optimum salinity, but down-regulated or unchanged at higher salinity. The small molecule transporters and cell differentiation-related proteins acted as sensing proteins that played a more important biological role at optimum salinity. However, the ABC transporters for compatible solutes, Na(+)-dependent transporters, and cell motility proteins acted as adaptive proteins that actively counteracted higher salinity stress. Overall, regulation of membrane proteins may provide a major protection strategy against hyperosmotic stress. PMID:26549328

  20. Effect of hair dyes and bleach on the hair protein patterns as revealed by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Nagai, A; Komoriya, H; Bunai, Y; Yamada, S; Jiang, X Y; Ohya, I

    1991-06-01

    The effect of hair dyes, i.e., temporary, semi-permanent, or permanent hair dyes, or hair bleach on the isoelectric focusing (IEF) hair protein patterns was studied. A permanent hair dye (metallic, alkaline oxidative, or acidic oxidative) and hair bleach induced changes in the IEF hair protein patterns and in the intensity of hair protein bands. The changes in the IEF patterns, caused by the alkaline oxidative dye or the bleach, are considered to result from the combined effect of an alkaline agent and an oxidative agent in the alkaline oxidative dye and in the hair bleach. PMID:1889397

  1. Rhabdovirus Matrix Protein Structures Reveal a Novel Mode of Self-Association

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Gholami, Alireza; Talbi, Chiraz; Owens, Raymond J.; Stuart, David I.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Bourhy, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    The matrix (M) proteins of rhabdoviruses are multifunctional proteins essential for virus maturation and budding that also regulate the expression of viral and host proteins. We have solved the structures of M from the vesicular stomatitis virus serotype New Jersey (genus: Vesiculovirus) and from Lagos bat virus (genus: Lyssavirus), revealing that both share a common fold despite sharing no identifiable sequence homology. Strikingly, in both structures a stretch of residues from the otherwise-disordered N terminus of a crystallographically adjacent molecule is observed binding to a hydrophobic cavity on the surface of the protein, thereby forming non-covalent linear polymers of M in the crystals. While the overall topology of the interaction is conserved between the two structures, the molecular details of the interactions are completely different. The observed interactions provide a compelling model for the flexible self-assembly of the matrix protein during virion morphogenesis and may also modulate interactions with host proteins. PMID:19112510

  2. Probing interactions between plant virus movement proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Tzfira, Tzvi; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2008-01-01

    Most plant viruses move between plant cells with the help of their movement proteins (MPs). MPs are multifunctional proteins, and one of their functions is almost invariably binding to nucleic acids. Presumably, the MP-nucleic acid interaction is directly involved in formation of nucleoprotein complexes that function as intermediates in the cell-to-cell transport of many plant viruses. Thus, when studying a viral MP, it is important to determine whether or not it binds nucleic acids, and to characterize the hallmark parameters of such binding, i.e., preference for single- or double-stranded nucleic acids and binding cooperativity and sequence specificity. Here, we present two major experimental approaches, native gel mobility shift assay and ultra violet (UV) light cross-linking, for detection and characterization of MP binding to DNA and RNA molecules. We also describe protocols for purification of recombinant viral MPs over-expressed in bacteria and production of different DNA and RNA probes for these binding assays. PMID:18370264

  3. Fatty acids exacerbate tubulointerstitial injury in protein-overload proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark E; Harris, Kevin P G; Walls, John; Furness, Peter N; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2002-10-01

    The role of the albumin-carried fatty acids in the induction of tubulointerstitial injury was studied in protein-overload proteinuria. Rats were injected with fatty acid-carrying BSA [FA(+)BSA], fatty acid-depleted BSA [FA(-)BSA], or saline. Macrophage infiltration was measured by immunohistochemical staining, apoptotic cells were detected by in situ end labeling, and proliferating cells were identified by in situ hybridization for histone mRNA. Macrophage infiltration was significantly greater in the FA(+)BSA group than in the FA(-)BSA and saline groups. The infiltrate was largely restricted to the outer cortex. Apoptosis was greater in the FA(+)BSA group than in the FA(-)BSA and saline groups. Compared with the saline group, apoptosis was significantly increased in the FA(+)BSA group but not in the FA(-)BSA group. Cortical cells proliferated significantly more in the FA(+)BSA and FA(-)BSA groups than in the saline group. FA(+)BSA is therefore a more potent inducer of macrophage infiltration and cell death than FA(-)BSA. The fatty acids carried on albumin may be the chief instigators of tubulointerstitial injury in protein-overload proteinuria. PMID:12217854

  4. Mannose 6 Dephosphorylation of Lysosomal Proteins Mediated by Acid Phosphatases Acp2 and Acp5

    PubMed Central

    Makrypidi, Georgia; Damme, Markus; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Trusch, Maria; Schmidt, Bernhard; Schlüter, Hartmut; Heeren, Joerg; Lübke, Torben; Saftig, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Mannose 6-phosphate (Man6P) residues represent a recognition signal required for efficient receptor-dependent transport of soluble lysosomal proteins to lysosomes. Upon arrival, the proteins are rapidly dephosphorylated. We used mice deficient for the lysosomal acid phosphatase Acp2 or Acp5 or lacking both phosphatases (Acp2/Acp5−/−) to examine their role in dephosphorylation of Man6P-containing proteins. Two-dimensional (2D) Man6P immunoblot analyses of tyloxapol-purified lysosomal fractions revealed an important role of Acp5 acting in concert with Acp2 for complete dephosphorylation of lysosomal proteins. The most abundant lysosomal substrates of Acp2 and Acp5 were identified by Man6P affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry. Depending on the presence of Acp2 or Acp5, the isoelectric point of the lysosomal cholesterol-binding protein Npc2 ranged between 7.0 and 5.4 and may thus regulate its interaction with negatively charged lysosomal membranes at acidic pH. Correspondingly, unesterified cholesterol was found to accumulate in lysosomes of cultured hepatocytes of Acp2/Acp5−/− mice. The data demonstrate that dephosphorylation of Man6P-containing lysosomal proteins requires the concerted action of Acp2 and Acp5 and is needed for hydrolysis and removal of degradation products. PMID:22158965

  5. Effects of Acids, Bases, and Heteroatoms on Proximal Radial Distribution Functions for Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bao Linh; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2015-01-01

    The proximal distribution of water around proteins is a convenient method of quantifying solvation. We consider the effect of charged and sulfur-containing amino acid side-chain atoms on the proximal radial distribution function (pRDF) of water molecules around proteins using side-chain analogs. The pRDF represents the relative probability of finding any solvent molecule at a distance from the closest or surface perpendicular protein atom. We consider the near-neighbor distribution. Previously, pRDFs were shown to be universal descriptors of the water molecules around C, N, and O atom types across hundreds of globular proteins. Using averaged pRDFs, a solvent density around any globular protein can be reconstructed with controllable relative error. Solvent reconstruction using the additional information from charged amino acid side-chain atom types from both small models and protein averages reveals the effects of surface charge distribution on solvent density and improves the reconstruction errors relative to simulation. Solvent density reconstructions from the small-molecule models are as effective and less computationally demanding than reconstructions from full macromolecular models in reproducing preferred hydration sites and solvent density fluctuations. PMID:26388706

  6. Effects of Acids, Bases, and Heteroatoms on Proximal Radial Distribution Functions for Proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bao Linh; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2015-04-14

    The proximal distribution of water around proteins is a convenient method of quantifying solvation. We consider the effect of charged and sulfur-containing amino acid side-chain atoms on the proximal radial distribution function (pRDF) of water molecules around proteins using side-chain analogs. The pRDF represents the relative probability of finding any solvent molecule at a distance from the closest or surface perpendicular protein atom. We consider the near-neighbor distribution. Previously, pRDFs were shown to be universal descriptors of the water molecules around C, N, and O atom types across hundreds of globular proteins. Using averaged pRDFs, a solvent density around any globular protein can be reconstructed with controllable relative error. Solvent reconstruction using the additional information from charged amino acid side-chain atom types from both small models and protein averages reveals the effects of surface charge distribution on solvent density and improves the reconstruction errors relative to simulation. Solvent density reconstructions from the small-molecule models are as effective and less computationally demanding than reconstructions from full macromolecular models in reproducing preferred hydration sites and solvent density fluctuations. PMID:26388706

  7. An essential role of a ferritin-like protein in acid stress tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Milecka, Dorota; Samluk, Anna; Wasiak, Katarzyna; Krawczyk-Balska, Agata

    2015-03-01

    The expression of ten genes of Listeria monocytogenes previously identified as penicillin G-inducible was transcriptionally analyzed in the presence of 0.5 M KCl, pH 5.0 and 42 °C. This study revealed that all the genes are upregulated by osmotic stress, seven by acid stress and four by temperature stress conditions. The contribution of a gene encoding a ferritin-like protein (fri), a two-component phosphate-response regulator (phoP) and an AraC/XylS family transcription regulator (axyR) to temperature, acid and osmotic stress tolerance was further examined by analysis of nonpolar deletion mutants. This revealed that a lack of PhoP or AxyR does not affect the ability to grow under the tested stress conditions. However, the Δ fri strain showed slightly delayed growth under osmotic and clearly impaired growth under acid stress conditions, indicating an important role of the ferritin-like protein in acid stress tolerance. PMID:25352185

  8. The biological activities of protein/oleic acid complexes reside in the fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Angelo; Spolaore, Barbara; Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia

    2013-06-01

    A complex formed by human α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and oleic acid (OA), named HAMLET, has been shown to have an apoptotic activity leading to the selective death of tumor cells. In numerous publications it has been reported that in the complex α-LA is monomeric and adopts a partly folded or "molten globule" state, leading to the idea that partly folded proteins can have "beneficial effects". The protein/OA molar ratio initially has been reported to be 1:1, while recent data have indicated that the OA-complex is given by an oligomeric protein capable of binding numerous OA molecules per protein monomer. Proteolytic fragments of α-LA, as well as other proteins unrelated to α-LA, can form OA-complexes with biological activities similar to those of HAMLET, thus indicating that a generic protein can form a cytotoxic complex under suitable experimental conditions. Moreover, even the selective tumoricidal activity of HAMLET-like complexes has been questioned. There is recent evidence that the biological activity of long chain unsaturated fatty acids, including OA, can be ascribed to their effect of perturbing the structure of biological membranes and consequently the function of membrane-bound proteins. In general, it has been observed that the cytotoxic effects exerted by HAMLET-like complexes are similar to those reported for OA alone. Overall, these findings can be interpreted by considering that the protein moiety does not have a toxic effect on its own, but merely acts as a solubilising agent for the inherently toxic fatty acid. PMID:23499846

  9. Quantitative Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Reveals a 1000-Fold Increase in Lifetime of Protein Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dianwen; Lans, Hannes; Vermeulen, Wim; Lenferink, Aufried; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated dilute protein solutions with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and have observed that a rapid loss of proteins occurs from solution. It is commonly assumed that such a loss is the result of protein adsorption to interfaces. A protocol was developed in which this mode of protein loss can be prevented. However, FCS on fluorescent protein (enhanced green fluorescent protein, mCherry, and mStrawberry) solutions enclosed by adsorption-protected interfaces still reveals a decrease of the fluorescent protein concentration, while the diffusion time is stable over long periods of time. We interpret this decay as a loss of protein functionality, probably caused by denaturation of the fluorescent proteins. We show that the typical lifetime of protein functionality in highly dilute, approximately single molecule per femtoliter solutions can be extended more than 1000-fold (typically from a few hours to >40 days) by adding compounds with surfactant behavior. No direct interactions between the surfactant and the fluorescent proteins were observed from the diffusion time measured by FCS. A critical surfactant concentration of more than 23 μM was required to achieve the desired protein stabilization for Triton X-100. The surfactant does not interfere with DNA-protein binding, because similar observations were made using DNA-cutting restriction enzymes. We associate the occurrence of denaturation of proteins with the activity of water at the water-protein interface, which was recently proposed in terms of the “water attack model”. Our observations suggest that soluble biomolecules can extend an influence over much larger distances than suggested by their actual volume. PMID:18586843

  10. Mechanically Untying a Protein Slipknot: Multiple Pathways Revealed by Force Spectroscopy and Steered Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    He, Chengzhi; Genchev, Georgi Z.; Lu, Hui; Li, Hongbin

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure is highly diverse when considering a wide range of protein types, helping to give rise to the multitude of functions that proteins perform. In particular, certain proteins are known to adopt a knotted or slipknotted fold. How such proteins undergo mechanical unfolding was investigated utilizing a combination of single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM), protein engineering and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to show the mechanical unfolding mechanism of the slipknotted protein AFV3-109. Our results reveal that the mechancial unfolding of AFV3-109 can proceed via multiple parallel unfolding pathways that all cause the protein slipknot to untie, and the polypeptide chain to completely extend. These distinct unfolding pathways proceed either via a two-state or three-state unfolding process involving the formation of a well-defined, stable intermediate state. SMD simulations predict the same contour length increments for different unfolding pathways as single molecule AFM results, thus provding a plausible molecular mechanism for the mechanical unfolding of AFV3-109. These SMD simulations also reveal that two-state unfolding is initiated from both the N- and C-termini, while three-state unfolding is initiated only from the C-terminus. In both pathways, the protein slipknot was untied during unfolding, and no tightened slipknot conformation observed. Detailed analysis revealed that interactions between key structural elements lock the knotting loop in place, preventing it from shrinking and the formation of a tightened slipknot conformation. Our results demonstrate the bifurcation of the mechancial unfolding pathway of AFV3-109, and point to the generality of a kinetic partitioning mechanism for protein folding/unfolding. PMID:22626004

  11. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Organophosphorus and Thiocarbamate Pesticides Reveals Multiple Serine Hydrolase Targets in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    NOMURA, DANIEL K.; CASIDA, JOHN E.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) and thiocarbamate (TC) agrochemicals are used worldwide as insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides, but their safety assessment in terms of potential off-targets remains incomplete. In this study, we used a chemoproteomic platform, termed activity-based protein profiling, to broadly define serine hydrolase targets in mouse brain of a panel of 29 OP and TC pesticides. Among the secondary targets identified, enzymes involved in degradation of endocannabinoid signaling lipids, monoacylglycerol lipase and fatty acid amide hydrolase, were inhibited by several OP and TC pesticides. Blockade of these two enzymes led to elevations in brain endocannabinoid levels and dysregulated brain arachidonate metabolism. Other secondary targets include enzymes thought to also play important roles in the nervous system and unannotated proteins. This study reveals a multitude of secondary targets for OP and TC pesticides and underscores the utility of chemoproteomic platforms in gaining insights into biochemical pathways that are perturbed by these toxicants. PMID:21341672

  12. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals That Argonaute Reshapes the Binding Properties of Its Nucleic Acid Guides

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, William E.; Jolly, Samson M.; Moore, Melissa J.; Zamore, Phillip D.; Serebrov, Victor

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Argonaute proteins repress gene expression and defend against foreign nucleic acids using short RNAs or DNAs to specify the correct target RNA or DNA sequence. We have developed single-molecule methods to analyze target binding and cleavage mediated by the Argonaute:guide complex, RISC. We find that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Argonaute proteins reshape the fundamental properties of RNA:RNA, RNA:DNA, and DNA:DNA hybridization: a small RNA or DNA bound to Argonaute as a guide no longer follows the well-established rules by which oligonucleotides find, bind, and dissociate from complementary nucleic acid sequences. Argonautes distinguish substrates from targets with similar complementarity. Mouse AGO2, for example, binds tighter to miRNA targets than its RNAi cleavage product, even though the cleaved product contains more base pairs. By re-writing the rules for nucleic acid hybridization, Argonautes allow oligonucleotides to serve as specificity determinants with thermodynamic and kinetic properties more typical of RNA-binding proteins than of RNA or DNA. PMID:26140592

  13. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals that Argonaute Reshapes the Binding Properties of Its Nucleic Acid Guides.

    PubMed

    Salomon, William E; Jolly, Samson M; Moore, Melissa J; Zamore, Phillip D; Serebrov, Victor

    2015-07-01

    Argonaute proteins repress gene expression and defend against foreign nucleic acids using short RNAs or DNAs to specify the correct target RNA or DNA sequence. We have developed single-molecule methods to analyze target binding and cleavage mediated by the Argonaute:guide complex, RISC. We find that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic Argonaute proteins reshape the fundamental properties of RNA:RNA, RNA:DNA, and DNA:DNA hybridization—a small RNA or DNA bound to Argonaute as a guide no longer follows the well-established rules by which oligonucleotides find, bind, and dissociate from complementary nucleic acid sequences. Argonautes distinguish substrates from targets with similar complementarity. Mouse AGO2, for example, binds tighter to miRNA targets than its RNAi cleavage product, even though the cleaved product contains more base pairs. By re-writing the rules for nucleic acid hybridization, Argonautes allow oligonucleotides to serve as specificity determinants with thermodynamic and kinetic properties more typical of RNA-binding proteins than of RNA or DNA. PMID:26140592

  14. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John Je; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. PMID:27115346

  15. Putative protein partners for the human CPI-17 protein revealed by bacterial two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-mi; Adyshev, Djanybek M; Kása, Anita; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Kolosova, Irina A; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2013-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that PKC-potentiated inhibitory protein of protein phosphatase-1 (CPI-17) is expressed in lung endothelium. CPI-17, a specific inhibitor of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), is involved in the endothelial cytoskeletal and barrier regulation. In this paper, we report the identification of fourteen putative CPI-17 interacting proteins in the lung using BacterioMatch Two-Hybrid System. Five of them: plectin 1 isoform 1, alpha II spectrin, OK/SW-CL.16, gelsolin isoform a, and junction plakoglobin are involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell adhesion, suggesting possible significance of these binding partners in CPI-17-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization of endothelial cells. Furthermore, we confirmed the specific interaction between plakoglobin and CPI-17, which is affected by the phosphorylation status of CPI-17 in human lung microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:23583905

  16. Binding of /sup 14/C-5-aminolevulinic acid to a stromal protein from developing pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, S.S.; Castelfranco, P.A.; Wilkinson, J.; Benson, G.

    1987-04-01

    /sup 14/-5-Aminolevulinic acid (/sup 14/C-ALA) binds to a stromal protein with an apparent molecular weight of 42-43 KD on LDS and non-denaturing gels. The reaction is rapid. Binding is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents, mM concentrations of levulinic, dihydroxy heptanoic acids and gabaculine, 10 ..mu..M N-methylprotoporphyrin. Dicarboxilic acids, such as deltaKG, Glu, OAA, do not inhibit. Chloramphenicol, ATP, protoporphyrin, anoxia, light, darkness have no effect. The product, once formed, is stable to treatment with 5% conc. HCl in cold acetone. It can be chased in a second incubation with unlabeled ALA, but not with levulinic acid. No activity was detected in the subplastidic membrane fractions. Western blot analysis failed to reveal any homology between the labeled protein and either cytochrome for ALA dehydratase. This ALA-binding protein was not formed in chloroplasts isolated from fully expanded pea leaves. Therefore, it is deemed likely to participate in ALA metabolism during chloroplast development.

  17. Functionalised carboxylic acids in atmospheric particles: An annual cycle revealing seasonal trends and possible sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Monique; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    acids. The high concentrations in summer could lead to the conclusion that these acids are mostly formed during photochemical processes in the atmosphere. However, the concentrations in autumn were often exceeded by the ones in winter. Therefore probably other sources beside photochemical processes have to be considered. The second group consists of aromatic compounds. Because of the high concentrations in winter it can be concluded that photochemical formation plays a minor role and primary emission sources e.g., wood combustion are likely. Further evidence in determining sources of the carboxylic acids could be obtained from the air mass origin. In general, air masses transported from East have a more anthropogenic influence than the air mass inflow from West. For all aromatic carboxylic acids higher concentrations were determined during eastern inflow, indicating anthropogenic sources. This presumption is supported by high correlations with the elemental carbon (EC). Regarding the aliphatic carboxylic there is one group with higher concentrations when the air mass is transported from West and one with higher concentrations when air mass is transported from East. In summary the findings of this study reveal a clear difference in the seasonal trends of the single target acids indicating a variety of different sources.

  18. An optimized isolation of biotinylated cell surface proteins reveals novel players in cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Ravela, Suvi; Laakso, Marko; Ritamo, Ilja; Tatti, Olga; Mäkinen, Selina; Goodison, Steve; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Hölttä, Erkki; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Valmu, Leena; Lehti, Kaisa; Laakkonen, Pirjo

    2012-01-01

    Details of metastasis, the deadliest aspect of cancer, are unclear. Cell surface proteins play central roles in adhesive contacts between the tumor cell and the stroma during metastasis. We optimized a fast, small-scale isolation of biotinylated cell surface proteins to reveal novel metastasis-associated players froman isogenic pair of human MDA-MB-435 cancer cells with opposite metastatic phenotypes. Isolated proteins were trypsin digested and analyzed using LC–MS/MS followed by quantitation with the Progenesis LC–MS software. Sixteen proteins displayed over twofold expression differences between the metastatic and non-metastatic cells. Interestingly, overexpression of most of them (14/16) in the metastatic cells indicates a gain of novel surface protein profile as compared to the non-metastatic one. All five validated, differentially expressed proteins showed higher expression in the metastatic cells in culture, and four of these were further validated in vivo. Moreover, we analyzed the expression of two of the identified proteins, CD109 and ITGA6 in 3-dimensional cultures of six melanoma cell lines. Both proteins marked the surface of cells derived from melanoma metastasis over cells derived from primary melanoma. These unbiased identification and validation of both known and novel metastasis-associated proteins indicate a reliable approach for the identification of differentially expressed surface proteins. PMID:22813880

  19. Proteomic Profiling of Cereal Aphid Saliva Reveals Both Ubiquitous and Adaptive Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Tom L.

    2013-01-01

    The secreted salivary proteins from two cereal aphid species, Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum, were collected from artificial diets and analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identification was performed by searching MS data against the official protein set from the current pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome assembly and revealed 12 and 7 proteins in the saliva of S. avenae and M. dirhodum, respectively. When combined with a comparable dataset from A. pisum, only three individual proteins were common to all the aphid species; two paralogues of the GMC oxidoreductase family (glucose dehydrogenase; GLD) and ACYPI009881, an aphid specific protein previously identified as a putative component of the salivary sheath. Antibodies were designed from translated protein sequences obtained from partial cDNA sequences for ACYPI009881 and both saliva associated GLDs. The antibodies detected all parent proteins in secreted saliva from the three aphid species, but could only detect ACYPI009881, and not saliva associated GLDs, in protein extractions from the salivary glands. This result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using whole and sectioned salivary glands, and in addition, localised ACYPI009881 to specific cell types within the principal salivary gland. The implications of these findings for the origin of salivary components and the putative role of the proteins identified are discussed in the context of our limited understanding of the functional relationship between aphid saliva and the plants they feed on. The mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange and can be accessed under the identifier PXD000113. PMID:23460852

  20. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  1. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery.

    PubMed

    Kalescky, Robert; Zhou, Hongyu; Liu, Jin; Tao, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier's principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  2. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier’s principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  3. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongbin; Wang, Qilei; Zhang, Long; Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  4. Isolation, characterization, and bioinformatic analysis of calmodulin-binding protein cmbB reveals a novel tandem IP22 repeat common to many Dictyostelium and Mimivirus proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Suhre, Karsten; Myre, Michael A; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Chavez, Sara E

    2006-08-01

    A novel calmodulin-binding protein cmbB from Dictyostelium discoideum is encoded in a single gene. Northern analysis reveals two cmbB transcripts first detectable at 4 h during multicellular development. Western blotting detects an approximately 46.6 kDa protein. Sequence analysis and calmodulin-agarose binding studies identified a "classic" calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding domain (179IPKSLRSLFLGKGYNQPLEF198) but structural analyses suggest binding may not involve classic alpha-helical calmodulin-binding. The cmbB protein is comprised of tandem repeats of a newly identified IP22 motif ([I,L]Pxxhxxhxhxxxhxxxhxxxx; where h = any hydrophobic amino acid) that is highly conserved and a more precise representation of the FNIP repeat. At least eight Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus proteins and over 100 Dictyostelium proteins contain tandem arrays of the IP22 motif and its variants. cmbB also shares structural homology to YopM, from the plague bacterium Yersenia pestis. PMID:16777069

  5. Proteome profiling of seed storage proteins reveals the nutritional potential of Salicornia brachiata Roxb., an extreme halophyte.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bhavanath; Singh, Nater Pal; Mishra, Avinash

    2012-05-01

    Salicornia brachiata is an extreme halophyte that grows in salty marshes and is considered to be a potential alternative crop for seawater agriculture. Salicornia seeds are rich in protein, and its tender shoots are eaten as salad greens. Seed storage proteins were fractionated by sequential extraction using different solvents, including distilled water for albumins, NaCl (1.0 M) for globulins, NaOH (0.1 N) for glutelins, and ethanol (70% v/v) for prolamins. Globulins accounted for 54.75% of the total seed storage proteins followed by albumins (34.30%) and glutelins (8.70%). The fractionated proteins were characterized using 2D-diagonal SDS-PAGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. The globulin fraction, composed of seven intermolecular disulfide-linked polypeptide pairs of molecular mass 63.5, 62.5, 54.7, 53.0, 43.2, 38.5, and 35.1 kDa, encompassed a basic and an acidic subunit. Two-dimensional gels revealed approximately 32 spots, with isoelectric points and molecular masses ranging from 4.93 to 11.6 and from ∼5.2 to ∼109.4 kDa, respectively. Protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS peptide mass fingerprint analysis and further classified. Homology analysis demonstrated that 19% of the proteins were involved in metabolism, 16% were involved in signaling, and 15% were regulatory proteins. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis confirmed the presence of inter- and intramolecular disulfide linkages in the globulin fraction. Sulfur-rich proteins are of high nutritional value, and disulfides make S. brachiata a potential source of dietary supplementation. PMID:22494338

  6. Elastoviscous Transitions of Articular Cartilage Reveal a Mechanism of Synergy between Lubricin and Hyaluronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Bonnevie, Edward D.; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Cohen, Itai; Bonassar, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    When lubricated by synovial fluid, articular cartilage provides some of the lowest friction coefficients found in nature. While it is known that macromolecular constituents of synovial fluid provide it with its lubricating ability, it is not fully understood how two of the main molecules, lubricin and hyaluronic acid, lubricate and interact with one another. Here, we develop a novel framework for cartilage lubrication based on the elastoviscous transition to show that lubricin and hyaluronic acid lubricate by distinct mechanisms. Such analysis revealed nonspecific interactions between these molecules in which lubricin acts to concentrate hyaluronic acid near the tissue surface and promotes a transition to a low friction regime consistent with the theory of viscous boundary lubrication. Understanding the mechanics of synovial fluid not only provides insight into the progression of diseases such as arthritis, but also may be applicable to the development of new biomimetic lubricants. PMID:26599797

  7. Nucleomorphin. A novel, acidic, nuclear calmodulin-binding protein from dictyostelium that regulates nuclear number.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2002-05-31

    Probing of Dictyostelium discoideum cell extracts after SDS-PAGE using (35)S-recombinant calmodulin (CaM) as a probe has revealed approximately three-dozen Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding proteins. Here, we report the molecular cloning, expression, and subcellular localization of a gene encoding a novel calmodulin-binding protein (CaMBP); we have called nucleomorphin, from D. discoideum. A lambdaZAP cDNA expression library of cells from multicellular development was screened using a recombinant calmodulin probe ((35)S-VU1-CaM). The open reading frame of 1119 nucleotides encodes a polypeptide of 340 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 38.7 kDa and is constitutively expressed throughout the Dictyostelium life cycle. Nucleomorphin contains a highly acidic glutamic/aspartic acid inverted repeat (DEED) with significant similarity to the conserved nucleoplasmin domain and a putative transmembrane domain in the carboxyl-terminal region. Southern blotting reveals that nucleomorphin exists as a single copy gene. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-agarose we show that bacterially expressed nucleomorphin binds to bovine CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Amino-terminal fusion to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) showed that GFP-NumA localized to the nucleus as distinct arc-like patterns similar to heterochromatin regions. GFP-NumA lacking the acidic DEED repeat still showed arc-like accumulations at the nuclear periphery, but the number of nuclei in these cells was increased markedly compared with control cells. Cells expressing GFP-NumA lacking the transmembrane domain localized to the nuclear periphery but did not affect nuclear number or gross morphology. Nucleomorphin is the first nuclear CaMBP to be identified in Dictyostelium. Furthermore, these data present the first identification of a member of the nucleoplasmin family as a calmodulin-binding protein and suggest nucleomorphin has a role in nuclear structure in Dictyostelium. PMID:11919178

  8. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated.

    PubMed

    Chung, Daehwan; Young, Jenna; Bomble, Yannick J; Vander Wall, Todd A; Groom, Joseph; Himmel, Michael E; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm for cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. It will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role in the structure

  9. Homologous Expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA Reveals that the Extracellular Protein Is Glycosylated

    PubMed Central

    Bomble, Yannick J.; Vander Wall, Todd A.; Groom, Joseph; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm for cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. It will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role in the structure

  10. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chung, Daehwan; Young, Jenna; Bomble, Yannick J.; Vander Wall, Todd A.; Groom, Joseph; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-03-23

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm formore » cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. Finally, it will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role

  11. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. This study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin. PMID:25724962

  12. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential for mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.

  13. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of HgcA and HgcB Reveals Amino Acid Residues Important for Mercury Methylation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Steven D.; Bridou, Romain; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Hurt, Richard A.; Brown, Steven D.; Podar, Mircea; Wall, Judy D.

