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Sample records for acidic protein-positive cells

  1. Toll-Interleukin 1 Receptor domain-containing adaptor protein positively regulates BV2 cell M1 polarization.

    PubMed

    Gong, Leilei; Wang, Hanxiang; Sun, Xiaolei; Liu, Chun; Duan, Chengwei; Cai, Rixin; Gu, Xingxing; Zhu, Shunxing

    2016-06-01

    Microglial activation, including classical (M1) and alternative (M2) activation, plays important roles in the development of several central nervous system disorders and promotes tissue reconstruction. Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 is important for microglial polarization. TIR domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) is an intracellular adaptor protein, which is responsible for the early phase of TLR4 activation. The role of TIRAP in BV2 cell M1 polarization is still unknown. In this study, we showed that TIRAP expression is greatly elevated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon (IFN)-γ-treated microglia. TIRAP overexpression promoted BV2 microglial M1 polarization by increasing M1-related marker production (inducible nitric oxide synthase, CD86, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α). In contrast, TIRAP knockdown prevented M1-related marker production. Mechanistically, TIRAP could interact with TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 6 (TRAF6) to increase M1-related marker production in TIRAP overexpressed and LPS/IFN-γ-treated BV2 cells. In addition, silencing of TIRAP effectively inhibited the activation of the Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Activated Kinase 1/I-Kappa-B Kinase /Nuclear Factor of Kappa Light Polypeptide Gene Enhancer in B-Cells (TAK1/IKK/NF-κB) signalling pathway and the phosphorylation of Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinases, which were activated by LPS/IFN-γ stimulation. Thus, our results suggest that TIRAP positively regulated BV2 microglial M1 polarization through TLR4-mediated TAK1/IKK/NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinases and Akt signalling pathways. PMID:27061018

  2. The Zebrafish Period2 Protein Positively Regulates the Circadian Clock through Mediation of Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR)-related Orphan Receptor α (Rorα)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyong; Zhong, Zhaomin; Zhong, Yingbin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Han

    2015-01-01

    We report the characterization of a null mutant for zebrafish circadian clock gene period2 (per2) generated by transcription activator-like effector nuclease and a positive role of PER2 in vertebrate circadian regulation. Locomotor experiments showed that per2 mutant zebrafish display reduced activities under light-dark and 2-h phase delay under constant darkness, and quantitative real time PCR analyses showed up-regulation of cry1aa, cry1ba, cry1bb, and aanat2 but down-regulation of per1b, per3, and bmal1b in per2 mutant zebrafish, suggesting that Per2 is essential for the zebrafish circadian clock. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that Per2 represses aanat2 expression through E-box and enhances bmal1b expression through the Ror/Rev-erb response element, implicating that Per2 plays dual roles in the zebrafish circadian clock. Cell transfection and co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Per2 enhances bmal1b expression through binding to orphan nuclear receptor Rorα. The enhancing effect of mouse PER2 on Bmal1 transcription is also mediated by RORα even though it binds to REV-ERBα. Moreover, zebrafish Per2 also appears to have tissue-specific regulatory roles in numerous peripheral organs. These findings help define the essential functions of Per2 in the zebrafish circadian clock and in particular provide strong evidence for a positive role of PER2 in the vertebrate circadian system. PMID:25544291

  3. Carboxyl-Terminal Modulator Protein Positively Acts as an Oncogenic Driver in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma via Regulating Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Jung, Seung-Nam; Kim, Ju-Hee; Shim, Geun-Ae; Park, Hee Sung; Liu, Lihua; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Jongsun; Koo, Bon Seok

    2016-01-01

    The exact regulatory mechanisms of carboxyl-terminal modulator protein (CTMP) and its downstream pathways in cancer have been controversial and are not completely understood. Here, we report a new mechanism of regulation of Akt serine/threonine kinase, one of the most important dysregulated signals in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) by the CTMP pathway and its clinical implications. We find that HNSCC tumor tissues and cell lines had relatively high levels of CTMP expression. Clinical data indicate that CTMP expression was significantly associated with positive lymph node metastasis (OR = 3.8, P = 0.033) and correlated with poor prognosis in patients with HNSCC. CTMP was also positively correlated with Akt/GSK-3β phosphorylation, Snail up-regulation and E-cadherin down-regulation, which lead to increased proliferation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, suggesting that CTMP expression results in enhanced tumorigenic and metastatic properties of HNSCC cells. Moreover, CTMP suppression restores sensitivity to cisplatin chemotherapy. Intriguingly, all the molecular responses to CTMP regulation are identical regardless of p53 status in HNSCC cells. We conclude that CTMP promotes Akt phosphorylation and functions as an oncogenic driver and prognostic marker in HNSCC irrespective of p53. PMID:27328758

  4. Carboxyl-Terminal Modulator Protein Positively Acts as an Oncogenic Driver in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma via Regulating Akt phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae Won; Jung, Seung-Nam; Kim, Ju-Hee; Shim, Geun-Ae; Park, Hee Sung; Liu, Lihua; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Jongsun; Koo, Bon Seok

    2016-01-01

    The exact regulatory mechanisms of carboxyl-terminal modulator protein (CTMP) and its downstream pathways in cancer have been controversial and are not completely understood. Here, we report a new mechanism of regulation of Akt serine/threonine kinase, one of the most important dysregulated signals in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) by the CTMP pathway and its clinical implications. We find that HNSCC tumor tissues and cell lines had relatively high levels of CTMP expression. Clinical data indicate that CTMP expression was significantly associated with positive lymph node metastasis (OR = 3.8, P = 0.033) and correlated with poor prognosis in patients with HNSCC. CTMP was also positively correlated with Akt/GSK-3β phosphorylation, Snail up-regulation and E-cadherin down-regulation, which lead to increased proliferation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, suggesting that CTMP expression results in enhanced tumorigenic and metastatic properties of HNSCC cells. Moreover, CTMP suppression restores sensitivity to cisplatin chemotherapy. Intriguingly, all the molecular responses to CTMP regulation are identical regardless of p53 status in HNSCC cells. We conclude that CTMP promotes Akt phosphorylation and functions as an oncogenic driver and prognostic marker in HNSCC irrespective of p53. PMID:27328758

  5. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  6. Lead-acid cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hradcovsky, R.J.; Kozak, O.R.

    1980-12-09

    A lead-acid storage battery is described that has a lead negative electrode, a lead dioxide positive electrode and a sulfuric acid electrolyte having an organic catalyst dissolved therein which prevents dissolution of the electrodes into lead sulfate whereby in the course of discharge, the lead dioxide is reduced to lead oxide and the lead is oxidized.

  7. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Platinum sintering on phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes is discussed. The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst dispersed on a conductive carbon support to minimize both cathode polarization and fabrication costs. During operation, however, the active surface area of these electrodes decreases, which in turn leads to decreased cell performance. This loss of active surface area is a major factor in the degradation of fuel cell performance over time.

  8. Anacardic Acid, Salicylic Acid, and Oleic Acid Differentially Alter Cellular Bioenergetic Function in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Radde, Brandie N; Alizadeh-Rad, Negin; Price, Stephanie M; Schultz, David J; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2016-11-01

    Anacardic acid is a dietary and medicinal phytochemical that inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Since mitochondrial-targeted anticancer therapy (mitocans) may be useful in breast cancer, we examined the effect of anacardic acid on cellular bioenergetics and OXPHOS pathway proteins in breast cancer cells modeling progression to endocrine-independence: MCF-7 estrogen receptor α (ERα)+ endocrine-sensitive; LCC9 and LY2 ERα+, endocrine-resistant, and MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. At concentrations similar to cell proliferation IC50 s, anacardic acid reduced ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate (OCR), mitochondrial reserve capacity, and coupling efficiency while increasing proton leak, reflecting mitochondrial toxicity which was greater in MCF-7 compared to endocrine-resistant and TNBC cells. These results suggest tolerance in endocrine-resistant and TNBC cells to mitochondrial stress induced by anacardic acid. Since anacardic acid is an alkylated 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, the effects of salicylic acid (SA, 2-hydroxybenzoic acid moiety) and oleic acid (OA, monounsaturated alkyl moiety) were tested. SA inhibited whereas OA stimulated cell viability. In contrast to stimulation of basal OCR by anacardic acid (uncoupling effect), neither SA nor OA altered basal OCR- except OA inhibited basal and ATP-linked OCR, and increased ECAR, in MDA-MB-231 cells. Changes in OXPHOS proteins correlated with changes in OCR. Overall, neither the 2-hydroxybenzoic acid moiety nor the monounsaturated alky moiety of anacardic acid is solely responsible for the observed mitochondria-targeted anticancer activity in breast cancer cells and hence both moieties are required in the same molecule for the observed effects. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2521-2532, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990649

  9. Corrosion free phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Maynard K.

    1990-01-01

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell with an electrolyte fuel system which supplies electrolyte via a wick disposed adjacent a cathode to an absorbent matrix which transports the electrolyte to portions of the cathode and an anode which overlaps the cathode on all sides to prevent corrosion within the cell.

  10. Multifunctional Nucleic Acids for Tumor Cell Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pofahl, Monika; Wengel, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multifunctional nucleic acid, termed AptamiR, composed of an aptamer domain and an antimiR domain. This composition mediates cell specific delivery of antimiR molecules for silencing of endogenous micro RNA. The introduced multifunctional molecule preserves cell targeting, anti-proliferative and antimiR function in one 37-nucleotide nucleic acid molecule. It inhibits cancer cell growth and induces gene expression that is pathologically damped by an oncomir. These findings will have a strong impact on future developments regarding aptamer- and antimiR-related applications for tumor targeting and treatment. PMID:24494617

  11. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-08-17

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  12. Micro-electro-mechanical systems phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Sopchak, David A.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Kotovsky, Jack; Graff, Robert T.

    2010-12-21

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell system comprising a porous electrolyte support, a phosphoric acid electrolyte in the porous electrolyte support, a cathode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte, and an anode electrode contacting the phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  13. Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Living Cell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiangling; Lv, Yifan; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiaobing; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-01

    Cells as the building blocks of life determine the basic functions and properties of a living organism. Understanding the structure and components of a cell aids in the elucidation of its biological functions. Moreover, knowledge of the similarities and differences between diseased and healthy cells is essential to understanding pathological mechanisms, identifying diagnostic markers, and designing therapeutic molecules. However, monitoring the structures and activities of a living cell remains a challenging task in bioanalytical and life science research. To meet the requirements of this task, aptamers, as “chemical antibodies,” have become increasingly powerful tools for cellular analysis. This article reviews recent advances in the development of nucleic acid aptamers in the areas of cell membrane analysis, cell detection and isolation, real-time monitoring of cell secretion, and intracellular delivery and analysis with living cell models. Limitations of aptamers and possible solutions are also discussed.

  14. Formic acid fuel cells and catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Masel, Richard I.; Larsen, Robert; Ha, Su Yun

    2010-06-22

    An exemplary fuel cell of the invention includes a formic acid fuel solution in communication with an anode (12, 134), an oxidizer in communication with a cathode (16, 135) electrically linked to the anode, and an anode catalyst that includes Pd. An exemplary formic acid fuel cell membrane electrode assembly (130) includes a proton-conducting membrane (131) having opposing first (132) and second surfaces (133), a cathode catalyst on the second membrane surface, and an anode catalyst including Pd on the first surface.

  15. Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Technology Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.; Prokopius, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the current phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development efforts is presented both for multimegawatt systems for electric utility applications and for multikilowatt systems for on-site integrated energy system applications. Improving fuel cell performance, reducing cost, and increasing durability are the technology drivers at this time. Electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, and fuel selection are discussed.

  16. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst supported on a carbon substrate. During operation, the small platinum crystallites sinter, causing loss in cell performance. A support was developed that stabilizes platinum in the high surface area condition by retarding or preventing the sintering process. The approach is to form etch pits in the carbon by oxidizing the carbon in the presence of a metal oxide catalyst, remove the metal oxide by an acid wash, and then deposit platinum in these pits. Results confirm the formation of etch pits in each of the three supports chosen for investigation: Vulcan XC-72R, Vulcan XC-72 that was graphized at 2500 C, and Shawinigan Acetylene Black.

  17. World wide IFC phosphoric acid fuel cell implementation

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    International Fuel Cells, a subsidary of United technologies Corporation, is engaged in research and development of all types of fuel cell technologies and currently manufactures alkaline fuel cell power plants for the U.S. manned space flight program and natural gas fueled stationary power plants using phosphoric acid fuel cells. This paper describes the phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants.

  18. Werner syndrome protein positively regulates XRCC4-like factor transcription

    PubMed Central

    LIU, DONGYUN; DENG, XIAOLI; YUAN, CHONGZHEN; CHEN, LIN; CONG, YUSHENG; XU, XINGZHI

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF) is involved in non-homologous end joining-mediated repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Mutations in the WRN gene results in the development of Werner syndrome (WS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature ageing and genome instability. In the present study, it was identified that XLF protein levels were lower in WRN-deficient fibroblasts, compared with normal fibroblasts. Depletion of WRN in HeLa cells led to a decrease of XLF mRNA and its promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that WRN was associated with the XLF promoter. Depletion of XLF in normal human fibroblasts increased the percentage of β-galactosidase (β-gal) staining-positive cells, indicating acceleration in cellular senescence. Taken together, the results suggest that XLF is a transcriptional target of WRN and may be involved in the regulation of cellular senescence. PMID:24626809

  19. Evaluation of organic acids as fuel cell electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, J.; Nguyen, T.H.; Foley, R.T.

    1981-11-01

    The electrochemical behavior of methanesulfonic acid, ethanesulfonic acid, and sulfoacetic acid as fuel cell electrolytes was studied in half-cell at various temperatures. The rate of the electro-oxidation of hydrogen at 115/degree/C was very high in methanesulfonic acid. The rate of the electro-oxidation of propane in all three acids was low even at 135/degree/C. Further, there is evidence for adsorption of these acids on the platinum electrode. It is concluded that anhydrous sulfonic acids are not good electrolytes; water solutions are required. Sulfonic acids containing unprotected carbon-hydrogen bonds are adsorbed on platinum and probably decompose during electrolysis. 9 refs.

  20. Lactobionic and cellobionic acid production profiles of the resting cells of acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, Takaaki; Kiso, Taro; Nakano, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Lactobionic acid was produced by acetic acid bacteria to oxidize lactose. Gluconobacter spp. and Gluconacetobacter spp. showed higher lactose-oxidizing activities than Acetobacter spp. Gluconobacter frateurii NBRC3285 produced the highest amount of lactobionic acid per cell, among the strains tested. This bacterium assimilated neither lactose nor lactobionic acid. At high lactose concentration (30%), resting cells of the bacterium showed sufficient oxidizing activity for efficient production of lactobionic acid. These properties may contribute to industrial production of lactobionic acid by the bacterium. The bacterium showed higher oxidizing activity on cellobiose than that on lactose and produced cellobionic acid. PMID:25965080

  1. Induced accumulation of oleanolic acid and ursolic acid in cell suspension cultures of Uncaria tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Feria-Romero, Iris; Lazo, Elizabeth; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-06-01

    Increasing sucrose from 20 to 50 g l(-1) in Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures enhanced ursolic acid and oleanolic acid production from 129 +/- 61 to 553 +/- 193 microg g(-1) cell dry wt. The maximal concentration of both triterpenes (1680 +/- 39 microg g(-1) cell dry wt) was 8 days after elicitation by jasmonic acid, while yeast extract or citrus pectin treatments produced 1189 +/- 20 or 1120 +/- 26 microg g(-1) cell dry wt, respectively. The ratio of ursolic acid:oleanolic acid was constant at 70:30. PMID:16086245

  2. New applications for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickles, R. P.; Breuer, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    New applications for phosphoric acid fuel cells were identified and evaluated. Candidates considered included all possibilities except grid connected electric utility applications, on site total energy systems, industrial cogeneration, opportunistic use of waste hydrogen, space and military applications, and applications smaller than 10 kW. Applications identified were screened, with the most promising subjected to technical and economic evaluation using a fuel cell and conventional power system data base developed in the study. The most promising applications appear to be the underground mine locomotive and the railroad locomotive. Also interesting are power for robotic submersibles and Arctic villages. The mine locomotive is particularly attractive since it is expected that the fuel cell could command a very high price and still be competitive with the conventionally used battery system. The railroad locomotive's attractiveness results from the (smaller) premium price which the fuel cell could command over the conventional diesel electric system based on its superior fuel efficiency, and on the large size of this market and the accompanying opportunities for manufacturing economy.

  3. New applications for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickles, R. P.; Breuer, C. T.

    1983-11-01

    New applications for phosphoric acid fuel cells were identified and evaluated. Candidates considered included all possibilities except grid connected electric utility applications, on site total energy systems, industrial cogeneration, opportunistic use of waste hydrogen, space and military applications, and applications smaller than 10 kW. Applications identified were screened, with the most promising subjected to technical and economic evaluation using a fuel cell and conventional power system data base developed in the study. The most promising applications appear to be the underground mine locomotive and the railroad locomotive. Also interesting are power for robotic submersibles and Arctic villages. The mine locomotive is particularly attractive since it is expected that the fuel cell could command a very high price and still be competitive with the conventionally used battery system. The railroad locomotive's attractiveness results from the (smaller) premium price which the fuel cell could command over the conventional diesel electric system based on its superior fuel efficiency, and on the large size of this market and the accompanying opportunities for manufacturing economy.

  4. New applications for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stickles, R.P.; Breuer, C.T.

    1983-11-01

    New applications for phosphoric acid fuel cells were identified and evaluated. Candidates considered included all possibilities except grid connected electric utility applications, on-site total energy systems, industrial co-generation, opportunistic use of waste hydrogen, space and military applications, and applications smaller than 10 kW. Applications identified were screened, with the most promising subjected to technical and economic evaluation using a fuel cell and conventional power system data base developed in the study. The most promising applications appear to be the underground mine locomotive and the railroad locomotive. Also interesting is power for robotic submersibles and Arctic villages. The mine locomotive is particularly attractive since it is expected that the fuel cell could command a very high price and still be competitive with the conventionally used battery system. The railroad locomotive's attractiveness results from the (smaller) premium price which the fuel cell could command over the conventional diesel electric system based on its superior fuel efficiency, and on the large size of this market and the accompanying opportunities for manufacturing economy.

  5. Lactobacillus casei combats acid stress by maintaining cell membrane functionality.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-07-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains have traditionally been recognized as probiotics and frequently used as adjunct culture in fermented dairy products where lactic acid stress is a frequently encountered environmental condition. We have investigated the effect of lactic acid stress on the cell membrane of L. casei Zhang [wild type (WT)] and its acid-resistant mutant Lbz-2. Both strains were grown under glucose-limiting conditions in chemostats; following challenge by low pH, the cell membrane stress responses were investigated. In response to acid stress, cell membrane fluidity decreased and its fatty acid composition changed to reduce the damage caused by lactic acid. Compared with the WT, the acid-resistant mutant exhibited numerous survival advantages, such as higher membrane fluidity, higher proportions of unsaturated fatty acids, and higher mean chain length. In addition, cell integrity analysis showed that the mutant maintained a more intact cellular structure and lower membrane permeability after environmental acidification. These results indicate that alteration in membrane fluidity, fatty acid distribution, and cell integrity are common mechanisms utilized by L. casei to withstand severe acidification and to reduce the deleterious effect of lactic acid on the cell membrane. This detailed comparison of cell membrane responses between the WT and mutant add to our knowledge of the acid stress adaptation and thus enable new strategies to be developed aimed at improving the industrial performance of this species under acid stress. PMID:22366811

  6. Lysophosphatidic acid synthesis and phospholipid metabolism in rat mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The role of lysophosphatidic acid in mast cell response to antigen was investigated using an isolated rat serosal mast cell model. The cells were incubated with monoclonal murine immunoglobulin E to the dinitrophenyl hapten and prelabeled with /sup 32/P-orthophosphate or /sup 3/H-fatty acids. Lysophosphatidic acid was isolated form cell extracts by 2-dimensional thin-layer chromatography, and the incorporated radioactivity was assessed by liquid scintillation counting. Lysophosphatidic acid labeling with /sup 32/P was increased 2-4 fold within 5 minutes after the addition of antigen or three other mast cell agonists. Functional group analyses unequivocally showed that the labeled compound was lysophosphatidic acid. Lysophosphatidic acid synthesis was dependent on the activity of diacylglycerol lipase, suggesting formation from monoacylglycerol. In addition, the studies of lysophosphatidic acid synthesis suggest that the addition of antigen to mast cells may initiate more than one route of phospholipid degradation and resynthesis. Whatever the origin of lysophosphatidic acid, the results of this study demonstrated that lysophosphatidic acid synthesis is stimulated by a variety of mast cell agonists. Dose-response, kinetic, and pharmacologic studies showed close concordance between histamine release and lysophosphatidic acid labeling responses. These observations provide strong evidence that lysophosphatidic acid plays an important role in mast cell activation.

  7. Stromal uptake and transmission of acid is a pathway for venting cancer cell-generated acid.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Black, Nicholas; Hsia, Lin-Ting; Wilding, Jennifer; Bodmer, Walter F; Swietach, Pawel

    2016-09-01

    Proliferation and invasion of cancer cells require favorable pH, yet potentially toxic quantities of acid are produced metabolically. Membrane-bound transporters extrude acid from cancer cells, but little is known about the mechanisms that handle acid once it is released into the poorly perfused extracellular space. Here, we studied acid handling by myofibroblasts (colon cancer-derived Hs675.T, intestinal InMyoFib, embryonic colon-derived CCD-112-CoN), skin fibroblasts (NHDF-Ad), and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells (HCT116, HT29) grown in monoculture or coculture. Expression of the acid-loading transporter anion exchanger 2 (AE2) (SLC4A2 product) was detected in myofibroblasts and fibroblasts, but not in CRC cells. Compared with CRC cells, Hs675.T and InMyoFib myofibroblasts had very high capacity to absorb extracellular acid. Acid uptake into CCD-112-CoN and NHDF-Ad cells was slower and comparable to levels in CRC cells, but increased alongside SLC4A2 expression under stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), a cytokine involved in cancer-stroma interplay. Myofibroblasts and fibroblasts are connected by gap junctions formed by proteins such as connexin-43, which allows the absorbed acid load to be transmitted across the stromal syncytium. To match the stimulatory effect on acid uptake, cell-to-cell coupling in NHDF-Ad and CCD-112-CoN cells was strengthened with TGFβ1. In contrast, acid transmission was absent between CRC cells, even after treatment with TGFβ1. Thus, stromal cells have the necessary molecular apparatus for assembling an acid-venting route that can improve the flow of metabolic acid through tumors. Importantly, the activities of stromal AE2 and connexin-43 do not place an energetic burden on cancer cells, allowing resources to be diverted for other activities. PMID:27543333

  8. Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Lowe, Keith S.; Larkins, Brian A.; Dilkes, Brian R.; Sun, Yuejin

    2007-08-14

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

  9. Amino acids in the cultivation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Andrew; Keusgen, Michael; von Hagen, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Amino acids are crucial for the cultivation of mammalian cells. This importance of amino acids was realized soon after the development of the first cell lines, and a solution of a mixture of amino acids has been supplied to cultured cells ever since. The importance of amino acids is further pronounced in chemically defined mammalian cell culture media, making the consideration of their biological and chemical properties necessary. Amino acids concentrations have been traditionally adjusted to their cellular consumption rates. However, since changes in the metabolic equilibrium of amino acids can be caused by changes in extracellular concentrations, metabolomics in conjunction with flux balance analysis is being used in the development of culture media. The study of amino acid transporters is also gaining importance since they control the intracellular concentrations of these molecules and are influenced by conditions in cell culture media. A better understanding of the solubility, stability, dissolution kinetics, and interactions of these molecules is needed for an exploitation of these properties in the development of dry powdered chemically defined media for mammalian cells. Due to the complexity of these mixtures however, this has proven to be challenging. Studying amino acids in mammalian cell culture media will help provide a better understanding of how mammalian cells in culture interact with their environment. It would also provide insight into the chemical behavior of these molecules in solutions of complex mixtures, which is important in the understanding of the contribution of individual amino acids to protein structure. PMID:26832172

  10. Polyunsaturated Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Geranylgeranoic Acid Induces Unfolded Protein Response in Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwao, Chieko; Shidoji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The acyclic diterpenoid acid geranylgeranoic acid (GGA) has been reported to induce autophagic cell death in several human hepatoma-derived cell lines; however, the molecular mechanism for this remains unknown. In the present study, several diterpenoids were examined for ability to induce XBP1 splicing and/or lipotoxicity for human hepatoma cell lines. Here we show that three groups of diterpenoids emerged: 1) GGA, 2,3-dihydro GGA and 9-cis retinoic acid induce cell death and XBP1 splicing; 2) all-trans retinoic acid induces XBP1 splicing but little cell death; and 3) phytanic acid, phytenic acid and geranylgeraniol induce neither cell death nor XBP1 splicing. GGA-induced ER stress/ unfolded protein response (UPR) and its lipotoxicity were both blocked by co-treatment with oleic acid. The blocking activity of oleic acid for GGA-induced XBP1 splicing was not attenuated by methylation of oleic acid. These findings strongly suggest that GGA at micromolar concentrations induces the so-called lipid-induced ER stress response/UPR, which is oleate-suppressive, and shows its lipotoxicity in human hepatoma cells. PMID:26186544

  11. Chrysophanic Acid Induces Necrosis but not Necroptosis in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Caki-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chrysophanic acid, also known as chrysophanol, has a number of biological activities. It enhances memory and learning abilities, raises superoxide dismutase activity, and has anti-cancer effects in several model systems. According to previous reports, chrysophanic acid-induced cell death shares features of necrotic cell death. However, the molecular and cellular processes underlying chrysophanic acid-induced cell death remain poorly understood. Methods: Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was monitored by cell viability assay and Annexin V-propidium iodide (PI) staining of renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. The induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by chrysophanic acid and the suppression of ROS by anti-oxidants were evaluated by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. The expression and phosphorylation of proteins that are involved in apoptosis and necroptosis were detected by immunoblotting. Results: The extent of chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was concentration and time dependent, and dead cells mainly appeared in the PI-positive population, which is a major feature of necrosis, upon fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was associated with the generation of intracellular ROS, and this effect was reversed by pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was not associated with changes in apoptotic or necroptotic marker proteins. Conclusions: The cell death induced by chrysophanic acid resembled neither apoptotic nor necroptotic cell death in human renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. PMID:27390736

  12. Phosphoric acid fuel cell platinum use study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the private development of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plants for terrestrial applications. Current PAFC technology utilizes platinum as catalysts in the power electrodes. The possible repercussions that the platinum demand of PAFC power plant commercialization will have on the worldwide supply and price of platinum from the outset of commercialization to the year 2000 are investigated. The platinum demand of PAFC commercialization is estimated by developing forecasts of platinum use per unit of generating capacity and penetration of PAFC power plants into the electric generation market. The ability of the platinum supply market to meet future demands is gauged by assessing the size of platinum reserves and the capability of platinum producers to extract, refine and market sufficient quantities of these reserves. The size and timing of platinum price shifts induced by the added demand of PAFC commercialization are investigated by several analytical methods. Estimates of these price shifts are then used to calculate the subsequent effects on PAFC power plant capital costs.

  13. Reduction of volatile acidity of acidic wines by immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Vilela, A; Schuller, D; Mendes-Faia, A; Côrte-Real, M

    2013-06-01

    Excessive volatile acidity in wines is a major problem and is still prevalent because available solutions are nevertheless unsatisfactory, namely, blending the filter-sterilized acidic wine with other wines of lower volatile acidity or using reverse osmosis. We have previously explored the use of an empirical biological deacidification procedure to lower the acetic acid content of wines. This winemaker's enological practice, which consists in refermentation associated with acetic acid consumption by yeasts, is performed by mixing the acidic wine with freshly crushed grapes, musts, or marc from a finished wine fermentation. We have shown that the commercial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae S26 is able to decrease the volatile acidity of acidic wines with a volatile acidity higher than 1.44 g L(-1) acetic acid, with no detrimental impact on wine aroma. In this study, we aimed to optimize the immobilization of S26 cells in alginate beads for the bioreduction of volatile acidity of acidic wines. We found that S26 cells immobilized in double-layer alginate-chitosan beads could reduce the volatile acidity of an acidic wine (1.1 g L(-1) acetic acid, 12.5 % (v/v) ethanol, pH 3.12) by 28 and 62 % within 72 and 168 h, respectively, associated with a slight decrease in ethanol concentration (0.7 %). Similar volatile acidity removal efficiencies were obtained in medium with high glucose concentration (20 % w/v), indicating that this process may also be useful in the deacidification of grape musts. We, therefore, show that immobilized S. cerevisiae S26 cells in double-layer beads are an efficient alternative to improve the quality of wines with excessive volatile acidity. PMID:23361840

  14. Stearidonic acid raises red blood cell membrane eicosapentaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kevin C; Rains, Tia M

    2012-03-01

    The consumption of EPA and DHA has been associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Mean intakes of EPA and DHA in the United States and elsewhere are below levels recommended by health authorities. The main non-marine source of dietary (n-3) fatty acids (α-linolenic acid) is poorly converted to EPA in humans. Stearidonic acid (SDA) is a non-marine fatty acid that appears to be more readily converted to EPA in humans. Results from previous studies suggested that SDA, relative to EPA, increases RBC EPA, with reported efficiencies ranging from ~16 to 30%. A recently published, randomized, single-blind, controlled, parallel group study in healthy men and women characterized the relationships between intakes of SDA and EPA and EPA enrichment of RBC membranes over a 12-wk period. %EPA in RBC membranes was greater after EPA (0.44, 1.3, or 2.7 g/d, respectively) and SDA (1.3, 2.6, or 5.2 g/d, respectively) consumption compared to a safflower control (all P < 0.02). Based on quadratic response surface models, for EPA intakes of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.89 g/d, SDA intakes of 0.61, 1.89, and 5.32 g/d, respectively, would be required to produce equivalent values for RBC %EPA, translating to relative efficiencies of 41.0, 26.5, and 16.7%. Thus, dietary SDA over a range of intakes increases RBC %EPA, with declining relative efficiency as SDA intake increases. PMID:22279138

  15. Chlorogenic Acids Biosynthesis in Centella asiatica Cells Is not Stimulated by Salicylic Acid Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ncube, E N; Steenkamp, P A; Madala, N E; Dubery, I A

    2016-07-01

    Exogenous application of synthetic and natural elicitors of plant defence has been shown to result in mass production of secondary metabolites with nutraceuticals properties in cultured cells. In particular, salicylic acid (SA) treatment has been reported to induce the production of phenylpropanoids, including cinnamic acid derivatives bound to quinic acid (chlorogenic acids). Centella asiatica is an important medicinal plant with several therapeutic properties owing to its wide spectrum of secondary metabolites. We investigated the effect of SA on C. asiatica cells by monitoring perturbation of chlorogenic acids in particular. Different concentrations of SA were used to treat C. asiatica cells, and extracts from both treated and untreated cells were analysed using an optimised UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS method. Semi-targeted multivariate data analyses with the aid of principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed a concentration-dependent metabolic response. Surprisingly, a range of chlorogenic acid derivatives were found to be downregulated as a consequence of SA treatment. Moreover, irbic acid (3,5-O-dicaffeoyl-4-O-malonilquinic acid) was found to be a dominant CGA in C. asiatica cells, although the SA treatment also had a negative effect on its concentration. Overall SA treatment was found to be an ineffective elicitor of CGA production in cultured C. asiatica cells. PMID:26922726

  16. Synthesis of novel acid electrolytes for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock, James L.

    1988-11-01

    A 40 millimole per hour scale aerosol direct fluorination reactor was constructed. F-Methyl F-4-methoxybutanoate and F-4-methoxybutanoyl fluoride were synthesized by aerosol direct fluorination of methyl 4-methoxybutanoate. Basic hydrolysis of the perfluorinated derivatives produce sodium F-4 methoxybutanoate which was pyrolyzed to F-3-methoxy-1-propene. Purification and shipment of 33 grams of F-3-methoxy-1-propene followed. Syntheses by analogous methods allowed production and shipment of 5 grams of F-3-ethoxy 1-propene, 18 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy) 1-propene, and 37 grams of F-3,3-dimethyl 1-butene. Eighteen grams of F-2,2-dimethyl 1-chloropropane was produced directly and shipped. As suggested by other contractors, 5 grams of F-3-methoxy 1-iodopropane, and 5 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy) 1-iodopropane were produced by converting the respective precursor acid sodium salts produced for olefin synthesis to the silver salts and pyrolyzing them with iodine. Each of these compounds was prepared for the first time by the aerosol fluorination process during the course of the contract. These samples were provided to other Gas Research Institute (GRI) contractors for synthesis of perfluorinated sulfur (VI) and phosphorous (V) acids.

  17. Amino Acids Regulate Transgene Expression in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torrente, Marta; Guetg, Adriano; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Arps, Lisa; Ruckstuhl, Lisa; Camargo, Simone M. R.; Verrey, François

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression and cell growth rely on the intracellular concentration of amino acids, which in metazoans depends on extracellular amino acid availability and transmembrane transport. To investigate the impact of extracellular amino acid concentrations on the expression of a concentrative amino acid transporter, we overexpressed the main kidney proximal tubule luminal neutral amino acid transporter B0AT1-collectrin (SLC6A19-TMEM27) in MDCK cell epithelia. Exogenously expressed proteins co-localized at the luminal membrane and mediated neutral amino acid uptake. However, the transgenes were lost over few cell culture passages. In contrast, the expression of a control transgene remained stable. To test whether this loss was due to inappropriately high amino acid uptake, freshly transduced MDCK cell lines were cultivated either with physiological amounts of amino acids or with the high concentration found in standard cell culture media. Expression of exogenous transporters was unaffected by physiological amino acid concentration in the media. Interestingly, mycoplasma infection resulted in a significant increase in transgene expression and correlated with the rapid metabolism of L-arginine. However, L-arginine metabolites were shown to play no role in transgene expression. In contrast, activation of the GCN2 pathway revealed by an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation may trigger transgene derepression. Taken together, high extracellular amino acid concentration provided by cell culture media appears to inhibit the constitutive expression of concentrative amino acid transporters whereas L-arginine depletion by mycoplasma induces the expression of transgenes possibly via stimulation of the GCN2 pathway. PMID:24797296

  18. The Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Induce Mouse Dendritic Cells Maturation but Reduce T-Cell Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Johan A.; Wold, Agnes E.; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Östman, Sofia M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) might regulate T-cell activation and lineage commitment. Here, we measured the effects of omega-3 (n-3), n-6 and n-9 fatty acids on the interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and naïve T cells. Spleen DCs from BALB/c mice were cultured in vitro with ovalbumin (OVA) with 50 μM fatty acids; α-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), linoleic acid or oleic acid and thereafter OVA-specific DO11.10 T cells were added to the cultures. Fatty acids were taken up by the DCs, as shown by gas chromatography analysis. After culture with arachidonic acid or DHA CD11c+ CD11b+ and CD11c+ CD11bneg DCs expressed more CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86 and PDL-1, while IAd remained unchanged. However, fewer T cells co-cultured with these DCs proliferated (CellTrace Violetlow) and expressed CD69 or CD25, while more were necrotic (7AAD+). We noted an increased proportion of T cells with a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype, i.e., when gating on CD4+ FoxP3+ CTLA-4+, CD4+ FoxP3+ Helios+ or CD4+ FoxP3+ PD-1+, in co-cultures with arachidonic acid- or DHA-primed DCs relative to control cultures. The proportion of putative Tregs was inversely correlated to T-cell proliferation, indicating a suppressive function of these cells. With arachidonic acid DCs produced higher levels of prostaglandin E2 while T cells produced lower amounts of IL-10 and IFNγ. In conclusion arachidonic acid and DHA induced up-regulation of activation markers on DCs. However arachidonic acid- and DHA-primed DCs reduced T-cell proliferation and increased the proportion of T cells expressing FoxP3, indicating that these fatty acids can promote induction of regulatory T cells. PMID:26619195

  19. Gallic acid suppresses cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong; Jiang, Feng; Jiang, Hao; Wu, Kalina; Zheng, Xuguang; Cai, Yizhong; Katakowski, Mark; Chopp, Michael; To, Shing-Shun Tony

    2010-01-01

    Gallic acid, an organic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, is cytotoxic against certain cancer cells, without harming normal cells. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether gallic acid can inhibit glioma cell viability, proliferation, invasion and reduce glioma cell mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of U87 and U251n glioma cells with gallic acid inhibited cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. BrdU and tube formation assays indicated that gallic acid significantly decreased glioma cell proliferation and tube formation in mouse brain endothelial cells, respectively. In addition, gallic acid decreased U87 cell invasion in vitro. Western blot analysis showed that expression of ADAM17, p-Akt and p-Erk was suppressed by gallic acid in both U87 and U251n cell lines. These data suggest that suppression of ADAM17 and downregulation of PI3K/Akt and Ras/MAPK signaling pathways may contribute to gallic acid-induced decrease of invasiveness. Gallic acid may be a valuable candidate for treatment of brain tumor. PMID:20553913

  20. Retinoic Acid Stimulates Regeneration of Mammalian Auditory Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Philippe P.; Malgrange, Brigitte; Staecker, Hinrich; Moonen, Gustave; van de Water, Thomas R.

    1993-04-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss resulting from the loss of auditory hair cells is thought to be irreversible in mammals. This study provides evidence that retinoic acid can stimulate the regeneration in vitro of mammalian auditory hair cells in ototoxic-poisoned organ of Corti explants in the rat. In contrast, treatment with retinoic acid does not stimulate the formation of extra hair cells in control cultures of Corti's organ. Retinoic acid-stimulated hair cell regeneration can be blocked by cytosine arabinoside, which suggests that a period of mitosis is required for the regeneration of auditory hair cells in this system. These results provide hope for a recovery of hearing function in mammals after auditory hair cell damage.

  1. Irbic acid, a dicaffeoylquinic acid derivative from Centella asiatica cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Antognoni, Fabiana; Perellino, Nicoletta Crespi; Crippa, Sergio; Dal Toso, Roberto; Danieli, Bruno; Minghetti, Anacleto; Poli, Ferruccio; Pressi, Giovanna

    2011-10-01

    3,5-O-dicaffeoyl-4-O-malonilquinic acid (1) (irbic acid) has been isolated for the first time from cell cultures of Centella asiatica and till now it has never been reported to be present in the intact plant. Evidence of its structure was obtained by spectroscopic analyses (MS/NMR). Besides 1, cell cultures produce also the known 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, chlorogenic acid, and the triferulic acid 2 (4-O-8'/4'-O-8″-didehydrotriferulic acid). Biological activities were evaluated for compound 1, which showed to have a strong radical scavenging capacity, together with a high inhibitory activity on collagenase. This suggests a possible utilization of this substance as a topical agent to reduce the skin ageing process. PMID:21635941

  2. Direct acid methylation for extraction of fatty acid content from microalgae cells.

    PubMed

    Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin D; Wang, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Direct acid methylation was examined as a means for both analysis of fatty acid content in microalgal cells and biodiesel production without pretreatment. Microalgal cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Dunaliella tertiolecta were prepared and examined. It appeared that direct acid methylation extracted higher fatty acid content than the solvent-based Soxhlet extraction process. It also revealed that the latter was prone to extract a significant amount of nonlipid hydrophobic impurities, including hydrophobic proteins and phytol-type compounds, while direct methylation produces essentially pure ester product. This work demonstrates that direct acid methylation provides superior fatty acid extraction, promising an efficient process for either quantification of lipid content or production of biodiesel. PMID:24838798

  3. Full scale phosphoric acid fuel cell stack technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.; Faroque, M.

    1984-01-01

    The technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cells is summarized. The preparation, heat treatment, and characterization of carbon composites used as bipolar separator plates are described. Characterization included resistivity, porosity, and electrochemical corrosion. High density glassy carbon/graphite composites performed well in long-term fuel cell endurance tests. Platinum alloy cathode catalysts and low-loaded platinum electrodes were evaluated in 25 sq cm cells. Although the alloys displayed an initial improvement, some of this improvement diminished after a few thousand hours of testing. Low platinum loading (0.12 mg/sq cm anodes and 0.3 mg/sq cm cathodes) performed nearly as well as twice this loading. A selectively wetproofed anode backing paper was tested in a 5 by 15 inch three-cell stack. This material may provide for acid volume expansion, acid storage, and acid lateral distribution.

  4. DIFFERENCES IN ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLISM BY HUMAN MYELOMONCYTIC CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production of arachidonic acid metabolites by the HL60, ML3, and U937 human phagocyte cell lines were determined after incubation with interferongamma (IFNg; 500 U/ml) or vehicle for 4 days. ells were prelabeled with tritiated arachidonic acid for 4 hours, and media supernata...

  5. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant (phase 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    The status of technology for the manufacturing and testing of 1200 sq. cm cell materials, components, and stacks for on-site integrated energy systems is assessed. Topics covered include: (1) preparation of thin layers of silicon carbide; (2) definition and control schemes for volume changes in phosphoric acid fuel cells; (3) preparation of low resin content graphite phenolic resin composites; (4) chemical corrosion of graphite-phenolic resin composites in hot phosphoric acid; (5) analysis of electrical resistance of composite materials for fuel cells; and (6) fuel cell performance and testing.

  6. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  7. The effect of propionic acid and valeric acid on the cell cycle in root meristems of Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Tramontano, W.A.; Yang, Shauyu; Delillo, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Propionic acid and valeric acid at 1mM reduced the mitotic index of root meristem cells of Pisum sativum to < 1% after 12 hr in aerated White's medium. This effect varied with different acid concentrations. After a 12 hr exposure to either acid, seedlings transferred to fresh medium without either acid, resumed their normal mitotic index after 12 hr, with a burst of mitosis 8 hr post-transfer. Exposure of root meristem cells to either acid also inhibited ({sup 3}H)-TdR incorporation. Neither acid significantly altered the distribution of meristematic cells in G1 and G2 after 12 hr. The incorporation of ({sup 3}H) - uridine was also unaltered by the addition of either acid. This information suggests that propionic acid and valeric acid, limit progression through the cell cycle by inhibiting DNA synthesis and arresting cells in G1 and G2. These results were consistent with previous data which utilized butyric acid.

  8. Apoptosis and modulation of cell cycle control by bile acids in human leukemia T cells.

    PubMed

    Fimognari, Carmela; Lenzi, Monia; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2009-08-01

    Depending on the nature of chemical structures, different bile acids exhibit distinct biological effects. Their therapeutic efficacy has been widely demonstrated in various liver diseases, suggesting that they might protect hepatocytes against common mechanisms of liver damage. Although it has been shown to prevent apoptotic cell death in certain cell lines, bile acids significantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in cancer cells. To better understand the pharmacological potential of bile acids in cancer cells, we investigated and compared the effects of deoxycholic acid (DCA), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine-derivatives [taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), respectively] on the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation of a human T leukemia cell line (Jurkat cells). All the bile acids tested induced a delay in cell cycle progression. Moreover, DCA markedly increased the fraction of apoptotic cells. The effects of TDCA, UDCA, and TUDCA were different from those observed for DCA. Their primary effect was the induction of necrosis. These distinctive features suggest that the hydrophobic properties of DCA play a role in its cytotoxic potential and indicate that it is possible to create new drugs useful for cancer therapy from bile acid derivatives as lead compounds. PMID:19723064

  9. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  10. Technology Development for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell Powerplant, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1980-01-01

    The technology development for materials, cells, and reformers for on site integrated energy systems is described. The carbonization of 25 cu cm, 350 cu cm, and 1200 cu cm cell test hardware was accomplished and the performance of 25 cu cm fuel cells was improved. Electrochemical corrosion rates of graphite/phenolic resin composites in phosphoric acid were determined. Three cells (5 in by 15 in stacks) were operated for longer than 7000 hours. Specified endurance stacks completed a total of 4000 hours. An electrically heated reformer was tested and is to provide hydrogen for 23 cell fuel cell stack.

  11. Bile acids induce hepatic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sawitza, Iris; Kordes, Claus; Götze, Silke; Herebian, Diran; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the potential to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and their therapeutic potential has become obvious. In the liver, MSC are represented by stellate cells which have the potential to differentiate into hepatocytes after stimulation with growth factors. Since bile acids can promote liver regeneration, their influence on liver-resident and bone marrow-derived MSC was investigated. Physiological concentrations of bile acids such as tauroursodeoxycholic acid were able to initiate hepatic differentiation of MSC via the farnesoid X receptor and transmembrane G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 5 as investigated with knockout mice. Notch, hedgehog, transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein family and non-canonical Wnt signalling were also essential for bile acid-mediated differentiation, whereas β-catenin-dependent Wnt signalling was able to attenuate this process. Our findings reveal bile acid-mediated signalling as an alternative way to induce hepatic differentiaion of stem cells and highlight bile acids as important signalling molecules during liver regeneration. PMID:26304833

  12. Uptake of aristolochic acid I into Caco-2 cells by monocarboxylic acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Osamu; Haraguchi, Koichi; Ohta, Chiho; Koga, Nobuyuki; Kato, Yoshihisa; Endo, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    The uptake mechanism of aristolochic acid I (AAI) was investigated using Caco-2 cells cultured on dishes and permeable membranes. The uptake of AAI from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells cultured on a dish was rapid, and a decrease in the pH of the incubation medium significantly increased uptake. Incubation at low temperature (4°C) and treatment with sodium azide (a metabolic inhibitor) or carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (a protonophore) significantly inhibited the AAI uptake. Coincubation with L-lactic acid or benzoic acid, typical substrates for the proton-linked monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCTs), significantly decreased the AAI uptake, as did coincubation with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (an inhibitor of MCTs). Dixon plotting revealed the competitive inhibition of benzoic acid on the AAI uptake. To confirm the AAI uptake via MCTs, the apical-to-basolateral transport of AAI was investigated using the Caco-2 cells cultured on the permeable membranes. The transport of AAI at pH 6.0 was markedly higher than that at pH 7.4, and was significantly decreased by coincubation with benzoic acid. These results suggest that the uptake of AAI from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells is mediated mainly by MCTs along with benzoic acid. PMID:25177030

  13. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Zhu, Yimin; Kahn, Zakia; Man, Malcolm

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  14. Amino acid transporters: roles in amino acid sensing and signalling in animal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Russell; Taylor, Peter M; Hundal, Harinder S

    2003-01-01

    Amino acid availability regulates cellular physiology by modulating gene expression and signal transduction pathways. However, although the signalling intermediates between nutrient availability and altered gene expression have become increasingly well documented, how eukaryotic cells sense the presence of either a nutritionally rich or deprived medium is still uncertain. From recent studies it appears that the intracellular amino acid pool size is particularly important in regulating translational effectors, thus, regulated transport of amino acids across the plasma membrane represents a means by which the cellular response to amino acids could be controlled. Furthermore, evidence from studies with transportable amino acid analogues has demonstrated that flux through amino acid transporters may act as an initiator of nutritional signalling. This evidence, coupled with the substrate selectivity and sensitivity to nutrient availability classically associated with amino acid transporters, plus the recent discovery of transporter-associated signalling proteins, demonstrates a potential role for nutrient transporters as initiators of cellular nutrient signalling. Here, we review the evidence supporting the idea that distinct amino acid "receptors" function to detect and transmit certain nutrient stimuli in higher eukaryotes. In particular, we focus on the role that amino acid transporters may play in the sensing of amino acid levels, both directly as initiators of nutrient signalling and indirectly as regulators of external amino acid access to intracellular receptor/signalling mechanisms. PMID:12879880

  15. Corrosion of graphite composites in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L. G.; Dhar, H. P.; Farooque, M.; Kush, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Polymers, polymer-graphite composites and different carbon materials are being considered for many of the fuel cell stack components. Exposure to concentrated phosphoric acid in the fuel cell environment and to high anodic potential results in corrosion. Relative corrosion rates of these materials, failure modes, plausible mechanisms of corrosion and methods for improvement of these materials are investigated.

  16. Mechanisms of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid inhibition of mammary cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Said, Thenaa K; Moraes, Ricardo CB; Sinha, Raghu; Medina, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in cell growth inhibition involved induction of pRb-2/p130 interaction and nuclear translocation with E2F-4, followed by significant repression in E2F-1 and PCNA nuclear levels, which led to inhibition in DNA synthesis in mammary epithelial cell lines. PMID:11250759

  17. Fatty Acid-Induced T Cell Loss Greases Liver Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shalapour, Shabnam; Karin, Michael

    2016-05-10

    A new study has added loss of CD4(+) T cells caused by aberrant lipid metabolism to the list of mechanisms promoting nonalcoholic steatohepatitis progression to liver cancer (Ma et al., 2016). Exposure of CD4(+) T cells to free linoleic acid causes their ROS-mediated depletion, thereby favoring liver cancer growth. PMID:27166937

  18. Nerve cell death induced in vivo by kainic acid and quinolinic acid does not involve apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ignatowicz, E; Vezzani, A M; Rizzi, M; D'Incalci, M

    1991-11-01

    We investigated whether in vivo excitotoxicity was mediated by a mechanism of programmed cell death called apoptosis. Neurotoxic doses of kainic acid (1.2 nmol) and quinolinic acid (120 nmol) were unilaterally injected in the dorsal hippocampus of anesthetized rats. Eight or 16 h later the animals were killed and DNA was extracted from the injected hippocampi. DNA from mouse thymocytes exposed to methylprednisolone (10(-5) M for 6 h at 37 degrees C) was used as a positive control of apoptotic cells. No typical 'ladder' of DNA fragments (multimers of approximately 200 Kb) which characterizes apoptosis was seen in hippocampal cells after toxic doses of kainic or quinolinic acid, as assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. This suggests that hippocampal nerve cell death induced in vivo by the excitotoxins is not mediated by apoptosis. PMID:1839770

  19. Solid Acid Fuel Cell Stack for APU Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duong, Hau H.

    2011-04-15

    Solid acid fuel cell technology affords the opportunity to operate at the 200-300 degree centigrade regime that would allow for more fuel flexibility, compared to polymer electrode membrane fuel cell, while avoiding the relatively more expensive and complex system components required by solid oxide fuel cell. This project addresses many factors such as MEA size scalability, fuel robustness, stability, etc., that are essential for successful commercialization of the technology.

  20. Silicon dioxide thin film mediated single cell nucleic acid isolation.

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube. PMID:23874571

  1. Silicon Dioxide Thin Film Mediated Single Cell Nucleic Acid Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Evgeny; Dominova, Irina; Shusharina, Natalia; Botman, Stepan; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Patrushev, Maksim

    2013-01-01

    A limited amount of DNA extracted from single cells, and the development of single cell diagnostics make it necessary to create a new highly effective method for the single cells nucleic acids isolation. In this paper, we propose the DNA isolation method from biomaterials with limited DNA quantity in sample, and from samples with degradable DNA based on the use of solid-phase adsorbent silicon dioxide nanofilm deposited on the inner surface of PCR tube. PMID:23874571

  2. Characterization of ascorbic acid uptake by isolated rat kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers-Komro, D.M.; McCormick, D.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Isolated kidney cells accumulated L(1-14C)ascorbic acid in a time-dependent manner and reached a steady state after 15 min at 37 degrees C. Initial velocity for uptake was over 300 pmol/mg protein per min when cells were separated from the bathing solution using a density gradient established during centrifugation. The uptake process was saturable with an apparent concentration at half maximal uptake of 36 mumols/L. Ascorbate uptake was reduced by metabolic inhibitors and was temperature dependent. Although ascorbic acid is an acid anion at pH 7.4, uptake did not appear to be inhibited by other acid anions such as p-aminohippurate and probenecid; however, involvement of the ion gradient established by Na+, H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase could not be confirmed. Replacing the sodium ion with other monovalent ions reduced the accumulation of ascorbate significantly. Isoascorbic and dehydroascorbic acids inhibited ascorbate uptake (34 and 13 mmol/L, respectively), whereas high concentrations of glucose showed some stimulation. These findings indicated that ascorbic acid is reabsorbed by the kidney in a sodium-dependent active transport process that is not common to other acid anions and has some specificity for the ascorbic acid structure.

  3. The effect of ascetic acid on mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mariana, Oana C; Trujillo, Antoinette; Sanders, Claire K; Burnett, Kassidy S; Freyer, James P; Mourant, Judith R

    2010-01-01

    Effects of the contrast agent, acetic acid, on mammalian cells are studied using light scattering measurements, viability and fluorescence pH assays. Results depend on whether cells are in PBS or are live and metabolizing. Acetic acid is a contrast agent used to aid the detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. Typically 3% or 5% acetic acid is applied to the swface of the cervix and areas of the tissue that turn 'acetowhite' are considered more likely to be precancerous. The mechanism of action of acetic acid has never been understood in detail, although there are several hypotheses. One is that a decrease in pH causes cytokeratins in epithelial cells to polymerize. We will present data demonstrating that this is not the sole mechanism of acetowhitening. Another hypothesis is that a decrease in pH in the nucleus causes deacetylation of the histones which in turn results in a dense chromatin structure. Relevant to this hypothesis we have measured the internal pH of cells. Additional goals of this work are to understand what physical changes result in acetowhitening, to understand why there is variation in how cells respond to acetic acid, and to investigate how acetowhitening affects the light scatter properties measured by a fiber-optic probe we have developed for cervical cancer diagnostics.

  4. Novel phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haifeng

    Acid doped polybenzimidazole (PBIRTM, called mPBI in this thesis) membranes are applied as electrolytes in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Several series of homopolymers and copolymers with high I.V. were synthesized in PPA solution. A novel membrane fabrication and acid doping process, called the PPA process, was developed by casting the polymer-polyphosphoric acid (PPA) solution directly after polymerization without isolation or redissolution of the polymers. The PPA absorbed moisture from the atmosphere and hydrolyzed to phosphoric acid, which induced a sol-gel transition and produced a high acid doped PBI membrane. A water spray method was developed to make an acid doped ABPBI membrane by spraying water or dilute phosphoric acid onto the cast solution directly. This process induced film formation for ABPBI, but washed out most of the phosphoric acid dopant. A more rigid pPBI homopolymer was synthesized in PPA solution with high inherent viscosity (2˜3 dL/g). Acid doped pPBI membranes showed high acid doping level (pPBI·69H3PO4) and high conductivity (0.24 S/cm at 160°C). Fuel cells based on pPBI/PA showed good performance at various conditions. For example, a fuel cell based on pPBI/PA showed a maximum power density of 0.92 W/cm2 at 160°C and ambient pressure (H2/O2). The degradation rate of the cell potential was -21 mV/1,000 hours and -35 mV/1,000 hours at 160°C and 180°C, respectively in continuous testing. Fuel cells also showed good performance and tolerance to carbon monoxide poisoning when operated at temperatures higher than 120°C. The voltage drop was only 31 mV (from 0.657 V to 0.626 V at 0.3 A/cm2) when reformate gas (40.0% H2, 0.2% CO, 19.0% CO2, 40.8% N2) was used instead of pure hydrogen at one atmosphere pressure and 160°C. The structure-property relationships were investigated on the homopolymers and copolymers with different rigidities in the main chain. It is found that para-oriented structures

  5. Materials characterization of phosphoric acid fuel cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesh, Srinivasan

    1986-01-01

    The component materials used in the fabrication of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC) must have mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical stability to withstand the moderately high temperature (200 C) and pressure (500 kPa) and highly oxidizing nature of phosphoric acid. This study discusses the chemical and structural stability, performance and corrosion data on certain catalysts, catalyst supports, and electrode support materials used in PAFC applications.