    2015-02-27

    Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that is produced by anaerobic microorganisms from inorganic mercury by a recently discovered pathway. A two-gene cluster, consisting of hgcA and hgcB, encodes two of the proteins essential for this activity. hgcA encodes a corrinoid protein with a strictly conserved cysteine proposed to be the ligand for cobalt in the corrinoid cofactor, whereas hgcB encodes a ferredoxin-like protein thought to be an electron donor to HgcA. Deletion of either gene eliminates mercury methylation by the methylator Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132. Here, site-directed mutants of HgcA and HgcB were constructed to determine amino acid residues essential formore » mercury methylation. Mutations of the strictly conserved residue Cys93 in HgcA, the proposed ligand for the corrinoid cobalt, to Ala or Thr completely abolished the methylation capacity, but a His substitution produced measurable methylmercury. Mutations of conserved amino acids near Cys93 had various impacts on the methylation capacity but showed that the structure of the putative “cap helix” region harboring Cys93 is crucial for methylation function. In the ferredoxin-like protein HgcB, only one of two conserved cysteines found at the C terminus was necessary for methylation, but either cysteine sufficed. An additional, strictly conserved cysteine, Cys73, was also determined to be essential for methylation. Ultimately, this study supports the previously predicted importance of Cys93 in HgcA for methylation of mercury and reveals additional residues in HgcA and HgcB that facilitate the production of this neurotoxin.« less

  14. Systematic Analysis of Compositional Order of Proteins Reveals New Characteristics of Biological Functions and a Universal Correlate of Macroevolution

    PubMed Central

    Persi, Erez; Horn, David

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel analysis of compositional order (CO) based on the occurrence of Frequent amino-acid Triplets (FTs) that appear much more than random in protein sequences. The method captures all types of proteomic compositional order including single amino-acid runs, tandem repeats, periodic structure of motifs and otherwise low complexity amino-acid regions. We introduce new order measures, distinguishing between ‘regularity’, ‘periodicity’ and ‘vocabulary’, to quantify these phenomena and to facilitate the identification of evolutionary effects. Detailed analysis of representative species across the tree-of-life demonstrates that CO proteins exhibit numerous functional enrichments, including a wide repertoire of particular patterns of dependencies on regularity and periodicity. Comparison between human and mouse proteomes further reveals the interplay of CO with evolutionary trends, such as faster substitution rate in mouse leading to decrease of periodicity, while innovation along the human lineage leads to larger regularity. Large-scale analysis of 94 proteomes leads to systematic ordering of all major taxonomic groups according to FT-vocabulary size. This is measured by the count of Different Frequent Triplets (DFT) in proteomes. The latter provides a clear hierarchical delineation of vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi and prokaryotes, with thermophiles showing the lowest level of FT-vocabulary. Among eukaryotes, this ordering correlates with phylogenetic proximity. Interestingly, in all kingdoms CO accumulation in the proteome has universal characteristics. We suggest that CO is a genomic-information correlate of both macroevolution and various protein functions. The results indicate a mechanism of genomic ‘innovation’ at the peptide level, involved in protein elongation, shaped in a universal manner by mutational and selective forces. PMID:24278003

  15. Crystallographic analysis reveals the structural basis of the high-affinity binding of iophenoxic acid to human serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Iophenoxic acid is an iodinated radiocontrast agent that was withdrawn from clinical use because of its exceptionally long half-life in the body, which was due in part to its high-affinity binding to human serum albumin (HSA). It was replaced by Iopanoic acid, which has an amino rather than a hydroxyl group at position 3 on the iodinated benzyl ring and, as a result, binds to albumin with lower affinity and is excreted more rapidly from the body. To understand how iophenoxic acid binds so tightly to albumin, we wanted to examine the structural basis of its interaction with HSA. Results We have determined the co-crystal structure of HSA in complex with iophenoxic acid at 2.75 Å resolution, revealing a total of four binding sites, two of which - in drugs sites 1 and 2 on the protein - are likely to be occupied at clinical doses. High-affinity binding of iophenoxic acid occurs at drug site 1. The structure reveals that polar and apolar groups on the compound are involved in its interactions with drug site 1. In particular, the 3-hydroxyl group makes three hydrogen bonds with the side-chains of Tyr 150 and Arg 257. The mode of binding to drug site 2 is similar except for the absence of a binding partner for the hydroxyl group on the benzyl ring of the compound. Conclusions The HSA-iophenoxic acid structure indicates that high-affinity binding to drug site 1 is likely to be due to extensive desolvation of the compound, coupled with the ability of the binding pocket to provide a full set of salt-bridging or hydrogen bonding partners for its polar groups. Consistent with this interpretation, the structure also suggests that the lower-affinity binding of iopanoic acid arises because replacement of the 3-hydroxyl by an amino group eliminates hydrogen bonding to Arg 257. This finding underscores the importance of polar interactions in high-affinity binding to albumin. PMID:21501503

  16. Optimization of folic acid nano-emulsification and encapsulation by maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions.

    PubMed

    Assadpour, Elham; Maghsoudlou, Yahya; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Aalami, Mehran

    2016-05-01

    Due to susceptibility of folic acid like many other vitamins to environmental and processing conditions, it is necessary to protect it by highly efficient methods such as micro/nano-encapsulation. Our aim was to prepare and optimize real water in oil nano-emulsions containing folic acid by a low energy (spontaneous) emulsification technique so that the final product could be encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. A non ionic surfactant (Span 80) was used for making nano-emulsions at three dispersed phase/surfactant ratios of 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0. Folic acid content was 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0mg/mL of dispersed phase by a volume fraction of 5.0, 8.5, and 12%. The final optimum nano-emulsion formulation with 12% dispersed phase, a water to surfactant ratio of 0.9 and folic acid content of 3mg/mL in dispersed phase was encapsulated within maltodextrin-whey protein double emulsions. It was found that the emulsification time for preparing nano-emulsions was between 4 to 16h based on formulation variables. Droplet size decreased at higher surfactant contents and final nano-emulsions had a droplet size<100nm. Shear viscosity was higher for those formulations containing more surfactant. Our results revealed that spontaneous method could be used successfully for preparing stable W/O nano-emulsions containing folic acid. PMID:26806649

  17. Separation of proteins and peptides by capillary electrophoresis in acid buffers containing high concentrations of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Miksík, I; Deyl, Z

    1999-08-01

    Separations of proteins at acid pH in the presence of a high concentration of surfactant [sodium laurylsulfate (SDS), 50 mmol/l] was investigated. The purpose of using high concentrations of SDS as background electrolyte modifier was threefold: First, the surfactant exerts a washing effect upon the capillary wall thus preventing binding of analytes and possible clogging of the capillary. Second, it was revealed that even under very acid conditions (below pH 3) the surfactant is capable of forming associates with protein analytes which still bear considerable negative charge and can be separated on this basis. Third, the system can be applied not only for protein mixtures sufficiently soluble in neutral to alkaline media (leukocyte lysates, standard proteins), but it can be used also with proteins, that are under such conditions virtually insoluble and their solubilization is possible in acid buffers only (eggshell proteins or collagen CNBr fragments). The result was that adsorption to the capillary wall was minimized and the analytes were separated as negatively charged associates with high efficiency. With collagen fragments partition was possible on the affinity differences of the peptides to the surfactant micelles and inner wall of the capillary. Theoretical plate counts approaching 100,000 were easily achieved even with proteins which under the more conventional operation conditions exhibit considerable sticking to the capillary wall. The other feature of this system is that the associates move very rapidly to the anode. Owing to the low pH, endoosmotic flow is negligible, and therefore the system has to be operated at reversed polarity. PMID:10480258

  18. Effect of Ethionine on the Ribonucleic Acid, Deoxyribonucleic Acid, and Protein Content of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert C.; Salmon, W. D.

    1965-01-01

    Smith, Robert C. (Auburn University, Auburn, Ala.), and W. D. Salmon. Effect of ethionine on the ribonucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid, and protein content of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 89:687–692. 1965.—The addition of ethionine to cultures of Escherichia coli K-12 W6, a methionine-requiring auxotroph, led to inhibition of the rate of increase in optical density when the ratio of ethionine to methionine was 200:1. When the ratio was 600:1, the increase in optical density became linear. When ethionine was substituted for methionine in the medium, the optical density of the culture increased, and there was a parallel increase in protein content. There was no cell division in these cultures. The rate of synthesis of ribonucleic acid (RNA) in a culture containing ethionine was similar to that of a culture deprived of methionine, but the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid in a culture with ethionine was about twice that of a culture deprived of methionine. No detectable radioactivity from ethionine-ethyl-1-C14 was incorporated into RNA. Ethionine-ethyl-1-C14 was readily incorporated into the protein fraction. PMID:14273646

  19. A Library of Plasmodium vivax Recombinant Merozoite Proteins Reveals New Vaccine Candidates and Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Jessica B.; Sharma, Sumana; Bartholdson, S. Josefin; Wright, Gavin J.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Rayner, Julian C.

    2015-01-01

    Background A vaccine targeting Plasmodium vivax will be an essential component of any comprehensive malaria elimination program, but major gaps in our understanding of P. vivax biology, including the protein-protein interactions that mediate merozoite invasion of reticulocytes, hinder the search for candidate antigens. Only one ligand-receptor interaction has been identified, that between P. vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) and the erythrocyte Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC), and strain-specific immune responses to PvDBP make it a complex vaccine target. To broaden the repertoire of potential P. vivax merozoite-stage vaccine targets, we exploited a recent breakthrough in expressing full-length ectodomains of Plasmodium proteins in a functionally-active form in mammalian cells and initiated a large-scale study of P. vivax merozoite proteins that are potentially involved in reticulocyte binding and invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings We selected 39 P. vivax proteins that are predicted to localize to the merozoite surface or invasive secretory organelles, some of which show homology to P. falciparum vaccine candidates. Of these, we were able to express 37 full-length protein ectodomains in a mammalian expression system, which has been previously used to express P. falciparum invasion ligands such as PfRH5. To establish whether the expressed proteins were correctly folded, we assessed whether they were recognized by antibodies from Cambodian patients with acute vivax malaria. IgG from these samples showed at least a two-fold change in reactivity over naïve controls in 27 of 34 antigens tested, and the majority showed heat-labile IgG immunoreactivity, suggesting the presence of conformation-sensitive epitopes and native tertiary protein structures. Using a method specifically designed to detect low-affinity, extracellular protein-protein interactions, we confirmed a predicted interaction between P. vivax 6-cysteine proteins P12 and P41, further

  20. Immunogenic membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sudhir; Kosalai, K; Arora, Shalini; Namane, Abdelkader; Sharma, Pawan; Gaikwad, Anil N; Brodin, Priscille; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-07-01

    Membrane-associated proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis offer a challenge, as well as an opportunity, in the quest for better therapeutic and prophylactic interventions against tuberculosis. The authors have previously reported that extraction with the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) is a useful step in proteomic analysis of mycobacterial cell membranes, and detergent-soluble membrane proteins of mycobacteria are potent stimulators of human T cells. In this study 1-D and 2-D gel electrophoresis-based protocols were used for the analysis of proteins in the TX-114 extract of M. tuberculosis membranes. Peptide mass mapping (using MALDI-TOF-MS, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) of 116 samples led to the identification of 105 proteins, 9 of which were new to the M. tuberculosis proteome. Functional orthologues of 73 of these proteins were also present in Mycobacterium leprae, suggesting their relative importance. Bioinformatics predicted that as many as 73% of the proteins had a hydrophobic disposition. 1-D gel electrophoresis revealed more hydrophobic/transmembrane and basic proteins than 2-D gel electrophoresis. Identified proteins fell into the following major categories: protein synthesis, cell wall biogenesis/architecture and conserved hypotheticals/unknowns. To identify immunodominant proteins of the detergent phase (DP), 14 low-molecular-mass fractions prepared by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis were subjected to T cell activation assays using blood samples from BCG-vaccinated healthy donors from a tuberculosis endemic area. Analysis of the responses (cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production) showed that the immunodominance of certain DP fractions was most probably due to ribosomal proteins, which is consistent with both their specificity for mycobacteria and their abundance. Other membrane-associated proteins, including transmembrane proteins/lipoproteins and ESAT-6, did not appear to contribute

  1. Identification of the Nuclear Export Signal and STAT-Binding Domains of the Nipah Virus V Protein Reveals Mechanisms Underlying Interferon Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jason J.; Cruz, Cristian D.; Horvath, Curt M.

    2004-01-01

    The V proteins of Nipah virus and Hendra virus have been demonstrated to bind to cellular STAT1 and STAT2 proteins to form high-molecular-weight complexes that inhibit interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral transcription by preventing STAT nuclear accumulation. Analysis of the Nipah virus V protein has revealed a region between amino acids 174 and 192 that functions as a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). This peptide is sufficient to complement an export-defective human immunodeficiency virus Rev protein, and deletion and substitution mutagenesis revealed that this peptide is necessary for both V protein shuttling and cytoplasmic retention of STAT1 and STAT2 proteins. However, the NES is not required for V-dependent IFN signaling inhibition. IFN signaling is blocked primarily by interaction between Nipah virus V residues 100 to 160 and STAT1 residues 509 to 712. Interaction with STAT2 requires a larger Nipah virus V segment between amino acids 100 and 300, but deletion of residues 230 to 237 greatly reduced STAT2 coprecipitation. Further, V protein interactions with cellular STAT1 is a prerequisite for STAT2 binding, and sequential immunoprecipitations demonstrate that V, STAT1, and STAT2 can form a tripartite complex. These findings characterize essential regions for Henipavirus V proteins that represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15113915

  2. The liver fatty acid binding protein--comparison of cavity properties of intracellular lipid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J; Ory, J; Reese-Wagoner, A; Banaszak, L

    1999-02-01

    The crystal and solution structures of all of the intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) reveal a common beta-barrel framework with only small local perturbations. All existing evidence points to the binding cavity and a poorly delimited 'portal' region as defining the function of each family member. The importance of local structure within the cavity appears to be its influence on binding affinity and specificity for the lipid. The portal region appears to be involved in the regulation of ligand exchange. Within the iLBP family, liver fatty acid binding protein or LFABP, has the unique property of binding two fatty acids within its internalized binding cavity rather than the commonly observed stoichiometry of one. Furthermore, LFABP will bind hydrophobic molecules larger than the ligands which will associate with other iLBPs. The crystal structure of LFABP contains two bound oleate molecules and provides the explanation for its unusual stoichiometry. One of the bound fatty acids is completely internalized and has its carboxylate interacting with an arginine and two serines. The second oleate represents an entirely new binding mode with the carboxylate on the surface of LFABP. The two oleates also interact with each other. Because of this interaction and its inner location, it appears the first oleate must be present before the second more external molecule is bound. PMID:10331654

  3. The Protein Architecture of Human Secretory Vesicles Reveals Differential Regulation of Signaling Molecule Secretion by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Taupenot, Laurent; Ziegler, Michael; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Ma, Qi; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Secretory vesicles are required for release of chemical messengers to mediate intercellular signaling among human biological systems. It is necessary to define the organization of the protein architecture of the ‘human’ dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) to understand mechanisms for secretion of signaling molecules essential for cellular regulatory processes. This study, therefore, conducted extensive quantitative proteomics and systems biology analyses of human DCSV purified from human pheochromocytoma. Over 600 human DCSV proteins were identified with quantitative evaluation of over 300 proteins, revealing that most proteins participate in producing peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, enzymes, and the secretory machinery. Systems biology analyses provided a model of interacting DCSV proteins, generating hypotheses for differential intracellular protein kinases A and C signaling pathways. Activation of cellular PKA and PKC pathways resulted in differential secretion of neuropeptides, catecholamines, and β-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease for mediating cell-cell communication. This is the first study to define a model of the protein architecture of human DCSV for human disease and health. PMID:22916103

  4. The requirements of protein & amino acid during acute & chronic infections.

    PubMed

    Kurpad, Anura V

    2006-08-01

    Nutrition and infection interact with each other in a synergistic vicious cycle, leading to an adverse nutritional status and increased susceptibility to infection. Infectious episodes result in hypermetabolism and a negative nitrogen balance which is modulated by hormones, cytokines and other pro-inflammatory mediators, and is compounded by a reduced food intake. The extent of the negative nitrogen balance varies with the type of infection and its duration; however, it is reasonable to suggest that the loss of body protein could be minimized by the provision of dietary nitrogen, although anorexia will limit this. Further, distinctions need to be made about the provision of nutrients or protein during the catabolic and anabolic or recovery phase of the infection, since the capacity of the body to retain protein is enhanced in the anabolic recovery phase. Meeting the increased requirement for protein (and other nutrients) in infection does not imply a complete therapeutic strategy. Infections need to be treated appropriately, with nutrition as an adjunct to the treatment. Prior undernutrition could also impair the body's response to infection, although the weight of the evidence would suggest that this happens more particularly in oedematous undernutrition. In general, the amount of extra protein that would appear to be needed is of the order of 20-25 per cent of the recommended intake, for most infections. In acute infections, this is particularly relevant during the convalescence period. Community trials have suggested that lysine supplementation to the level required for normal daily nutriture, in predominantly wheat eating or potentially lysine deficient communities, improves immune function among other functional nutritional parameters; however, there is as yet insufficient evidence to suggest a specific requirement for amino acids in infections over and above the normal daily requirement as based on recent evidence. Some clinical studies that have showed

  5. Retinoic acid binding protein in normal and neopolastic rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Gesell, M S; Brandes, M J; Arnold, E A; Isaacs, J T; Ueda, H; Millan, J C; Brandes, D

    1982-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosol from normal and neoplastic rat prostatic tissues exhibited a peak of (3H) retinoic acid binding in the 2S region, corresponding to the cytoplasmic retinoic acid binding protein (cRABP). In the Fisher-Copenhagen F1 rat, cRABP was present in the lateral lobe, but could not be detected in the ventral nor in the dorsal prostatic lobes. Four sublines of the R-3327 rat prostatic tumor contained similar levels of this binding protein. The absence of cRABP in the normal tissue of origin of the R-3327 tumor, the rat dorsal prostate, and reappearance in the neoplastic tissues follows a pattern described in other human and animal tumors. The occurrence of cRABP in the well-differentiated as well as in the anaplastic R-3327 tumors in which markers which reflect a state of differentiation and hormonal regulation, such as androgen receptor, 5 alpha reductase, and secretory acid phosphatase are either markedly reduced or absent, points to cRABP as a marker of malignant transformation. PMID:6283503

  6. The interactome of a PTB domain-containing adapter protein, Odin, revealed by SILAC

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jun; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Gucek, Marjan; Cole, Robert N.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2011-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways are tightly controlled by positive and negative regulators. We have previously identified Odin (also known as ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain containing 1A; gene symbol AKNS1A) as a negative regulator of growth factor signaling; however, the mechanisms through which Odin regulates these pathways remain to be elucidated. To determine how Odin negatively regulates growth factor signaling, we undertook a proteomic approach to systematically identify proteins that interact with Odin using the SILAC strategy. In this study, we identified 18 molecules that were specifically associated in a protein complex with Odin. Our study established that the complete family of 14-3-3 proteins occur in a protein complex with Odin, which is also supported by earlier reports that identified a few members of the 14-3-3 family as Odin interactors. Among the novel protein interactors of Odin were CD2-associated protein, SH3 domain kinase binding protein 1 and DAB2 interacting protein. We confirmed 8 of the eighteen interactions identified in the Odin protein complex by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Finally, a literature-based network analysis revealed that Odin interacting partners are involved in various cellular processes, some of which are key molecules in regulating receptor endocytosis. PMID:21081186

  7. Function of the hydration layer around an antifreeze protein revealed by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nutt, David; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the mechanism by which the antifreeze protein from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, binds to ice. Comparison of structural and dynamic properties of the water around the three faces of the triangular prism-shaped protein in aqueous solution reveals that at low temperature the water structure is ordered and the dynamics slowed down around the ice-binding face of the protein, with a disordering effect observed around the other two faces. These results suggest a dual role for the solvation water around the protein. The preconfigured solvation shell around the ice-binding face is involved in the initial recognition and binding of the antifreeze protein to ice by lowering the barrier for binding and consolidation of the protein:ice interaction surface. Thus, the antifreeze protein can bind to the molecularly rough ice surface by becoming actively involved in the formation of its own binding site. Also, the disruption of water structure around the rest of the protein helps prevent the adsorbed protein becoming covered by further ice growth.

  8. Cardiomyocyte degeneration with calpain deficiency reveals a critical role in protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Anita S; Diwan, Abhinav; Odley, Amy M; Hahn, Harvey S; Osinska, Hanna; Melendez, Jaime G; Robbins, Jeffrey; Lynch, Roy A; Marreez, Yehia; Dorn, Gerald W

    2007-04-13

    Regulating the balance between synthesis and proteasomal degradation of cellular proteins is essential for tissue growth and maintenance, but the critical pathways regulating protein ubiquitination and degradation are incompletely defined. Although participation of calpain calcium-activated proteases in post-necrotic myocardial autolysis is well characterized, their importance in homeostatic turnover of normal cardiac tissue is controversial. Hence, we evaluated the consequences of physiologic calpain (calcium-activated protease) activity in cultured cardiomyocytes and unstressed mouse hearts. Comparison of in vitro proteolytic activities of cardiac-expressed calpains 1 and 2 revealed calpain 1, but not calpain 2, activity at physiological calcium concentrations. Physiological calpain 1 activation was evident in adenoviral transfected cultured cardiomyocytes as proteolysis of specific substrates, generally increased protein ubiquitination, and accelerated protein turnover, that were each inhibited by coexpression of the inhibitor protein calpastatin. Conditional forced expression of calpain 1, but not calpain 2, in mouse hearts demonstrated substrate-specific proteolytic activity under basal conditions, with hyperubiquitination of cardiac proteins and increased 26S proteasome activity. Loss of myocardial calpain activity by forced expression of calpastatin diminished ubiquitination of 1 or more specific myocardial proteins, without affecting overall ubiquitination or proteasome activity, and resulted in a progressive dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by accumulation of intracellular protein aggregates, formation of autophagosomes, and degeneration of sarcomeres. Thus, calpain 1 is upstream of, and necessary for, ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of a subset of myocardial proteins whose abnormal accumulation produces autophagosomes and degeneration of cardiomyocytes with functional decompensation. PMID:17332428

  9. Fatty acid profiling reveals seasonal and spatial shifts in zooplankton diet in a temperate estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. M. M.; Azeiteiro, U. M.; Pardal, M. A.; De Troch, M.

    2012-08-01

    Fatty acids composition of copepod and cladoceran species and their possible food sources was investigated in the Mondego estuary (southern Europe) in order to explain the seasonal variation of the small copepods Acartia clausi, Acartia tonsa, Copidodiaptomus numidicus, Temora longicornis and the freshwater cladoceran Daphnia longispina. A total of 12 zooplankton species (7 marine, 2 estuarine and 3 freshwater species) were studied. A multivariate analysis revealed a clear seasonal distribution of zooplankton species in terms of fatty acids composition and abundance, with winter and spring zooplankton species showing maximal concentrations and diversity of total fatty acids. These findings underline the role of lipids as storage during the colder seasons in a highly variable environment like an estuary. Estuarine and freshwater species showed a more diverse array of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids rather than marine species, except for Centropages typicus. Fatty acids markers of trophic position indicated the presence of two trophic levels: copepod species were primarily omnivorous, whereas cladocerans showed to be herbivorous. Our results suggest that feeding patterns of plankton change spatially and temporally, reflecting the shifts in dominance between diatoms and flagellates as well as between dinoflagellates/diatoms and small animals.

  10. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs. PMID:26487699

  11. Foamy Virus Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Martin V; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  12. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  13. Human Skeletal Muscle Protein Metabolism Responses to Amino Acid Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Phillips, Bethan E; Lund, Jonathan N; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Healthy individuals maintain remarkably constant skeletal muscle mass across much of adult life, suggesting the existence of robust homeostatic mechanisms. Muscle exists in dynamic equilibrium whereby the influx of amino acids (AAs) and the resulting increases in muscle protein synthesis (MPS) associated with the intake of dietary proteins cancel out the efflux of AAs from muscle protein breakdown that occurs between meals. Dysregulated proteostasis is evident with aging, especially beyond the sixth decade of life. Women and men aged 75 y lose muscle mass at a rate of ∼0.7% and 1%/y, respectively (sarcopenia), and lose strength 2- to 5-fold faster (dynapenia) as muscle "quality" decreases. Factors contributing to the disruption of an otherwise robust proteostatic system represent targets for potential therapies that promote healthy aging. Understanding age-related impairments in anabolic responses to AAs and identifying strategies to mitigate these factors constitute major areas of interest. Numerous studies have aimed to identify 1) the influence of distinct protein sources on absorption kinetics and muscle anabolism, 2) the latency and time course of MPS responses to protein/AAs, 3) the impacts of protein/AA intake on muscle microvascular recruitment, and 4) the role of certain AAs (e.g., leucine) as signaling molecules, which are able to trigger anabolic pathways in tissues. This review aims to discuss these 4 issues listed, to provide historical and modern perspectives of AAs as modulators of human skeletal muscle protein metabolism, to describe how advances in stable isotope/mass spectrometric approaches and instrumentation have underpinned these advances, and to highlight relevant differences between young adults and older individuals. Whenever possible, observations are based on human studies, with additional consideration of relevant nonhuman studies. PMID:27422520

  14. Amino acid profiles and digestible indispensable amino acid scores of proteins from the prioritized key foods in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Nazma; Islam, Saiful; Munmun, Sarah; Mohiduzzaman, Md; Longvah, Thingnganing

    2016-12-15

    Concentrations of standard amino acids were determined in the composite samples (representing 30 agro-ecological zones of Bangladesh) of six prioritized key dietary protein sources: Oryza sativa (rice), Triticum aestivum (wheat flour), Lens culinaris (lentils), Pangusius pangusius (pangas), Labeo rohita (rohu) and Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia). Digestible indispensable amino acid scores (DIAAS) was calculated using published data on amino acids' digestibility to evaluate the protein quality of these foods. Indispensable amino acid (IAA) contents (mg IAA/g protein), found to be highest in pangas (430) and lowest in wheat (336), of all these analyzed foods exceeded the FAO recommended daily allowance (277mg IAA/g protein) and contributed on average 40% to total amino acid contents. Untruncated DIAAS values ranged from 51% (lysine) in wheat to 106% (histidine) in pangas and distinguished pangas, rohu, and tilapia containing 'excellent quality' protein (DIAAS>100%) with potential to complement lower quality protein of cereals, fruits, and vegetables. PMID:27451158

  15. Studies on fatty acid-binding proteins. The detection and quantification of the protein from rat liver by using a fluorescent fatty acid analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, T C; Wilton, D C

    1986-01-01

    Fatty acid-binding protein from rat liver is shown to bind the fluorescent fatty acid probe dansyl undecanoic acid. Binding is accompanied by a shift in the fluorescence emission maximum from 550 nm to 500 nm and a 60-fold fluorescence enhancement at 500 nm. These spectral properties have allowed the use of this probe to detect and quantify microgram amounts of liver fatty acid-binding protein during purification procedures. In conjunction with h.p.l.c. the method allows the rapid estimation of liver fatty acid-binding protein in biological samples. The validity of the method is demonstrated by measuring the concentration of fatty acid-binding protein in livers from control and hypolipidaemic-drug-treated rats. The dramatic diurnal rhythm previously reported for this protein [Dempsey (1984) Curr. Top. Cell. Regul. 24, 63-86] was not observed with this method. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3800946

  16. The effect of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid on protein synthesis and breakdown in murine C2C12 myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Kamolrat, Torkamol; Gray, Stuart R.

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► EPA can enhance protein synthesis and retard protein breakdown in muscle cells. ► These effects were concurrent with increases in p70s6k and FOXO3a phosphorylation. ► EPA may be a useful tool in the treatment of muscle wasting conditions. -- Abstract: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have been found to stimulate protein synthesis with little information regarding their effects on protein breakdown. Furthermore whether there are distinct effects of EPA and DHA remains to be established. The aim of the current study was to determine the distinct effects of EPA and DHA on protein synthesis, protein breakdown and signalling pathways in C2C12 myotubes. Fully differentiated C2C12 cells were incubated for 24 h with 0.1% ethanol (control), 50 μM EPA or 50 μM DHA prior to experimentation. After serum (4 h) and amino acid (1 h) starvation cells were stimulated with 2 mM L-leucine and protein synthesis measured using {sup 3}H-labelled phenylalanine. Protein breakdown was measured using {sup 3}H-labelled phenylalanine and signalling pathways (Akt, mTOR, p70S6k, 4EBP1, rps6 and FOXO3a) via Western blots. Data revealed that after incubation with EPA protein synthesis was 25% greater (P < 0.05) compared to control cells, with no effect of DHA. Protein breakdown was 22% (P < 0.05) lower, compared to control cells, after incubation with EPA, with no effect of DHA. Analysis of signalling pathways revealed that both EPA and DHA incubation increased (P < 0.05) p70s6k phosphorylation, EPA increased (P < 0.05) FOXO3a phosphorylation, with no alteration in other signalling proteins. The current study has demonstrated distinct effects of EPA and DHA on protein metabolism with EPA showing a greater ability to result in skeletal muscle protein accretion.