  6. Lactic Acid Bacteria Convert Human Fibroblasts to Multipotent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kunimasa; Kawano, Rie; Ito, Naofumi

    2012-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is colonized by a vast community of symbionts and commensals. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) form a group of related, low-GC-content, gram-positive bacteria that are considered to offer a number of probiotic benefits to general health. While the role of LAB in gastrointestinal microecology has been the subject of extensive study, little is known about how commensal prokaryotic organisms directly influence eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate the generation of multipotential cells from adult human dermal fibroblast cells by incorporating LAB. LAB-incorporated cell clusters are similar to embryoid bodies derived from embryonic stem cells and can differentiate into endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal cells in vivo and in vitro. LAB-incorporated cell clusters express a set of genes associated with multipotency, and microarray analysis indicates a remarkable increase of NANOG, a multipotency marker, and a notable decrease in HOX gene expression in LAB-incorporated cells. During the cell culture, the LAB-incorporated cell clusters stop cell division and start to express early senescence markers without cell death. Thus, LAB-incorporated cell clusters have potentially wide-ranging implications for cell generation, reprogramming, and cell-based therapy. PMID:23300571

  7. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Primary Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gyan, Emmanuel; Tournilhac, Olivier; Halty, Christelle; Veyrat-Masson, Richard; Akil, Saïda; Berger, Marc; Hérault, Olivier; Callanan, Mary; Bay, Jacques-Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an indolent disorder with an increased infectious risk remaining one of the main causes of death. Development of therapies with higher safety profile is thus a challenging issue. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) is an omega-3 fatty acid, a natural compound of normal cells, and has been shown to display antitumor potency in cancer. We evaluated the potential in vitro effect of DHA in primary CLL cells. DHA induces high level of in vitro apoptosis compared to oleic acid in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Estimation of IC50 was only of 4.813 µM, which appears lower than those reported in solid cancers. DHA is highly active on CLL cells in vitro. This observation provides a rationale for further studies aiming to understand its mechanisms of action and its potent in vivo activity. PMID:26734128

  8. Amino Acid Synthesis in Photosynthesizing Spinach Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Peder Olesen; Cornwell, Karen L.; Gee, Sherry L.; Bassham, James A.

    1981-01-01

    Isolated cells from leaves of Spinacia oleracea have been maintained in a state capable of high rates of photosynthetic CO2 fixation for more than 60 hours. The incorporation of 14CO2 under saturating CO2 conditions into carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids, and the effect of ammonia on this incorporation have been studied. Total incorporation, specific radioactivity, and pool size have been determined as a function of time for most of the protein amino acids and for γ-aminobutyric acid. The measurements of specific radio-activities and of the approaches to 14C “saturation” of some amino acids indicate the presence and relative sizes of metabolically active and passive pools of these amino acids. Added ammonia decreased carbon fixation into carbohydrates and increased fixation into carboxylic acids and amino acids. Different amino acids were, however, affected in different and highly specific ways. Ammonia caused large stimulatory effects in incorporation of 14C into glutamine (a factor of 21), aspartate, asparagine, valine, alanine, arginine, and histidine. No effect or slight decreases were seen in glycine, serine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine labeling. In the case of glutamate, 14C labeling decreased, but specific radioactivity increased. The production of labeled γ-aminobutyric acid was virtually stopped by ammonia. The results indicate that added ammonia stimulates the reactions mediated by pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, as seen with other plant systems. The data on the effects of added ammonia on total labeling, pool sizes, and specific radioactivities of several amino acids provides a number of indications about the intracellular sites of principal synthesis from carbon skeletons of these amino acids and the selective nature of effects of increased intracellular ammonia concentration on such synthesis. PMID:16661904

  9. Cinnamic acid induces apoptotic cell death and cytoskeleton disruption in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer activities of cinnamic acid derivatives include induction of apoptosis by irreversible DNA damage leading to cell death. The present work aimed to compare the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of cinnamic acid in human melanoma cell line (HT-144) and human melanocyte cell line derived from blue nevus (NGM). Viability assay showed that the IC50 for HT-144 cells was 2.4 mM, while NGM cells were more resistant to the treatment. The growth inhibition was probably associated with DNA damage leading to DNA synthesis inhibition, as shown by BrdU incorporation assay, induction of nuclear aberrations and then apoptosis. The frequency of cell death caused by cinnamic acid was higher in HT-144 cells. Activated-caspase 3 staining showed apoptosis after 24 hours of treatment with cinnamic acid 3.2 mM in HT-144 cells, but not in NGM. We observed microtubules disorganization after cinnamic acid exposure, but this event and cell death seem to be independent according to M30 and tubulin labeling. The frequency of micronucleated HT-144 cells was higher after treatment with cinnamic acid (0.4 and 3.2 mM) when compared to the controls. Cinnamic acid 3.2 mM also increased the frequency of micronucleated NGM cells indicating genotoxic activity of the compound, but the effects were milder. Binucleation and multinucleation counting showed similar results. We conclude that cinnamic acid has effective antiproliferative activity against melanoma cells. However, the increased frequency of micronucleation in NGM cells warrants the possibility of genotoxicity and needs further investigation. PMID:23701745

  10. Retinoic acid-primed human dendritic cells inhibit Th9 cells and induce Th1/Th17 cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rampal, Ritika; Awasthi, Amit; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-07-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid plays a central role in mucosal immunity, where it promotes its synthesis by up-regulating CD103 expression on dendritic cells, induces gut tropic (α4β7(+) and CCR9(+)) T cells, and inhibits Th1/Th17 differentiation. Recently, murine studies have highlighted the proinflammatory role of retinoic acid in maintaining inflammation under a variety of pathologic conditions. However, as a result of limited human data, we investigated the effect of retinoic acid on human dendritic cells and CD4(+) T cell responses in the presence of polarizing (Th1/Th9/Th17) and inflammatory (LPS-induced dendritic cells) conditions. We report a novel role of retinoic acid in an inflammatory setup, where retinoic acid-primed dendritic cells (retinoic acid-monocyte-derived dendritic cells) up-regulated CCR9(+)T cells, which were observed to express high levels of IFN-γ in the presence of Th1/Th17 conditions. Retinoic acid-monocyte-derived dendritic cells, under Th17 conditions, also favored the induction of IL-17(+) T cells. Furthermore, in the presence of TGF-β1 and IL-4, retinoic acid-monocyte-derived dendritic cells inhibited IL-9 and induced IFN-γ expression on T cells. Experiments with naïve CD4(+) T cells, activated in the presence of Th1/Th17 conditions and absence of DCs, indicated that retinoic acid inhibited IFN-γ and IL-17 expression on T cells. These data revealed that in the face of inflammatory conditions, retinoic acid, in contrast from its anti-inflammatory role, could maintain or aggravate the intestinal inflammation. PMID:26980802

  11. Folic Acid Supplementation Stimulates Notch Signaling and Cell Proliferation in Embryonic Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Huang, Guo-wei; Zhang, Xu-mei; Ren, Da-lin; X. Wilson, John

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of folic acid supplementation on the Notch signaling pathway and cell proliferation in rat embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs). The NSCs were isolated from E14–16 rat brain and grown as neurospheres in serum-free suspension culture. Individual cultures were assigned to one of 3 treatment groups that differed according to the concentration of folic acid in the medium: Control (baseline folic acid concentration of 4 mg/l), low folic acid supplementation (4 mg/l above baseline, Folate-L) and high folic acid supplementation (40 mg/l above baseline, Folate-H). NSCs were identified by their expression of immunoreactive nestin and proliferating cells by incorporation of 5'bromo-2'deoxyuridine. Cell proliferation was also assessed by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Notch signaling was analyzed by real-time PCR and western blot analyses of the expression of Notch1 and hairy and enhancer of split 5 (Hes5). Supplementation of NSCs with folic acid increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of Notch1 and Hes5. Folic acid supplementation also stimulated NSC proliferation dose-dependently. Embryonic NSCs respond to folic acid supplementation with increased Notch signaling and cell proliferation. This mechanism may mediate the effects of folic acid supplementation on neurogenesis in the embryonic nervous system. PMID:20838574

  12. Enhancement effect of poly(amino acid)s on insulin uptake in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Oda, Keisuke; Yumoto, Ryoko; Nagai, Junya; Katayama, Hirokazu; Takano, Mikihisa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we elucidated the effect of poly(amino acid)s such as poly-L-ornithine (PLO) on FITC-insulin uptake in cultured alveolar type II epithelial cells, RLE-6TN. FITC-insulin uptake by RLE-6TN cells as well as its cell surface binding was markedly increased by PLO without cytotoxicity. The uptake of FITC-insulin in the presence of PLO was shown to be mediated by endocytosis, but in contrast to the uptake in the absence of PLO, the contribution of macropinocytosis emerged. Colocalization of FITC-insulin and LysoTracker Red was observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy both in the absence and presence of PLO, indicating that FITC-insulin was partly targeted to lysosomes in the cells and degraded. The half-life of the intracellular degradation of FITC-insulin was, however, prolonged by the presence of PLO. PLO also stimulated the uptake of other FITC-labeled compounds. Among them, the enhancement effects of PLO on FITC-albumin and FITC-insulin uptake were prominent. The effect of PLO on insulin absorption was also examined in in-vivo pulmonary administration in rats, and co-administration of PLO enhanced the hypoglycemic action of insulin. These findings suggest that co-administration of poly(amino acid)s such as PLO is a useful strategy for enhancing insulin uptake by alveolar epithelial cells and subsequent absorption from the lung. PMID:22510869

  13. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  14. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  15. Integral edge seals for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granata, Jr., Samuel J. (Inventor); Woodle, Boyd M. (Inventor); Dunyak, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell having integral edge seals formed by an elastomer permeating an outer peripheral band contiguous with the outer peripheral edges of the cathode and anode assemblies and the matrix to form an integral edge seal which is reliable, easy to manufacture and has creep characteristics similar to the anode, cathode and matrix assemblies inboard of the seals to assure good electrical contact throughout the life of the fuel cell.

  16. Effects of ursolic acid and oleanolic acid on human colon carcinoma cell line HCT15

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Guo, Wei-Jian; Yang, Qing-Yao

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) are triperpene acids having a similar chemical structure and are distributed wildly in plants all over the world. In recent years, it was found that they had marked anti-tumor effects. There is little literature currently available regarding their effects on colon carcinoma cells. The present study was designed to investigate their inhibitory effects on human colon carcinoma cell line HCT15. METHODS: HCT15 cells were cultured with different drugs. The treated cells were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and their morphologic changes observed under a light microscope. The cytotoxicity of these drugs was evaluated by tetrazolium dye assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by flow cytometry (FCM). Data were expressed as means ± SEM and Analysis of variance and Student’ t-test for individual comparisons. RESULTS: Twenty-four to 72 h after UA or OA 60 μmol/L treatment, the numbers of dead cells and cell fragments were increased and most cells were dead at the 72nd hour. The cytotoxicity of UA was stronger than that of OA. Seventy-eight hours after 30 μmol/L of UA or OA treatment, a number of cells were degenerated, but cell fragments were rarely seen. The IC50 values for UA and OA were 30 and 60 μmol/L, respectively. Proliferation assay showed that proliferation of UA and OA-treated cells was slightly increased at 24 h and significantly decreased at 48 h and 60 h, whereas untreated control cells maintained an exponential growth curve. Cell cycle analysis by FCM showed HCT15 cells treated with UA 30 and OA 60 for 36 h and 72 h gradually accumulated in G0/G1 phase (both drugs P < 0.05 for 72 h), with a concomitant decrease of cell populations in S phase (both drugs P < 0.01 for 72 h) and no detectable apoptotic fraction. CONCLUSION: UA and OA have significant anti-tumor activity. The effect of UA is stronger than that of OA. The possible mechanism of action is that both drugs have an inhibitory effect on tumor cell

  17. Enhanced Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiming; Jiang, Xudong; Ou, Qin; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mingfu; Sun, Guozhi; Wang, Zhao; Sun, Jie; Ge, Tangdong

    2014-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), one of the important polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with pharmaceutical and nutraceutical effects, may be obtained through diet or synthesized in vivo from dietary a-linolenic acid (ALA). However, the acumulation of DHA in human body or other mammals relies on the intake of high dose of DHA for a certain period of time, and the bioconversion of dietary ALA to DHA is very limited. Therefore the mammalian cells are not rich in DHA. Here, we report a new technology for increased prodution of DHA in mammalian cells. By using transient transfection method, Siganus canaliculatus Δ4 desaturase was heterologously expressed in chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and simultaneously, mouse Δ6-desaturase and Δ5-desaturase were overexpressed. The results demonstrated that the overexpression of Δ6/Δ5-desaturases significantly enhanced the ability of transfected cells to convert the added ALA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) which in turn get converted into DHA directly and efficiently by the heterologously expressed Δ4 desaturase. This technology provides the basis for potential utility of these gene constructs in the creation of transgenic livestock for increased production of DHA/related products to meet the growing demand of this important PUFA. PMID:24788769

  18. Enhanced production of docosahexaenoic acid in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiming; Jiang, Xudong; Ou, Qin; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mingfu; Sun, Guozhi; Wang, Zhao; Sun, Jie; Ge, Tangdong

    2014-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), one of the important polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with pharmaceutical and nutraceutical effects, may be obtained through diet or synthesized in vivo from dietary a-linolenic acid (ALA). However, the accumulation of DHA in human body or other mammals relies on the intake of high dose of DHA for a certain period of time, and the bioconversion of dietary ALA to DHA is very limited. Therefore the mammalian cells are not rich in DHA. Here, we report a new technology for increased production of DHA in mammalian cells. By using transient transfection method, Siganus canaliculatus Δ4 desaturase was heterologously expressed in chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and simultaneously, mouse Δ6-desaturase and Δ5-desaturase were overexpressed. The results demonstrated that the overexpression of Δ6/Δ5-desaturases significantly enhanced the ability of transfected cells to convert the added ALA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) which in turn get converted into DHA directly and efficiently by the heterologously expressed Δ4 desaturase. This technology provides the basis for potential utility of these gene constructs in the creation of transgenic livestock for increased production of DHA/related products to meet the growing demand of this important PUFA. PMID:24788769

  19. Cystine and dibasic amino acid uptake by opossum kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    States, B.; Segal, S. )

    1990-06-01

    The characteristics of the uptake of L-cystine by the continuous opossum kidney cell line, OK, were examined. Uptake of cystine is rapid and, in contrast to other continuous cultured cell lines, these cells retain the cystine/dibasic amino acid transport system which is found in vivo and in freshly isolated kidney tissue. Confluent monolayers of cells also fail to show the presence of the cystine/glutamate transport system present in LLC-PK1 cells, fibroblasts, and cultured hepatocytes. Uptake of cystine occurs via a high-affinity saturable process which is independent of medium sodium concentration. The predominant site of cystine transport is across the apical cell membrane. The intracellular concentration of GSH far exceeds that of cystine with a ratio greater than 100:1 for GSH:cysteine. Incubation of cells for 5 minutes with a physiological level of labelled cystine resulted in the labelling of 66% and 5% of the total intracellular cysteine and glutathione, respectively. The ability of these cells to reflect the shared cystine/dibasic amino acid transport system makes them a suitable model for investigation of the cystine carrier which is altered in human cystinuria.

  20. Fatty acid metabolism in the regulation of T cell function.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Matthias; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-02-01

    The specific regulation of cellular metabolic processes is of major importance for directing immune cell differentiation and function. We review recent evidence indicating that changes in basic cellular lipid metabolism have critical effects on T cell proliferation and cell fate decisions. While induction of de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis is essential for activation-induced proliferation and differentiation of effector T cells, FA catabolism via β-oxidation is important for the development of CD8(+) T cell memory as well as for the differentiation of CD4(+) regulatory T cells. We consider the influence of lipid metabolism and metabolic intermediates on the regulation of signaling and transcriptional pathways via post-translational modifications, and discuss how an improved understanding of FA metabolism may reveal strategies for manipulating immune responses towards therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25592731

  1. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1981-01-01

    The development of materials, cell components, and reformers for on site integrated energy systems is described. Progress includes: (1) heat-treatment of 25 sq cm, 350 sq cm and 1200 sq cm cell test hardware was accomplished. Performance of fuel cells is improved by using this material; (2) electrochemical and chemical corrosion rates of heat-treated and as-molded graphite/phenolic resin composites in phosphoric acid were determined; (3) three cell, 5 in. x 15 in. stacks operated for up to 10,000 hours and 12 in. x 17 in. five cell stacks were tested for 5,000 hours; (4) a three cell 5 in. x 15 in. stack with 0.12 mg Pt/sq cm anodes and 0.25 mg Pt/sq cm cathodes was operated for 4,500 hours; and (5) an ERC proprietary high bubble pressure matrix, MAT-1, was tested for up to 10,000 hours.

  2. Acid-induced secretory cell metaplasia in hamster bronchi

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, T.G.; Lucey, E.C.; Breuer, R.; Snider, G.L.

    1988-02-01

    Hamsters were exposed to an intratracheal instillation of 0.5 ml of 0.08 N nitric, hydrochloric, or sulfuric acid to determine their airway epithelial response. Three weeks after exposure, the left intrapulmonary bronchi in Alcian blue/PAS-strained paraffin sections were evaluated for the amount of secretory product in the airway epithelium as a measure of secretory cell metaplasia (SCM). Compared to saline-treated control animals, all three acids caused statistically significant SCM. In addition to the bronchial lesion, all three acids caused similar interstitial fibrosis, bronchiolectasis, and bronchiolization of alveoli that varied in individual animals from mild to severe. In a separate experiment to study the persistence of the SCM, hamsters treated with a single instillation of 0.1 N nitric acid showed significant SCM 3, 7, and 17 weeks after exposure. There was a high correlation (r = 0.96) between a subjective assessment of SCM and objective assessment using a digital image-analysis system. We conclude that protons induce SCM independently of the associated anion; the SCM persists at least 17 weeks. Sulfuric acid is an atmospheric pollutant and nitric acid may form locally on the mucosa of lungs exposed to nitrogen dioxide. These acids may contribute to the development of maintenance of the SCM seen in the conducting airways of humans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  3. Retinoic acid-induced neural differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Villeneuve, E M; Rudnicki, M A; Harris, J F; McBurney, M W

    1983-01-01

    We have previously shown that the P19 line of embryonal carcinoma cells develops into neurons, astroglia, and fibroblasts after aggregation and exposure to retinoic acid. The neurons were initially identified by their morphology and by the presence of neurofilaments within their cytoplasm. We have more fully documented the neuronal nature of these cells by showing that their cell surfaces display tetanus toxin receptors, a neuronal cell marker, and that choline acetyl-transferase and acetyl cholinesterase activities appear coordinately in neuron-containing cultures. Several days before the appearance of neurons, there is a marked decrease in the amount of an embryonal carcinoma surface antigen, and at the same time there is a substantial decrease in the volumes of individual cells. Various retinoids were able to induce the development of neurons in cultures of aggregated P19 cells, but it did not appear that polyamine metabolism was involved in the effect. We have isolated a mutant clone which does not differentiate in the presence of any of the drugs which are normally effective in inducing differentiation of P19 cells. This mutant and others may help to elucidate the chain of events triggered by retinoic acid and other differentiation-inducing drugs. Images PMID:6656766

  4. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:26378497

  5. Nutrient-deprived cancer cells preferentially use sialic acid to maintain cell surface glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Badr, Haitham A; AlSadek, Dina M M; Mathew, Mohit P; Li, Chen-Zhong; Djansugurova, Leyla B; Yarema, Kevin J; Ahmed, Hafiz

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is characterized by abnormal energy metabolism shaped by nutrient deprivation that malignant cells experience during various stages of tumor development. This study investigated the response of nutrient-deprived cancer cells and their non-malignant counterparts to sialic acid supplementation and found that cells utilize negligible amounts of this sugar for energy. Instead cells use sialic acid to maintain cell surface glycosylation through complementary mechanisms. First, levels of key metabolites (e.g., UDP-GlcNAc and CMP-Neu5Ac) required for glycan biosynthesis are maintained or enhanced upon Neu5Ac supplementation. In concert, sialyltransferase expression increased at both the mRNA and protein levels, which facilitated increased sialylation in biochemical assays that measure sialyltransferase activity as well as at the whole cell level. In the course of these experiments, several important differences emerged that differentiated the cancer cells from their normal counterparts including resistant to sialic acid-mediated energy depletion, consistently more robust sialic acid-mediated glycan display, and distinctive cell surface vs. internal vesicle display of newly-produced sialoglycans. Finally, the impact of sialic acid supplementation on specific markers implicated in cancer progression was demonstrated by measuring levels of expression and sialylation of EGFR1 and MUC1 as well as the corresponding function of sialic acid-supplemented cells in migration assays. These findings both provide fundamental insight into the biological basis of sialic acid supplementation of nutrient-deprived cancer cells and open the door to the development of diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:26295436

  6. Intertissue Signal Transfer of Abscisic Acid from Vascular Cells to Guard Cells1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kuromori, Takashi; Sugimoto, Eriko; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a phytohormone that responds to environmental stresses, such as water deficiency. Recent studies have shown that ABA biosynthetic enzymes are expressed in the vascular area under both nonstressed and water-stressed growth conditions. However, specific cells in the vasculature involved in ABA biosynthesis have not been identified. Here, we detected the expression of two genes encoding ABA biosynthetic enzymes, ABSCISIC ACID DEFICIENT2 and ABSCISIC ALDEHYDE OXIDASE3, in phloem companion cells in vascular tissues. Furthermore, we identified an ATP-binding cassette transporter, Arabidopsis thaliana ABCG25 (AtABCG25), expressed in the same cells. Additionally, AtABCG25-expressing Spodoptera frugiperda9 culture cells showed an ABA efflux function. Finally, we observed that enhancement of ABA biosynthesis in phloem companion cells induced guard cell responses, even under normal growth conditions. These results show that ABA is synthesized in specific cells and can be transported to target cells in different tissues. PMID:24521878

  7. Cells labeled with multiple fluorophores bound to a nucleic acid carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Dattagupta, N.; Kamarch, M.E.

    1989-04-25

    In passing labeled cells through a cell sorter, the improvement which comprises employing a labeled cell comprising a cell, an antibody specific to and bound to such cell, a nucleic acid fragment joined to the antibody, and a plurality of labels on the nucleic acid fragment. Because of the presence of multiple labels, the sensitivity of the separation of labeled cells in increased.

  8. Oxidation of L-ascorbic acid to dehydroascorbic acid on the surface of the red blood cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.; Jennings, M.; Bennett, K.

    1986-05-01

    L-ascorbic acid-1-/sup 14/C when incubated with human blood did not bind irreversibly to any of the protein components of plasma but did migrate irreversibly into erythrocytes. Isolation and characterization via IR of the moiety trapped within the cell established its identity as apparently, unchanged L-ascorbic acid. When dehydroascorbic acid-1-/sup 14/C was incubated with human blood, the results were identical including the identity of the entrapped moiety, L-ascorbic acid. It was found that L-ascorbic acid was enzymatically oxidized on the surface of the red blood cell to dehydroascorbic acid which diffused through the lipid soluble portion of the cell membrane and was enzymatically reduced back to ascorbic acid within the cell.

  9. Cathode catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Alkylation or carbon Vulcan XC-72, the support carbon, was shown to provide the most stable bond type for linking cobalt dehydrodibenzo tetraazannulene (CoTAA) to the surface of the carbon; this result is based on data obtained by cyclic voltammetry, pulse voltammetry and by release of 14C from bonded CoTAA. Half-cell tests at 100 C in 85% phosphoric acid showed that CoTAA bonded to the surface of carbon (Vulcan XC-72) via an alkylation procedure is a more active catalyst than is platinum based on a factor of two improvement in Tafel slope; dimeric CoTAA had catalytic activity equal to platinum. Half-cell tests also showed that bonded CoTAA catalysts do not suffer a loss in potential when air is used as a fuel rather than oxygen. Commercially available polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE) was shown to be unstable in the fuel cell environment with degradation occurring in 2000 hours or less. The PTFE was stressed at 200 C in concentrated phosphoric acid as well as electrochemically stressed in 150 C concentrated phosphoric acid; the surface chemistry of PTFE was observed to change significantly. Radiolabeled PTFE was prepared and used to verify that such chemical changes also occur in the primary fuel cell environment.

  10. Galactosylated poly(ethyleneglycol)-lithocholic Acid selectively kills hepatoma cells, while sparing normal liver cells.

    PubMed

    Gankhuyag, Nomundelger; Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-06-01

    Delivering drugs selectively to cancer cells but not to nearby normal cells is a major obstacle in drug therapy. In this study, lithocholic acid (LCA), a potent anti-cancer drug, is converted to two forms of poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) conjugates, viz., PEG-LCA (PL) and lactobionic acid (LBA) conjugated PEG-LCA (LPL). The latter form contains a galactose ligand in LBA to target the hepatocytes. Both forms are self-assembled to form nanoparticle formulation, and they have high potency than LCA to kill HepG2 cancer cells, sparing normal LO2 cells. Besides, LPL has high specificity to mouse liver cells in vivo. Western blot results confirm that the cell death is occurred through apoptosis induced by LPL nanoparticles. In conclusion, the induction of apoptosis and cell death is much more efficient with LPL nanoparticles than LCA molecules. PMID:25657071

  11. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  12. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2014-08-29

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  13. Catalyst and electrode research for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.; King, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the development status of phosphoric acid fuel cells' high performance catalyst and electrode materials. Binary alloys have been identified which outperform the baseline platinum catalyst; it has also become apparent that pressurized operation is required to reach the desired efficiencies, calling in turn for the use of graphitized carbon blacks in the role of catalyst supports. Efforts to improve cell performance and reduce catalyst costs have led to the investigation of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts represented by the tetraazaannulenes, and a mixed catalyst which is a mixture of carbons catalyzed with an organometallic and a noble metal.

  14. Status of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.; Prokopius, P. R.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the current commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system development efforts is presented. In both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are important. The barrier to the attainment of these goals has been materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants are their technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy.

  15. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation. PMID:26001374

  16. Boswellic acid activity against glioblastoma stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    SCHNEIDER, HANNAH; WELLER, MICHAEL

    2016-01-01

    Boswellic acids (BAs) have long been considered as useful adjunct pharmacological agents for the treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors, notably glioblastoma. Two principal modes of action associated with BAs have been postulated: i) Anti-inflammatory properties, which are useful for containing edema formation, and ii) intrinsic antitumor cell properties, with a hitherto ill-defined mode of action. The present study assessed the effects of various BA derivatives on the viability and clonogenicity of a panel of nine long-term glioma cell lines and five glioma-initiating cell lines, studied cell cycle progression and the mode of cell death induction, and explored potential synergy with temozolomide (TMZ) or irradiation. BA induced the concentration-dependent loss of viability and clonogenicity that was independent of tumor protein 53 status and O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase expression. The treatment of glioma cells with BA resulted in cell death induction, prior to or upon S phase entry, and exhibited features of apoptotic cell death. Synergy with irradiation or TMZ was detected at certain concentrations; however, the inhibitory effects were mostly additive, and never antagonistic. While the intrinsic cytotoxic properties of BA at low micromolecular concentrations were confirmed and the potential synergy with irradiation and TMZ was identified, the proximate pharmacodynamic target of BA remains to be identified. PMID:27313764

  17. Cell membrane fatty acid composition differs between normal and malignant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xialong; Riordan, Neil H; Riordan, Hugh D; Mikirova, Nina; Jackson, James; González, Michael J; Miranda-Massari, Jorge R; Mora, Edna; Trinidad Castillo, Waleska

    2004-06-01

    Twenty-eight fatty acids (C8:0 to C24:l n-9) were measured by gas chromatography in four normal cell lines (C3H / 10T1 / 2, CCD-18Co, CCD-25SK and CCD-37Lu) and seven cancer cell lines (C-41, Caov-3, LS-180, PC-3, SK-MEL-28, SK-MES-1 and U-87 MG). Results show differences in the content and proportions of fatty acids when comparing cancer cell lines with their normal counterparts. Cancer cell lines showed lower C20: 4 n-6, C24:1 n-9, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA's) and ratios of C20:4 n-6 to C20:5 n-3 and C16:0 to C18:1 n-9 and stearic to oleic (SA/OA) than their normal counterparts. All cancer cell lines had SA/OA ratios lower than 7.0 while normal cell lines had ratios greater than 0.7 (p<0.05). In addition, the ratios of total saturated fatty acids (SFA) to PUFA'S and the concentration of C18:1 n-9, C18:2 n-6, C20:5 n-3 were higher in cancer cell lines as compared to normal cell lines. A positive correlation was detected between C16:0 and longer SFA'S (r = +0.511, p<0.05) in normal cell lines whereas a negative correlation (r=0.608, p<0.05) was obtained for malignant cell lines. Moreover, cancerous cell lines exhibited a particular desaturation defect and an abnormal incorporation of C18:2 n-6 and C20-4 n-6 fatty acids. PMID:15377057

  18. Apoptotic effect of tannic acid on fatty acid synthase over-expressed human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Fangyuan; Liang, Yan; Jiang, Bing; Li, Xiabing; Xun, Hang; He, Wei; Lau, Hay Tong; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Novel therapies and chemo-therapeutic drugs are urgently needed to be developed for the treatment of breast cancer. Increasing evidence suggests that fatty acid synthase (FAS) plays an important role in breast cancer, for the expression of FAS is significantly higher in human breast cancer cells than in normal cells. Tannic acid (TA), a natural polyphenol, possesses significant biological functions, including bacteriostasis, hemostasis, and anti-oxidant. Our previous studies demonstrated that TA is a natural FAS inhibitor whose inhibitory activity is stronger than that of classical FAS inhibitors, such as C75 and cerulenin. This study further assessed the effect and therapeutic potential of TA on FAS over-expressed breast cancer cells, and as a result, TA had been proven to possess the functions of inhibiting intracellular FAS activity, down-regulating FAS expression in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, and inducing cancer cell apoptosis. Since high-expressed FAS is recognized as a molecular marker for breast cancer and plays an important role in cancer prognosis, these findings suggest that TA is a potential drug candidate for treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26349913

  19. Effects of acetic acid on light scattering from cells

    PubMed Central

    Marina, Oana C.; Sanders, Claire K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Acetic acid has been used for decades as an aid for the detection of precancerous cervical lesions, and the use of acetic acid is being investigated in several other tissues. Nonetheless, the mechanism of acetowhitening is unclear. This work tests some of the hypotheses in the literature and measures changes in light scattering specific to the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Wide angle side scattering from both the nucleus and the cytoplasm increases with acetic application to tumorigenic cells, with the increase in nuclear scattering being greater. In one cell line, the changes in nuclear scattering are likely due to an increase in number or scattering efficiency of scattering centers smaller than the wavelength of excitation light. There are likely several cellular changes that cause acetowhitening and the cellular changes may differ with cell type. These results should lead to a better understanding of acetowhitening and potentially the development of adjunct techniques to improve the utility of acetic acid application. For the well-studied case of cervical tissue, acetowhitening has been shown to be sensitive, but not specific for oncogenic changes needing treatment. PMID:23224185

  20. Phenylpropenoic Acid Glucoside from Rooibos Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Cell Death Induced by Acute Injury

    PubMed Central

    Himpe, Eddy; Cunha, Daniel A.; Song, Imane; Bugliani, Marco; Marchetti, Piero; Cnop, Miriam; Bouwens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies demonstrated that a phenylpropenoic acid glucoside (PPAG) from rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) extract had anti-hyperglycemic activity and significant protective effects on the pancreatic beta cell mass in a chronic diet-induced diabetes model. The present study evaluated the cytoprotective effect of the phytochemical on beta cells exposed to acute cell stress. Methods Synthetically prepared PPAG was administered orally in mice treated with a single dose of streptozotocin to acutely induce beta cell death and hyperglycemia. Its effect was assessed on beta cell mass, proliferation and apoptotic cell death. Its cytoprotective effect was also studied in vitro on INS-1E beta cells and on human pancreatic islet cells. Results Treatment with the phytochemical PPAG protected beta cells during the first days after the insult against apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by TUNEL staining, and prevented loss of expression of anti-apoptotic protein BCL2 in vivo. In vitro, PPAG protected INS-1E beta cells from streptozotocin-induced apoptosis and necrosis in a BCL2-dependent and independent way, respectively, depending on glucose concentration. PPAG also protected human pancreatic islet cells against the cytotoxic action of the fatty acid palmitate. Conclusions These findings show the potential use of PPAG as phytomedicine which protects the beta cell mass exposed to acute diabetogenic stress. PMID:27299564

  1. Orexin A attenuates palmitic acid-induced hypothalamic cell death.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Cayla M; Nixon, Joshua P; Butterick, Tammy A

    2016-09-01

    Palmitic acid (PA), an abundant dietary saturated fatty acid, contributes to obesity and hypothalamic dysregulation in part through increase in oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and neuroinflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of PA exposure contributes to the onset of neuronal apoptosis. Additionally, high fat diets lead to changes in hypothalamic gene expression profiles including suppression of the anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 associated X protein (Bax). Orexin A (OXA), a hypothalamic peptide important in obesity resistance, also contributes to neuroprotection. Prior studies have demonstrated that OXA attenuates oxidative stress induced cell death. We hypothesized that OXA would be neuroprotective against PA induced cell death. To test this, we treated an immortalized hypothalamic cell line (designated mHypoA-1/2) with OXA and PA. We demonstrate that OXA attenuates PA-induced hypothalamic cell death via reduced caspase-3/7 apoptosis, stabilization of Bcl-2 gene expression, and reduced Bax/Bcl-2 gene expression ratio. We also found that OXA inhibits ROS production after PA exposure. Finally, we show that PA exposure in mHypoA-1/2 cells significantly reduces basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. However, OXA treatment reverses PA-induced changes in intracellular metabolism, increasing basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. Collectively, these results support that OXA protects against PA-induced hypothalamic dysregulation, and may represent one mechanism through which OXA can ameliorate effects of obesogenic diet on brain health. PMID:27449757

  2. Response of Cultured Maize Cells to (+)-Abscisic Acid, (-)-Abscisic Acid, and Their Metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Balsevich, J. J.; Cutler, A. J.; Lamb, N.; Friesen, L. J.; Kurz, E. U.; Perras, M. R.; Abrams, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    The metabolism and effects of (+)-S- and (-)-R-abscisic acid (ABA) and some metabolites were studied in maize (Zea mays L. cv Black Mexican Sweet) suspension-cultured cells. Time-course studies of metabolite formation were performed in both cells and medium via analytical high-performance liquid chromatography. Metabolites were isolated and identified using physical and chemical methods. At 10 [mu]M concentration and 28[deg] C, (+)-ABA was metabolized within 24 h, yielding natural (-)-phaseic acid [(-)-PA] as the major product. The unnatural enantiomer (-)-ABA was less than 50% metabolized within 24 h and gave primarily (-)-7[prime]-hydroxyABA [(-)-7[prime]-HOABA], together with (+)-PA and ABA glucose ester. The distribution of metabolites in cells and medium was different, reflecting different sites of metabolism and membrane permeabilities of conjugated and nonconjugated metabolites. The results imply that (+)-ABA was oxidized to (-)-PA inside the cell, whereas (-)-ABA was converted to (-)-7[prime]-HOABA at the cell surface. Growth of maize cells was inhibited by both (+)- and (-)-ABA, with only weak contributions from their metabolites. The concentration of (+)-ABA that caused a 50% inhibition of growth of maize cells was approximately 1 [mu]M, whereas that for its metabolite (-)-PA was approximately 50 [mu]M. (-)-ABA was less active than (+)-ABA, with 50% growth inhibition observed at about 10 [mu]M. (-)-7[prime]-HOABA was only weakly active, with 50% inhibition caused by approximately 500 [mu]M. Time-course studies of medium pH indicated that (+)-ABA caused a transient pH increase (+0.3 units) at 6 h after addition that was not observed in controls or in samples treated with (-)-PA. The effect of (-)-ABA on medium Ph was marginal. No racemization at C-1[prime] of (+)-ABA, (-)-ABA, or metabolites was observed during the studies. PMID:12232311

  3. Retinoic Acid as a Modulator of T Cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Bono, Maria Rosa; Tejon, Gabriela; Flores-Santibañez, Felipe; Fernandez, Dominique; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sauma, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A, a generic designation for an array of organic molecules that includes retinal, retinol and retinoic acid, is an essential nutrient needed in a wide array of aspects including the proper functioning of the visual system, maintenance of cell function and differentiation, epithelial surface integrity, erythrocyte production, reproduction, and normal immune function. Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies worldwide and is associated with defects in adaptive immunity. Reports from epidemiological studies, clinical trials and experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that vitamin A plays a central role in immunity and that its deficiency is the cause of broad immune alterations including decreased humoral and cellular responses, inadequate immune regulation, weak response to vaccines and poor lymphoid organ development. In this review, we will examine the role of vitamin A in immunity and focus on several aspects of T cell biology such as T helper cell differentiation, function and homing, as well as lymphoid organ development. Further, we will provide an overview of the effects of vitamin A deficiency in the adaptive immune responses and how retinoic acid, through its effect on T cells can fine-tune the balance between tolerance and immunity. PMID:27304965

  4. Retinoic Acid as a Modulator of T Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Maria Rosa; Tejon, Gabriela; Flores-Santibañez, Felipe; Fernandez, Dominique; Rosemblatt, Mario; Sauma, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A, a generic designation for an array of organic molecules that includes retinal, retinol and retinoic acid, is an essential nutrient needed in a wide array of aspects including the proper functioning of the visual system, maintenance of cell function and differentiation, epithelial surface integrity, erythrocyte production, reproduction, and normal immune function. Vitamin A deficiency is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies worldwide and is associated with defects in adaptive immunity. Reports from epidemiological studies, clinical trials and experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that vitamin A plays a central role in immunity and that its deficiency is the cause of broad immune alterations including decreased humoral and cellular responses, inadequate immune regulation, weak response to vaccines and poor lymphoid organ development. In this review, we will examine the role of vitamin A in immunity and focus on several aspects of T cell biology such as T helper cell differentiation, function and homing, as well as lymphoid organ development. Further, we will provide an overview of the effects of vitamin A deficiency in the adaptive immune responses and how retinoic acid, through its effect on T cells can fine-tune the balance between tolerance and immunity. PMID:27304965

  5. Effects of Ascorbic Acid, Phytic Acid and Tannic Acid on Ferritin-Iron Bioavailability as Determined Using an In Vitro Digestion/Caco-2 Cell Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of ascorbic acid, phytate and tannic acid on Fe bioavailability from Fe supplied as ferritin was compared to FeSO4 using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Horse spleen ferritin (HSF) was chemically reconstituted into a plant-type ferritin (P-HSF). In the presence of ascorbic acid...

  6. Effects of Ascorbic Acid, Phytic Acid and Tannic Acid on Iron Bioavailability from Reconstituted Ferritin Measured by an In Vitro Digestion/Caco-2 Cell Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of ascorbic acid, phytate and tannic acid on Fe bioavailability from Fe supplied as ferritin was compared to FeSO4 using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Horse spleen ferritin (HSF) was chemically reconstituted into a plant-type ferritin (P-HSF). In the presence of ascorbic acid...

  7. Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid on Cell Cycle Pathways in Breast Cell Lines With Different Transformation Degree.

    PubMed

    Rescigno, Tania; Capasso, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice

    2016-06-01

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), abundant in fish, have been shown to affect development and progression of some types of cancer, including breast cancer. The aim of our study was to further analyze and clarify the effects of these nutrients on the molecular mechanisms underlying breast cancer. Following treatments with DHA we examined cell viability, death, cell cycle, and some molecular effects in breast cell lines with different transformation, phenotypic, and biochemical characteristics (MCF-10A, MCF-7, SK-BR-3, ZR-75-1). These investigations showed that DHA is able to affect cell viability, proliferation, and cell cycle progression in a different way in each assayed breast cell line. The activation of ERK1/2 and STAT3 pathways and the expression and/or activation of molecules involved in cell cycle regulation such as p21(Waf1/Cip1) and p53, are very differently regulated by DHA treatments in each cell model. DHA selectively: (i) arrests non tumoral MCF-10A breast cells in G0 /G1 cycle phase, activating p21(Waf1/Cip1) , and p53, (ii) induces to death highly transformed breast cells SK-BR-3, reducing ERK1/2 and STAT3 phosphorylation and (iii) only slightly affects each analyzed process in MCF-7 breast cell line with transformation degree lower than SK-BR-3 cells. These findings suggest a more relevant inhibitory role of DHA within early development and late progression of breast cancer cell transformation and a variable effect in the other phases, depending on individual molecular properties and degree of malignancy of each clinical case. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1226-1236, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26480024

  8. Organometallic catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Fraser

    1987-01-01

    A continuing effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the competitiveness of the phosphoric acid fuel cell by improving cell performance and/or reducing cell cost is discussed. Cathode improvement, both in performance and cost, available through the use of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts, the tetraazaannulenes (TAAs), was investigated. A new mixed catalyst was identified which provides improved cathode performance without the need for the use of a noble metal. This mixed catalyst was tested under load for 1000 hr. in full cell at 160 to 200 C in phosphoric acid H3PO4, and was shown to provide stable performance. The mixed catalyst contains an organometallic to catalyze electroreduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and a metal to catalyze further electroreduction of the hydrogen peroxide to water. Cathodes containing an exemplar mixed catalyst (e.g., Co bisphenyl TAA/Mn) operate at approximately 650 mV vs DHE in 160 C, 85% H3PO4 with oxygen as reactant. In developing this mixed catalyst, a broad spectrum of TAAs were prepared, tested in half-cell and in a rotating ring-disk electrode system. TAAs found to facilitate the production of hydrogen peroxide in electroreduction were shown to be preferred TAAs for use in the mixed catalyst. Manganese (Mn) was identified as a preferred metal because it is capable of catalyzing hydrogen peroxide electroreduction, is lower in cost and is of less strategic importance than platinum, the cathode catalyst normally used in the fuel cell.

  9. Organometallic catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Fraser

    1987-03-01

    A continuing effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the competitiveness of the phosphoric acid fuel cell by improving cell performance and/or reducing cell cost is discussed. Cathode improvement, both in performance and cost, available through the use of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts, the tetraazaannulenes (TAAs), was investigated. A new mixed catalyst was identified which provides improved cathode performance without the need for the use of a noble metal. This mixed catalyst was tested under load for 1000 hr. in full cell at 160 to 200 C in phosphoric acid H3PO4, and was shown to provide stable performance. The mixed catalyst contains an organometallic to catalyze electroreduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and a metal to catalyze further electroreduction of the hydrogen peroxide to water. Cathodes containing an exemplar mixed catalyst (e.g., Co bisphenyl TAA/Mn) operate at approximately 650 mV vs DHE in 160 C, 85% H3PO4 with oxygen as reactant. In developing this mixed catalyst, a broad spectrum of TAAs were prepared, tested in half-cell and in a rotating ring-disk electrode system. TAAs found to facilitate the production of hydrogen peroxide in electroreduction were shown to be preferred TAAs for use in the mixed catalyst. Manganese (Mn) was identified as a preferred metal because it is capable of catalyzing hydrogen peroxide electroreduction, is lower in cost and is of less strategic importance than platinum, the cathode catalyst normally used in the fuel cell.

  10. Direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cell design and performance evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Zuria, A.; Dector, A.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Esquivel, J. P.; Sabaté, N.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.; Chávez-Ramírez, A. U.

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the evolution of design, fabrication and testing of direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cells (DFAμFFC), the architecture and channel dimensions are miniaturized from a thousand to few cents of micrometers. Three generations of DFAμFFCs are presented, from the initial Y-shape configuration made by a hot pressing technique; evolving into a novel miniaturized fuel cell based on microfabrication technology using SU-8 photoresist as core material; to the last air-breathing μFFC with enhanced performance and built with low cost materials and processes. The three devices were evaluated in acidic media in the presence of formic acid as fuel and oxygen/air as oxidant. Commercial Pt/C (30 wt. % E-TEK) and Pd/C XC-72 (20 wt. %, E-TEK) were used as cathode and anode electrodes respectively. The air-breathing μFFC generation, delivered up to 27.3 mW cm-2 for at least 30 min, which is a competitive power density value at the lowest fuel flow of 200 μL min-1 reported to date.

  11. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids stimulate cellular fatty acid uptake in human placental choriocarcinoma (BeWo) cells.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, G M; Weedon-Fekjaer, M S; Tobin, K A R; Staff, A C; Duttaroy, A K

    2009-12-01

    Supplementation of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) is advocated during pregnancy in some countries although very little information is available on their effects on placental ability to take up these fatty acids for fetal supply to which the fetal growth and development are critically dependent. To identify the roles of LCPUFAs on placental fatty acid transport function, we examined the effects of LCPUFAs on the uptake of fatty acids and expression of fatty acid transport/metabolic genes using placental trophoblast cells (BeWo). Following 24 h incubation of these cells with 100 microM of LCPUFAs (arachidonic acid, 20:4n-6, eicosapentaenoic acid, 20:5n-3, or docosahexaenoic acid, 22:6n-3), the cellular uptake of [(14)C] fatty acids was increased by 20-50%, and accumulated fatty acids were preferentially incorporated into phospholipid fractions. Oleic acid (OA, 18:1n-9), on the other hand, could not stimulate fatty acid uptake. LCPUFAs and OA increased the gene expression of ADRP whilst decreased the expression of ASCL3, ACSL4, ACSL6, LPIN1, and FABP3 in these cells. However, LCPUFAs but not OA increased expression of ACSL1 and ACSL5. Since acyl-CoA synthetases are involved in cellular uptake of fatty acids via activation for their channelling to lipid metabolism and/or for storage, the increased expression of ACSL1 and ACLS5 by LCPUFAs may be responsible for the increased fatty acid uptake. These findings demonstrate that LCPUFA may function as an important regulator of general fatty acid uptake in trophoblast cells and may thus have impact on fetal growth and development. PMID:19880178

  12. Retinoic acid induces cells cultured from oral squamous cell carcinomas to become anti-angiogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Lingen, M. W.; Polverini, P. J.; Bouck, N. P.

    1996-01-01

    Retinoids have shown great promise as chemopreventive against the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract. However, the exact mechanism by which they block new tumors from arising is unknown. Here, we report that 13-cis- and all-trans-retinoic acid, used at clinically achievable doses of 10(-6) mol/L or less, can directly and specifically affect cell lines cultured from oral squamous cell carcinomas, inducing them to switch from an angiogenic to an anti-angiogenic phenotype. Although retinoic-acid-treated and untreated tumor cells make the same amount of interleukin-8, the major inducer of neovascularization produced by such tumor lines, they vary in production of inhibitory activity. Only the retinoic-acid-treated cells produce a potent angio-inhibitory activity that is able to block in vitro migration of endothelial cells toward tumor cell conditioned media and to halt neovascularization induced by such media in the rat cornea. Anti-angiogenic activity is induced in the tumor cells by low doses of retinoids in the absence of toxicity with a kinetics that suggest that it could be contributing to the effectiveness of the retinoids as chemopreventive agents. Images Figure 6 PMID:8686749

  13. Dry compliant seal for phosphoric acid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Granata, Jr., Samuel J.; Woodle, Boyd M.

    1990-01-01

    A dry compliant overlapping seal for a phosphoric acid fuel cell preformed f non-compliant Teflon to make an anode seal frame that encircles an anode assembly, a cathode seal frame that encircles a cathode assembly and a compliant seal frame made of expanded Teflon, generally encircling a matrix assembly. Each frame has a thickness selected to accommodate various tolerances of the fuel cell elements and are either bonded to one of the other frames or to a bipolar or end plate. One of the non-compliant frames is wider than the other frames forming an overlap of the matrix over the wider seal frame, which cooperates with electrolyte permeating the matrix to form a wet seal within the fuel cell that prevents process gases from intermixing at the periphery of the fuel cell and a dry seal surrounding the cell to keep electrolyte from the periphery thereof. The frames may be made in one piece, in L-shaped portions or in strips and have an outer perimeter which registers with the outer perimeter of bipolar or end plates to form surfaces upon which flanges of pan shaped, gas manifolds can be sealed.

  14. Compartmentation and equilibration of abscisic acid in isolated Xanthium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, E.A.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The compartmentation of endogenous abscisic acid (ABA), applied (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)ABA, and (+/-)-trans-ABA was measured in isolated mesophyll cells of the Chicago strain of Xanthium strumarium L. The release of ABA to the medium in the presence or absence of DMSO was used to determine the equilibration of ABA in the cells. It was found that a greater percentage of the (+/-)-(/sup 3/H)ABA and the (+/-)-trans-ABA was released into the medium than of the endogenous ABA, indicating that applied ABA did not equilibrate with the endogenous material. Therefore, in further investigations only the compartmentation of endogenous ABA was studied. Endogenous ABA was released from Xanthium cells according to the pH gradients among the various cellular compartments. Thus, darkness, high external pH, KNO/sub 2/, and drought-stress all increased the efflux of ABA from the cells. Efflux of ABA from the cells in the presence of 0.6 M mannitol occurred within 30 seconds, but only 8% of the endogenous material was released during the 20 minute treatment.

  15. Lysophosphatidic acid-induced chemotaxis of bone cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Bollinger, Nikki; Karin, Norm J.

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a platelet-derived bioactive lipid that is postulated to regulate wound healing. LPA activates G protein-coupled receptors to induce Ca2+ signaling in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts, and is a potent chemotactic stimulus for these cells. Since bone fracture healing requires the migration of osteoblast progenitors, we postulate that LPA is among the factors that stimulate bone repair. UMR 106-01 cells, which express a more mature osteoblastic phenotype than MC3T3-E1 cells, did not migrate in response to LPA, although they express LPA receptors and exhibit LPA-induced Ca2+ signals. This suggests that LPA differentially induces pre-osteoblast chemotaxis, consistent with our hypothesis that LPA stimulates the motility of osteoblast progenitors during bone healing. LPA-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells exhibit striking changes in morphology and F-actin architecture, and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) is required for motility-associated cytoskeletal rearrangements in many cell types. We found a dose-dependent reduction in LPA-induced osteoblast migration when cells also were treated with the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Treatment of many cell types with LPA is associated with an autocrine/paracrine transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) via shedding of surface-tethered EGFR ligands, a phenomenon often required for LPA-induced chemotaxis. MC3T3-E1 cells express multiple EGFR ligands (epigen, epiregulin, HB-EGF and amphiregulin) and migrated in response to EGF. However, while EGF-stimulated motility in MC3T3-E1 cells was blocked by an EGFR inhibitor, there was no significant effect on LPA-induced chemotaxis. Activation of MAP kinases is a hallmark of EGFR-mediated signaling, and EGF treatment of MC3T3-E1 cells led to a strong stimulation of ERK1/2 kinase. In contrast, LPA induced only a minor elevation in ERK activity. Thus, it is likely that the increase in ERK activity by LPA is related to cell proliferation associated with lipid treatment. We

  16. Commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Warshay, M.; Simons, S. N.; King, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the current commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell system technology development efforts is presented. In both the electric utility and on-site integrated energy system applications, reducing cost and increasing reliability are the technology drivers at this time. The longstanding barrier to the attainment of these goals, which manifests itself in a number of ways, has been materials. The differences in approach among the three major participants (United Technologies Corporation (UTC), Westinghouse Electric Corporation/Energy Research Corporation (ERC), and Engelhard Industries) and their unique technological features, including electrodes, matrices, intercell cooling, bipolar/separator plates, electrolyte management, fuel selection and system design philosophy are discussed.

  17. Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R.; Wheeler, D.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the technical and cost gap analysis performed to identify pathways for reducing the costs of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stationary fuel cell power plants.

  18. A flexible micro biofuel cell utilizing hydrogel containing ascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hideaki; Fukushi, Yudai; Nishioka, Yasushiro

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on a biofuel cell with a dimension of 13×24 mm2 fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate. I its porous carbon-coated platinum (Pt) electrodes of 3 mm in width and 10 mm in length were fabricated using photolithography and screen printing techniques. Porous carbon was deposited by screen printing of carbon black ink on the Pt electrode surfaces in order to increase the effective electrode surface area and to absorb more enzymes on the electrode surfaces. It utilizes a solidified ascorbic acid (AA) aqueous solution in an agarose hydrogel to increase the portability. The maximum power and power density for the biofuel cell with the fuel unit containing 100 mM AA were 0.063 μW and 0.21 μW/cm2 at 0.019 V, respectively.

  19. Fatty Acid and Lipid Transport in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nannan; Xu, Changcheng; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Philippar, Katrin

    2016-02-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) and lipids are essential - not only as membrane constituents but also for growth and development. In plants and algae, FAs are synthesized in plastids and to a large extent transported to the endoplasmic reticulum for modification and lipid assembly. Subsequently, lipophilic compounds are distributed within the cell, and thus are transported across most membrane systems. Membrane-intrinsic transporters and proteins for cellular FA/lipid transfer therefore represent key components for delivery and dissemination. In addition to highlighting their role in lipid homeostasis and plant performance, different transport mechanisms for land plants and green algae - in the model systems Arabidopsis thaliana, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii - are compared, thereby providing a current perspective on protein-mediated FA and lipid trafficking in photosynthetic cells. PMID:26616197

  20. Transcriptomic changes induced by mycophenolic acid in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Boying; Sharma, Ashok; Xu, Heng; Liu, Haitao; Bai, Shan; Zeng, Lingwen; She, Jin-Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inhibition of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) by mycophenolic acid (MPA) can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in cancer cells. This study investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms of MPA’s anticancer activity. Methods: A gastric cancer cell line (AGS) was treated with MPA and gene expression at different time points was analyzed using Illumina whole genome microarrays and selected genes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Results: Transcriptomic profiling identified 1070 genes with ≥2 fold changes and 85 genes with >4 fold alterations. The most significantly altered biological processes by MPA treatment include cell cycle, apoptosis, cell proliferation and migration. MPA treatment altered at least ten KEGG pathways, of which eight (p53 signaling, cell cycle, pathways in cancer, PPAR signaling, bladder cancer, protein processing in ER, small cell lung cancer and MAPK signaling) are cancer-related. Among the earliest cellular events induced by MPA is cell cycle arrest which may be caused by six molecular pathways: 1) up-regulation of cyclins (CCND1 and CCNE2) and down-regulation of CCNA2 and CCNB1, 2) down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4 and CDK5); 3) inhibition of cell division related genes (CDC20, CDC25B and CDC25C) and other cell cycle related genes (MCM2, CENPE and PSRC1), 4) activation of p53, which activates the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKN1A), 5) impaired spindle checkpoint function and chromosome segregation (BUB1, BUB1B, BOP1, AURKA, AURKB, and FOXM1); and 6) reduction of availability of deoxyribonucleotides and therefore DNA synthesis through down-regulation of the RRM1 enzyme. Cell cycle arrest is followed by inhibition of cell proliferation, which is mainly attributable to the inhibition of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, and caspase-dependent apoptosis due to up-regulation of the p53 and FAS pathways. Conclusions: These results suggest that MPA has beneficial anticancer activity through

  1. Pulse charging of lead-acid traction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Pulse charging, as a method of rapidly and efficiently charging 300 amp-hour lead-acid traction cells for an electric vehicle application was investigated. A wide range of charge pulse current square waveforms were investigated and the results were compared to constant current charging at the time averaged pulse current values. Representative pulse current waveforms were: (1) positive waveform-peak charge pulse current of 300 amperes (amps), discharge pulse-current of zero amps, and a duty cycle of about 50%; (2) Romanov waveform-peak charge pulse current of 300 amps, peak discharge pulse current of 15 amps, and a duty of 50%; and (3) McCulloch waveform peak charge pulse current of 193 amps, peak discharge pulse current of about 575 amps, and a duty cycle of 94%. Experimental results indicate that on the basis of amp-hour efficiency, pulse charging offered no significant advantage as a method of rapidly charging 300 amp-hour lead-acid traction cells when compared to constant current charging at the time average pulse current value. There were, however, some disadvantages of pulse charging in particular a decrease in charge amp-hour and energy efficiencies and an increase in cell electrolyte temperature. The constant current charge method resulted in the best energy efficiency with no significant sacrifice of charge time or amp-hour output. Whether or not pulse charging offers an advantage over constant current charging with regard to the cell charge/discharge cycle life is unknown at this time.