  17. Top-Down Proteomics Reveals Novel Protein Forms Expressed in Methanosarcina acetivorans

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Jonathan T.; Wenger, Craig D.; Metcalf, William W.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2010-01-01

    Using both automated nanospray and online liquid chromatography mass spectrometry LC-MS strategies, 99 proteins have been newly identified by top-down tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in Methanosarcina acetivorans, the methanogen with the largest known genome [5.7 mega base pairs (Mb)] for an Archaeon. Because top-down MS/MS was used, 15 proteins were detected with mispredicted start sites along with an additional five from small open reading frames (SORFs). Beyond characterization of these more common discrepancies in genome annotation, one SORF resulted from a rare start codon (AUA) as the initiation site for translation of this protein. Also, a methylation on a 30S ribosomal protein (MA1259) was localized to Pro59–Val69, contrasting sharply from its homologue in Escherichia coli (rp S12) known to harbor an unusual β-thiomethylated aspartic acid residue. PMID:19577935

  18. Bacillus anthracis Overcomes an Amino Acid Auxotrophy by Cleaving Host Serum Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, Austen; Swick, Michelle C.; Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Pomerantsev, Andrei; Lyons, C. Rick; Koehler, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria sustain an infection by acquiring nutrients from the host to support replication. The host sequesters these nutrients as a growth-restricting strategy, a concept termed “nutritional immunity.” Historically, the study of nutritional immunity has centered on iron uptake because many bacteria target hemoglobin, an abundant circulating protein, as an iron source. Left unresolved are the mechanisms that bacteria use to attain other nutrients from host sources, including amino acids. We employed a novel medium designed to mimic the chemical composition of human serum, and we show here that Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, proteolyzes human hemoglobin to liberate essential amino acids which enhance its growth. This property can be traced to the actions of InhA1, a secreted metalloprotease, and extends to at least three other serum proteins, including serum albumin. The results suggest that we must also consider proteolysis of key host proteins to be a way for bacterial pathogens to attain essential nutrients, and we provide an experimental framework to determine the host and bacterial factors involved in this process. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens acquire nutrients during infection are poorly understood. Here we used a novel defined medium that approximates the chemical composition of human blood serum, blood serum mimic (BSM), to better model the nutritional environment that pathogens encounter during bacteremia. Removing essential amino acids from BSM revealed that two of the most abundant proteins in blood—hemoglobin and serum albumin—can satiate the amino acid requirement for Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. We further demonstrate that hemoglobin is proteolyzed by the secreted protease InhA1. These studies highlight that common blood proteins can be a nutrient source for bacteria. They also challenge the historical view that hemoglobin is solely an iron source for

  19. Characterization of a Fasciola gigantica protein carrying two DM9 domains reveals cellular relocalization property.

    PubMed

    Phadungsil, Wansika; Smooker, Peter M; Vichasri-Grams, Suksiri; Grams, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    Even at the present age of whole-organism analysis, e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, the biological roles of many proteins remain unresolved. Classified among the proteins of unknown function is a family of proteins harboring repeats of the DM9 domain, a 60-75 amino acids motif first described in a small number of Drosophila melanogaster proteins. Proteins may carry two or more DM9 domains either in combination with other domains or as their sole constituent. Here we have characterized a 16.8kDa Fasciola gigantica protein comprising two tandem repeated DM9 domains (FgDM9-1). The protein was located in the parenchyma of the immature and mature parasite and consequently it was not detected in the ES product of the parasite but only in the whole worm extract. Interestingly, extraction with SDS yielded a substantially higher amount of the protein suggesting association with insoluble cell components. In Sf9 insect cells a heterologously expressed EGFP-FgDM9-1 chimera showed cell-wide distribution but relocated to vesicle-like structures in the cytoplasm after stimulating cellular stress by bacteria, heat shock or chloroquine. These structures did not colocalize with the markers of endocytosis/phagocytosis ubiquitin, RAB7, GABARAP. The same behavior was noted for Aedes aegypti PRS1, a homologous mosquito DM9 protein as a positive control while EGFP did not exhibit such relocation in the insect cells. Cross-linking experiments on soluble recombinant FgDM9-1 indicated that the protein can undergo specific oligomerization. It is speculated that proteins carrying the DM9 domain have a role in vesicular transport in flatworms and insects. PMID:26946400

  20. Analysis of Protein Phosphatase-1 and Aurora Protein Kinase Suppressors Reveals New Aspects of Regulatory Protein Function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anuprita; Cannon, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) controls many processes in eukaryotic cells. Modulation of mitosis by reversing phosphorylation of proteins phosphorylated by aurora protein kinase is a critical function for PP1. Overexpression of the sole PP1, Glc7, in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is lethal. This work shows that lethality requires the function of Glc7 regulatory proteins Sds22, Reg2, and phosphorylated Glc8. This finding shows that Glc7 overexpression induced cell death requires a specific subset of the many Glc7-interacting proteins and therefore is likely caused by promiscuous dephosphorylation of a variety of substrates. Additionally, suppression can occur by reducing Glc7 protein levels by high-copy Fpr3 without use of its proline isomerase domain. This divulges a novel function of Fpr3. Most suppressors of GLC7 overexpression also suppress aurora protein kinase, ipl1, temperature-sensitive mutations. However, high-copy mutant SDS22 genes show reciprocal suppression of GLC7 overexpression induced cell death or ipl1 temperature sensitivity. Sds22 binds to many proteins besides Glc7. The N-terminal 25 residues of Sds22 are sufficient to bind, directly or indirectly, to seven proteins studied here including the spindle assembly checkpoint protein, Bub3. These data demonstrate that Sds22 organizes several proteins in addition to Glc7 to perform functions that counteract Ipl1 activity or lead to hyper Glc7 induced cell death. These data also emphasize that Sds22 targets Glc7 to nuclear locations distinct from Ipl1 substrates. PMID:23894419

  1. Impact of confinement on proteins concentrated in lithocholic acid based organic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Kim, Youngchan; Bassim, Nabil; Collins, Greg E

    2015-09-15

    Organic nanotubes form in aqueous solution near physiological pH by self-assembly of lithocholic acid (LCA) with inner diameters of 20-40nm. The encapsulation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and resultant confinement effect for eGFP within these nanotubes is studied via confocal microscopy. Timed release rate studies of eGFP encapsulated in LCA nanotubes and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) indicate that the diffusive transport of eGFP out of and/or within the nanotubes is very slow, in contrast to the rapid introduction of eGFP into the nanotubes. By encapsulating two fluorescent proteins in LCA nanotubes, eGFP and mCherry, as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair, the FRET efficiencies are determined using FRET imaging microscopy at three different protein concentrations with a fixed donor-to-acceptor ratio of 1:1. Förster theory reveals that the proteins are spatially separated by 4.8-7.2nm in distance inside these nanotubes. The biomimetic nanochannels of LCA nanotubes not only afford a confining effect on eGFP that results in enhanced chemical and thermal stability under conditions of high denaturant concentration and temperature, but also function as protein concentrators for enriching protein in the nanochannels from a diluted protein solution by up to two orders of magnitude. PMID:26004574

  2. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction. PMID:27349982

  3. beta-Keratins in crocodiles reveal amino acid homology with avian keratins.

    PubMed

    Ye, Changjiang; Wu, Xiaobing; Yan, Peng; Amato, George

    2010-03-01

    The DNA sequences encoding beta-keratin have been obtained from Marsh Mugger (Crocodylus palustris) and Orinoco Crocodiles (Crocodylus intermedius). Through the deduced amino acid sequence, these proteins are rich in glycine, proline and serine. The central region of the proteins are composed of two beta-folded regions and show a high degree of identity with beta-keratins of aves and squamates. This central part is thought to be the site of polymerization to build the framework of beta-keratin filaments. It is believed that the beta-keratins in reptiles and birds share a common ancestry. Near the C-terminal, these beta-keratins contain a peptide rich in glycine-X and glycine-X-X, and the distinctive feature of the region is some 12-amino acid repeats, which are similar to the 13-amino acid repeats in chick scale keratin but absent from avian feather keratin. From our phylogenetic analysis, the beta-keratins in crocodile have a closer relationship with avian keratins than the other keratins in reptiles. PMID:19266314

  4. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Gagne, Steve J.; Stout, Jake M.; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M.; Page, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2–C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity. PMID:22802619

  5. Hydra meiosis reveals unexpected conservation of structural synaptonemal complex proteins across metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Fraune, Johanna; Alsheimer, Manfred; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Busch, Karoline; Fraune, Sebastian; Bosch, Thomas C. G.; Benavente, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a key structure of meiosis, mediating the stable pairing (synapsis) of homologous chromosomes during prophase I. Its remarkable tripartite structure is evolutionarily well conserved and can be found in almost all sexually reproducing organisms. However, comparison of the different SC protein components in the common meiosis model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and Mus musculus revealed no sequence homology. This discrepancy challenged the hypothesis that the SC arose only once in evolution. To pursue this matter we focused on the evolution of SYCP1 and SYCP3, the two major structural SC proteins of mammals. Remarkably, our comparative bioinformatic and expression studies revealed that SYCP1 and SYCP3 are also components of the SC in the basal metazoan Hydra. In contrast to previous assumptions, we therefore conclude that SYCP1 and SYCP3 form monophyletic groups of orthologous proteins across metazoans. PMID:23012415

  6. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Effects of Exogenous Calcium against Acid Rain Stress in Liquidambar formosana Hance Leaves.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Jun; Wu, Qian; Liu, Xiang; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Chen, Juan; Zhu, Chun-Quan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Chen, Lin; Wei, Jia; Qiu, Xiao-Yun; Shen, Guo-Xin; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Acid rain (AR) impacts forest health by leaching calcium (Ca) away from soils and plants. Ca is an essential element and participates in various plant physiological responses. In the present study, the protective role of exogenous Ca in alleviating AR stress in Liquidambar formosana Hance at the physiological and proteomic levels was examined. Our results showed that low Ca condition resulted in the chlorophyll content and photosynthesis decreasing significantly in L. formosana leaves; however, these effects could be reversed by high Ca supplementation. Further proteomic analyses successfully identified 81 differentially expressed proteins in AR-treated L. formosana under different Ca levels. In particular, some of the proteins are involved in primary metabolism, photosynthesis, energy production, antioxidant defense, transcription, and translation. Moreover, quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) results indicated that low Ca significantly increased the expression level of the investigated Ca-related genes, which can be reversed by high Ca supplementation under AR stress. Further, Western blotting analysis revealed that exogenous Ca supply reduced AR damage by elevating the expression of proteins involved in the Calvin cycle, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging system. These findings allowed us to better understand how woody plants respond to AR stress at various Ca levels and the protective role of exogenous Ca against AR stress in forest tree species. PMID:26616104

  7. Local Geometry and Evolutionary Conservation of Protein Surfaces Reveal the Multiple Recognition Patches in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Elodie; Carbone, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential to all biological processes and they represent increasingly important therapeutic targets. Here, we present a new method for accurately predicting protein-protein interfaces, understanding their properties, origins and binding to multiple partners. Contrary to machine learning approaches, our method combines in a rational and very straightforward way three sequence- and structure-based descriptors of protein residues: evolutionary conservation, physico-chemical properties and local geometry. The implemented strategy yields very precise predictions for a wide range of protein-protein interfaces and discriminates them from small-molecule binding sites. Beyond its predictive power, the approach permits to dissect interaction surfaces and unravel their complexity. We show how the analysis of the predicted patches can foster new strategies for PPIs modulation and interaction surface redesign. The approach is implemented in JET2, an automated tool based on the Joint Evolutionary Trees (JET) method for sequence-based protein interface prediction. JET2 is freely available at www.lcqb.upmc.fr/JET2. PMID:26690684

  8. Amino acid sequence of the Amur tiger prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changde; Pang, Wanyong; Zhao, Deming

    2006-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders in human and animal associated with conformational conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathologic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Various data indicate that the polymorphisms within the open reading frame (ORF) of PrP are associated with the susceptibility and control the species barrier in prion diseases. In the present study, partial Prnp from 25 Amur tigers (tPrnp) were cloned and screened for polymorphisms. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (T423C, A501G, C511A, A610G) were found; the C511A and A610G nucleotide substitutions resulted in the amino acid changes Lysine171Glutamine and Alanine204Threoine, respectively. The tPrnp amino acid sequence is similar to house cat (Felis catus ) and sheep, but differs significantly from other two cat Prnp sequences that were previously deposited in GenBank. PMID:16780982

  9. Protein-Protein Interaction Network could reveal the relationship between the breast and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian-Azodi, Mona; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Rahmati-Rad, Sara; Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Rezaei Tavirani, Majid; Seyyedi, Samaneh Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study is aimed to elicit the possible correlation between breast and colon cancer from molecular prospective by analyzing and comparing pathway-based biomarkers. Background: Breast and colon cancer are known to be frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in men and women around the world. There is some evidence that while the incident of breast cancer in young women is high, it is reported lower in the aged women. In fact, aged women are more prone to colorectal cancer than older men. . In addition, many studies showed that several biomarkers are common among these malignancies. Patients and methods: The genes were retrieved and compared from KEGG database and WikiPathway, and subsequently, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed and analyzed using Cytoscape v:3.2.1 software and related algorithms. Results: More than forty common genes were identified among these malignancies; however, by pathways comparison, twenty genes are related to both breast and colon cancer. Centrality and cluster screening identified hub genes, including SMAD2, SMAD3, (SMAD4, MYC), JUN, BAD, TP53. These seven genes are enriched in regulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor signaling pathway, positive regulation of Rac protein signal transduction, positive regulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization involved in apoptotic signaling pathway, and positive regulation of mitotic metaphase/anaphase transition respectively. Conclusion: As there are numerous genes frequent between colorectal cancer and breast cancer, there may be a common molecular origin for these malignancies occurrences. It seems that breast cancer in females interferes with the rate of colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:26328044

  10. Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein.

    PubMed

    Longo, Liam M; Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael

    2013-02-01

    A compendium of different types of abiotic chemical syntheses identifies a consensus set of 10 "prebiotic" α-amino acids. Before the emergence of biosynthetic pathways, this set is the most plausible resource for protein formation (i.e., proteogenesis) within the overall process of abiogenesis. An essential unsolved question regarding this prebiotic set is whether it defines a "foldable set"--that is, does it contain sufficient chemical information to permit cooperatively folding polypeptides? If so, what (if any) characteristic properties might such polypeptides exhibit? To investigate these questions, two "primitive" versions of an extant protein fold (the β-trefoil) were produced by top-down symmetric deconstruction, resulting in a reduced alphabet size of 12 or 13 amino acids and a percentage of prebiotic amino acids approaching 80%. These proteins show a substantial acidification of pI and require high salt concentrations for cooperative folding. The results suggest that the prebiotic amino acids do comprise a foldable set within the halophile environment. PMID:23341608

  11. Simplified protein design biased for prebiotic amino acids yields a foldable, halophilic protein

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Liam M.; Lee, Jihun; Blaber, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A compendium of different types of abiotic chemical syntheses identifies a consensus set of 10 “prebiotic” α-amino acids. Before the emergence of biosynthetic pathways, this set is the most plausible resource for protein formation (i.e., proteogenesis) within the overall process of abiogenesis. An essential unsolved question regarding this prebiotic set is whether it defines a “foldable set”—that is, does it contain sufficient chemical information to permit cooperatively folding polypeptides? If so, what (if any) characteristic properties might such polypeptides exhibit? To investigate these questions, two “primitive” versions of an extant protein fold (the β-trefoil) were produced by top-down symmetric deconstruction, resulting in a reduced alphabet size of 12 or 13 amino acids and a percentage of prebiotic amino acids approaching 80%. These proteins show a substantial acidification of pI and require high salt concentrations for cooperative folding. The results suggest that the prebiotic amino acids do comprise a foldable set within the halophile environment. PMID:23341608

  12. Systematic Analysis of Essential Genes Reveals New Regulators of G protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cappell, Steven D.; Baker, Rachael; Skowyra, Dorota; Dohlman, Henrik G.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The yeast pheromone pathway consists of a canonical heterotrimeric G protein and MAP kinase cascade. To identify new signaling components we systematically evaluated 870 essential genes using a library of repressible-promoter strains. Quantitative transcription-reporter and MAPK activity assays were used to identify strains that exhibit altered pheromone sensitivity. Of the 92 newly identified essential genes required for proper G protein signaling, those involved with protein degradation were most highly-represented. Included in this group are members of the SCF (Skp-Cullin-F-Box) ubiquitin ligase complex. Further genetic and biochemical analysis reveals that SCFCdc4 acts together with the Cdc34 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme at the level of the G protein, promotes degradation of the G protein α subunit, Gpa1, in vivo and catalyzes Gpa1 ubiquitination in vitro. These new insights to the G protein signaling network reveal the essential-genome as an untapped resource for identifying new components and regulators of signal transduction pathways. PMID:20542006

  13. Photolabeling of brain membrane proteins by lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Mahon, A C; Hartig, P R

    1982-04-01

    3H-Lysergic acid diethylamide (3H-LSD) is irreversibly incorporated into bovine caudate membranes during ultraviolet light illumination. The incorporated radioligand apparently forms a covalent bond with a subpopulation of the membrane proteins. Although the photolabeling pattern differs significantly from the Coomassie blue staining pattern on SDS gels, the photolabeling is apparently not specific for LSD binding sites associated with neurotransmitter receptors. 3H-LSD photolabeling can occur during prolonged exposure of membrane samples to room lighting and thus may introduce artifacts into receptor binding assays. PMID:7087658

  14. Photolabeling of brain membrane proteins by lysergic acid diethylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Mahon, A.C.; Hartig, P.R.

    1982-04-05

    /sup 3/H-Lysergic acid diethylamide (/sup 3/H-LSD) is irreversibly incorporated into bovine caudate membranes during ultraviolet light illumination. The incorporated radioligand apparently forms a covalent bond with a sub-population of the membrane proteins. Although the photolabeling pattern differs significantly from the Coomassie blue staining pattern on SDS gels, the photolabeling is apparently not specific for LSD binding sites associated with neurotransmitter receptors. /sup 3/H-LSD photolabeling can occur during prolonged exposure of membrane samples to room lighting and thus may introduce artifacts into receptor binding assays.

  15. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. PMID:26762189

  16. Quantitative proteomics reveals the effect of protein glycosylation in soybean root under flooding stress

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ghazala; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Flooding stress has a negative impact on soybean cultivation because it severely impairs growth and development. To understand the flooding responsive mechanism in early stage soybeans, a glycoproteomic technique was used. Two-day-old soybeans were treated with flooding for 2 days and roots were collected. Globally, the accumulation level of glycoproteins, as revealed by cross-reaction with concanavalin A decreased by 2 days of flooding stress. Glycoproteins were enriched from total protein extracts using concanavalin A lectin resin and analyzed using a gel-free proteomic technique. One-hundred eleven and 69 glycoproteins were identified without and with 2 days of flooding stress, respectively. Functional categorization of these identified glycoproteins indicated that the accumulation level of proteins related to protein degradation, cell wall, and glycolysis increased, while stress-related proteins decreased under flooding stress. Also the accumulation level of glycoproteins localized in the secretory pathway decreased under flooding stress. Out of 23 common glycoproteins between control and flooding conditions, peroxidases and glycosyl hydrolases were decreased by 2 days of flooding stress. mRNA expression levels of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and N-glycosylation related proteins were downregulated by flooding stress. These results suggest that flooding might negatively affect the process of N-glycosylation of proteins related to stress and protein degradation; however glycoproteins involved in glycolysis are activated. PMID:25477889

  17. Multimodular biosensors reveal a novel platform for activation of G proteins by growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Krishna K.; Aznar, Nicolas; Laederich, Melanie B.; Ma, Gary S.; Kunkel, Maya T.; Newton, Alexandra C.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    Environmental cues are transmitted to the interior of the cell via a complex network of signaling hubs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two such major signaling hubs in eukaryotes. Conventionally, canonical signal transduction via trimeric G proteins is thought to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors. Here we used molecular engineering to develop modular fluorescent biosensors that exploit the remarkable specificity of bimolecular recognition, i.e., of both G proteins and RTKs, and reveal the workings of a novel platform for activation of G proteins by RTKs in single living cells. Comprised of the unique modular makeup of guanidine exchange factor Gα-interacting vesicle-associated protein (GIV)/girdin, a guanidine exchange factor that links G proteins to a variety of RTKs, these biosensors provide direct evidence that RTK–GIV–Gαi ternary complexes are formed in living cells and that Gαi is transactivated within minutes after growth factor stimulation at the plasma membrane. Thus, GIV-derived biosensors provide a versatile strategy for visualizing, monitoring, and manipulating the dynamic association of Gαi with RTKs for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins in cells and illuminate a fundamental signaling event regulated by GIV during diverse cellular processes and pathophysiologic states. PMID:25713130

  18. Proteomics Reveals Plastid- and Periplastid-Targeted Proteins in the Chlorarachniophyte Alga Bigelowiella natans

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Spencer, David F.; Laboissiere, Sylvie; Neilson, Jonathan A.D.; Eveleigh, Robert J.M.; Durnford, Dion G.; Gray, Michael W.; Archibald, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are unicellular marine algae with plastids (chloroplasts) of secondary endosymbiotic origin. Chlorarachniophyte cells retain the remnant nucleus (nucleomorph) and cytoplasm (periplastidial compartment, PPC) of the green algal endosymbiont from which their plastid was derived. To characterize the diversity of nucleus-encoded proteins targeted to the chlorarachniophyte plastid, nucleomorph, and PPC, we isolated plastid–nucleomorph complexes from the model chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans and subjected them to high-pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Our proteomic analysis, the first of its kind for a nucleomorph-bearing alga, resulted in the identification of 324 proteins with 95% confidence. Approximately 50% of these proteins have predicted bipartite leader sequences at their amino termini. Nucleus-encoded proteins make up >90% of the proteins identified. With respect to biological function, plastid-localized light-harvesting proteins were well represented, as were proteins involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that many, but by no means all, of the proteins identified in our proteomic screen are of apparent green algal ancestry, consistent with the inferred evolutionary origin of the plastid and nucleomorph in chlorarachniophytes. PMID:23221610

  19. Essential Strategies for Revealing Nanoscale Protein Dynamics by Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Callaway, David J E; Bu, Zimei

    2016-01-01

    Determining the internal motions of a protein on nanosecond-to-microsecond timescales and on nanometer length scales is challenging by experimental biophysical techniques. Neutron spin echo spectroscopy (NSE) offers a unique opportunity to determine such nanoscale protein domain motions. However, the major hurdle in applying NSE to determine nanoscale protein motion is that the time and length scales of internal protein motions tend to be comparable to that of the global motions of a protein. The signals detected by NSE tend to be dominated by rigid-body translational and rotational diffusion. Using theoretical analyses, our laboratory showed that selective deuteration of a protein domain or a subunit can enhance the capability of NSE to reveal the internal motions in a protein complex. Here, we discuss the essential theoretical analysis and experimental methodology in detail. Protein nanomachines are far more complex than any molecular motors that have been artificially constructed, and their skillful utilization likely represents the future of medicine. With selective deuteration, NSE will allow us to see these nanomachines in motion. PMID:26791982

  20. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A; López-Climent, María F; Casaretto, José A; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  1. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A.; López-Climent, María F.; Casaretto, José A.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  2. Lipidomic profiling reveals protective function of fatty acid oxidation in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity[S

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolei; Yao, Dan; Gosnell, Blake A.; Chen, Chi

    2012-01-01

    During cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity, lipid accumulation occurs prior to necrotic cell death in the liver. However, the exact influences of cocaine on the homeostasis of lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In this study, the progression of subacute hepatotoxicity, including centrilobular necrosis in the liver and elevation of transaminase activity in serum, was observed in a three-day cocaine treatment, accompanying the disruption of triacylglycerol (TAG) turnover. Serum TAG level increased on day 1 of cocaine treatment but remained unchanged afterwards. In contrast, hepatic TAG level was elevated continuously during three days of cocaine treatment and was better correlated with the development of hepatotoxicity. Lipidomic analyses of serum and liver samples revealed time-dependent separation of the control and cocaine-treated mice in multivariate models, which was due to the accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines together with the disturbances of many bioactive phospholipid species in the cocaine-treated mice. An in vitro function assay confirmed the progressive inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation after the cocaine treatment. Cotreatment of fenofibrate significantly increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-targeted genes and the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation activity in the cocaine-treated mice, resulting in the inhibition of cocaine-induced acylcarnitine accumulation and other hepatotoxic effects. Overall, the results from this lipidomics-guided study revealed that the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation plays an important role in cocaine-induced liver injury. PMID:22904346

  3. Non-standard amino acid incorporation into proteins using Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seok Hoon; Kwon, Yong-Chan; Jewett, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating non-standard amino acids (NSAAs) into proteins enables new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions. In recent years, improvements in cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems have opened the way to accurate and efficient incorporation of NSAAs into proteins. The driving force behind this development has been three-fold. First, a technical renaissance has enabled high-yielding (>1 g/L) and long-lasting (>10 h in batch operation) CFPS in systems derived from Escherichia coli. Second, the efficiency of orthogonal translation systems has improved. Third, the open nature of the CFPS platform has brought about an unprecedented level of control and freedom of design. Here, we review recent developments in CFPS platforms designed to precisely incorporate NSAAs. In the coming years, we anticipate that CFPS systems will impact efforts to elucidate structure/function relationships of proteins and to make biomaterials and sequence-defined biopolymers for medical and industrial applications.

  4. Salicylic acid interferes with clathrin-mediated endocytic protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Du, Yunlong; Tejos, Ricardo; Beck, Martina; Himschoot, Ellie; Li, Hongjiang; Robatzek, Silke; Vanneste, Steffen; Friml, Jirí

    2013-05-01

    Removal of cargos from the cell surface via endocytosis is an efficient mechanism to regulate activities of plasma membrane (PM)-resident proteins, such as receptors or transporters. Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone that is traditionally associated with pathogen defense. Here, we describe an unanticipated effect of SA on subcellular endocytic cycling of proteins. Both exogenous treatments and endogenously enhanced SA levels repressed endocytosis of different PM proteins. The SA effect on endocytosis did not involve transcription or known components of the SA signaling pathway for transcriptional regulation. SA likely targets an endocytic mechanism that involves the coat protein clathrin, because SA interfered with the clathrin incidence at the PM and clathrin-deficient mutants were less sensitive to the impact of SA on the auxin distribution and root bending during the gravitropic response. By contrast, SA did not affect the ligand-induced endocytosis of the flagellin sensing2 (FLS2) receptor during pathogen responses. Our data suggest that the established SA impact on transcription in plant immunity and the nontranscriptional effect of SA on clathrin-mediated endocytosis are independent mechanisms by which SA regulates distinct aspects of plant physiology. PMID:23613581

  5. Acid Stability of the Hemagglutinin Protein Regulates H5N1 Influenza Virus Pathogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, Rebecca M.; Zaraket, Hassan; Reddivari, Muralidhar; Heath, Richard J.; White, Stephen W.; Russell, Charles J.

    2012-12-10

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype continue to threaten agriculture and human health. Here, we use biochemistry and x-ray crystallography to reveal how amino-acid variations in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein contribute to the pathogenicity of H5N1 influenza virus in chickens. HA proteins from highly pathogenic (HP) A/chicken/Hong Kong/YU562/2001 and moderately pathogenic (MP) A/goose/Hong Kong/437-10/1999 isolates of H5N1 were found to be expressed and cleaved in similar amounts, and both proteins had similar receptor-binding properties. However, amino-acid variations at positions 104 and 115 in the vestigial esterase sub-domain of the HA1 receptor-binding domain (RBD) were found to modulate the pH of HA activation such that the HP and MP HA proteins are activated for membrane fusion at pH 5.7 and 5.3, respectively. In general, an increase in H5N1 pathogenicity in chickens was found to correlate with an increase in the pH of HA activation for mutant and chimeric HA proteins in the observed range of pH 5.2 to 6.0. We determined a crystal structure of the MP HA protein at 2.50 {angstrom} resolution and two structures of HP HA at 2.95 and 3.10 {angstrom} resolution. Residues 104 and 115 that modulate the acid stability of the HA protein are situated at the N- and C-termini of the 110-helix in the vestigial esterase sub-domain, which interacts with the B loop of the HA2 stalk domain. Interactions between the 110-helix and the stalk domain appear to be important in regulating HA protein acid stability, which in turn modulates influenza virus replication and pathogenesis. Overall, an optimal activation pH of the HA protein is found to be necessary for high pathogenicity by H5N1 influenza virus in avian species.

  6. Dependence of intestinal amino acid uptake on dietary protein or amino acid levels

    SciTech Connect

    Karasov, W.H.; Solberg, D.H.; Diamond, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    To understand how intestinal amino acid (AA) transport is regulated by dietary substrate levels, the authors measured uptake of seven radioactively-labelled AAs and glucose across the jejunal brush-border membrane of mice kept on one of three isocaloric rations differing in nitrogen content. In the high-protein ration, uptake increased by 77-81% for the nonessential, less toxic AAs, proline, and aspartate but only by 32-61% for the more toxic essential AAs tested. In the nitrogen-deficient ration, uptake decreased for the nonessential aspartate and proline but stayed constant or increased for essential AAs and for the nonessential alanine. These patterns imply independent regulation of the intestine's various AA transporters. With decreasing dietary AA (or protein), the imino acid and acidic AA private transporters are repressed, while activities of the basic AA transporter and the neutral AA public transporter decrease to an asymptote or else go through a minimum. These regulatory patterns can be understood as a compromise among conflicting constraints imposed by protein's multiple roles as a source of calories, nitrogen, and essential AAs and by the toxicity of essential AAs at high concentrations.

  7. Metabolomic Analyses of Leishmania Reveal Multiple Species Differences and Large Differences in Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijie; Zhang, Tong; Watson, David G.; Silva, Ana Marta; Coombs, Graham H.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of Leishmania species have revealed relatively minor heterogeneity amongst recognised housekeeping genes and yet the species cause distinct infections and pathogenesis in their mammalian hosts. To gain greater information on the biochemical variation between species, and insights into possible metabolic mechanisms underpinning visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, we have undertaken in this study a comparative analysis of the metabolomes of promastigotes of L. donovani, L. major and L. mexicana. The analysis revealed 64 metabolites with confirmed identity differing 3-fold or more between the cell extracts of species, with 161 putatively identified metabolites differing similarly. Analysis of the media from cultures revealed an at least 3-fold difference in use or excretion of 43 metabolites of confirmed identity and 87 putatively identified metabolites that differed to a similar extent. Strikingly large differences were detected in their extent of amino acid use and metabolism, especially for tryptophan, aspartate, arginine and proline. Major pathways of tryptophan and arginine catabolism were shown to be to indole-3-lactate and arginic acid, respectively, which were excreted. The data presented provide clear evidence on the value of global metabolomic analyses in detecting species-specific metabolic features, thus application of this technology should be a major contributor to gaining greater understanding of how pathogens are adapted to infecting their hosts. PMID:26368322

  8. Ribonucleic Acid Regulation in Permeabilized Cells of Escherichia coli Capable of Ribonucleic Acid and Protein Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Alan G.

    1974-01-01

    A cell permeabilization procedure is described that reduces viability less than 10% and does not significantly reduce the rates of ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis when appropriately supplemented. Permeabilization abolishes the normal stringent coupling of protein and ribonucleic acid synthesis. PMID:4364330

  9. Fatty acids and small organic compounds bind to mineralo-organic nanoparticles derived from human body fluids as revealed by metabolomic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Jan; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Hung, Cheng-Yu; Wong, Tsui-Yin; Cheng, Ann-Joy; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Young, John D.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles entering the human body instantly become coated with a ``protein corona'' that influences the effects and distribution of the particles in vivo. Yet, whether nanoparticles may bind to other organic compounds remains unclear. Here we use an untargeted metabolomic approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the organic compounds that bind to mineral nanoparticles formed in human body fluids (serum, plasma, saliva, and urine). A wide range of organic compounds is identified, including fatty acids, glycerophospholipids, amino acids, sugars, and amides. Our results reveal that, in addition to the proteins identified previously, nanoparticles harbor an ``organic corona'' containing several fatty acids which may affect particle-cell interactions in vivo. This study provides a platform to study the organic corona of biological and synthetic nanoparticles found in the human body.Nanoparticles entering the human body instantly become coated with a ``protein corona'' that influences the effects and distribution of the particles in vivo. Yet, whether nanoparticles may bind to other organic compounds remains unclear. Here we use an untargeted metabolomic approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography and quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify the organic compounds that bind to mineral nanoparticles formed in human body fluids (serum, plasma, saliva, and urine). A wide range of organic compounds is identified, including fatty acids, glycerophospholipids, amino acids, sugars, and amides. Our results reveal that, in addition to the proteins identified previously, nanoparticles harbor an ``organic corona'' containing several fatty acids which may affect particle-cell interactions in vivo. This study provides a platform to study the organic corona of biological and synthetic nanoparticles found in the human body. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See

  10. The natural non-protein amino acid N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is incorporated into protein during synthesis.