  2. Breakdown of Cell Wall Nanostructure in Dilute Acid Pretreated Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker S; Heller, William T; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Foston, Marcus B; Myles, Dean A A; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Evans, Barbara R

    2010-01-01

    The generation of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass holds great promise for renewable and clean energy production. A better understanding of the complex mechanisms of lignocellulose breakdown during various pretreatment methods is needed to realize this potential in a cost and energy efficient way. Here, we use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to characterize morphological changes in switchgrass lignocellulose across molecular to sub-micron length scales resulting from the industrially-relevant dilute acid pretreatment method. Our results demonstrate that dilute acid pretreatment increases the cross-sectional radius of the crystalline cellulose fibril. This change is accompanied by removal of hemicellulose and the formation of Rg ~ 135 lignin aggregates. The structural signature of smooth cell wall surfaces is observed at length scales larger than 1000 , and it remains remarkably invariable during pretreatment. This study elucidates the interplay of the different biomolecular components in the break down process of switchgrass by dilute acid pretreatment. The results are important for the development of efficient strategies of biomass to biofuel conversion.

  3. Quinolinic acid induces cell apoptosis in PC12 cells through HIF-1-dependent RTP801 activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojia; Yang, Kaiyong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qiang; Li, Yongjin

    2016-04-01

    Neurological disease comprises a series of disorders featuring brain dysfunction and neuronal cell death. Among the factors contributing to neuronal death, excitotoxicity induced by excitatory amino acids, such as glutamate, plays a critical role. However, the mechanisms about how the excitatory amino acids induce neuronal death remain elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of HIF-1α (hypoxia inducible factor-1α) and RTP801 in cell apoptosis induced by quinolinic acid (QUIN), a glutamatergic agonist, in PC12 cells. We found that QUIN at 5 μM increased the expression of HIF-1α significantly with a peak at 24 h. After the treatment with QUIN (5-20 μM) for 24 h, the cells exhibited decreased viability and cell apoptosis with a concomitant increased expression of apoptosis related proteins. QUIN treatment also induced the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and RTP801 up-regulation in a HIF-1α-dependent manner that were inhibited by 2-methoxyestradiol, a HIF-1α inhibitor. Importantly, HIF-1 or RTP801 invalidation by siRNA rescued the cell apoptosis induced by QUIN or cobalt chloride, a chemical inducer of HIF-1. Taken together, these findings support the concept that neurotoxicity induced by QUIN is associated with HIF-1-dependent RTP801 activation and provide insight into the potential of RTP801 inhibitor in treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:26738727

  4. Universal nucleic acids sample preparation method for cells, spores and their mixture

    DOEpatents

    Bavykin, Sergei

    2011-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method for extracting nucleic acids from biological samples. More specifically the invention relates to a universal method for extracting nucleic acids from unidentified biological samples. An advantage of the presently invented method is its ability to effectively and efficiently extract nucleic acids from a variety of different cell types including but not limited to prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and/or recalcitrant organisms (i.e. spores). Unlike prior art methods which are focused on extracting nucleic acids from vegetative cell or spores, the present invention effectively extracts nucleic acids from spores, multiple cell types or mixtures thereof using a single method. Important that the invented method has demonstrated an ability to extract nucleic acids from spores and vegetative bacterial cells with similar levels effectiveness. The invented method employs a multi-step protocol which erodes the cell structure of the biological sample, isolates, labels, fragments nucleic acids and purifies labeled samples from the excess of dye.

  5. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish.

    PubMed

    Setlow, Richard B

    2002-03-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma. PMID:11906839

  6. Shedding light on proteins, nucleic acids, cells, humans and fish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlow, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    I was trained as a physicist in graduate school. Hence, when I decided to go into the field of biophysics, it was natural that I concentrated on the effects of light on relatively simple biological systems, such as proteins. The wavelengths absorbed by the amino acid subunits of proteins are in the ultraviolet (UV). The wavelengths that affect the biological activities, the action spectra, also are in the UV, but are not necessarily parallel to the absorption spectra. Understanding these differences led me to investigate the action spectra for affecting nucleic acids, and the effects of UV on viruses and cells. The latter studies led me to the discovery of the important molecular nature of the damages affecting DNA (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and to the discovery of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals with the genetic disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extraordinarily sensitive to sunlight-induced skin cancer. The finding, by James Cleaver, that their skin cells were defective in DNA repair strongly suggested that DNA damage was a key step in carcinogenesis. Such information was important for estimating the wavelengths in sunlight responsible for human skin cancer and for predicting the effects of ozone depletion on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. It took experiments with backcross hybrid fish to call attention to the probable role of the longer UV wavelengths not absorbed by DNA in the induction of melanoma. These reflections trace the biophysicist's path from molecules to melanoma.

  7. Enhancement of cell viability after treatment with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bartl, J; Walitza, S; Grünblatt, E

    2014-01-24

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is highly prevalent in children and adolescents and both environmental and genetic factors play major roles. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are postulated to contribute to the development of the infant brain and an imbalance in these may increase the risk of ADHD. In recent clinical studies, supplementation with PUFAs improved symptoms of ADHD in some cases. Similarly, some beneficial effects were observed with PUFA treatment in neuronal cell cultures. Therefore, in this study, we hypothesized that a specific PUFA combination (available on the market as Equazen™ [Vifor Pharma, Switzerland]) along with iron, zinc, or vitamin B5 (vitB5) would produce an additive beneficial effect on the viability of rat pheochromocytoma-12 dopaminergic cells. The specific PUFA combination alone, as well as added to each of the three nutrients, was tested in a dose-response manner. The specific PUFAs significantly improved cell viability, starting at very low doses (100pM) from 60h up to 90h; while the combined treatment with vitB5 and minerals did not provide additional benefit. Our results confirmed the beneficial effect of the specific PUFAs on neuronal cell viability; although supplementation with minerals and vitB5 did not enhance this effect. PMID:24269370

  8. Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This program was conducted to improve the performance and minimize the cost of existing water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell stacks for electric utility and on-site applications. The goals for the electric utility stack technology were a power density of at least 175 watts per square foot over a 40,000-hour useful life and a projected one-of-a-kind, full-scale manufactured cost of less than $400 per kilowatt. The program adapted the existing on-site Configuration-B cell design to electric utility operating conditions and introduced additional new design features. Task 1 consisted of the conceptual design of a full-scale electric utility cell stack that meets program objectives. The conceptual design was updated to incorporate the results of material and process developments in Tasks 2 and 3, as well as results of stack tests conducted in Task 6. Tasks 2 and 3 developed the materials and processes required to fabricate the components that meet the program objectives. The design of the small area and 10-ft{sup 2} stacks was conducted in Task 4. Fabrication and assembly of the short stacks were conducted in Task 5 and subsequent tests were conducted in Task 6. The management and reporting functions of Task 7 provided DOE/METC with program visibility through required documentation and program reviews. This report describes the cell design and development effort that was conducted to demonstrate, by subscale stack test, the technical achievements made toward the above program objectives.

  9. Fibroblastic reticular cell-derived lysophosphatidic acid regulates confined intranodal T-cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Akira; Kobayashi, Daichi; Aoi, Keita; Sasaki, Naoko; Sugiura, Yuki; Igarashi, Hidemitsu; Tohya, Kazuo; Inoue, Asuka; Hata, Erina; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Hayasaka, Haruko; Kikuta, Junichi; Scandella, Elke; Ludewig, Burkhard; Ishii, Satoshi; Aoki, Junken; Suematsu, Makoto; Ishii, Masaru; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Umemoto, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are highly confined environments with a cell-dense three-dimensional meshwork, in which lymphocyte migration is regulated by intracellular contractile proteins. However, the molecular cues directing intranodal cell migration remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) produced by LN fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs) acts locally to LPA2 to induce T-cell motility. In vivo, either specific ablation of LPA-producing ectoenzyme autotaxin in FRCs or LPA2 deficiency in T cells markedly decreased intranodal T cell motility, and FRC-derived LPA critically affected the LPA2-dependent T-cell motility. In vitro, LPA activated the small GTPase RhoA in T cells and limited T-cell adhesion to the underlying substrate via LPA2. The LPA-LPA2 axis also enhanced T-cell migration through narrow pores in a three-dimensional environment, in a ROCK-myosin II-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that FRC-derived LPA serves as a cell-extrinsic factor that optimizes T-cell movement through the densely packed LN reticular network. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10561.001 PMID:26830463

  10. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  11. Optimization of ascorbic acid-2-phosphate production from ascorbic acid using resting cell of Brevundimonas diminuta.

    PubMed

    Shin, Woo-Jung; Kim, Byung-Yong; Bang, Won-Gi

    2007-05-01

    With the aim to produce ascorbic acid-2-phosphate (AsA-2-P) from L-ascorbic acid (AsA, Vitamin C), nine bacteria conferring the ability to transform AsA to AsA-2-P were isolated from soil samples alongside known strains from culture collections. Most isolates were classified to the genus Brevundimonas by 16S phylogenetic analysis. Among them, Brevundimonas diminuta KACC 10306 was selected as the experimental strain because of its the highest productivity of AsA-2-P. The optimum set of conditions for the AsA-2-P production from AsA using resting cells as the source of the enzyme was also investigated. The optimum cultivation time was 16 h and the cell concentration was 120 g/l (wet weight). The optimum concentrations of AsA and pyrophosphate were 550 mM and 450 mM, respectively. The most effective buffer was 50 mM sodium formate. The optimum pH was 4.5 and temperature was 40 degrees C. Under the above conditions, 27.5 g/l of AsA-2-P was produced from AsA after 36 h of incubation, which corresponded to a 19.7% conversion efficiency based on the initial concentration of AsA. PMID:18051298

  12. Uric acid: a modulator of prostate cells and activin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sangkop, Febbie; Singh, Geeta; Rodrigues, Ely; Gold, Elspeth; Bahn, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) or urate is associated with inflammation and gout. Recent evidence has linked urate to cancers, but little is known about urate effects in prostate cancer. Activins are inflammatory cytokines and negative growth regulators in the prostate. A hallmark of prostate cancer progression is activin insensitivity; however, mechanisms underlying this are unclear. We propose that elevated SUA is associated with prostate cancer counteracting the growth inhibitory effects of activins. The expression of activins A and B, urate transporter GLUT9 and tissue urate levels were examined in human prostate disease. Intracellular and secreted urate and GLUT9 expression were assessed in human prostate cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the effects of urate and probenecid, a known urate transport inhibitor, were determined in combination with activin A. Activin A expression was increased in low-grade prostate cancer, whereas activin B expression was reduced in high-grade prostate cancer. Intracellular urate levels decreased in all prostate pathologies, while GLUT9 expression decreased in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis and high-grade prostate cancer. Activin responsive LNCaP cells had higher intracellular and lower secreted urate levels than activin-insensitive PC3 cells. GLUT9 expression in prostate cancer cells was progressively lower than in prostate epithelial cells. Elevated extracellular urate was growth promoting in vitro, which was abolished by the gout medication probenecid, and it antagonized the growth inhibitory effects of activins. This study shows for the first time that a change in plasma or intracellular urate levels, possibly involving GLUT9 and a urate efflux transporter, has an impact on prostate cancer cell growth, and that lowering SUA levels in prostate cancer is likely to be therapeutically beneficial. PMID:26910779

  13. Gambogic acid induces apoptotic cell death in T98G glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Thida, Mya; Kim, Dae Won; Tran, Thi Thu Thuy; Pham, Minh Quan; Lee, Heesu; Kim, Inki; Lee, Jae Wook

    2016-02-01

    Gambogic acid (GA), a natural product with a xanthone structure, has a broad range of anti-proliferative effects on cancer cell lines. We evaluated GA for its cytotoxic effects on T98G glioblastoma cells. GA exhibited potent anti-proliferative activity and induced apoptosis in T98G glioblastoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of cells with GA revealed apoptotic features including increased Bax and AIF expression, cytochrome c release, and cleavage of caspase-3, -8, -9, and PARP, while Bcl-2 expression was downregulated. Furthermore, GA induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in T98G cells. Our results indicate that GA increases Bax- and AIF-associated apoptotic signaling in glioblastoma cells. PMID:26631318

  14. Conjugated linoleic acids influence fatty acid metabolism in ovine ruminal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Masur, F; Benesch, F; Pfannkuche, H; Fuhrmann, H; Gäbel, G

    2016-04-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), particularly cis-9,trans-11 (c9t11) and trans-10,cis-12 (t10c12), are used as feed additives to adapt to constantly increasing demands on the performance of lactating cows. Under these feeding conditions, the rumen wall, and the rumen epithelial cells (REC) in particular, are directly exposed to high amounts of CLA. This study determined the effect of CLA on the fatty acid (FA) metabolism of REC and expression of genes known to be modulated by FA. Cultured REC were incubated with c9t11, t10c12, and the structurally similar FA linoleic acid (LA), oleic acid (OA), and trans-vaccenic acid (TVA) for 48 h at a concentration of 100µM. Cellular FA levels were determined by gas chromatography. Messenger RNA expression levels of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 1 and 4 were quantified by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Fatty acid evaluation revealed significant effects of CLA, LA, OA, and TVA on the amount of FA metabolites of β-oxidation and elongation and of metabolites related to desaturation by SCD. The observed changes in FA content point (among others) to the ability of REC to synthesize c9t11 from TVA endogenously. The mRNA expression levels of SCD identified a decrease after CLA, LA, OA, or TVA treatment. In line with the changes in mRNA expression, we found reduced amounts of C16:1n-7 cis-9 and C18:1n-9 cis-9, the main products of SCD. The expression of MCT1 mRNA increased after c9t11 and t10c12 treatment, and CLA c9t11 induced an upregulation of MCT4. Application of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α antagonist suggested that activation of PPARα is involved in the changes of MCT1, MCT4, and SCD mRNA expression induced by c9t11. Participation of PPARγ in the changes of MCT1 and SCD mRNA expression was shown by the application of the respective antagonist. The study demonstrates that exposure to CLA affects both FA metabolism and regulatory pathways within REC. PMID

  15. Induction of cellular deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in butyrate-treated cells by simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, S.; Diamond, L.; Baserga, R.

    1981-11-01

    Sodium butyrate (3mM) inhibited the entry into the S phase of quiescent 3T3 cells stimulated by serum, but had no effect on the accumulation of cellular ribonucleic acid. Simian virus 40 infection or manual microinjection of cloned fragments from the simian virus 40 A gene caused quiescent 3T3 cells to enter the S phase even in the presence of butyrate. NGI cells, a line of 3T3 cells transformed by simian virus 40, grew vigorously in 3 mM butyrate. Homokaryons were formed between G/sub 1/ and S-phase 3T3 cells. Butyrate inhibited the induction of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis that usually occurs in G/sub 1/ nuclei when G/sub 1/ cells are fused with S-phase cells. However, when G/sub 1/ 3T3 cells were fused with exponentially growing NGI cells, the 3T3 nuclei were induced to enter deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis. In tsAF8 cells, a ribonucleic acid polymerase II mutant that stops in the G/sub 1/ phase of the cell cycle, no temporal sequence was demonstrated between the butyrate block and the temperature-sensitive block. These results confirm previous reports that certain virally coded proteins can induce cell deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in the absence of cellular functions that are required by serum-stimulated cells. The author's interpretation of these data is that butyrate inhibited cell growth by inhibiting the expression of genes required for the G/sub o/ ..-->.. G/sub 1/ ..-->.. S transition and that the product of the simian virus 40 A gene overrode this inhibition by providing all of the necessary functions for the entry into the S phase.

  16. Ribonucleic Acid Regulation in Permeabilized Cells of Escherichia coli Capable of Ribonucleic Acid and Protein Synthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Atherly, Alan G.

    1974-01-01

    A cell permeabilization procedure is described that reduces viability less than 10% and does not significantly reduce the rates of ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis when appropriately supplemented. Permeabilization abolishes the normal stringent coupling of protein and ribonucleic acid synthesis. PMID:4364330

  17. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  18. Inhibitory effect of succinic acid on epithelial cell proliferation of colonic mucosa in rats.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Akiko; Ichikawa, Hirofumi; Sakata, Takashi

    2007-08-01

    Microbial breakdown of carbohydrates in the large intestine mainly produces short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). SCFA stimulate epithelial cell proliferation of the digestive tract in vivo. Succinic acid sometimes accumulates in the colonic lumen. However, the effect of succinic acid on colonic epithelial cell proliferation is unknown. Thus, we planned to clarify the influence of succinic acid on colonic epithelial cell proliferation in vivo. We continuously administered infusate with or without succinic acid (100 mM) into the distal colon of rats for 6 d and measured accumulated mitosis per crypt of distal colon of these rats. Succinic acid infused into rat colons significantly inhibited colonic cell proliferation and reduced crypt size. These results clearly indicated the inhibitory effects of succinic acid on colonic epithelial cell proliferation in vivo. PMID:17934246

  19. Gambogenic Acid Kills Lung Cancer Cells through Aberrant Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Wang; Dong, Chen; Hui, Cheng; Bin, Li; Fenggen, Yan; Jingjing, Su; Cheng, Peng; Meiling, Sun; Yawen, Hu; Xiaoshan, Wang; Guanghui, Wang; Zhiwu, Chen; Qinglin, Li

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common types of cancer and causes 1.38 million deaths annually, as of 2008 worldwide. Identifying natural anti-lung cancer agents has become very important. Gambogenic acid (GNA) is one of the active compounds of Gamboge, a traditional medicine that was used as a drastic purgative, emetic, or vermifuge for treating tapeworm. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that GNA exerts promising anti-tumor effects; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present paper, we found that GNA could induce the formation of vacuoles, which was linked with autophagy in A549 and HeLa cells. Further studies revealed that GNA triggers the initiation of autophagy based on the results of MDC staining, AO staining, accumulation of LC3 II, activation of Beclin 1 and phosphorylation of P70S6K. However, degradation of p62 was disrupted and free GFP could not be released in GNA treated cells, which indicated a block in the autophagy flux. Further studies demonstrated that GNA blocks the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes by inhibiting acidification in lysosomes. This dysfunctional autophagy plays a pro-death role in GNA-treated cells by activating p53, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 while decreasing Bcl-2. Beclin 1 knockdown greatly decreased GNA-induced cell death and the effects on p53, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2. Similar results were obtained using a xenograft model. Our findings show, for the first time, that GNA can cause aberrant autophagy to induce cell death and may suggest the potential application of GNA as a tool or viable drug in anticancer therapies. PMID:24427275

  20. Folic acid-CdTe quantum dot conjugates and their applications for cancer cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Suriamoorthy, Preethi; Zhang, Xing; Hao, Guiyang; Joly, Alan G.; Singh, S.; Hossu, Marius; Sun, Xiankai; Chen, Wei

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we report the preparation,luminescence, and targeting properties of folic acid- CdTe quantum dot conjugates. Water-soluble CdTe quantum dots were synthesized and conjugated with folic acid using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide-N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry. The in-fluence of folic acid on the luminescence properties of CdTe quantum dots was investigated, and no energy transfer between them was observed. To investigate the efficiency of folic acid-CdTe nanoconjugates for tumor targeting, pure CdTe quantum dots and folic acid-coated CdTe quantum dots were incubated with human naso- pharyngeal epidermal carcinoma cell line with positive expressing folic acid receptors (KB cells) and lung cancer cells without expression of folic acid receptors (A549 cells). For the cancer cells with positive folate receptors (KB cells), the uptake for CdTe quantum dots is very low, but for folic acid-CdTe nanoconjugates, the uptake is very high. For the lung cancer cells without folate receptors (A549 cells), the uptake for folic acid- CdTe nanoconjugates is also very low. The results indicate that folic acid is an effective targeting molecule for tumor cells with overexpressed folate receptors.

  1. [Determination of the nucleic acids in pig embryonic kidney cells by magnetic cytaphoresis].

    PubMed

    Chikov, V M; Maksimova, E V

    1989-01-01

    Gallocyanine-chrome alum-stained pig embryonic kidney cells have paramagnetic properties. They move under the influence of gradient magnetic field (magnetophoresis). The velocity of magnetophoresis is proportional to the content of nucleic acids in cells. This allows to estimate the content of nucleic acids per cell dry weight by magnetophoresis and analytical centrifugation. PMID:2473104

  2. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-3 enhances cell migration in rat lung tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mai; Okabe, Kyoko; Yamawaki, Yasuna; Teranishi, Miki; Honoki, Kanya; Mori, Toshio; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of the Lpar3 expression due to aberrant DNA methylation occurred in rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 inhibited cell migration of rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 may act as a negative regulator of rat lung tumor cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) indicates several biological effects, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. LPA interacts with G protein-coupled transmembrane LPA receptors. In our previous report, we detected that loss of the LPA receptor-1 (Lpar1) expression is due to its aberrant DNA methylation in rat tumor cell lines. In this study, to assess an involvement of the other LPA receptor, Lpar3, in the pathogenesis of rat lung tumor cells, we measured the expression levels of the Lpar3 gene and its DNA methylation status by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bisulfite sequencing analyses, respectively. RLCNR lung adenocarcinoma cells showed reduced expression of the Lpar3, compared with normal lung tissues. In the 5' upstream region of the Lpar3, normal lung tissues were unmethylated. By contrast, RLCNR cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expressions of the Lpar3. Based on these results, we generated the Lpar3-expressing RLCNR-a3 cells and measured the cell migration ability. Interestingly, the cell migration of RLCNR-a3 cells was significantly lower than that of RLCNR cells. This study suggests that loss of the Lpar3 due to aberrant DNA methylation may be involved in the progression of rat lung tumor cells.

  3. The fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) gene product catalyzes Δ4 desaturation to yield n-3 docosahexaenoic acid and n-6 docosapentaenoic acid in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hui Gyu; Park, Woo Jung; Kothapalli, Kumar S. D.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is a Δ4-desaturated C22 fatty acid and the limiting highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) in neural tissue. The biosynthesis of Δ4-desaturated docosanoid fatty acids 22:6n-3 and 22:5n-6 are believed to proceed via a circuitous biochemical pathway requiring repeated use of a fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) protein to perform Δ6 desaturation on C24 fatty acids in the endoplasmic reticulum followed by 1 round of β-oxidation in the peroxisomes. We demonstrate here that the FADS2 gene product can directly Δ4-desaturate 22:5n-3→22:6n-3 (DHA) and 22:4n-6→22:5n-6. Human MCF-7 cells lacking functional FADS2-mediated Δ6-desaturase were stably transformed with FADS2, FADS1, or empty vector. When incubated with 22:5n-3 or 22:4n-6, FADS2 stable cells produce 22:6n-3 or 22:5n-6, respectively. Similarly, FADS2 stable cells when incubated with d5-18:3n-3 show synthesis of d5-22:6n-3 with no labeling of 24:5n-3 or 24:6n-3 at 24 h. Further, both C24 fatty acids are shown to be products of the respective C22 fatty acids via elongation. Our results demonstrate that the FADS2 classical transcript mediates direct Δ4 desaturation to yield 22:6n-3 and 22:5n-6 in human cells, as has been widely shown previously for desaturation by fish and many other organisms.—Park, H. G., Park, W. J., Kothapalli, K. S. D., Brenna, J. T. The fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) gene product catalyzes Δ4 desaturation to yield n-3 docosahexaenoic acid and n-6 docosapentaenoic acid in human cells. PMID:26065859

  4. Requirement of Phosphoinositides Containing Stearic Acid To Control Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Laquel, Patricia; Testet, Eric; Tuphile, Karine; Fouillen, Laetitia; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIPs) are present in very small amounts but are essential for cell signaling, morphogenesis, and polarity. By mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that some PIPs with stearic acyl chains were strongly disturbed in a psi1Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain deficient in the specific incorporation of a stearoyl chain at the sn-1 position of phosphatidylinositol. The absence of PIPs containing stearic acid induced disturbances in intracellular trafficking, although the total amount of PIPs was not diminished. Changes in PIPs also induced alterations in the budding pattern and defects in actin cytoskeleton organization (cables and patches). Moreover, when the PSI1 gene was impaired, a high proportion of cells with bipolar cortical actin patches that occurred concomitantly with the bipolar localization of Cdc42p was specifically found among diploid cells. This bipolar cortical actin phenotype, never previously described, was also detected in a bud9Δ/bud9Δ strain. Very interestingly, overexpression of PSI1 reversed this phenotype. PMID:26711260

  5. Cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity of cyclopiazonic acid on human cells.

    PubMed

    Hymery, Nolwenn; Masson, Floriane; Barbier, Georges; Coton, Emmanuel

    2014-08-01

    In this study, in vitro cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity of the mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) was evaluated on human cells. To evaluate cytoxicity, several cellular targets were used (CD34+, monocytes, THP-1 and Caco-2). Monocytes were more sensitive to CPA than the THP-1 monocytic cell line after 48h of incubation in the tested conditions. Half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) were determined to be 8.5 × 10(-8) and 1.75 × 10(-7)M for monocytes and THP1, respectively, while IC50>1.25 × 10(-7)M was observed for Caco-2 and CD34+ cells. The CPA effect on macrophage differentiation was also examined at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The monocyte differentiation process was markedly disturbed in the presence of CPA. After 6 days of culture, CD71 expression was downregulated, while CD14 and CD11a expressions did not change. Moreover, activated macrophages showed a raised burst activity and TNF-α secretion. Overall, the results indicated that CPA exhibited toxicity on various human cellular models. Moreover, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, CPA disturbed human monocytes differentiation into macrophages. This work contributes to understanding the immunosuppressive properties of this food-related toxin. PMID:24747294

  6. cAMP-response-element-binding protein positively regulates breast cancer metastasis and subsequent bone destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Jieun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Ha, Hyunil Lee, Zang Hee

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is highly expressed in advanced breast cancer cells. {yields} Tumor-related factors such as TGF-{beta} further elevate CREB expression. {yields} CREB upregulation stimulates metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. {yields} CREB signaling is required for breast cancer-induced bone destruction. -- Abstract: cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has been reported to be associated with cancer development and poor clinical outcome in various types of cancer. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CREB is involved in breast cancer development and osteotropism. Here, we found that metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited higher CREB expression than did non-metastatic MCF-7 cells and that CREB expression was further increased by several soluble factors linked to cancer progression, such as IL-1, IGF-1, and TGF-{beta}. Using wild-type CREB and a dominant-negative form (K-CREB), we found that CREB signaling positively regulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, K-CREB prevented MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic lesions in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Furthermore, CREB signaling in cancer cells regulated the gene expression of PTHrP, MMPs, and OPG, which are closely involved in cancer metastasis and bone destruction. These results indicate that breast cancer cells acquire CREB overexpression during their development and that this CREB upregulation plays an important role in multiple steps of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  7. Synthesis and release of fatty acids by human trophoblast cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R.A.; Haynes, E.B.

    1987-11-01

    In order to determine whether placental cells can synthesize and release fatty acids, trophoblast cells from term human placentas were established in monolayer culture. The cells continued to secrete placental lactogen and progesterone and maintained specific activities of critical enzymes of triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis for 24 to 72 hr in culture. Fatty acid was rapidly synthesized from (/sup 14/C)acetate and released by the cells. Palmitoleic, palmitic, and oleic acids were the major fatty acids synthesized from (/sup 14/C)acetate and released. Small amounts of lauric, myristic, and stearic acids were also identified. (/sup 14/C)acetate was also incorporated into cellular triacylglycerol, phospholipid, and cholesterol, but radiolabeled free fatty acid did not accumulate intracellularly. In a pulse-chase experiment, cellular glycerolipids were labeled with (1-/sup 14/C)oleate; trophoblast cells then released /sup 14/C-labeled fatty acid into the media as the cellular content of labeled phospholipid and triacylglycerol decreased without intracellular accumulation of free fatty acid. Twenty percent of the /sup 14/C-label lost from cellular glycerolipid could not be recovered as a chloroform-extractable product, suggesting that some of the hydrolyzed fatty acid had been oxidized. These data indicate that cultured placenta trophoblast cells can release fatty acids that have either been synthesized de novo or that have been hydrolyzed from cellular glycerolipids. Trophoblast cells in monolayer culture should provide an excellent model for molecular studies of placental fatty acid metabolism and release.

  8. Lactic acid-producing yeast cells having nonfunctional L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome C oxidoreductase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Matthew; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Hause, Benjamin Matthew; Van Hoek, Pim; Dundon, Catherine Asleson

    2012-03-20

    Yeast cells having an exogenous lactate dehydrogenase gene ae modified by reducing L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity in the cell. This leads to reduced consumption of lactate by the cell and can increase overall lactate yields in a fermentation process. Cells having the reduced L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity can be screened for by resistance to organic acids such as lactic or glycolic acid.

  9. Corrosion-resistant catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kosek, J.A.; Cropley, C.C.; LaConti, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    High-surface-area carbon blacks such as Vulcan XC-72 (Cabot Corp.) and graphitized carbon blacks such as 2700{degree}C heat-treated Black Pearls 2000 (HTBP) (Cabot Corp.) have found widespread applications as catalyst supports in phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs). However, due to the operating temperatures and pressures being utilized in PAFCs currently under development, the carbon-based cathode catalyst supports suffer from corrosion, which decreases the performance and life span of a PAFC stack. The feasibility of using alternative, low-cost, corrosion-resistant catalyst support (CRCS) materials as replacements for the cathode carbon support materials was investigated. The objectives of the program were to prepare high-surface-area alternative supports and to evaluate the physical characteristics and the electrochemical stability of these materials. The O{sub 2} reduction activity of the platinized CRCS materials was also evaluated. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Transmission electron microscopic examination of phosphoric acid fuel cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pebler, A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to physically characterize tested and untested phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) components. Those examined included carbon-supported platinum catalysts, carbon backing paper, and Teflon-bonded catalyst layers at various stages of fabrication and after testing in pressurized PAFC's. Applicability of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy for identifying the various phases was explored. The discussion focuses on the morphology and size distribution of platinum, the morphology and structural aspects of Teflon in catalyst layers, and the structural evidence of carbon corrosion. Reference is made to other physical characterization techniques where appropriate. A qualitative model of the catalyst layer that emerged from the TEM studies is presented.

  11. Engineering a cyanobacterial cell factory for production of lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, S Andreas; Paszota, Michal; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2012-10-01

    Metabolic engineering of microorganisms has become a versatile tool to facilitate production of bulk chemicals, fuels, etc. Accordingly, CO(2) has been exploited via cyanobacterial metabolism as a sustainable carbon source of biofuel and bioplastic precursors. Here we extended these observations by showing that integration of an ldh gene from Bacillus subtilis (encoding an l-lactate dehydrogenase) into the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 leads to l-lactic acid production, a phenotype which is shown to be stable for prolonged batch culturing. Coexpression of a heterologous soluble transhydrogenase leads to an even higher lactate production rate and yield (lactic acid accumulating up to a several-millimolar concentration in the extracellular medium) than those for the single ldh mutant. The expression of a transhydrogenase alone, however, appears to be harmful to the cells, and a mutant carrying such a gene is rapidly outcompeted by a revertant(s) with a wild-type growth phenotype. Furthermore, our results indicate that the introduction of a lactate dehydrogenase rescues this phenotype by preventing the reversion. PMID:22865063

  12. Stereoconfiguration of bisphosphatidic and semilysobisphosphatidic acids from cultured hamster fibroblasts (BHK cells).

    PubMed

    Somerharju, P; Brotherus, J; Kahma, K; Renkonen, O

    1977-04-26

    Monolayers of hamster fibroblasts (BHK cells) were incubated in Eagle's minimal essential medium under conditions where an increase in the levels of all cellular bisphosphatidic acids takes place. Bisphosphatidic acid and semilysobisphosphatidic were isolated from these cells and subjected to strong alkaline hydrolysis. Stereochemical analysis of the hydrolysis products revealed that the majority of the molecules of both lipids are derivatives of sn-1-glycerophospho-sn-1'-glycerol, the structure previously found to be the "backbone" of lysobisphosphatidic acid, (bis(monoacylglycerol)phosphate) from BHK cells and other sources. This finding suggests a close metabolic relationship between the three bisphosphatidic acid derivatives of BHK cells. PMID:857898

  13. Salicylic acid induces apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells grown in-vitro: Influence of oxygen and salicylic acid concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Zitta, Karina; Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Huang, Ying; Heinrich, Christin; Scholz, Jens; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-04-15

    In solid tumors the hypoxic environment can promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy. Recently, acetylsalicylic acid a major component of analgesic drugs and its metabolite salicylic acid (SA) have been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer, but the mechanisms of action remain still unclear. Here we elucidate the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of SA on colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2) grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Western blotting, caspase-3/7 apoptosis assays, MTS cell-proliferation assays, LDH cytotoxicity assays and hydrogen peroxide measurements were performed to investigate the effects of 1 and 10 {mu}M SA on CaCo-2 cells grown under normoxic conditions and cells exposed to hypoxia. Under normoxic conditions, SA did not influence cell proliferation or LDH release of CaCo-2 cells. However, caspase-3/7 activity was significantly increased. Under hypoxia, cell proliferation was reduced and LDH release and caspase-3/7 activities were increased. None of these parameters was altered by the addition of SA under hypoxic conditions. Hypoxia increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations 300-fold and SA significantly augmented the release of hydrogen peroxide under normoxic, but not under hypoxic conditions. Phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinases akt and erk1/2 was not changed by SA under hypoxic conditions, whereas under normoxia SA reduced phosphorylation of erk1/2 after 2 hours. We conclude that in colon carcinoma cells effects of SA on apoptosis and cellular signaling are dependent on the availability of oxygen. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of salicylic acid on colon carcinoma cells grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid increases caspase-3/7 activity and hydrogen peroxide release under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid decreases pro-survival erk-1/2 phosphorylation under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid does

  14. Proteomic analysis of the molecular response of Raji cells to maslinic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Yap, W H; Khoo, K S; Lim, S H; Yeo, C C; Lim, Y M

    2012-01-15

    Maslinic acid, a natural pentacyclic triterpene has been shown to inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in some tumour cell lines. We studied the molecular response of Raji cells towards maslinic acid treatment. A proteomics approach was employed to identify the target proteins. Seventeen differentially expressed proteins including those involved in DNA replication, microtubule filament assembly, nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking, cell signaling, energy metabolism and cytoskeletal organization were identified by MALDI TOF-TOF MS. The down-regulation of stathmin, Ran GTPase activating protein-1 (RanBP1), and microtubule associated protein RP/EB family member 1 (EB1) were confirmed by Western blotting. The study of the effect of maslinic acid on Raji cell cycle regulation showed that it induced a G1 cell cycle arrest. The differential proteomic changes in maslinic acid-treated Raji cells demonstrated that it also inhibited expression of dUTPase and stathmin which are known to induce early S and G2 cell cycle arrests. The mechanism of maslinic acid-induced cell cycle arrest may be mediated by inhibiting cyclin D1 expression and enhancing the levels of cell cycle-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 protein. Maslinic acid suppressed nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity which is known to stimulate expression of anti-apoptotic and cell cycle regulatory gene products. These results suggest that maslinic acid affects multiple signaling molecules and inhibits fundamental pathways regulating cell growth and survival in Raji cells. PMID:21893403

  15. Perillyl alcohol and perillic acid induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in non small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Laxmi; Pierre, Keon J; Elegbede, Abiodun; Wang, Robert C; Carper, Stephen W

    2007-11-18

    Plant products such as perillyl alcohol have been reported to possess anti-tumor activities against a number of human cancers though the mechanism of action has not yet been elucidated. The effects of perillyl alcohol (POH) and its metabolite perillic acid (PA) on the proliferation of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, A549, and H520) cells were investigated. Both POH and PA elicited dose-dependent cytotoxicity, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis with increasing expression of bax, p21 and caspase-3 activity in both the cell lines. Combination studies revealed that exposing the cells to an IC50 concentration of POH or PA sensitized the cells to cisplatin and radiation in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that POH and PA in combination therapy may have chemotherapeutic value against NSCLC. PMID:17888568

  16. Cell proliferation and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in a cell line from southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii).

    PubMed

    Scholefield, Andrew M; Schuller, Kathryn A

    2014-07-01

    Southern bluefin tuna (SBT, Thunnus maccoyii) aquaculture is a highly valuable industry, but research on these fish is hampered by strict catch quotas and the limited success of captive breeding. To address these limitations, we have developed a SBT cell line (SBT-E1) and here we report on fatty acid metabolism in this cell line. The SBT-E1 cells proliferated well in standard Leibovitz's L-15 cell culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS) as the source of fatty acids. Decreasing the FBS concentration decreased the cell proliferation. Addition of the C(18) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3) or linoleic acid (LNA, 18:2n-6) to the cell culture medium had little effect on the proliferation of the cells, whereas addition of the long-chain PUFA (LC-PUFA) arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) significantly reduced the proliferation of the cells, especially at higher concentrations and especially for DHA. Addition of vitamin E to the culture medium overcame this effect, suggesting that it was due to oxidative stress. The fatty acid profiles of the total lipid from the cells reflected those of the respective culture media with little evidence for desaturation or elongation of any of the fatty acids. The only exceptions were EPA and ARA, which showed substantial elongation to 22:5n-3 and 22:4n-6, respectively, and DHA, which was significantly enriched in the cells compared with the culture medium. The results are discussed in light of the dietary PUFA requirements of SBT in the wild and in aquaculture. PMID:24825740

  17. Ferulic acid reverses ABCB1-mediated paclitaxel resistance in MDR cell lines.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Ganesan; Balupillai, Agilan; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Gunaseelan, Srithar; Mary, Beaulah; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. The use of the dietary phytochemicals as chemosensitizing agents to enhance the efficacy of conventional cytostatic drugs has recently gained the attention as a plausible approach for overcoming the drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a naturally occurring diet-based phenolic acid, ferulic acid, could sensitize paclitaxel efficacy in ABCB1 overexpressing (P-glycoprotein) colchicine selected KB Ch(R)8-5 cell line. In vitro drug efflux assays demonstrated that ferulic acid inhibits P-glycoprotein transport function in drug resistant KB Ch(R)8-5 cell lines. However, ferulic acid significantly downregulates ABCB1 expression in a concentration dependent manner. Cytotoxicity assay reveals that ferulic acid decreased paclitaxel resistance in KBCh(R)8-5 and HEK293/ABCB1 cells, which indicates its chemosensitizing potential. Clonogenic cell survival assay and apoptotic morphological staining further confirm the chemosensitizing potential of ferulic acid in drug resistant KB Ch(R)8-5 cell lines. Ferulic acid treatment enhances paclitaxel mediated cell cycle arrest and upregulates paclitaxel-induced apoptotic signaling in KB resistant cells. Hence, it has been concluded that downregulation of ABCB1 and subsequent induction of paclitaxel-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptotic signaling may be the cause for the chemosensitizing potential of ferulic acid in P-gp overexpressing cell lines. PMID:27262378

  18. Differential Utilization of Dietary Fatty Acids in Benign and Malignant Cells of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Theresa; Höfer, Julia; Gnaiger, Erich; Aufinger, Astrid; Kenner, Lukas; Perktold, Bernhard; Ramoner, Reinhold; Klocker, Helmut; Eder, Iris E.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells adapt via metabolic reprogramming to meet elevated energy demands due to continuous proliferation, for example by switching to alternative energy sources. Nutrients such as glucose, fatty acids, ketone bodies and amino acids may be utilized as preferred substrates to fulfill increased energy requirements. In this study we investigated the metabolic characteristics of benign and cancer cells of the prostate with respect to their utilization of medium chain (MCTs) and long chain triglycerides (LCTs) under standard and glucose-starved culture conditions by assessing cell viability, glycolytic activity, mitochondrial respiration, the expression of genes encoding key metabolic enzymes as well as mitochondrial mass and mtDNA content. We report that BE prostate cells (RWPE-1) have a higher competence to utilize fatty acids as energy source than PCa cells (LNCaP, ABL, PC3) as shown not only by increased cell viability upon fatty acid supplementation but also by an increased ß-oxidation of fatty acids, although the base-line respiration was 2-fold higher in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, BE RWPE-1 cells were found to compensate for glucose starvation in the presence of fatty acids. Of notice, these findings were confirmed in vivo by showing that PCa tissue has a lower capacity in oxidizing fatty acids than benign prostate. Collectively, these metabolic differences between benign and prostate cancer cells and especially their differential utilization of fatty acids could be exploited to establish novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26285134

  19. Differential Utilization of Dietary Fatty Acids in Benign and Malignant Cells of the Prostate.

    PubMed

    Dueregger, Andrea; Schöpf, Bernd; Eder, Theresa; Höfer, Julia; Gnaiger, Erich; Aufinger, Astrid; Kenner, Lukas; Perktold, Bernhard; Ramoner, Reinhold; Klocker, Helmut; Eder, Iris E

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells adapt via metabolic reprogramming to meet elevated energy demands due to continuous proliferation, for example by switching to alternative energy sources. Nutrients such as glucose, fatty acids, ketone bodies and amino acids may be utilized as preferred substrates to fulfill increased energy requirements. In this study we investigated the metabolic characteristics of benign and cancer cells of the prostate with respect to their utilization of medium chain (MCTs) and long chain triglycerides (LCTs) under standard and glucose-starved culture conditions by assessing cell viability, glycolytic activity, mitochondrial respiration, the expression of genes encoding key metabolic enzymes as well as mitochondrial mass and mtDNA content. We report that BE prostate cells (RWPE-1) have a higher competence to utilize fatty acids as energy source than PCa cells (LNCaP, ABL, PC3) as shown not only by increased cell viability upon fatty acid supplementation but also by an increased ß-oxidation of fatty acids, although the base-line respiration was 2-fold higher in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, BE RWPE-1 cells were found to compensate for glucose starvation in the presence of fatty acids. Of notice, these findings were confirmed in vivo by showing that PCa tissue has a lower capacity in oxidizing fatty acids than benign prostate. Collectively, these metabolic differences between benign and prostate cancer cells and especially their differential utilization of fatty acids could be exploited to establish novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26285134

  20. Proliferation-dependent changes in release of arachidonic acid from endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Whatley, R E; Satoh, K; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M

    1994-01-01

    Stimulation of endothelial cells resulted in release of arachidonic acid from phospholipids. The magnitude of this response decreased as the cells became confluent and the change coincided with a decrease in the percentage of cells in growth phases (G2+M); this was not a consequence of time in culture or a factor in the growth medium. Preconfluent cells released approximately 30% of arachidonic acid; confluent cells released only 6%. The decreasing release of arachidonic acid was demonstrated using metabolic labeling, mass measurements of arachidonic acid, and measurement of PGI2. The decrease was not due to a changing pool of arachidonic acid, and mass measurements showed no depletion of arachidonic acid. Release from each phospholipid and from each phospholipid class decreased with confluence. Conversion of confluent cells to the proliferative phenotype by mechanical wounding of the monolayer caused increased release of arachidonic acid. Potential mechanisms for these changes were investigated using assays of phospholipase activity. Phospholipase A2 activity changed in concert with the alteration in release, a consequence of changes in phosphorylation of the enzyme. The increased release of arachidonic acid from preconfluent, actively dividing cells may have important physiologic implications and may help elucidate mechanisms regulating release of arachidonic acid. Images PMID:7962534

  1. Ethacrynic acid inhibitable Ca2+ and Mg2+-activated membrane adenosine triphosphatase in rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Magro, A M

    1977-01-01

    A crude plasma membrane fraction from the homogenate of purified rat mast cells demonstrates a high degree of Ca2+-dependent and Mg2+-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity. The microsomal and mitochondrial fractions show negligible amounts of the Ca2+ and Mg2+-activated ATPases. The broad ATPase inhibitor, ethacrynic acid, effectively blocks the mast cell ATPase activity while ouabain demonstrates little inhibitory effect. Correspondingly, ethacrynic acid inhibits histamine release from antigen-challenged mast cells while ouabain does not. Both ATPase inhibition and histamine release inhibition by ethacrynic acid require the presence of the olefinic bond in the ethacrynic acid molecule. PMID:75076

  2. Versatile Microfluidic Platform for the Assessment of Sialic Acid Expression on Cancer Cells Using Quantum Dots with Phenylboronic Acid Tags.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Peng-Hui; Liu, Yan-Ming; Abdel-Halim, E S; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-07-15

    This work describes a versatile microfluidic platform for evaluation of cell-surface glycan expression at the single-cell level using quantum dots (QDs) tagged with phenylboronic acid. The platform was integrated with dual microwell arrays, allowing the introduction of cells in two states using the same cell culture chamber. The simultaneous analysis of cells in the same environment minimized errors resulting from different culture conditions. As proof-of-concept, the expressions of sialic acid (SA) groups on K562 cells, with or without 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) treatment, were evaluated in the same chamber. 3-Aminophenylboronic acid functionalized CdSeTe@ZnS-SiO2 QDs (APBA-QDs) were prepared as probes to recognize SA groups on K562 cells with only one-step labeling. The results showed that the expression of SA moieties on K562 cells was increased by 18% and 31% after treatment with 20 and 40 μM AZT, respectively. Performing the drug treatment and control experiments simultaneously in the same chamber significantly improved the robustness and effectiveness of the assay. The strategy presented here provides an alternative tool for glycan analysis in a sensitive, high-throughput, and effective manner. PMID:26086216

  3. Whole-cell bioconversion of vanillin to vanillic acid by Streptomyces viridosporus

    SciTech Connect

    Pometto, A.L. III; Crawford, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    A two-step batch fermentation-bioconversion of vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) to vanillic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid) was developed, utilizing whole cells of Streptomyces viridosporus T7A. In the first step, cells were grown in a yeast extract-vanillin medium under conditions where cells produced an aromatic aldehyde oxidase. In the second step, vanillin was incubated with the active cells and was quantitatively oxidized to vanillic acid which accumulated in the growth medium. Vanillic acid was readily recovered from the spent medium by a combination of acid precipitation and ether extraction at greater than or equal to96% molar yield and upon recrystallization from glacial acetic acid was obtained in greater than or equal to99% purity.

  4. Whole-cell bioconversion of vanillin to vanillic acid by Streptomyces viridosporus.

    PubMed Central

    Pometto, A L; Crawford, D L

    1983-01-01

    A two-step batch fermentation-bioconversion of vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) to vanillic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid) was developed, utilizing whole cells of Streptomyces viridosporus T7A. In the first step, cells were grown in a yeast extract-vanillin medium under conditions where cells produced an aromatic aldehyde oxidase. In the second step, vanillin was incubated with the active cells and was quantitatively oxidized to vanillic acid which accumulated in the growth medium. Vanillic acid was readily recovered from the spent medium by a combination of acid precipitation and ether extraction at greater than or equal to 96% molar yield and upon recrystallization from glacial acetic acid was obtained in greater than or equal to 99% purity. PMID:6870241

  5. Effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids on drug-sensitive and resistant tumor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies showed that γ-linolenic acid (GLA, 18: 3 ω-6), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4 ω -6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20: 5 ω -3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 ω -3) have selective tumoricidal action. In the present study, it was observed that dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA) and AA, EPA and DHA have cytotoxic action on both vincristine-sensitive (KB-3-1) and resistant (KB-ChR-8-5) cancer cells in vitro that appeared to be a free-radical dependent process but not due to the formation of prostaglandins, leukotrienes and thromboxanes. Uptake of vincristine and fatty acids was higher while their efflux was lower in KB-3-1 cells compared with KB-ChR-8-5 cells, suggesting that drug resistant cells have an effective efflux pump. GLA, DGLA, AA, EPA and DHA enhanced the uptake and decreased efflux in both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cells and augmented the susceptibility of tumor cells especially, of drug-resistant cells to the cytotoxic action of vincristine. These results suggest that certain polyunsaturated fatty acids have tumoricidal action and are capable of enhancing the cytotoxic action of anti-cancer drugs specifically, on drug-resistant cells by enhancing drug uptake and reducing its efflux. Thus, polyunsaturated fatty acids either by themselves or in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs have the potential as anti-cancer molecules. PMID:21917129

  6. Fusaric acid induction of programmed cell death modulated through nitric oxide signalling in tobacco suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Zhou, Benguo; Zhu, Xiaoping; Gao, Zhengliang; Liang, Yuancun

    2013-10-01

    Fusaric acid (FA) is a nonhost-selective toxin mainly produced by Fusarium oxysporum, the causal agent of plant wilt diseases. We demonstrate that FA can induce programmed cell death (PCD) in tobacco suspension cells and the FA-induced PCD is modulated by nitric oxide (NO) signalling. Cells undergoing cell death induced by FA treatment exhibited typical characteristics of PCD including cytoplasmic shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, membrane plasmolysis, and formation of small cytoplasmic vacuoles. In addition, caspase-3-like activity was activated upon the FA treatment. The process of FA-induced PCD was accompanied by a rapid accumulation of NO in a FA dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of cells with NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-arginine monoacetate (L-NMMA) significantly reduced the rate of FA-induced cell death. Furthermore, the caspase-3-like activity and the expression of PAL and Hsr203J genes were alleviated by application of cPTIO or L-NMMA to FA-treated tobacco cells. This indicates that NO is an important factor involved in the FA-induced PCD. Our results also show that pre-treatment of tobacco cells with a caspase-3-specific inhibitor, Ac-DEVD-CHO, can reduce the rate of FA-induced cell death. These results demonstrate that the FA-induced cell death is a PCD and is modulated by NO signalling through caspase-3-like activation. PMID:23838885

  7. Asiatic Acid Prevents the Deleterious Effects of Valproic Acid on Cognition and Hippocampal Cell Proliferation and Survival.