    PubMed

    Glover, W Broc; Mash, Deborah C; Murch, Susan J

    2014-11-01

    N-β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is an amino acid produced by cyanobacteria and accumulated through trophic levels in the environment and natural food webs. Human exposure to BMAA has been linked to progressive neurodegenerative diseases, potentially due to incorporation of BMAA into protein. The insertion of BMAA and other non-protein amino acids into proteins may trigger protein misfunction, misfolding and/or aggregation. However, the specific mechanism by which BMAA is associated with proteins remained unidentified. Such studies are challenging because of the complexity of biological systems and samples. A cell-free in vitro protein synthesis system offers an excellent approach for investigation of changing amino acid composition in protein. In this study, we report that BMAA incorporates into protein as an error in synthesis when a template DNA sequence is used. Bicinchoninic acid assay of total protein synthesis determined that BMAA effectively substituted for alanine and serine in protein product. LC-MS/MS confirmed that BMAA was selectively inserted into proteins in place of other amino acids, but isomers N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine (AEG) and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) did not share this characteristic. Incorporation of BMAA into proteins was significantly higher when genomic DNA from post-mortem brain was the template. About half of BMAA in the synthetic proteins was released with denaturation with sodium dodecylsulfonate and dithiothreitol, but the remaining BMAA could only be released by acid hydrolysis. Together these data demonstrate that BMAA is incorporated into the amino acid backbone of proteins during synthesis and also associated with proteins through non-covalent bonding. PMID:25096519

  11. Proteome Analysis of Streptococcus thermophilus Grown in Milk Reveals Pyruvate Formate-Lyase as the Major Upregulated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Derzelle, Sylviane; Bolotin, Alexander; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Rul, Françoise

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the adaptation to milk of Streptococcus thermophilus LMG18311 using a proteomic approach. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of cytosolic proteins were performed after growth in M17 medium or in milk. A major modification of the proteome concerned proteins involved in the supply of amino acids, like the peptidase PepX, and several enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. In parallel, we observed the upregulation of the synthesis of seven enzymes directly involved in the synthesis of purines, as well as formyl-tetrahydrofolate (THF) synthetase and serine hydroxy-methyl transferase, two enzymes responsible for the synthesis of compounds (THF and glycine, respectively) feeding the purine biosynthetic pathway. The analysis also revealed a massive increase in the synthesis of pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL), the enzyme which converts pyruvate into acetyl coenzyme A and formate. PFL has been essentially studied for its role in mixed-acid product formation in lactic acid bacteria during anaerobic fermentation. However, formate is an important methyl group donor for anabolic pathway through the formation of folate derivates. We hypothesized that PFL was involved in purine biosynthesis during growth in milk. We showed that PFL expression was regulated at the transcriptional level and that pfl transcription occurred during the exponential growth phase in milk. The complementation of milk with formate or purine bases was shown to reduce pfl expression, to suppress PFL synthesis, and to stimulate growth of S. thermophilus. These results show a novel regulatory mechanism controlling the synthesis of PFL and suggest an unrecognized physiological role for PFL as a formate supplier for anabolic purposes. PMID:16332852

  12. Indole-3-acetic acid protein conjugates: novel players in auxin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Seidel, C; Walz, A; Park, S; Cohen, J D; Ludwig-Müller, J

    2006-05-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is found in plants in both free and conjugated forms. Within the group of conjugated IAA there is a unique class of proteins and peptides where IAA is attached directly to the polypeptide structure as a prosthetic group. The first gene, IAP1, encoding for a protein with IAA as a prosthetic group, was cloned from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). It was shown that the expression of IAP1 as a major IAA modified protein in bean seed (PvIAP1) was correlated to a developmental period of rapid growth during seed development. Moreover, this protein underwent rapid degradation during germination. Since further molecular analysis was difficult in bean, the IAP1 gene was transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula. Expression of the bean IAP1 gene in both plant species under the control of its native promoter targeted protein expression to the seeds. In Arabidopsis no IAA was found to be attached to PvIAP1. These results show that there is specificity to protein modification by IAA and suggests that protein conjugation may be catalyzed by species specific enzymes. Furthermore, subcellular localization showed that in Arabidopsis PvIAP1 was predominantly associated with the microsomal fraction. In addition, a related protein and several smaller peptides that are conjugated to IAA were identified in Arabidopsis. Further research on this novel class of proteins from Arabidopsis will both advance our knowledge of IAA proteins and explore aspects of auxin homeostasis that were not fully revealed by studies of free IAA and lower molecular weight conjugates. PMID:16807826

  13. In Vivo Biosynthesis of a β-Amino Acid-Containing Protein.

    PubMed

    Melo Czekster, Clarissa; Robertson, Wesley E; Walker, Allison S; Söll, Dieter; Schepartz, Alanna

    2016-04-27

    It has recently been reported that ribosomes from erythromycin-resistant Escherichia coli strains, when isolated in S30 extracts and incubated with chemically mis-acylated tRNA, can incorporate certain β-amino acids into full length DHFR in vitro. Here we report that wild-type E. coli EF-Tu and phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase collaborate with these mutant ribosomes and others to incorporate β(3)-Phe analogs into full length DHFR in vivo. E. coli harboring the most active mutant ribosomes are robust, with a doubling time only 14% longer than wild-type. These results reveal the unexpected tolerance of E. coli and its translation machinery to the β(3)-amino acid backbone and should embolden in vivo selections for orthogonal translational machinery components that incorporate diverse β-amino acids into proteins and peptides. E. coli harboring mutant ribosomes may possess the capacity to incorporate many non-natural, non-α-amino acids into proteins and other sequence-programmed polymeric materials. PMID:27086674

  14. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish.

    PubMed

    Setlow, Richard B

    2002-03-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma. PMID:11906839

  15. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  16. Oligosaccharide Binding Proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveal a Preference for Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J. Bruce; Raybould, Helen E.; Mills, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. PMID:21423604

  17. Structure and function of a mitochondrial late embryogenesis abundant protein are revealed by desiccation.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Jaquinod, Michel; Mangavel, Cécile; Passirani, Catherine; Saulnier, Patrick; Manon, Stephen; Teyssier, Emeline; Payet, Nicole; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Macherel, David

    2007-05-01

    Few organisms are able to withstand desiccation stress; however, desiccation tolerance is widespread among plant seeds. Survival without water relies on an array of mechanisms, including the accumulation of stress proteins such as the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. These hydrophilic proteins are prominent in plant seeds but also found in desiccation-tolerant organisms. In spite of many theories and observations, LEA protein function remains unclear. Here, we show that LEAM, a mitochondrial LEA protein expressed in seeds, is a natively unfolded protein, which reversibly folds into alpha-helices upon desiccation. Structural modeling revealed an analogy with class A amphipathic helices of apolipoproteins that coat low-density lipoprotein particles in mammals. LEAM appears spontaneously modified by deamidation and oxidation of several residues that contribute to its structural features. LEAM interacts with membranes in the dry state and protects liposomes subjected to drying. The overall results provide strong evidence that LEAM protects the inner mitochondrial membrane during desiccation. According to sequence analyses of several homologous proteins from various desiccation-tolerant organisms, a similar protection mechanism likely acts with other types of cellular membranes. PMID:17526751

  18. Three steps to gold: mechanism of protein adsorption revealed by Brownian and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ozboyaci, M; Kokh, D B; Wade, R C

    2016-04-21

    The addition of three N-terminal histidines to β-lactamase inhibitor protein was shown experimentally to increase its binding potency to an Au(111) surface substantially but the binding mechanism was not resolved. Here, we propose a complete adsorption mechanism for this fusion protein by means of a multi-scale simulation approach and free energy calculations. We find that adsorption is a three-step process: (i) recognition of the surface predominantly by the histidine fusion peptide and formation of an encounter complex facilitated by a reduced dielectric screening of water in the interfacial region, (ii) adsorption of the protein on the surface and adoption of a specific binding orientation, and (iii) adaptation of the protein structure on the metal surface accompanied by induced fit. We anticipate that the mechanistic features of protein adsorption to an Au(111) surface revealed here can be extended to other inorganic surfaces and proteins and will therefore aid the design of specific protein-surface interactions. PMID:27021898

  19. Proteomic analysis of a segregant population reveals candidate proteins linked to mealiness in peach.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Andréa Miyasaka; Urra, Claudio; Moraga, Carol; Jego, Marcela; Flores, Alejandra; Meisel, Lee; González, Mauricio; Infante, Rodrigo; Defilippi, Bruno G; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Orellana, Ariel

    2016-01-10

    Peaches are stored at low temperatures to delay ripening and increase postharvest life. However some varieties are susceptible to chilling injury,which leads to fruit mealiness, browning and flesh bleeding. In order to identify potentialmarkers associated with chilling injury,we performed proteomic analyses on a segregating population with contrasting susceptibility to chilling-induced mealiness. Chilling-induced mealiness was assessed by measuring juiciness in fruits that have been stored in cold and then allowed to ripen. Fruitmesocarp and leaf proteome from contrasting segregants were analyzed using 2-DE gels. Comparison of protein abundance between segregants revealed 133 spots from fruit mesocarp and 36 from leaf. Thirty four fruit mesocarp proteins were identified from these spots. Most of these proteins were related to ethylene synthesis, ABA response and stress response. Leaf protein analyses identified 22 proteins, most of which related to energy metabolism. Some of the genes that code for these proteins have been previously correlated with chilling injury through transcript analyses and co-segregation with mealiness QTLs. The results from this study, further deciphers the molecular mechanisms associated with chilling response in peach fruit, and identifies candidate proteins linked to mealiness in peach which may be used as putative markers for this trait. PMID:26459401

  20. Revealing Atomic-Level Mechanisms of Protein Allostery with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hertig, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have become a powerful and popular method for the study of protein allostery, the widespread phenomenon in which a stimulus at one site on a protein influences the properties of another site on the protein. By capturing the motions of a protein’s constituent atoms, simulations can enable the discovery of allosteric binding sites and the determination of the mechanistic basis for allostery. These results can provide a foundation for applications including rational drug design and protein engineering. Here, we provide an introduction to the investigation of protein allostery using molecular dynamics simulation. We emphasize the importance of designing simulations that include appropriate perturbations to the molecular system, such as the addition or removal of ligands or the application of mechanical force. We also demonstrate how the bidirectional nature of allostery—the fact that the two sites involved influence one another in a symmetrical manner—can facilitate such investigations. Through a series of case studies, we illustrate how these concepts have been used to reveal the structural basis for allostery in several proteins and protein complexes of biological and pharmaceutical interest. PMID:27285999

  1. Analysis of Euglena gracilis Plastid-Targeted Proteins Reveals Different Classes of Transit Sequences▿

    PubMed Central

    Durnford, Dion G.; Gray, Michael W.

    2006-01-01

    The plastid of Euglena gracilis was acquired secondarily through an endosymbiotic event with a eukaryotic green alga, and as a result, it is surrounded by a third membrane. This membrane complexity raises the question of how the plastid proteins are targeted to and imported into the organelle. To further explore plastid protein targeting in Euglena, we screened a total of 9,461 expressed sequence tag (EST) clusters (derived from 19,013 individual ESTs) for full-length proteins that are plastid localized to characterize their targeting sequences and to infer potential modes of translocation. Of the 117 proteins identified as being potentially plastid localized whose N-terminal targeting sequences could be inferred, 83 were unique and could be classified into two major groups. Class I proteins have tripartite targeting sequences, comprising (in order) an N-terminal signal sequence, a plastid transit peptide domain, and a predicted stop-transfer sequence. Within this class of proteins are the lumen-targeted proteins (class IB), which have an additional hydrophobic domain similar to a signal sequence and required for further targeting across the thylakoid membrane. Class II proteins lack the putative stop-transfer sequence and possess only a signal sequence at the N terminus, followed by what, in amino acid composition, resembles a plastid transit peptide. Unexpectedly, a few unrelated plastid-targeted proteins exhibit highly similar transit sequences, implying either a recent swapping of these domains or a conserved function. This work represents the most comprehensive description to date of transit peptides in Euglena and hints at the complex routes of plastid targeting that must exist in this organism. PMID:16998072

  2. Systematic protein interactome analysis of glycosaminoglycans revealed YcbS as a novel bacterial virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Felix Shih-Hsiang; Sutandy, Fx Reymond; Syu, Guan-Da; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lin, Jun-Mu; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Microbial pathogens have evolved several strategies for interacting with host cell components, such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Some microbial proteins involved in host-GAG binding have been described; however, a systematic study on microbial proteome-mammalian GAG interactions has not been conducted. Here, we used Escherichia coli proteome chips to probe four typical mammalian GAGs, heparin, heparan sulphate (HS), chondroitin sulphate B (CSB), and chondroitin sulphate C (CSC), and identified 185 heparin-, 62 HS-, 98 CSB-, and 101 CSC-interacting proteins. Bioinformatics analyses revealed the unique functions of heparin- and HS-specific interacting proteins in glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism. Among all the GAG-interacting proteins, three were outer membrane proteins (MbhA, YcbS, and YmgH). Invasion assays confirmed that mutant E. coli lacking ycbS could not invade the epithelial cells. Introducing plasmid carrying ycbS complemented the invading defects at ycbS lacking E. coli mutant, that can be further improved by overexpressing ycbS. Preblocking epithelial cells with YcbS reduced the percentage of E. coli invasions. Moreover, we observed that whole components of the ycb operon were crucial for invasion. The displacement assay revealed that YcbS binds to the laminin-binding site of heparin and might affect the host extracellular matrix structure by displacing heparin from laminin. PMID:27323865

  3. Systematic protein interactome analysis of glycosaminoglycans revealed YcbS as a novel bacterial virulence factor

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Felix Shih-Hsiang; Sutandy, FX Reymond; Syu, Guan-Da; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lin, Jun-Mu; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Microbial pathogens have evolved several strategies for interacting with host cell components, such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Some microbial proteins involved in host–GAG binding have been described; however, a systematic study on microbial proteome–mammalian GAG interactions has not been conducted. Here, we used Escherichia coli proteome chips to probe four typical mammalian GAGs, heparin, heparan sulphate (HS), chondroitin sulphate B (CSB), and chondroitin sulphate C (CSC), and identified 185 heparin-, 62 HS-, 98 CSB-, and 101 CSC-interacting proteins. Bioinformatics analyses revealed the unique functions of heparin- and HS-specific interacting proteins in glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism. Among all the GAG-interacting proteins, three were outer membrane proteins (MbhA, YcbS, and YmgH). Invasion assays confirmed that mutant E. coli lacking ycbS could not invade the epithelial cells. Introducing plasmid carrying ycbS complemented the invading defects at ycbS lacking E. coli mutant, that can be further improved by overexpressing ycbS. Preblocking epithelial cells with YcbS reduced the percentage of E. coli invasions. Moreover, we observed that whole components of the ycb operon were crucial for invasion. The displacement assay revealed that YcbS binds to the laminin-binding site of heparin and might affect the host extracellular matrix structure by displacing heparin from laminin. PMID:27323865

  4. Comparative Analysis of Human, Mouse, and Pig Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Gene Structures.

    PubMed

    Eun, Kiyoung; Hwang, Seon-Ung; Jeon, Hye-Min; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Hyunggee

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the coding and regulatory sequences of genes in different species provides information on whether proteins translated from genes have conserved functions or gene expressions are regulated by analogical mechanisms. Herein, we compared the coding and regulatory sequences of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) from humans, mice, and pigs. The GFAP gene encodes a class III intermediate filament protein expressed specifically in astrocytes of the central nervous system. On comparing the mRNA, regulatory region (promoter), and protein sequences of GFAP gene in silico, we found that GFAP mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), promoter, and amino acid sequences showed higher similarities between humans and pigs than between humans and mice. In addition, the promoter-luciferase reporter gene assay revealed that the pig GFAP promoter functioned in human astrocytes. Notably, the 1.8-kb promoter fragment upstream from transcription initiation site showed strongest transcriptional activity compared to 5.2-kb DNA fragment or other regions of GFAP promoter. We also found that pig GFAP mRNA and promoter activity increased in pig fibroblasts by human IL-1β treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that the regulatory mechanisms and functions of pig genes might be more similar to those of humans than mice, indicating that pigs, particularly miniature pigs, are a useful model for studying human biological and pathological events. PMID:26913554

  5. Influence of acid-soluble proteins from bivalve Siliqua radiata ligaments on calcium carbonate crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zeng-Qiong; Zhang, Gang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    In vitro biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the presence of shell proteins is a heavily researched topic in biomineralization. However, little is known regarding the function of bivalve ligament proteins in the growth of CaCO3 crystals. In this study, using fibrous protein K58 from Siliqua radiata ligaments or coverslips as substrates, we report the results of our study of CaCO3 precipitation in the presence or absence of acid-soluble proteins (ASP) from inner ligament layers. ASP can disturb the controlling function of K58 or a coverslip on the crystalline phase, resulting in the formation of aragonite, calcite, and vaterite. In addition, we identified the following four primary components from ASP by mass spectroscopy: alkaline phosphatase (ALP), ABC transporter, keratin type II cytoskeletal 1 (KRT 1), and phosphate ABC transporter, phosphate-binding protein (PstS). Further analysis revealed that the first three proteins and especially ALP, which is important in bone mineralisation, could affect the polymorphism and morphology of CaCO3 crystals by trapping calcium ions in their domains. Our results indicate that ALP may play an important role in the formation of aragonite in S. radiata ligaments. This paper may facilitate our understanding of the biomineralization process.

  6. Chenodeoxycholic Acid Reduces Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α Protein and Its Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yunwon; Choi, Su Mi; Chang, Soojeong; Park, Bongju; Lee, Seongyeol; Lee, Mi-Ock; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Park, Hyunsung

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated HIF-1α inhibitors under different hypoxic conditions, physiological hypoxia (5% O2) and severe hypoxia (0.1% O2). We found that chenodeoxy cholic acid (CDCA) reduced the amount of HIF-1α protein only under physiological hypoxia but not under severe hypoxia without decreasing its mRNA level. By using a proteasome inhibitor MG132 and a translation inhibitor cyclohexamide, we showed that CDCA reduced HIF-1α protein by decreasing its translation but not by enhancing its degradation. The following findings indicated that farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a CDCA receptor and its target gene, Small heterodimer partner (SHP) are not involved in this effect of CDCA. Distinctly from CDCA, MG132 prevented SHP and an exogenous FXR agonist, GW4064 from reducing HIF-1α protein. Furthermore a FXR antagonist, guggulsterone failed to prevent CDCA from decreasing HIF-1α protein. Furthermore, guggulsterone by itself reduced HIF-1α protein even in the presence of MG132. These findings suggested that CDCA and guggulsterone reduced the translation of HIF-1α in a mechanism which FXR and SHP are not involved. This study reveals novel therapeutic functions of traditional nontoxic drugs, CDCA and guggulsterone, as inhibitors of HIF-1α protein. PMID:26098428

  7. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter protein levels are down-regulated through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation induced by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-15

    The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2) has a crucial role in intestinal bile acid absorption. We previously reported that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid conversion was involved in the alteration of ileal ASBT expression levels. In the present study, to investigate the hypothesis that ileal ASBT protein levels are post-translationally regulated by enterobacteria-associated bile acids, alteration of ileal ASBT protein levels was analysed in mice 12 h and 24 h after anti-bacterial drug ampicillin (ABPC) treatment (100 mg/kg, single shot) that altered bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. In ABPC-treated mice, enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and cholic acid (CA) levels were decreased, whereas taurocholic acid (TCA) and tauro-β-muricholic acid levels were increased in the intestinal lumen. Ileal ASBT protein levels in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs), but not ileal Asbt mRNA levels, were significantly increased in the ABPC-treated mice, and the extent of ubiquitination of the ileal ASBT protein was reduced in the ABPC-treated mice. Treatment of ABPC-pretreated mice with CA or TDCA, but not TCA, significantly decreased ileal ASBT protein levels and increased the extent of ubiquitination of ileal ASBT protein. Treatment of mice with the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine, or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, increased ileal ASBT protein levels in BBMVs. CA-mediated reduction of ASBT protein levels in the ABPC-pretreated mice was attenuated by co-treatment with chloroquine or MG132. These results suggest that ileal ASBT protein is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent pathway in response to enterobacteria-associated bile acids. PMID:23872411

  8. Targeted covalent inactivation of protein kinases by resorcylic acid lactone polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, Andreas; Kennedy, Jonathan; Murli, Sumati; Reid, Ralph; Santi, Daniel V.

    2006-01-01

    Resorcylic acid lactones containing a cis-enone are susceptible to Michael addition reactions and are potent inhibitors of several protein kinases. A structural-bioinformatics analysis identified a conserved Cys residue in the ATP-binding site of the kinases reported to be inhibited by cis-enone resorcylic acid lactones but absent in those that are not. Mining of the kinome database revealed that a subset of some 46 kinases contained this Cys residue. Screening a panel of 124 kinases with the resorcylic acid lactone hypothemycin showed that 18 of 19 targets containing the conserved Cys were inhibited. Kinetic analyses showed time-dependent inhibition, a hallmark of covalent inactivation, and biochemical studies of the interaction of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)2 with hypothemycin confirmed covalent adduct formation. Resorcylic acid lactones are unique among kinase inhibitors in that they target mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways at four levels: mitogen receptors, MAP kinase kinase (MEK)1/2 and ERK1/2, and certain downstream ERK substrates. Cell lines dependent on the activation of Tyr kinase mitogen receptor targets of the resorcylic acid lactones were unusually sensitive toward hypothemycin and showed the expected inhibition of kinase phosphorylation due to inhibition of the mitogen receptors and/or MEK1/2 and ERK1/2. Among cells without mitogen receptor targets, those harboring an ERK pathway-activating B-RAF V600E mutation were selectively and potently inhibited by hypothemycin. Hypothemycin also prevented stimulated activation of the p38 cascade through inhibition of the Cys-containing targets MEK3/6 and TGF-β-activated kinase 1 and of the JNK/SAPK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase) cascade through inhibition of MEK4/7. PMID:16537514

  9. A genome wide study in fission yeast reveals nine PPR proteins that regulate mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Inge; Dujeancourt, Laurent; Gaisne, Mauricette; Herbert, Christopher J; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2011-10-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are particularly numerous in plant mitochondria and chloroplasts, where they are involved in different steps of RNA metabolism, probably due to the repeated 35 amino acid PPR motifs that are thought to mediate interactions with RNA. In non-photosynthetic eukaryotes only a handful of PPR proteins exist, for example the human LRPPRC, which is involved in a mitochondrial disease. We have conducted a systematic study of the PPR proteins in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and identified, in addition to the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, eight proteins all of which localized to the mitochondria, and showed some association with the membrane. The absence of all but one of these PPR proteins leads to a respiratory deficiency and modified patterns of steady state mt-mRNAs or newly synthesized mitochondrial proteins. Some cause a general defect, whereas others affect specific mitochondrial RNAs, either coding or non-coding: cox1, cox2, cox3, 15S rRNA, atp9 or atp6, sometimes leading to secondary defects. Interestingly, the two possible homologs of LRPPRC, ppr4 and ppr5, play opposite roles in the expression of the cox1 mt-mRNA, ppr4 being the first mRNA-specific translational activator identified in S. pombe, whereas ppr5 appears to be a general negative regulator of mitochondrial translation. PMID:21727087

  10. Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 Modulates Docosahexaenoic Acid-Induced Recovery in Rats Undergoing Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Johnny D; Serrano-Illan, Miguel; Licero, Jenniffer; Cordero, Kathia; Miranda, Jorge D; De Leon, Marino

    2016-08-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) promote functional recovery in rats undergoing spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the precise molecular mechanism coupling n-3 PUFAs to neurorestorative responses is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the spatiotemporal expression of fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5) after contusive SCI and to investigate whether this protein plays a role in n-3 PUFA-mediated functional recovery post-SCI. We found that SCI resulted in a robust spinal cord up-regulation in FABP5 mRNA levels (556 ± 187%) and protein expression (518 ± 195%), when compared to sham-operated rats, at 7 days post-injury (dpi). This upregulation coincided with significant alterations in the metabolism of fatty acids in the injured spinal cord, as revealed by metabolomics-based lipid analyses. In particular, we found increased levels of the n-3 series PUFAs, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 n-3) at 7 dpi. Animals consuming a diet rich in DHA and EPA exhibited a significant upregulation in FABP5 mRNA levels at 7 dpi. Immunofluorescence showed low basal FABP5 immunoreactivity in spinal cord ventral gray matter NeuN(+) neurons of sham-operated rats. SCI resulted in a robust induction of FABP5 in glial (GFAP(+), APC(+), and NG2(+)) and precursor cells (DCX(+), nestin(+)). We found that continuous intrathecal administration of FABP5 silencing with small interfering RNA (2 μg) impaired spontaneous open-field locomotion post-SCI. Further, FABP5 siRNA administration hindered the beneficial effects of DHA to ameliorate functional recovery at 7 dpi. Altogether, our findings suggest that FABP5 may be an important player in the promotion of cellular uptake, transport, and/or metabolism of DHA post-SCI. Given the beneficial roles of n-3 PUFAs in ameliorating functional recovery, we propose that FABP5 is an important contributor to basic repair mechanisms in the

  11. Mutagenesis Mapping of the Protein-Protein Interaction Underlying FusB-Type Fusidic Acid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Georgina; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    FusB-type proteins represent the predominant mechanism of resistance to fusidic acid in staphylococci and act by binding to and modulating the function of the drug target (elongation factor G [EF-G]). To gain further insight into this antibiotic resistance mechanism, we sought to identify residues important for the interaction of FusB with EF-G and thereby delineate the binding interface within the FusB–EF-G complex. Replacement with alanine of any one of four conserved residues within the C-terminal domain of FusB (F156, K184, Y187, and F208) abrogated the ability of the protein to confer resistance to fusidic acid; the purified mutant proteins also lost the ability to bind S. aureus EF-G in vitro. E. coli EF-G, which is not ordinarily able to bind FusB-type proteins, was rendered competent for binding to FusB following deletion of a 3-residue tract (529SNP531) from domain IV of the protein. This study has identified key regions of both FusB and EF-G that are important for the interaction between the proteins, findings which corroborate our previous in silico prediction for the architecture of the complex formed between the resistance protein and the drug target (G. Cox, G. S. Thompson, H. T. Jenkins, F. Peske, A. Savelsbergh, M. V. Rodnina, W. Wintermeyer, S. W. Homans, T. A. Edwards, and A. J. O'Neill, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 109:2102-2107, 2012). PMID:23836182

  12. Mutagenesis mapping of the protein-protein interaction underlying FusB-type fusidic acid resistance.

    PubMed

    Cox, Georgina; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2013-10-01

    FusB-type proteins represent the predominant mechanism of resistance to fusidic acid in staphylococci and act by binding to and modulating the function of the drug target (elongation factor G [EF-G]). To gain further insight into this antibiotic resistance mechanism, we sought to identify residues important for the interaction of FusB with EF-G and thereby delineate the binding interface within the FusB-EF-G complex. Replacement with alanine of any one of four conserved residues within the C-terminal domain of FusB (F156, K184, Y187, and F208) abrogated the ability of the protein to confer resistance to fusidic acid; the purified mutant proteins also lost the ability to bind S. aureus EF-G in vitro. E. coli EF-G, which is not ordinarily able to bind FusB-type proteins, was rendered competent for binding to FusB following deletion of a 3-residue tract (529SNP531) from domain IV of the protein. This study has identified key regions of both FusB and EF-G that are important for the interaction between the proteins, findings which corroborate our previous in silico prediction for the architecture of the complex formed between the resistance protein and the drug target (G. Cox, G. S. Thompson, H. T. Jenkins, F. Peske, A. Savelsbergh, M. V. Rodnina, W. Wintermeyer, S. W. Homans, T. A. Edwards, and A. J. O'Neill, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 109:2102-2107, 2012). PMID:23836182

  13. Coarse grained simulation reveals antifreeze properties of hyperactive antifreeze protein from Antarctic bacterium Colwellia sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung; Van, Thanh Dac; Le, Ly

    2015-10-01

    The novel hyperactive antifreeze protein (AFP) of Antarctic sea ice bacterium Colwellia sp. provides a target for studying the protection of psychrophilic microgoranisms against freezing environment. Interestingly, the Colwellia sp. hyperactive antifreeze protein (ColAFP) was crystallized without the structural dynamic characteristics. Here, the result indicated, through coarse grained simulation of ColAFP under various subfreezing temperature, that ColAFP remains active at temperature of equal and greater than 275 K (∼2 °C). Extensive simulation analyses also revealed the adaptive mechanism of ColAFP in subfreezing environment. Our result provides a structural dynamic understanding of the ColAFP.

  14. Protein sequences from mastodon and Tyrannosaurus rex revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asara, John M; Schweitzer, Mary H; Freimark, Lisa M; Phillips, Matthew; Cantley, Lewis C

    2007-04-13

    Fossilized bones from extinct taxa harbor the potential for obtaining protein or DNA sequences that could reveal evolutionary links to extant species. We used mass spectrometry to obtain protein sequences from bones of a 160,000- to 600,000-year-old extinct mastodon (Mammut americanum) and a 68-million-year-old dinosaur (Tyrannosaurus rex). The presence of T. rex sequences indicates that their peptide bonds were remarkably stable. Mass spectrometry can thus be used to determine unique sequences from ancient organisms from peptide fragmentation patterns, a valuable tool to study the evolution and adaptation of ancient taxa from which genomic sequences are unlikely to be obtained. PMID:17431180

  15. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  16. Prediction of protein-protein interactions with clustered amino acids and weighted sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaoying; You, Zhuhong; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yong

    2015-01-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project, bioscience has entered into the era of the genome and proteome. Therefore, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) research is becoming more and more important. Life activities and the protein-protein interactions are inseparable, such as DNA synthesis, gene transcription activation, protein translation, etc. Though many methods based on biological experiments and machine learning have been proposed, they all spent a long time to learn and obtained an imprecise accuracy. How to efficiently and accurately predict PPIs is still a big challenge. To take up such a challenge, we developed a new predictor by incorporating the reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) information into the general form of pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and with the weighted sparse representation-based classification (WSRC). The remarkable advantages of introducing the reduced amino acid alphabet is being able to avoid the notorious dimensionality disaster or overfitting problem in statistical prediction. Additionally, experiments have proven that our method achieved good performance in both a low- and high-dimensional feature space. Among all of the experiments performed on the PPIs data of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the best one achieved 90.91% accuracy, 94.17% sensitivity, 87.22% precision and a 83.43% Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) value. In order to evaluate the prediction ability of our method, extensive experiments are performed to compare with the state-of-the-art technique, support vector machine (SVM). The achieved results show that the proposed approach is very promising for predicting PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for PPIs prediction. PMID:25984606

  17. Metabolic labeling with stable isotope nitrogen (15N) to follow amino acid and protein turnover of three plastid proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The length of time that a protein remains available to perform its function is significantly influenced by its turnover rate. Knowing the turnover rate of proteins involved in different processes is important to determining how long a function might progress even when the stimulus has been removed and no further synthesis of the particular proteins occurs. In this article, we describe the use of 15N-metabolic labeling coupled to GC-MS to follow the turnover of free amino acids and LC-MS/MS to identify and LC-MS to follow the turnover of specific proteins in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Results To achieve the metabolic labeling, the growth medium was formulated with standard Tris acetate phosphate medium (TAP) in which14NH4Cl was replaced with 15NH415NO3 and (14NH4)6Mo7O24.4H2O was replaced with Na2MoO4.2H2O. This medium designated 15N-TAP allowed CC-125 algal cells to grow normally. Mass isotopic distribution revealed successful 15N incorporation into 13 amino acids with approximately 98% labeling efficiency. Tryptic digestion of the 55 kDa SDS-PAGE bands from 14N- and 15N-labeled crude algal protein extracts followed by LC-MS/MS resulted in the identification of 27 proteins. Of these, five displayed peptide sequence confidence levels greater than 95% and protein sequence coverage greater than 25%. These proteins were the RuBisCo large subunit, ATP synthase CF1 alpha and beta subunits, the mitochondrial protein (F1F0 ATP synthase) and the cytosolic protein (S-adenosyl homocysteine hydroxylase). These proteins were present in both labeled and unlabeled samples. Once the newly synthesized 15N-labeled free amino acids and proteins obtained maximum incorporation of the 15N-label, turnover rates were determined after transfer of cells into 14N-TAP medium. The t½ values were determined for the three plastid proteins (RuBisCo, ATP synthase CF1 alpha and beta) by following the reduction of the 15N-fractional abundance over time. Conclusion We describe a more

  18. Dynamic Coupling among Protein Binding, Sliding, and DNA Bending Revealed by Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheng; Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Shoji

    2016-07-13

    Protein binding to DNA changes the DNA's structure, and altered DNA structure can, in turn, modulate the dynamics of protein binding. This mutual dependency is poorly understood. Here we investigated dynamic couplings among protein binding to DNA, protein sliding on DNA, and DNA bending by applying a coarse-grained simulation method to the bacterial architectural protein HU and 14 other DNA-binding proteins. First, we verified our method by showing that the simulated HU exhibits a weak preference for A/T-rich regions of DNA and a much higher affinity for gapped and nicked DNA, consistent with biochemical experiments. The high affinity was attributed to a local DNA bend, but not the specific chemical moiety of the gap/nick. The long-time dynamic analysis revealed that HU sliding is associated with the movement of the local DNA bending site. Deciphering single sliding steps, we found the coupling between HU sliding and DNA bending is akin to neither induced-fit nor population-shift; instead they moved concomitantly. This is reminiscent of a cation transfer on DNA and can be viewed as a protein version of polaron-like sliding. Interestingly, on shorter time scales, HU paused when the DNA was highly bent at the bound position and escaped from pauses once the DNA spontaneously returned to a less bent structure. The HU sliding is largely regulated by DNA bending dynamics. With 14 other proteins, we explored the generality and versatility of the dynamic coupling and found that 6 of the 15 assayed proteins exhibit the polaron-like sliding. PMID:27309278

  19. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  20. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test thismore » strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.« less

  1. Thermophysical properties of starch and whey protein composite prepared in presence of organic acid and esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we prepared starch and protein composite by reactive mixing in presence of various organic acids and found that use of these acid esters resulted in composites with good mechanical properties. In this study, concentration (% w/w) of acid citrates in the starch-protein composites were var...

  2. Molecular Recognition and Structural Influences on Function in Bio-nanosystems of Nucleic Acids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda

    duplexes alone interacted with cations distinct from a specific sequence. Under physiologically relevant conditions, a duplex of RNA polyguanine-polycitidine was highly responsive and able to sequester cations to the middle of the purine stretches. The least responsive structure was a DNA polyadenine-polythymine duplex. A random sequence DNA duplex contorted into an RNA-like helix resulted in cationic dynamics similar to RNA systems. These studies showed that cation diffusive binding events in nucleic acid duplex structures are sequence specific and heavily influenced by structural aspects helical forms to account for much of the differences observed. Although structural information in nucleic acids is encoded within their sequence, linking amino acid sequence to protein structure is murkier; the structural information within proteins is encoded by the folding process itself: a complex phenomenon driven toward the equilibrium state of the active conformation. Upwards of two thirds of a protein's sequence can be substituted with similar amino acids without significantly perturbing its function; conserved residues of about 10% seem to be vital; since evolutionary selection pressure in proteins operates 3-dimenionally, a linear sequence is partially informative. We explored this problem by folding de-novo the cytosolic portion of the membrane protein, cellulose synthase, CESA1 from upland cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (Ghcesa1). The cytoplasmic region was generated by homology modeling and refined with molecular dynamics. These mutations impair local structural flexibility which likely results in cellulose that is produced at a lower rate and is less crystalline. Additional modeling of fragments of cellulose synthases from the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, offered novel insights into the function of conserved cytosolic domains within plant cellulose synthases. Transport mechanisms related to the transmembrane region revealed significant differences between plants and a

  3. Insight toward epithelial Na+ channel mechanism revealed by the acid-sensing ion channel 1 structure.

    PubMed

    Stockand, James D; Staruschenko, Alexander; Pochynyuk, Oleh; Booth, Rachell E; Silverthorn, Dee U

    2008-09-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG) protein family includes a diverse group of ion channels, including nonvoltage-gated Na(+) channels of epithelia and neurons, and the acid-sensing ion channel 1 (ASIC1). In mammalian epithelia, ENaC helps regulate Na(+) and associated water transport, making it a critical determinant of systemic blood pressure and pulmonary mucosal fluidity. In the nervous system, ENaC/DEG proteins are related to sensory transduction. While the importance and physiological function of these ion channels are established, less is known about their structure. One hallmark of the ENaC/DEG channel family is that each channel subunit has only two transmembrane domains connected by an exceedingly large extracellular loop. This subunit structure was recently confirmed when Jasti and colleagues determined the crystal structure of chicken ASIC1, a neuronal acid-sensing ENaC/DEG channel. By mapping ENaC to the structural coordinates of cASIC1, as we do here, we hope to provide insight toward ENaC structure. ENaC, like ASIC1, appears to be a trimeric channel containing 1alpha, 1beta, and 1gamma subunit. Heterotrimeric ENaC and monomeric ENaC subunits within the trimer possibly contain many of the major secondary, tertiary, and quaternary features identified in cASIC1 with a few subtle but critical differences. These differences are expected to have profound effects on channel behavior. In particular, they may contribute to ENaC insensitivity to acid and to its constitutive activity in the absence of time- and ligand-dependent inactivation. Experiments resulting from this comparison of cASIC1 and ENaC may help clarify unresolved issues related to ENaC architecture, and may help identify secondary structures and residues critical to ENaC function. PMID:18459164

  4. Exoproteome analysis reveals higher abundance of proteins linked to alkaline stress in persistent Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    PubMed

    Rychli, Kathrin; Grunert, Tom; Ciolacu, Luminita; Zaiser, Andreas; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Wagner, Martin

    2016-02-01

    surface virulence associated protein SvpA. Furthermore proteins involved in cell wall modification, such as the lipoteichonic acid primase LtaP and the N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase (Lmo2591) are more abundant in EGDe than in the persistent strains and could indirectly contribute to virulence. In conclusion this study provides information about a set of proteins that could potentially support survival of L. monocytogenes in abiotic niches in food processing environments. Based on these data, a more detailed analysis of the role of the identified proteins under stresses mimicking conditions in food producing environment is essential for further elucidate the mechanism of the phenomenon of persistence of L. monocytogenes. PMID:26594790

  5. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10−4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10−3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10−8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  6. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Engin, H Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10-4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10-3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10-8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer genes

  7. Fatty Acid-Binding Protein 5 Facilitates the Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Docosahexaenoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yijun; Scanlon, Martin J; Owada, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yui; Porter, Christopher J H; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2015-12-01

    The brain has a limited ability to synthesize the essential polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from its omega-3 fatty acid precursors. Therefore, to maintain brain concentrations of this PUFA at physiological levels, plasma-derived DHA must be transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). While DHA is able to partition into the luminal membrane of brain endothelial cells, its low aqueous solubility likely limits its cytosolic transfer to the abluminal membrane, necessitating the requirement of an intracellular carrier protein to facilitate trafficking of this PUFA across the BBB. As the intracellular carrier protein fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5) is expressed at the human BBB, the current study assessed the putative role of FABP5 in the brain endothelial cell uptake and BBB transport of DHA in vitro and in vivo, respectively. hFAPB5 was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli C41(DE3) cells and the binding affinity of DHA to hFABP5 assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry. The impact of FABP5 siRNA on uptake of (14)C-DHA into immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial (hCMEC/D3) cells was assessed. An in situ transcardiac perfusion method was optimized in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently used to compare the BBB influx rate (Kin) of (14)C-DHA between FABP5-deficient (FABP5(-/-)) and wild-type (FABP5(+/+)) C57BL/6 mice. DHA bound to hFABP5 with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 155 ± 8 nM (mean ± SEM). FABP5 siRNA transfection decreased hCMEC/D3 mRNA and protein expression of FABP5 by 53.2 ± 5.5% and 44.8 ± 13.7%, respectively, which was associated with a 14.1 ± 2.7% reduction in (14)C-DHA cellular uptake. By using optimized conditions for the in situ transcardiac perfusion (a 1 min preperfusion (10 mL/min) followed by perfusion of (14)C-DHA (1 min)), the Kin of (14)C-DHA was 0.04 ± 0.01 mL/g/s. Relative to FABP5(+/+) mice, the Kin of (14)C-DHA decreased 36.7 ± 12.4% in FABP5(-/-) mice

  8. Activation of acid-sensing ion channels by localized proton transient reveals their role in proton signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Di-Shi; Liu, Lu; She, Liang; Wu, Long-Jun; Xu, Tian-Le

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular transients of pH alterations likely mediate signal transduction in the nervous system. Neuronal acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) act as sensors for extracellular protons, but the mechanism underlying ASIC activation remains largely unknown. Here, we show that, following activation of a light-activated proton pump, Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), proton transients induced ASIC currents in both neurons and HEK293T cells co-expressing ASIC1a channels. Using chimera proteins that bridge Arch and ASIC1a by a glycine/serine linker, we found that successful coupling occurred within 15 nm distance. Furthermore, two-cell sniffer patch recording revealed that regulated release of protons through either Arch or voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 activated neighbouring cells expressing ASIC1a channels. Finally, computational modelling predicted the peak proton concentration at the intercellular interface to be at pH 6.7, which is acidic enough to activate ASICs in vivo. Our results highlight the pathophysiological role of proton signalling in the nervous system. PMID:26370138

  9. NSP-Cas protein structures reveal a promiscuous interaction module in cell signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, P.D.; Robinson, H.; Wallez, Y.; Dobaczewska, M. K.; Lee, J. J.; Pasquale, E. B.; Riedl, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Members of the novel SH2-containing protein (NSP) and Crk-associated substrate (Cas) protein families form multidomain signaling platforms that mediate cell migration and invasion through a collection of distinct signaling motifs. Members of each family interact via their respective C-terminal domains, but the mechanism of this association has remained enigmatic. Here we present the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain from the NSP protein BCAR3 and the complex of NSP3 with p130Cas. BCAR3 adopts the Cdc25-homology fold of Ras GTPase exchange factors, but it has a 'closed' conformation incapable of enzymatic activity. The structure of the NSP3-p130Cas complex reveals that this closed conformation is instrumental for interaction of NSP proteins with a focal adhesion-targeting domain present in Cas proteins. This enzyme-to-adaptor conversion enables high-affinity, yet promiscuous, interactions between NSP and Cas proteins and represents an unprecedented mechanistic paradigm linking cellular signaling networks.

  10. Activation of Nanoscale Allosteric Protein Domain Motion Revealed by Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Farago, Bela; Li, Jianquan; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2010-01-01

    NHERF1 is a multidomain scaffolding protein that assembles signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by the membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 Ångstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length-scales and on submicrosecond timescales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much-simplified coarse-grained model suffices to describe interdomain motion of a multidomain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves changes in long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond timescales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE. PMID:21081097

  11. Developmental Staging of Maize Microspores Reveals a Transition in Developing Microspore Proteins 1

    PubMed Central

    Bedinger, Patricia A.; Edgerton, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    A method for the preparation of developmentally staged microspores and young pollen from maize (Zea mays) has been devised. The preparations are of sufficient purity and quantity for biochemical analysis, including the analysis of steady-state protein and RNA populations associated with each stage. A major transition in protein populations occurs during the developmental period that encompasses microspore mitosis, the asymmetric nuclear division producing the vegetative and generative nuclei. Several differences between early and late stage proteins can be detected by one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins reveals that over half of the steady-state proteins differ between the younger and older stages, either quantitative or qualitative. One protein that increases in relative abundance about fourfold is actin. In vitro translation of RNA isolated from staged microspores demonstrates changes in microspore gene expression during the same developmental period. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16667300

  12. Protein profiles of CCL5, HPGDS, and NPSR1 in plasma reveal association with childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Hamsten, C; Häggmark, A; Grundström, J; Mikus, M; Lindskog, C; Konradsen, J R; Eklund, A; Pershagen, G; Wickman, M; Grunewald, J; Melén, E; Hedlin, G; Nilsson, P; van Hage, M

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a common chronic childhood disease with many different phenotypes that need to be identified. We analyzed a broad range of plasma proteins in children with well-characterized asthma phenotypes to identify potential markers of childhood asthma. Using an affinity proteomics approach, plasma levels of 362 proteins covered by antibodies from the Human Protein Atlas were investigated in a total of 154 children with persistent or intermittent asthma and controls. After screening, chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5) hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (HPGDS) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) were selected for further investigation. Significantly lower levels of both CCL5 and HPGDS were found in children with persistent asthma, while NPSR1 was found at higher levels in children with mild intermittent asthma compared to healthy controls. In addition, the protein levels were investigated in another respiratory disease, sarcoidosis, showing significantly higher NPSR1 levels in sera from sarcoidosis patients compared to healthy controls. Immunohistochemical staining of healthy tissues revealed high cytoplasmic expression of HPGDS in mast cells, present in stroma of both airway epithelia, lung as well as in other organs. High expression of NPSR1 was observed in neuroendocrine tissues, while no expression was observed in airway epithelia or lung. In conclusion, we have utilized a broad-scaled affinity proteomics approach to identify three proteins with altered plasma levels in asthmatic children, representing one of the first evaluations of HPGDS and NPSR1 protein levels in plasma. PMID:27145233

  13. Coupled protein domain motion in Taq polymerase revealed by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Zimei; Biehl, Ralf; Monkenbusch, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Callaway, David J. E.

    2005-01-01

    Long-range conformational changes in proteins are ubiquitous in biology for the transmission and amplification of signals; such conformational changes can be triggered by small-amplitude, nanosecond protein domain motion. Understanding how conformational changes are initiated requires the characterization of protein domain motion on these timescales and on length scales comparable to protein dimensions. Using neutron spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE), normal mode analysis, and a statistical-mechanical framework, we reveal overdamped, coupled domain motion within DNA polymerase I from Thermus aquaticus (Taq polymerase). This protein utilizes correlated domain dynamics over 70 Å to coordinate nucleotide synthesis and cleavage during DNA synthesis and repair. We show that NSE spectroscopy can determine the domain mobility tensor, which determines the degree of dynamical coupling between domains. The mobility tensor defines the domain velocity response to a force applied to it or to another domain, just as the sails of a sailboat determine its velocity given the applied wind force. The NSE results provide insights into the nature of protein domain motion that are not appreciated by conventional biophysical techniques. PMID:16306270

  14. Proteome analysis of Paenibacillus larvae reveals the existence of a putative S-layer protein.

    PubMed

    Fünfhaus, Anne; Genersch, Elke

    2012-04-01

    Honey bee pathology has attracted much interest recently due to the problems with honey bee declines in many regions of the world. American Foulbrood (AFB) caused by Paenibacillus larvae is the most devastating bacterial brood disease of the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera) causing considerable economic losses to beekeepers worldwide. AFB outbreaks are mainly caused by two differentially virulent genotypes of P. larvae, P. larvae ERIC I and ERIC II. To better understand AFB pathogenesis and to complement already existing data from the genetic level we aimed at obtaining expression data from the protein level. We successfully developed a protocol for two-dimensional proteome analysis of P. larvae with subsequent mass-spectrometry based protein sequencing. Based on the obtained master protein maps of P. larvae genotypes ERIC I and II we identified the dominantly expressed cytosolic proteins of both genotypes, some of them presumably linked to pathogenesis and virulence. Comparing the master maps of both genotypes revealed differentially expressed proteins, i.e. a putative S-layer protein which is expressed by P. larvae ERIC II but absent from the proteome of P. larvae ERIC I. The implications of our findings for pathogenesis of AFB and virulence of P. larvae will be discussed. PMID:23757273

  15. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2011-08-30

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  16. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  17. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  18. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    DOEpatents

    Alfonta; Lital , Schultz; Peter G. , Zhang; Zhiwen

    2010-10-12

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  19. Antiparasitic evaluation of betulinic acid derivatives reveals effective and selective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meira, Cássio Santana; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana; Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with several biological properties already described, including antiparasitic activity. Here, the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of betulinic acid and its semi-synthetic amide derivatives (BA1-BA8) was investigated. The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity and selectivity were enhanced in semi-synthetic derivatives, specially on derivatives BA5, BA6 and BA8. To understand the mechanism of action underlying betulinic acid anti-T. cruzi activity, we investigated ultrastructural changes by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies showed that trypomastigotes incubated with BA5 had membrane blebling, flagella retraction, atypical cytoplasmic vacuoles and Golgi cisternae dilatation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that parasite death is mainly caused by necrosis. Treatment with derivatives BA5, BA6 or BA8 reduced the invasion process, as well as intracellular parasite development in host cells, with a potency and selectivity similar to that observed in benznidazole-treated cells. More importantly, the combination of BA5 and benznidazole revealed synergistic effects on trypomastigote and amastigote forms of T. cruzi. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BA5 compound is an effective and selective anti-T. cruzi agent. PMID:27080160

  20. The structure of BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus reveals a superfamily of bacterial periplasmic proteins with possible inhibitory function

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Finn, Robert D.; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins that contain the DUF2874 domain constitute a new Pfam family PF11396. Members of this family have predominantly been identified in microbes found in the human gut and oral cavity. The crystal structure of one member of this family, BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus, has been determined, revealing a β-lactamase inhibitor protein-like structure with a tandem repeat of domains. Sequence analysis and structural comparisons reveal that BVU2987 and other DUF2874 proteins are related to β-lactamase inhibitor protein, PepSY and SmpA_OmlA proteins and hence are likely to function as inhibitory proteins. PMID:20944221

  1. Polymorphism Analysis Reveals Reduced Negative Selection and Elevated Rate of Insertions and Deletions in Intrinsically Disordered Protein Regions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tahsin; Douglas, Gavin M.; Patel, Priyenbhai; Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Moses, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered protein regions are abundant in eukaryotic proteins and lack stable tertiary structures and enzymatic functions. Previous studies of disordered region evolution based on interspecific alignments have revealed an increased propensity for indels and rapid rates of amino acid substitution. How disordered regions are maintained at high abundance in the proteome and across taxa, despite apparently weak evolutionary constraints, remains unclear. Here, we use single nucleotide and indel polymorphism data in yeast and human populations to survey the population variation within disordered regions. First, we show that single nucleotide polymorphisms in disordered regions are under weaker negative selection compared with more structured protein regions and have a higher proportion of neutral non-synonymous sites. We also confirm previous findings that nonframeshifting indels are much more abundant in disordered regions relative to structured regions. We find that the rate of nonframeshifting indel polymorphism in intrinsically disordered regions resembles that of noncoding DNA and pseudogenes, and that large indels segregate in disordered regions in the human population. Our survey of polymorphism confirms patterns of evolution in disordered regions inferred based on longer evolutionary comparisons. PMID:26047845

  2. Secretory protein profiling reveals TNFα inactivation by selective and promiscuous Sec61 modulators

    PubMed Central

    Maifeld, Sarah V.; MacKinnon, Andrew L.; Garrison, Jennifer L.; Sharma, Ajay; Kunkel, Eric J.; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Taunton, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cotransins are cyclic heptadepsipeptides that bind the Sec61 translocon to inhibit cotranslational translocation of a subset of secreted and type I transmembrane proteins. The few known cotransin-sensitive substrates are all targeted to the translocon by a cleavable signal sequence, previously shown to be a critical determinant of cotransin sensitivity. By profiling two cotransin variants against a panel of secreted and transmembrane proteins, we demonstrate that cotransin side-chain differences profoundly affect substrate selectivity. Among the most sensitive substrates we identified is the pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Like all type II transmembrane proteins, TNFα is targeted to the translocon by its membrane-spanning domain, indicating that a cleavable signal sequence is not strictly required for cotransin sensitivity. Our results thus reveal an unanticipated breadth of translocon substrates whose expression is inhibited by Sec61 modulators. PMID:21944747

  3. Mass Spectrometry and Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal an Abundant and Rapidly Evolving Abalone Sperm Protein

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Melody R.; McDowall, Margo H.; Stewart, Lia; Ouaddi, Aleena; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Abalone, a broadcast spawning marine mollusk, is an important model for molecular interactions and positive selection in fertilization, but the focus has previously been on only two sperm proteins, lysin and sp18.We used genomic and proteomic techniques to bring new insights to this model by characterizing the testis transcriptome and sperm proteome of the Red abalone Haliotis rufescens. One pair of homologous, testis-specific proteins contains a secretion signal and is small, abundant, and associated with the acrosome. Comparative analysis revealed that homologs are extremely divergent between species, and show strong evidence for positive selection. The acrosomal localization and rapid evolution of these proteins indicates that they play an important role in fertilization, and could be involved in the species-specificity of sperm-egg interactions in abalone. Our genomic and proteomic characterization of abalone fertilization resulted in the identification of interesting, novel peptides that have eluded detection in this important model system for 20 years. PMID:23585193

  4. Integrative analysis of RNA, translation, and protein levels reveals distinct regulatory variation across humans

    PubMed Central

    Cenik, Can; Cenik, Elif Sarinay; Byeon, Gun W.; Grubert, Fabian; Candille, Sophie I.; Spacek, Damek; Alsallakh, Bilal; Tilgner, Hagen; Araya, Carlos L.; Tang, Hua; Ricci, Emiliano; Snyder, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the consequences of genetic differences between humans is essential for understanding phenotypic diversity and personalized medicine. Although variation in RNA levels, transcription factor binding, and chromatin have been explored, little is known about global variation in translation and its genetic determinants. We used ribosome profiling, RNA sequencing, and mass spectrometry to perform an integrated analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a diverse group of individuals. We find significant differences in RNA, translation, and protein levels suggesting diverse mechanisms of personalized gene expression control. Combined analysis of RNA expression and ribosome occupancy improves the identification of individual protein level differences. Finally, we identify genetic differences that specifically modulate ribosome occupancy—many of these differences lie close to start codons and upstream ORFs. Our results reveal a new level of gene expression variation among humans and indicate that genetic variants can cause changes in protein levels through effects on translation. PMID:26297486

  5. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies. PMID:26598702

  6. Targeted Protein Destabilization Reveals an Estrogen-mediated ER Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Kanak; Noblin, Devin J.; Serebrenik, Yevgeniy V.; Adams, Alison; Zhao, Connie; Crews, Craig M.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells leads to an unfolded protein response (UPR) that either restores homeostasis or commits the cells to apoptosis. Tools traditionally used to study the UPR are pro-apoptotic and thus confound analysis of long-term cellular responses to ER stress. Here, we describe an Endoplasmic Reticulum-localized HaloTag (ERHT) protein that can be conditionally destabilized using a small molecule hydrophobic tag (HyT36). Treatment of ERHT-expressing cells with HyT36 induces an acute, resolvable ER stress that results in transient UPR activation without induction of apoptosis. Transcriptome analysis of late-stage responses to this UPR stimulus reveals a link between UPR activity and estrogen signaling. PMID:25242550

  7. Enterocyte fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs): different functions of liver and intestinal FABPs in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Angela M; Storch, Judith

    2015-02-01

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABP) are highly abundant cytosolic proteins that are expressed in most mammalian tissues. In the intestinal enterocyte, both liver- (LFABP; FABP1) and intestinal FABPs (IFABP; FABP2) are expressed. These proteins display high-affinity binding for long-chain fatty acids (FA) and other hydrophobic ligands; thus, they are believed to be involved with uptake and trafficking of lipids in the intestine. In vitro studies have identified differences in ligand-binding stoichiometry and specificity, and in mechanisms of FA transfer to membranes, and it has been hypothesized that LFABP and IFABP have different functions in the enterocyte. Studies directly comparing LFABP- and IFABP-null mice have revealed markedly different phenotypes, indicating that these proteins indeed have different functions in intestinal lipid metabolism and whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the evolving knowledge of the functions of LFABP and IFABP in the intestinal enterocyte. PMID:25458898

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Fatty-acylated Proteins in Mammalian Cells with Chemical Reporters Reveals S-Acylation of Histone H3 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John P.; Raghavan, Anuradha S.; Yang, Yu-Ying; Charron, Guillaume; Hang, Howard C.

    2011-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemical reporters are useful tools for visualizing and identifying post-translational modifications on proteins. Here we report the proteomic analysis of mammalian proteins targeted by a series of fatty acid chemical reporters ranging from myristic to stearic acid. The large-scale analysis of total cell lysates from fully solubilized Jurkat T cells identified known fatty-acylated proteins and many new candidates, including nuclear proteins and in particular histone H3 variants. We demonstrate that histones H3.1, H3.2, and H3.3 are modified with fatty acid chemical reporters and identify the conserved cysteine 110 as a new site of S-acylation on histone H3.2. This newly discovered modification of histone H3 could have implications for nuclear organization and chromatin regulation. The unbiased proteomic analysis of fatty-acylated proteins using chemical reporters has revealed a greater diversity of lipid-modified proteins in mammalian cells and identified a novel post-translational modification of histones. PMID:21076176

  9. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility. PMID:26908877

  10. Reversible Post-translational Modification of Proteins by Nitrated Fatty Acids in Vivo*S

    PubMed Central

    Batthyany, Carlos; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Baker, Paul R. S.; Durán, Rosario; Baker, Laura M. S.; Huang, Yingying; Cerveñansky, Carlos; Branchaud, Bruce P.; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (˙NO)-derived reactive species nitrate unsaturated fatty acids, yielding nitroalkene derivatives, including the clinically abundant nitrated oleic and linoleic acids. The olefinic nitro group renders these derivatives electrophilic at the carbon β to the nitro group, thus competent for Michael addition reactions with cysteine and histidine. By using chromatographic and mass spectrometric approaches, we characterized this reactivity by using in vitro reaction systems, and we demonstrated that nitroalkene-protein and GSH adducts are present in vivo under basal conditions in healthy human red cells. Nitro-linoleic acid (9-, 10-, 12-, and 13-nitro-9,12-octadecadienoic acids) (m/z 324.2) and nitro-oleic acid (9- and 10-nitro-9-octadecaenoic acids) (m/z 326.2) reacted with GSH (m/z 306.1), yielding adducts with m/z of 631.3 and 633.3, respectively. At physiological concentrations, nitroalkenes inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), which contains a critical catalytic Cys (Cys-149). GAPDH inhibition displayed an IC50 of ∼3 μm for both nitroalkenes, an IC50 equivalent to the potent thiol oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO−) and an IC50 30-fold less than H2O2, indicating that nitroalkenes are potent thiol-reactive species. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed covalent adducts between fatty acid nitroalkene derivatives and GAPDH, including at the catalytic Cys-149. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human red cells confirmed that nitroalkenes readily undergo covalent, thiol-reversible post-translational modification of nucleophilic amino acids in GSH and GAPDH in vivo. The adduction of GAPDH and GSH by nitroalkenes significantly increased the hydrophobicity of these molecules, both inducing translocation to membranes and suggesting why these abundant derivatives had not been detected previously via traditional high pressure liquid chromatography analysis. The occurrence of these

  11. Phaseolin expression in tobacco chloroplast reveals an autoregulatory mechanism in heterologous protein translation.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele; Pompa, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Plastid DNA engineering is a well-established research area of plant biotechnology, and plastid transgenes often give high expression levels. However, it is still almost impossible to predict the accumulation rate of heterologous protein in transplastomic plants, and there are many cases of unsuccessful transgene expression. Chloroplasts regulate their proteome at the post-transcriptional level, mainly through translation control. One of the mechanisms to modulate the translation has been described in plant chloroplasts for the chloroplast-encoded subunits of multiprotein complexes, and the autoregulation of the translation initiation of these subunits depends on the availability of their assembly partners [control by epistasy of synthesis (CES)]. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, autoregulation of endogenous proteins recruited in the assembly of functional complexes has also been reported. In this study, we revealed a self-regulation mechanism triggered by the accumulation of a soluble recombinant protein, phaseolin, in the stroma of chloroplast-transformed tobacco plants. Immunoblotting experiments showed that phaseolin could avoid this self-regulation mechanism when targeted to the thylakoids in transplastomic plants. To inhibit the thylakoid-targeted phaseolin translation as well, this protein was expressed in the presence of a nuclear version of the phaseolin gene with a transit peptide. Pulse-chase and polysome analysis revealed that phaseolin mRNA translation on plastid ribosomes was repressed due to the accumulation in the stroma of the same soluble polypeptide imported from the cytosol. We suggest that translation autoregulation in chloroplast is not limited to heteromeric protein subunits but also involves at least some of the foreign soluble recombinant proteins, leading to the inhibition of plastome-encoded transgene expression in chloroplast. PMID:26031839

  12. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency disrupts endocytosis, neuritogenesis, and mitochondrial protein pathways in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    English, Jane A.; Harauma, Akiko; Föcking, Melanie; Wynne, Kieran; Scaife, Caitriona; Cagney, Gerard; Moriguchi, Toru; Cotter, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid (n-3 FA) deficiency is an environmental risk factor for schizophrenia, yet characterization of the consequences of deficiency at the protein level in the brain is limited. We aimed to identify the protein pathways disrupted as a consequence of chronic n-3 deficiency in the hippocampus of mice. Fatty acid analysis of the hippocampus following chronic dietary deficiency revealed a 3-fold decrease (p < 0.001) in n-3 FA levels. Label free LC-MS/MS analysis identified and profiled 1008 proteins, of which 114 were observed to be differentially expressed between n-3 deficient and control groups (n = 8 per group). The cellular processes that were most implicated were neuritogenesis, endocytosis, and exocytosis, while specific protein pathways that were most significantly dysregulated were mitochondrial dysfunction and clathrin mediated endocytosis (CME). In order to characterize whether these processes and pathways are ones influenced by antipsychotic medication, we used LC-MS/MS to test the differential expression of these 114 proteins in the hippocampus of mice chronically treated with the antipsychotic agent haloperidol. We observed 23 of the 114 proteins to be differentially expressed, 17 of which were altered in the opposite direction to that observed following n-3 deficiency. Overall, our findings point to disturbed synaptic function, neuritogenesis, and mitochondrial function as a consequence of dietary deficiency in n-3 FA. This study greatly aids our understanding of the molecular mechanism by which n-3 deficiency impairs normal brain function, and provides clues as to how n-3 FA exert their therapeutic effect in early psychosis. PMID:24194745

  13. IQGAP proteins reveal an atypical phosphoinositide (aPI) binding domain with a pseudo C2 domain fold.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Miles J; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R; van Aalten, Daan M F; Downes, C Peter; Batty, Ian H

    2012-06-29

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP(3)). The binding affinity for PtdInsP(3), together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP(3) effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules. PMID:22493426

  14. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  15. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication.