    PubMed

    Umka Welbat, Jariya; Sirichoat, Apiwat; Chaijaroonkhanarak, Wunnee; Prachaney, Parichat; Pannangrong, Wanassanun; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn; Wigmore, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is commonly prescribed as an anticonvulsant and mood stabilizer used in the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. A recent study has demonstrated that VPA reduces histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, an action which is believed to contribute to the effects of VPA on neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation which may explain the cognitive impairments produced in rodents and patients. Asiatic acid is a triterpenoid derived from the medicinal plant Centella asiatica. Our previous study has shown that Asiatic acid improves working spatial memory and increases cell proliferation in the sub granular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the present study we investigate the effects of Asiatic acid in preventing the memory and cellular effects of VPA. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were orally administered Asiatic acid (30 mg/kg/day) for 28 days, while VPA-treated animals received injections of VPA (300 mg/kg) twice a day from Day 15 to Day 28 for 14 days. Spatial memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL) test and hippocampal cell proliferation and survival was quantified by immuostaining for Ki-67 and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), respectively. The results showed that VPA-treated animals were unable to discriminate between objects in familiar and novel locations. Moreover, VPA significantly reduced numbers of Ki-67 and BrdU positive cells. These results indicate that VPA treatment caused impairments of spatial working memory, cell proliferation and survival in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). However, these abnormalities were restored to control levels by co-treatment with Asiatic acid. These data demonstrate that Asiatic acid could prevent the spatial memory and neurogenesis impairments caused by VPA. PMID:27213437

  8. Asiatic Acid Prevents the Deleterious Effects of Valproic Acid on Cognition and Hippocampal Cell Proliferation and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Umka Welbat, Jariya; Sirichoat, Apiwat; Chaijaroonkhanarak, Wunnee; Prachaney, Parichat; Pannangrong, Wanassanun; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn; Wigmore, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is commonly prescribed as an anticonvulsant and mood stabilizer used in the treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. A recent study has demonstrated that VPA reduces histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, an action which is believed to contribute to the effects of VPA on neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation which may explain the cognitive impairments produced in rodents and patients. Asiatic acid is a triterpenoid derived from the medicinal plant Centella asiatica. Our previous study has shown that Asiatic acid improves working spatial memory and increases cell proliferation in the sub granular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the present study we investigate the effects of Asiatic acid in preventing the memory and cellular effects of VPA. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were orally administered Asiatic acid (30 mg/kg/day) for 28 days, while VPA-treated animals received injections of VPA (300 mg/kg) twice a day from Day 15 to Day 28 for 14 days. Spatial memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL) test and hippocampal cell proliferation and survival was quantified by immuostaining for Ki-67 and Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), respectively. The results showed that VPA-treated animals were unable to discriminate between objects in familiar and novel locations. Moreover, VPA significantly reduced numbers of Ki-67 and BrdU positive cells. These results indicate that VPA treatment caused impairments of spatial working memory, cell proliferation and survival in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). However, these abnormalities were restored to control levels by co-treatment with Asiatic acid. These data demonstrate that Asiatic acid could prevent the spatial memory and neurogenesis impairments caused by VPA. PMID:27213437

  9. Tranexamic Acid and Hyaluronate/Carboxymethylcellulose Create Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Bayram; Dilbaz, Serdar; Üstün, Yusuf; Kumru, Selahattin

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Postoperative pelvic adhesions are associated with chronic pelvic pain, dyspareunia, and infertility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adhesion prevention effects of tranexamic acid (TA) and hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose (HA/CMC) barrier in the rat uterine horn models on the basis of macroscopic and microscopic adhesion scores and histopathological as well as biochemical parameters of inflammation. Methods: Twenty-one Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups. Ten lesions were created on the antimesenteric surface of both uterine horns by bipolar cautery. Three milliliters of 0.9% sodium chloride solution were administered in the control group. A single layer of 2 × 2 cm HA/CMC was plated in group 2. Two milliliters of TA was applied in the last group. All rats were sacrificed at postoperative day 21. Results: No significant difference was found among the control group, the HA/CMC group, and the TA group in terms of macro-adhesion score (P = .206) and microadhesion score (P = .056). No significant difference was found among the 3 groups in terms of inflammation score (P = .815) and inflammatory cell activity (P = .835). Malondialdehyde levels were significantly lower in the control group than in the TA group and HA/CMC group (P = .028). Superoxide dismutase and glutathione S-transferase activities were found to be higher in the control group than in the TA group (P = .005) and HA/CMC group (P = .009). Conclusions: TA and HA/CMC had no efficacy in preventing macroscopic or microscopic adhesion formation and decreasing inflammatory cell activity or inflammation score in our rat models. TA and HA/CMC increased the levels of free radicals and reduced the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione S-transferase enzymes, which act to reduce tissue injury. PMID:25392658

  10. De novo fatty acid synthesis controls the fate between regulatory T and T helper 17 cells.

    PubMed

    Berod, Luciana; Friedrich, Christin; Nandan, Amrita; Freitag, Jenny; Hagemann, Stefanie; Harmrolfs, Kirsten; Sandouk, Aline; Hesse, Christina; Castro, Carla N; Bähre, Heike; Tschirner, Sarah K; Gorinski, Nataliya; Gohmert, Melanie; Mayer, Christian T; Huehn, Jochen; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Müller, Rolf; Lochner, Matthias; Sparwasser, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17)-secreting T cells of the T helper 17 (TH17) lineage play a pathogenic role in multiple inflammatory and autoimmune conditions and thus represent a highly attractive target for therapeutic intervention. We report that inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) restrains the formation of human and mouse TH17 cells and promotes the development of anti-inflammatory Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. We show that TH17 cells, but not Treg cells, depend on ACC1-mediated de novo fatty acid synthesis and the underlying glycolytic-lipogenic metabolic pathway for their development. Although TH17 cells use this pathway to produce phospholipids for cellular membranes, Treg cells readily take up exogenous fatty acids for this purpose. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition or T cell-specific deletion of ACC1 not only blocks de novo fatty acid synthesis but also interferes with the metabolic flux of glucose-derived carbon via glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In vivo, treatment with the ACC-specific inhibitor soraphen A or T cell-specific deletion of ACC1 in mice attenuates TH17 cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Our results indicate fundamental differences between TH17 cells and Treg cells regarding their dependency on ACC1-mediated de novo fatty acid synthesis, which might be exploited as a new strategy for metabolic immune modulation of TH17 cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:25282359

  11. Retinoic acid stimulates interstitial collagenase messenger ribonucleic acid in osteosarcoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, T. J.; Clohisy, J. C.; Shilt, J. S.; Bergman, K. D.; Partridge, N. C.; Quinn, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    The rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01 secretes interstitial collagenase in response to retinoic acid (RA). The present study demonstrates by Northern blot analysis that RA causes an increase in collagenase messenger RNA (mRNA) at 6 h, which is maximal at 24 h (20.5 times basal) and declines toward basal level by 72 h. This stimulation is dose dependent, with a maximal response at 5 x 10(-7) M RA. Nuclear run-on assays show a greater than 20-fold increase in the rate of collagenase mRNA transcription between 12-24 h after RA treatment. Cycloheximide blocks RA stimulation of collagenase mRNA, demonstrating the need for de novo protein synthesis. RA not only causes an increase in collagenase secretion, but is known to decrease collagen synthesis in UMR 106-01 cells. In this study, the increase in collagenase mRNA is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the level of alpha 1(I) procollagen mRNA, which is maximal at 24 h (70% decrease), with a return to near-control levels by 72 h. Nuclear run-on assays demonstrated that the decrease in alpha 1 (I) procollagen expression does not have a statistically significant transcriptional component. RA did not statistically decrease the stability of alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA (calculated t1/2 = 8.06 +/- 0.30 and 9.01 +/- 0.62 h in the presence and absence of RA, respectively). However, transcription and stability together probably contribute to the major decrease in stable alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA observed. Cycloheximide treatment inhibits basal level alpha 1 (I) procollagen mRNA accumulation, demonstrating the need for on-going protein synthesis to maintain basal expression of this gene.

  12. Omega-3 fatty acids differentially modulate enzymatic anti-oxidant systems in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    da Silva, E P; Nachbar, R T; Levada-Pires, A C; Hirabara, S M; Lambertucci, R H

    2016-01-01

    During physical activity, increased reactive oxygen species production occurs, which can lead to cell damage and in a decline of individual's performance and health. The use of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as a supplement to protect the immune system has been increasing; however, their possible benefit to the anti-oxidant system is not well described. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the omega-3 fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid) can be beneficial to the anti-oxidant system in cultured skeletal muscle cells. C2C12 myocytes were differentiated and treated with either eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid for 24 h. Superoxide content was quantified using the dihydroethidine oxidation method and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activity, and expression was quantified. We observed that the docosahexaenoic fatty acids caused an increase in superoxide production. Eicosapentaenoic acid induced catalase activity, while docosahexaenoic acid suppressed superoxide dismutase activity. In addition, we found an increased protein expression of the total manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes when cells were treated with eicosapentaenoic acid. Taken together, these data indicate that the use of eicosapentaenoic acid may present both acute and chronic benefits; however, the treatment with DHA may not be beneficial to muscle cells. PMID:26386577

  13. Retinoic acid induces Sertoli cell paracrine signals for spermatogonia differentiation but cell autonomously drives spermatocyte meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Raverdeau, Mathilde; Gely-Pernot, Aurore; Féret, Betty; Dennefeld, Christine; Benoit, Gérard; Davidson, Irwin; Chambon, Pierre; Mark, Manuel; Ghyselinck, Norbert B.

    2012-01-01

    Direct evidence for a role of endogenous retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A in the initial differentiation and meiotic entry of spermatogonia, and thus in the initiation of spermatogenesis is still lacking. RA is synthesized by dedicated enzymes, the retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDH), and binds to and activates nuclear RA receptors (RARA, RARB, and RARG) either within the RA-synthesizing cells or in the neighboring cells. In the present study, we have used a combination of somatic genetic ablations and pharmacological approaches in vivo to show that during the first, prepubertal, spermatogenic cycle (i) RALDH-dependent synthesis of RA by Sertoli cells (SC), the supporting cells of the germ cell (GC) lineage, is indispensable to initiate differentiation of A aligned into A1 spermatogonia; (ii) RARA in SC mediates the effects of RA, possibly through activating Mafb expression, a gene whose Drosophila homolog is mandatory to GC differentiation; (iii) RA synthesized by premeiotic spermatocytes cell autonomously induces meiotic initiation through controlling the RAR-dependent expression of Stra8. Furthermore, we show that RA of SC origin is no longer necessary for the subsequent spermatogenic cycles but essential to spermiation. Altogether, our data establish that the effects of RA in vivo on spermatogonia differentiation are indirect, via SC, but direct on meiotic initiation in spermatocytes, supporting thereby the notion that, contrary to the situation in the female, RA is necessary to induce meiosis in the male. PMID:23012458

  14. The cytotoxicity of hydrophobic bile acids is ameliorated by more hydrophilic bile acids in intestinal cell lines IEC-6 and Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoshio; Andoh, Akira; Bamba, Hiromichi; Yoshikawa, Kouhei; Doi, Hisakazu; Komai, Yasunobu; Higuchi, Akihiko; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    Bile acids, especially those with hydrophobic properties, are known to possess cytotoxicity. However, the mechanisms responsible for the cytotoxicity of bile acids are still under investigation. On the other hand, the hydrophilic bile acid, ursodeoxycholic acid has been reported to exhibit therapeutic effects against cytotoxic hydrophobic bile acids. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of individual bile acids and combinations of bile acids using the intestinal cell lines IEC-6 and Caco-2 cells. The cytotoxicities of individual bile acids and the effects of various bile acid combinations were evaluated using the MTS [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] assay. The bile acids induced cytotoxic effects depending on their hydrophobicity except for hyodeoxycholic acid. In the study for the effects of combined bile acids, not only ursodeoxycholic acid but other hydrophilic bile salts such as cholic acid and hyocholic acid exhibited cytoprotection against deoxycholic acid-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, even some hydrophobic bile acids, such as chenodeoxycholic acid also exhibited cytoprotection. It is possible that the cytotoxicity of hydrophobic bile acids is ameliorated by more hydrophilic bile acids under certain conditions. The understanding of the precise mechanism of this phenomenon remains to be determined. PMID:14534721

  15. Complexing of amino acids to DNA by chromate in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Voitkun, V; Zhitkovich, A; Costa, M

    1994-01-01

    Using o-pthaldialdehyde (OPT) fluorescence, the amino acids associated with DNA were studied following exposure of intact Chinese hamster ovary cells to chromate. Rigorous extraction with EDTA, acid, or base was required to release the amino acids cross-linked to the DNA isolated from control or chromate-treated cells by standard procedures (i.e., proteinase K, phenol, etc.). Amino acids resisting extraction from DNA were not studied since analysis was limited to those that could be released by these procedures. There was a chromate dose-dependent increase in amino acids complexed with the DNA that could be released by EDTA, acid, and base, and these amino acids were separated by HPLC and identified. Substantial increases in cysteine, glutamine, glutamic acid, histidine, threonine, and tyrosine were found as a function of increasing concentrations of chromate. There was also a time-dependent increase in complexing of these amino acids to the DNA by chromate. The amino acids found complexed to DNA in intact cells by chromate were thought to originate from reactions of free amino acids or small peptides with the DNA rather than being proteolytic products derived from larger proteins that were cross-linked to the DNA. This was supported by a number of experiments: a) free amino acids or bovine serum albumin (BSA) were cross-linked by chromium to DNA in vitro and the DNA was isolated by standard procedures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7843108

  16. Delta-6 desaturase from borage converts linoleic acid to gamma-linolenic acid in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Nimal, Jonathan; Li, Wanli; Liu, Xia; Cao, Wenguang

    2011-07-01

    Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3 n6) is an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid of the omega-6 family and is found to be effective in prevention and/or treatment of various health problems. In this study, we evaluated the possibility of increasing γ-linolenic acid contents in mammalian cells using the delta-6 gene from Borago officinalis. The borage Δ6-desaturase gene (sDelta-6) was codon-optimized and introduced into HEK293 cells by lipofectin transfection. Co-expression of GFP with sDelta-6 and RT-PCR analysis indicated that sDelta-6 could be expressed in mammalian cells. Subsequently, the heterologous expression of borage Δ6-desaturase was evaluated by fatty acid analysis. Total cellular lipid analysis of transformed cells fed with linoleic acid (LA 18:2 n6) as a substrate showed that the expression of sDelta-6 resulted in an 228-483% (p<0.05) increase of GLA when compared with that in the control cells. The highest conversion efficiency of LA into GLA in sDelta-6(+) cells was 6.9 times higher than that in the control group (11.59% vs. 1.69%; p<0.05). Our present work demonstrated that the sDelta-6 gene from borage could be functionally expressed in mammalian cells, and could convert LA into GLA. Furthermore, this study may pave the way to generate transgenic livestock that can synthesise GLA. PMID:21679695

  17. Combined effects of zoledronic acid and doxorubicin on breast cancer cell invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Julia K L; Neville-Webbe, Helen L; Coleman, Robert E; Holen, Ingunn

    2005-09-01

    The bisphosphonate zoledronic acid and the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin induce synergistic levels of apoptosis in breast cancer cells. As zoledronic acid and doxorubicin have been shown to reduce cell invasion and migration, we have investigated if these drugs also act synergistically on breast cancer invasion in vitro. MCF7 cells were treated with 0.05 microM doxorubicin/4 h followed by 1 or 10 microM zoledronic acid/24 h (or the reverse sequence). To study invasion, MCF7 cells were either grown on Transwell membranes coated with Matrigel or in a 24-well plate. Cells were treated sequentially using the above drug combinations, prior to starting the invasion assays for 48 h. Cell growth and death were also assessed under the same conditions. We found that invasion of MCF7 cells treated with zoledronic acid and doxorubicin was significantly reduced when compared with control, but the effect was dependent on drug sequence. At 1 microM, zoledronic acid significantly reduced invasion only if cells were pre-treated with doxorubicin, but cell growth was unaffected. For 10 microM zoledronic acid, invasion was reduced when administered before or after the doxorubicin, but this dose of zoledronic acid caused a significant reduction in MCF7 growth. Apoptosis was not induced by any of the drug doses and combinations. We conclude that pre-treatment with 0.05 microM doxorubicin followed by 1 microM zoledronic acid reduces invasion when cells were grown on Matrigel. For 10 microM zoledronic acid, pre- or post-doxorubicin also reduces invasion, but for this combination inhibition of cell growth may contribute to the reduction in invasion observed. PMID:16096432

  18. Cytotoxicity of sulfurous acid on cell membrane and bioactivity of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruiyu; Wang, Mingqing; Xue, Jianliang; Xu, Ning; Hou, Guihua; Zhang, Wubing

    2015-01-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium, was chosen as a research model to study the alteration of cell membrane in the presence of sulfurous acid and biodegradation of acetochlor. Significant changes of the outer cell membrane were observed in the presence of sulfurous acid using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The fluorescence polarization has shown a significant decrease in membrane fluidity and the increase of permeability of cell membrane. Lysozyme experiment show the cell becomes easily influenced by substance in medium. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements show considerable amount of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in the supernatant from the sulfurous acid exposed cells. Sulfurous acid treatment enhanced the ability of N. europaea to degrade acetochlor. On this basis, it can be concluded that the increased cell permeability is favor for the absorbability of nutrition. As a result, N. europaea grows faster and the biodegradation efficiency was improved. PMID:25240954

  19. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  20. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  1. In vitro evidence that phosphatidylcholine protects against indomethacin/bile acid-induced injury to cells

    PubMed Central

    Dial, Elizabeth J.; Dawson, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Indomethacin is a powerful analgesic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), but is limited in use by its primary side effect to cause gastrointestinal bleeding and serious injury. One factor important for exacerbating NSAID injury is the presence of bile acids, which may interact with indomethacin to form toxic mixed micelles in the gut. The development of a safer gastrointestinal formulation of indomethacin that is chemically complexed with phosphatidylcholine (PC-indomethacin) may offer an improved therapeutic agent, particularly in the presence of bile acid, but its potential protective mechanism is incompletely understood. Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were tested for injury with indomethacin (alone and plus various bile acids) compared with PC-indomethacin (alone and plus bile acids). To explore a role for bile acid uptake into cells as a requirement for NSAID injury, studies were performed using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells transfected with the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT). Indomethacin, but not PC-indomethacin, was directly and dose-dependently injurious to IEC-6 cells. Similarly, the combination of any bile acid plus indomethacin, but not PC-indomethacin, induced cell injury. The expression of ASBT had a modest effect on the acute cytotoxicity of indomethacin in the presence of some conjugated bile acids. Complexing PC with indomethacin protected against the acute intestinal epithelial injury caused by indomethacin regardless of the presence of bile acids. The presence of luminal bile acid, but not its carrier-mediated uptake into the enterocyte, is required for acute indomethacin-induced cell injury. It is likely that initial cell damage induced by indomethacin occurs at or near the cell membrane, an effect exacerbated by bile acids and attenuated by PC. PMID:25477376

  2. Pseudolaric acid B activates autophagy in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to prevent cell death

    PubMed Central

    YU, JINGHUA; CHEN, CHUNHAI; XU, TIANYANG; YAN, MINGHUI; XUE, BIANBIAN; WANG, YING; LIU, CHUNYU; ZHONG, TING; WANG, ZENGYAN; MENG, XIANYING; HU, DONGHUA; YU, XIAOFANG

    2016-01-01

    Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) has been demonstrated to exert antitumor effects in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of resistance to PAB-induced cell death. Following incubation with 4 µM of PAB for 3 days, the majority of MCF-7 cells became senescent, while some retained the same morphology as control cells, as assessed using a senescence detection kit. Additionally, 36 h of treatment with 4 µM of PAB increased the positive staining of autophagy markers, as shown by monodansylcadaverine and acridine orange staining. Western blot analysis indicated that this treatment also increased expression of the autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. Furthermore, treatment with PAB and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine significantly decreased the ratio of autophagy, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of monodansylcadaverine staining density (P<0.001), and increased the ratio of cell death, as assessed by MTT analysis (P<0.001). This indicated that autophagy promotes cell survival as a resistance mechanism to PAB treatment. Additionally, the present study demonstrated that PAB treatment did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, which may be related to autophagy. Increased Bcl-2 expression may explain why PAB did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential. A Bcl-2 binding test demonstrated that PAB treatment inhibits the binding of Bcl-2 and Beclin-1, which may free Beclin-1 to participate in autophagy. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that autophagy may be activated by PAB treatment in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, contributing to resistance to cell death. PMID:26998069

  3. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection. PMID:26105052

  4. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection. PMID:26105052

  5. Luteolin prevents uric acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shi, Xuhui; Shuai, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuemei; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Wei, Dong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated uric acid causes direct injury to pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of luteolin, an important antioxidant, on uric acid-induced β-cell dysfunction. We first evaluated the effect of luteolin on nitric oxide (NO) formation in uric acid-stimulated Min6 cells using the Griess method. Next, we performed transient transfection and reporter assays to measure transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blotting assays were also performed to assess the effect of luteolin on the expression of MafA and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in uric acid-treated cells. Finally, we evaluated the effect of luteolin on uric acid-induced inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in Min6 cells and freshly isolated mouse pancreatic islets. We found that luteolin significantly inhibited uric acid-induced NO production, which was well correlated with reduced expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, decreased activity of NF-κB was implicated in inhibition by luteolin of increased iNOS expression induced by uric acid. Besides, luteolin significantly increased MafA expression in Min6 cells exposed to uric acid, which was reversed by overexpression of iNOS. Moreover, luteolin prevented uric acid-induced inhibition of GSIS in both Min6 cells and mouse islets. In conclusion, luteolin protects pancreatic β-cells from uric acid-induced dysfunction and may confer benefit on the protection of pancreatic β-cells in hyperuricemia-associated diabetes. PMID:25050113

  6. Retinol metabolism in LLC-PK1 Cells. Characterization of retinoic acid synthesis by an established mammalian cell line.

    PubMed

    Napoli, J L

    1986-10-15

    Specific assays, based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography, were used to quantify the conversion of retinol and retinal into retinoic acid by the pig kidney cell line LLC-PK1. Retinoic acid synthesis was linear for 2-4 h as well as with graded amounts of either substrate to at least 50 microM. Retinoic acid concentrations increased through 6-8 h, but decreased thereafter because of substrate depletion (t1/2 of retinol = 13 h) and product metabolism (1/2 = 2.3 h). Retinoic acid metabolism was accelerated by treating cells with 100 nM retinoic acid for 10 h (t1/2 = 1.7 h) and was inhibited by the antimycotic imidazole ketoconazole. Feedback inhibition was not indicated since retinoic acid up to 100 nM did not inhibit its own synthesis. Retinol dehydrogenation was rate-limiting. The reduction and dehydrogenation of retinal were 4-8-fold and 30-60-fold faster, respectively. Greater than 95% of retinol was converted into metabolites other than retinoic acid, whereas the major metabolite of retinal was retinoic acid. The synthetic retinoid 13-cis-N-ethylretinamide inhibited retinoic acid synthesis, but 4-hydroxylphenylretinamide did not. 4'-(9-Acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide, an inhibitor of aldehyde oxidase, and ethanol did not inhibit retinoic acid synthesis. 4-Methylpyrazole was a weak inhibitor: disulfiram was a potent inhibitor. These data indicate that retinol dehydrogenase is a sulfhydryl group-dependent enzyme, distinct from ethanol dehydrogenase. Homogenates of LLC-PK1 cells converted retinol into retinoic acid and retinyl palmitate and hydrolyzed retinyl palmitate. This report suggests that substrate availability, relative to enzyme activity/amount, is a primary determinant of the rate of retinoic acid synthesis, identifies inhibitors of retinoic acid synthesis, and places retinoic acid synthesis into perspective with several other known pathways of retinoid metabolism. PMID:3759984

  7. Asparagine promotes cancer cell proliferation through use as an amino acid exchange factor

    PubMed Central

    Krall, Abigail S.; Xu, Shili; Graeber, Thomas G.; Braas, Daniel; Christofk, Heather R.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular amino acid uptake is critical for mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activation and cell proliferation. However, the regulation of amino acid uptake is not well-understood. Here we describe a role for asparagine as an amino acid exchange factor: intracellular asparagine exchanges with extracellular amino acids. Through asparagine synthetase knockdown and altering of media asparagine concentrations, we show that intracellular asparagine levels regulate uptake of amino acids, especially serine, arginine and histidine. Through its exchange factor role, asparagine regulates mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis. In addition, we show that asparagine regulation of serine uptake influences serine metabolism and nucleotide synthesis, suggesting that asparagine is involved in coordinating protein and nucleotide synthesis. Finally, we show that maintenance of intracellular asparagine levels is critical for cancer cell growth. Collectively, our results indicate that asparagine is an important regulator of cancer cell amino acid homeostasis, anabolic metabolism and proliferation. PMID:27126896

  8. Combination of amino acids reduces pigmentation in B16F0 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masago; Kawase, Ichiro; Ishii, Fumio

    2007-04-01

    Amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, play significant roles in numerous physiological events in mammals. As the effects of amino acids on melanogenesis have yet to be demonstrated, the present study was conducted to identify whether amino acids, in particular alanine, glycine, isoleucine and leucine, influence melanogenesis in B16F0 melanoma cells. Glycine and L-isoleucine, but not D-isoleucine, reduced melanogenesis in a concentration-dependent manner without any morphological changes in B16F0 melanoma cells. L-Alanine and L-leucine, but not D-alanine and D-leucine, also reduced melanogenesis without any morphological changes in B16F0 melanoma cells. However these amino acids did not show a concentration-dependency. Combination of L-alanine and the other amino acids, particularly 4 amino acids combination, had an additive effect on the inhibition of melanogenesis compared with single treatment of L-alanine. None of the amino acids affected the activity of tyrosinase, a key enzyme in melanogenesis. These results suggest that L-alanine, glycine, L-isoleucine and L-leucine, but not the D-form amino acids, have a hypopigmenting effect in B16F0 melanoma cells, and that these effects are not due to the inhibition of tyrosinase activity. Combination of these 4 amino acids had the additive effect on hypopigmentation that was as similar as that of kojic acid. PMID:17409501

  9. Okadaic Acid Toxin at Sublethal Dose Produced Cell Proliferation in Gastric and Colon Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Miguel; Toledo, Héctor; Lagos, Néstor

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of Okadaic Acid (OA) on the proliferation of gastric and colon epithelial cells, the main target tissues of the toxin. We hypothesized that OA, at sublethal doses, activates multiple signaling pathways, such as Erk and Akt, through the inhibition of PP2A. To demonstrate this, we carried out curves of doses and time response against OA in AGS, MKN-45 and Caco 2 cell lines, and found an increase in the cell proliferation at sublethal doses, at 24 h or 48 h exposure. Indeed, cells can withstand high concentrations of the toxin at 4 h exposure, the time chosen considering the maximum time before total gastric emptying. We have proved that this increased proliferation is due to an overexpression of Cyclin B, a cyclin that promotes the passage from G2 to mitosis. In addition, we have demonstrated that OA induces activation of Akt and Erk in the three cells lines, showing that OA can activate pathways involved in oncogenesis. In conclusion, this study contributes to the knowledge about the possible effects of chronic OA consumption. PMID:24317467

  10. Ascorbic acid and colon cancer: an oxidative stimulus to cell death depending on cell profile.

    PubMed

    Pires, Ana Salomé; Marques, Cláudia Raquel; Encarnação, João Carlos; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Mamede, Ana Catarina; Laranjo, Mafalda; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela; Botelho, Maria Filomena

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major health problem worldwide with urgent need for new and effective anti-cancer approaches that allow treating, increasing survival and improving life quality of patients. At pharmacological concentrations, ascorbic acid (AA) exerts a selective cytotoxic effect, whose mechanism of cytotoxicity remains unsolved. It has been suggested that it depends on the production of extracellular hydrogen peroxide, using ascorbate radical as an intermediate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects induced by AA in three colon cancer cell lines, as well as, possible cell death mechanisms involved. Our results showed that pharmacological concentrations of AA induce anti-proliferative, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on three colon cancer cell lines under study. We also found that AA can induce cell death by an increment of oxidative stress, but also mediating a ROS-independent mechanism, as observed in LS1034 cells. This work explores AA anti-tumoral effects and highlights its applicability in the treatment of CC, underlying the importance of proceeding to clinical trials. PMID:27083410

  11. Protective Effects of Oleic Acid Against Palmitic Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic AR42J Cells and Its Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Joung Hoon; Kim, Min Hye; Kwon, Hyung Joo; Choi, Soo Young

    2013-01-01

    Palmitic acid (PAM), one of the most common saturated fatty acid (SFA) in animals and plants, has been shown to induce apoptosis in exocrine pancreatic AR42J cells. In this study, we investigated cellular mechanisms underlying protective effects of oleic acid (OLA) against the lipotoxic actions of PAM in AR42J cells. Exposure of cells to long-chain SFA induced apoptotic cell death determined by MTT cell viability assay and Hoechst staining. Co-treatment of OLA with PAM markedly protected cells against PAM-induced apoptosis. OLA significantly attenuated the PAM-induced increase in the levels of pro-apoptotic Bak protein, cleaved forms of apoptotic proteins (caspase-3, PARP). On the contrary, OLA restored the decreased levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1) in PAM-treated cells. OLA also induced up-regulation of the mRNA expression of Dgat2 and Cpt1 genes which are involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis and mitochondrial β-oxidation, respectively. Intracellular TAG accumulation was increased by OLA supplementation in accordance with enhanced expression of Dgat2 gene. These results indicate that restoration of anti-apoptotic/pro-apoptotic protein balance from apoptosis toward cell survival is involved in the cytoprotective effects of OLA against PAM-induced apoptosis in pancreatic AR42J cells. In addition, OLA-induced increase in TAG accumulation and up-regulation of Dgat2 and Cpt1 gene expressions may be possibly associated in part with the ability of OLA to protect cells from deleterious actions of PAM. PMID:23440052

  12. Potential Role of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on the Myogenic Program of Satellite Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Amritpal S.; Putman, Charles T.; Mazurak, Vera C.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle loss is associated with aging as well as pathological conditions. Satellite cells (SCs) play an important role in muscle regeneration. Omega-3 fatty acids are widely studied in a variety of muscle wasting diseases; however, little is known about their impact on skeletal muscle regeneration. The aim of this review is to evaluate studies examining the effect of omega-3 fatty acids, α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid on the regulation of SC proliferation and differentiation. This review highlights mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may modulate the myogenic program of the stem cell population within skeletal muscles and identifies considerations for future studies. It is proposed that minimally three myogenic transcriptional regulatory factors, paired box 7 (Pax7), myogenic differentiation 1 protein, and myogenin, should be measured to confirm the stage of SCs within the myogenic program affected by omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:26884682

  13. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Affect Electrolyte Transport in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells: Dependence on Cyclooxygenase and Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Nüsing, Rolf M.; Schweer, Horst; Fleming, Ingrid; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Wegmann, Markus

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) on ion transport in the polarized renal distal tubular cell line, MDCK C7. Of the four EET regioisomers (5,6-EET, 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, and 14,15-EET) studied, only apical, but not basolateral, application of 5,6-EET increased short circuit current (Isc) with kinetics similar to those of arachidonic acid. The ion transport was blocked by preincubation with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or with the chloride channel blocker NPPB. Further, both a Cl−-free bath solution and the Ca2+ antagonist verapamil blocked 5,6-EET-induced ion transport. Although the presence of the PGE2 receptors EP2, EP3, and EP4 was demonstrated, apically added PGE2 was ineffective and basolaterally added PGE2 caused a different kinetics in ion transport compared to 5,6-EET. Moreover, PGE2 sythesis in MDCK C7 cells was unaffected by 5,6-EET treatment. GC/MS/MS analysis of cell supernatants revealed the presence of the biologically inactive 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1 in 5,6-EET-treated cells, but not in control cells. Indomethacin suppressed the formation of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1. 5,6-epoxy-PGE1 the precursor of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1, caused a similar ion transport as 5,6-EET. Cytochrome P450 enzymes homolog to human CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2J2 protein were detected immunologically in the MDCK C7 cells. Our findings suggest that 5,6-EET affects Cl-transport in renal distal tubular cells independent of PGE2 but by a mechanism, dependent on its conversion to 5,6-epoxy-PGE1 by cyclooxygenase. We suggest a role for this P450 epoxygenase product in the regulation of electrolyte transport, especially as a saluretic compound acting from the luminal side of tubular cells in the mammalian kidney. PMID:17494091

  14. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids affect electrolyte transport in renal tubular epithelial cells: dependence on cyclooxygenase and cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Nüsing, Rolf M; Schweer, Horst; Fleming, Ingrid; Zeldin, Darryl C; Wegmann, Markus

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the effects of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) on ion transport in the polarized renal distal tubular cell line, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) C7. Of the four EET regioisomers (5,6-EET, 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, and 14,15-EET) studied, only apical, but not basolateral, application of 5,6-EET increased short-circuit current (I(sc)) with kinetics similar to those of arachidonic acid. The ion transport was blocked by preincubation with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or with the chloride channel blocker NPPB. Furthermore, both a Cl(-)-free bath solution and the Ca(2+) antagonist verapamil blocked 5,6-EET-induced ion transport. Although the presence of the PGE(2) receptors EP2, EP3, and EP4 was demonstrated, apically added PGE(2) was ineffective and basolaterally added PGE(2) caused a different kinetics in ion transport compared with 5,6-EET. Moreover, PGE(2) synthesis in MDCK C7 cells was unaffected by 5,6-EET treatment. GC/MS/MS analysis of cell supernatants revealed the presence of the biologically inactive 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE(1) in 5,6-EET-treated cells, but not in control cells. Indomethacin suppressed the formation of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE(1). 5,6-Epoxy-PGE(1), the precursor of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE(1), caused a similar ion transport as 5,6-EET. Cytochrome P-450 enzymes homolog to human CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2J2 protein were detected immunologically in the MDCK C7 cells. Our findings suggest that 5,6-EET affects Cl(-) transport in renal distal tubular cells independent of PGE(2) but by a mechanism, dependent on its conversion to 5,6-epoxy-PGE(1) by cyclooxygenase. We suggest a role for this P450 epoxygenase product in the regulation of electrolyte transport, especially as a saluretic compound acting from the luminal side of tubular cells in the mammalian kidney. PMID:17494091

  15. Dietary Phenolic Acids Act as Effective Antioxidants in Membrane Models and in Cultured Cells, Exhibiting Proapoptotic Effects in Leukaemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zambonin, Laura; Caliceti, Cristiana; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Fiorentini, Diana; Hrelia, Silvana; Landi, Laura; Prata, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Caffeic, syringic, and protocatechuic acids are phenolic acids derived directly from food intake or come from the gut metabolism of polyphenols. In this study, the antioxidant activity of these compounds was at first evaluated in membrane models, where caffeic acid behaved as a very effective chain-breaking antioxidant, whereas syringic and protocatechuic acids were only retardants of lipid peroxidation. However, all three compounds acted as good scavengers of reactive species in cultured cells subjected to exogenous oxidative stress produced by low level of H2O2. Many tumour cells are characterised by increased ROS levels compared with their noncancerous counterparts. Therefore, we investigated whether phenolic acids, at low concentrations, comparable to those present in human plasma, were able to decrease basal reactive species. Results show that phenolic acids reduced ROS in a leukaemia cell line (HEL), whereas no effect was observed in normal cells, such as HUVEC. The compounds exhibited no toxicity to normal cells while they decreased proliferation in leukaemia cells, inducing apoptosis. In the debate on optimal ROS-manipulating strategies in cancer therapy, our work in leukaemia cells supports the antioxidant ROS-depleting approach. PMID:22792417

  16. Induction of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 and fatty acid oxidation by retinoic acid in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Amengual, Jaume; Petrov, Petar; Bonet, M Luisa; Ribot, Joan; Palou, Andreu

    2012-11-01

    The vitamin A derivative retinoic acid (RA) is an important regulator of mammalian adiposity and lipid metabolism, primarily acting at the gene expression level through nuclear receptors of the RA receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) subfamilies. Here, we studied cell-autonomous effects of RA on fatty acid metabolism, particularly fatty acid oxidation, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Exposure to all-trans RA (ATRA) up-regulated the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT1-L) in HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and increased cellular oxidation rate of exogenously added radiolabeled palmitate. The effect of ATRA on gene expression of CPT1-L was: dependent on ongoing transcription, reproduced by both 9-cis RA and a pan-RXR agonist (but not a pan-RAR agonist) and abolished following RXRα partial siRNA-mediated silencing. CPT1-L gene expression was synergistically induced in HepG2 cells simultaneously exposed to ATRA and a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist. We conclude that ATRA treatment enhances fatty acid catabolism in hepatocytes through RXR-mediated mechanisms that likely involve the transactivation of the PPARα:RXR heterodimer. Knowledge of agents and nutrient-derivatives capable of enhancing substrate oxidation systemically and specifically in liver, and their mechanisms of action, may contribute to new avenues of prevention and treatment of fatty liver, obesity and other metabolic syndrome-related disorders. PMID:22871568

  17. GSH-dependent antioxidant defense contributes to the acclimation of colon cancer cells to acidic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minnan; Liu, Qiao; Gong, Yanchao; Xu, Xiuhua; Zhang, Chen; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Caibo; Guo, Haiyang; Zhang, Xiyu; Gong, Yaoqin; Shao, Changshun

    2016-04-17

    Due to increased glycolysis and poor local perfusion, solid tumors are usually immersed in an acidic microenvironment. While extracellular acidosis is cytotoxic, cancer cells eventually become acclimated to it. While previous studies have addressed the acute effect of acidosis on cancer cells, little is known about how cancer cells survive chronic acidosis. In this study we exposed colorectal cancer (CRC) cells (HCT15, HCT116 and LoVo) to acidic pH (pH 6.5) continuously for over three months and obtained CRC cells that become acclimated to acidic pH, designated as CRC-acidosis-acclimated or CRC-AA. We unexpectedly found that while acute exposure to low pH resulted in an increase in the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), CRC-AA cells exhibited a significantly reduced level of ROS when compared to ancestor cells. CRC-AA cells were found to maintain a higher level of reduced glutathione, via the upregulation of CD44 and glutathione reductase (GSR), among others, than their ancestor cells. Importantly, CRC-AA cells were more sensitive to agents that deplete GSH. Moreover, downregulation of GSR by RNA interference was more deleterious to CRC-AA cells than to control cells. Together, our results demonstrate a critical role of glutathione-dependent antioxidant defense in acclimation of CRC cells to acidic extracellular pH. PMID:26950675

  18. GSH-dependent antioxidant defense contributes to the acclimation of colon cancer cells to acidic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Minnan; Liu, Qiao; Gong, Yanchao; Xu, Xiuhua; Zhang, Chen; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Caibo; Guo, Haiyang; Zhang, Xiyu; Gong, Yaoqin; Shao, Changshun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Due to increased glycolysis and poor local perfusion, solid tumors are usually immersed in an acidic microenvironment. While extracellular acidosis is cytotoxic, cancer cells eventually become acclimated to it. While previous studies have addressed the acute effect of acidosis on cancer cells, little is known about how cancer cells survive chronic acidosis. In this study we exposed colorectal cancer (CRC) cells (HCT15, HCT116 and LoVo) to acidic pH (pH 6.5) continuously for over three months and obtained CRC cells that become acclimated to acidic pH, designated as CRC-acidosis-acclimated or CRC-AA. We unexpectedly found that while acute exposure to low pH resulted in an increase in the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), CRC-AA cells exhibited a significantly reduced level of ROS when compared to ancestor cells. CRC-AA cells were found to maintain a higher level of reduced glutathione, via the upregulation of CD44 and glutathione reductase (GSR), among others, than their ancestor cells. Importantly, CRC-AA cells were more sensitive to agents that deplete GSH. Moreover, downregulation of GSR by RNA interference was more deleterious to CRC-AA cells than to control cells. Together, our results demonstrate a critical role of glutathione-dependent antioxidant defense in acclimation of CRC cells to acidic extracellular pH. PMID:26950675

  19. Production of Cell Wall Hydrolyzing Enzymes by Barley Aleurone Layers in Response to Gibberellic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Taiz, Lincoln; Honigman, William A.

    1976-01-01

    The cell walls of barley (Hordeum vulgare var. Himalaya) aleurone layers undergo extensive degradation during the tissue's response to gibberellic acid. Previous work had shown that these cell walls consist almost entirely of arabinoxylan. In this study we show that gibberellic acid stimulates endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity in isolated aleurone layers. In addition, gibberellic acid enhances the activity of two glycosidases: β-xylopyranosidase and α-arabinofuranosidase. No gibberellic acid-stimulated cellulase activity was detected. Germination studies showed a similar pattern of enzyme development in intact seeds. Images PMID:16659683

  20. Valeric acid induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in CHO cell cultures and improves recombinant antibody productivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hyoung; Noh, Soo Min; Woo, Ju Rang; Kim, Jong Won; Lee, Gyun Min

    2016-03-01

    To find a more effective chemical reagent for improved monoclonal antibody (mAb) production, eight chemical reagents (curcumin, quercein, DL-sulforaphane, thymidine, valeric acid, phenyl butyrate, valproic acid, and lithium chloride) known to induce cell cycle arrest were examined individually as chemical additives to recombinant CHO (rCHO) cell cultures producing mAb. Among these chemical additives, valeric acid showed the best production performance. Valeric acid decreased specific growth rate (μ), but increased culture longevity and specific mAb productivity (qmAb ) in a dose-dependent manner. The beneficial effect of valeric acid on culture longevity and qmAb outweighed its detrimental effect on μ, resulting in 2.9-fold increase in the maximum mAb concentration when 1.5 mM valeric acid was added to the cultures. Furthermore, valeric acid did not negatively affect the mAb quality attributes with regard to aggregation, charge variation, and galactosylation. Unexpectedly, galactosylation of the mAb increased by the 1.5 mM valeric acid addition. Taken together, the results obtained here demonstrate that valeric acid is an effective chemical reagent to increase mAb production in rCHO cells. PMID:26663903

  1. Stearidonic acid, a plant-based dietary fatty acid, enhances the chemosensitivity of canine lymphoid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pondugula, Satyanarayana R; Ferniany, Glennie; Ashraf, Farah; Abbott, Kodye L; Smith, Bruce F; Coleman, Elaine S; Mansour, Mahmoud; Bird, R Curtis; Smith, Annette N; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Trivedi, Piyush; Tiwari, Amit K

    2015-05-15

    Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic tumor in dogs and humans, with similar pathogenesis and therapeutic responses. Anticancer drugs like vincristine (VCR) and doxorubicin (DOX) are often used in treating lymphoma. However, the cure rate is generally poor due to chemoresistance. Here, we sought to determine whether stearidonic acid (SDA), a plant-based dietary fatty acid, sensitizes chemoresistant canine lymphoid-tumor cells. GL-1 B-cell lymphoid-tumor cells were found to be highly sensitive to the antitumor-activity of VCR and DOX, while OSW T-cell and 17-71 B-cell lymphoid-tumor cells were moderately and fully resistant, respectively. SDA, at its non-toxic concentrations, significantly promoted the antitumor action of VCR and DOX in both OSW and 17-71 cells. SDA-mediated chemosensitization was associated with SDA inhibition of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function. This was confirmed in HEK293 cells stably expressing P-gp as well as by increased binding-affinity of SDA to P-gp in P-gp docking analysis. SDA at its chemosensitizing concentrations did not affect the viability of healthy dog peripheral blood mononuclear cells, suggesting that SDA is non-toxic to normal dog peripheral blood leucocytes at its chemosensitizing concentrations. Our study identifies a novel dietary fatty acid that may be used as a dietary supplement in combination with chemotherapy to promote the antitumor efficacy of the chemotherapy drugs in dogs and possibly in humans with chemoresistant lymphoma. PMID:25847597

  2. [Accumulation of porphyrins in cells of system of blood induced by 5-aminolaevulinic acid].

    PubMed

    Lobanok, E S; Vasilevich, I B; Vorobeĭ, A V

    2011-01-01

    The levels and rates of accumulation of porphyrins in lymphoid cells and bone marrow cells treated with exogenous 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) were studied. The dependence of the quantity of porphyrins accumulated in cell on ALA concentrations in the medium had maximum at 0.7-1.0 mM ALA for all the cell types studied (splenocytes, thymocytes, peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow cells). The rate of accumulation of uro-, copro- and protoporphyrins depended on cell types. The lowest and the highest levels were found in splenocytes and highest in bone marrow cells respectively. It is suggested that photodynamic therapy employing ALA is potentially dangerous for blood cells. PMID:21870605

  3. Redox control of retinoic acid receptor activity: a novel mechanism for retinoic acid resistance in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Demary, K; Wong, L; Liou, J S; Faller, D V; Spanjaard, R A

    2001-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) slows growth and induces differentiation of tumor cells through activation of RA receptors (RARs). However, melanoma cell lines display highly variable responsiveness to RA, which is a poorly understood phenomenon. By using Northern and Western blot analyses, we show that RA-resistant A375 and RA-responsive S91 melanoma cells express comparable levels of major components of RAR-signaling pathways. However, A375 cells have substantially higher intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels than S91 cells. Lowering ROS levels in A375 cells through hypoxic culture conditions restores RAR-dependent trans-activity, which could be further enhanced by addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. Hypoxia also enhances RAR activity in the moderately RA-responsive C32 cells, which have intermediate ROS levels. Conversely, increasing oxidative stress in highly RA-responsive S91 and B16 cells, which have low ROS levels, by treatment with H(2)O(2) impairs RAR activity. Consistent with these observations, RA more potently inhibited the proliferation of hypoxic A375 cells than that of normoxic cells. Oxidative states diminish, whereas reducing conditions enhance, DNA binding of retinoid X receptor/RAR heterodimers in vitro, providing a molecular basis for the observed inverse correlation between RAR activity and ROS levels. The redox state of melanoma cells provides a novel, epigenetic control mechanism of RAR activity and RA resistance. PMID:11356710

  4. The Comparative Performance of Batteries: The Lead-Acid and the Aluminum-Air Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeRoux, Xavier; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a teaching program that shows how electrochemical principles can be conveyed by means of hands-on experiences of student-centered teaching experiments. Employs the readily available lead-acid cell and the simple aluminum-air cell. Discusses the batteries, equilibrium cell potential, performance comparison, current, electrode separation,…

  5. Single-Cell Protein Production by the Acid-Tolerant Fungus Scytalidium acidophilum from Acid Hydrolysates of Waste Paper †

    PubMed Central

    Ivarson, K. C.; Morita, H.

    1982-01-01

    The bioconversion of waste paper to single-cell protein at pH <1 by Scytalidium acidophilum is described. Waste paper pretreated with 72% H2SO4 at 4°C was diluted with water to a pH of <0.1 and hydrolyzed. This yielded an adequate sugar-containing substrate for the growth of the fungus. A total of 97% of the sugars (glucose, galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose) in the hydrolysates were converted to cell biomass. Microbial contamination was not observed. Based on the sugars consumed, S. acidophilum produced higher yields in shake cultures than many other Fungi Imperfecti. In aerated cultures, productivity increased, and yields of 43 to 46% containing 44 to 47% crude protein were obtained. This compares favorably with Candida utilis, a yeast used commercially to produce single-cell protein. The chemical constituents and the essential amino acids of the fungal cells were similar to those of other fungi. The nucleic acid content was characteristic of microbes containing low levels of nucleic acid. The advantages of using S. acidophilum for single-cell protein production are discussed. PMID:16345970

  6. Inhibitory effects of rosemary extracts, carnosic acid and rosmarinic acid on the growth of various human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem; Sevimli, Canan; Bedir, Erdal; Vardar-Sukan, Fazilet

    2010-06-01

    The leaves of Rosmarinus officinalis harvested from three different locations of Turkey were extracted by both methanolic and supercritical CO(2) extraction. Subsequently, six extracts and the active compounds, carnosic acid, and rosmarinic acid were applied to various human cancer cell lines including NCI-H82 (human, small cell lung, carcinoma), DU-145 (human, prostate, carcinoma), Hep-3B (human, black, liver, carcinoma, hepatocellular), K-562 (human chronic myeloid leukemia), MCF-7 (human, breast, adenocarcinoma), PC-3 (human, prostate, adenocarcinoma) and MDA-MB-231 (human, breast, adenocarcinoma) by MTT assay. Supercritical CO(2) extracts had superior antiproliferative effect compared to the soxhlet extracts. Although the extracts exhibited various cytotoxic effects against different cell lines, comparatively low IC(50) values ranging between 12.50 and 47.55 microg/ml were attained against K-562, being the most sensitive cell line. Moreover, carnosic acid caused the lowest cell viability with values ranging from 13 to 30 % at a concentration of 19 muM after 48 h of treatments, resulting in superior antiproliferative effect. Rosemary extract is a potential candidate to be included in the anti-cancer diet with pre-determined doses avoiding toxicity. PMID:20449663

  7. Single-cell protein production by the acid-tolerant fungus Scytalidium acidophilum from acid hydrolysates of waste paper

    SciTech Connect

    Ivarson, K.C.; Morita, H.

    1982-03-01

    The bioconversion of waste paper to single-cell protein at pH less than 1 by Scytalidium acidophilum is described. Waste paper pretreated with 72% H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 4 degrees C was diluted with water to a pH of less than 0.1 and hydrolyzed. This yielded an adequate sugar-containing substrate for the growth of the fungus. A total of 97% of the sugars (glucose, galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose) in the hydrolysates were converted to cell biomass. Microbial contamination was not observed. Based on the sugars consumed, S. acidophilum produced higher yields in shake cultures than many other Fungi Imperfecti. In aerated cultures, productivity increased, and yields of 43 to 46% containing 44 to 47% crude protein were obtained. This compares favorably with Candida utilis, a yeast used commercially to produce single-cell protein. The chemical constituents and the essential amino acids of the fungal cells were similar to those of other fungi. The nucleic acid content was characteristic of microbes containing low levels of nucleic acid. The advantages of using S. acidophilum for single-cell protein production are discussed. (Refs. 30).

  8. Anti-inflammatory drugs and uterine cervical cancer cells: Antineoplastic effect of meclofenamic acid

    PubMed Central

    SORIANO-HERNANDEZ, ALEJANDRO D.; MADRIGAL-PÉREZ, DANIELA; GALVAN-SALAZAR, HECTOR R.; MARTINEZ-FIERRO, MARGARITA L.; VALDEZ-VELAZQUEZ, LAURA L.; ESPINOZA-GÓMEZ, FRANCISCO; VAZQUEZ-VUELVAS, OSCAR F.; OLMEDO-BUENROSTRO, BERTHA A.; GUZMAN-ESQUIVEL, JOSE; RODRIGUEZ-SANCHEZ, IRAM P.; LARA-ESQUEDA, AGUSTIN; MONTES-GALINDO, DANIEL A.; DELGADO-ENCISO, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer (UCC) is one of the main causes of cancer-associated mortality in women. Inflammation has been identified as an important component of this neoplasia; in this context, anti-inflammatory drugs represent possible prophylactic and/or therapeutic alternatives that require further investigation. Anti-inflammatory drugs are common and each one may exhibit a different antineoplastic effect. As a result, the present study investigated different anti-inflammatory models of UCC in vitro and in vivo. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, dexamethasone, meclofenamic acid, flufenamic acid and mefenamic acid were tested in UCC HeLa, VIPA, INBL and SiHa cell lines. The cytotoxicity of the drugs was evaluated in vitro. Celecoxib, sulindac, nimesulide, mefenamic acid and flufenamic acid presented with slight to moderate toxicity (10–40% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM) in certain cell lines, while meclofenamic acid exhibited significant cytotoxicity in all essayed cell lines (50–90% of cell death corresponding to 100 µM). The meclofenamic acid was tested in murine models (immunodeficient and immunocompetent) of UCC, which manifested a significant reduction in tumor growth and increased mouse survival. It was demonstrated that of the evaluated anti-inflammatory drugs, meclofenamic acid was the most cytotoxic, with a significant antitumor effect in murine models. Subsequent studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical utility of this drug. PMID:26622892

  9. Pantothenic acid and its derivatives protect Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Slyshenkov, V S; Rakowska, M; Moiseenok, A G; Wojtczak, L

    1995-12-01

    Preincubation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells at 22 or 32 degrees C, but not at 0 degree C, with pantothenic acid, 4'-phosphopantothenic acid, pantothenol, or pantethine reduced lipid peroxidation (measured by production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive compounds) induced by the Fenton reaction (Fe2+ + H2O2) and partly protected the plasma membrane against the leakiness to cytoplasmic proteins produced by the same reagent. Pantothenic acid and its derivatives did not inhibit (Fe2+ + H2O2)-induced peroxidation of phospholipid multilamellar vesicles, thus indicating that their effect on the cells was not due to the scavenging mechanism. Homopantothenic acid and its 4'-phosphate ester (which are not precursors of CoA) neither protected Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against lipid peroxidation nor prevented plasma membrane leakiness under the same conditions. Incubation of the cells with pantothenic acid, 4'-phosphopantothenic acid, pantothenol, or pantethine significantly increased the amount of cellular CoA and potentiated incorporation of added palmitate into phospholipids and cholesterol esters. It is concluded that pantothenic acid and its related compounds protect the plasma membrane of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells against the damage by oxygen free radicals due to increasing cellular level of CoA. The latter compound may act by diminishing propagation of lipid peroxidation and promoting repair mechanisms, mainly the synthesis of phospholipids. PMID:8582649

  10. Acid-induced autophagy protects human lung cancer cells from apoptosis by activating ER stress.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-Yue; Zhou, Xiang-Dong; Li, Qi; Chen, Ling-Xiu; Ran, Dan-Hua

    2015-12-10

    An acidic tumor microenvironment exists widely in solid tumors. However, the detailed mechanism of cell survival under acidic stress remains unclear. The aim of this study is to clarify whether acid-induced autophagy exists and to determine the function and mechanism of autophagy in lung cancer cells. We have found that acute low pH stimulated autophagy by increasing LC3-positive punctate vesicles, increasing LC3 II expression levels and reducing p62 protein levels. Additionally, autophagy was inhibited by the addition of Baf or knockdown of Beclin 1, and cell apoptosis was increased markedly. In mouse tumors, the expression of cleaved caspase3 and p62 was enhanced by oral treatment with sodium bicarbonate, which can raise the intratumoral pH. Furthermore, the protein levels of ER stress markers, including p-PERK, p-eIF2α, CHOP, XBP-1s and GRP78, were also increased in response to acidic pH. The antioxidant NAC, which reduces ROS accumulation, alleviated acid-mediated ER stress and autophagy, and knocking down GRP78 reduced autophagy activation under acidic conditions, which suggests that autophagy was induced by acidic pH through ER stress. Taken together, these results indicate that the acidic microenvironment in non-small cell lung cancer cells promotes autophagy by increasing ROS-ER stress, which serves as a survival adaption in this setting. PMID:26559141

  11. Omega 3 but not omega 6 fatty acids inhibit AP-1 activity and cell transformation in JB6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangming; Bibus, Douglas M.; Bode, Ann M.; Ma, Wei-Ya; Holman, Ralph T.; Dong, Zigang

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal-based investigations have indicated that the development of skin cancer is in part associated with poor dietary practices. Lipid content and subsequently the derived fatty acid composition of the diet are believed to play a major role in the development of tumorigenesis. Omega 3 (ω3) fatty acids, including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), can effectively reduce the risk of skin cancer whereas omega 6 (ω6) fatty acids such as arachidonic acid (AA) reportedly promote risk. To investigate the effects of fatty acids on tumorigenesis, we performed experiments to examine the effects of the ω3 fatty acids EPA and DHA and of the ω6 fatty acid AA on phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced or epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription activator protein 1 (AP-1) transactivation and on the subsequent cellular transformation in a mouse epidermal JB6 cell model. DHA treatment resulted in marked inhibition of TPA- and EGF-induced cell transformation by inhibiting AP-1 transactivation. EPA treatment also inhibited TPA-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation but had no effect on EGF-induced transformation. AA treatment had no effect on either TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation or transformation, but did abrogate the inhibitory effects of DHA on TPA- or EGF-induced AP-1 transactivation and cell transformation in a dose-dependent manner. The results of this study demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of ω3 fatty acids on tumorigenesis are more significant for DHA than for EPA and are related to an inhibition of AP-1. Similarly, because AA abrogates the beneficial effects of DHA, the dietary ratio of ω6 to ω3 fatty acids may be a significant factor in mediating tumor development. PMID:11416221

  12. Release of endothelial cell lipoprotein lipase by plasma lipoproteins and free fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, U.; Witte, L.D.; Goldberg, I.J.

    1989-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) bound to the lumenal surface of vascular endothelial cells is responsible for the hydrolysis of triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins. Studies were performed to investigate whether human plasma lipoproteins and/or free fatty acids would release LPL which was bound to endothelial cells. Purified bovine milk LPL was incubated with cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells resulting in the association of enzyme activity with the cells. When the cells were then incubated with media containing chylomicrons or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), a concentration-dependent decrease in the cell-associated LPL enzymatic activity was observed. In contrast, incubation with media containing low density lipoproteins or high density lipoproteins produced a much smaller decrease in the cell-associated enzymatic activity. The addition of increasing molar ratios of oleic acid:bovine serum albumin to the media also reduced enzyme activity associated with the endothelial cells. To determine whether the decrease in LPL activity was due to release of the enzyme from the cells or inactivation of the enzyme, studies were performed utilizing radioiodinated bovine LPL. Radiolabeled LPL protein was released from endothelial cells by chylomicrons, VLDL, and by free fatty acids (i.e. oleic acid bound to bovine serum albumin). The release of radiolabeled LPL by VLDL correlated with the generation of free fatty acids from the hydrolysis of VLDL triglyceride by LPL bound to the cells. Inhibition of LPL enzymatic activity by use of a specific monoclonal antibody, reduced the extent of release of /sup 125/I-LPL from the endothelial cells by the added VLDL. These results demonstrated that LPL enzymatic activity and protein were removed from endothelial cells by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons and VLDL) and oleic acid.