    PubMed

    Carr, Stephen B; Phillips, Simon E V; Thomas, Christopher D

    2016-03-18

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  16. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  17. Analysis of Protein–Protein Interactions in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Cell Lines Using Phthalic Acid Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates are a class of plasticizers that have been characterized as endocrine disrupters, and are associated with genital diseases, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity in the GeneOntology gene/protein database. In this study, we synthesized phthalic acid chemical probes and demonstrated differing protein–protein interactions between MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Phthalic acid chemical probes were synthesized using silicon dioxide particle carriers, which were modified using the silanized linker 3-aminopropyl triethoxyslane (APTES). Incubation with cell lysates from breast cancer cell lines revealed interactions between phthalic acid and cellular proteins in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Subsequent proteomics analyses indicated 22 phthalic acid-binding proteins in both cell types, including heat shock cognate 71-kDa protein, ATP synthase subunit beta, and heat shock protein HSP 90-beta. In addition, 21 MCF-7-specific and 32 MDA-MB-231 specific phthalic acid-binding proteins were identified, including related proteasome proteins, heat shock 70-kDa protein, and NADPH dehydrogenase and ribosomal correlated proteins, ras-related proteins, and members of the heat shock protein family, respectively. PMID:25402641

  18. Design and synthesis of an activity-based protein profiling probe derived from cinnamic hydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Ai, Teng; Qiu, Li; Xie, Jiashu; Geraghty, Robert J; Chen, Liqiang

    2016-02-15

    In our continued effort to discover new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) agents, we validated the anti-replicon activity of compound 1, a potent and selective anti-HCV hydroxamic acid recently reported by us. Generally favorable physicochemical and in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties exhibited by 1 made it an ideal parent compound from which activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probe 3 was designed and synthesized. Evaluation of probe 3 revealed that it possessed necessary anti-HCV activity and selectivity. Therefore, we have successfully obtained compound 3 as a suitable ABPP probe to identify potential molecular targets of compound 1. Probe 3 and its improved analogs are expected to join a growing list of ABPP probes that have made important contributions to not only the studies of biochemical and cellular functions but also discovery of selective inhibitors of protein targets. PMID:26753813

  19. Identification of novel peptide substrates for protein farnesyltransferase reveals two substrate classes with distinct sequence selectivities

    PubMed Central

    Hougland, James L.; Hicks, Katherine A.; Hartman, Heather L.; Kelly, Rebekah A.; Watt, Terry J.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Prenylation is a post-translational modification essential for the proper localization and function of many proteins. Farnesylation, the attachment of a 15-carbon farnesyl group near the C-terminus of protein substrates, is catalyzed by protein farnesyltransferase (FTase). Farnesylation has received significant interest as a target for pharmaceutical development and farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) are in clinical trials as cancer therapeutics. However, as the total complement of prenylated proteins is unknown, the FTase substrates responsible for FTI efficacy are not yet understood. Identifying novel prenylated proteins within the human proteome constitutes an important step towards understanding prenylation-dependent cellular processes. Based on sequence preferences for FTase derived from analysis of known farnesylated proteins, we selected and screened a library of small peptides representing the C-termini of 213 human proteins for activity with FTase. We identified 77 novel FTase substrates that exhibit multiple-turnover reactivity within this library; our library also contained 85 peptides that can be farnesylated by FTase only under single-turnover conditions. Based on these results, a second library was designed that yielded an additional 29 novel multiple-turnover FTase substrates and 45 single-turnover substrates. The two classes of substrates exhibit different specificity requirements. Efficient multiple-turnover reactivity correlates with the presence of a nonpolar amino acid at the a2 position and a Phe, Met, or Gln at the terminal X residue, consistent with the proposed Ca1a2X sequence model. In contrast, the sequences of the single-turnover substrates vary significantly more at both the a2 and X residues and are not well-described by current farnesylation algorithms. These results improve the definition of prenyltransferase substrate specificity, test the efficacy of substrate algorithms, and provide valuable information about therapeutic targets

  20. Retinol-binding protein 4 and its potential roles in hypercholesterolemia revealed by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Jugnam-ang, Watcharapong; Pannengpetch, Supitcha; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Patcharee; Thippakorn, Chadinee; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Lawung, Ratana; Prachayasittiku, Virapong

    2015-01-01

    Effects of hypercholesterolemia on alterations of serum proteins have not been fully elucidated. Herein, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in conjunction with LC-MS searching has successfully been carried out to investigate the change of protein expression profiles as consequences of raised blood cholesterol at different levels (normal group: total cholesterol 200 mg/dL; borderline high group: total cholesterol 200-239 mg/dL; and high group: total cholesterol ≥ 240 mg/dL) (n = 45). Results revealed that down-regulation of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) (-2.26 fold), transthyretin (-1.25 fold) and gelsolin (-1.47 fold) was observed in the high group. Meanwhile, the other proteins such as haptoglobin, complement factor B and CD5 antigen-like protein were up-regulated upto +3.24, +1.96 and +2.04 fold, respectively. Confirmation by Western blotting revealed a significant reduction of RBP4 (approximately 50 %) in individual samples derived from the high group. Presumptive conclusion can be drawn that down-regulation of RBP4 might be attributable to the inflammation of adipocytes caused by the release of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β) from adipose tissues. Moreover, the decrease of transthyretin might also be taken into accounts since it is known that the transthyretin usually forms complex with RBP4 to prevent glomerular filtration and excretion through the kidney. The suppressing effect on RBP4 should be potentiated by the increase of complement factor B and CD5 antigen-like protein, which rendered the adipose tissues to overwhelm the liberation of RBP4 to blood circulation by metabolic and inflammatory processes. Such inflammation could further modulate the induction of cytokine release (e.g. IL-6 and IL-1β), resulting in the synthesis of acute phase protein, in particular, haptoglobin and C-reactive proteins from hepatocytes. However, the mechanism of gelsolin reduction remains unclear. Among these

  1. Pitfalls in protein quantitation using acid-catalyzed O18 labeling: hydrolysis-driven deamidation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shunhai; Bobst, Cedric E.; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis combined with O18 labeling emerged recently as a powerful tool for quantitation of proteins for which suitable internal standards cannot be produced using molecular biology methods. Several recent reports suggested that acid-catalyzed O18 labeling may be superior to the commonly accepted enzymatic protocol, as it may allow more significant spacing between the isotopic clusters of labeled and unlabeled peptides, thereby eliminating signal interference and enhancing the quality of quantitation. However, careful examination of this procedure reveals that the results of protein quantitation assisted by acid-catalyzed O18 labeling are highly peptide-dependent. The inconsistency was found to be caused by deamidation of Asn, Gln and carbamidomethylated Cys residues during prolonged exposure of the proteolytic fragments to the acidic environment of the labeling reaction, which translates into a loss in signal for theses peptides. Taking deamidation into account leads to a significant improvement in the consistency of quantitation across a range of different proteolytic fragments. PMID:21819098

  2. Human odontoblasts express transient receptor protein and acid-sensing ion channel mechanosensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Solé-Magdalena, Antonio; Revuelta, Enrique G; Menénez-Díaz, Ivan; Calavia, Marta G; Cobo, Teresa; García-Suárez, Olivia; Pérez-Piñera, Pablo; De Carlos, Felix; Cobo, Juan; Vega, Jose A

    2011-05-01

    Diverse proteins of the denegerin/epithelial sodium channel (DEG/ENa(+) C) superfamily, in particular those belonging to the acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) family, as well as some members of the transient receptor protein (TRP) channel, function as mechanosensors or may be required for mechanosensation in a diverse range of species and cell types. Therefore, we investigated the putative mechanosensitive function of human odontoblasts using immunohistochemistry to detect ENa(+) C subunits (α, β, and γ) and ASIC (1, 2, 3, and 4) proteins, as well as TRPV4, in these cells. Positive and specific immunoreactivity in the odontoblast soma and/or processes was detected for all proteins studied except α-ENa(+) C. The intensity of immunostaining was high for β-ENa(+) C and ASIC2, whereas it was low for ASIC1, ASIC3, γ-ENa(+) C, and TRPV4, being absent for α-ENa(+) C and ASIC4. These results suggest that human odontoblasts in situ express proteins related to mechanosensitive channels that probably participate in the mechanisms involved in teeth sensory transmission. PMID:20836083

  3. Early region 1B of adenovirus 2 encodes two coterminal proteins of 495 and 155 amino acid residues.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C W; Schmitt, R C; Smart, J E; Lewis, J B

    1984-01-01

    Partial sequence analysis of tryptic peptides has identified the E1B-495R (E1b-57K) (early transcription region 1B of 495 amino acid residues, with an approximate molecular weight of 57,000) protein of adenovirus 2 as encoded by the 495 amino acid open reading frame located in the adenovirus 2 DNA sequence between nucleotides 2016 and 3500. Additional proteins of 16,000 Mr and 18,000 Mr that are related to the E1B-495R protein were identified by cell-free translation of hybridization-selected mRNA. Analysis of [35S]methionine-containing amino terminal tryptic peptides by thin-layer chromatography showed that the E1B-495R, E1B-18K, and E1B-16K proteins all begin at the same initiation codon. The E1B-495R protein from 293 cells also has the same initial tryptic peptide, acetyl-methionyl-glutamyl-arginine. Sequence analysis of E1B-18K tryptic peptides indicated that this protein also has the same carboxy terminus as the E1B-495R protein and that it is derived from an mRNA that is spliced to remove sequences between nucleotides 2250 and 3269, resulting in a protein product of 155 amino acid residues. Analysis of E1B-16K tryptic peptides has not yet revealed the carboxy terminal structure of this protein. Both the E1B-495R and the E1B-155R (E1B-18K) proteins, as well as the E1B-16K protein, were precipitated from cell-free translations and from extracts of infected cells by antiserum against an amino terminal nonapeptide common to these proteins. Images PMID:6323739

  4. DBBP: database of binding pairs in protein-nucleic acid interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interaction of proteins with other molecules plays an important role in many biological activities. As many structures of protein-DNA complexes and protein-RNA complexes have been determined in the past years, several databases have been constructed to provide structure data of the complexes. However, the information on the binding sites between proteins and nucleic acids is not readily available from the structure data since the data consists mostly of the three-dimensional coordinates of the atoms in the complexes. Results We analyzed the huge amount of structure data for the hydrogen bonding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids and developed a database called DBBP (DataBase of Binding Pairs in protein-nucleic acid interactions, http://bclab.inha.ac.kr/dbbp). DBBP contains 44,955 hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) of protein-DNA interactions and 77,947 H-bonds of protein-RNA interactions. Conclusions Analysis of the huge amount of structure data of protein-nucleic acid complexes is labor-intensive, yet provides useful information for studying protein-nucleic acid interactions. DBBP provides the detailed information of hydrogen-bonding interactions between proteins and nucleic acids at various levels from the atomic level to the residue level. The binding information can be used as a valuable resource for developing a computational method aiming at predicting new binding sites in proteins or nucleic acids. PMID:25474259

  5. Tissue-Based Proteogenomics Reveals that Human Testis Endows Plentiful Missing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Li, Qidan; Wu, Feilin; Zhou, Ruo; Qi, Yingzi; Su, Na; Chen, Lingsheng; Xu, Shaohang; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Chengpu; Cheng, Gang; Chen, Xinguo; Kong, Degang; Wang, Yujia; Zhang, Tao; Zi, Jin; Wei, Wei; Gao, Yuan; Zhen, Bei; Xiong, Zhi; Wu, Songfeng; Yang, Pengyuan; Wang, Quanhui; Wen, Bo; He, Fuchu; Xu, Ping; Liu, Siqi

    2015-09-01

    Investigations of missing proteins (MPs) are being endorsed by many bioanalytical strategies. We proposed that proteogenomics of testis tissue was a feasible approach to identify more MPs because testis tissues have higher gene expression levels. Here we combined proteomics and transcriptomics to survey gene expression in human testis tissues from three post-mortem individuals. Proteins were extracted and separated with glycine- and tricine-SDS-PAGE. A total of 9597 protein groups were identified; of these, 166 protein groups were listed as MPs, including 138 groups (83.1%) with transcriptional evidence. A total of 2948 proteins are designated as MPs, and 5.6% of these were identified in this study. The high incidence of MPs in testis tissue indicates that this is a rich resource for MPs. Functional category analysis revealed that the biological processes that testis MPs are mainly involved in are sexual reproduction and spermatogenesis. Some of the MPs are potentially involved in tumorgenesis in other tissues. Therefore, this proteogenomics analysis of individual testis tissues provides convincing evidence of the discovery of MPs. All mass spectrometry data from this study have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange (data set identifier PXD002179). PMID:26282447

  6. Brain phosphoproteome obtained by a FASP-based method reveals plasma membrane protein topology.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Zougman, Alexandre; Gnad, Florian; Mann, Matthias

    2010-06-01

    Taking advantage of the recently developed Filter Assisted Sample Preparation (FASP) method for sample preparation, we performed an in-depth analysis of phosphorylation sites in mouse brain. To maximize the number of detected phosphorylation sites, we fractionated proteins by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) or separated tryptic peptides on an anion exchanger (SAX) prior or after the TiO(2)-based phosphopeptide enrichment, respectively. SEC allowed analysis of minute tissue samples (1 mg total protein), and resulted in identification of more than 4000 sites in a single experiment, comprising eight fractions. SAX in a pipet tip format offered a convenient and rapid way to fractionate phosphopeptides and mapped more than 5000 sites in a single six fraction experiment. To enrich peptides containing phosphotyrosine residues, we describe a filter aided antibody capturing and elution (FACE) method that requires only the uncoupled instead of resin-immobilized capture reagent. In total, we identified 12,035 phosphorylation sites on 4579 brain proteins of which 8446 are novel. Gene Ontology annotation reveals that 23% of identified sites are located on plasma membrane proteins, including a large number of ion channels and transporters. Together with the glycosylation sites from a recent large-scale study, they can confirm or correct predicted membrane topologies of these proteins, as we show for the examples calcium channels and glutamate receptors. PMID:20415495

  7. Crystal structure of human tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-2 reveals the mechanism of protein tyrosine sulfation reaction

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Takamasa; Fujikawa, Yukari; Kawaguchi, Yoshirou; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Soejima, Masayuki; Adachi, Rumi; Nakanishi, Yuichi; Mishiro-Sato, Emi; Liu, Ming-Cheh; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Kimura, Makoto; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational protein modification by tyrosine-sulfation plays an important role in extracellular protein-protein interactions. The protein tyrosine sulfation reaction is catalyzed by the Golgi-enzyme called the tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). To date, no crystal structure is available for TPST. Detailed mechanism of protein tyrosine sulfation reaction has thus remained unclear. Here we present the first crystal structure of the human TPST isoform 2 (TPST2) complexed with a substrate peptide (C4P5Y3) derived from complement C4 and 3’-phosphoadenosine-5’-phosphate (PAP) at 1.9Å resolution. Structural and complementary mutational analyses revealed the molecular basis for catalysis being an SN2-like in-line displacement mechanism. TPST2 appeared to recognize the C4 peptide in a deep cleft by using a short parallel β-sheet type interaction, and the bound C4P5Y3 forms an L-shaped structure. Surprisingly, the mode of substrate peptide recognition observed in the TPST2 structure resembles that observed for the receptor type tyrosine kinases. PMID:23481380

  8. Principal Component Analysis reveals correlation of cavities evolution and functional motions in proteins.

    PubMed

    Desdouits, Nathan; Nilges, Michael; Blondel, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Protein conformation has been recognized as the key feature determining biological function, as it determines the position of the essential groups specifically interacting with substrates. Hence, the shape of the cavities or grooves at the protein surface appears to drive those functions. However, only a few studies describe the geometrical evolution of protein cavities during molecular dynamics simulations (MD), usually with a crude representation. To unveil the dynamics of cavity geometry evolution, we developed an approach combining cavity detection and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This approach was applied to four systems subjected to MD (lysozyme, sperm whale myoglobin, Dengue envelope protein and EF-CaM complex). PCA on cavities allows us to perform efficient analysis and classification of the geometry diversity explored by a cavity. Additionally, it reveals correlations between the evolutions of the cavities and structures, and can even suggest how to modify the protein conformation to induce a given cavity geometry. It also helps to perform fast and consensual clustering of conformations according to cavity geometry. Finally, using this approach, we show that both carbon monoxide (CO) location and transfer among the different xenon sites of myoglobin are correlated with few cavity evolution modes of high amplitude. This correlation illustrates the link between ligand diffusion and the dynamic network of internal cavities. PMID:25424655

  9. Effects of pressure on the dynamics of a hyperthermophilic protein revealed by quasielastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, U. R.; Bhowmik, D.; Copley, J. R. D.; Tyagi, M.; Leao, J. B.; Chu, X.-Q.

    Inorganic pyrophosphatase (IPPase) from Thermococcus thioreducens is a large oligomeric protein derived from hyperthermophilic microorganism that is found near hydrothermal vents deep under the sea, where the pressure is nearly 100 MPa. Here we study the effects of pressure on the conformational flexibility and relaxation dynamics of IPPase over a wide temperature range using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. Two spectrometers were used to investigate the β-relaxation dynamics of proteins in time ranges from 2 to 25 ps, and from 100 ps to 2 ns. Our results reveal that, under the pressure of 100 MPa, IPPase displays much faster relaxation dynamics than a mesophilic model protein, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), opposite to what we observed previously under the ambient pressure. These contradictory observations imply that high pressure affects the dynamical properties of proteins by distorting their energy landscapes. Accordingly, we derived a general schematic denaturation phase diagram that can be used as a general picture to understand the effects of pressure on protein dynamics and activities Wayne State Univ Startup Fund.

  10. Protein structural ensembles are revealed by redefining X-ray electron density noise.

    PubMed

    Lang, P Therese; Holton, James M; Fraser, James S; Alber, Tom

    2014-01-01

    To increase the power of X-ray crystallography to determine not only the structures but also the motions of biomolecules, we developed methods to address two classic crystallographic problems: putting electron density maps on the absolute scale of e(-)/Å(3) and calculating the noise at every point in the map. We find that noise varies with position and is often six to eight times lower than thresholds currently used in model building. Analyzing the rescaled electron density maps from 485 representative proteins revealed unmodeled conformations above the estimated noise for 45% of side chains and a previously hidden, low-occupancy inhibitor of HIV capsid protein. Comparing the electron density maps in the free and nucleotide-bound structures of three human protein kinases suggested that substrate binding perturbs distinct intrinsic allosteric networks that link the active site to surfaces that recognize regulatory proteins. These results illustrate general approaches to identify and analyze alternative conformations, low-occupancy small molecules, solvent distributions, communication pathways, and protein motions. PMID:24363322

  11. The Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins reveals spatiotemporal dynamics of tubular extensions.

    PubMed

    Matz, Joachim M; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Grützke, Josephine; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W A

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte is an extraordinary host cell for intracellular pathogens and requires extensive remodelling to become permissive for infection. Malaria parasites modify their host red blood cells through protein export to acquire nutrients and evade immune responses. Endogenous fluorescent tagging of three signature proteins of the Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins (PTEX), heat shock protein 101, exported protein 2 (EXP2), and PTEX88, revealed motile, tubular extensions of the parasitophorous vacuole that protrude from the parasite far into the red blood cell. EXP2 displays a more prominent presence at the periphery of the parasite, consistent with its proposed role in pore formation. The tubular compartment is most prominent during trophozoite growth. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of individual PTEX components during sporogony and liver-stage development indicates additional functions and tight regulation of the PTEX translocon during parasite life cycle progression. Together, live cell imaging and correlative light and electron microscopy permitted previously unrecognized spatiotemporal and subcellular resolution of PTEX-containing tubules in murine malaria parasites. These findings further refine current models for Plasmodium-induced erythrocyte makeover. PMID:26219962

  12. The Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins reveals spatiotemporal dynamics of tubular extensions

    PubMed Central

    Matz, Joachim M.; Goosmann, Christian; Brinkmann, Volker; Grützke, Josephine; Ingmundson, Alyssa; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W. A.

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte is an extraordinary host cell for intracellular pathogens and requires extensive remodelling to become permissive for infection. Malaria parasites modify their host red blood cells through protein export to acquire nutrients and evade immune responses. Endogenous fluorescent tagging of three signature proteins of the Plasmodium berghei translocon of exported proteins (PTEX), heat shock protein 101, exported protein 2 (EXP2), and PTEX88, revealed motile, tubular extensions of the parasitophorous vacuole that protrude from the parasite far into the red blood cell. EXP2 displays a more prominent presence at the periphery of the parasite, consistent with its proposed role in pore formation. The tubular compartment is most prominent during trophozoite growth. Distinct spatiotemporal expression of individual PTEX components during sporogony and liver-stage development indicates additional functions and tight regulation of the PTEX translocon during parasite life cycle progression. Together, live cell imaging and correlative light and electron microscopy permitted previously unrecognized spatiotemporal and subcellular resolution of PTEX-containing tubules in murine malaria parasites. These findings further refine current models for Plasmodium-induced erythrocyte makeover. PMID:26219962

  13. A novel antimicrobial protein isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum) shares homology with an acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Yuan, Fenghua; Gao, Yin; Liang, Chenggang; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Changling; He, Liyuan

    2003-12-01

    The nucleotide and amino acids sequences for AP(1) will appear in the GenBank(R) and NCBI databases under accession number AY297449. A novel antimicrobial protein (AP(1)) was purified from leaves of the potato ( Solanum tuberosum, variety MS-42.3) with a procedure involving ammonium sulphate fractionation, molecular sieve chromatography with Sephacryl S-200 and hydrophobic chromatography with Butyl-Sepharose using a FPLC system. The inhibition spectrum investigation showed that AP(1) had good inhibition activity against five different strains of Ralstonia solanacearum from potato or other crops, and two fungal pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria solani from potato. The full-length cDNA encoding AP(1) has been successfully cloned by screening a cDNA expression library of potato with an anti-AP(1) antibody and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR. Determination of the nucleotide sequences revealed the presence of an open reading frame encoding 343 amino acids. At the C-terminus of AP(1) there is an ATP-binding domain, and the N-terminus exhibits 58% identity with an/the acid phosphatase from Mesorhizobium loti. SDS/PAGE and Western blotting analysis suggested that the AP(1) gene can be successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and recognized by an antibody against AP(1). Also the expressed protein showed an inhibition activity the same as original AP(1) protein isolated from potato. We suggest that AP(1) most likely belongs to a new group of proteins with antimicrobial characteristics in vitro and functions in relation to phosphorylation and energy metabolism of plants. PMID:12927022

  14. Modelling NifH2 protein of Clostridium pasteurianum reveals clues about its physiological function.

    PubMed

    Kasap, Murat

    2006-11-01

    Clostridium pasteurianum is an anaerobic free-living nitrogen fixer. As a unique feature, the organism contains five extra nifH-like genes in addition to nifH1. Detailed analysis with respect to the structure and function of the nifH-like gene products is missing due to the lack of information about the presence of their translation products in the cell. Recent work indicates that the nifH2 gene is transcribed and translated into a polypeptide of expected size in nitrogen-fixing cells of C. pasteurianum and is regulated both at the transcriptional and translational levels. However, the current data do not reveal the physiological function of the NifH2 protein. In this study, we have used computer tools and the NifH1 of C. pasteurianum as the template to predict a possible tertiary structure and assign a putative function for NifH2 protein. A comparison of the structures of the NifH1 and modelled NifH2 revealed similarities in the polypeptide conformations for both monomers. Analysis of the properties of nucleotide binding, dimer interacting and cluster containing regions did not reveal major differences between NifH1 and modelled NifH2, although minor differences were observed. Rigid docking results revealed the possibility of formation of a NifH1-NifH2 heterodimer as well as formation of a NifH2 homodimer. We, therefore, propose that NifH2 can form a dimer with NifH1, albeit less efficiently and may function as a regulatory Fe-protein. PMID:16495101

  15. LEA polypeptide profiling of recalcitrant and orthodox legume seeds reveals ABI3-regulated LEA protein abundance linked to desiccation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hundertmark, Michaela; Buitink, Julia

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to orthodox seeds that acquire desiccation tolerance during maturation, recalcitrant seeds are unable to survive drying. These desiccation-sensitive seeds constitute an interesting model for comparative analysis with phylogenetically close species that are desiccation tolerant. Considering the importance of LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins as protective molecules both in drought and in desiccation tolerance, the heat-stable proteome was characterized in cotyledons of the legume Castanospermum australe and it was compared with that of the orthodox model legume Medicago truncatula. RNA sequencing identified transcripts of 16 homologues out of 17 LEA genes for which polypeptides are detected in M. truncatula seeds. It is shown that for 12 LEA genes, polypeptides were either absent or strongly reduced in C. australe cotyledons compared with M. truncatula seeds. Instead, osmotically responsive, non-seed-specific dehydrins accumulated to high levels in the recalcitrant cotyledons compared with orthodox seeds. Next, M. truncatula mutants of the ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) gene were characterized. Mature Mtabi3 seeds were found to be desiccation sensitive when dried below a critical water content of 0.4g H2O g DW–1. Characterization of the LEA proteome of the Mtabi3 seeds revealed a subset of LEA proteins with severely reduced abundance that were also found to be reduced or absent in C. australe cotyledons. Transcripts of these genes were indeed shown to be ABI3 responsive. The results highlight those LEA proteins that are critical to desiccation tolerance and suggest that comparable regulatory pathways responsible for their accumulation are missing in both desiccation-sensitive genotypes, revealing new insights into the mechanistic basis of the recalcitrant trait in seeds. PMID:24043848

  16. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-07-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  17. Chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry targeting acidic residues in proteins and protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Alexander; Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Unverdorben, Pia; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Frydman, Judith; Förster, Friedrich; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The study of proteins and protein complexes using chemical cross-linking followed by the MS identification of the cross-linked peptides has found increasingly widespread use in recent years. Thus far, such analyses have used almost exclusively homobifunctional, amine-reactive cross-linking reagents. Here we report the development and application of an orthogonal cross-linking chemistry specific for carboxyl groups. Chemical cross-linking of acidic residues is achieved using homobifunctional dihydrazides as cross-linking reagents and a coupling chemistry at neutral pH that is compatible with the structural integrity of most protein complexes. In addition to cross-links formed through insertion of the dihydrazides with different spacer lengths, zero-length cross-link products are also obtained, thereby providing additional structural information. We demonstrate the application of the reaction and the MS identification of the resulting cross-linked peptides for the chaperonin TRiC/CCT and the 26S proteasome. The results indicate that the targeting of acidic residues for cross-linking provides distance restraints that are complementary and orthogonal to those obtained from lysine cross-linking, thereby expanding the yield of structural information that can be obtained from cross-linking studies and used in hybrid modeling approaches. PMID:24938783

  18. Coffee bean arabinogalactans: acidic polymers covalently linked to protein.

    PubMed

    Redgwell, Robert J; Curti, Delphine; Fischer, Monica; Nicolas, Pierre; Fay, Laurent B

    2002-02-11

    The arabinogalactan content of green coffee beans (Coffea arabica var. Yellow Caturra) was released by a combination of chemical extraction and enzymatic hydrolysis of the mannan-cellulose component of the wall. Several arabinogalactan fractions were isolated, purified by gel-permeation and ion-exchange chromatography and characterised by compositional and linkage analysis. The AG fractions contained between 6 and 8% glucuronic acid, and gave a positive test for the beta-glucosyl-Yariv reagent, a stain specific for arabinogalactan-proteins. The protein component accounted for between 0.5 and 2.0% of the AGPs and contained between 7 and 12% hydroxyproline. The AG moieties displayed considerable heterogeneity with regard to their degree of arabinosylation and the extent and composition of their side-chains. They possessed a MW average of 650 kDa which ranged between 150 and 2000 kDa. An investigation of the structural features of the major AG fraction, released following enzymatic hydrolysis of the mannan-cellulose polymers, allowed a partial structure of coffee arabinogalactan to be proposed. PMID:11844494

  19. Small acid soluble proteins for rapid spore identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Jokerst, Amanda S.