  13. Mechanisms for stimulation of rat anterior pituitary cells by arginine and other amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos, C; Núñez, L; García-Sancho, J

    1997-01-01

    1. Arginine and other amino acids are secretagogues for growth hormone and prolactin in the intact animal, but the mechanism of action is unclear. We have studied the effects of amino acids on cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in single rat anterior pituitary (AP) cells. Arginine elicited a large increase of [Ca2+]i) in about 40% of all the AP cells, suggesting that amino acids may modulate hormone secretion by acting directly on the pituitary. 2. Cell typing by immunofluorescence of the hormone the cells store showed that the arginine-sensitive cells are distributed uniformly within all the five AP cell types. The arginine-sensitive cells overlapped closely with the subpopulation of cells sensitive to thyrotrophin-releasing hormone. 3. Other cationic as well as several neutral (dipolar) amino acids had the same effect as arginine. The increase of [Ca2+]i was dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and blocked by dihydropyridine, suggesting that it is due to Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The [Ca2+]i increase was also blocked by removal of extracellular Na+ but not by tetrodotoxin. The substrate specificity for stimulation of AP cells resembled closely that of the amino acid transport system B0+. We propose that electrogenic amino acid influx through this pathway depolarizes the plasma membrane with the subsequent activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ entry. 4. Amino acids also stimulated prolactin secretion in vitro with a similar substrate specificity to that found for the [Ca2+]i increase. Existing data on the stimulation of secretion of other hormones by amino acids suggest that a similar mechanism could apply to other endocrine glands. PMID:9263921

  14. A review on synthesis and characterization of solid acid materials for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Norsyahida; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Loh, Kee Shyuan

    2016-08-01

    Solid acids emerged as an electrolyte material for application in fuel cells due to their high protonic conductivity and stability at high temperatures between 100 °C and 250 °C. This paper gives an overview of the different solid acid materials and their properties, such as high protonic conductivity and thermal stability, in relation to phase transitions and mechanisms of proton transport. Various solid acid synthesis methods including aqueous and dry mixing, electrospinning, sol-gel, impregnation and thin-film casting will be discussed, and the impact of synthesis methods on the properties of solid acids will be highlighted. The properties of solid acids synthesized as either single crystals and or polycrystalline powders were identified via X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, thermal analyses, optical microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. A selection of electrolyte-electrode assembly methods and the performance of solid acid fuel cell prototypes are also reviewed.

  15. Recent advances in lead-acid cell research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.

    1980-01-01

    During the last decade it was demonstate that the lead-acid system is capable of proving an attractive energy source of sufficient energy and power per unit weight and volume which allows its sucessful application for electric vehicle propulsion. This is shown by a number of typical examples, such as the relationship between active material properties and capacity at high rates of discharge the effect of acid stratification and others. Simultaneously, the expenditure for the maintenance of lead-acid batteries was minimized by the development of peripheric equipment, as there are means for central-automatic water refill and recombination devices. It is shown that there is still a considerable potential for further improvement which might again strengthen the unique position of the lead-acid system in the market in comparison to competitive systems.

  16. Electrogenic responses induced by neutral amino acids in endoderm cells from Xenopus embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, C; Bergman, J

    1981-01-01

    1. Membrane potential measurements were carried out on endoderm cells from early Xenopus embryos in order to study neutral amino acid transport in non-excitable cells. 2. The electrical properties of the cell membrane were studied under normal conditions, then in the presence of various Na/K-pump inhibitors and at different Na, K and Cl concentrations in Ringer solution. Blockade of the Na/K-pump by ouabain, Li, cooling to 10 degrees C or low [Na]0 induces similar depolarizations of about 40 mV. 3. External application of various neutral L-amino acids induces reversible membrane depolarizations. The D-isomeric forms are found to be ineffective. The amino acid induced depolarizations are not accompanied by changes in membrane resistance. They do not show voltage dependence for potential changes of less than 40 mV. 4. The amino acid depolarization increases with increasing concentration and follows first order Michaëlian kinetics. Both the size and the time course of the amino acid depolarization depend on [Na]0. Increasing [Na]0 markedly increases the apparent affinity of the membrane receptor for amino acid. 5. Increasing [k]0 reduces the size of the amino acid response. Short exposures to either ouabain or Li do not alter the amino acid depolarization. However, p time course of the amino acid depolarization depend on [Na]0. Increasing [Na]0 markedly increases the apparent affinity of the membrane receptor for amino acid. 5. Increasing [k]0 reduces the size of the amino acid response. Short exposures to either ouabain or Li do not alter the amino acid depolarization. However, p time course of the amino acid depolarization depend on [Na]0. Increasing [Na]0 markedly increases the apparent affinity of the membrane receptor for amino acid. 5. Increasing [k]0 reduces the size of the amino acid response. Short exposures to either ouabain or Li do not alter the amino acid depolarization. However, prolonged exposure to pump inhibitors or marked alteration of the Na

  17. Acetic acid suppresses the increase in disaccharidase activity that occurs during culture of caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Satsu, H; Watanabe, H; Fukaya, M; Tsukamoto, Y; Miyamoto, Y; Shimizu, M

    2000-03-01

    To understand how blood glucose level is lowered by oral administration of vinegar, we examined effects of acetic acid on glucose transport and disaccharidase activity in Caco-2 cells. Cells were cultured for 15 d in a medium containing 5 mmol/L of acetic acid. This chronic treatment did not affect cell growth or viability, and furthermore, apoptotic cell death was not observed. Glucose transport, evaluated with a nonmetabolizable substrate, 3-O-methyl glucose, also was not affected. However, the increase of sucrase activity observed in control cells (no acetic acid) was significantly suppressed by acetic acid (P < 0.01). Acetic acid suppressed sucrase activity in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Similar treatments (5 mmol/L and 15 d) with other organic acids such as citric, succinic, L-maric, L-lactic, L-tartaric and itaconic acids, did not suppress the increase in sucrase activity. Acetic acid treatment (5 mmol/L and 15 d) significantly decreased the activities of disaccharidases (sucrase, maltase, trehalase and lactase) and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme, whereas the activities of other hydrolases (alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase-N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase) were not affected. To understand mechanisms underlying the suppression of disaccharidase activity by acetic acid, Northern and Western analyses of the sucrase-isomaltase complex were performed. Acetic acid did not affect the de novo synthesis of this complex at either the transcriptional or translational levels. The antihyperglycemic effect of acetic acid may be partially due to the suppression of disaccharidase activity. This suppression seems to occur during the post-translational processing. PMID:10702577

  18. Plasmonic coupling of dual gold nanoprobes for SERS imaging of sialic acids on living cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Wanyao; Ding, Lin; Chen, Yunlong; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-08-23

    This work reports a benzoic group functionalized gold nanoflower as a bridge probe for both recognition of target sialic acids and assembly of poly(N-acetylneuraminic acid) modified gold nanoparticles, which leads to plasmonic coupling of two kinds of gold nanoprobes in a single-core-multi-satellite nanostructure to produce a sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal for the imaging of sialic acids on living cells. PMID:27500291

  19. Fatty acids and glucose increase neutral endopeptidase activity in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muangman, Pornprom; Spenny, Michelle L; Tamura, Richard N; Gibran, Nicole S

    2003-06-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (NEP), a membrane-bound metallopeptidase enzyme that degrades neuropeptides, bradykinin, atrial natriuretic factor, enkephalins, and endothelin may regulate response to injury. We have previously demonstrated increased NEP localization and enzyme activity in diabetic wounds and skin compared with normal controls. We hypothesized that hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus may induce excessive NEP activity and thereby diminish normal response to injury. Human microvascular endothelial cells were treated with five different fatty acids (40 microM) with varying degrees of saturation, including oleic acid, linoleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, and linolenic acid and/or glucose (40 mM) for 48 h. The effect of the antioxidative agents vitamin E and C on NEP enzyme activation was determined by treating the cultured cells with alpha-tocopherol succinate and/or L-ascorbic acid. Cell membrane preparations were assayed for NEP activity by incubation with glutaryl-Ala-Ala-Phe-4-methoxy-beta naphthylamide to generate a fluorescent degradation product methoxy 2 naphthylamine. High glucose or fatty acid concentration upregulated NEP activity. The highest NEP activity was observed with combined elevated glucose, linoleic acid, and oleic acid (P < 0.05). Antioxidant vitamin E and C treatment significantly reduced NEP enzyme activity after fatty acid exposure (P < 0.05). Thus, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus may increase endothelial cell NEP activity and thereby decrease early pro-inflammatory responses. The modulator effect of vitamin E and C on NEP membrane enzyme activity after exposure to fatty acid stimulation suggests that lipid oxidation may activate NEP. PMID:12785004

  20. Depletion of arachidonic acid from GH3 cells. Effects on inositol phospholipid turnover and cellular activation.

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, D T; Macfarlane, D E; Spector, A A

    1987-01-01

    We have adapted rat pituitary GH3 cells to grow in delipidated culture medium. In response, esterfied linoleic acid and arachidonic acid become essentially undetectable, whereas eicosa-5,8,11-trienoic acid accumulates and oleic acid increases markedly. These changes occur in all phospholipid classes, but are particularly pronounced in inositol phospholipids, where the usual stearate/arachidonate profile is replaced with oleate/eicosatrienoate (n - 9) and stearate/eicosatrienoate (n - 9). Incubation of arachidonate-depleted cells with 10 microM-arachidonic acid for only 24 h results in extensive remodelling of phospholipid fatty acids, such that close-to-normal compositions and arachidonic acid content are achieved for the inositol phospholipids. In comparison studies with arachidonic acid-depleted or -repleted cells, it was found that the arachidonate content does not affect thyrotropin-releasing-hormone (TRH)-stimulated responses measured at long time points, including [32P]Pi labelling of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid, stimulation of protein phosphorylation, and basal or TRH-stimulated prolactin release. However, transient events such as stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids and an initial rise in diacylglycerol are enhanced by the presence of arachidonate. These results show that arachidonic acid itself is not required for operation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle and is not an obligatory intermediate in TRH-mediated GH3 cell activation. It is possible that any structural or functional role of arachidonic acid in these processes is largely met by replacement with eicosatrienoate (n - 9). However, since arachidonate in inositol phospholipids facilitates their hydrolysis upon stimulation by TRH, arachidonic acid apparently may have a specific role in the recognition of these lipids by phospholipase C. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3120699

  1. Proteomic Investigation into Betulinic Acid-Induced Apoptosis of Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway. PMID:25148076

  2. Loss of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 leads to impaired islet mass and beta cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Stephanie R.; Priyadarshini, Medha; Fuller, Miles H.; Bhardwaj, Tanya; Brodsky, Michael R.; Angueira, Anthony R.; Mosser, Rockann E.; Carboneau, Bethany A.; Tersey, Sarah A.; Mancebo, Helena; Gilchrist, Annette; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.; Gannon, Maureen; Layden, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of pancreatic β cell mass is a critical factor to help maintain normoglycemia during insulin resistance. Nutrient-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) contribute to aspects of β cell function, including regulation of β cell mass. Nutrients such as free fatty acids (FFAs) contribute to precise regulation of β cell mass by signaling through cognate GPCRs, and considerable evidence suggests that circulating FFAs promote β cell expansion by direct and indirect mechanisms. Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFA2) is a β cell-expressed GPCR that is activated by short chain fatty acids, particularly acetate. Recent studies of FFA2 suggest that it may act as a regulator of β cell function. Here, we set out to explore what role FFA2 may play in regulation of β cell mass. Interestingly, Ffar2−/− mice exhibit diminished β cell mass at birth and throughout adulthood, and increased β cell death at adolescent time points, suggesting a role for FFA2 in establishment and maintenance of β cell mass. Additionally, activation of FFA2 with Gαq/11-biased agonists substantially increased β cell proliferation in in vitro and ex vivo proliferation assays. Collectively, these data suggest that FFA2 may be a novel therapeutic target to stimulate β cell growth and proliferation. PMID:27324831

  3. Loss of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 leads to impaired islet mass and beta cell survival.

    PubMed

    Villa, Stephanie R; Priyadarshini, Medha; Fuller, Miles H; Bhardwaj, Tanya; Brodsky, Michael R; Angueira, Anthony R; Mosser, Rockann E; Carboneau, Bethany A; Tersey, Sarah A; Mancebo, Helena; Gilchrist, Annette; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Gannon, Maureen; Layden, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of pancreatic β cell mass is a critical factor to help maintain normoglycemia during insulin resistance. Nutrient-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) contribute to aspects of β cell function, including regulation of β cell mass. Nutrients such as free fatty acids (FFAs) contribute to precise regulation of β cell mass by signaling through cognate GPCRs, and considerable evidence suggests that circulating FFAs promote β cell expansion by direct and indirect mechanisms. Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFA2) is a β cell-expressed GPCR that is activated by short chain fatty acids, particularly acetate. Recent studies of FFA2 suggest that it may act as a regulator of β cell function. Here, we set out to explore what role FFA2 may play in regulation of β cell mass. Interestingly, Ffar2(-/-) mice exhibit diminished β cell mass at birth and throughout adulthood, and increased β cell death at adolescent time points, suggesting a role for FFA2 in establishment and maintenance of β cell mass. Additionally, activation of FFA2 with Gαq/11-biased agonists substantially increased β cell proliferation in in vitro and ex vivo proliferation assays. Collectively, these data suggest that FFA2 may be a novel therapeutic target to stimulate β cell growth and proliferation. PMID:27324831

  4. Red blood cell fatty acid composition and the metabolic syndrome: NHLBI GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different fatty acids may vary in their effect on the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We tested whether fatty acid classes measured in red blood cells (RBC) are associated with the MetS or its components. Included were men (n=497, 49+/-16 y) and women (n=539, 48+/-16 y) from 187 families in the Genetics ...

  5. Pinolenic Acid Downregulates Lipid Anabolic Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Ron; Han, Sung Nim

    2016-07-01

    Pine nut oil (PNO) was reported to reduce lipid accumulation in the liver. However, the specific effect of pinolenic acid (18:3, all-cis-Δ5,9,12), a unique component of PNO, on lipid metabolism has not been studied. We hypothesized that pinolenic acid downregulates the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells were incubated in serum-free medium supplemented with 50 μM bovine serum albumin (BSA), palmitic acid, oleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, pinolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or α-linolenic acid for 24 h. Lipid accumulation was determined by Oil Red O (ORO) staining. The mRNA levels of genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis (SREBP1c, FAS, SCD1, and ACC1), fatty acid oxidation (ACC2, PPARα, CPT1A, and ACADL), cholesterol synthesis (SREBP2 and HMGCR), and lipoprotein uptake (LDLr) and of genes that may be involved in the downregulation of the lipogenic pathway (ACSL3, ACSL4, and ACSL5) were determined by qPCR. LDLR protein levels were measured by Western blot analysis. The mRNA levels of SREBP1c, FAS, and SCD1 were significantly downregulated by pinolenic acid treatment compared to BSA control (53, 54, and 38 % lower, respectively). In addition, the mRNA levels of HMGCR, ACSL3, and LDLr were significantly lower (30, 30, and 43 % lower, respectively), and ACSL4 tended to be lower in the pinolenic acid group (20 % lower, P = 0.082) relative to the control group. In conclusion, pinolenic acid downregulated the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells by reducing expression of genes related to lipid synthesis, lipoprotein uptake, and the regulation of the lipogenic pathway. PMID:27084371

  6. Human Gastric Epithelial Cells Contribute to Gastric Immune Regulation by Providing Retinoic Acid to Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bimczok, Diane; Kao, John Y.; Zhang, Min; Cochrun, Steven; Mannon, Peter; Peter, Shajan; Wilcox, Charles M.; Mönkemüller, Klaus E.; Harris, Paul R.; Grams, Jayleen M.; Stahl, Richard D.; Smith, Phillip D.; Smythies, Lesley E.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of chronic gastritis caused by H. pylori, the gastric mucosa has received little investigative attention as a unique immune environment. Here, we analyzed whether retinoic acid (RA), an important homeostatic factor in the small intestinal mucosa, also contributes to gastric immune regulation. We report that human gastric tissue contains high levels of the RA precursor molecule, retinol, and that gastric epithelial cells express both RA biosynthesis genes and RA response genes, indicative of active RA biosynthesis. Moreover, primary gastric epithelial cells cultured in the presence of retinol synthesized RA in vitro and induced RA biosynthesis in co-cultured monocytes through an RA-dependent mechanism, suggesting that gastric epithelial cells may also confer the ability to generate RA on gastric DCs. Indeed, DCs purified from gastric mucosa had similar levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and RA biosynthesis gene expression as small intestinal DCs, although gastric DCs lacked CD103. In H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa, gastric RA biosynthesis gene expression was severely disrupted, which may lead to reduced RA signaling and thus contribute to disease progression. Collectively, our results support a critical role for RA in human gastric immune regulation. PMID:25249167

  7. Retinoic acid, local cell-cell interactions, and pattern formation in vertebrate limbs.

    PubMed

    Bryant, S V; Gardiner, D M

    1992-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a derivative of vitamin A, has remarkable effects on developing and regenerating limbs. These effects include teratogenesis, arising from RA's ability to inhibit growth and pattern formation. They also include pattern duplication, arising as a result of the stimulation of additional growth and pattern formation. In this review we present evidence that the diverse effects of RA are consistent with a singular, underlying explanation. We propose that in all cases exogenously applied RA causes the positional information of pattern formation-competent cells to be reset to a value that is posterior-ventral-proximal with respect to the limb. The diversity of outcomes can be seen as a product of the mode of application of exogenous RA (global versus local) coupled with the unifying concept that growth and pattern formation in both limb development and limb regeneration are controlled by local cell-cell interactions, as formulated in the polar coordinate model. We explore the possibility that the major role of endogenous RA in limb development is in the establishment of the limb field rather than as a diffusible morphogen that specifies graded positional information across the limb as previously proposed. Finally, we interpret the results of the recent finding that RA can turn tail regenerates into limbs, as evidence that intercalary interactions may also be involved in the formation of the primary body axis. PMID:1628749

  8. Listeria monocytogenes wall teichoic acid decoration in virulence and cell-to-cell spread.

    PubMed

    Spears, Patricia A; Havell, Edward A; Hamrick, Terri S; Goforth, John B; Levine, Alexandra L; Abraham, S Thomas; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Orndorff, Paul E

    2016-09-01

    Wall teichoic acid (WTA) comprises a class of glycopolymers covalently attached to the peptidoglycan of gram positive bacteria. In Listeria monocytogenes, mutations that prevent addition of certain WTA decorating sugars are attenuating. However, the steps required for decoration and the pathogenic process interrupted are not well described. We systematically examined the requirement for WTA galactosylation in a mouse oral-virulent strain by first creating mutations in four genes whose products conferred resistance to a WTA-binding bacteriophage. WTA biochemical and structural studies indicated that galactosylated WTA was directly required for bacteriophage adsorption and that mutant WTA lacked appreciable galactose in all except one mutant - which retained a level ca. 7% of the parent. All mutants were profoundly attenuated in orally infected mice and were impaired in cell-to-cell spread in vitro. Confocal microscopy of cytosolic mutants revealed that all expressed ActA on their cell surface and formed actin tails with a frequency similar to the parent. However, the mutant tails were significantly shorter - suggesting a defect in actin based motility. Roles for the gene products in WTA galactosylation are proposed. Identification and interruption of WTA decoration pathways may provide a general strategy to discover non-antibiotic therapeutics for gram positive infections. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26871418

  9. Biosynthesis of medium-chain fatty acids by mammary epithelial cells from virgin rats.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S; Pasco, D; Nandi, S

    1983-01-01

    Epithelial cells were isolated from the undifferentiated mammary glands of mature virgin female rats, and their lipogenic characteristics were studied. These cells synthesized predominantly medium-chain fatty acids, albeit at a low rate. In contrast, whole tissue from mammary glands of virgin rats synthesized predominantly long-chain fatty acids at a relatively higher rate, indicating that the lipogenic activity is dominated by the adipocyte component of the gland. Enzyme assays revealed that thioesterase II, the enzyme which regulates production of medium-chain fatty acids by the fatty acid synthetase, was present at a high activity in the undifferentiated mammary epithelial cells of virgin rats. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed this observation and showed that the regulatory enzyme was present exclusively in the epithelial cells lining the alveolar and ductal elements of the undifferentiated gland. This study demonstrates that the potential to elaborate tissue-specific medium-chain fatty acids is already expressed in the undifferentiated tissue of virgin rats and is not acquired as a result of the differentiation associated with the lactogenic phase of development. In this species mammary epithelial cells apparently synthesize predominantly medium-chain fatty acids at all stages of development, and only the overall rate of synthesis is increased on induction of the fatty acid synthetase during lactogenesis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6409098

  10. Cytotoxic activity of an octadecenoic acid extract from Euphorbia kansui (Euphorbiaceae) on human tumour cell strains.

    PubMed

    Yu, Farong; Lu, Shunqing; Yu, Fahong; Shi, Junnian; McGuire, Peter M; Wang, Rui

    2008-02-01

    We have investigated the cytotoxic and antitumour activity of an octadecenoic acid extract, mainly containing oleic and linoleic acids, from Euphorbia kansui on human gastric (SGC-7901), hepatocellular carcinoma (BEL-7402), and leukaemia (HL-60) tumour cell strains. Significant and dose-dependent antiproliferation effects were observed on tumour cells from the dose of 3.2 microg mL(-1), which were comparable with or better than those of the common antitumour agent 5-fluorouracil. Results from the clone formation assay and flow cytometry indicated that the mixture of octadecenoic acids resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the number of tumour cells and significantly inhibited cell proliferation, with induced apoptosis and G(0)/G(1) phase cell cycle arrest. Also, the octadecenoic acids could not only cause cell apoptosis/necrosis but also functionally and structurally damage the tumour cell membrane and cell ultra-structures. These observations encourage further clinical evaluation of the inhibitory effects of octadecenoic acids on various forms of cancer. PMID:18237474

  11. Inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism decreases tumor cell invasion and matrix metalloproteinase expression.

    PubMed

    Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Monthanapisut, Paopanga; Saensuk, Theeranuch

    2010-11-01

    Head and neck cancers are known to synthesize arachidonic acid metabolites. Interfering with arachidonic acid metabolism may inhibit growth and invasiveness of cancer cells. In this study we investigate effects of sulindac (the non-selective COX inhibitor), aspirin (the irreversible, preferential COX-1 inhibitor), NS-398 (the selective COX-2 inhibitor), NDGA (nordihydroguaiaretic acid, the selective LOX inhibitor) and ETYA (5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, the COX and LOX inhibitor) on cell viability, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities, and in vitro invasion of cancer cells derived from primary and metastatic head and neck, and colon cancers. The inhibitors of COX and/or LOX could inhibit cell proliferation, MMP activity and invasion in head and neck and colon cancer cells. However, the inhibitory effect was obviously observed in colon cancer cells. Inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism caused a decrease in cancer cell motility, which partially explained by the inhibition of MMPs. Therefore, COX and LOX pathways play important roles in head and neck cancer cell growth. PMID:20654727

  12. Degradation of h-acid by free and immobilized cells of Alcaligenes latus

    PubMed Central

    Usha, M.S.; Sanjay, M.K.; Gaddad, S.M.; Shivannavar, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Alcaligenes latus, isolated from industrial effluent, was able to grow in mineral salts medium with 50 ppm (0.15 mM) of H-acid as a sole source of carbon. Immobilization of Alcaligenes latus in Ca-alginate and polyurethane foam resulted in cells embedded in the matrices. When free cells and immobilized cells were used for biodegradation studies at concentration ranging from 100 ppm (0.3 mM) to 500 ppm (1.15 mM) degradation rate was enhanced with immobilized cells. Cells immobilized in polyurethane foam showed 100% degradation up to 350 ppm (1.05 mM) and 57% degradation at 500 ppm (1.5 mM). Degradation rate of Ca-alginate immobilized cells was less as compared to that of polyurethane foam immobilized cells. With Ca-alginate immobilized cells 100% degradation was recorded up to 200 ppm (0.6 mM) of H-acid and only 33% degradation was recorded at 500 ppm (1.5 mM) of H-acid. Spectral analysis of the products after H-acid utilization showed that the spent medium did not contain any aromatic compounds indicating H-acid degradation by A. latus. PMID:24031573

  13. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) for quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hoedt, Esthelle; Zhang, Guoan; Neubert, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) is a powerful approach for high-throughput quantitative proteomics. SILAC allows highly accurate protein quantitation through metabolic encoding of whole cell proteomes using stable isotope labeled amino acids. Since its introduction in 2002, SILAC has become increasingly popular. In this chapter we review the methodology and application of SILAC, with an emphasis on three research areas: dynamics of posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and protein turnover. PMID:24952180

  14. Measurement of Fatty Acid Oxidation Rates in Animal Tissues and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Frank K.; Green, Michelle F.; Koves, Timothy R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    While much oncological research has focused on metabolic shifts in glucose and amino acid oxidation, recent evidence suggests that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) may also play an important role in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells. Here, we present a simple method for measuring FAO rates using radiolabeled palmitate, common laboratory reagents, and standard supplies. This protocol is broadly applicable for measuring FAO rates in cultured cancer cells as well as in both malignant and nontransformed animal tissues. PMID:24862277

  15. Autophagy Is a Protective Mechanism for Human Melanoma Cells under Acidic Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Maria Lucia; Pellegrini, Paola; Di Lernia, Giuseppe; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; Brnjic, Slavica; Zhang, Xiaonan; Hägg, Maria; Linder, Stig; Fais, Stefano; Codogno, Patrice; De Milito, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic hypoxia and alterations in oncogenic signaling contribute to switch cancer cell metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. A major consequence of up-regulated glycolysis is the increased production of metabolic acids responsible for the presence of acidic areas within solid tumors. Tumor acidosis is an important determinant of tumor progression and tumor pH regulation is being investigated as a therapeutic target. Autophagy is a cellular catabolic pathway leading to lysosomal degradation and recycling of proteins and organelles, currently considered an important survival mechanism in cancer cells under metabolic stress or subjected to chemotherapy. We investigated the response of human melanoma cells cultured in acidic conditions in terms of survival and autophagy regulation. Melanoma cells exposed to acidic culture conditions (7.0 < pH < 6.2) promptly accumulated LC3+ autophagic vesicles. Immunoblot analysis showed a consistent increase of LC3-II in acidic culture conditions as compared with cells at normal pH. Inhibition of lysosomal acidification by bafilomycin A1 further increased LC3-II accumulation, suggesting an active autophagic flux in cells under acidic stress. Acute exposure to acidic stress induced rapid inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway detected by decreased phosphorylation of p70S6K and increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase, associated with decreased ATP content and reduced glucose and leucine uptake. Inhibition of autophagy by knockdown of the autophagic gene ATG5 consistently reduced melanoma cell survival in low pH conditions. These observations indicate that induction of autophagy may represent an adaptation mechanism for cancer cells exposed to an acidic environment. Our data strengthen the validity of therapeutic strategies targeting tumor pH regulation and autophagy in progressive malignancies. PMID:22761435

  16. Single-Plasmid-Based System for Efficient Noncanonical Amino Acid Mutagenesis in Cultured Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sarit; Arbely, Eyal

    2016-06-01

    We describe a new expression system for efficient non-canonical amino acid mutagenesis in cultured mammalian cells by using the pyrrolysine tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA (Pyl) pair. A significant improvement in the incorporation of non-canonical amino acids into proteins was obtained by combining all the required genetic components into a single and compact vector that can be efficiently delivered to different mammalian cell lines by conventional transfection reagents. PMID:27120490

  17. Aspergillus oryzae-based cell factory for direct kojic acid production from cellulose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kojic acid (5-Hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) is one of the major secondary metabolites in Aspergillus oryzae. It is widely used in food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. The production cost, however, is too high for its use in many applications. Thus, an efficient and cost-effective kojic acid production process would be valuable. However, little is known about the complete set of genes for kojic acid production. Currently, kojic acid is produced from glucose. The efficient production of kojic acid using cellulose as an inexpensive substrate would help establish cost-effective kojic acid production. Results A kojic acid transcription factor gene over-expressing the A. oryzae strain was constructed. Three genes related to kojic acid production in this strain were transcribed in higher amounts than those found in the wild-type strain. This strain produced 26.4 g/L kojic acid from 80 g/L glucose. Furthermore, this strain was transformed with plasmid harboring 3 cellulase genes. The resultant A. oryzae strain successfully produced 0.18 g/L of kojic acid in 6 days of fermentation from the phosphoric acid swollen cellulose. Conclusions Kojic acid was produced directly from cellulose material using genetically engineered A. oryzae. Because A. oryzae has efficient protein secretion ability and secondary metabolite productivity, an A. oryzae-based cell factory could be a platform for the production of various kinds of bio-based chemicals. PMID:24885968

  18. Synthesis of milk specific fatty acids and proteins by dispersed goat mammary-gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, H O; Tornehave, D; Knudsen, J

    1986-01-01

    The method now described for preparation of dispersed lactating goat mammary-gland cells gives a high yield of morphologically and functionally normal mammary cells. The cells synthesize specific goat milk fatty acids in the right proportions, and they respond to hormones by increased protein synthesis. The cells can be frozen and thawed without losing the above properties, which makes them an excellent tool for metabolic and hormonal studies. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3800930

  19. Recent advances in lead-acid cell research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.

    1980-01-01

    The lead-acid battery still is and will be for the foreseeable future the most widely used secondary energy storage system. It will maintain this predominant role because of its highly developed technology, its low costs as compared to other secondary systems and its high reliability. During the last decade it has been demonstrated that the lead-acid system is capable of providing an attractive energy source of sufficient energy and power per unit weight and volume which allows its successful application for electric vehicle propulsion. Basic research has contributed in a worldwide effort to the improvement of active material utilization and cycle life as well. This is shown by a number of typical examples, such as the relationship between active material properties and capacity at high rates of discharge, the effect of acid stratification and others. Simultaneously, the expenditure for the maintenance of lead-acid batteries has been minimized by the development of peripheric equipment, as there are means for central-automatic water refill and recombination devices. It is shown that there is still a considerable potential for further improvement which might again strengthen the unique position of the lead-acid system in the market in comparison to competitive systems.

  20. Propionic acid production by immobilized cells of a propionate-tolerant strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    PubMed

    Paik, H D; Glatz, B A

    1994-10-01

    Cells of the propionate-tolerant strain Propionibacterium acidipropionici P200910, immobilized in calcium alginate beads, were tested for propionic and acetic acid production both in a semidefined laboratory medium and in corn steep liquor in batch, fed-batch, and continuous fermentation. Cell density was about 9.8 x 10(9) cells/g (wet weight) of beads, and beads were added to the medium at 0.1 g (wet weight) beads/ml. Beads could be reused for several consecutive batch fermentations; propionic acid production in the tenth cycle was about 50%-70% of that in the first cycle. In batch culture complete substrate consumption (glucose in semidefined medium, lactate in corn steep liquor) and maximum acid production were seen within 36 h, and acid yields from the substrate were higher than in free-cell fermentations. Fed-batch fermentations were incubated up to 250 h. Maximum propionic acid concentrations obtained were 45.6 g/l in corn steep liquor and 57 g/l in semidefined medium; this is the highest concentration achieved to date in our laboratory. Maximum acetic acid concentrations were 17 g/l and 12 g/l, respectively. In continuous fermentation of semide-fined medium, dilution rates up to 0.31 h-1 could be used, which gave higher volumetric productivities (0.96 g l-1 h-1 for propionic acid and 0.26 g l-1 h-1 for acetic acid) than we have obtained with free cells. Corn steep liquor shows promise as an inexpensive medium for production of both acids by immobilized cells of propionibacteria. PMID:7765817

  1. The contribution of lactic acid to acidification of tumours: studies of variant cells lacking lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, M.; Hasuda, K.; Stamato, T.; Tannock, I. F.

    1998-01-01

    Solid tumours develop an acidic extracellular environment with high concentration of lactic acid, and lactic acid produced by glycolysis has been assumed to be the major cause of tumour acidity. Experiments using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-deficient ras-transfected Chinese hamster ovarian cells have been undertaken to address directly the hypothesis that lactic acid production is responsible for tumour acidification. The variant cells produce negligible quantities of lactic acid and consume minimal amounts of glucose compared with parental cells. Lactate-producing parental cells acidified lightly-buffered medium but variant cells did not. Tumours derived from parental and variant cells implanted into nude mice were found to have mean values of extracellular pH (pHe) of 7.03 +/- 0.03 and 7.03 +/- 0.05, respectively, both of which were significantly lower than that of normal muscle (pHe = 7.43 +/- 0.03; P < 0.001). Lactic acid concentration in variant tumours (450 +/- 90 microg g(-1) wet weight) was much lower than that in parental tumours (1880 +/- 140 microg/g(-1)) and similar to that in serum (400 +/- 35 microg/g(-1)). These data show discordance between mean levels of pHe and lactate content in tumours; the results support those of Newell et al (1993) and suggest that the production of lactic acid via glycolysis causes acidification of culture medium, but is not the only mechanism, and is probably not the major mechanism responsible for the development of an acidic environment within solid tumours. PMID:9667639

  2. Inhibitory effect of ursolic acid and oleanolic acid from Eriobotrya fragrans on A549 cell viability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y S; Yuan, Y; Song, G; Lin, S Q

    2016-01-01

    Loquat [Eriobotrya japonica (Lindl.)] is a traditional Chinese medicine, which has been used as an anti-inflammatory and for curing chronic bronchitis among other potential applications. Extracted ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA) from wild loquat were previously found capable of suppressing the proliferation of A549 cells in vitro. In the current study, nude mice were used to determine the inhibitory effect of UA and OA on tumor formation in vivo. The results demonstrate that UA and OA reduced the proliferation of A549 cells in nude mice, and increased the expression of Bid while decreasing the protein levels of MMP-2, Ki-67, and CD34. In this study, we identified potential antitumor activity in a wild loquat extract containing UA and OA, which demonstrates that traditional Chinese medicine may have a role in treating certain types of cancer. PMID:27323036

  3. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    Component development has resulted in routine molding of 12 in. by 17 in. bipolar plates with 80 percent acceptance. A 5 C per hour post-cure heating cycle for these plates was found to give blister free materials. Lowering the resin in a bipolar plate content from 32 percent to 22 percent decreases the resistivity more than 50 percent. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of Novolak and Resol resins at 185 C in phosphoric acid indicates a slow etch. aerosol modified phenolics, however, decompose rapidly. Estimates of acid loss by the use of analytical expressions known as Margule, van Laar, and Wilson equations were not satisfactory. Experimental evaluation of the P4O10 vapor concentration of 103 wt percent acid at 191 C provided a value of 2 ppm. This value is based on a single experiment.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  5. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  6. A comparative evaluation of different types of microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangli; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Haiping; Cheng, Xing; Zhang, Renduo; Teng, Wenkai

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate different microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production. The systems included microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC), microbial electrolysis desalination cell (MEDC) with bipolar membrane and anion exchange membrane (BP-A MEDC), MEDC with bipolar membrane and cation exchange membrane (BP-C MEDC), and modified microbial desalination cell (M-MDC). The microbial electrolysis desalination cells performed differently in terms of malic acid production and energy consumption. The MEDCC performed best with the highest malic acid production rate (18.4 ± 0.6 mmol/Lh) and the lowest energy consumption (0.35 ± 0.14 kWh/kg). The best performance of MEDCC was attributable to the neutral pH condition in the anode chamber, the lowest internal resistance, and the highest Geobacter percentage of the anode biofilm population among all the reactors. PMID:26367771

  7. Sucrose Loading in Isolated Veins of Pisum sativum: Regulation by Abscisic Acid, Gibberellic Acid, and Cell Turgor.

    PubMed

    Estruch, J J; Peretó, J G; Vercher, Y; Beltrán, J P

    1989-09-01

    Enzymatically isolated vein networks from mature pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska) leaves were employed to investigate the properties of sucrose loading and the effect of phytohormones and cell turgor on this process. The sucrose uptake showed two components: a saturable and a first-order kinetics system. The high affinity system (K(m), 3.3 millimolar) was located at the plasmalemma (p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and orthovanadate sensitivity). Further characterization of this system, including pH dependence and effects of energy metabolism inhibitors, supported the H(+)-sugar symport concept for sucrose loading. Within a physiological range (0.1-100 micromolar) and after 90 min, abscisic acid (ABA) inhibited and gibberellic acid (GA(3)) promoted 1 millimolar sucrose uptake. These responses were partially (ABA) or totally (GA(3)) turgor-dependent. In experiments of combined hormonal treatments, ABA counteracted the GA(3) positive effects on sucrose uptake. The abolishment of these responses by p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and experiments on proton flux suggest that both factors (cell turgor and hormones) are modulating the H(+) ATPase plasmalemma activity. The results are discussed in terms of their physiological relevance. PMID:16667007

  8. Cancer cell-associated fatty acid synthase activates endothelial cells and promotes angiogenesis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaytseva, Yekaterina Y; Elliott, Victoria A; Rychahou, Piotr; Mustain, W Conan; Kim, Ji Tae; Valentino, Joseph; Gao, Tianyan; O'Connor, Kathleen L; Neltner, Janna M; Lee, Eun Y; Weiss, Heidi L; Evers, B Mark

    2014-06-01

    Upregulation of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key enzyme of de novo lipogenesis, is associated with metastasis in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the mechanisms of regulation are unknown. Since angiogenesis is crucial for metastasis, we investigated the role of FASN in the neovascularization of CRC. The effect of FASN on tumor vasculature was studied in orthotopic CRCs, the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and Matrigel plug models using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy. Cell secretion was evaluated by ELISA and antibody arrays. Proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis of endothelial cells (ECs) were assessed in CRC-EC coculture models. In this study, we found that stable knockdown of FASN decreased microvessel density in HT29 and HCT116 orthotopic CRCs and resulted in 'normalization' of tumor vasculature in both orthotopic and CAM models. Furthermore, FASN regulated secretion of pro- and antiangiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). Mechanisms associated with the antiangiogenic activity noted with knockdown of FASN included: downregulation of VEGF(189), upregulation of antiangiogenic isoform VEGF(165b) and a decrease in expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9. Furthermore, conditioned medium from FASN knockdown CRC cells inhibited activation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and its downstream signaling and decreased proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis of ECs as compared with control medium. Together, these results suggest that cancer cell-associated FASN regulates tumor vasculature through alteration of the profile of secreted angiogenic factors and regulation of their bioavailability. Inhibition of FASN upstream of VEGF-A and other angiogenic pathways can be a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent or inhibit metastasis in CRC. PMID:24510238

  9. Cancer cell-associated fatty acid synthase activates endothelial cells and promotes angiogenesis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B.Mark

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key enzyme of de novo lipogenesis, is associated with metastasis in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the mechanisms of regulation are unknown. Since angiogenesis is crucial for metastasis, we investigated the role of FASN in the neovascularization of CRC. The effect of FASN on tumor vasculature was studied in orthotopic CRCs, the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and Matrigel plug models using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy. Cell secretion was evaluated by ELISA and antibody arrays. Proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis of endothelial cells (ECs) were assessed in CRC–EC coculture models. In this study, we found that stable knockdown of FASN decreased microvessel density in HT29 and HCT116 orthotopic CRCs and resulted in ‘normalization’ of tumor vasculature in both orthotopic and CAM models. Furthermore, FASN regulated secretion of pro- and antiangiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). Mechanisms associated with the antiangiogenic activity noted with knockdown of FASN included: downregulation of VEGF189, upregulation of antiangiogenic isoform VEGF165b and a decrease in expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9. Furthermore, conditioned medium from FASN knockdown CRC cells inhibited activation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and its downstream signaling and decreased proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis of ECs as compared with control medium. Together, these results suggest that cancer cell-associated FASN regulates tumor vasculature through alteration of the profile of secreted angiogenic factors and regulation of their bioavailability. Inhibition of FASN upstream of VEGF-A and other angiogenic pathways can be a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent or inhibit metastasis in CRC. PMID:24510238

  10. Photosensitization of human bladder carcinoma cells by pyrene-dodecanoic acid: quantitative analysis of the cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fibach, E; Rachmilewitz, E A; Gatt, S

    1992-01-01

    The effects of photochemotherapy with the fluorescent fatty acid pyrenedodecanoic acid (P12) and long-wavelength ultraviolet (UVA) light on cells derived from human bladder carcinoma were studied. Exposure of these anchorage-dependent cells to P12 either in monolayers of adherent cells or in suspension resulted in a time-related uptake of P12 and its incorporation into the cells' neutral and phospholipids. The uptake and localization of P12 was visualized with fluorescence microscopy and the distribution of the cell population with respect to P12 uptake was analyzed by flow cytometry. Irradiation of P12-containing monolayers of bladder carcinoma cells with UVA light resulted in cell killing. But, on microscopic examination no apparent cell lysis was detected, and since digestion with trypsin did not result in the dispersion of the monolayers it was impossible to assess toxicity by cell count. Alternative procedures were therefore used, and the following cell parameters were determined: (a) cellular uptake or release of chromate; (b) ability of cells to re-adhere to the substratum; and (c) the long-range proliferation potential. The combined inhibitory effect of photoirradiation on cell adherence and on their proliferative potential was utilized for determining reductions of up to 7 log in cell viability. The results obtained with five independently established in vitro bladder carcinoma cell lines indicated that these cells are susceptible to P12-induced photosensitization, suggesting that bladder malignancies might be potential candidates for pyrene-induced photochemotherapy. PMID:1636063

  11. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for producing an acid inventory control member by spraying FEP onto a partially screened carbon paper backing is discussed. Theoretical analysis of the acid management indicates that the vapor composition of 103% H3PO4 is approximately 1.0 ppm P4O10. An SEM evaluation of corrosion resistance of phenolic resins and graphite/phenolic resin composites in H3PO4 at 185 C shows specific surface etching. Carbonization of graphite/phenolic bipolar plates is achieved without blistering.

  12. The 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced porphyrin biosynthesis in benign and malignant cells of the skin.

    PubMed

    Lang, K; Bolsen, K; Stahl, W; Ruzicka, T; Sies, H; Lehmann, P; Fritsch, C

    2001-12-01

    In fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy of neoplastic tissues 5-aminolevulinic acid is used to synthesize endogenous porphyrins as photosensitizers. The efficacy of neoplastic tissues to fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy is thought to be dependent on the total level of intralesional formed porphyrins. The available profiles of porphyrin metabolites in normal and in neoplastic cell lines after administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid vary considerably. Thus, this is the first in-vitro study which compares the porphyrin biosynthesis in normal skin cells (HaCaT, fibroblasts) with melanoma cells (Bro, SKMel-23, SKMel-28). After incubation with 1 mM 5-aminolevulinic acid, kinetics of porphyrin levels and metabolites were determined in the cells and the corresponding supernatants. Exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid induced porphyrin formation in all cells with maximum values after an incubation period of 16-36 h. Increase of porphyrin levels varied from 10- to 80-fold (SKMel-28>HaCaT>fibroblasts>SKMel-23>Bro) with minimum 1.5 times higher levels of porphyrins in the supernatants than in the cells. In cells and supernatants protoporphyrin and coproporphyrin were the predominantly formed porphyrin metabolites. Metastatic melanoma cells (SKMel-23, SKMel-28) accumulated much higher porphyrin levels than primary melanoma cells (Bro). In conclusion, by optimizing the treatment modalities, especially the light source, topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) could become a treatment alternative of melanoma metastases in progressive disease. PMID:11748002

  13. Next market opportunities for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, R.H.

    1996-03-01

    Key early entry markets for the next step PC25 Model C fuel cell are most likely to include: Premium Quality Power markets such as data centers, communications facilities, and the like; Healthcare Facilities, particularly for nursing homes and hospitals having 300 or more beds, here, the thermal side of a 200 kW fuel cell is an excellent match and some importance is also attached to power quality and reliability; and Auxiliary Electric Power at natural gas compression facilities, such facilities also tend to place a premium on reliability and low maintenance, moreover, the fuel cell`s inherently low emissions can be very important within the northeast Ozone Transport Region. For the fuel cell concept to remain viable, penetration of this class of early entry markets is needed to sustain economic and reliability progress within a goal of moderate production volumes. This can then build the needed bridge to further markets and to other emerging fuel cell technologies.

  14. Retinoic acid modulates rat Ito cell proliferation, collagen, and transforming growth factor beta production.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B H; Kramer, R T; Davidson, N O

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that vitamin A plays an inhibitory role with respect to "activation" of the hepatic Ito cell, a likely effector of hepatic fibrogenesis. Ito cell "activation" during fibrogenesis is characterized by a decrease in intracellular vitamin A and an increase in cellular proliferation and collagen production. To explore the hypothesis that retinoids have the capacity to diminish Ito cell activation, cultured Ito cells were exposed to retinoic acid and its effects assessed on three key features: cell proliferation, collagen protein production and mRNA abundance, and transforming growth factor beta protein production. Retinoic acid was 100-1,000X more potent than retinol with respect to inhibition of Ito cell proliferation. Interstitial collagen and transforming growth factor beta production were also reduced by 10(-6) M retinoic acid. The relative abundance of type I collagen mRNA however, was not significantly altered. By contrast, retinoic acid administration to rats caused a marked reduction in the abundance of type I collagen mRNA in both total hepatic and purified Ito cell RNA. The relative abundance of rat hepatic fibronectin or apolipoprotein E mRNA was not significantly altered. These studies demonstrate that retinoic acid can differentially modulate several key features of hepatic fibrogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Images PMID:2254460

  15. Linoleic acid supplementation results in increased arachidonic acid and eicosanoid production in CF airway cells and in cftr−/− transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Munir M.; Martin, Camilia R.; Andersson, Charlotte; Bhutta, Abdul Q.; Cluette-Brown, Joanne E.; Laposata, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients display a fatty acid imbalance characterized by low linoleic acid levels and variable changes in arachidonic acid. This led to the recommendation that CF patients consume a high-fat diet containing >6% linoleic acid. We hypothesized that increased conversion of linoleic acid to arachidonic acid in CF leads to increased levels of arachidonate-derived proinflammatory metabolites and that this process is exacerbated by increasing linoleic acid levels in the diet. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effect of linoleic acid supplementation on downstream proinflammatory biomarkers in two CF models: 1) in vitro cell culture model using 16HBE14o− sense [wild-type (WT)] and antisense (CF) human airway epithelial cells; and 2) in an in vivo model using cftr−/− transgenic mice. Fatty acids were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and IL-8 and eicosanoids were measured by ELISA. Neutrophils were quantified in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from knockout mice following linoleic acid supplementation and exposure to aerosolized Pseudomonas LPS. Linoleic acid supplementation increased arachidonic acid levels in CF but not WT cells. IL-8, PGE2, and PGF2α secretion were increased in CF compared with WT cells, with a further increase following linoleic acid supplementation. cftr−/− Mice supplemented with 100 mg of linoleic acid had increased arachidonic acid levels in lung tissue associated with increased neutrophil infiltration into the airway compared with control mice. These findings support the hypothesis that increasing linoleic acid levels in the setting of loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function leads to increased arachidonic acid levels and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:20656894

  16. The fatty acid profile of rainbow trout liver cells modulates their tolerance to methylmercury and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Ferain, Aline; Bonnineau, Chloé; Neefs, Ineke; Rees, Jean François; Larondelle, Yvan; Schamphelaere, Karel A C De; Debier, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of fish tissues, which generally reflects that of the diet, affects various cellular properties such as membrane structure and fluidity, energy metabolism and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Since these cellular parameters can play an important role in the cellular response to organic and inorganic pollutants, a variation of the PUFA supply might modify the toxicity induced by such xenobiotics. In this work, we investigated whether the cellular fatty acid profile has an impact on the in vitro cell sensitivity to two environmental pollutants: methylmercury and cadmium. Firstly, the fatty acid composition of the rainbow trout liver cell line RTL-W1 was modified by enriching the growth medium with either alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) or docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-6). These modified cells and their control (no PUFA enrichment) were then challenged for 24h with increasing concentrations of methylmercury or cadmium. We observed that (i) the phospholipid composition of the RTL-W1 cells was profoundly modulated by changing the PUFA content of the growth medium: major modifications were a high incorporation of the supplemented PUFA in the cellular phospholipids, the appearance of direct elongation and desaturation metabolites in the cellular phospholipids as well as a change in the gross phospholipid composition (PUFA and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) levels and n-3/n-6 ratio); (ii) ALA, EPA and DPA enrichment significantly protected the RTL-W1 cells against both methylmercury and cadmium; (iv) DHA enrichment significantly protected the cells against cadmium but not methylmercury; (v) AA and LA enrichment had no impact on the cell tolerance to both methylmercury and cadmium; (vi) the abundance of 20:3n-6, a metabolite of the n-6 biotransformation pathway, in

  17. Assessing physio-macromolecular effects of lactic acid on Zygosaccharomyces bailii cells during microaerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kuanyshev, Nurzhan; Ami, Diletta; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Morrissey, John P; Branduardi, Paola

    2016-08-01

    The ability of Zygosaccharomyces bailii to grow at low pH and in the presence of considerable amounts of weak organic acids, at lethal condition for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, increased the interest in the biotechnological potential of the yeast. To understand the mechanism of tolerance and growth effect of weak acids on Z. bailii, we evaluated the physiological and macromolecular changes of the yeast exposed to sub lethal concentrations of lactic acid. Lactic acid represents one of the important commodity chemical which can be produced by microbial fermentation. We assessed physiological effect of lactic acid by bioreactor fermentation using synthetic media at low pH in the presence of lactic acid. Samples collected from bioreactors were stained with propidium iodide (PI) which revealed that, despite lactic acid negatively influence the growth rate, the number of PI positive cells is similar to that of the control. Moreover, we have performed Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) microspectroscopy analysis on intact cells of the same samples. This technique has been never applied before to study Z. bailii under this condition. The analyses revealed lactic acid induced macromolecular changes in the overall cellular protein secondary structures, and alterations of cell wall and membrane physico-chemical properties. PMID:27381983

  18. Mycolic Acid Cyclopropanation is Essential for Viability, Drug Resistance, and Cell Wall Integrity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, Daniel; Liu, Zhen; Sacchettini, James C.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection remains a major global health problem complicated by escalating rates of antibiotic resistance. Despite the established role of mycolic acid cyclopropane modification in pathogenesis, the feasibility of targeting this enzyme family for antibiotic development is unknown. We show through genetics and chemical biology that mycolic acid methyltransferases are essential for M. tuberculosis viability, cell wall structure, and intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. The tool compound dioctylamine, which we show acts as a substrate mimic, directly inhibits the function of multiple mycolic acid methyltransferases, resulting in loss of cyclopropanation, cell death, loss of acid fastness, and synergistic killing with isoniazid and ciprofloxacin. These results demonstrate that mycolic acid methyltransferases are a promising antibiotic target and that a family of virulence factors can be chemically inhibited with effects not anticipated from studies of each individual enzyme.

  19. Requirement of glucose for mycolic acid biosynthetic activity localized in the cell wall of Bacterionema matruchotii.

    PubMed

    Shimakata, T; Tsubokura, K; Kusaka, T

    1986-06-01

    When the localization of mycolic acid biosynthetic activity was examined with Bacterionema matruchotii cells disrupted by the ultrasonic vibration method, activity was detected only in the cell wall fraction, not in the inner membrane nor in the 78,000g supernatant. Either the supernatant or sugar was absolutely required for the incorporation of [14C]palmitate into mycolic acids. Among sugars examined, glucose was most effective, with maltose being second. Unexpectedly, trehalose was inert. As to substrate, the present system utilized free palmitic acid rather than palmitoyl-CoA. The reaction products from palmitate and glucose were glucose mycolate and trehalose monomycolate, in which the label from [14C]palmitate or [14C]glucose was incorporated. Glucose palmitate was also formed. Addition of trehalose resulted in a shift from glucose mycolate to trehalose monomycolate. These data clearly indicate that sugars play an important role in the synthesis of mycolic acids from free fatty acids. PMID:3717946

  20. Advanced water-cooled phosphoric acid fuel cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Fabrication of repeat parts for the small area short stack is nearing completion and assembly activities are being initiated. Electrolyte reservoir plates (ERPs) were completed and processed into integral separator plates, and acid fill of parts was initiated. Fabrication of electrodes was also completed, including catalyzation and applications of seals and matrices.

  1. Kinase Signaling in Apoptosis Induced by Saturated Fatty Acids in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Šrámek, Jan; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Kovář, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic β-cell failure and death is considered to be one of the main factors responsible for type 2 diabetes. It is caused by, in addition to hyperglycemia, chronic exposure to increased concentrations of fatty acids, mainly saturated fatty acids. Molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induction by saturated fatty acids in β-cells are not completely clear. It has been proposed that kinase signaling could be involved, particularly, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), protein kinase C (PKC), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and Akt kinases and their pathways. In this review, we discuss these kinases and their signaling pathways with respect to their possible role in apoptosis induction by saturated fatty acids in pancreatic β-cells. PMID:27626409

  2. Removal of an acid fume system contaminated with perchlorates located within hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Vroman, W.R.; Krsul, J.R.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Knighton, G.C.

    1992-09-01

    An add scrubbing system located within the confines of a highly radioactive hot cell at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was remotely removed. The acid scrubbing system was routinely used for the dissolution of irradiated reactor fuel samples and structural materials. Perchloric acid was one of the acids used in the dissolution process and remained in the system with its inherent risks. Personnel could not enter the hot cell to perform the dismantling of the acid scabbing system due to the high radiation field and the explosion potential associated with the perchlorates. A robot was designed and built at ANL-W and used to dismantle the system without the need for personnel entry into the hot cell. The robot was also used for size reduction of removed components and loading of the removed components into waste containers.

  3. Ascorbic acid protects against cadmium-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan-Li; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Mei; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Meng, Xiu-Hong; Xu, De-Xiang

    2012-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a testicular toxicant which induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes. This study investigated the effects of ascorbic acid on Cd-evoked ER stress and germ cell apoptosis in testes. Male mice were intraperitoneally injected with CdCl(2) (2.0 mg/kg). As expected, a single dose of Cd induced testicular germ cell apoptosis. Interestingly, Cd-triggered testicular germ cell apoptosis was almost completely inhibited in mice treated with ascorbic acid. Interestingly, ascorbic acid significantly attenuated Cd-induced upregulation of GRP78 in testes. In addition, ascorbic acid significantly attenuated Cd-triggered testicular IRE1α and eIF2α phosphorylation and XBP-1 activation, indicating that this antioxidant counteracts Cd-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) in testes. Finally, ascorbic acid significantly attenuated Cd-evoked upregulation of CHOP and JNK phosphorylation, two components in ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, ascorbic acid protects mice from Cd-triggered germ cell apoptosis via inhibiting ER stress and UPR in testes. PMID:22569276

  4. Vasopressin induces release of arachidonic acid from vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grillone, L.R.; Clark, M.A.; Heckman, G.; Schmidt, D.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Cultured smooth muscle cells (A-10), derived from rat thoracic aorta, have vascular (V/sub 1/) vasopressin receptors. They have previously shown that these receptors mediate phosphatidylinositol turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, and inhibition of isoproterenol-induced increases in cAMP. Here they studied the effect of vasopressin on arachidonic acid metabolism of A-10 cells. Cells were incubated for 18-20 hr with (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid (80 Ci/mmol). Vasopressin stimulated release of arachidonic acid in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Significant release of arachidonic acid was observed after 4 min with 10/sup -9/ M vasopressin. Maximum release was reached 4 min after addition of 10/sup -7/ M vasopressin (1100 dpm/10/sup 6/ cells). About 800 dmp were released after 1 and 4 min with 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin, respectively. The vasopressin-stimulated release of arachidonic acid was blocked by the specific V/sub 1//V/sub 2/ vasopressin antagonist d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)VAVP. These data indicate that vascular smooth muscle cells increase arachidonic acid release in response to vasopressin. This response is likely mediated by V/sub 1/ receptors.

  5. Electric utility acid fuel cell stack technology advancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congdon, J. V.; Goller, G. J.; Greising, G. J.; Obrien, J. J.; Randall, S. A.; Sandelli, G. J.; Breault, R. D.; Austin, G. W.; Bopse, S.; Coykendall, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The principal effort under this program was directed at the fuel cell stack technology required to accomplish the initial feasibility demonstrations of increased cell stack operating pressures and temperatures, increased cell active area, incorporation of the ribbed substrate cell configuration at the bove conditions, and the introduction of higher performance electrocatalysts. The program results were successful with the primary accomplishments being: (1) fabrication of 10 sq ft ribbed substrate, cell components including higher performing electrocatalysts; (2) assembly of a 10 sq ft, 30-cell short stack; and (3) initial test of this stack at 120 psia and 405 F. These accomplishments demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating and handling large area cells using materials and processes that are oriented to low cost manufacture. An additional accomplishment under the program was the testing of two 3.7 sq ft short stacks at 12 psia/405 F to 5400 and 4500 hours respectively. These tests demonstrate the durability of the components and the cell stack configuration to a nominal 5000 hours at the higher pressure and temperature condition planned for the next electric utility power plant.

  6. Lauric Acid Stimulates Ketone Body Production in the KT-5 Astrocyte Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Yudai; Takagi, Tetsuo; Inai, Makoto; Nishimura, Shuhei; Urashima, Shogo; Honda, Kazumitsu; Aoyama, Toshiaki; Terada, Shin

    2016-08-01

    Coconut oil has recently attracted considerable attention as a potential Alzheimer's disease therapy because it contains large amounts of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) and its consumption is thought to stimulate hepatic ketogenesis, supplying an alternative energy source for brains with impaired glucose metabolism. In this study, we first reevaluated the responses of plasma ketone bodies to oral administration of coconut oil to rats. We found that the coconut oil-induced increase in plasma ketone body concentration was negligible and did not significantly differ from that observed after high-oleic sunflower oil administration. In contrast, the administration of coconut oil substantially increased the plasma free fatty acid concentration and lauric acid content, which is the major MCFA in coconut oil. Next, to elucidate whether lauric acid can activate ketogenesis in astrocytes with the capacity to generate ketone bodies from fatty acids, we treated the KT-5 astrocyte cell line with 50 and 100 μM lauric acid for 4 h. The lauric acid treatments increased the total ketone body concentration in the cell culture supernatant to a greater extent than oleic acid, suggesting that lauric acid can directly and potently activate ketogenesis in KT-5 astrocytes. These results suggest that coconut oil intake may improve brain health by directly activating ketogenesis in astrocytes and thereby by providing fuel to neighboring neurons. PMID:27430387

  7. Liquid biopsy of gastric cancer patients: circulating tumor cells and cell-free nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Tsujiura, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Konishi, Hirotaka; Komatsu, Shuhei; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2014-03-28

    To improve the clinical outcomes of cancer patients, early detection and accurate monitoring of diseases are necessary. Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to oncogenesis and cancer progression, and analyses of these changes have been increasingly utilized for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic purposes in malignant diseases including gastric cancer (GC). Surgical and/or biopsy specimens are generally used to understand the tumor-associated alterations; however, those approaches cannot always be performed because of their invasive characteristics and may fail to reflect current tumor dynamics and drug sensitivities, which may change during the therapeutic process. Therefore, the importance of developing a non-invasive biomarker with the ability to monitor real-time tumor dynamics should be emphasized. This concept, so called "liquid biopsy", would provide an ideal therapeutic strategy for an individual cancer patient and would facilitate the development of "tailor-made" cancer management programs. In the blood of cancer patients, the presence and potent utilities of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free nucleic acids (cfNAs) such as DNA, mRNA and microRNA have been recognized, and their clinical relevance is attracting considerable attention. In this review, we discuss recent developments in this research field as well as the relevance and future perspectives of CTCs and cfNAs in cancer patients, especially focusing on GC. PMID:24696609

  8. Liquid biopsy in patients with pancreatic cancer: Circulating tumor cells and cell-free nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Taisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Tsutomu; Miyamae, Mahito; Okajima, Wataru; Ohashi, Takuma; Arita, Tomohiro; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Morimura, Ryo; Ikoma, Hisashi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Otsuji, Eigo

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in surgical techniques and perioperative management, the prognosis of pancreatic cancer (PCa) remains extremely poor. To provide optimal treatment for each patient with Pca, superior biomarkers are urgently needed in all phases of management from early detection to staging, treatment monitoring, and prognosis. In the blood of patients with cancer, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free nucleic acids (cfNAs), such as DNA, mRNA, and noncoding RNA have been recognized. In the recent years, their presence in the blood has encouraged researchers to investigate their potential use as novel blood biomarkers, and numerous studies have demonstrated their potential clinical utility as a biomarker for certain types of cancer. This concept, called “liquid biopsy” has been focused on as a less invasive, alternative approach to cancer tissue biopsy for obtaining genetic and epigenetic aberrations that contribute to oncogenesis and cancer progression. In this article, we review the available literature on CTCs and cfNAs in patients with cancer, particularly focusing on PCa, and discuss future perspectives in this field. PMID:27433079

  9. Inhibitory effects of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 on cellular functions of sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Araki, Mutsumi; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Ozaki, Shuhei; Mori, Shiori; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid that interacts with G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA receptor-1 (LPA1) to LPA6). Here, we investigated the effects of LPA signaling via LPA5 on cellular functions of sarcoma cells by generating Lpar5 overexpressing and Lpar5 knockdown cells from rat osteosarcoma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma cells, respectively. The cell motility activity of Lpar5 overexpressing cells was significantly lower, while Lpar5 knockdown cells showed high cell motility, compared with respective controls. Gelatin zymography showed that LPA5 suppressed the activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2. LPA5 also inhibited the cell motility activity of endothelial cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor genes. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA5 negatively regulates the cellular functions of rat sarcoma cells. PMID:24798396

  10. Arachidonic acid activation of a new family of K+ channels in cultured rat neuronal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, D; Sladek, C D; Aguado-Velasco, C; Mathiasen, J R

    1995-01-01

    1. The presence and properties of K+ channels activated by arachidonic acid were studied in neuronal cells cultured from the mesencephalic and hypothalamic areas of rat brain. 2. Arachidonic acid produced a concentration-dependent (5-50 microM) and reversible activation of whole-cell currents. 3. In excised membrane patches, arachidonic acid applied to the cytoplasmic or extracellular side of the membrane caused opening of three types of channels whose current-voltage relationships were slightly outwardly rectifying, inwardly rectifying and linear, and whose single channel slope conductances at +60 mV were 143, 45 and 52 pS, respectively. 4. All three currents were K+ selective and blocked by 2 mM Ba2+ but not by other K+ channel blockers such as tetraethylammonium chloride, 4-aminopyridine and quinidine. The outwardly and inwardly rectifying currents were slightly voltage dependent with higher channel activity at more depolarized potentials. 5. Arachidonic acid activated the K+ channels in cells treated with cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid), indicating that arachidonic acid itself can directly activate the channels. Alcohol and methyl ester derivatives of arachidonic acid failed to activate the K+ channels, indicating that the charged carboxyl group is important for activation. 6. Certain unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic, linolenic and docosahexaenoic acids), but not saturated fatty acids (myristic, palmitic, stearic acids), also reversibly activated all three types of K+ channel. 7. All three K+ channels were activated by pressure applied to the membrane (i.e. channels were stretch sensitive) with a half-maximal pressure of approximately 18 mmHg. The K+ channels were not blocked by 100 microM GdCl3. 8. A decrease in intracellular pH (over the range 5.6-7.2) caused a reversible, pH-dependent increase in channel activity whether the channel was initially activated by arachidonic acid or stretch. 9. Glutamate

  11. RETINOIDAL BENZOIC ACIDS (AROTENOIDS) AND OTHER RETINOIDS INHIBIT IN VITRO TRANSFORMATION OF EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five retinoids were calcluated for their ability to inhibit N-methyl-N'nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induccd transformation of primary rat trachcal epithelial (RTE) cells in culture at concentrations that did not affect cell survival. wo retinoidal benzoic acids (arotcnoids), R...

  12. Mechanical damage to Escherichia coli cells in a model of amino-acid crystal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Okutani, Satoshi; Iwai, Takayoshi; Iwatani, Shintaro; Kondo, Kazuya; Osumi, Tsuyoshi; Tsujimoto, Nobuharu; Matsuno, Kiyoshi

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the mechanical damage to the Escherichia coli cell caused by polyvinyl chloride particles as a model of amino-acid crystal fermentation. Our results indicated that the glucose-consumption rate and the intracellular ATP concentration temporarily increased by the mechanical damage, and decreased after considerable damage had occurred on cell membrane. PMID:22153714

  13. Phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system performance model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program was developed for analyzing the performance of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant systems. Energy mass and electrochemical analysis in the reformer, the shaft converters, the heat exchangers, and the fuel cell stack were combined to develop a mathematical model for the power plant for both atmospheric and pressurized conditions, and for several commercial fuels.

  14. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is an acid-base sensor in epithelial base-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Roa, Jinae N; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Blood acid-base regulation by specialized epithelia, such as gills and kidney, requires the ability to sense blood acid-base status. Here, we developed primary cultures of ray (Urolophus halleri) gill cells to study mechanisms for acid-base sensing without the interference of whole animal hormonal regulation. Ray gills have abundant base-secreting cells, identified by their noticeable expression of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA), and also express the evolutionarily conserved acid-base sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Exposure of cultured cells to extracellular alkalosis (pH 8.0, 40 mM HCO3 (-)) triggered VHA translocation to the cell membrane, similar to previous reports in live animals experiencing blood alkalosis. VHA translocation was dependent on sAC, as it was blocked by the sAC-specific inhibitor KH7. Ray gill base-secreting cells also express transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); however, tmAC inhibition by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine did not prevent alkalosis-dependent VHA translocation, and tmAC activation by forskolin reduced the abundance of VHA at the cell membrane. This study demonstrates that sAC is a necessary and sufficient sensor of extracellular alkalosis in ray gill base-secreting cells. In addition, this study indicates that different sources of cAMP differentially modulate cell biology. PMID:27335168

  15. Current legal and institutional issues in the commercialization of phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimmons, J. T.; Sheehy, K. D.; Singer, J. R.; Gardner, T. C.

    1982-01-01

    Legal and institutional factors affecting the development and commercial diffusion of phosphoric acid fuel cells are assessed. Issues for future research and action are suggested. Perceived barriers and potential opportunities for fuel cells in central and dispersed utility operations and on-site applications are reviewed, as well as the general concept of commercialization as applied to emerging energy technologies.

  16. HALOACETIC ACIDS AND KINASE INHIBITORS PERTURB MOUSE NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    HUNTER, E.S.1, J. SMITH2, J. ANDREWS1. 1 Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park and 2 Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Haloacetic acids and kinase inhibitors perturb mouse neural crest cells in vi...

  17. Altered sensitivity to ellagic acid in neuroblastoma cells undergoing differentiation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and all-trans retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Alfredsson, Christina Fjæraa; Rendel, Filip; Liang, Qui-Li; Sundström, Birgitta E; Nånberg, Eewa

    2015-12-01

    Ellagic acid has previously been reported to induce reduced proliferation and activation of apoptosis in several tumor cell lines including our own previous data from non-differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The aim of this study was now to investigate if in vitro differentiation with the phorbol ester 12-O- tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or the vitamin A derivative all-trans retinoic acid altered the sensitivity to ellagic acid in SH-SY5Y cells. The methods used were cell counting and LDH-assay for evaluation of cell number and cell death, flow cytometric analysis of SubG1- and TUNEL-analysis for apoptosis and western blot for expression of apoptosis-associated proteins. In vitro differentiation was shown to reduce the sensitivity to ellagic acid with respect to cell detachment, loss of viability and activation of apoptosis. The protective effect was phenotype-specific and most prominent in all-trans retinoic acid-differentiated cultures. Differentiation-dependent up-regulation of Bcl-2 and integrin expression is introduced as possible protective mechanisms. The presented data also point to a positive correlation between proliferative activity and sensitivity to ellagic-acid-induced cell detachment. In conclusion, the presented data emphasize the need to consider degree of neuronal differentiation and phenotype of neuroblastoma cells when discussing a potential pharmaceutical application of ellagic acid in tumor treatment. PMID:26653548

  18. Relationship between extracellular enzymes and cell growth during the cell cycle of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: acid phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, M; Miyata, H

    1978-01-01

    By using the intact cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the activity of acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) was compared through the cell cycle with the growth in cell length as a measure of cell growth. The cells of a growing asynchronous culture increased exponentially in number and in total enzyme activity, but remained constant in average length and in specific activity, In a synchronous culture prepared by selection or by induction, the specific activity was periodic in parallel with the increase in average cell length. When hydroxyurea was added to an asynchronous or a synchronous culture by selection, both specific and total activity followed the same continuous pattern as the growth in cell length after the stoppage of cell division. When oversized cells produced by a hydroxyurea pulse treatment to the culture previously syndronized by selection were transferred to a poor medium, they divided synchronously but could hardly grow in the total cell length. In this experimental situation, the total enzyme activity also scarcely increased through three division cycles. These results suggested that the increase in acid phosphatase in dependent on cell elongation. PMID:711673

  19. Beef conjugated linoleic acid isomers reduce human cancer cell growth even when associated with other beef fatty acids.

    PubMed

    De La Torre, Anne; Debiton, Eric; Juanéda, Pierre; Durand, Denys; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Barthomeuf, Chantal; Bauchart, Dominique; Gruffat, Dominique

    2006-02-01

    Although many data are available concerning anticarcinogenic effects of industrial conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), few studies have reported the antitumour properties of CLA mixtures originating from ruminant products. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro antiproliferative effects of beef CLA mixtures on breast, lung, colon, melanoma and ovarian human cancer cell lines. For this purpose, four fatty acid (FA) extracts prepared from beef lipid and varying in their CLA composition, their corresponding purified CLA-enriched fractions, and mixtures of pure synthetic CLA, the composition of which reproduced that of the four selected beef samples, were tested on cancer cell lines. Cancer cells were exposed for 48 h to medium containing 100 microm-FA and their proliferation was determined by quantifying cellular DNA content (Hoechst 33342 dye). Compared with cells incubated without FA, the number of cancer cells was reduced from 25 to 67 % (P<0.0001) following FA treatment. Antiproliferative effects of CLA mixtures varied in magnitude according to the source of FA, the CLA composition and the cell lines. CLA mixtures naturally present in beef inhibited the proliferation of human cancer cell lines, a high content in cis-trans isomers allowing the most important antiproliferative effect. Beef total FA exhibited a greater growth-inhibitory activity than their corresponding CLA-enriched fractions. These results suggested that either beef FA other than beef CLA could possess antiproliferative properties and/or the existence of complementary effects of non-conjugated FA and CLA, which could favour the antiproliferative properties of beef total FA. PMID:16469152

  20. Valproic Acid Enhances the Anti-tumor Effect of (-)-gossypol to Burkitt Lymphoma Namalwa Cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Ni, Zhen Hong; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Xing Hua; Zou, Zhong Min

    2015-10-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a highly aggressive B-cell neoplasm. New therapeutic methods are needed to overcome the adverse effect of intensive chemotherapy regimens. Valproic acid and (-)-gossypol are two kinds of chemical compounds used as new anti-tumor drugs in recent years. To investigate the anti-tumor effect of valproic acid and (-)-gossypol, Burkitt lymphoma Namalwa cells were cultured and treated with valproic acid and (-)-gossypol at different concentrations. The proliferation of Namalwa cells was dramatically suppressed after the combination treatment with 2 mmol/L valproic acid and 5 μmol/L (-)-gossypol. The combined treatment also enhanced intrinsic apoptosis by down-regulating anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Moreover, the autophagy flux significantly increased in Namalwa cells after combined treatment. However, the enhanced autophagy showed little effect on cell survival with present regimen. The results confirmed that combination of valproic acid and (-)-gossypol had synergistic anti-tumor effect to Burkitt lymphoma Namalwa cells. The related mechanisms might include the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and avianized pro-survival role of autophagy. PMID:26582100

  1. Tailoring folic acid and methotrexate-attributed quantum dots for integrated cancer cell imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Mochamad Zakki; Chang, Jia-Yaw

    2016-03-01

    Potential application of folic acid and methotrexate-attributed AgInS2-ZnS quantum dots on both detection and therapeutic of cancer cell were intensively investigated on this study. In the initial step, the bright luminescent of QDs, with % QY up to 55.3, were synthesized with one-pot two-step process resulting narrow particle distribution and successfully transferred to water phase without significant effect on optical properties. The water-soluble AgInS2-ZnS quantum dots (QDs) encapsulated with oleylamine have been successfully prepared by ultrasonication assisting. Several aspect including QDs characterization, pH stability, ionic strength, and bonding properties were investigated to reach desired condition of water-soluble AgInS2-ZnS QDs. Folic acid was further conjugated to QDs for HeLa and MCF7 cancer cell imaging to performs the targeting capability. Moreover, folic acid is efficiently internalized into cell through the receptor-mediated endocytosis even when conjugated with a wide variety of molecules. Confocal imaging characterization further informs folic acid-conjugated AgInS2-ZnS QDs could most specific targeted to the human cervical (HeLa) cells. The therapeutic feature of QDs on HeLa cancer cell was conjugated by attributing methotrexate on the QDs, instead of folic acid, and the design could improve on inhibiting the cancer cell viability as well as its fluorescent intensity.

  2. Omega 3 fatty acids increase spontaneous release of cytosolic components from tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jenski, L.J.; Sturdevant, L.K.; Ehringer, W.D.; Stillwell, W. )

    1991-05-01

    Mice fed menhaden (fish) oil or coconut oil-rich diets were inoculated intraperitoneally with a rapidly growing leukemia, T27A. After one week, the tumor cells were harvested, and 51Cr was used to label intracellular molecules. Spontaneous release of 51Cr was used as a measure of plasma membrane permeability. Compared to cells from mice fed coconut oil (rich in saturated fatty acids), tumor cells from mice fed menhaden oil (rich in long chain polyunsaturated omega 3 fatty acids) showed an increased level of spontaneous 51Cr release, which was exacerbated by increased temperature and reduced by extracellular protein. At physiological salt concentrations, the released 51Cr was detected in particles of approximately 2700 daltons. Enhanced permeability correlated with the incorporation of dietary (fish oil) omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid into the tumor cells. The results demonstrate that omega 3 fatty acids are incorporated into cellular constituents of tumor cells and change properties associated with the plasma membrane. This result suggests that dietary manipulation may be used to enhance tumor cell permeability and contribute to tumor eradication.

  3. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Chang Seon; Kwak, Hui Chan; Lee, Kye Sook; Kang, Keon Wook; Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Ki Ho; Kim, Hwan Mook; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2011-08-15

    Although methionine dependency is a phenotypic characteristic of tumor cells, it remains to be determined whether changes in sulfur amino acid metabolism occur in cancer cells resistant to chemotherapeutic medications. We compared expression/activity of sulfur amino acid metabolizing enzymes and cellular levels of sulfur amino acids and their metabolites between normal MCF-7 cells and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/Adr) cells. The S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, an index of transmethylation potential, in MCF-7/Adr cells decreased to {approx} 10% relative to that in MCF-7 cells, which may have resulted from down-regulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase. Expression of homocysteine-clearing enzymes, such as cystathionine beta-synthase, methionine synthase/methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase, and betaine homocysteine methyltransferase, was up-regulated in MCF-7/Adr cells, suggesting that acquiring doxorubicin resistance attenuated methionine-dependence and activated transsulfuration from methionine to cysteine. Homocysteine was similar, which is associated with a balance between the increased expressions of homocysteine-clearing enzymes and decreased extracellular homocysteine. Despite an elevation in cysteine, cellular GSH decreased in MCF-7/Adr cells, which was attributed to over-efflux of GSH into the medium and down-regulation of the GSH synthesis enzyme. Consequently, MCF-7/Adr cells were more sensitive to the oxidative stress induced by bleomycin and menadione than MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that regulating sulfur amino acid metabolism may be a possible therapeutic target for chemoresistant cancer cells. These results warrant further investigations to determine the role of sulfur amino acid metabolism in acquiring anticancer drug resistance in cancer cells using chemical and biological regulators involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. - Research Highlights: > MCF-7/Adr cells showed decreases in cellular GSH

  4. Cell surface changes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO4069 in response to treatment with 6-aminopenicillanic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, A J; Bryan, L E

    1989-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO4096 was induced for beta-lactamases with 6-aminopenicillanic acid. Surface changes concomitant with beta-lactamase induction were monitored. The surface hydrophobicity of the culture increased during exposure to 6-aminopenicillanic acid. The increase was associated with a change in the distribution of the O antigen in the lipopolysaccharide of treated cells. The hydrophobicity change was reversible and partially inhibited by depressed protein synthesis. The susceptibility of induced cells to rifampin was increased transiently, suggesting increased permeability of the induced cells. Images PMID:2554796

  5. First solar cells on silicon wafers doped using sprayed boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. A.; Brito, Miguel C.; Costa, Ivo; Alves, Jorge Maia; Serra, João; Vallêra, António

    2010-11-01

    A new method for boron bulk doping of silicon ribbons is developed. The method is based on the spraying of the ribbons with a boric acid solution and is particularly suited for silicon ribbons that require a zone-melting recrystallization step. To analyse the quality of the material thus obtained, multicrystalline silicon samples doped with this doping process were used as substrate for solar cells and compared with solar cells made on commercial multicrystalline silicon wafers. The values obtained for the diffusion length and the IV curve parameters show that the method of doping with the boric acid solution is suitable to produce p-doped silicon ribbons for solar cell applications.

  6. Anti-apoptotic activity of caffeic acid, ellagic acid and ferulic acid in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: a Bcl-2 independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Khanduja, Krishan Lal; Avti, Pramod Kumar; Kumar, Surender; Mittal, Nidhi; Sohi, Kiranjit Kaur; Pathak, Chander Mohan

    2006-02-01

    Polyphenols have been shown to induce apoptosis in a variety of tumor cells including leukemia both in vitro and in vivo. However, their action on normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during oxidative stress remains to be explored. In this study, we have evaluated the anti-apoptotic and radical scavenging activities of dietary phenolics, namely caffeic acid (CA), ellagic acid (EA) and ferulic acid (FA). H2O2-induced apoptosis in normal human PBMCs was assayed by phosphotidylserine externalization, nucleosomal damage and DNA fragmentation. Incubation of PBMCs with 5 mM H2O2 led to increased Annexin-V binding to externalized phosphatidyl serine (PS), an event of pre-apoptotic stage of the cell. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells pretreated with phenolics could resist H2O2-induced apoptotic damage. Caffeic acid (60 and 120 microM) and EA (100 and 200 microM) caused no change in externalization of PS, whereas FA (100 and 200 microM) increased externalization of PS in PBMCs treated with H2O2. The effects of phenolics were abolished to a large extent by culturing the PBMCs for 24 h after washing the phenolics from the medium. Inhibitory activities of these phenolics on lipid peroxidation were in the order of EA

  7. Canine and feline parvoviruses preferentially recognize the non-human cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Löfling, Jonas; Michael Lyi, Sangbom; Parrish, Colin R.; Varki, Ajit

    2013-05-25

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a pathogen whose canine-adapted form (canine parvovirus (CPV)) emerged in 1978. These viruses infect by binding host transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR), but also hemagglutinate erythrocytes. We show that hemagglutination involves selective recognition of the non-human sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) but not N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which differs by only one oxygen atom from Neu5Gc. Overexpression of α2-6 sialyltransferase did not change binding, indicating that both α2-3 and α2-6 linkages are recognized. However, Neu5Gc expression on target cells did not enhance CPV or FPV infection in vitro. Thus, the conserved Neu5Gc-binding preference of these viruses likely plays a role in the natural history of the virus in vivo. Further studies must clarify relationships between virus infection and host Neu5Gc expression. As a first step, we show that transcripts of CMAH (which generates Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac) are at very low levels in Western dog breed cells. - Highlights: ► Feline and canine parvoviruses recognize Neu5Gc but not Neu5Ac, which differ by one oxygen atom. ► The underlying linkage of these sialic acids does not affect recognition. ► Induced Neu5Gc expression on target cells that normally express Neu5Ac did not enhance infection. ► Thus, the conserved binding preference plays an important yet unknown role in in vivo infections. ► Population and breed variations in Neu5Gc expression occur, likely by regulating the gene CMAH.

  8. Improved cellular response of ion modified poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) substrates for mouse fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Ananta Raj; Geranpayeh, Tanya; Chu, Wei Kan; Otteson, Deborah C

    2016-03-01

    In this report, the effects of argon (Ar) ion irradiation on poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) substrates on biocompatibility were studied. PLGA scaffold substrates were prepared by spin coating glass surfaces with PLGA dissolved in anhydrous chloroform. Previously, we showed that surface modifications of PLGA films using ion irradiation modulate the inherent hydrophobicity of PLGA surface. Here we show that with increasing ion dose (1×10(12) to 1×10(14) ions/cm(2)), hydrophobicity and surface roughness decreased. Biocompatibility for NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was increased by argon irradiation of PLGA substrates. On unirradiated PLGA films, fibroblasts had a longer doubling time and cell densities were 52% lower than controls after 48 h in vitro. Argon irradiated PLGA substrates supported growth rates similar to control. Despite differences in cell cycle kinetics, there was no detectible cytotoxicity observed on any substrate. This demonstrates that argon ion irradiation can be used to tune the surface microstructure and generate substrates that are more compatible for the cell growth and proliferation. PMID:26706518

  9. Efficient production of propionic acid through high density culture with recycling cells of Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Ge, Yongsheng; Xu, Jing; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore propionic acid production via high density culture of Propionibacterium acidipropionici and recycling of cells. Results showed that final cells of P. acidipropionici from high density culture still had high metabolic activity for reuse. Using our process, 75.9gl(-1) propionic acid was produced, which was 1.84-fold of that in fed-batch fermentation with low cell density (41.2gl(-1)); the corresponding productivity was 100.0% higher than that in fed-batch fermentation with low cell density (0.16gl(-1)h(-1)). This bioprocess may have potential for the industrial production of propionic acid. PMID:27318164

  10. Active targeting of cancer cells using folic acid-conjugated platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teow, Yiwei; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2010-12-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles with human cells is an interesting topic for understanding toxicity and developing potential drug candidates. Water soluble platinum nanoparticles were synthesized viareduction of hexachloroplatinic acid using sodium borohydride in the presence of capping agents. The bioactivity of folic acid and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) capped platinum nanoparticles (Pt-nps) has been investigated using commercially available cell lines. In the cell viability experiments, PVP-capped nanoparticles were found to be less toxic (>80% viability), whereas, folic acid-capped platinum nanoparticles showed a reduced viability down to 24% after 72 h of exposure at a concentration of 100 μg ml-1 for MCF7 breast cancer cells. Such toxicity, combined with the possibility to incorporate functional organic molecules as capping agents, can be used for developing new drug candidates.

  11. Ferulic acid in combination with PARP inhibitor sensitizes breast cancer cells as chemotherapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Eun; Park, Eunmi

    2015-03-13

    Homologous-recombination (HR)-dependent repair defective cells are hypersensitive to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Combinations of defective HR pathway and PARP inhibitors have been an effective chemotherapeutic modality. We previously showed that knockdown of the WD40-repeat containing protein, Uaf1, causes an HR repair defect in mouse embryo fibroblast cells and therefore, increases sensitivity to PARP inhibitor, ABT-888. Similarly, here, we show that ferulic acid reduces HR repair, inhibits RAD 51 foci formation, and accumulates γ-H2AX in breast cancer cells. Moreover, ferulic acid, when combined with ABT-888, renders breast cancer cells become hypersensitive to ABT-888. Our study indicates that ferulic acid in combination with ABT-888 treatment may serve as an effective combination chemotherapeutic agent as a natural bioactive compound. PMID:25677620

  12. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Kiran; De, Sachinandan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for riboflavin biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria are discussed. Genetically modified strains by employing genetic engineering and chemical analogues have been developed to enhance riboflavin production. The present review attempts to collect the currently available information on riboflavin production by microbes in general, while placing greater emphasis on food grade lactic acid bacteria and human gut commensals. For designing riboflavin‐enriched functional foods, proper selection and exploitation of riboflavin‐producing lactic acid bacteria is essential. Moreover, eliminating the in situ vitamin fortification step will decrease the cost of food production. PMID:26686515

  13. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Kiran; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2016-07-01

    Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for riboflavin biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria are discussed. Genetically modified strains by employing genetic engineering and chemical analogues have been developed to enhance riboflavin production. The present review attempts to collect the currently available information on riboflavin production by microbes in general, while placing greater emphasis on food grade lactic acid bacteria and human gut commensals. For designing riboflavin-enriched functional foods, proper selection and exploitation of riboflavin-producing lactic acid bacteria is essential. Moreover, eliminating the in situ vitamin fortification step will decrease the cost of food production. PMID:26686515

  14. IMPACT OF SOYBEAN OILS VARYING IN FATTY ACID PROFILE ON T CELL PROLIFERATION OF MODERATELY HYPERLIPIDEMIC SUBJECTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Linoleic acid and alpha linolenic acid are essential fatty acids, which play an important role in modulation of T cell proliferation. We studied the effects of feeding selectively bred and genetically modified soybean oils distinguished by altered fatty acid profiles, resulting in varied linoleic/li...

  15. Cell Division During Inhibition of Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Helmstetter, Charles E.; Pierucci, Olga

    1968-01-01

    When cultures of Escherichia coli B/r growing at various rates were exposed to ultraviolet light, mitomycin C, or nalidixic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis stopped but cell division continued for at least 20 min. The chromosome configurations in the cells which divided were estimated by determining the rate of DNA synthesis during the division cycle. The cultures were pulse-labeled with 14C-thymidine, and the amount of label incorporated into cells of different ages was found by measuring the radioactivity in cells born subsequent to the labeling period. The cells which divided in the absence of DNA synthesis were those which had completed a round of chromosome replication prior to the treatments. It was concluded that completion of a round of replication is a necessary and sufficient condition of DNA synthesis for cell division. PMID:4870278

  16. Differential effects of deoxycholic acid versus selenium metabolite methylselenol on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A typical part of the Western diet is a high fat intake that leads to increased levels of fecal bile acids, and these bile acids, primarily deoxycholic acid (DCA) in humans, have been believed to be tumor promoters of colon cancer. The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxyc...

  17. Anacardic acid induces apoptosis-like cell death in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Suhail; Bose, Chinchu; Banerji, Ashok; Nair, Bipin G; Chattoo, Bharat B

    2016-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid), extracted from cashew nut shell liquid, is a natural phenolic lipid well known for its strong antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. Its effect has been well studied in bacterial and mammalian systems but remains largely unexplored in fungi. The present study identifies antifungal, cytotoxic, and antioxidant activities of anacardic acid in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. It was found that anacardic acid causes inhibition of conidial germination and mycelial growth in this ascomycetous fungus. Phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, DNA degradation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggest that growth inhibition of fungus is mainly caused by apoptosis-like cell death. Broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK treatment indicated that anacardic acid induces caspase-independent apoptosis in M. oryzae. Expression of a predicted ortholog of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was upregulated during the process of apoptosis, suggesting the possibility of mitochondria dependent apoptosis via activation of apoptosis-inducing factor. Anacardic acid treatment leads to decrease in reactive oxygen species rather than increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation normally observed during apoptosis, confirming the antioxidant properties of anacardic acid as suggested by earlier reports. Our study also shows that anacardic acid renders the fungus highly sensitive to DNA damaging agents like ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS). Treatment of rice leaves with anacardic acid prevents M. oryzae from infecting the plant without affecting the leaf, suggesting that anacardic acid can be an effective antifungal agent. PMID:26381667

  18. Assessment of the environmental aspects of the DOE phosphoric acid fuel cell program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, H. L.; Cavagrotti, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The likely facets of a nationwide phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plant commercial system are described. The beneficial and adverse environmental impacts produced by the system are assessed. Eleven specific system activities are characterized and evaluated. Also included is a review of fuel cell technology and a description of DOE's National Fuel Cell Program. Based on current and reasonably foreseeable PAFC characteristics, no environmental or energy impact factor was identified that would significantly inhibit the commercialization of PAFC power plant technology.

  19. The Effect of a Retinoic Acid Derivative on Cell-Growth Inhibition in a Pulmonary Carcinoma Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Akita, Tomomi; Horiguchi, Michiko; Ozawa, Chihiro; Terada, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoma is a major cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Because the prognosis remains poor, the development of novel therapeutic approaches is highly desirable. In this study, we investigated the effect of Tamibarotene (Am80), a retinoic acid derivative, on the growth of human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Our ultimate goal in this study is to provide pulmonary carcinoma therapy with a new approach. First, we treated A549 cells with Am80 to clarify the effect of cell-growth inhibition. Am80 significantly reduced the viability of A549 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50 value, which was determined using CellTiter-Glo Luminescent Cell Viability assay, of Am80 and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) against A549 cells at 6 d was 49.1±8.1 µM and 92.3±8.0 µM, respectively. Furthermore, Am80 reduced the anchorage-independent cell-growth ability of A549 cells. However, it was not an apoptosis-mediated mechanism. These results suggest that Am80 can be used as an effective, novel cell-growth inhibitor in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26934924

  20. Gallic acid induces mitotic catastrophe and inhibits centrosomal clustering in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Si; Guan, Xin; Grün, Christoph; Zhou, Zhiqin; Schepers, Ute; Nick, Peter

    2015-12-25

    Cancer cells divide rapidly, providing medical targets for anticancer agents. The polyphenolic gallic acid (GA) is known to be toxic for certain cancer cells. However, the cellular mode of action has not been elucidated. Therefore, the current study addressed a potential effect of GA on the mitosis of cancer cells. GA inhibited viability of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. We could show, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), that this inhibition was accompanied by elevated frequency of cells arrested at the G2/M transition. This cell-cycle arrest was accompanied by mitotic catastrophe, and formation of cells with multiple nuclei. These aberrations were preceded by impaired centrosomal clustering. We arrive at a model of action, where GA inhibits the progression of the cell cycle at the G2/M phase by impairing centrosomal clustering which will stimulate mitotic catastrophe. Thus, GA has potential as compound against cervical cancer. PMID:26368671

  1. Effects of multivalent cations on cell wall-associated acid phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, S.I.; Brouillette, J.N.; Nagahashi, G.; Kumosinski, T.F.

    1988-09-01

    Primary cell walls, free from cytoplasmic contamination were prepared from corn (Zea mays L.) roots and potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers. After EDTA treatment, the bound acid phosphatase activities were measured in the presence of various multivalent cations. Under the conditions of minimized Donnan effect and at pH 4.2, the bound enzyme activity of potato tuber cell walls (PCW) was stimulated by Cu/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Za/sup 2 +/, and Mn/sup 2 +/; unaffected by Ba/sup 2 +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, and Pb/sup 2 +/; and inhibited by Al/sup 3 +/. The bound acid phosphatase of PCW was stimulated by a low concentration but inhibited by a higher concentration of Hg/sup 2 +/. On the other hand, in the case of corn root cells walls (CCW), only inhibition of the bound acid phosphatase by Al/sup 3 +/ and Hg/sup 2 +/ was observed. Kinetic analyses revealed that PCW acid phosphatase exhibited a negative cooperativity under all employed experimental conditions except in the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/. In contrast, CCW acid phosphatase showed no cooperative behavior. The presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ significantly reduced the effects of Hg/sup 2 +/ or Al/sup 3 +/, but not Mg/sup 2 +/, to the bound cell wall acid phosphatases. The salt solubilized (free) acid phosphatases from both PCW and CCW were not affected by the presence of tested cations except for Hg/sup 2 +/ or Al/sup 3 +/ which caused a Ca/sup 2 +/-insensitive inhibition of the enzymes. The induced stimulation or inhibition of bound acid phosphatases was quantitatively related to cation binding in the cell wall structure.

  2. [Mechanism of inhibiting the cell growth in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by valproic acid combined with temsirolimus].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong; Zhao, Yan; Dong, Li-Hua; Wang, Li; Cheng, Shu; Zhao, Wei-Li

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the mechanism of inhibiting the cell growth in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) combined with mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus (TEM). MTT assay and Wright's stain were used to assess cell growth inhibition and to detect the cell morphological changes respectively. The cell apoptosis, cell cycle and cell autophagy were determined by flow cytometry. Ultrastructure changes were confirmed by electron microscopy. Protein changes were detected by Western blot. The results showed that both VPA and TEM alone inhibited cell proliferation and the effect was more obvious in the combination group. VPA combined with TEM induced cell arrest in G0/G1 phase and upregulated the expression of autophagy-related protein LC3, without cell apoptosis. Moreover, typical autophagosomes were observed, further confirming the presence of autophagy. Western blot showed the changes of proteins involved in autophagy signaling pathway. VPA decreased HDAC1 and HDAC3 expression and increased histone acetylation, suggesting that VPA also affected lymphoma cell proliferation through epigenetic modification. It is concluded that the combined treatment of VPA and TEM induces cell cycle arrest and cell autophagy, which provides a new clue for their clinical application in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:24370026

  3. Lactic acid fermentation by cells immobilised on various porous cellulosic materials and their alginate/poly-lactic acid composites.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mrinal Nishant; Gialleli, Angelika-Ioanna; Masson, Jean Bernard; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Bekatorou, Argyro; Koutinas, Athanasios A; Kanellaki, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Porous delignified cellulose (or tubular cellulose, abbr. TC) from Indian Mango (Mangifera indica) and Sal (Shorea robusta) wood and Rice husk, and TC/Ca-alginate/polylactic acid composites, were used as Lactobacillus bulgaricus immobilisation carriers leading to improvements in lactic acid fermentation of cheese whey and synthetic lactose media, compared to free cells. Specifically, shorter fermentation rates, higher lactic acid yields (g/g sugar utilised) and productivities (g/Ld), and higher amounts of volatile by-products were achieved, while no significant differences were observed on the performance of the different immobilised biocatalysts. The proposed biocatalysts are of food grade purity, cheap and easy to prepare, and they are attractive for bioprocess development based on immobilised cells. Such composite biocatalysts may be used for the co-immobilisation of different microorganisms or enzymes (in separate layers of the biocatalyst), to efficiently conduct different types of fermentations in the same bioreactor, avoiding inhibition problems of chemical or biological (competition) nature. PMID:24690466

  4. Canine and feline parvoviruses preferentially recognize the non-human cell surface sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid.

    PubMed

    Löfling, Jonas; Lyi, Sangbom Michael; Parrish, Colin R; Varki, Ajit

    2013-05-25

    Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) is a pathogen whose canine-adapted form (canine parvovirus (CPV)) emerged in 1978. These viruses infect by binding host transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR), but also hemagglutinate erythrocytes. We show that hemagglutination involves selective recognition of the non-human sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) but not N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which differs by only one oxygen atom from Neu5Gc. Overexpression of α2-6 sialyltransferase did not change binding, indicating that both α2-3 and α2-6 linkages are recognized. However, Neu5Gc expression on target cells did not enhance CPV or FPV infection in vitro. Thus, the conserved Neu5Gc-binding preference of these viruses likely plays a role in the natural history of the virus in vivo. Further studies must clarify relationships between virus infection and host Neu5Gc expression. As a first step, we show that transcripts of CMAH (which generates Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac) are at very low levels in Western dog breed cells. PMID:23497940

  5. Inactivation of enveloped viruses and killing of cells by fatty acids and monoglycerides.

    PubMed Central

    Thormar, H; Isaacs, C E; Brown, H R; Barshatzky, M R; Pessolano, T

    1987-01-01

    Lipids in fresh human milk do not inactivate viruses but become antiviral after storage of the milk for a few days at 4 or 23 degrees C. The appearance of antiviral activity depends on active milk lipases and correlates with the release of free fatty acids in the milk. A number of fatty acids which are normal components of milk lipids were tested against enveloped viruses, i.e., vesicular stomatitis virus, herpes simplex virus, and visna virus, and against a nonenveloped virus, poliovirus. Short-chain and long-chain saturated fatty acids had no or a very small antiviral effect at the highest concentrations tested. Medium-chain saturated and long-chain unsaturated fatty acids, on the other hand, were all highly active against the enveloped viruses, although the fatty acid concentration required for maximum viral inactivation varied by as much as 20-fold. Monoglycerides of these fatty acids were also highly antiviral, in some instances at a concentration 10 times lower than that of the free fatty acids. None of the fatty acids inactivated poliovirus. Antiviral fatty acids were found to affect the viral envelope, causing leakage and at higher concentrations, a complete disintegration of the envelope and the viral particles. They also caused disintegration of the plasma membranes of tissue culture cells resulting in cell lysis and death. The same phenomenon occurred in cell cultures incubated with stored antiviral human milk. The antimicrobial effect of human milk lipids in vitro is therefore most likely caused by disintegration of cellular and viral membranes by fatty acids. Studies are needed to establish whether human milk lipids have an antimicrobial effect in the stomach and intestines of infants and to determine what role, if any, they play in protecting infants against gastrointestinal infections. Images PMID:3032090

  6. Effect of Chicoric Acid on Mast Cell-Mediated Allergic Inflammation in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Na Young; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Jin, Jong Sik; Bang, Keuk Soo; Eom, Ye-Jin; Hong, Chul-Hee; Nugroho, Agung; Park, Hee-Jun; An, Hyo-Jin

    2015-12-24

    Chicoric acid (dicaffeoyl-tartaric acid), is a natural phenolic compound found in a number of plants, such as chicory (Cichorium intybus) and Echinacea (Echinacea purpurea), which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and analgesic activities. Although these biological effects of chicoric acid have been investigated, there are no reports of its antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effects in human mast cells (HMC)-1 or anaphylactic activity in a mouse model. Therefore, we investigated the antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effect of chicoric acid and its underlying mechanisms of action using phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Chicoric acid decreased the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β. We studied the inhibitory effects of chicoric acid on the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activation of caspase-1. However, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation was not sufficient to abrogate the stimulus. In addition, we investigated the ability of chicoric acid to inhibit compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis in vivo. Oral administration of chicoric acid at 20 mg/kg inhibited histamine release and protected mice against compound 48/80-induced anaphylactic mortality. These results suggest that chicoric acid has an antiallergic-related anti-inflammatory effect that involves modulating mast cell-mediated allergic responses. Therefore, chicoric acid could be an efficacious agent for allergy-related inflammatory disorders. PMID:26593037

  7. Influence of retinoic acid on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in amyloid hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba Susan; Das, Subhadeep; Ghosh, Dhiman; Maji, Samir K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data related to the research article “Self healing hydrogels composed of amyloid nano fibrils for cell culture and stem cell differentiation” [1]. Here we probed the collective influence of all-trans retinoic acid (RA) and substrate properties (amyloid hydrogel) on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) differentiation. Stem cells were cultured on soft amyloid hydrogels [1], [2] in the presence and absence of matrix encapsulated RA. The cell morphology was imaged and assessed via quantification of circularity. Further immunostaining and quantitative real time PCR was used to quantify various markers of differentiation in the neuronal lineage. PMID:26740966

  8. Isonicotinic acid hydrazide inhibits cell population growth during teratogenesis of chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M V; Shah, V B; Modak, S P

    1991-01-01

    In chick embryos treated with a 4 hr pulse of 7.2 X 10(-5) M isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) the cell population growth is inhibited with an increased population doubling time. Teratogenised blastoderm cells complete their ongoing cell cycle and arrest in G1 phase. A chase with an equimolar concentration of pyridoxal-5-phosphate restores the growth rate after a lag of 4 hr equivalent to the duration of treatment with INH. Presumptive mesoblast cells invaginated through the primitive streak and neuroectoblast cells induced prior to the application of INH differentiate, while the teratogen inhibits morphogenesis and organization of organ primordia. PMID:1864614

  9. Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity: Implications for Multi-Targeted Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    D’Eliseo, Donatella; Velotti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a major disease worldwide. Despite progress in cancer therapy, conventional cytotoxic therapies lead to unsatisfactory long-term survival, mainly related to development of drug resistance by tumor cells and toxicity towards normal cells. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), can exert anti-neoplastic activity by inducing apoptotic cell death in human cancer cells either alone or in combination with conventional therapies. Indeed, n-3 PUFAs potentially increase the sensitivity of tumor cells to conventional therapies, possibly improving their efficacy especially against cancers resistant to treatment. Moreover, in contrast to traditional therapies, n-3 PUFAs appear to cause selective cytotoxicity towards cancer cells with little or no toxicity on normal cells. This review focuses on studies investigating the cytotoxic activity of n-3 PUFAs against cancer cells via apoptosis, analyzing the molecular mechanisms underlying this effective and selective activity. Here, we highlight the multiple molecules potentially targeted by n-3 PUFAs to trigger cancer cell apoptosis. This analysis can allow a better comprehension of the potential cytotoxic therapeutic role of n-3 PUFAs against cancer, providing specific information and support to design future pre-clinical and clinical studies for a better use of n-3 PUFAs in cancer therapy, mainly combinational therapy. PMID:26821053

  10. All-trans and 9-cis retinoic acid alter rat hepatic stellate cell phenotype differentially

    PubMed Central

    Hellemans, K; Grinko, I; Rombouts, K; Schuppan, D; Geerts, A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Hepatic stellate cells exert specific functions in the liver: storage of large amounts of retinyl esters, synthesis and breakdown of hepatic extracellular matrix, secretion of a variety of cytokines, and control of the diameter of the sinusoids.
AIMS—To examine the influence of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis retinoic acid (9RA) on extracellular matrix production and proliferation of activated hepatic stellate cells.
METHODS—Cells were isolated using collagenase/pronase, purified by centrifugation in nycodenz, and cultured for two weeks. At this time point the cells exhibited the activated phenotype. Cells were exposed to various concentrations of ATRA and 9RA. The expression of procollagens I, III, and IV, of fibronectin and of laminin were analysed by immunoprecipitation and northern hybridisation.
RESULTS—ATRA exerted a significant inhibitory effect on the synthesis of procollagens type I, III, and IV, fibronectin, and laminin, but did not influence stellate cell proliferation, whereas 9RA showed a clear but late effect on proliferation. 9RA increased procollagen I mRNA 1.9-fold, but did not affect the expression of other matrix proteins.
CONCLUSION—Results showed that ATRA and 9RA exert different, often contrary effects on activated stellate cells. These observations may explain prior divergent results obtained following retinoid administration to cultured stellate cells or in animals subjected to fibrogenic stimuli.


Keywords: hepatic stellate cells; retinoic acid; extracellular matrix proteins; proliferation PMID:10369717

  11. Effect of alpha Ni3S2 on arachidonic acid metabolites in cultured human lung cells (L132 cell line).

    PubMed

    Shirali, P; Teissier, E; Marez, T; Hildebrand, H F; Haguenoer, J M

    1994-04-01

    Our previous investigations have shown evidence of an interaction between alpha Ni3S2 and membranous and cellular lipids of lung cells with a significant increase in the linoleic, linolenic and arachidonic acid pool. The present work is designed to follow the metabolic fate of arachidonic acid in alpha Ni3S2-exposed human embryonic pulmonary epithelial cells (L132) in culture (50 microM alpha Ni3S2 for 3 days). The metabolites of arachidonic acid were assessed by HPLC determination coupled with UV or electrochemical detection. We determined malondialdehyde (MDA), hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), leukotrienes (LT) and reduced glutathione (GSH). In exposed cells we observed a significant increase of MDA, which is a breakdown product of lipid peroxidation. In addition, we noted significant increases of 5-HETE and 15-HETE in L132 cells resulting from the enzymatic reduction of 5-HPETE and 15-HPETE respectively. There was also a simultaneous decrease of GSH--confirmed by a strong decrease of GSH in exposed cells with respect to controls. 5-HPETE is furthermore converted to epoxides such as leukotriene A4 and we also quantified in exposed cells a significant increase of its subsequent catabolites LTB4, LTC4 and LTE4. These investigations show clearly that exposure of L132 cells to alpha Ni3S2 enhances lipid peroxidation based upon direct measurements of MDA and other metabolites of arachidonic acid. This lipid peroxidation is an autocatalytic free-radical process and could be responsible for DNA damage. PMID:8149492

  12. The cumulus cell layer protects the bovine maturing oocyte against fatty acid-induced lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Francesca; Brouwers, Jos F; de Lest, Chris H A van; Wubbolts, Richard; Aardema, Hilde; Priore, Paola; Roelen, Bernard A J; Helms, J Bernd; Gadella, Bart M

    2015-01-01

    Mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue during metabolic stress increases the amount of free fatty acids in blood and follicular fluid and is associated with impaired female fertility. In a previous report, we described the effects of the three predominant fatty acids in follicular fluid (saturated palmitate and stearate and unsaturated oleate) on oocyte maturation and quality. In the current study, the effects of elevated fatty acid levels on cumulus cells were investigated. In a dose-dependent manner, the three fatty acids induced lipid storage in cumulus cells accompanied by an enhanced immune labeling of perilipin-2, a marker for lipid droplets. Lipidomic analysis confirmed incorporation of the administered fatty acids into triglyceride, resulting in a 3- to 6-fold increase of triglyceride content. In addition, palmitate selectively induced ceramide formation, which has been implicated in apoptosis. Indeed, of the three fatty acids tested, palmitate induced reactive oxygen species formation, caspase 3 activation, and mitochondria deterioration, leading to degeneration of the cumulus cell layers. This effect could be mimicked by addition of the ceramide-C2 analog and could be inhibited by the ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin-B1. Interfering with the intactness of the cumulus cell layers, either by mechanical force or by palmitate treatment, resulted in enhanced uptake of lipids in the oocyte and increased radical formation. Our results show that cumulus cells act as a barrier, protecting oocytes from in vitro induced lipotoxic effects. We suggest that this protective function of the cumulus cell layers is important for the developmental competence of the oocyte. The relevance of our findings for assisted reproduction technologies is discussed. PMID:25297544

  13. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other. PMID:25010412

  14. Relationship between cadmium, zinc, Cd-peptide, and organic acid in tobacco suspension cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krotz, R.M.; Evangelou, B.P.; Wagner, G.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Responses of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) suspension cells to Cd and Zn were studied in the presence and absence of ligand of Cd-peptide in order to understand the role of this peptide versus other mechanisms in Cd and Zn accumulation and accommodation in plants. With 45 micromolar Cd and 300 micromolar Zn (non-growth-inhibiting levels), metals appeared rapidly within cells, and intracellular Cd and Zn reached medium concentrations after 6 to 10 hours. Cd-peptide was observed in response to Cd after 2 hours, but this form only accounted for {approximately}30% of soluble Cd after 24 hours. Peptide was not observed in cells exposed to 300 micromolar Zn for up to 7 days. Organic acid-to-metal stoichiometry indicated that endogenous organic acid content of cells was more than sufficient to complex absorbed metals and no evidence was found for stimulation of organic acid biosynthesis by Cd or Zn. Metal-complexing potential of organic acids for Cd and Zn versus endogenous cations is discussed as is vacuolar-extravacuolar distribution of metals. The absence of Cd-peptide does not limit Cd-accumulation in the system studied. Results suggest that tobacco suspension cells accommodte the presence of non-growth-inhibiting and growth-inhibiting levels of Cd and Zn by sequestration in the vacuole as complexes with endogenous organic acids and that this may be a principal means for accommodation of Cd as well as Zn in the presence and absence of Cd-peptide.

  15. STRUCTURAL REMODELING OF PROTEOGLYCANS UPON RETINOIC ACID-INDUCED DIFFERENTIATION OF NCCIT CELLS*

    PubMed Central

    Gasimli, Leyla; Stansfield, Hope E.; Nairn, Alison V.; Liu, Haiying; Paluh, Janet L.; Yang, Bo; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Moremen, Kelley W.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent and multipotent cells become increasingly lineage restricted through differentiation. Alterations to the cellular proteoglycan composition and structure should accompany these changes to influence cell proliferation, delineation of tissues and acquisition of cell migration capabilities. Retinoic acid plays an important role in pre-patterning of the early embryo. Retinoic acid can be used in vitro to induce differentiation, causing pluripotent and multipotent cells to become increasingly lineage restricted. We examined retinoic acid-induced changes in the cellular proteoglycan composition of the well-characterized teratocarcinoma line NCCIT. Our analysis revealed changes in the abundance of transcripts for genes encoding core proteins, enzymes that are responsible for early and late linkage region biosynthesis, as well as enzymes for GAG chain extension and modification. Transcript levels for genes encoding core proteins used as backbones for polysaccharide synthesis revealed highly significant increases in expression of lumican and decorin, 1500-fold and 2800-fold, respectively. Similarly, glypican 3, glypican 5, versican and glypican 6 showed increases between 5 and 70-fold. Significant decreases in biglycan, serglycin, glypican 4, aggrecan, neurocan, CD74 and glypican 1 were observed. Disaccharide analysis of the glycans in heparin/heparan sulfate and chondroitin/dermatan sulfate revealed retinoic acid-induced changes restricted to chondroitin/dermatan sulfate glycans. Our study provides the first detailed analysis of changes in the glycosaminoglycan profile of human pluripotent cells upon treatment with the retinoic acid morphogen. PMID:23053635

  16. Structural remodeling of proteoglycans upon retinoic acid-induced differentiation of NCCIT cells.

    PubMed

    Gasimli, Leyla; Stansfield, Hope E; Nairn, Alison V; Liu, Haiying; Paluh, Janet L; Yang, Bo; Dordick, Jonathan S; Moremen, Kelley W; Linhardt, Robert J

    2013-07-01

    Pluripotent and multipotent cells become increasingly lineage restricted through differentiation. Alterations to the cellular proteoglycan composition and structure should accompany these changes to influence cell proliferation, delineation of tissues and acquisition of cell migration capabilities. Retinoic acid plays an important role in pre-patterning of the early embryo. Retinoic acid can be used in vitro to induce differentiation, causing pluripotent and multipotent cells to become increasingly lineage restricted. We examined retinoic acid-induced changes in the cellular proteoglycan composition of the well-characterized teratocarcinoma line NCCIT. Our analysis revealed changes in the abundance of transcripts for genes encoding core proteins, enzymes that are responsible for early and late linkage region biosynthesis, as well as enzymes for GAG chain extension and modification. Transcript levels for genes encoding core proteins used as backbones for polysaccharide synthesis revealed highly significant increases in expression of lumican and decorin, 1,500-fold and 2,800-fold, respectively. Similarly, glypican 3, glypican 5, versican and glypican 6 showed increases between 5 and 70-fold. Significant decreases in biglycan, serglycin, glypican 4, aggrecan, neurocan, CD74 and glypican 1 were observed. Disaccharide analysis of the glycans in heparin/heparan sulfate and chondroitin/dermatan sulfate revealed retinoic acid-induced changes restricted to chondroitin/dermatan sulfate glycans. Our study provides the first detailed analysis of changes in the glycosaminoglycan profile of human pluripotent cells upon treatment with the retinoic acid morphogen. PMID:23053635

  17. Coke-free direct formic acid solid oxide fuel cells operating at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yubo; Su, Chao; Zheng, Tao; Shao, Zongping

    2012-12-01

    Formic acid is investigated as a fuel for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) for the first time. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that carbon deposition is avoidable above 600 °C. The carbon deposition properties are also investigated experimentally by first treating a nickel plus yttria-stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ) anode material in particle form under a formic acid-containing atmosphere for a limited time at 500-800 °C and then analyzing the particles by O2-TPO. This analysis confirms that carbon deposition on Ni-YSZ is weak above 600 °C. We further treat half-cells composed of YSZ electrolyte and Ni-YSZ anode under formic acid-containing atmosphere at 600, 700 and 800 °C; the anodes maintain their original geometric shape and microstructure and show no obvious weight gain. It suggests that formic acid can be directly fed into SOFCs constructed with conventional nickel-based cermet anodes. I-V tests show that the cell delivers a promising peak power density of 571 mW cm-2 at 800 °C. In addition, the cells also show good performance stability. The results indicate that formic acid is highly promising as a direct fuel for SOFCs without the need for cell material modifications.