    2006-12-01

    This one year LDRD addressed the problem of rapid characterization of bacterial spores such as those from the genus Bacillus, the group that contains pathogenic spores such as B. anthracis. In this effort we addressed the feasibility of using a proteomics based approach to spore characterization using a subset of conserved spore proteins known as the small acid soluble proteins or SASPs. We proposed developing techniques that built on our previous expertise in microseparations to rapidly characterize or identify spores. An alternative SASP extraction method was developed that was amenable to both the subsequent fluorescent labeling required for laser-induced fluorescence detection and the low ionic strength requirements for isoelectric focusing. For the microseparations, both capillary isoelectric focusing and chip gel electrophoresis were employed. A variety of methods were evaluated to improve the molecular weight resolution for the SASPs, which are in a molecular weight range that is not well resolved by the current methods. Isoelectric focusing was optimized and employed to resolve the SASPs using UV absorbance detection. Proteomic signatures of native wild type Bacillus spores and clones genetically engineered to produce altered SASP patterns were assessed by slab gel electrophoresis, capillary isoelectric focusing with absorbance detection as well as microchip based gel electrophoresis employing sensitive laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  20. Crystal growth of proteins, nucleic acids, and viruses in gels.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Bernard; Sauter, Claude; Théobald-Dietrich, Anne; Moreno, Abel; Schellenberger, Pascale; Robert, Marie-Claire; Capelle, Bernard; Sanglier, Sarah; Potier, Noëlle; Giegé, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Medium-sized single crystals with perfect habits and no defect producing intense and well-resolved diffraction patterns are the dream of every protein crystallographer. Crystals of biological macromolecules possessing these characteristics can be prepared within a medium in which mass transport is restricted to diffusion. Chemical gels (like polysiloxane) and physical gels (such as agarose) provide such an environment and are therefore suitable for the crystallisation of biological macromolecules. Instructions for the preparation of each type of gel are given to urge crystal growers to apply diffusive media for enhancing crystallographic quality of their crystals. Examples of quality enhancement achieved with silica and agarose gels are given. Results obtained with other substances forming gel-like media (such as lipidic phases and cellulose derivatives) are presented. Finally, the use of gels in combination with capillary tubes for counter-diffusion experiments is discussed. Methods and techniques implemented with proteins can also be applied to nucleic acids and nucleoprotein assemblies such as viruses. PMID:20005247

  1. Protein Composition of Infectious Spores Reveals Novel Sexual Development and Germination Factors in Cryptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingwei; Hebert, Alexander S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Hull, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Spores are an essential cell type required for long-term survival across diverse organisms in the tree of life and are a hallmark of fungal reproduction, persistence, and dispersal. Among human fungal pathogens, spores are presumed infectious particles, but relatively little is known about this robust cell type. Here we used the meningitis-causing fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to determine the roles of spore-resident proteins in spore biology. Using highly sensitive nanoscale liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, we compared the proteomes of spores and vegetative cells (yeast) and identified eighteen proteins specifically enriched in spores. The genes encoding these proteins were deleted, and the resulting strains were evaluated for discernable phenotypes. We hypothesized that spore-enriched proteins would be preferentially involved in spore-specific processes such as dormancy, stress resistance, and germination. Surprisingly, however, the majority of the mutants harbored defects in sexual development, the process by which spores are formed. One mutant in the cohort was defective in the spore-specific process of germination, showing a delay specifically in the initiation of vegetative growth. Thus, by using this in-depth proteomics approach as a screening tool for cell type-specific proteins and combining it with molecular genetics, we successfully identified the first germination factor in C. neoformans. We also identified numerous proteins with previously unknown functions in both sexual development and spore composition. Our findings provide the first insights into the basic protein components of infectious spores and reveal unexpected molecular connections between infectious particle production and spore composition in a pathogenic eukaryote. PMID:26313153

  2. A J-Like Protein Influences Fatty Acid Composition of Chloroplast Lipids in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ajjawi, Imad; Coku, Ardian; Froehlich, John E.; Yang, Yue; Osteryoung, Katherine W.; Benning, Christoph; Last, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the lipid and fatty acid metabolic machinery is needed for optimizing production of oils and fatty acids for fuel, industrial feedstocks and nutritional improvement in plants. T-DNA mutants in the poorly annotated Arabidopsis thaliana gene At1g08640 were identified as containing moderately high levels (50–100%) of 16∶1Δ7 and 18∶1Δ9 leaf fatty acids and subtle decreases (5–30%) of 16∶3 and 18∶3 (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/). TLC separation of fatty acids in the leaf polar lipids revealed that the chloroplastic galactolipids monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) were the main lipid types affected by this mutation. Analysis of the inferred amino acid sequence of At1g08640 predicted the presence of a transit peptide, three transmembrane domains and an N-terminal J-like domain, and the gene was named CJD1 for Chloroplast J-like Domain 1. GFP reporter experiments and in vitro chloroplast import assays demonstrated CJD1 is a chloroplast membrane protein. Screening of an Arabidopsis cDNA library by yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H) using the J-like domain of CJD1 as bait identified a plastidial inner envelope protein (Accumulation and Replication of Chloroplasts 6, ARC6) as the primary interacting partner in the Y2H assay. ARC6 plays a central role in chloroplast division and binds CJD1 via its own J-like domain along with an adjacent conserved region whose function is not fully known. These results provide a starting point for future investigations of how mutations in CJD1 affect lipid composition. PMID:22028775

  3. Revealing the binding mode between respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein and benzimidazole-based inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dingjue; Ye, Wei; Chen, HaiFeng

    2015-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major respiratory pathogen in newborn infants and young children and can also be a threat to some elderly and high-risk adults with chronic pulmonary disease and the severely immunocompromised. The RSV fusion (RSVF) protein has been an attractive target for vaccine and drug development. Experimental results indicate a series of benzimidazole-based inhibitors which target RSVF protein to inhibit the viral entry of RSV. To reveal the binding mode between these inhibitors and RSVF protein, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the interactions between the inhibitors and the core domain of RSVF protein. MD results suggest that the active molecules have stronger π-π stacking, cation-π, and other interactions than less active inhibitors. The binding free energy between the active inhibitor and RSVF protein is also found to be significantly lower than that of the less active one using MM/GBSA. Then, Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods were used to construct three dimensional quantitative structure-activity (3D-QSAR) models. The cross-validated q(2) values are found to be 0.821 and 0.795 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. And the non-cross-validated r(2) values are 0.973 and 0.961. Ninety-two test set compounds validated these models. The results suggest that these models are robust with good prediction abilities. Furthermore, these models reveal possible methods to improve the bioactivity of inhibitors. PMID:25872614

  4. System-wide Studies of N-Lysine Acetylation in Rhodopseudomonas palustris Reveals Substrate Specificity of Protein Acetyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Heidi A; Pelletier, Dale A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Protein acetylation is widespread in prokaryotes. Results: Six new acyl-CoA synthetases whose activities are controlled by acetylation were identified, and their substrate preference established. A new protein acetyltransferase was also identified and its substrate specificity determined. Conclusion: Protein acetyltransferases acetylate a conserved lysine residue in protein substrates. Significance: The R. palustris Pat enzyme specifically acetylates AMP-forming acyl-CoA synthetases and regulates fatty acid metabolism.

  5. Latency, duration and dose response relationships of amino acid effects on human muscle protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Michael J; Bohé, Julien; Wolfe, Robert R

    2002-10-01

    The components of the stimulatory effect of food on net deposition of protein are beginning to be identified and separated. One of the most important of these appears to be the effect of amino acids per se in stimulating muscle anabolism. Amino acids appear to have a linear stimulatory effect within the range of normal diurnal plasma concentrations from postabsorptive to postprandial. Within this range, muscle protein synthesis (measured by incorporation of stable isotope tracers of amino acids into biopsied muscle protein) appears to be stimulated approximately twofold; however, little further increase occurs when very high concentrations of amino acids (>2.5 times the normal postabsorptive plasma concentration) are made available. Amino acids provided in surfeit of the ability of the system to synthesize protein are disposed of by oxidation, ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis. The stimulatory effect of amino acids appears to be time dependent; a square wave increase in the availability of amino acids causes muscle protein synthesis to be stimulated and to fall back to basal values, despite continued amino acid availability. The relationship between muscle protein synthesis and insulin availability suggests that most of the stimulatory effects occur at low insulin concentrations, with large increases having no effect. These findings may have implications for our understanding of the body's requirements for protein. The maximal capacity for storage of amino acids as muscle protein probably sets an upper value on the extent to which amino acids can be stored after a single meal. PMID:12368422

  6. Reducing protein adsorption with polymer-grafted hyaluronic acid coatings.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Mohamed H; Prata, Joseph E; Karácsony, Orsolya; Dunér, Gunnar; Washburn, Newell R

    2014-07-01

    We report a thermoresponsive chemical modification strategy of hyaluronic acid (HA) for coating onto a broad range of biomaterials without relying on chemical functionalization of the surface. Poly(di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PMEO2MA), a polymer with a lower critical solution temperature of 26 °C in water, was grafted onto HA to allow facile formation of biopolymer coatings. While the mechanism for film formation appears to involve a complex combination of homogeneous nucleation followed by heterogeneous film growth, we demonstrate that it resulted in hydrophilic coatings that significantly reduce protein adsorption despite the high fraction of hydrophobic (PMEO2MA). Structural characterization was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), which showed the formation of a dense, continuous coating based on 200 nm domains that were stable in protein solutions for at least 15 days. The coatings had a water contact angle of 16°, suggesting the formation of hydrophilic but not fully wetting films. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) as well as biolayer interferometry (BLI) techniques were used to measure adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibrinogen (Fbg), and human immunoglobulin (IgG), with results indicating that HA-PMEO2MA-coated surfaces effectively inhibited adsorption of all three serum proteins. These results are consistent with previous studies demonstrating that this degree of hydrophilicity is sufficient to generate an effectively nonfouling surface and suggest that segregation during the solubility transition resulted in a surface that presented the hydrophilic HA component of the hybrid biopolymer. We conclude that PMEO2MA-grafted HA is a versatile platform for the passivation of hydrophobic biomaterial surfaces without need for substrate functionalization. PMID:24892924

  7. ASSESSMENT OF NEUROTOXICITY: USE OF GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN AS A BIOMARKER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diverse neurotoxic insults results in proliferation and hypertrophy of astrocytes. he hallmark of this response is enhanced expression of the major intermediate filament protein of astrocytes, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). hese observations suggest that GFAP may be a us...

  8. SEED PROTEIN QUANTITIES OF FIELD-GROWN SOYBEANS EXPOSED TO SIMULATED ACIDIC RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of seeds harvested from field-grown soybeans demonstrated that simulated acidic rainfalls from two experimental protocols can significantly decrease total protein contents of soybeans. Statistically significant differences in protein content per seed mass were obtained i...

  9. Affinity chromatography reveals RuBisCO as an ecdysteroid-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Kamlar, Marek; Kohout, Ladislav; Jezek, Rudolf; Harmatha, Juraj; Macek, Tomas

    2008-12-22

    The aim of this work was to isolate plant ecdysteroid-binding proteins using affinity chromatography. Ecdysteroids as insect hormones have been investigated thoroughly but their function and the mechanism of action in plants and other organisms is still unknown although ecdysteroids occur in some plants in a relatively large amount. Therefore, 20-hydroxyecdysone was immobilized on a polymeric carrier as a ligand for affinity chromatography in order to isolate plant ecdysteroid-binding proteins from the cytosolic extract of New Zealand spinach (Tetragonia tetragonoides). Non-specifically bound proteins were eluted with a rising gradient of concentration of sodium chloride, and 3% (v/v) acetic acid was used for the elution of the specifically bound proteins. Using this method, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) was isolated. The influence of ecdysteroids on RuBisCO was further studied. Our results show that ecdysteroids are able to increase the yield of RuBisCO-mediated reaction in which CO(2) is fixed into organic matter by more than 10%. PMID:18761365

  10. Exosome proteomics reveals transcriptional regulator proteins with potential to mediate downstream pathways.

    PubMed

    Ung, Timothy H; Madsen, Helen J; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Lencioni, Alex M; Graner, Michael W

    2014-11-01

    Exosomes are virus-sized, membrane-enclosed vesicles with origins in the cellular endosomal system, but are released extracellularly. As a population, these tiny vesicles carry relatively enormous amounts of information in their protein, lipid and nucleic acid content, and the vesicles can have profound impacts on recipient cells. This review employs publically-available data combined with gene ontology applications to propose a novel concept, that exosomes transport transcriptional and translational machinery that may have direct impacts on gene expression in recipient cells. Here, we examine the previously published proteomic contents of medulloblastoma-derived exosomes, focusing on transcriptional regulators; we found that there are numerous proteins that may have potential roles in transcriptional and translational regulation with putative influence on downstream, cancer-related pathways. We expanded this search to all of the proteins in the Vesiclepedia database; using gene ontology approaches, we see that these regulatory factors are implicated in many of the processes involved in cancer initiation and progression. This information suggests that some of the effects of exosomes on recipient cells may be due to the delivery of protein factors that can directly and fundamentally change the transcriptional landscape of the cells. Within a tumor environment, this has potential to tilt the advantage towards the cancer. PMID:25220623

  11. Exosome proteomics reveals transcriptional regulator proteins with potential to mediate downstream pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Timothy H; Madsen, Helen J; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Lencioni, Alex M; Graner, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are virus-sized, membrane-enclosed vesicles with origins in the cellular endosomal system, but are released extracellularly. As a population, these tiny vesicles carry relatively enormous amounts of information in their protein, lipid and nucleic acid content, and the vesicles can have profound impacts on recipient cells. This review employs publically-available data combined with gene ontology applications to propose a novel concept, that exosomes transport transcriptional and translational machinery that may have direct impacts on gene expression in recipient cells. Here, we examine the previously published proteomic contents of medulloblastoma-derived exosomes, focusing on transcriptional regulators; we found that there are numerous proteins that may have potential roles in transcriptional and translational regulation with putative influence on downstream, cancer-related pathways. We expanded this search to all of the proteins in the Vesiclepedia database; using gene ontology approaches, we see that these regulatory factors are implicated in many of the processes involved in cancer initiation and progression. This information suggests that some of the effects of exosomes on recipient cells may be due to the delivery of protein factors that can directly and fundamentally change the transcriptional landscape of the cells. Within a tumor environment, this has potential to tilt the advantage towards the cancer. PMID:25220623

  12. Proteomic analysis reveals dynamic regulation of fruit development and sugar and acid accumulation in apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Li, Dongxia; Feng, Fengjuan; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the fruit developmental process is critical for fruit quality improvement. Here, we report a comprehensive proteomic analysis of apple fruit development over five growth stages, from young fruit to maturity, coupled with metabolomic profiling. A tandem mass tag (TMT)-based comparative proteomics approach led to the identification and quantification of 7098 and 6247 proteins, respectively. This large-scale proteomic dataset presents a global view of the critical pathways involved in fruit development and metabolism. When linked with metabolomics data, these results provide new insights into the modulation of fruit development, the metabolism and storage of sugars and organic acids (mainly malate), and events within the energy-related pathways for respiration and glycolysis. We suggest that the key steps identified here (e.g. those involving the FK2, TST, EDR6, SPS, mtME and mtMDH switches), can be further targeted to confirm their roles in accumulation and balance of fructose, sucrose and malate. Moreover, our findings imply that the primary reason for decreases in amino acid concentrations during fruit development is related to a reduction in substrate flux via glycolysis, which is mainly regulated by fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and bisphosphoglycerate mutase. PMID:27535992

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Reveals Correlated Inter-Lobe Motion in Protein Lysine Methyltransferase SMYD2

    PubMed Central

    Spellmon, Nicholas; Sun, Xiaonan; Sirinupong, Nualpun; Edwards, Brian; Li, Chunying; Yang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    SMYD proteins are an exciting field of study as they are linked to many types of cancer-related pathways. Cardiac and skeletal muscle development and function also depend on SMYD proteins opening a possible avenue for cardiac-related treatment. Previous crystal structure studies have revealed that this special class of protein lysine methyltransferases have a bilobal structure, and an open–closed motion may regulate substrate specificity. Here we use the molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the still-poorly-understood SMYD2 dynamics. Cross-correlation analysis reveals that SMYD2 exhibits a negative correlated inter-lobe motion. Principle component analysis suggests that this correlated dynamic is contributed to by a twisting motion of the C-lobe with respect to the N-lobe and a clamshell-like motion between the lobes. Dynamical network analysis defines possible allosteric paths for the correlated dynamics. There are nine communities in the dynamical network with six in the N-lobe and three in the C-lobe, and the communication between the lobes is mediated by a lobe-bridging β hairpin. This study provides insight into the dynamical nature of SMYD2 and could facilitate better understanding of SMYD2 substrate specificity. PMID:26717235

  14. The Volumetric Diversity of Misfolded Prion Protein Oligomers Revealed by Pressure Dissociation*

    PubMed Central

    Torrent, Joan; Lange, Reinhard; Rezaei, Human

    2015-01-01

    Protein oligomerization has been associated with a wide range of diseases. High pressure approaches offer a powerful tool for deciphering the underlying molecular mechanisms by revealing volume changes associated with the misfolding and assembly reactions. We applied high pressure to induce conformational changes in three distinct β-sheet-rich oligomers of the prion protein PrP, a protein characterized by a variety of infectious quaternary structures that can propagate stably and faithfully and cause diseases with specific phenotypic traits. We show that pressure induces dissociation of the oligomers and leads to a lower volume monomeric PrP state that refolds into the native conformation after pressure release. By measuring the different pressure and temperature sensitivity of the tested PrP oligomers, we demonstrate significantly different void volumes in their quaternary structure. In addition, by focusing on the kinetic and energetic behavior of the pressure-induced dissociation of one specific PrP oligomer, we reveal a large negative activation volume and an increase in both apparent activation enthalpy and entropy. This suggests a transition state ensemble that is less structured and significantly more hydrated than the oligomeric state. Finally, we found that site-specific fluorescent labeling allows monitoring of the transient population of a kinetic intermediate in the dissociation reaction. Our results indicate that defects in atomic packing may deserve consideration as a new factor that influences differences between PrP assemblies and that could be relevant also for explaining the origin of prion strains. PMID:26126829

  15. Solvent accessible surface area-based hot-spot detection methods for protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Pimenta, António C; Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Melo, André; Cordeiro, Maria N D S; Moreira, Irina S

    2015-05-26

    Due to the importance of hot-spots (HS) detection and the efficiency of computational methodologies, several HS detecting approaches have been developed. The current paper presents new models to predict HS for protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions with better statistics compared with the ones currently reported in literature. These models are based on solvent accessible surface area (SASA) and genetic conservation features subjected to simple Bayes networks (protein-protein systems) and a more complex multi-objective genetic algorithm-support vector machine algorithms (protein-nucleic acid systems). The best models for these interactions have been implemented in two free Web tools. PMID:25845030

  16. Experimental Evolution of a Green Fluorescent Protein Composed of 19 Unique Amino Acids without Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara-Kobayashi, Akio; Hitotsuyanagi, Mitsuhiro; Amikura, Kazuaki; Kiga, Daisuke

    2014-04-01

    At some stage of evolution, genes of organisms may have encoded proteins that were synthesized using fewer than 20 unique amino acids. Similar to evolution of the natural 19-amino-acid proteins GroEL/ES, proteins composed of 19 unique amino acids would have been able to evolve by accumulating beneficial mutations within the 19-amino-acid repertoire encoded in an ancestral genetic code. Because Trp is thought to be the last amino acid included in the canonical 20-amino-acid repertoire, this late stage of protein evolution could be mimicked by experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without tryptophan (Trp). To further understand the evolution of proteins, we tried to mimic the evolution of a 19-amino-acid protein involving the accumulation of beneficial mutations using directed evolution by random mutagenesis on the whole targeted gene sequence. We created active 19-amino-acid green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) without Trp from a poorly fluorescent 19-amino-acid mutant, S1-W57F, by using directed evolution with two rounds of mutagenesis and selection. The N105I and S205T mutations showed beneficial effects on the S1-W57F mutant. When these two mutations were combined on S1-W57F, we observed an additive effect on the fluorescence intensity. In contrast, these mutations showed no clear improvement individually or in combination on GFPS1, which is the parental GFP mutant composed of 20 amino acids. Our results provide an additional example for the experimental evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins without Trp, and would help understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of 19-amino-acid proteins. (236 words)

  17. The Structure of the BfrB-Bfd Complex Reveals Protein-Protein Interactions Enabling Iron Release from Bacterioferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Huili; Wang, Yan; Lovell, Scott; Kumar, Ritesh; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Battaile, Kevin P; Vakser, Ilya A; Rivera, Mario

    2012-09-11

    Ferritin-like molecules are unique to cellular iron homeostasis because they can store iron at concentrations much higher than those dictated by the solubility of Fe3+. Very little is known about the protein interactions that deliver iron for storage or promote the mobilization of stored iron from ferritin-like molecules. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin (Pa-BfrB) in complex with bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (Pa-Bfd) at 2.0 Å resolution. As the first example of a ferritin-like molecule in complex with a cognate partner, the structure provides unprecedented insight into the complementary interface that enables the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Pa-Bfd to promote heme-mediated electron transfer through the BfrB protein dielectric (~18 Å), a process that is necessary to reduce the core ferric mineral and facilitate mobilization of Fe2+. The Pa-BfrB-Bfd complex also revealed the first structure of a Bfd, thus providing a first view to what appears to be a versatile metal binding domain ubiquitous to the large Fer2_BFD family of proteins and enzymes with diverse functions. Residues at the Pa-BfrB-Bfd interface are highly conserved in Bfr and Bfd sequences from a number of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that the specific recognition between Pa-BfrB and Pa-Bfd is of widespread significance to the understanding of bacterial iron homeostasis.

  18. The structure of the BfrB-Bfd complex reveals protein-protein interactions enabling iron release from bacterioferritin

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huili; Wang, Yan; Lovell, Scott; Kumar, Ritesh; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Vakser, Ilya A.; Rivera, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin-like molecules are unique to cellular iron homeostasis because they can store iron at concentrations much higher than those dictated by the solubility of Fe3+. Very little is known about the protein interactions that deliver iron for storage, or promote the mobilization of stored iron from ferritin-like molecules. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin (Pa-BfrB) in complex with bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (Pa-Bfd) at 2.0 Å resolution. As the first example of a ferritin-like molecule in complex with a cognate partner, the structure provides unprecedented insight into the complementary interface that enables the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Pa-Bfd to promote heme-mediated electron transfer through the BfrB protein dielectric (~18 Å), a process that is necessary to reduce the core ferric mineral and facilitate mobilization of Fe2+. The Pa-BfrB-Bfd complex also revealed the first structure of a Bfd, thus providing a first view to what appears to be a versatile metal binding domain ubiquitous to the large Fer2_BFD family of proteins and enzymes with diverse functions. Residues at the Pa-BfrB-Bfd interface are highly conserved in Bfr and Bfd sequences from a number of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that the specific recognition between Pa-BfrB and Pa-Bfd is of widespread significance to the understanding of bacterial iron homeostasis. PMID:22812654

  19. Analysis of TP53 mutation spectra reveals the fingerprint of the potent environmental carcinogen, aristolochic acid

    PubMed Central

    Hollstein, M; Moriya, M.; Grollman, AP; Olivier, M

    2013-01-01

    Genetic alterations in cancer tissues may reflect the mutational fingerprint of environmental carcinogens. Here we review the evidence that support the role of aristolochic acid (AA) in inducing a mutational fingerprint in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 in urothelial carcinomas of the upper urinary tract (UUT). Exposure to AA, a nitrophenathrene carboxylic acid present in certain herbal remedies and in flour prepared from wheat grain contaminated with seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, has been linked to chronic nephropathy and UUT. TP53 mutations in UUT of individuals exposed to AA reveal a unique pattern of mutations characterised by A to T transversions on the non-transcribed strand, which cluster at hotspots rarely mutated in other cancers. This unusual pattern, originally discovered in UUTs from two different populations, one in Taiwan, and one in the Balkans, has been reproduced experimentally by treating mouse cells that harbour human TP53 sequences with AA. The convergence of molecular epidemiological and experimental data establishes a clear causal association between exposure to the human carcinogen AA and UUT cancer. Despite bans on the sale of herbs containing AA, their use continues, raising global public health concern and an urgent need to identify populations at risk. PMID:23422071

  20. Coffee polyphenol caffeic acid but not chlorogenic acid increases 5'AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Satoshi; Egawa, Tatsuro; Ma, Xiao; Oshima, Rieko; Kurogi, Eriko; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2012-11-01

    Chlorogenic acid is an ester of caffeic and quinic acids, and is one of the most widely consumed polyphenols because it is abundant in foods, especially coffee. We explored whether chlorogenic acid and its metabolite, caffeic acid, act directly on skeletal muscle to stimulate 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Incubation of rat epitrochlearis muscles with Krebs buffer containing caffeic acid (≥0.1 mM, ≥30 min) but not chlorogenic acid increased the phosphorylation of AMPKα Thr(172), an essential step for kinase activation, and acetyl CoA carboxylase Ser(79), a downstream target of AMPK, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Analysis of isoform-specific AMPK activity revealed that AMPKα2 activity increased significantly, whereas AMPKα1 activity did not change. This enzyme activation was associated with a reduction in phosphocreatine content and an increased rate of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose transport activity in the absence of insulin. These results suggest that caffeic acid but not chlorogenic acid acutely stimulates skeletal muscle AMPK activity and insulin-independent glucose transport with a reduction of the intracellular energy status. PMID:22227267

  1. Hydroxyindole Carboxylic Acid-Based Inhibitors for Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Beta

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Bai, Yunpeng; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play an important role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. Understanding the role of PTPs within these processes has been hampered by a lack of potent and selective PTP inhibitors. Generating potent and selective probes for PTPs remains a significant challenge because of the highly conserved and positively charged PTP active site that also harbors a redox-sensitive Cys residue. Results: We describe a facile method that uses an appropriate hydroxyindole carboxylic acid to anchor the inhibitor to the PTP active site and relies on the secondary binding elements introduced through an amide-focused library to enhance binding affinity for the target PTP and to impart selectivity against off-target phosphatases. Here, we disclose a novel series of hydroxyindole carboxylic acid-based inhibitors for receptor-type tyrosine protein phosphatase beta (RPTPβ), a potential target that is implicated in blood vessel development. The representative RPTPβ inhibitor 8b-1 (L87B44) has an IC50 of 0.38 μM and at least 14-fold selectivity for RPTPβ over a large panel of PTPs. Moreover, 8b-1 also exhibits excellent cellular activity and augments growth factor signaling in HEK293, MDA-MB-468, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Innovation: The bicyclic salicylic acid pharmacophore-based focused library approach may provide a potential solution to overcome the bioavailability issue that has plagued the PTP drug discovery field for many years. Conclusion: A novel method is described for the development of bioavailable PTP inhibitors that utilizes bicyclic salicylic acid to anchor the inhibitors to the active site and peripheral site interactions to enhance binding affinity and selectivity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2130–2140. PMID:24180557

  2. Pretreatment of Gymnema sylvestre revealed the protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Overproduction of free radicals and decreased antioxidant capacity are well-known risk factors for inflammatory bowel diseases. Gymnema sylvestre (GS) leaves extract is distinguished for its anti-diabetic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Present study is designed to evaluate the preventative activities of GS against acetic acid (AA)-induced ulcerative colitis in Wistar rats. Methods Experimentally ulcerative colitis (UC) was induced by AA in animals pretreated with three different doses of GS leaves extract (50, 100, 200 mg/kg/day) and a single dose of mesalazine (MES, 300 mg/kg/day) for seven days. Twenty four hours later, animals were sacrificed and the colonic tissues were collected. Colonic mucus content was determined using Alcian blue dye binding technique. Levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total glutathione sulfhydryl group (T-GSH) and non-protein sulfhydryl group (NPSH) as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were estimated in colon tissues. Colonic nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and total protein (TP) concentrations were also determined. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO) were estimated in colonic tissues. The histopathological changes of the colonic tissues were also observed. Results In AA administered group TBARS levels were increased, while colonic mucus content, T-GSH and NP-SH, SOD and CAT were reduced in colon. Pretreatment with GS inhibited TBARS elevation as well as mucus content, T-GSH and NP-SH reduction. Enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT were brought back to their normal levels in GS pretreated group. A significant reduction in DNA, RNA and TP levels was seen following AA administration and this inhibition was significantly eliminated by GS treatment. GS pretreatment also inhibited

  3. Proteome-wide analysis reveals clues of complementary interactions between mRNAs and their cognate proteins as the physicochemical foundation of the genetic code

    PubMed Central

    Polyansky, Anton A; Hlevnjak, Mario; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Despite more than 50 years of effort, the origin of the genetic code remains enigmatic. Among different theories, the stereochemical hypothesis suggests that the code evolved as a consequence of direct interactions between amino acids and appropriate bases. If indeed true, such physicochemical foundation of the mRNA/protein relationship could also potentially lead to novel principles of protein-mRNA interactions in general. Inspired by this promise, we have recently explored the connection between the physicochemical properties of mRNAs and their cognate proteins at the proteome level. Using experimentally and computationally derived measures of solubility of amino acids in aqueous solutions of pyrimidine analogs together with knowledge-based interaction preferences of amino acids for different nucleobases, we have revealed a statistically significant matching between the composition of mRNA coding sequences and the base-binding preferences of their cognate protein sequences. Our findings provide strong support for the stereochemical hypothesis of genetic code’s origin and suggest the possibility of direct complementary interactions between mRNAs and cognate proteins even in present-day cells. PMID:23945356

  4. A Shotgun Proteomic Approach Reveals That Fe Deficiency Causes Marked Changes in the Protein Profiles of Plasma Membrane and Detergent-Resistant Microdomain Preparations from Beta vulgaris Roots.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Carbonell, Elain; Takahashi, Daisuke; Lüthje, Sabine; González-Reyes, José Antonio; Mongrand, Sébastien; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Abadía, Anunciación; Uemura, Matsuo; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana Flor

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we have used label-free shotgun proteomic analysis to examine the effects of Fe deficiency on the protein profiles of highly pure sugar beet root plasma membrane (PM) preparations and detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), the latter as an approach to study microdomains. Altogether, 545 proteins were detected, with 52 and 68 of them changing significantly with Fe deficiency in PM and DRM, respectively. Functional categorization of these proteins showed that signaling and general and vesicle-related transport accounted for approximately 50% of the differences in both PM and DRM, indicating that from a qualitative point of view changes induced by Fe deficiency are similar in both preparations. Results indicate that Fe deficiency has an impact in phosphorylation processes at the PM level and highlight the involvement of signaling proteins, especially those from the 14-3-3 family. Lipid profiling revealed Fe-deficiency-induced decreases in phosphatidic acid derivatives, which may impair vesicle formation, in agreement with the decreases measured in proteins related to intracellular trafficking and secretion. The modifications induced by Fe deficiency in the relative enrichment of proteins in DRMs revealed the existence of a group of cytoplasmic proteins that appears to be more attached to the PM in conditions of Fe deficiency. PMID:27321140

  5. Directed evolution and in silico analysis of reaction centre proteins reveal molecular signatures of photosynthesis adaptation to radiation pressure.

    PubMed

    Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya; Polticelli, Fabio; Bertalan, Ivo; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Damasso, Mario; Johanningmeier, Udo; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary mechanisms adopted by the photosynthetic apparatus to modifications in the Earth's atmosphere on a geological time-scale remain a focus of intense research. The photosynthetic machinery has had to cope with continuously changing environmental conditions and particularly with the complex ionizing radiation emitted by solar flares. The photosynthetic D1 protein, being the site of electron tunneling-mediated charge separation and solar energy transduction, is a hot spot for the generation of radiation-induced radical injuries. We explored the possibility to produce D1 variants tolerant to ionizing radiation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and clarified the effect of radiation-induced oxidative damage on the photosynthetic proteins evolution. In vitro directed evolution strategies targeted at the D1 protein were adopted to create libraries of chlamydomonas random mutants, subsequently selected by exposures to radical-generating proton or neutron sources. The common trend observed in the D1 aminoacidic substitutions was the replacement of less polar by more polar amino acids. The applied selection pressure forced replacement of residues more sensitive to oxidative damage with less sensitive ones, suggesting that ionizing radiation may have been one of the driving forces in the evolution of the eukaryotic photosynthetic apparatus. A set of the identified aminoacidic substitutions, close to the secondary plastoquinone binding niche and oxygen evolving complex, were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in un-transformed strains, and their sensitivity to free radicals attack analyzed. Mutants displayed reduced electron transport efficiency in physiological conditions, and increased photosynthetic performance stability and oxygen evolution capacity in stressful high-light conditions. Finally, comparative in silico analyses of D1 aminoacidic sequences of organisms differently located in the evolution chain, revealed a higher ratio of residues more sensitive to

  6. Directed Evolution and In Silico Analysis of Reaction Centre Proteins Reveal Molecular Signatures of Photosynthesis Adaptation to Radiation Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya; Polticelli, Fabio; Bertalan, Ivo; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Damasso, Mario; Johanningmeier, Udo; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary mechanisms adopted by the photosynthetic apparatus to modifications in the Earth's atmosphere on a geological time-scale remain a focus of intense research. The photosynthetic machinery has had to cope with continuously changing environmental conditions and particularly with the complex ionizing radiation emitted by solar flares. The photosynthetic D1 protein, being the site of electron tunneling-mediated charge separation and solar energy transduction, is a hot spot for the generation of radiation-induced radical injuries. We explored the possibility to produce D1 variants tolerant to ionizing radiation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and clarified the effect of radiation-induced oxidative damage on the photosynthetic proteins evolution. In vitro directed evolution strategies targeted at the D1 protein were adopted to create libraries of chlamydomonas random mutants, subsequently selected by exposures to radical-generating proton or neutron sources. The common trend observed in the D1 aminoacidic substitutions was the replacement of less polar by more polar amino acids. The applied selection pressure forced replacement of residues more sensitive to oxidative damage with less sensitive ones, suggesting that ionizing radiation may have been one of the driving forces in the evolution of the eukaryotic photosynthetic apparatus. A set of the identified aminoacidic substitutions, close to the secondary plastoquinone binding niche and oxygen evolving complex, were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in un-transformed strains, and their sensitivity to free radicals attack analyzed. Mutants displayed reduced electron transport efficiency in physiological conditions, and increased photosynthetic performance stability and oxygen evolution capacity in stressful high-light conditions. Finally, comparative in silico analyses of D1 aminoacidic sequences of organisms differently located in the evolution chain, revealed a higher ratio of residues more sensitive to

  7. Fatty acid transport protein 1 can compensate for fatty acid transport protein 4 in the developing mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meei-Hua; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2015-02-01

    Fatty acid transport protein (FATP) 4 is one of a family of six FATPs that facilitate long- and very-long-chain fatty acid uptake. Mice lacking FATP4 are born with tight, thick skin and a defective barrier; they die neonatally because of dehydration and restricted movements. Mutations in SLC27A4, the gene encoding FATP4, cause ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS), characterized by premature birth, respiratory distress, and edematous skin with severe ichthyotic scaling. Symptoms of surviving patients become mild, although atopic manifestations are common. We previously showed that suprabasal keratinocyte expression of a Fatp4 transgene in Fatp4 mutant skin rescues the lethality and ameliorates the skin phenotype. Here we tested the hypothesis that FATP1, the closest FATP4 homolog, can compensate for the lack of FATP4 in our mouse model of IPS, as it might do postnatally in IPS patients. Transgenic expression of FATP1 in suprabasal keratinocytes rescued the phenotype of Fatp4 mutants, and FATP1 sorted to the same intracellular organelles as endogenous FATP4. Thus, FATP1 and FATP4 likely have overlapping substrate specificities, enzymatic activities, and biological functions. These results suggest that increasing expression of FATP1 in suprabasal keratinocytes could normalize the skin of IPS patients and perhaps prevent the atopic manifestations. PMID:25184958

  8. Protein content and amino acids profile of pseudocereals.

    PubMed

    Mota, Carla; Santos, Mariana; Mauro, Raul; Samman, Norma; Matos, Ana Sofia; Torres, Duarte; Castanheira, Isabel

    2016-02-15

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa), amaranth (Amaranthus caudatus) and buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) represent the main protein source in several diets, although these pseudocereals are not currently present in the FCDB nutrient profile information. The aim of this work is to characterise the AA profile of these pseudocereals and compare them with rice. Total protein content revealed to vary from 16.3g/100g (quinoa Salta) to 13.1g/100g (buckwheat) and lower values were found in rice samples (6.7g/100g). For pseudocereals the most abundant essential AA was leucine. Quinoa-Salta evidences the highest leucine content (1013mg/100g) and the minor methionine content (199mg/100g). Buckwheat was the cereal with the highest phenylalanine content (862mg/100g). Rice (Oryza sativa) presents the lowest content for all AA. Results showed pseudocereals as the best source of AA. EuroFIR guidelines where strictly followed and proved to be a crucial tool to guarantee data interchangeability and comparability. PMID:26433287

  9. Impact of antinutritional factors in food proteins on the digestibility of protein and the bioavailability of amino acids and on protein quality.

    PubMed

    Sarwar Gilani, G; Wu Xiao, Chao; Cockell, Kevin A

    2012-08-01

    Dietary antinutritional factors have been reported to adversely affect the digestibility of protein, bioavailability of amino acids and protein quality of foods. Published data on these negative effects of major dietary antinutritional factors are summarized in this manuscript. Digestibility and the quality of mixed diets in developing countries are considerably lower than of those in developed regions. For example, the digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94 %). Poor digestibility of protein in the diets of developing countries, which are based on less refined cereals and grain legumes as major sources of protein, is due to the presence of less digestible protein fractions, high levels of insoluble fibre, and/or high concentrations of antinutritional factors present endogenously or formed during processing. Examples of naturally occurring antinutritional factors include glucosinolates in mustard and canola protein products, trypsin inhibitors and haemagglutinins in legumes, tannins in legumes and cereals, gossypol in cottonseed protein products, and uricogenic nucleobases in yeast protein products. Heat/alkaline treatments of protein products may yield Maillard reaction compounds, oxidized forms of sulphur amino acids, D-amino acids and lysinoalanine (LAL, an unnatural nephrotoxic amino acid derivative). Among common food and feed protein products, soyabeans are the most concentrated source of trypsin inhibitors. The presence of high levels of dietary trypsin inhibitors from soyabeans, kidney beans or other grain legumes have been reported to cause substantial reductions in protein and amino acid digestibility (up to 50 %) and protein quality (up to 100 %) in rats and/or pigs. Similarly, the presence of high levels of tannins in sorghum and other cereals, fababean and other grain legumes can cause

  10. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo. PMID:27503803

  11. The Lipid-Droplet Proteome Reveals that Droplets Are a Protein-Storage Depot

    SciTech Connect

    Cermelli, Silvia; Guo, Yi; Gross, Steven P.; Welte, Michael

    2006-09-19

    Lipid droplets are ubiquitous organelles that are among the basic building blocks of eukaryotic cells. Despite central roles for cholesterol homeostasis and lipid metabolism, their function and protein composition are poorly understood. Results: We purified lipid droplets from Drosophila embryos and analyzed the associated proteins by capillary LC-MS-MS. Important functional groups include enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, signaling molecules, and proteins related to membrane trafficking. Unexpectedly, histones H2A, H2Av, and H2B were present. Using biochemistry, genetics, real-time imaging, and cell biology, we confirm that roughly 50% of certain embryonic histones are physically attached to lipid droplets, a localization conserved in other fly species. Histone association with droplets starts during oogenesis and is prominent in early embryos, but it is undetectable in later stages or in cultured cells. Histones on droplets are not irreversibly trapped; quantitation of droplet histone levels and transplantation experiments suggest that histones are transferred from droplets to nuclei as development proceeds. When this maternal store of histones is unavailable because lipid droplets are mislocalized, zygotic histone production starts prematurely. Conclusions: Because we uncover a striking proteomic similarity of Drosophila droplets to mammalian lipid droplets, Drosophila likely provides a good model for understanding droplet function in general. Our analysis also reveals a new function for these organelles; the massive nature of histone association with droplets and its developmental time-course suggest that droplets sequester maternally provided proteins until they are needed. We propose that lipid droplets can serve as transient storage depots for proteins that lack appropriate binding partners in the cell. Such sequestration may provide a general cellular strategy for handling excess proteins.

  12. Nullspace Sampling with Holonomic Constraints Reveals Molecular Mechanisms of Protein Gαs

    PubMed Central

    Pachov, Dimitar V.; van den Bedem, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Proteins perform their function or interact with partners by exchanging between conformational substates on a wide range of spatiotemporal scales. Structurally characterizing these exchanges is challenging, both experimentally and computationally. Large, diffusional motions are often on timescales that are difficult to access with molecular dynamics simulations, especially for large proteins and their complexes. The low frequency modes of normal mode analysis (NMA) report on molecular fluctuations associated with biological activity. However, NMA is limited to a second order expansion about a minimum of the potential energy function, which limits opportunities to observe diffusional motions. By contrast, kino-geometric conformational sampling (KGS) permits large perturbations while maintaining the exact geometry of explicit conformational constraints, such as hydrogen bonds. Here, we extend KGS and show that a conformational ensemble of the α subunit Gαs of heterotrimeric stimulatory protein Gs exhibits structural features implicated in its activation pathway. Activation of protein Gs by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is associated with GDP release and large conformational changes of its α-helical domain. Our method reveals a coupled α-helical domain opening motion while, simultaneously, Gαs helix α5 samples an activated conformation. These motions are moderated in the activated state. The motion centers on a dynamic hub near the nucleotide-binding site of Gαs, and radiates to helix α4. We find that comparative NMA-based ensembles underestimate the amplitudes of the motion. Additionally, the ensembles fall short in predicting the accepted direction of the full activation pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that nullspace sampling with explicit, holonomic constraints yields ensembles that illuminate molecular mechanisms involved in GDP release and protein Gs activation, and further establish conformational coupling between key structural

  13. Revealing divergent evolution, identifying circular permutations and detecting active-sites by protein structure comparison

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Luonan; Wu, Ling-Yun; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2006-01-01

    Background Protein structure comparison is one of the most important problems in computational biology and plays a key role in protein structure prediction, fold family classification, motif finding, phylogenetic tree reconstruction and protein docking. Results We propose a novel method to compare the protein structures in an accurate and efficient manner. Such a method can be used to not only reveal divergent evolution, but also identify circular permutations and further detect active-sites. Specifically, we define the structure alignment as a multi-objective optimization problem, i.e., maximizing the number of aligned atoms and minimizing their root mean square distance. By controlling a single distance-related parameter, theoretically we can obtain a variety of optimal alignments corresponding to different optimal matching patterns, i.e., from a large matching portion to a small matching portion. The number of variables in our algorithm increases with the number of atoms of protein pairs in almost a linear manner. In addition to solid theoretical background, numerical experiments demonstrated significant improvement of our approach over the existing methods in terms of quality and efficiency. In particular, we show that divergent evolution, circular permutations and active-sites (or structural motifs) can be identified by our method. The software SAMO is available upon request from the authors, or from and . Conclusion A novel formulation is proposed to accurately align protein structures in the framework of multi-objective optimization, based on a sequence order-independent strategy. A fast and accurate algorithm based on the bipartite matching algorithm is developed by exploiting the special features. Convergence of computation is shown in experiments and is also theoretically proven. PMID:16948858

  14. Comparative genomics of lactic acid bacteria reveals a niche-specific gene set

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The recently sequenced genome of Lactobacillus helveticus DPC4571 [1] revealed a dairy organism with significant homology (75% of genes are homologous) to a probiotic bacteria Lb. acidophilus NCFM [2]. This led us to hypothesise that a group of genes could be determined which could define an organism's niche. Results Taking 11 fully sequenced lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as our target, (3 dairy LAB, 5 gut LAB and 3 multi-niche LAB), we demonstrated that the presence or absence of certain genes involved in sugar metabolism, the proteolytic system, and restriction modification enzymes were pivotal in suggesting the niche of a strain. We identified 9 niche specific genes, of which 6 are dairy specific and 3 are gut specific. The dairy specific genes identified in Lactobacillus helveticus DPC4571 were lhv_1161 and lhv_1171, encoding components of the proteolytic system, lhv_1031 lhv_1152, lhv_1978 and lhv_0028 encoding restriction endonuclease genes, while bile salt hydrolase genes lba_0892 and lba_1078, and the sugar metabolism gene lba_1689 from Lb. acidophilus NCFM were identified as gut specific genes. Conclusion Comparative analysis revealed that if an organism had homologs to the dairy specific geneset, it probably came from a dairy environment, whilst if it had homologs to gut specific genes, it was highly likely to be of intestinal origin. We propose that this "barcode" of 9 genes will be a useful initial guide to researchers in the LAB field to indicate an organism's ability to occupy a specific niche. PMID:19265535

  15. Dynamics of Protein Expression Reveals Primary Targets and Secondary Messengers of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Signaling in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Drabovich, Andrei P; Pavlou, Maria P; Schiza, Christina; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-mediated proliferation of breast cancer cells is facilitated through expression of multiple primary target genes, products of which induce a secondary response to stimulation. To differentiate between the primary and secondary target proteins of ERα signaling, we measured dynamics of protein expression induced by 17β-estradiol in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Measurement of the global proteomic effects of estradiol by stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) resulted in identification of 103 estrogen-regulated proteins, with only 40 of the corresponding genes having estrogen response elements. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assays were used to validate the differential expression of 19 proteins and measure the dynamics of their expression within 72 h after estradiol stimulation, and in the absence or presence of 4-hydroxytamoxifen, to confirm ERα-mediated signaling. Dynamics of protein expression unambiguously revealed early and delayed response proteins and well correlated with presence or absence of estrogen response elements in the corresponding genes. Finally, we quantified dynamics of protein expression in a rarely studied network of transcription factors with a negative feedback loop (ERα-EGR3-NAB2). Because NAB2 protein is a repressor of EGR3-induced transcription, siRNA-mediated silencing of NAB2 resulted in the enhanced expression of the EGR3-induced protein ITGA2. To conclude, we provided a high-quality proteomic resource to supplement genomic and transcriptomic studies of ERα signaling. PMID:27067054

  16. Prebiotic Synthesis of Hydrophobic and Protein Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ring, David; Wolman, Yecheskel; Friedmann, Nadav; Miller, Stanley L.

    1972-01-01

    The formation of amino acids by the action of electric discharges on a mixture of methane, nitrogen, and water with traces of ammonia was studied in detail. The presence of glycine, alanine, α-amino-n-butyric acid, α-aminoisobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, isovaline, leucine, isoleucine, alloisoleucine, norleucine, proline, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, allothreonine, α-hydroxy-γ-aminobutyric acid, and α,γ-diaminobutyric acid was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All of the primary α-amino acids found in the Murchison Meteorite have been synthesized by this electric discharge experiment. PMID:4501592

  17. Gene Activation in Eukaryotes: Are Nuclear Acidic Proteins the Cause or the Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Thoru

    1974-01-01

    Nuclear acidic proteins have been implicated in the positive control of gene transcription in eukaryotes. This hypothesis was examined in greater detail by analysis of these proteins during experimental gene activation by a technique for fractionating nuclei into chromatin and the ribonucleoprotein particles that contain heterogeneous nuclear RNA. When synthesis of rat-liver heterogeneous nuclear RNA was stimulated by administration of hydrocortisone, there was a parallel increase in the labeling of acidic proteins in ribonucleoprotein particles. However, there was no detectable effect on the labeling of either acidic chromatin proteins or histones. Thus, the nuclear acidic proteins that respond to the hormone are concerned with a post-transcriptional event, namely the assembly and processing of ribonucleoprotein particles that contain heterogeneous RNA, rather than with direct gene activation. Increases in synthesis of “chromatin” acidic proteins during gene activation observed by others may reflect the presence of these ribonucleoprotein particles in crude chromatin preparations. Images PMID:4522777

  18. Hyper sensitive protein detection by Tandem-HTRF reveals Cyclin D1 dynamics in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Alexandre; Champagne, Julien; Auzemery, Baptiste; Fuentes, Ivanna; Maurel, Benjamin; Bienvenu, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We present here a novel method for the semi-quantitative detection of low abundance proteins in solution that is both fast and simple. It is based on Homogenous Time Resolved Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (HTRF), between a lanthanide labeled donor antibody and a d2 or XL665 labeled acceptor antibody that are both raised against different epitopes of the same target. This novel approach we termed “Tandem-HTRF”, can specifically reveal rare polypeptides from only a few microliters of cellular lysate within one hour in a 384-well plate format. Using this sensitive approach, we observed surprisingly that the core cell cycle regulator Cyclin D1 is sustained in fully developed adult organs and harbors an unexpected expression pattern affected by environmental challenge. Thus our method, Tandem-HTRF offers a promising way to investigate subtle variations in the dynamics of sparse proteins from limited biological material. PMID:26503526

  19. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM1 characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines. PMID:25389185

  20. Structure of the Yeast DEAD Box Protein Mss116p Reveals Two Wedges that Crimp RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Del Campo, Mark; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2010-01-12

    The yeast DEAD box protein Mss116p is a general RNA chaperone that functions in mitochondrial group I and II intron splicing, translational activation, and RNA end processing. Here we determined high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of Mss116p complexed with an RNA oligonucleotide and ATP analogs AMP-PNP, ADP-BeF{sub 3}, or ADP-AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structures show the entire helicase core acting together with a functionally important C-terminal extension. In all structures, the helicase core is in a closed conformation with a wedge {alpha} helix bending RNA 3' of the central bound nucleotides, as in previous DEAD box protein structures. Notably, Mss116p's C-terminal extension also bends RNA 5' of the central nucleotides, resulting in RNA crimping. Despite reported functional differences, we observe few structural changes in ternary complexes with different ATP analogs. The structures constrain models of DEAD box protein function and reveal a strand separation mechanism in which a protein uses two wedges to act as a molecular crimper.

  1. Synthesis of alanyl nucleobase amino acids and their incorporation into proteins.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Poulami; Dedkova, Larisa M; Ellington, Andrew D; Yakovchuk, Petro; Lim, Jaebum; Anslyn, Eric V; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-09-15

    Proteins which bind to nucleic acids and regulate their structure and functions are numerous and exceptionally important. Such proteins employ a variety of strategies for recognition of the relevant structural elements in their nucleic acid substrates, some of which have been shown to involve rather subtle interactions which might have been difficult to design from first principles. In the present study, we have explored the preparation of proteins containing unnatural amino acids having nucleobase side chains. In principle, the introduction of multiple nucleobase amino acids into the nucleic acid binding domain of a protein should enable these modified proteins to interact with their nucleic acid substrates using Watson-Crick and other base pairing interactions. We describe the synthesis of five alanyl nucleobase amino acids protected in a fashion which enabled their attachment to a suppressor tRNA, and their incorporation into each of two proteins with acceptable efficiencies. The nucleobases studied included cytosine, uracil, thymine, adenine and guanine, i.e. the major nucleobase constituents of DNA and RNA. Dihydrofolate reductase was chosen as one model protein to enable direct comparison of the facility of incorporation of the nucleobase amino acids with numerous other unnatural amino acids studied previously. The Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I was chosen as a representative DNA binding protein whose mode of action has been studied in detail. PMID:27452282

  2. Molecular characterization of a 13-amino acid deletion in VP1 (1D) protein and novel amino acid substitutions in 3D polymerase protein of foot and mouth disease virus subtype A/Iran87

    PubMed Central

    Jelokhani-Niaraki, Saber; Hashemnejad, Khadije; Kamalzadeh, Morteza; Lotfi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the VP1 (1D) and partial 3D polymerase (3Dpol) coding regions of the foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) vaccine strain A/Iran87, a highly passaged isolate (~150 passages), was determined and aligned with previously published FMDV serotype A sequences. Overall analysis of the amino acid substitutions revealed that the partial 3Dpol coding region contained four amino acid alterations. Amino acid sequence comparison of the VP1 coding region of the field isolates revealed deletions in the highly passaged Iranian isolate (A/Iran87). The prominent G-H loop of the FMDV VP1 protein contains the conserved arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide, which is a well-known ligand for a specific cell surface integrin. Despite losing the RGD sequence of the VP1 protein and an Asp26→Glu substitution in a beta sheet located within a small groove of the 3Dpol protein, the virus grew in BHK 21 suspension cell cultures. Since this strain has been used as a vaccine strain, it may be inferred that the RGD deletion has no critical role in virus attachment to the cell during the initiation of infection. It is probable that this FMDV subtype can utilize other pathways for cell attachment. PMID:22122902

  3. Identification of Dynamic Changes in Proteins Associated with the Cellular Cytoskeleton after Exposure to Okadaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Opsahl, Jill A.; Ljostveit, Sonja; Solstad, Therese; Risa, Kristin; Roepstorff, Peter; Fladmark, Kari E.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of cells to the diarrhetic shellfish poison, okadaic acid, leads to a dramatic reorganization of cytoskeletal architecture and loss of cell-cell contact. When cells are exposed to high concentrations of okadaic acid (100–500 nM), the morphological rearrangement is followed by apoptotic cell death. Okadaic acid inhibits the broad acting Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, which results in hyperphosphorylation of a large number of proteins. Some of these hyperphosphorylated proteins are most likely key players in the reorganization of the cell morphology induced by okadaic acid. We wanted to identify these phosphoproteins and searched for them in the cellular lipid rafts, which have been found to contain proteins that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and cell adhesion. By using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture cells treated with okadaic acid (400 nM) could be combined with control cells before the isolation of lipid rafts. Protein phosphorylation events and translocations induced by okadaic acid were identified by mass spectrometry. Okadaic acid was shown to regulate the phosphorylation status and location of proteins associated with the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules and cell adhesion structures. A large number of these okadaic acid-regulated proteins have previously also been shown to be similarly regulated prior to cell proliferation and migration. Our results suggest that okadaic acid activates general cell signaling pathways that induce breakdown of the cortical actin cytoskeleton and cell detachment. PMID:23708184

  4. Whole-body protein turnover reveals the cost of detoxification of secondary metabolites in a vertebrate browser.

    PubMed

    Au, Jessie; Marsh, Karen J; Wallis, Ian R; Foley, William J

    2013-10-01

    The detoxification limitation hypothesis predicts that the metabolism and biotransformation of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) elicit a cost to herbivores. There have been many attempts to estimate these costs to mammalian herbivores in terms of energy, but this ignores what may be a more important cost-increases in protein turnover and concomitant losses of amino acids. We measured the effect of varying dietary protein concentrations on the ingestion of two PSMs (1,8 cineole-a monoterpene, and benzoic acid-an aromatic carboxylic acid) by common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula). The dietary protein concentration had a small effect on how much cineole possums ingested. In contrast, protein had a large effect on how much benzoate they ingested, especially at high dietary concentrations of benzoate. This prompted us to measure the effects of dietary protein and benzoate on whole-body protein turnover using the end-product method following an oral dose of [(15)N] glycine. Increasing the concentration of dietary protein in diets without PSMs improved N balance but did not influence whole-body protein turnover. In contrast, feeding benzoate in a low-protein diet pushed animals into negative N balance. The concomitant increases in the rates of whole-body protein turnover in possums eating diets with more benzoate were indicative of a protein cost of detoxification. This was about 30 % of the dietary N intake and highlights the significant effects that PSMs can have on nutrient metabolism and retention. PMID:23640139

  5. Quantitative H2S-mediated protein sulfhydration reveals metabolic reprogramming during the integrated stress response.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-Huang; Krokowski, Dawid; Guan, Bo-Jhih; Bederman, Ilya; Majumder, Mithu; Parisien, Marc; Diatchenko, Luda; Kabil, Omer; Willard, Belinda; Banerjee, Ruma; Wang, Benlian; Bebek, Gurkan; Evans, Charles R; Fox, Paul L; Gerson, Stanton L; Hoppel, Charles L; Liu, Ming; Arvan, Peter; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The sulfhydration of cysteine residues in proteins is an important mechanism involved in diverse biological processes. We have developed a proteomics approach to quantitatively profile the changes of sulfhydrated cysteines in biological systems. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that sulfhydrated cysteines are part of a wide range of biological functions. In pancreatic β cells exposed to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, elevated H2S promotes the sulfhydration of enzymes in energy metabolism and stimulates glycolytic flux. We propose that transcriptional and translational reprogramming by the integrated stress response (ISR) in pancreatic β cells is coupled to metabolic alternations triggered by sulfhydration of key enzymes in intermediary metabolism. PMID:26595448

  6. Metagenome-based screening reveals worldwide distribution of LOV-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Gopal P; Losi, Aba; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomes from various environments were screened for sequences homologous to light, oxygen, voltage (LOV)-domain proteins. LOV domains are flavin binding, blue-light (BL)-sensitive photoreceptors present in 10-15% of deposited prokaryotic genomes. The LOV domain has been selected, since BL is an ever present and sometimes harmful environmental factor for microbial communities. The majority of the metagenome material originated from the Sargasso Sea Project and from open-ocean sampling. In total, more than 40 million open reading frames were investigated for LOV-domain sequences. Most sequences were identified from aquatic material, but they were also found in metagenomes from soil and extreme environments, e.g. hypersaline ponds, acidic mine drainage or wastewater treatment facilities. A total of 578 LOV domains was assigned by three criteria: (1) the highly conserved core region, (2) the presence of minimally 14 essential amino acids and (3) a minimal length of 80 amino acids. More than three quarters of these identified genes showed a sequence divergence of more than 20% from database-deposited LOV domains from known organisms, indicating the large variation of this photoreceptor motif. The broad occurrence of LOV domains in metagenomes emphasizes their important physiological role for light-induced signal transduction, stress adaptation and survival mechanisms. PMID:22044076

  7. Polyploid genome of Camelina sativa revealed by isolation of fatty acid synthesis genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Camelina sativa, an oilseed crop in the Brassicaceae family, has inspired renewed interest due to its potential for biofuels applications. Little is understood of the nature of the C. sativa genome, however. A study was undertaken to characterize two genes in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, fatty acid desaturase (FAD) 2 and fatty acid elongase (FAE) 1, which revealed unexpected complexity in the C. sativa genome. Results In C. sativa, Southern analysis indicates the presence of three copies of both FAD2 and FAE1 as well as LFY, a known single copy gene in other species. All three copies of both CsFAD2 and CsFAE1 are expressed in developing seeds, and sequence alignments show that previously described conserved sites are present, suggesting that all three copies of both genes could be functional. The regions downstream of CsFAD2 and upstream of CsFAE1 demonstrate co-linearity with the Arabidopsis genome. In addition, three expressed haplotypes were observed for six predicted single-copy genes in 454 sequencing analysis and results from flow cytometry indicate that the DNA content of C. sativa is approximately three-fold that of diploid Camelina relatives. Phylogenetic analyses further support a history of duplication and indicate that C. sativa and C. microcarpa might share a parental genome. Conclusions There is compelling evidence for triplication of the C. sativa genome, including a larger chromosome number and three-fold larger measured genome size than other Camelina relatives, three isolated copies of FAD2, FAE1, and the KCS17-FAE1 intergenic region, and three expressed haplotypes observed for six predicted single-copy genes. Based on these results, we propose that C. sativa be considered an allohexaploid. The characterization of fatty acid synthesis pathway genes will allow for the future manipulation of oil composition of this emerging biofuel crop; however, targeted manipulations of oil composition and general development of C. sativa should

  8. Towards the elucidation of molecular determinants of cooperativity in the liver bile acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Pedò, Massimo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ferranti, Pasquale; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2009-11-15

    Bile acid binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Liver BABPs act in parallel with ileal transporters to ensure vectorial transport of bile salts in hepatocytes and enterocytes, respectively. We describe the investigation of ligand binding to liver BABP, an essential step in the understanding of intracellular bile salt transport. Binding site occupancies were monitored in NMR titration experiments using (15)N-labelled ligand, while the relative populations of differently bound BABP forms were assessed by mass spectrometry. This site-specific information allowed the determination of intrinsic thermodynamic parameters and the identification of an extremely high cooperativity between two binding sites. Protein-observed NMR experiments revealed a global structural rearrangement which suggests an allosteric mechanism at the basis of the observed cooperativity. The view of a molecular tool capable of buffering against significant concentrations of free bile salts in a large range of solution conditions emerges from the observed pH-dependence of binding. We set to determine the molecular determinants of cooperativity by analysing the binding properties of a protein containing a mutated internal histidine. Both mass spectrometry and NMR experiments are consistent with an overall decreased binding affinity of the mutant, while the measured diffusion coefficients of ligand species reveal that the affinity loss concerns essentially one of the two binding sites. We therefore identified a mutation able to disrupt energetic communication functional to efficient binding and conclude that the buried histidine establishes contacts that stabilize the ternary complex. PMID:19603488

  9. BILE ACIDS REGULATE THE ONTOGENIC EXPRESSION OF ILEAL BILE ACID BINDING PROTEIN IN THE RAT VIA THE FARNESOID X RECEPTOR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the rat, an increase in ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP) expression occurs during the third postnatal week. In vitro studies suggest that bile acids (BAs) increase IBABP transcription by activating the BA receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Thus, we investigated the role of BAs on the on...

  10. Seeing is believing: Direct imaging of charge flow along pili proteins reveals new mechanism for bacterial electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Yalcin, Sibel Ebru; Adhikari, Ramesh; Tuominen, Mark; Lovley, Derek

    2015-03-01

    Visualization of charge flow on the nanoscale in proteins is crucial for a fundamental understanding of several life processes. Here, we report direct visualization of charge propagation along native pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens at nanometer resolution using electrostatic force microscopy. Surprisingly, charges injected at a single point into individual, untreated pili, still attached to cells, propagate over the entire filament. The charges propagate despite a lack of cytochromes on the pili, in contrast to the dominant biochemical model that proteins are electronically insulating and must incorporate redox-active cofactors in order to achieve electron transport functionality. The mobile charge density in pili is comparable to synthetic organic conductors, increasing with proton doping, and with temperature-dependence consistent with previously discovered metallic-like transport mechanism. Conductive pili enable syntrophic bacteria to share energy by directly exchanging electrons among each other. Measurements along individual pilus using nanoelectrodes showed ohmic behavior strongly dependent on the amino acid composition of pili. Electron transfer rate measurement revealed that the pili conductivity is the decisive factor in controlling the bacterial respiration rate. Funded by Office of Naval Research, DOE Genomic Sciences, NSF-NSEC CHM (CMMI-1025020) and Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

  11. Implications for proteasome nuclear localization revealed by the structure of the nuclear proteasome tether protein Cut8

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kojiro; Tonthat, Nam K.; Glover, Tiffany; Xu, Weijun; Koonin, Eugene V.; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Schumacher, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of nuclear proteins by the 26S proteasome is essential for cell viability. In yeast, the nuclear envelope protein Cut8 mediates nuclear proteasomal sequestration by an uncharacterized mechanism. Here we describe structures of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cut8, which shows that it contains a unique, modular fold composed of an extended N-terminal, lysine-rich segment that when ubiquitinated binds the proteasome, a dimer domain followed by a six-helix bundle connected to a flexible C tail. The Cut8 six-helix bundle shows structural similarity to 14-3-3 phosphoprotein-binding domains, and binding assays show that this domain is necessary and sufficient for liposome and cholesterol binding. Moreover, specific mutations in the 14-3-3 regions corresponding to putative cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus motifs abrogate cholesterol binding. In vivo studies confirmed that the 14-3-3 region is necessary for Cut8 membrane localization and that dimerization is critical for its function. Thus, the data reveal the Cut8 organization at the nuclear envelope. Reconstruction of Cut8 evolution suggests that it was present in the last common ancestor of extant eukaryotes and accordingly that nuclear proteasomal sequestration is an ancestral eukaryotic feature. The importance of Cut8 for cell viability and its absence in humans suggests it as a possible target for the development of specific chemotherapeutics against invasive fungal infections. PMID:21976488

  12. [Effect of proteolysis inhibitors on the incorporation of labelled am