  18. Synergism of α-linolenic acid, conjugated linoleic acid and calcium in decreasing adipocyte and increasing osteoblast cell growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youjin; Kelly, Owen J; Ilich, Jasminka Z

    2013-08-01

    Whole fat milk and dairy products (although providing more energy compared to low- or non-fat products), are good sources of α-linolenic acid (ALA), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and calcium, which may be favorable in modulating bone and adipose tissue metabolism. We examined individual and/or synergistic effects of ALA, CLA and calcium (at levels similar to those in whole milk/dairy products) in regulating bone and adipose cell growth. ST2 stromal, MC3T3-L1 adipocyte-like and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells were treated with: (a) linoleic acid (LNA):ALA ratios = 1-5:1; (b) individual/combined 80-90 % c9, t11 (9,11) and 5-10 % t10, c12 (10,12) CLA isomers; (c) 0.5-3.0 mM calcium; (d) combinations of (a), (b), (c); and (e) control. Local mediators, including eicosanoids and growth factors, were measured. (a) The optimal effect was found at the 4:1 LNA:ALA ratio where insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) production was the lowest in MC3T3-L1 cells. (b) All CLA isomer blends decreased MC3T3-L1 and increased MC3T3-E1 cell differentiation. (c) 1.5-2.5 mM calcium increased ST2 and MC3T3-E1, and decreased MC3T3-L1 cell proliferation. (d) Combination of 4:1 LNA:ALA + 90:10 % CLA + 2.0 mM calcium lowered MC3T3-L1 and increased MC3T3-E1 cell differentiation. Overall, the optimal LNA:ALA ratio to enhance osteoblastogenesis and inhibit adipogenesis was 4:1. This effect was enhanced by 90:10 % CLA + 2.0 mM calcium, indicating possible synergism of these dietary factors in promoting osteoblast and inhibiting adipocyte differentiation in cell cultures. PMID:23757205

  19. Differential regulation of Na/H antiporter by acid in renal epithelial cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Moe, O W; Miller, R T; Horie, S; Cano, A; Preisig, P A; Alpern, R J

    1991-01-01

    Increased Na/H antiporter activity has been demonstrated after in vivo chronic metabolic acidosis as well as in vitro acid preincubation of cultured rabbit renal tubule cells. To study the underlying molecular mechanisms of this adaptive increase in Na/H antiporter activity, the present studies examined the effect of low pH media on Na/H antiporter activity and mRNA abundance in cultured renal tubule cells. Na/H antiporter activity was increased by 60% in a mouse renal cortical tubule cell line (MCT), and by 90% in an opossum kidney cell line (OKP) after 24 h of preincubation in acid (low [HCO3]) media. The ethylisopropylamiloride sensitivity of the Na/H antiporters were different in these two cell lines (MCT IC50 = 65 nM; OKP IC50 = 4.5 microM). In MCT cells, Na/H antiporter mRNA abundance measured by RNA blots increased by two- to fivefold after 24 h in low [HCO3] media. Na/H antiporter mRNA abundance was also increased in MCT cells with high CO2 preincubation as well as in rat renal cortex with in vivo chronic acid feeding. In contrast to renal epithelia, acid preincubation of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts led to suppression of Na/H antiporter activity. RNA blots of 3T3 fibroblasts revealed the same size Na/H antiporter transcript as in MCT cells. However, Na/H antiporter mRNA levels were suppressed by acid preincubation. These studies demonstrate differential regulation of Na/H antiporter activity and mRNA abundance in renal epithelial cells and fibroblasts in response to an acidotic environment. Images PMID:1658050

  20. Progress and prospects for phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bonville, L.J.; Scheffler, G.W.; Smith, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    International Fuel Cells (IFC) has developed the fuel cell power plant as a new, on-site power generation source. IFC`s commercial fuel cell product is the 200-kW PC25{trademark} power plant. To date over 100 PC25 units have been manufactured. Fleet operating time is in excess of one million hours. Individual units of the initial power plant model, the PC25 A, have operated for more than 30,000 hours. The first model {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} power plant has over 10,000 hours of operation. The manufacturing, application and operation of this power plant fleet has established a firm base for design and technology development in terms of a clear understanding of the requirements for power plant reliability and durability. This fleet provides the benchmark against which power plant improvements must be measured.

  1. Potential in vitro Protective Effect of Quercetin, Catechin, Caffeic Acid and Phytic Acid against Ethanol-Induced Oxidative Stress in SK-Hep-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ki-Mo; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Yun, Chul-Ho; Kwak, Hahn-Shik

    2012-01-01

    Phytochemicals have been known to exhibit potent antioxidant activity. This study examined cytoprotective effects of phytochemicals including quercetin, catechin, caffeic acid, and phytic acid against oxidative damage in SK-Hep-1 cells induced by the oxidative and non-oxidative metabolism of ethanol. Exposure of the cells to excess ethanol resulted in a significant increase in cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, lipid hydroperoxide (LPO), and antioxidant enzyme activity. Excess ethanol also caused a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the quantity of reduced glutathione (GSH). Co-treatment of cells with ethanol and quercetin, catechin, caffeic acid and phytic acid significantly inhibited oxidative ethanol metabolism-induced cytotoxicity by blocking ROS production. When the cells were treated with ethanol after pretreatment of 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP), increased cytotoxicity, ROS production, antioxidant enzyme activity, and loss of MMP were observed. The addition of quercetin, catechin, caffeic acid and phytic acid to these cells showed suppression of non-oxidative ethanol metabolism-induced cytotoxicity, similar to oxidative ethanol metabolism. These results suggest that quercetin, catechin, caffeic acid and phytic acid have protective effects against ethanol metabolism-induced oxidative insult in SK-Hep-1 cells by blocking ROS production and elevating antioxidant potentials. PMID:24009840

  2. In Vitro Cytotoxic Effects of Celecoxib, Mefenamic Acid, Aspirin and Indometacin on Several Cells Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Mehrabizadeh Honarmand, Hoda; Falsafi, Farideh; Tahmasebi Arashlo, Mehrnaz; Rajabalian, Saied; Gandjalikhan Nassab, Sayed Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Use of cyclooxygenase inhibitors as chemotherapy agents has attracted the attention of a large number of investigators in recent years. Given the importance of cancer therapy, only a limited number of studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on specific cell lines. Purpose This research aimed to determine the in vitro cytotoxic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors) on KB, Saos-2, 1321N, U-87MG, SFBF-PI 39 cell lines. Materials and Method Powders of celecoxib, mefenamic acid, aspirin and indometacin were dissolved in the appropriate solvent. The viability of cell lines was carried out by MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay technique. Data gathered from four separate experiments were expressed as mean±SD. Statistical significance was defined at p< 0.05 by using analysis of variance. Significant treatment mean values were subjected to post-hoc Tukey’s test. Results Celecoxib showed marked cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells, which was significant in comparison with the control group. Celecoxib was not effective in killing U-87MG cell line. Mefenamic acid exerted cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells, where the viability was approximately 75%. U-87MG cells were resistant to mefenamic acid. Indometacin had the highest rate of activity on U-87MG cells, which was significant in comparison with the control group. Aspirin did not exhibit any activity on these cell lines and was not effective in killing U-87MG, KB, Saos-2, and 1321N cells. Conclusion This research showed that celecoxib, indometacin, and mefenamic acid have the cytotoxic effects on KB, Saos-2, 1321N and U-87MG cell lines. Therefore, it appears that these drugs can be considered as anti-neoplastic agents in the experimental phase. PMID:27602398

  3. Exogenous fatty acid binding protein 4 promotes human prostate cancer cell progression.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Hisanori; Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Oha, Mina; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Izumi, Keisuke

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have found that obesity is associated with malignant grade and mortality in prostate cancer. Several adipokines have been implicated as putative mediating factors between obesity and prostate cancer. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), a member of the cytoplasmic fatty acid binding protein multigene family, was recently identified as a novel adipokine. Although FABP4 is released from adipocytes and mean circulating concentrations of FABP4 are linked with obesity, effects of exogenous FABP4 on prostate cancer progression are unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of exogenous FABP4 on human prostate cancer cell progression. FABP4 treatment promoted serum-induced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro. Furthermore, oleic acid promoted prostate cancer cell invasion only if FABP4 was present in the medium. These promoting effects were reduced by FABP4 inhibitor, which inhibits FABP4 binding to fatty acids. Immunostaining for FABP4 showed that exogenous FABP4 was taken up into DU145 cells in three-dimensional culture. In mice, treatment with FABP4 inhibitor reduced the subcutaneous growth and lung metastasis of prostate cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the number of apoptotic cells, positive for cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, was increased in subcutaneous tumors of FABP4 inhibitor-treated mice, as compared with control mice. These results suggest that exogenous FABP4 might promote human prostate cancer cell progression by binding with fatty acids. Additionally, exogenous FABP4 activated the PI3K/Akt pathway, independently of binding to fatty acids. Thus, FABP4 might be a key molecule to understand the mechanisms underlying the obesity-prostate cancer progression link. PMID:24740818

  4. An in vitro co-culture model of esophageal cells identifies ascorbic acid as a modulator of cell competition

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The evolutionary dynamics between interacting heterogeneous cell types are fundamental properties of neoplastic progression but can be difficult to measure and quantify. Cancers are heterogeneous mixtures of mutant clones but the direct effect of interactions between these clones is rarely documented. The implicit goal of most preventive interventions is to bias competition in favor of normal cells over neoplastic cells. However, this is rarely explicitly tested. Here we have developed a cell culture competition model to allow for direct observation of the effect of chemopreventive or therapeutic agents on two interacting cell types. We have examined competition between normal and Barrett's esophagus cell lines, in the hopes of identifying a system that could screen for potential chemopreventive agents. Methods One fluorescently-labeled normal squamous esophageal cell line (EPC2-hTERT) was grown in competition with one of four Barrett's esophagus cell lines (CP-A, CP-B, CP-C, CP-D) under varying conditions and the outcome of competition measured over 14 days by flow cytometry. Results We demonstrate that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) can help squamous cells outcompete Barrett's cells in this system. We are also able to show that ascorbic acid's boost to the relative fitness of squamous cells was increased in most cases by mimicking the pH conditions of gastrointestinal reflux in the lower esophagus. Conclusions This model is able to integrate differential fitness effects on various cell types, allowing us to simultaneously capture effects on interacting cell types without having to perform separate experiments. This model system may be used to screen for new classes of cancer prevention agents designed to modulate the competition between normal and neoplastic cells. PMID:22026449

  5. Cell-free cartilage engineering approach using hyaluronic acid-polycaprolactone scaffolds: a study in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lebourg, M; Martínez-Díaz, S; García-Giralt, N; Torres-Claramunt, R; Gómez-Tejedor, J A; Ribelles, J L Gómez; Vila-Canet, G; Monllau, J C

    2014-05-01

    Polycaprolactone scaffolds modified with cross-linked hyaluronic acid were prepared in order to establish whether a more hydrophilic and biomimetic microenvironment benefits the progenitor cells arriving from bone marrow in a cell-free tissue-engineering approach. The polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/hyaluronic acid scaffolds were characterized in terms of morphology and water absorption capacity. The polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/hyaluronic acid samples were implanted in a chondral defect in rabbits; bleeding of the subchondral bone was provoked to generate a spontaneous healing response. Repair at 1, 4, 12, and 24 weeks was assessed macroscopically using the International Cartilage Repair Society score and the Oswestry Arthroscopy Score and microscopically using immunohistological staining for collagen type I and type II, and for Ki-67. The presence of hyaluronic acid improves scaffold performance, which supports a good repair response without biomaterial pre-seeding. PMID:24108064

  6. Permeability of Rosmarinic acid in Prunella vulgaris and Ursolic acid in Salvia officinalis Extracts across Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Zhiyi; Ye, Zhong; Hauck, Cathy; Murphy, Patricia A.; McCoy, Joe-Ann; Widrlechner, Mark P.; Reddy, Manju B.; Hendrich, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Rosmarinic acid (RA), a caffeic acid-related compound found in high concentrations in Prunella vulgaris (self-heal), and ursolic acid (UA), a pentacyclic triterpene acid concentrated in Salvia officinalis (sage), have been traditionally used to treat inflammation in the mouth, and may also be beneficial for gastrointestinal health in general. Aim of the study To investigate the permeabilities of RA and UA as pure compounds and in P. vulgaris and S. officinalis ethanol extracts across human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cell monolayers. Materials and methods The permeabilities and Phase II biotransformation of RA and UA as pure compounds and in herbal extracts were compared using Caco-2 cells with HPLC detection. Results The apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) for RA and RA in P. vulgaris extracts was 0.2 ± 0.05 × 10−6 cm/s, significantly increased to 0.9 ± 0.2 × 10−6 cm/s after β-glucuronidase/sulfatase treatment. Papp for UA and UA in S. officinalis extract was 2.7 ± 0.3 × 10−6 cm/s and 2.3 ± 0.5 × 10−6 cm/s before and after β-glucuronidase/sulfatase treatment, respectively. Neither compound was affected in permeability by the herbal extract matrix. Conclusion RA and UA in herbal extracts had similar uptake as that found using the pure compounds, which may simplify the prediction of compound efficacy, but the apparent lack of intestinal glucuronidation/sulfation of UA is likely to further enhance the bioavailability of that compound compared with RA. PMID:21798330

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  8. Deoxycholic Acid and Selenium Metabolite Methylselenol Exert Common and Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle, Apoptosis, and MAP Kinase Pathway in HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a known tumor promoter in colon tumor development. The cell growth inhibition induced by DCA may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and provide selection for subpopulations of cells resistant to DCA’s inhibitory effect. These survivi...

  9. Synthesis of novel acid electrolytes for phosphoric acid fuel cells. Final report, May 1985-October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Adcock, J.L.

    1988-11-01

    Construction of a 40-millimole-per-hour-scale aerosol direct-fluorination reactor was completed June 26, 1986. F-Methyl F-4-methoxybutanoate and F-4-methoxybutanoyl fluoride were synthesized by aerosol direct fluorination of methyl 4-methoxybutanoate. Basic hydrolysis of the perfluorinated derivatives produce sodium F-4-methoxybutanoate which was pyrolyzed to F-3-methoxy-1-propene. Purification and shipment of 33 grams of F-3-methoxy-1-propene followed. Syntheses by analogous methods allowed production and shipment of 5 grams of F-3-ethoxy-1-propene, 18 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy)-1-propene, and 37 grams of F-3,3-dimethyl-1-butene. Eighteen grams of F-2,2-dimethyl-1-chloropropane was produced directly and shipped. As suggested by other contractors, 5 grams of F-3-methoxy-1-iodopropane, and 5 grams of F-3-(2-methoxy.ethoxy)-1-iodopropane were produced by converting the respective precursor acid sodium salts produced for olefin synthesis to the silver salts and pyrolyzing them with iodine. Each of these compounds was prepared for the first time by the aerosol fluorination process during the course of the contract. These samples were provided to other GRI contractors for synthesis of perfluorinated sulfur(VI) and phosphorous(V) acids.

  10. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  11. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  12. Polymer length of teichuronic acid released from cell walls of Micrococcus luteus.

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, P J; Hildebrandt, K M; Dickie, J P; Anderson, J S

    1990-01-01

    Teichuronic acid released from its phosphodiester linkage to peptidoglycan in the cell walls of Micrococcus luteus by mild acid treatment is resolved into a ladderlike series of bands by electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels in the presence of borate. Each band of the ladder differs from its nearest neighbor by one disaccharide repeat unit, ----4)-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-mannopyranuronosyl-(1----6)- alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-. Acid-fragmented teichuronic acid, after conversion to the phenylamine derivative, was fractionated by preparative-scale molecular sieve column chromatography, which produced a series of elution peaks. Fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of the smallest member of the series determined its molecular weight and established its identity as the phenylamine derivative of one disaccharide repeat unit of teichuronic acid. Homologous fractions of the same series were used to index the ladder of bands obtained by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from samples containing a more extensive distribution of polymer lengths. Nearly native teichuronic acid consists of polymers with a broad range of molecular sizes ranging from 20 to 55 disaccharide units. The most abundant species are those which have 25 to 40 repeat units. Prolonged treatment of teichuronic acid with the acid conditions used to release it from peptidoglycan causes gradual fragmentation of the teichuronic acid. Images PMID:2394683

  13. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids attenuate cigarette smoke extract-induced interleukin-8 production in bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen-Jiang; Sun, Yan-Hong; Jiang, Jun-Xia; Dong, Xin-Wei; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Xie, Qiang-Min

    2015-03-01

    In response to endothelial cell activation, arachidonic acid can be converted by cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenases to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), which have potent vasodilator and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of exogenous EETs on cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced inflammation in human bronchial epithelial cells (NCI-H292). We found that CSE inhibited the expression of CYP2C8 and mildly stimulated the expression of epoxide hydrolase 2 (EPHX2) but did not change the expression of CYP2J2. Treatment with 11,12-EET or 14,15-EET attenuated the CSE-induced release of interleukin (IL)-8 by inhibiting the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Our results demonstrated that CSE may reduce the anti-inflammatory ability of epithelial cells themselves by lowering the EET level. EETs from pulmonary epithelial cells may play a critical protective role on epithelial cell injury. PMID:25467970

  14. Effect of Poliovirus on Deoxyribonucleic Acid Synthesis in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, W. W.; Cox, D. C.; Kurtz, H.; Powers, C. D.; Davies, S. J.

    1966-01-01

    Ackermann, W. W. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), D. C. Cox, H. Kurtz, C. D. Powers, and S. J. Davies. Effect of poliovirus on deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in HeLa cells. J. Bacteriol. 91:1943–1952. 1966.—Both poliovirus and arginine stimulated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in cultures of HeLa cells which were preconditioned by incubation in a medium deficient in arginine. However, the number of cells producing DNA was unaffected. DNA synthesis in such preconditioned cells was 10 to 20% of the maximal value obtained with a full complement of amino acids. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was produced in these cultures either by increasing the multiplicity of exposure above 40 plaque-forming units of virus per cell or by increasing the concentration of the deficient amino acid at the time of virus addition. Inhibition of DNA synthesis resulted from a reduction in the fraction of cells producing DNA. The concentration of arginine required for viral inhibition of DNA synthesis is greater than that for viral multiplication. PMID:4287076

  15. Periplasmic Acid Stress Increases Cell Division Asymmetry (Polar Aging) of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Michelle W.; Yie, Anna M.; Eder, Elizabeth K.; Dennis, Richard G.; Basting, Preston J.; Martinez, Keith A.; Jones, Brian D.; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2015-01-01

    Under certain kinds of cytoplasmic stress, Escherichia coli selectively reproduce by distributing the newer cytoplasmic components to new-pole cells while sequestering older, damaged components in cells inheriting the old pole. This phenomenon is termed polar aging or cell division asymmetry. It is unknown whether cell division asymmetry can arise from a periplasmic stress, such as the stress of extracellular acid, which is mediated by the periplasm. We tested the effect of periplasmic acid stress on growth and division of adherent single cells. We tracked individual cell lineages over five or more generations, using fluorescence microscopy with ratiometric pHluorin to measure cytoplasmic pH. Adherent colonies were perfused continually with LBK medium buffered at pH 6.00 or at pH 7.50; the external pH determines periplasmic pH. In each experiment, cell lineages were mapped to correlate division time, pole age and cell generation number. In colonies perfused at pH 6.0, the cells inheriting the oldest pole divided significantly more slowly than the cells inheriting the newest pole. In colonies perfused at pH 7.50 (near or above cytoplasmic pH), no significant cell division asymmetry was observed. Under both conditions (periplasmic pH 6.0 or pH 7.5) the cells maintained cytoplasmic pH values at 7.2–7.3. No evidence of cytoplasmic protein aggregation was seen. Thus, periplasmic acid stress leads to cell division asymmetry with minimal cytoplasmic stress. PMID:26713733

  16. Intraluminal acid activates esophageal nodose C fibers after mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shizhong; Liu, Zhenyu; Heldsinger, Andrea; Owyang, Chung; Yu, Shaoyong

    2014-02-01

    Acid reflux in the esophagus can induce esophageal painful sensations such as heartburn and noncardiac chest pain. The mechanisms underlying acid-induced esophageal nociception are not clearly understood. In our previous studies, we characterized esophageal vagal nociceptive afferents and defined their responses to noxious mechanical and chemical stimulation. In the present study, we aim to determine their responses to intraluminal acid infusion. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose ganglion neurons with intact nerve endings in the esophagus using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal intraluminal acid perfusion were compared in naive and ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged animals, followed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the expression of tight junction proteins (zona occludens-1 and occludin). In naive guinea pigs, intraluminal infusion with either acid (pH = 2-3) or capsaicin did not evoke an action potential discharge in esophageal nodose C fibers. In OVA-sensitized animals, following esophageal mast cell activation by in vivo OVA inhalation, intraluminal acid infusion for about 20 min started to evoke action potential discharges. This effect is further confirmed by selective mast cell activation using in vitro tissue OVA challenge in esophageal-vagal preparations. OVA inhalation leads to decreased TEER and zona occludens-1 expression, suggesting an impaired esophageal epithelial barrier function after mast cell activation. These data for the first time provide direct evidence of intraluminal acid-induced activation of esophageal nociceptive C fibers and suggest that mast cell activation may make esophageal epithelium more permeable to acid, which subsequently may increase esophageal vagal nociceptive C fiber activation. PMID:24264049

  17. Relationship between Mast Cells and the Colitis with Relapse Induced by Trinitrobenzesulphonic Acid in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Luchini, Ana Carolina; Costa de Oliveira, Déborah Mara; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio; Gomes, José Carlos

    2009-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify the role of mast cells in colitis with relapse induced in Wistar rats by trinitrobenzenosulphonic acid. Colitis induction increased the histamine concentration in the colon, which peaked on day 26. The number of mast cells, probably immature, was ten times higher on day 8. Different from animals infected with intestinal parasites, after colitis remission, mast cells do not migrate to the spleen, showing that mast cell proliferation presents different characteristics depending on the inflammation stimuli. Treatment with sulfasalazine, doxantrazole, quercetin, or nedocromil did not increase the histamine concentration or the mast cell number in the colon on day 26, thereby showing absence of degranulation of these cells. In conclusion, although mast cell proliferation is associated with colitis, these cells and their mediators appear to play no clear role in the colitis with relapses. PMID:19436763

  18. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Is a Functional Marker of Adult Hippocampal Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Tara L.; Overall, Rupert W.; Vogler, Steffen; Sykes, Alex M.; Ruhwald, Susann; Lasse, Daniela; Ichwan, Muhammad; Fabel, Klaus; Kempermann, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here, we show that the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1) is expressed by a defined population of type 1 stem cells and type 2a precursor cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus. LPA1, in contrast to Nestin, also marks the quiescent stem cell population. Combining LPA1-GFP with EGFR and prominin-1 expression, we have enabled the prospective separation of both proliferative and non-proliferative precursor cell populations. Transcriptional profiling of the isolated proliferative precursor cells suggested immune mechanisms and cytokine signaling as molecular regulators of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation. In addition to LPA1 being a marker of this important stem cell population, we also show that the corresponding ligand LPA is directly involved in the regulation of adult hippocampal precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis, an effect that can be attributed to LPA signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. PMID:27050949

  19. Metabolism of Abscisic Acid in Guard Cells of Vicia faba L. and Commelina communis L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Grantz, David A.; Ho, Tuan-Hua David; Uknes, Scott J.; Cheeseman, John M.; Boyer, John S.

    1985-01-01

    Metabolism of abscisic acid (ABA) was investigated in isolated guard cells and in mesophyll tissue of Vicia faba L. and Commelina communis L. After incubation in buffer containing [G-3H]±ABA, the tissue was extracted by grinding and the metabolites separated by thin layer chromatography. Guard cells of Commelina metabolized ABA to phaseic acid (PA), dihydrophaseic acid (DPA), and alkali labile conjugates. Guard cells of Vicia formed only the conjugates. Mesophyll cells of Commelina accumulated DPA while mesophyll cells of Vicia accumulated PA. Controls showed that the observed metabolism was not due to extracellular enzyme contaminants nor to bacterial action. Metabolism of ABA in guard cells suggests a mechanism for removal of ABA, which causes stomatal closure of both species, from the stomatal complex. Conversion to metabolites which are inactive in stomatal regulation, within the cells controlling stomatal opening, might precede detectable changes in levels of ABA in bulk leaf tissue. The differences observed between Commelina and Vicia in metabolism of ABA in guard cells, and in the accumulation product in the mesophyll, may be related to differences in stomatal sensitivity to PA which have been reported for these species. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16664207

  20. Taxol induced apoptosis regulates amino acid transport in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanyuan; Shen, Dejun; Chen, Zujian; Clayton, Sheila; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2007-03-01

    A major outcome from Taxol treatment is induction of tumor cell apoptosis. However, metabolic responses to Taxol-induced apoptosis are poorly understood. In this study, we hypothesize that alterations in specific amino acid transporters may affect the Taxol-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells. In this case, the activity of the given transporter may serve as a biomarker that could provide a biological assessment of response to drug treatment. We have examined the mechanisms responsible for Taxol-induced neutral amino acid uptake by breast cancer cells, such as MCF-7, BT474, MDAMB231 and T47D. The biochemical and molecular studies include: (1) growth-inhibition (MTT); (2) transport kinetics: (3) substrate-specific inhibition; (4) effect of thiol-modifying agents NEM and NPM; (5) gene expression of amino acid transporters; and (6) apoptotic assays. Our data show that Taxol treatment of MCF-7 cells induced a transient increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of the neutral amino acid transporter B0 at both gene and protein level. This increase was attenuated by blocking the transporter in the presence of high concentrations of the substrate amino acid. Other neutral amino acid transporters such as ATA2 (System A) and ASC were not altered. Amino acid starvation resulted in the expected up-regulation of System A (ATA2) gene, but not for B0 and ASC. B0 was significantly down regulated. Taxol treatment had no significant effect on the uptake of arginine and glutamate as measured by System y(+) and X(-) (GC) respectively. Tunel assays and FACS cell cycle analysis demonstrated that both Taxol- and doxorubicin-induced upregulation of B0 transporter gene with accompanying increase in cell apoptosis, could be reversed partially by blocking the B0 transporter with high concentration of alanine, and/or by inhibiting the caspase pathway. Both Taxol and doxorubicin treatment caused a significant decrease in S-phase of the cell cycle. However, Taxol-induced an increase primarily

  1. Tumor cell-endothelial cell interactions: evidence for roles for lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid in metastasis.

    PubMed

    Damtew, B; Spagnuolo, P J

    1997-04-01

    Adhesion of tumor cells (TC) to endothelial cells (EC) is necessary for movement of TC out of the interstitium to form metastatic deposits. This interaction may be influenced by proadhesive molecules such as lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid metabolism. We studied the effect of inflammatory stimuli, A23187 calcium ionophore, n-formyl-methionyl-leucine-phenylalanine (FMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) on TC-EC interaction. Adherence of metastatic breast tumor cell line (MCF-7), choriocarcinoma cell line (JEG-3), and non metastatic pituitary cell (GH-3) were assayed as the number of radiolabeled TC attached to EC (cpm/well). TC and EC were incubated with A23187, FMLP, and PMA for varying time periods. Lipoxygenase products (LTB4, 5-HETE) were measured under basal and stimulated conditions using RP-HPLC and RIA. There were no differences in basal adherence of TC lines to EC. When EC were incubated with stimuli, there were significant increases in the numbers of MCF-7 and JEG-3 cells adherent to EC compared to GH-3. Light and phase contrast microscopy confirmed that TC were attached to EC. Upon stimulation, GH-3 preferentially produced prostaglandins (PGI1(2)) while MCF-7 and JEG-3 produced lipoxygenase products (LTB4 and 5-HETE). Pre-incubation of MCF-7 and JEG-3 with the lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguiaretic acid resulted in partial inhibition of adhesion to EC. Our data strongly indicate a role for lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid in adherence of TC to EC. PMID:9150375

  2. The Influence of 13-cis Retinoic Acid on Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Juan; Kam, Wendy R.; Dieckow, Julia; Sullivan, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is a primary cause of dry eye disease. One of the risk factors for MGD is exposure to 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA), a metabolite of vitamin A. However, the mechanism is not well understood. We hypothesize that 13-cis RA inhibits cell proliferation, promotes cell death, alters gene and protein expressions, and attenuates cell survival pathways in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Methods. To test our hypotheses, immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells were cultured with or without 13-cis RA for varying doses and time. Cell proliferation, cell death, gene expression, and proteins involved in proliferation/survival and inflammation were evaluated. Results. We found that 13-cis RA inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell death, and significantly altered the expression of 6726 genes, including those involved in cell proliferation, cell death, differentiation, keratinization, and inflammation, in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Further, 13-cis RA also reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and increased the generation of interleukin-1β and matrix metallopeptidase 9. Conclusions. Exposure to 13-cis RA inhibits cell proliferation, increases cell death, alters gene expression, changes signaling pathways, and promotes inflammatory mediator and protease expression in meibomian gland epithelial cells. These effects may be responsible, at least in part, for the 13-cis RA–related induction of MGD. PMID:23722388

  3. Nature and nurture in atherosclerosis: The roles of acylcarnitine and cell membrane-fatty acid intermediates.

    PubMed

    Blair, Harry C; Sepulveda, Jorge; Papachristou, Dionysios J

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages recycle components of dead cells, including cell membranes. When quantities of lipids from cell membranes of dead cells exceed processing capacity, phospholipid and cholesterol debris accumulate as atheromas. Plasma lipid profiles, particularly HDL and LDL cholesterol, are important tools to monitor atherosclerosis risk. Membrane lipids are exported, as triglycerides or phospholipids, or as cholesterol or cholesterol esters, via lipoproteins for disposal, for re-use in cell membranes, or for fat storage. Alternative assays evaluate other aspects of lipid pathology. A key process underlying atherosclerosis is backup of macrophage fatty acid catabolism. This can be quantified by accumulation of acylcarnitine intermediates in extracellular fluid, a direct assay of adequacy of β-oxidation to deal with membrane fatty acid recycling. Further, membranes of somatic cells, such as red blood cells (RBC), incorporate fatty acids that reflect dietary intake. Changes in RBC lipid composition occur within days of ingesting modified fats. Since diets with high saturated fat content or artificial trans-fatty acids promote atherosclerosis, RBC lipid content shifts occur with atherosclerosis, and can show cellular adaptation to pathologically stiff membranes by increased long-chain doubly unsaturated fatty acid production. Additional metabolic changes with atherosclerosis of potential utility include inflammatory cytokine production, modified macrophage signaling pathways, and altered lipid-handling enzymes. Even after atherosclerotic lesions appear, approaches to minimize macrophage overload by reducing rate of fat metabolism are promising. These include preventive measures, and drugs including statins and the newer PCSK9 inhibitors. New cell-based biochemical and cytokine assays provide data to prevent or monitor atherosclerosis progression. PMID:26133667

  4. Ca2+/H+ exchange by acidic organelles regulates cell migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Melchionda, Manuela; Pittman, Jon K; Mayor, Roberto; Patel, Sandip

    2016-03-28

    Increasing evidence implicates Ca(2+) in the control of cell migration. However, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Acidic Ca(2+) stores are fast emerging as signaling centers. But how Ca(2+) is taken up by these organelles in metazoans and the physiological relevance for migration is unclear. Here, we identify a vertebrate Ca(2+)/H(+)exchanger (CAX) as part of a widespread family of homologues in animals. CAX is expressed in neural crest cells and required for their migration in vivo. It localizes to acidic organelles, tempers evoked Ca(2+) signals, and regulates cell-matrix adhesion during migration. Our data provide new molecular insight into how Ca(2+) is handled by acidic organelles and link this to migration, thereby underscoring the role of noncanonical Ca(2+) stores in the control of Ca(2+)-dependent function. PMID:27002171

  5. Differential effects of omega-3 and omega-6 Fatty acids on gene expression in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hammamieh, Rasha; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Miller, Stacy-Ann; Waddy, Edward; Barmada, Mohsen; Das, Rina; Peel, Sheila A; Day, Agnes A; Jett, Marti

    2007-01-01

    Essential fatty acids have long been identified as possible oncogenic factors. Existing reports suggest omega-6 (omega-6) essential fatty acids (EFA) as pro-oncogenic and omega-3 (omega-3) EFA as anti-oncogenic factors. The omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells while the omega-6 fatty acids induces growth of these cells in animal models and cell lines. In order to explore likely mechanisms for the modulation of breast cancer cell growth by omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, we examined the effects of arachidonic acid (AA), linoleic acid (LA), EPA and DHA on human breast cancer cell lines using cDNA microarrays and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435s, MCF-7 and HCC2218 cell lines were treated with the selected fatty acids for 6 and 24 h. Microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in the breast cancer cells treated with both classes of fatty acids discerned essential differences among the two classes at the earlier time point. The differential effects of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids on the breast cancer cells were lessened at the late time point. Data mining and statistical analyses identified genes that were differentially expressed between breast cancer cells treated with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. Ontological investigations have associated those genes to a broad spectrum of biological functions, including cellular nutrition, cell division, cell proliferation, metastasis and transcription factors etc., and thus presented an important pool of biomarkers for the differential effect of omega-3 and omega-6EFAs. PMID:16823509

  6. Arsanilic acid-Sepharose chromatography of pyruvate kinase from KB cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, R N; Yeh, H Y; Cheng, S C; Chow, L P; Lee, T C

    2000-03-31

    In the present study, arsanical-based affinity chromatography for pyruvate kinase (PK) isolation was explored. p-Arsanilic acid (4-aminophenyl arsonic acid), which contains an arsonic acid moiety structurally similar to inorganic pentavalent arsenate, was conjugated to Sepharose 4B via its para-amino group to form an As(V)-Sepharose matrix. The cellular proteins from KB cells bound to arsonic acid moieties were eluted by 50 mM sodium arsenate in Tris-HCl buffer (50 mM, pH 7.6). A single protein band with a molecular mass of 58 kDa was shown on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel. By immunoblotting, amino acid sequencing and enzymatic analysis, the sodium arsenate-eluted 58-kDa protein was demonstrated to be a human PK (type M2). By using this one-step As(V)-Sepharose chromatography, PK from KB cells was purified 35.4-fold with a specific activity of 153.15 U/mg protein in the presence of 6 mM fructose-1,6-biphosphate. Although PK was eluted from an As(V)-Sepharose column with sodium arsenate, PK activity was apparently inhibited by the used eluent system, but not by p-arsanilic acid, indicating a specific interaction of As(V) to PK. In summary, our results indicate that As(V)-Sepharose can serve as a simple and efficient chromatographic support for PK purification from KB cells. PMID:10798300

  7. The Mechanism of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell Using Pd, Pt and Pt-Ru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Nobuyuki; Liu, Yan; Mitsushima, Shigenori; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuyuki; Ogawa, Naoya; Kon, Norihiro; Eguchi, Mika

    The electro-oxidation of formic acid, 2-propanol and methanol on Pd black, Pd/C, Pt-Ru/C and Pt/C has been investigated to clear the reaction mechanism. It was suggested that the formic acid is dehydrogenated on Pd surface and the hydrogen is occluded in the Pd lattice. Thus obtained hydrogen acts like pure hydrogen supplied from the outside and the cell performance of the direct formic acid fuel cell showed as high as that of a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell. 2-propanol did not show such dehydrogenation reaction on Pd catalyst. Platinum and Pt-Ru accelerated the oxidation of C-OH of 2-propanol and methanol. Slow scan voltammogram (SSV) and chronoamperometry measurements showed that the activity of formic acid oxidation increased in the following order: Pd black > Pd 30wt.%/C > Pt50wt.%/C > 27wt.%Pt-13wt.%Ru/C. A large oxidation current for formic acid was found at a low overpotential on the palladium electrocatalysts. These results indicate that formic acid is mainly oxidized through a dehydrogenation reaction. For the oxidation of 2-propanol and methanol, palladium was not effective, and 27wt.%Pt-13wt.%Ru/C showed the best oxidation activity.

  8. Mitochondria targeting of non-peroxidizable triphenylphosphonium conjugated oleic acid protects mouse embryonic cells against apoptosis: Role of cardiolipin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Tungekar, Muhammad A.; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Stoyanovsky, Detcho A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxidation of cardiolipin in mitochondria is essential for the execution of apoptosis. We suggested that integration of oleic acid into cardiolipin generates non-oxidizable cardiolipin species hence protects cells against apoptosis. We synthesized mitochondria-targeted triphenylphosphonium oleic acid ester. Using lipidomics analysis we found that pretreatment of mouse embryonic cells with triphenylphosphonium oleic acid ester resulted in decreased contents of polyunsaturated cardiolipins and elevation of its species containing oleic acid residues. This caused suppression of apoptosis induced by actinomycin D. Triacsin C, an inhibitor of acyl-CoA synthase, blocked integration of oleic acid into cardiolipin and restored cell sensitivity to apoptosis. PMID:22210054

  9. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yi Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients. -- Highlights: ► Palmitic acid and cyclosporine (CsA) synergistically increased cytotoxicity. ► The impairment of mitochondrial functions may contribute to the enhanced toxicity. ► Inhibition of JNK activity attenuated

  10. Retinoic Acid Promotes the Generation of Pancreatic Endocrine Progenitor Cells and Their Further Differentiation into β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Öström, Maria; Loffler, Kelly A.; Edfalk, Sara; Selander, Lars; Dahl, Ulf; Ricordi, Camillo; Jeon, Jongmin; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Diez, Juan; Edlund, Helena

    2008-01-01

    The identification of secreted factors that can selectively stimulate the generation of insulin producing β-cells from stem and/or progenitor cells represent a significant step in the development of stem cell-based β-cell replacement therapy. By elucidating the molecular mechanisms that regulate the generation of β-cells during normal pancreatic development such putative factors may be identified. In the mouse, β-cells increase markedly in numbers from embryonic day (e) 14.5 and onwards, but the extra-cellular signal(s) that promotes the selective generation of β-cells at these stages remains to be identified. Here we show that the retinoic acid (RA) synthesizing enzyme Raldh1 is expressed in developing mouse and human pancreas at stages when β-cells are generated. We also provide evidence that RA induces the generation of Ngn3+ endocrine progenitor cells and stimulates their further differentiation into β-cells by activating a program of cell differentiation that recapitulates the normal temporal program of β-cell differentiation. PMID:18665267

  11. Nrf2-dependent and -independent Responses to Nitro-fatty Acids in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kansanen, Emilia; Jyrkkänen, Henna-Kaisa; Volger, Oscar L.; Leinonen, Hanna; Kivelä, Annukka M.; Häkkinen, Sanna-Kaisa; Woodcock, Steven R.; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Horrevoets, Anton J.; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Freeman, Bruce A.; Levonen, Anna-Liisa

    2009-01-01

    Electrophilic fatty acid derivatives, including nitrolinoleic acid and nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2), can mediate anti-inflammatory and pro-survival signaling reactions. The transcription factor Nrf2, activated by electrophilic fatty acids, suppresses redox-sensitive pro-inflammatory gene expression and protects against vascular endothelial oxidative injury. It was therefore postulated that activation of Nrf2 by OA-NO2 accounts in part for its anti-inflammatory actions, motivating the characterization of Nrf2-dependent and -independent effects of OA-NO2 on gene expression using genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Control and Nrf2-small interfering RNA-transfected human endothelial cells were treated with vehicle, oleic acid, or OA-NO2, and differential gene expression profiles were determined. Although OA-NO2 significantly induced the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes, including heme oxygenase-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit, the majority of OA-NO2-regulated genes were regulated by Nrf2-independent pathways. Moreover, gene set enrichment analysis revealed that the heat shock response is the major pathway activated by OA-NO2, with robust induction of a number of heat shock genes regulated by the heat shock transcription factor. Inasmuch as the heat shock response mediates anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective actions, this mechanism is proposed to contribute to the protective cell signaling functions of nitro-fatty acids and other electrophilic fatty acid derivatives. PMID:19808663

  12. Crocetinic acid inhibits hedgehog signaling to inhibit pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Parthasarathy; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Paul, Santanu; Kwatra, Deep; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Islam, Shamima; Harihar, Sitaram; Ramalingam, Satish; Gutheil, William; Putty, Sandeep; Pradhan, Rohan; Padhye, Subhash; Welch, Danny R.; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and no significant treatment is currently available. Here, we describe the effect of crocetinic acid, which we purified from commercial saffron compound crocetin using high performance liquid chromatography. Crocetinic acid inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, it induced apoptosis. Moreover, the compound significantly inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, crocetinic acid decreased the number and size of the pancospheres in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed the expression of the marker protein DCLK-1 (Doublecortin Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase-1) suggesting that crocetinic acid targets cancer stem cells (CSC). To understand the mechanism of CSC inhibition, the signaling pathways affected by purified crocetinic acid were dissected. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) upon binding to its cognate receptor patched, allows smoothened to accumulate and activate Gli transcription factor. Crocetinic acid inhibited the expression of both Shh and smoothened. Finally, these data were confirmed in vivo where the compound at a dose of 0.5 mg/Kg bw suppressed growth of tumor xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that purified crocetinic acid inhibits pancreatic CSC, thereby inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis. PMID:26317547

  13. Free Amino Acids in Serine-Antagonized Cells of Tetrahymena pyriformis1

    PubMed Central

    Wragg, June B.; Reynolds, Howard; Pelczar, Michael J.

    1965-01-01

    Wragg, June B. (Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, Md.), Howard Reynolds, and Michael J. Pelczar, Jr. Free amino acids in serine-antagonized cells of Tetrahymena pyriformis. J. Bacteriol. 90:748–754. 1965.—Growth inhibition of Tetrahymena pyriformis by l-serine in a chemically defined medium was reversed by l-arginine in a manner which resembled competitive antagonism. Composition of the free amino acid pools from cells grown in either a balanced amino acid mixture or a mixture with serine concentrations which inhibited growth suggested an antagonism by serine with energy-yielding reactions. Growth in media with excess serine resulted in the accumulation of higher concentrations of free cellular amino acids and an apparent increase in the rate of conversion of arginine to ornithine, as compared with growth in the balanced medium. The results suggested that serine or a metabolic product of serine interferes with the formation of pyruvic acid. In the presence of high levels of serine, arginine appeared to be metabolized more rapidly and to be spared when alanine, aspartic acid, or glutamic acid was added to the unbalanced medium. PMID:16562077

  14. Arachidonic acid induces a prolonged inhibition of glutamate uptake into glial cells.

    PubMed

    Barbour, B; Szatkowski, M; Ingledew, N; Attwell, D

    Activation of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors by neurotransmitter glutamate stimulates phospholipase A2 to release arachidonic acid. This second messenger facilitates long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synapses in the hippocampus, possibly by blocking glutamate uptake. We have studied the effect of arachidonic acid on glutamate uptake into glial cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to monitor the uptake electrically. Micromolar levels of arachidonic acid inhibit glutamate uptake, mainly by reducing the maximum uptake rate with only small effects on the affinity for external glutamate and sodium. On removal of arachidonic acid a rapid (5 minutes) phase of partial recovery is followed by a maintained suppression of uptake lasting at least 20 minutes. Surprisingly, the action of arachidonic acid is unaffected by cyclo-oxygenase or lipoxygenase inhibitors suggesting that it inhibits uptake directly, possibly by increasing membrane fluidity. As blockade of phospholipase A2 prevents the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), inhibition of glutamate uptake by arachidonic acid may contribute to the increase of synaptic gain that occurs in LTP. During anoxia, release of arachidonic acid could severely compromise glutamate uptake and thus contribute to neuronal death. PMID:2512508

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids in THP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Guixiang; Etherton, Terry D.; Martin, Keith R.; Vanden Heuvel, John P.; Gillies, Peter J.; West, Sheila G.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M. . E-mail: pmk3@psu.edu

    2005-10-28

    The effects of linoleic acid (LA), {alpha}-linolenic acid (ALA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were compared to that of palmitic acid (PA), on inflammatory responses in human monocytic THP-1 cells. When cells were pre-incubated with fatty acids for 2-h and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide for 24-h in the presence of fatty acids, secretion of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}) was significantly decreased after treatment with LA, ALA, and DHA versus PA (P < 0.01 for all); ALA and DHA elicited more favorable effects. These effects were comparable to those for 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) and were dose-dependent. In addition, LA, ALA, and DHA decreased IL-6, IL-1{beta}, and TNF{alpha} gene expression (P < 0.05 for all) and nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B DNA-binding activity, whereas peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) DNA-binding activity was increased. The results indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids may be, in part, due to the inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation via activation of PPAR{gamma}.

  16. Crocetinic acid inhibits hedgehog signaling to inhibit pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Parthasarathy; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Paul, Santanu; Kwatra, Deep; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Islam, Shamima; Harihar, Sitaram; Ramalingam, Satish; Gutheil, William; Putty, Sandeep; Pradhan, Rohan; Padhye, Subhash; Welch, Danny R; Anant, Shrikant; Dhar, Animesh

    2015-09-29

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the US and no significant treatment is currently available. Here, we describe the effect of crocetinic acid, which we purified from commercial saffron compound crocetin using high performance liquid chromatography. Crocetinic acid inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, it induced apoptosis. Moreover, the compound significantly inhibited epidermal growth factor receptor and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore, crocetinic acid decreased the number and size of the pancospheres in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed the expression of the marker protein DCLK-1 (Doublecortin Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase-1) suggesting that crocetinic acid targets cancer stem cells (CSC). To understand the mechanism of CSC inhibition, the signaling pathways affected by purified crocetinic acid were dissected. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) upon binding to its cognate receptor patched, allows smoothened to accumulate and activate Gli transcription factor. Crocetinic acid inhibited the expression of both Shh and smoothened. Finally, these data were confirmed in vivo where the compound at a dose of 0.5 mg/Kg bw suppressed growth of tumor xenografts. Collectively, these data suggest that purified crocetinic acid inhibits pancreatic CSC, thereby inhibiting pancreatic tumorigenesis. PMID:26317547

  17. Tannic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Huh7.5 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Curt H.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Although antiviral therapy has dramatically improved recently, a number of patients remain untreated and some do not clear infection with treatment. Viral entry is an essential step in initiating and maintaining chronic HCV infections. One dramatic example of this is the nearly 100% infection of newly transplanted livers in patients with chronic hepatitis C. HCV entry inhibitors could play a critical role in preventing HCV infection of newly transplanted livers. Tannic acid, a polymer of gallic acid and glucose molecules, is a plant-derived polyphenol that defends some plants from insects and microbial infections. It has been shown to have a variety of biological effects, including antiviral activity, and is used as a flavoring agent in foods and beverages. In this study, we demonstrate that tannic acid is a potent inhibitor of HCV entry into Huh7.5 cells at low concentrations (IC50 5.8 μM). It also blocks cell-to-cell spread in infectious HCV cell cultures, but does not inhibit HCV replication following infection. Moreover, experimental results indicate that tannic acid inhibits an early step of viral entry, such as the docking of HCV at the cell surface. Gallic acid, tannic acid’s structural component, did not show any anti-HCV activity including inhibition of HCV entry or replication at concentrations up to 25 μM. It is possible the tannin structure is related on the effect on HCV inhibition. Tannic acid, which is widely distributed in plants and foods, has HCV antiviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar concentrations, may provide a relative inexpensive adjuvant to direct-acting HCV antivirals and warrants future investigation. PMID:26186636

  18. Dietary α-linolenic acid diminishes experimental atherogenesis and restricts T cell-driven inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Winnik, Stephan; Lohmann, Christine; Richter, Eva K.; Schäfer, Nicola; Song, Wen-Liang; Leiber, Florian; Mocharla, Pavani; Hofmann, Janin; Klingenberg, Roland; Borén, Jan; Becher, Burkhard; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Matter, Christian M.; Beer, Jürg H.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Epidemiological studies report an inverse association between plant-derived dietary α-linolenic acid (ALA) and cardiovascular events. However, little is known about the mechanism of this protection. We assessed the cellular and molecular mechanisms of dietary ALA (flaxseed) on atherosclerosis in a mouse model. Methods and results Eight-week-old male apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE−/−) mice were fed a 0.21 % (w/w) cholesterol diet for 16 weeks containing either a high ALA [7.3 % (w/w); n = 10] or low ALA content [0.03 % (w/w); n = 10]. Bioavailability, chain elongation, and fatty acid metabolism were measured by gas chromatography of tissue lysates and urine. Plaques were assessed using immunohistochemistry. T cell proliferation was investigated in primary murine CD3-positive lymphocytes. T cell differentiation and activation was assessed by expression analyses of interferon-γ, interleukin-4, and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) using quantitative PCR and ELISA. Dietary ALA increased aortic tissue levels of ALA as well as of the n−3 long chain fatty acids (LC n−3 FA) eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid. The high ALA diet reduced plaque area by 50% and decreased plaque T cell content as well as expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and TNFα. Both dietary ALA and direct ALA exposure restricted T cell proliferation, differentiation, and inflammatory activity. Dietary ALA shifted prostaglandin and isoprostane formation towards 3-series compounds, potentially contributing to the atheroprotective effects of ALA. Conclusion Dietary ALA diminishes experimental atherogenesis and restricts T cell-driven inflammation, thus providing the proof-of-principle that plant-derived ALA may provide a valuable alternative to marine LC n−3 FA. PMID:21285075

  19. Computing in mammalian cells with nucleic acid strand exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, Benjamin; Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Zurla, Chiara; Pochekailov, Sergii; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Seelig, Georg

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand displacement has been widely used for the design of molecular circuits, motors, and sensors in cell-free settings. Recently, it has been shown that this technology can also operate in biological environments, but capabilities remain limited. Here, we look to adapt strand displacement and exchange reactions to mammalian cells and report DNA circuitry that can directly interact with a native mRNA. We began by optimizing the cellular performance of fluorescent reporters based on four-way strand exchange reactions and identified robust design principles by systematically varying the molecular structure, chemistry and delivery method. Next, we developed and tested AND and OR logic gates based on four-way strand exchange, demonstrating the feasibility of multi-input logic. Finally, we established that functional siRNA could be activated through strand exchange, and used native mRNA as programmable scaffolds for co-localizing gates and visualizing their operation with subcellular resolution.

  20. Computing in mammalian cells with nucleic acid strand exchange

    PubMed Central

    Pochekailov, Sergii; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Seelig, Georg

    2015-01-01

    DNA strand displacement has been widely used for the design of molecular circuits, motors, and sensors in cell-free settings. Recently, it has been shown that this technology can also operate in biological environments, but capabilities remain limited. Here, we look to adapt strand displacement and exchange reactions to mammalian cells and report DNA circuitry that can directly interact with a native mRNA. We began by optimizing the cellular performance of fluorescent reporters based on four-way strand exchange reactions and identified robust design principles by systematically varying the molecular structure, chemistry and delivery method. Next, we developed and tested AND and OR logic gates based on four-way strand exchange, demonstrating the feasibility of multi-input logic. Finally, we established that functional siRNA could be activated through strand exchange, and used native mRNA as programmable scaffolds for co-localizing gates and visualizing their operation with subcellular resolution. PMID:26689378

  1. Computing in mammalian cells with nucleic acid strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Groves, Benjamin; Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Zurla, Chiara; Pochekailov, Sergii; Kirschman, Jonathan L; Santangelo, Philip J; Seelig, Georg

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand displacement has been widely used for the design of molecular circuits, motors, and sensors in cell-free settings. Recently, it has been shown that this technology can also operate in biological environments, but capabilities remain limited. Here, we look to adapt strand displacement and exchange reactions to mammalian cells and report DNA circuitry that can directly interact with a native mRNA. We began by optimizing the cellular performance of fluorescent reporters based on four-way strand exchange reactions and identified robust design principles by systematically varying the molecular structure, chemistry and delivery method. Next, we developed and tested AND and OR logic gates based on four-way strand exchange, demonstrating the feasibility of multi-input logic. Finally, we established that functional siRNA could be activated through strand exchange, and used native mRNA as programmable scaffolds for co-localizing gates and visualizing their operation with subcellular resolution. PMID:26689378

  2. Protecting cell walls from binding aluminum by organic acids contributes to aluminum resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Ying; Zhang, Yue-Jiao; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Jian-Li; Zheng, Shao-Jian

    2009-06-01

    Aluminum-induced secretion of organic acids from the root apex has been demonstrated to be one major Al resistance mechanism in plants. However, whether the organic acid concentration is high enough to detoxify Al in the growth medium is frequently questioned. The genotypes of Al-resistant wheat, Cassia tora L. and buckwheat secrete malate, citrate and oxalate, respectively. In the present study we found that at a 35% inhibition of root elongation, the Al activities in the solution were 10, 20, and 50 muM with the corresponding malate, citrate, and oxalate exudation at the rates of 15, 20 and 21 nmol/cm(2) per 12 h, respectively, for the above three plant species. When exogenous organic acids were added to ameliorate Al toxicity, twofold and eightfold higher oxalate and malate concentrations were required to produce the equal effect by citrate. After the root apical cell walls were isolated and preincubated in 1 mM malate, oxalate or citrate solution overnight, the total amount of Al adsorbed to the cell walls all decreased significantly to a similar level, implying that these organic acids own an equal ability to protect the cell walls from binding Al. These findings suggest that protection of cell walls from binding Al by organic acids may contribute significantly to Al resistance. PMID:19522816

  3. Neutrophils are immune cells preferentially targeted by retinoic acid in elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The immune system gradually deteriorates with age and nutritional status is a major factor in immunosenescence. Of the many nutritional factors implicated in age-related immune dysfunction, vitamin A may be a good candidate, since vitamin A concentrations classically decrease during aging whereas it may possess important immunomodulatory properties via its active metabolites, the retinoic acids. This prompted us to investigate the immune response induced by retinoids in adults and elderly healthy subjects. Before and after oral supplementation with 13cis retinoic acid (0.5 mg/kg/day during 28 days), whole blood cells were phenotyped, and functions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) were investigated by flow cytometry and ELISA tests. Results In both young adults (n = 20, 25 ± 4 years) and older subjects (n = 20, 65 ± 4 years), retinoic acid supplementation had no effect on the distribution of leukocyte subpopulations or on the functions of PBMC (Il-2 and sIl-2R production, membrane expression of CD25). Concerning PMN, retinoic acid induced an increase in both spontaneous migration and cell surface expression of CD11b in the two different age populations, whereas bactericidal activity and phagocytosis remained unchanged. Conclusions We demonstrated that retinoic acid induces the same intensity of immune response between adult and older subjects, and more specifically affects PMN functions, i.e. adhesion and migration, than PBMC functions. PMID:20727130

  4. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Rondón, Netxibeth; Esquiva, Gema; Germain, Francisco; de la Villa, Pedro; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss. PMID:26379056

  5. The concentration of amino acids by yeast cells depleted of adenosine triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, A. A.; Backen, K.; Watson, G.

    1970-01-01

    1. The ATP content of preparations of a strain of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis was lowered below 0.3nmol/mg of yeast by starving the yeast cells in the presence of both antimycin and 5mm-deoxyglucose. 2. When the depleted cells were put at pH4.5 with glycine up to about 20nmol of the amino acid/mg of yeast was absorbed without being chemically modified. The mechanism did not depend on an exchange with endogenous amino acids. 3. The concentration of the absorbed glycine could apparently reach 100–200 times that outside the cells. 4. Replacement of the cellular K+ by Na+ almost stopped amino acid absorption in the presence of antimycin and deoxyglucose, but not in their absence. 5. It is suggested that, when energy metabolism itself had stopped, a purely physical process, namely the movements of H+ and K+ into and out of the yeast respectively, served to concentrate the amino acids in the cells. Both ionic species appear to be co-substrates of the system transporting amino acids. PMID:5495157

  6. Acid gradient across plasma membrane can drive phosphate bond synthesis in cancer cells: acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Gautam; Sen, Suvajit; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive cancers exhibit an efficient conversion of high amounts of glucose to lactate accompanied by acid secretion, a phenomenon popularly known as the Warburg effect. The acidic microenvironment and the alkaline cytosol create a proton-gradient (acid gradient) across the plasma membrane that represents proton-motive energy. Increasing experimental data from physiological relevant models suggest that acid gradient stimulates tumor proliferation, and can also support its energy needs. However, direct biochemical evidence linking extracellular acid gradient to generation of intracellular ATP are missing. In this work, we demonstrate that cancer cells can synthesize significant amounts of phosphate-bonds from phosphate in response to acid gradient across plasma membrane. The noted phenomenon exists in absence of glycolysis and mitochondrial ATP synthesis, and is unique to cancer. Biochemical assays using viable cancer cells, and purified plasma membrane vesicles utilizing radioactive phosphate, confirmed phosphate-bond synthesis from free phosphate (Pi), and also localization of this activity to the plasma membrane. In addition to ATP, predominant formation of pyrophosphate (PPi) from Pi was also observed when plasma membrane vesicles from cancer cells were subjected to trans-membrane acid gradient. Cancer cytosols were found capable of converting PPi to ATP, and also stimulate ATP synthesis from Pi from the vesicles. Acid gradient created through glucose metabolism by cancer cells, as observed in tumors, also proved critical for phosphate-bond synthesis. In brief, these observations reveal a role of acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source and may offer a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25874623

  7. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. PMID:27348124

  8. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Stimulation of Energy Metabolism by Acetic Acid in L6 Myotube Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruta, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Araki, Aya; Kimoto, Masumi; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that orally administered acetic acid decreased lipogenesis in the liver and suppressed lipid accumulation in adipose tissue of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, which exhibit hyperglycemic obesity with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Administered acetic acid led to increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in both liver and skeletal muscle cells, and increased transcripts of myoglobin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) genes in skeletal muscle of the rats. It was suggested that acetic acid improved the lipid metabolism in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the activation of AMPK and the stimulation of GLUT4 and myoglobin expression by acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells to clarify the physiological function of acetic acid in skeletal muscle cells. Acetic acid added to culture medium was taken up rapidly by L6 cells, and AMPK was phosphorylated upon treatment with acetic acid. We observed increased gene and protein expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. Uptake of glucose and fatty acids by L6 cells were increased, while triglyceride accumulation was lower in treated cells compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, treated cells also showed increased gene and protein expression of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which is a well-known transcription factor involved in the expression of myoglobin and GLUT4 genes. These results indicate that acetic acid enhances glucose uptake and fatty acid metabolism through the activation of AMPK, and increases expression of GLUT4 and myoglobin. PMID:27348124

  9. Oxidized derivative of docosahexaenoic acid preferentially inhibit cell proliferation in triple negative over luminal breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Bayoumy, Karam; Amin, Shantu; Gowda, Krishne; de Cicco, Ricardo López; Barton, Maria; Su, Yanrong; Russo, Irma H.; Himmelberger, Julie A.; Slifker, Michael; Manni, Andrea; Russo, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exert an anticancer effect by affecting multiple cellular mechanisms leading to inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. It is well known that breast cancer comprises distinct molecular subtypes which differ in their responsiveness to therapeutic and preventive agents. We tested the hypothesis that n-3FA may preferentially affect triple-negative breast cancer cells for which no targeted intervention is presently available. The in vitro antiproliferative effects of n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and its metabolite, 4-OH-DHA as well as its putative metabolite 4-OXO-DHA, were tested in five triple-negative human basal breast cell lines at different stages of transformation (MCF-10F, trMCF, bsMCF, MDA-MB-231, and BT-549) and three luminal breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T-47D, and SK-BR-3). Cell proliferation was measured with the tetrazolium MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. DHA and its oxidized derivatives significantly inhibited cell proliferation (20–90% reduction) of both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. The inhibitory effect was more pronounced on triple-negative basal breast cancer cell lines as compared to luminal breast cancer cell lines after 4-OXO-DHA treatment. Our data provide novel information regarding the preferential antitumor effect of oxidized derivatives of DHA on basal type breast cancer. PMID:25413005

  10. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-01-01

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3138971

  11. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    PubMed

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-05-15

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. PMID:3138971

  12. Differential effects of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids upon oxidant-stimulated release and uptake of arachidonic acid in human lymphoma U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, Oluwakemi; Black, Kenneth D; MacDonald, Donald J; Boyle, Rose M; Glen, Iain; Ross, Brian M

    2005-08-01

    The use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, as found in fish-oil derived dietary supplements, as anti-inflammatory agents is supported by a variety of biochemical and physiological data. Recent studies investigating the therapeutic potential of long chain (>C20) n-3 fatty acids in mental illness have lead to the conclusion, however, that not all n-3 fatty acid types are equally efficacious. In particular eicosapentaeoic acid (EPA) appears to possess antidepressant and antipsychotic activity, while docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) does not, an effect suggested to be due to a differential ability to antagonize arachidonic acid (AA)-dependent cell signalling. In this study, we examine the effect of EPA and DHA supplementation upon uptake and release of arachidonic acid stimulated by tert-butyl hydroperoxide/Fe2+ in U937 cells. Oxidant-stimulated 3H-AA release from cells was enhanced by pre-treatment with EPA, DHA and AA, but not stearic or oleic acids for 18 days, with the order of effect magnitude being EPA > DHA = AA. Supplementation of cells for 1 day gave qualitatively similar results, although the effect magnitude was smaller. To determine whether enhanced release was due to decreased reuptake of AA, cells were cultured in the presence of 10 microM fatty acids. Pre-treatment of cells with EPA, and to a lesser extent AA, but not DHA, inhibited uptake of 3H-AA measured subsequent to the removal of unesterified fatty acids. This study suggests that, in U937 cells, EPA can alter the rate of uptake and release of AA from phospholipids in an exposure time-dependent manner, whereas DHA has no or little effect. Our results predict that EPA will have a more pronounced effect upon AA-dependent processes compared to DHA, and suggests that the relative amounts of EPA and DHA in fish oil supplements may modify their biochemical, and potentially, behavioural effects. PMID:15967385

  13. Cross Talk between Cancer and Mesenchymal Stem Cells through Extracellular Vesicles Carrying Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lopatina, Tatiana; Gai, Chiara; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are considered to be a novel complex mechanism of cell communication within the tumor microenvironment. EVs may act as vehicles for transcription factors and nucleic acids inducing epigenetic changes in recipient cells. Since tumor EVs may be present in patient biological fluids, it is important to investigate their function and molecular mechanisms of action. It has been shown that tumor cells release EVs, which are capable of regulating cell apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition, as well as to suppress activity of immune cells, to enhance angiogenesis, and to prepare a favorable microenvironment for metastasis. On the other hand, EVs derived from stromal cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), may influence the phenotype of tumor cells through reciprocal cross talk greatly influenced by the transcription factors and nucleic acids they carry. In particular, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs and long ncRNAs, have recently been identified as the main candidates for the phenotypic changes induced in the recipient cells by EVs. ncRNAs, which are important regulators of mRNA and protein expression, can function either as tumor suppressors or as oncogenes, depending on their targets. Herein, we have attempted to revise actual evidence reported in the literature on the role of EVs in tumor biology with particular regard to the cross talk of ncRNAs between cancer cells and MSCs. PMID:27242964

  14. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells' molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  15. Changes in Gene Expression Profiling of Apoptotic Genes in Neuroblastoma Cell Lines upon Retinoic Acid Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Celay, Jon; Blanco, Idoia; Lázcoz, Paula; Rotinen, Mirja; Castresana, Javier S.; Encío, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effect of retinoic acid (RA) in neuroblastoma we treated RA sensitive neuroblastoma cell lines with 9-cis RA or ATRA for 9 days, or for 5 days followed by absence of RA for another 4 days. Both isomers induced apoptosis and reduced cell density as a result of cell differentiation and/or apoptosis. Flow cytometry revealed that 9-cis RA induced apoptosis more effectively than ATRA. The expression profile of apoptosis and survival pathways was cell line specific and depended on the isomer used. PMID:23650528

  16. Current distribution over the electrode surface in a lead-acid cell during discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Král, Petr; Křivák, Petr; Bača, Petr; Calábek, Milan; Micka, Karel

    The current distribution over the plate surface in lead-acid cells in the course of discharge was determined mathematically by using the equivalent circuit method. The dependence of the internal cell resistance on the current and charge passed was determined by measurements on a laboratory cell. Six cell variants were considered differing by the location of tabs serving as current terminals. The results are presented in the form of 3D diagrams at various states of discharge. To make the current distribution nearly uniform, extended current tabs located at opposite ends of the plate electrodes were proposed.

  17. The C-Terminal Acidic Region of Calreticulin Mediates Phosphatidylserine Binding and Apoptotic Cell Phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva Joseph; Bedi, Sukhmani Kaur; Huynh, David; Raghavan, Malini

    2016-05-01

    Calreticulin is a calcium-binding chaperone that is normally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Calreticulin is detectable on the surface of apoptotic cells under some apoptosis-inducing conditions, where it promotes the phagocytosis and immunogenicity of dying cells. However, the precise mechanism by which calreticulin, a soluble protein, localizes to the outer surface of the plasma membrane of dying cells is unknown, as are the molecular mechanisms that are relevant to calreticulin-induced cellular phagocytosis. Calreticulin comprises three distinct structural domains: a globular domain, an extended arm-like P-domain, and a C-terminal acidic region containing multiple low-affinity calcium binding sites. We show that calreticulin, via its C-terminal acidic region, preferentially interacts with phosphatidylserine (PS) compared with other phospholipids and that this interaction is calcium dependent. Additionally, exogenous calreticulin binds apoptotic cells via a higher-affinity calcium-dependent mode that is acidic region dependent. Exogenous calreticulin also binds live cells, including macrophages, via a second, lower-affinity P-domain and globular domain-dependent, but calcium-independent binding mode that likely involves its generic polypeptide binding site. Truncation constructs lacking the acidic region or arm-like P-domain of calreticulin are impaired in their abilities to induce apoptotic cell phagocytosis by murine peritoneal macrophages. Taken together, the results of this investigation provide the first molecular insights into the phospholipid binding site of calreticulin as a key anchor point for the cell surface expression of calreticulin on apoptotic cells. These findings also support a role for calreticulin as a PS-bridging molecule that cooperates with other PS-binding factors to promote the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. PMID:27036911

  18. Rapid, efficient charging of lead-acid and nickel-zinc traction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Lead-acid and nickel-zinc traction cells were rapidly and efficiently charged using a high rate tapered direct current (HRTDC) charge method which could possibly be used for on-the-road service recharge of electric vehicles. The HRTDC method takes advantage of initial high cell charge acceptance and uses cell gassing rate and temperature as an indicator of charging efficiency. On the average, in these preliminary tests, 300 amp-hour nickel-zinc traction cells were given a HRTDC (initial current 500 amps, final current 100 amps) to 78 percent of rated amp-hour capacity within 53 minutes at an amp-hour efficiency of 92 percent and an energy efficiency of 52 percent. Three hundred amp-hour lead-acid traction cells were charged to 69 percent of rated amp-hour capacity within 46 minutes at an amp-hour efficiency of 91 percent with an energy efficiency of 64 percent. In order to find ways to further decrease the recharge times, the effect of periodically (0 to 400 Hz) pulse discharging cells during a constant current charging process (94% duty cycle) was investigated. Preliminary data indicate no significant effect of this type of pulse discharging during charge on charge acceptance of lead-acid or nickel-zinc cells.

  19. Short-chain fatty acids regulate IGF-binding protein secretion by intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, A; Fujimoto, M; Oguchi, S; Fusunyan, R D; MacDermott, R P; Sanderson, I R

    1998-07-01

    Gastrointestinal epithelial cells secrete insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding proteins (IGFBPs), which modulate the actions of IGFs on cell proliferation and differentiation. Short-chain fatty acids are bacterial metabolites from unabsorbed carbohydrate (including fiber). We hypothesized that they may alter the pattern of IGFBPs secreted by epithelial cells as part of a wider phenomenon by which luminal molecules regulate gastrointestinal epithelial cell signaling. The intestinal epithelial cell line, Caco-2, predominantly secretes IGFBP-3; however, butyrate increased the secretion of IGFBP-2 in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. Butyrate decreased the secretion of IGFBP-3. Butyrate altered only the synthesis and not the cell sorting of IGFBPs because 1) the secretion of IGFBPs remained polarized despite changes in their rates of production, and 2) IGFBP secretion corresponded to mRNA accumulation. The ability of short-chain fatty acids or the fungicide trichostatin A to stimulate IGFBP-2 correlated with their actions on histone acetylation. In conclusion, intestinal epithelial cells respond to short-chain fatty acids by altering secretion of IGFBPs. PMID:9688874

  20. Ascorbic acid recycling by cultured beta cells: effects of increased glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Steffner, Robert J; Wu, Lan; Powers, Alvin C; May, James M

    2004-11-15

    Ascorbic acid is necessary for optimal insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. We evaluated ascorbate recycling and whether it is impaired by increased glucose metabolism in the rat beta-cell line INS-1. INS-1 cells, engineered with the potential for overexpression of glucokinase under the control of a tetracycline-inducible gene expression system, took up and reduced dehydroascorbic acid to ascorbate in a concentration-dependent manner that was optimal in the presence of physiologic D-glucose concentrations. Ascorbate uptake did not affect intracellular GSH concentrations. Whereas depletion of GSH in culture to levels about 25% of normal also did not affect the ability of the cells to reduce dehydroascorbic acid, more severe acute GSH depletion to less than 10% of normal levels did impair dehydroascorbic acid reduction. Culture of inducible cells in 11.8 mM D-glucose and doxycycline for 48 h enhanced glucokinase activity, increased glucose utilization, abolished D-glucose-dependent insulin secretion, and increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The latter may have contributed to subsequent decreases in the ability of the cells both to maintain intracellular ascorbate and to recycle it from dehydroascorbic acid. Cultured beta cells have a high capacity to recycle ascorbate, but this is sensitive to oxidant stress generated by increased glucose metabolism due to culture in high glucose concentrations and increased glucokinase expression. Impaired ascorbate recycling as a result of increased glucose metabolism may have implications for the role of ascorbate in insulin secretion in diabetes mellitus and may partially explain glucose toxicity in beta cells. PMID:15477012

  1. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  2. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid-Derived Lipid Mediators and T Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, Anna; Mauro, Claudio; Urquhart, Paula; Marelli-Berg, Federica

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are involved in T cell biology both as nutrients important for energy production as well as signaling molecules. In particular, polyunsaturated fatty acids are known to exhibit a range of immunomodulatory properties that progress through T cell mediated events, although the molecular mechanisms of these actions have not yet been fully elucidated. Some of these immune activities are linked to polyunsaturated fatty acid-induced alteration of the composition of cellular membranes and the consequent changes in signaling pathways linked to membrane raft-associated proteins. However, significant aspects of the polyunsaturated fatty acid bioactivities are mediated through their transformation to specific lipid mediators, products of cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, or cytochrome P450 enzymatic reactions. Resulting bioactive metabolites including prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and endocannabinoids are produced by and/or act upon T leukocytes through cell surface receptors and have been shown to alter T cell activation and differentiation, proliferation, cytokine production, motility, and homing events. Detailed appreciation of the mode of action of these lipids presents opportunities for the design and development of therapeutic strategies aimed at regulating T cell function. PMID:24611066

  3. Alternative route for the biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids in K562 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Naval, J; Martínez-Lorenzo, M J; Marzo, I; Desportes, P; Piñeiro, A

    1993-01-01

    K562 human leukaemia cells lack a significant delta 6-desaturase activity. However, they synthesize long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) from linoleic (C18:2(9,12)) and linolenic (C18:3(9,12,15)) acids, by reactions involving a C2 chain elongation followed by a delta 5-desaturation step and, to some extent, a further elongation. The main products formed were separated by argentation t.l.c. and identified by g.l.c. as the uncommon fatty acids C20:3(5,11,14) and C20:4(5,11,14,17) respectively. These acids were also produced when cells were supplemented with C20:2(11,14) or C20:3(11,14,17) respectively. The presence of a delta 5-desaturase was further confirmed by using its corresponding normal substrates, C20:3(8,11,14) and C20:4(8,11,14,17), which led to C20:4(5,8,11,14) and C20:5(5,8,11,14,17) respectively. On the other hand, a high delta 9-desaturase activity, but no significant delta 4-desaturase activity, were detected in K562 cells. These results indicate the existence of an alternative pathway, involving delta 5-desaturase, which is the only route for PUFA biosynthesis in K562 cells. This pathway may be relevant for the biosynthesis of PUFA in cells lacking delta 6-desaturase activity. PMID:8489510

  4. Nucleic Acid Encoding A Lectin-Derived Progenitor Cell Preservation Factor

    DOEpatents

    Colucci, M. Gabriella; Chrispeels, Maarten J.; Moore, Jeffrey G.

    2001-10-30

    The invention relates to an isolated nucleic acid molecule that encodes a protein that is effective to preserve progenitor cells, such as hematopoietic progenitor cells. The nucleic acid comprises a sequence defined by SEQ ID NO:1, a homolog thereof, or a fragment thereof. The encoded protein has an amino acid sequence that comprises a sequence defined by SEQ ID NO:2, a homolog thereof, or a fragment thereof that contains an amino acid sequence TNNVLQVT. Methods of using the encoded protein for preserving progenitor cells in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo are also described. The invention, therefore, include methods such as myeloablation therapies for cancer treatment wherein myeloid reconstitution is facilitated by means of the specified protein. Other therapeutic utilities are also enabled through the invention, for example, expanding progenitor cell populations ex vivo to increase chances of engraftation, improving conditions for transporting and storing progenitor cells, and facilitating gene therapy to treat and cure a broad range of life-threatening hematologic diseases.

  5. Regulation of the Nucleolar DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase by Amino Acids in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Franze-Fernández, M. T.; Pogo, A. O.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were performed to ascertain the degree to which the amount of amino acids might be one of the regulatory factors that control the activity of the nucleolar RNA polymerase. Assays of the enzymatic activity were done with isolated nuclei from cells incubated with low and high concentrations of amino acids. Soon after the cells were exposed to a medium enriched in amino acids, a rapid increase of nucleolar RNA polymerase activity occurred. A similar result was obtained in cells incubated with lower concentrations of amino acids. However, the rate of ribosomal RNA synthesized was regularly much higher in cells incubated in a medium enriched with amino acids than in a medium low in amino acids. Apparently, the amino acids only controlled ribosomal RNA synthesis. Thus, neither maturation, processing, and transport of nuclear precursors into cytoplasmic ribosomal RNA, nor the synthesis of rapidly labeled RNA was affected. PMID:4108870

  6. Electrocatalyst advances for hydrogen oxidation in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonehart, P.

    1984-01-01

    The important considerations that presently exist for achieving commercial acceptance of fuel cells are centered on cost (which translates to efficiency) and lifetime. This paper addresses the questions of electrocatalyst utilization within porous electrode structures and the preparation of low-cost noble metal electrocatalyst combinations with extreme dispersions of the metal. Now that electrocatalyst particles can be prepared with dimensions of 10 A, either singly or in alloy combinations, a very large percentage of the noble metal atoms in a crystallite are available for reaction. The cost savings for such electrocatalysts in the present commercially driven environment are considerable.

  7. Molecular analysis of the effect of short-chain fatty acids on intestinal cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Blottière, Hervé M; Buecher, Bruno; Galmiche, Jean-Paul; Cherbut, Christine

    2003-02-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), particularly butyrate, were shown to regulate cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, butyrate is the major fuel for colonic epithelial cells, and it can influence cell proliferation through the release of growth factors or gastrointestinal peptides such as gastrin, or through modulation of mucosal blood flow. Lastly, SCFA can act directly on genes regulating cell proliferation, and butyrate is the main SCFA to display such an effect. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase, which will allow histone hyperacetylation. Such hyperacetylation leads to transcription of several genes, including p21/Cip1. Moreover, it will allow cyclin D3 hyper-expression by inhibiting its degradation. The induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory protein p21/Cip1 accounts for cell arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. However, in the absence of p21 other mechanisms are initiated, leading to inhibition of cell proliferation. PMID:12740064

  8. Gut Microbiota-Derived Short-Chain Fatty Acids, T Cells, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeongho; Kim, Myunghoo

    2014-01-01

    T cells are central players in the regulation of adaptive immunity and immune tolerance. In the periphery, T cell differentiation for maturation and effector function is regulated by a number of factors. Various factors such as antigens, co-stimulation signals, and cytokines regulate T cell differentiation into functionally specialized effector and regulatory T cells. Other factors such as nutrients, micronutrients, nuclear hormones and microbial products provide important environmental cues for T cell differentiation. A mounting body of evidence indicates that the microbial metabolites short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have profound effects on T cells and directly and indirectly regulate their differentiation. We review the current status of our understanding of SCFA functions in regulation of peripheral T cell activity and discuss their impact on tissue inflammation. PMID:25550694

  9. Gut microbiota-derived short-chain Fatty acids, T cells, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang H; Park, Jeongho; Kim, Myunghoo

    2014-12-01

    T cells are central players in the regulation of adaptive immunity and immune tolerance. In the periphery, T cell differentiation for maturation and effector function is regulated by a number of factors. Various factors such as antigens, co-stimulation signals, and cytokines regulate T cell differentiation into functionally specialized effector and regulatory T cells. Other factors such as nutrients, micronutrients, nuclear hormones and microbial products provide important environmental cues for T cell differentiation. A mounting body of evidence indicates that the microbial metabolites short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have profound effects on T cells and directly and indirectly regulate their differentiation. We review the current status of our understanding of SCFA functions in regulation of peripheral T cell activity and discuss their impact on tissue inflammation. PMID:25550694

  10. Targeting leukemic side population cells by isatin derivatives of nicotinic acid amide.

    PubMed

    Naglah, A M; Shinwari, Z; Bhat, M A; Al-Tahhan, M; Al-Omar, M A; Al-Dhfyan, A

    2016-01-01

    Side population (SP) cells mediate chemoresistance in leukemia. However, chemical inhibition approach to target SP cells has been poorly studied. Herein, we report the discovery of isatin derivatives of nicotinic acid amide as potent side population cell inhibitors. The selected derivatives showed superior potency over the reference drug verapamil. Furthermore, the treatment increased chemosensitivity and inhibited the cell proliferation on three different leukemic cell lines, K562, THP-1 and U937, suggesting that both SP and the bulk of leukemic cells are affected. Moreover, treatment with the most potent compound Nic9 reduced the expression of ABCG2, demonstrating that side population inhibition effect of the target derivatives is at least via ABCG2 inhibition. Importantly, the target derivatives induced erythrocyte/dendritic differentiation to leukemic cells mainly through Musashi/Numb pathway modulation. PMID:27358121

  11. Rapid Formation of Cell Aggregates and Spheroids Induced by a "Smart" Boronic Acid Copolymer.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Adérito J R; Pasparakis, George

    2016-09-01

    Cell surface engineering has emerged as a powerful approach to forming cell aggregates/spheroids and cell-biomaterial ensembles with significant uses in tissue engineering and cell therapeutics. Herein, we demonstrate that cell membrane remodeling with a thermoresponsive boronic acid copolymer induces the rapid formation of spheroids using either cancer or cardiac cell lines under conventional cell culture conditions at minute concentrations. It is shown that the formation of well-defined spheroids is accelerated by at least 24 h compared to non-polymer-treated controls, and, more importantly, the polymer allows for fine control of the aggregation kinetics owing to its stimulus response to temperature and glucose content. On the basis of its simplicity and effectiveness to promote cellular aggregation, this platform holds promise in three-dimensional tissue/tumor modeling and tissue engineering applications. PMID:27571512

  12. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  13. Basal cell proliferation in female SKH-1 mice treated with alpha- and beta-hydroxy acids.

    PubMed

    Sams, R L; Couch, L H; Miller, B J; Okerberg, C V; Warbritton, A; Wamer, W G; Beer, J Z; Howard, P C

    2001-08-15

    Alpha- and beta-hydroxy acids are compounds that have been used extensively in cosmetic and dermatological formulations. Clinical and qualitative effects of alpha- and beta-hydroxy acids have been well characterized, but little is known about their mechanism of action or acute and chronic biochemical effects. In the present study, we examined the acute proliferative effects of glycolic and salicylic acids on cell proliferation in the epidermis of SKH-1 female mice, using BrdU incorporation as a marker of epidermal proliferation. In preliminary experiments, we observed an increase in the rate of proliferation after 3 days of treatment with 10% glycolic acid-containing cream and this was sustained throughout a 6.5-week (treatment 5 days/week) time course compared with untreated control animals. After each treatment with cream containing glycolic acid there was a wave of proliferation that was maximal 12 to 16 h (significant at p < 0.05) after treatment, followed by a subsequent increase in epidermal thickness at 18 to 20 h (significant at p < 0.05). The effects of the concentration and pH level of glycolic acid- and salicylic acid-containing creams on the rate of proliferation and increases in skin thickness in SKH-1 epidermis were also investigated. We observed a dose-dependent increase in epidermal proliferation of animals treated with either glycolic or salicylic acid. A similar time-dependent response was observed in the epidermal thickness in animals treated with salicylic acid, but not with glycolic acid. Differences in pH (3.5 or 4.0) had no significant effect on either epidermal proliferation or skin thickness. The data that we present here should be useful in characterizing not only the beneficial but also the adverse effects that occur following acute or chronic usage of alpha-hydroxy acids. PMID:11509029

  14. A New HPLC-MS Method for Measuring Maslinic Acid and Oleanolic Acid in HT29 and HepG2 Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peragón, Juan; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; Muñoz-Espada, Irene; Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) and oleanolic acid (OA), the main triterpenic acids present in olive, have important properties for health and disease prevention. MA selectively inhibits cell proliferation of the HT29 human colon-cancer cell line by inducing selective apoptosis. For measuring the MA and OA concentration inside the cell and in the culture medium, a new HPLC-MS procedure has been developed. With this method, a determination of the amount of MA and OA incorporated into HT29 and HepG2 human cancer-cell lines incubated with different concentrations of MA corresponding to 50% growth inhibitory concentration (IC50), IC50/2, IC50/4, and IC50/8 has been made. The results demonstrate that this method is appropriate for determining the MA and OA concentration in different types of cultured cells and reveals the specific dynamics of entry of MA into HT29 and HepG2 cells. PMID:26370984

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide Is Involved in Salicylic Acid-Elicited Rosmarinic Acid Production in Salvia miltiorrhiza Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenfang; Zhang, Jingyi; Hu, Gege; Yao, Yaqin; Dong, Juane

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an elicitor to induce the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in plant cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays an important role as a key signaling molecule in response to various stimuli and is involved in the accumulation of secondary metabolites. However, the relationship between them is unclear and their synergetic functions on accumulation of secondary metabolites are unknown. In this paper, the roles of SA and H2O2 in rosmarinic acid (RA) production in Salvia miltiorrhiza cell cultures were investigated. The results showed that SA significantly enhanced H2O2 production, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity, and RA accumulation. Exogenous H2O2 could also promote PAL activity and enhance RA production. If H2O2 production was inhibited by NADPH oxidase inhibitor (IMD) or scavenged by quencher (DMTU), RA accumulation would be blocked. These results indicated that H2O2 is secondary messenger for signal transduction, which can be induced by SA, significantly and promotes RA accumulation. PMID:24995364

  16. Calcium mobilization in salicylic acid-induced Salvia miltiorrhiza cell cultures and its effect on the accumulation of rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongbo; Zhu, Nan; Deyholos, Michael K; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoru; Dong, Juane

    2015-03-01

    Ca(2+) serves as a second messenger in plant responses to different signals, and salicylic acid (SA) has been recognized as a signal mediating plant responses to many stresses. We recently found that SA treatment led to the cytoplasmic acidification of Salvia miltiorrhiza cells and alkalinization of extracellular medium. Here, we demonstrate that SA can rapidly induce Ca(2+) mobilization in protoplasts, but the induction can be blocked with a channel blocker of either plasma or organellar membranes. Following SA, A 23187, or 10 mmol/L Ca(2+) treatment, rosmarinic acid (RA) accumulation reached the highest level at 16 h, whereas the peak was found at 10 h if plasma membrane channel blockers were used. By contrast, the highest accumulation of RA occurred at 16 h when organellar channels were blocked, exhibiting the same tendency with SA-induced cells. In agreement with these observations, both phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity and its gene expression detected by real-time PCR also showed the same patterns. These results indicate that SA treatment firstly results in calcium release from internal stores, which in turn leads to PAL activity increase, RA accumulation, and a large amount of Ca(2+) influx from apoplast after 10 h of SA induction. PMID:25561058

  17. Direct hepatic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells induced by valproic acid and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Zhou, Qing-Jun; Pan, Ruo-Lang; Chen, Ye; Xiang, Li-Xin; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a protocol for direct hepatic lineage differentiation from early developmental progenitors to a population of mature hepatocytes. METHODS: Hepatic progenitor cells and then mature hepatocytes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were obtained in a sequential manner, induced by valproic acid (VPA) and cytokines (hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor and insulin). Morphological changes of the differentiated cells were examined by phase-contrast microscopy and electron microscopy. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical analyses were used to evaluate the gene expression profiles of the VPA-induced hepatic progenitors and the hepatic progenitor-derived hepatocytes. Glycogen storage, cytochrome P450 activity, transplantation assay, differentiation of bile duct-like structures and tumorigenic analyses were performed for the functional identification of the differentiated cells. Furthermore, FACS and electron microscopy were used for the analyses of cell cycle profile and apoptosis in VPA-induced hepatic differentiated cells. RESULTS: Based on the combination of VPA and cytokines, mouse ES cells differentiated into a uniform and homogeneous cell population of hepatic progenitor cells and then matured into functional hepatocytes. The progenitor population shared several characteristics with ES cells and hepatic stem/progenitor cells, and represented a novel progenitor cell between ES and hepatic oval cells in embryonic development. The differentiated hepatocytes from progenitor cells shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including the patterns of gene expression, immunological markers, in vitro hepatocyte functions and in vivo capacity to restore acute-damaged liver function. In addition, the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells from ES cells was accompanied by significant cell cycle arrest and selective survival of differentiating cells towards hepatic lineages. CONCLUSION: Hepatic cells

  18. Group A Streptococci Bind to Mucin and Human Pharyngeal Cells through Sialic Acid-Containing Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Patricia A.; Pancholi, Vijaykumar; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2001-01-01

    The first step in the colonization of group A streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes) is adherence to pharyngeal epithelial cells. Prior to adherence to their target tissue, the first barrier that the streptococci encounter is the mucous layer of the respiratory tract. The present study was undertaken to characterize the interaction between mucin, the major glycoprotein component of mucus, and streptococci. We report here that S. pyogenes is able to bind to bovine submaxillary mucin in solid-phase microtiter plate assays. Western blots probed with 125I-labeled mucin and a panel of monoclonal antibodies revealed that the streptococcal M protein is one of two cell wall-associated proteins responsible for this binding. The binding was further localized to the N-terminal portion of the M molecule. Further analysis revealed that the M protein binds to the sialic acid moieties on mucin, and this interaction seems to be based on M-protein conformation rather than specific amino acid sequences. We found that sialic acid also plays a critical role in the adherence of an M6 streptococcal strain to the Detroit 562 human pharyngeal cell line and have identified α2-6-linked sialic acid as an important sialylated linkage for M-protein recognition. Western blot analysis of extracted pharyngeal cell membrane proteins identified three potential sialic acid-containing receptors for the M protein. The results are the first to show that sialic acid not only is involved in the binding of the streptococci to mucin but also plays an important role in adherence of group A streptococci to the pharyngeal cell surface. PMID:11705914

  19. Peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in human hepatoma cells (HEP-G2)

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, P.A.; Blake, D.C. Jr.; Pedersen, J.I.

    1987-05-01

    Hep-G2 cells oxidize (1-/sup 14/C)palmitic acid (C16) and (1-/sup 14/C) lignoceric acid (C24) via beta-oxidation to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and water-soluble (WS) products. After perchloric acid precipitation and chloroform-methanol extraction, the WS fraction contained labelled oxidation products as well as fatty acyl CoA's, thus, measurement of WS radioactivity is an overestimate of Hep-G2 beta-oxidation. Alkaline hydrolysis of fatty acyl CoA's prior to measurement of WS radioactivity permits more accurate assessment of beta-oxidation. Using this method, the optimal pH for oxidation of each fatty acid to WS products by Hep-G2 cells was 9.0, while /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production was maximal at pH 7.0. To determine the subcellular location of beta-oxidation, mitochondria (M) were partially separated from peroxisomes (P) on linear Nycodenz gradients. In Hep-G2 cells, oxidation of both C16 and C24 was observed mainly in fractions enriched in succinate dehydrogenase, an M marker enzyme. In contrast, both P and M of rat liver oxidized these fatty acids. However, when Hep-G2 cells were fractionated on discontinuous sucrose gradients, C16 and C24 were oxidized by both P and M fractions. They conclude that beta-oxidation of both long (C16) and very long (C24) chain fatty acids occurs in P as well as in M of Hep-G2 cells, and the present method reflects a more accurate and sensitive measurement of oxidation rates.

  20. Effects of coolant parameters on steady state temperature distribution in phospheric-acid fuel cell electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Abdul-Aziz, A.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of thermophysical properties and flow rate on the steady-state temperature distribution in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell electrode plate was experimentally investigated. An experimental setup that simulates the operating conditions prevailing in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell stack was used. The fuel cell cooling system utilized three types of coolants to remove excess heat generated in the cell electrode and to maintain a reasonably uniform temperature distribution in the electrode plate. The coolants used were water, engine oil, and air. These coolants were circulated at Reynolds number ranging from 1165 to 6165 for water; 3070 to 6864 for air; and 15 to 79 for oil. Experimental results are presented.

  1. Anacardic acid sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiation therapy by regulating H2AX expression

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kun; Jiang, Xianzhen; He, leye; Tang, Yuxin; Yin, Guangming; Zeng, Qing; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Tan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Anacardic acid (6-pentadecylsalicylic acid, AA), a natural compound isolated from the traditional medicine Amphipterygiumadstringens, has been reported as potential antitumor agents in various cancers including prostate cancer (PC). However, the effects and mechanism of AA on the radiosensitivity of prostate cancer remains unknown. The results indicated that AA exhibited strong antitumor activity in PC cell lines, either as a single agentor in combination with radiation. AA significantly induced the downregulation of H2AX and p-H2AX expression, increase of cell apoptosis and decreasing of cell invasion, which were reversed by overexpressed H2AX. These results suggest that AA sensitize prostate cancer cells to radiation therapy by repressing H2AX expression. PMID:26884865

  2. C. butyricum lipoteichoic acid inhibits the inflammatory response and apoptosis in HT-29 cells induced by S. aureus lipoteichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbo; Qi, Lili; Mei, Lehe; Wu, Zhige; Wang, Hengzheng

    2016-07-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is one of microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules of gram-positive bacteria. In this study, we demonstrated that Clostridium butyricum LTA (bLTA) significantly inhibited the inflammatory response and apoptosis induced by Staphylococcus aureus LTA (aLTA) in HT-29 cells. aLTA stimulated the inflammatory responses by activating a strong signal transduction cascade through NF-κB and ERK, but bLTA did not activate the signaling pathway. bLTA pretreatment inhibited the activation of the NF-κB and ERK signaling pathway induced by aLTA. The expression and release of cytokines such as IL-8 and TNF-α were also suppressed by bLTA pretreatment. aLTA treatment induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells, but bLTA did not affect the viability of the cells. Further study indicated that bLTA inhibited apoptosis in HT-29 cells induced by aLTA. These results suggest that bLTA may act as an aLTA antagonist and that an antagonistic bLTA may be a useful agent for suppressing the pro-inflammatory activities of gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27020942

  3. Boronic acid recognition based-gold nanoparticle-labeling strategy for the assay of sialic acid expression on cancer cell surface by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Yuan; Peng, Lu; Hu, Bin

    2016-02-01

    Sialic acids are special sugars widely expressed at the termini of glycan chains on the cell surface, and their expression level on the cancer cell surface is much higher than on the normal cell surface. Herein, we reported an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) based method with elemental tags for the analysis of sialic acids on the cancer cell surface. The method is based on the selective recognition of sialic acids by biotinylated phenylboronic acid (biotin-APBA) at physiological pH and signal enhancement of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in ICP-MS when AuNPs were used as elemental tags labeled on biotin-APBA. A specificity test reveals that the proposed method has high specificity towards cancer cells. Taking HepG2 and MCF-7 cells as two model cancer cells, competitive experiments were performed to estimate the expression level of sialic acids on the cancer cell surface, and it was found that the average numbers of sialic acids expressed on the single MCF-7 and HepG2 cell surface were 7.0 × 10(9) and 5.4 × 10(9), respectively. With sialic acid as the biomarker for cancer cells, the method was further used for cell detection. The limits of detection in terms of cell number for HepG2 and MCF-7 cells were 120 and 64, respectively. And the relative standard deviations for nine replicate determinations of ca. 1000 HepG2 and MCF-7 cells were 9.6% and 8.9%, respectively. The linear ranges for HepG2 cells and MCF-7 cells were 300-10 000 and 170-11 000, respectively. The proposed approach is sensitive as well as selective for the analysis of sialic acids on the cancer cell surface, and is potentially applicable for the study of tumor malignancy and metastasis, which is helpful for biological research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:26811850

  4. Physiological concentrations of bile acids down-regulate agonist induced secretion in colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Keating, Niamh; Mroz, Magdalena S; Scharl, Michael M; Marsh, Christine; Ferguson, Gail; Hofmann, Alan F; Keely, Stephen J

    2009-08-01

    In patients with bile acid malabsorption, high concentrations of bile acids enter the colon and stimulate Cl(-) and fluid secretion, thereby causing diarrhoea. However, deoxycholic acid (DCA), the predominant colonic bile acid, is normally present at lower concentrations where its role in regulating transport is unclear. Thus, the current study set out to investigate the effects of physiologically relevant DCA concentrations on colonic epithelial secretory function. Cl(-) secretion was measured as changes in short-circuit current across voltage-clamped T(84) cell monolayers. At high concentrations (0.5-1 mM), DCA acutely stimulated Cl(-) secretion but this effect was associated with cell injury, as evidenced by decreased transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. In contrast, chronic (24 hrs) exposure to lower DCA concentrations (10-200 microM) inhibited responses to Ca(2+) and cAMP-dependent secretagogues without altering TER, LDH release, or secretagogue-induced increases in intracellular second messengers. Other bile acids - taurodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid - had similar antisecretory effects. DCA (50 microM) rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) and both ERK and p38 MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases). The EGFr inhibitor, AG1478, and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, reversed the antisecretory effects of DCA, while the MAPK inhibitors, PD98059 and SB203580, did not. In summary, our studies suggest that, in contrast to its acute prosecretory effects at pathophysiological concentrations, lower, physiologically relevant, levels of DCA chronically down-regulate colonic epithelial secretory function. On the basis of these data, we propose a novel role for bile acids as physiological regulators of colonic secretory capacity. PMID:19583809

  5. Physiological concentrations of bile acids down‐regulate agonist induced secretion in colonic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Niamh; Mroz, Magdalena S.; Scharl, Michael M.; Marsh, Christine; Ferguson, Gail; Hofmann, Alan F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In patients with bile acid malabsorption, high concentrations of bile acids enter the colon and stimulate Cl− and fluid secretion, thereby causing diarrhoea. However, deoxycholic acid (DCA), the predominant colonic bile acid, is normally present at lower concentrations where its role in regulating transport is unclear. Thus, the current study set out to investigate the effects of physiologically relevant DCA concentrations on colonic epithelial secretory function. Cl− secretion was measured as changes in short‐circuit current across voltage‐clamped T84 cell monolayers. At high concentrations (0.5–1 mM), DCA acutely stimulated Cl− secretion but this effect was associated with cell injury, as evidenced by decreased transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. In contrast, chronic (24 hrs) exposure to lower DCA concentrations (10–200 μM) inhibited responses to Ca2+ and cAMP‐dependent secretagogues without altering TER, LDH release, or secretagogue‐induced increases in intracellular second messengers. Other bile acids – taurodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid – had similar antisecretory effects. DCA (50 μM) rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) and both ERK and p38 MAPKs (mitogen‐activated protein kinases). The EGFr inhibitor, AG1478, and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, reversed the antisecretory effects of DCA, while the MAPK inhibitors, PD98059 and SB203580, did not. In summary, our studies suggest that, in contrast to its acute prosecretory effects at pathophysiological concentrations, lower, physiologically relevant, levels of DCA chronically down‐regulate colonic epithelial secretory function. On the basis of these data, we propose a novel role for bile acids as physiological regulators of colonic secretory capacity. PMID:19583809

  6. Cell nucleus targeting for living cell extraction of nucleic acid associated proteins with intracellular nanoprobes of magnetic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Hu, Zhengyan; Qin, Hongqiang; Liu, Fangjie; Cheng, Kai; Wu, Ren'an; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-08-01

    Since nanoparticles could be ingested by cells naturally and target at a specific cellular location as designed, the extraction of intracellular proteins from living cells for large-scale analysis by nanoprobes seems to be ideally possible. Nucleic acid associated proteins (NAaP) take the crucial position during biological processes in maintaining and regulating gene structure and gene related behaviors, yet there are still challenges during the global investigation of intracellular NAaP, especially from living cells. In this work, a strategy to extract intracellular proteins from living cells with the magnetic carbon nanotube (oMWCNT@Fe3O4) as an intracellular probe is developed, to achieve the high throughput analysis of NAaP from living human hepatoma BEL-7402 cells with a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach. Due to the specific intracellular localization of the magnetic carbon nanotubes around nuclei and its strong interaction with nucleic acids, the highly efficient extraction was realized for cellular NAaP from living cells, with the capability of identifying 2383 intracellular NAaP from only ca. 10,000 living cells. This method exhibited potential applications in dynamic and in situ analysis of intracellular proteins. PMID:23815738

  7. Ethylene signaling in salt stress- and salicylic acid-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Poór, Péter; Kovács, Judit; Szopkó, Dóra; Tari, Irma

    2013-02-01

    Salt stress- and salicylic acid (SA)-induced cell death can be activated by various signaling pathways including ethylene (ET) signaling in intact tomato plants. In tomato suspension cultures, a treatment with 250 mM NaCl increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), and ET. The 10(-3) M SA-induced cell death was also accompanied by ROS and NO production, but ET emanation, the most characteristic difference between the two cell death programs, did not change. ET synthesis was enhanced by addition of ET precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, which, after 2 h, increased the ROS production in the case of both stressors and accelerated cell death under salt stress. However, it did not change the viability and NO levels in SA-treated samples. The effect of ET induced by salt stress could be blocked with silver thiosulfate (STS), an inhibitor of ET action. STS reduced the death of cells which is in accordance with the decrease in ROS production of cells exposed to high salinity. Unexpectedly, application of STS together with SA resulted in increasing ROS and reduced NO accumulation which led to a faster cell death. NaCl- and SA-induced cell death was blocked by Ca(2+) chelator EGTA and calmodulin inhibitor W-7, or with the inhibitors of ROS. The inhibitor of MAPKs, PD98059, and the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64 reduced cell death in both cases. These results show that NaCl induces cell death mainly by ET-induced ROS production, but ROS generated by SA was not controlled by ET in tomato cell suspension. PMID:22535239

  8. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  9. Gastroprotective mechanisms of action of semisynthetic carnosic acid derivatives in human cells.

    PubMed

    Theoduloz, Cristina; Pertino, Mariano Walter; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Carnosic acid (CA) and its semisynthetic derivatives display relevant gastroprotective effects on HCl/ethanol induced gastric lesions in mice. However, little is known on the mechanisms of action of the new compounds. The aim of the present work was to assess the gastroprotective action mechanisms of CA and its derivatives using human cell culture models. A human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS) and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) were used to reveal the possible mechanisms involved. The ability of the compounds to protect cells against sodium taurocholate (NaT)-induced damage, and to increase the cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) content was determined using AGS cells. Stimulation of cell proliferation was studied employing MRC-5 fibroblasts. Carnosic acid and its derivatives 10-18 raised GSH levels in AGS cells. While CA did not increase the PGE2 content in AGS cells, all derivatives significantly stimulated PGE2 synthesis, the best effect being found for the 12-O-indolebutyrylmethylcarnosate 13. A significant increase in MRC-5 fibroblast proliferation was observed for the derivatives 7 and 16-18. The antioxidant effect of the compounds was assessed by the inhibition of lipid peroxidation in human erythrocyte membranes, scavenging of superoxide anion and DPPH discoloration assay. The new CA derivatives showed gastroprotective effects by different mechanisms, including protection against cell damage induced by NaT, increase in GSH content, stimulation of PGE2 synthesis and cell proliferation. PMID:24399049

  10. Co-culture of vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells by hyaluronic acid micro-pattern on titanium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingan; Li, Guicai; Zhang, Kun; Liao, Yuzhen; Yang, Ping; Maitz, Manfred F.; Huang, Nan

    2013-05-01

    Micro-patterning as an effective bio-modification technique is increasingly used in the development of biomaterials with superior mechanical and biological properties. However, as of now, little is known about the simultaneous regulation of endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) by cardiovascular implants. In this study, a co-culture system of EC and SMC was built on titanium surface by the high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMW-HA) micro-pattern. Firstly, the micro-pattern sample with a geometry of 25 μm wide HMW-HA ridges, and 25 μm alkali-activated Ti grooves was prepared by microtransfer molding (μTM) for regulating SMC morphology. Secondly, hyaluronidase was used to decompose high molecular weight hyaluronic acid into low molecular weight hyaluronic acid which could promote EC adhesion. Finally, the morphology of the adherent EC was elongated by the SMC micro-pattern. The surface morphology of the patterned Ti was imaged by SEM. The existence of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid on the modified Ti surface was demonstrated by FTIR. The SMC micro-pattern and EC/SMC co-culture system were characterized by immunofluorescence microscopy. The nitric oxide release test and cell retention calculation were used to evaluate EC function on inhibiting hyperplasia and cell shedding, respectively. The results indicate that EC in EC/SMC co-culture system displayed a higher NO release and cell retention compared with EC cultured alone. It can be suggested that the EC/SMC co-culture system possessed superiority to EC cultured alone in inhibiting hyperplasia and cell shedding at least in a short time of 24 h.

  11. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell stack three-dimensional model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed distributed mathematical model of phosphoric acid fuel cell stack have been developed, with the FORTRAN computer program, for analyzing the temperature distribution in the stack and the associated current density distribution on the cell plates. Energy, mass, and electrochemical analyses in the stack were combined to develop the model. Several reasonable assumptions were made to solve this mathematical model by means of the finite differences numerical method.

  12. Generation, Release, and Uptake of the NAD Precursor Nicotinic Acid Riboside by Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Veronika; Shabalin, Konstantin; Nerinovski, Kirill; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Yakimov, Alexander; Redpath, Philip; Khodorkovskiy, Mikhail; Migaud, Marie E; Ziegler, Mathias; Nikiforov, Andrey

    2015-11-01

    NAD is essential for cellular metabolism and has a key role in various signaling pathways in human cells. To ensure proper control of vital reactions, NAD must be permanently resynthesized. Nicotinamide and nicotinic acid as well as nicotinamide riboside (NR) and nicotinic acid riboside (NAR) are the major precursors for NAD biosynthesis in humans. In this study, we explored whether the ribosides NR and NAR can be generated in human cells. We demonstrate that purified, recombinant human cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) CN-II and CN-III, but not CN-IA, can dephosphorylate the mononucleotides nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinic acid mononucleotide (NAMN) and thus catalyze NR and NAR formation in vitro. Similar to their counterpart from yeast, Sdt1, the human 5'-NTs require high (millimolar) concentrations of nicotinamide mononucleotide or NAMN for efficient catalysis. Overexpression of FLAG-tagged CN-II and CN-III in HEK293 and HepG2 cells resulted in the formation and release of NAR. However, NAR accumulation in the culture medium of these cells was only detectable under conditions that led to increased NAMN production from nicotinic acid. The amount of NAR released from cells engineered for increased NAMN production was sufficient to maintain viability of surrounding cells unable to use any other NAD precursor. Moreover, we found that untransfected HeLa cells produce and release sufficient amounts of NAR and NR under normal culture conditions. Collectively, our results indicate that cytosolic 5'-NTs participate in the conversion of NAD precursors and establish NR and NAR as integral constituents of human NAD metabolism. In addition, they point to the possibility that different cell types might facilitate each other's NAD supply by providing alternative precursors. PMID:26385918

  13. Continuous Taurocholic Acid Exposure Promotes Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression Due to Reduced Cell Loss Resulting from Enhanced Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Sho; Yamamoto, Hiroto; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Saito, Shota; Hattori, Takanori; Yamamoto, Gaku; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Refluxogenic effects of smoking and alcohol abuse may be related to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The present study attempts to clarify the effects of continuous taurocholic acid (TCA) exposure, which is neither mutagenic nor genotoxic, on ESCC progression. Methods A squamous carcinoma cell line (ESCC-DR) was established from a tumor induced in a rat model of gastroduodenal reflux. ESCC-DR cells were incubated with 2 mM TCA for ≥2 months. The effects of continuous TCA exposure were evaluated in vitro on cell morphology, growth, and invasion and in vivo on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, the mean level of secreted transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins in cell culture supernatants and mRNA synthesis of TGF-β1 and VEGF-A of ESCC cells were measured. The angiogenic potential was further examined by a migration assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results Continuous TCA exposure induced marked formation of filopodia in vitro. Expression levels of angiogenic factors were significantly higher in the cells treated with TCA than in control cells. Tumor xenografts derived from cells pre-exposed to TCA were larger and more vascularized than those derived from control cells. In addition, TCA exposure increased HUVEC migration. Conclusion Continuous TCA exposure enhanced ESCC progression due to reduced cell loss in vivo. Cell loss was inhibited by TCA-induced vascular endothelial cell migration, which was mediated by TGF-β1 and VEGF-A released from ESCC cells. PMID:24551170

  14. Retinoic acid promotes primary fetal alveolar epithelial type II cell proliferation and differentiation to alveolar epithelial type I cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui-wei; Kong, Xiang-yong; Zhu, Xiao-xi; Zhu, Guo-qing; Ma, Jin-shuai; Liu, Xiu-xiang

    2015-05-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in lung development and maturation. Many stimuli can induce alveolar epithelial cell damage which will result in the injury of lung parenchyma. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of RA on the proliferation and differentiation of primary fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells (fAECIIs). Primary fAECIIs were isolated from fetal rats at 19 d of gestation and purified by a differential centrifugation and adhesion method. The cells were randomly divided into control (dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO) and RA groups. Cell proliferation, viability, apoptosis, cycle, and expression of target protein were examined at 24, 48, and 72 h. We found that the proliferation and viability of cells in the RA-exposed group significantly increased compared with the DMSO control group. The proportion (%) of cells in the G2 and S phases in the RA group was significantly higher than that in control group cells. The proportion (%) of both early apoptotic cells and late apoptotic cells decreased significantly in cells exposed to RA compared with cells exposed to DMSO. RA significantly enhanced the expression of aquaporin 5 (AQP5). The expression level of pulmonary surfactant C (SPC) was elevated after cells were exposed to RA for 24 and 72 h but was inhibited when cells were exposed to RA for 48 h. These results suggest that RA promotes fAECII proliferation by improving cell viability, promoting S phase entry and inhibiting apoptosis and RA promotes fAECIIs differentiation to alveolar epithelial type I cells (AECIs). PMID:25515249

  15. Inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation in repeated and non-repeated treatment with zoledronic acid

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Zoledronic acid is used to treat bone metastases and has been shown to reduce skeletal-related events and exert antitumor activity. The present in vitro study investigates the mechanism of action of Zoledronic Acid on breast cancer cell lines with different hormonal and HER2 patterns. Furthermore, we investigated the efficacy of repeated versus non-repeated treatments. Methods The study was performed on 4 breast cancer cell lines (BRC-230, SkBr3, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). Non-repeated treatment (single exposure of 168 hrs’ duration) with zoledronic acid was compared with repeated treatment (separate exposures, each of 48 hrs’ duration, for a total of 168 hrs) at different dosages. A dose–response profile was generated using sulforhodamine B assay. Apoptosis was evaluated by TUNEL assay and biomolecular characteristics were analyzed by western blot. Results Zoledronic acid produced a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation in all cell lines. Anti-proliferative activity was enhanced with the repeated treatment, proving to be statistically significant in the triple-negative lines. In these lines repeated treatment showed a cytocidal effect, with apoptotic cell death caused by caspase 3, 8 and 9 activation and decreased RAS and pMAPK expression. Apoptosis was not observed in estrogen receptor-positive line: p21 overexpression suggested a slowing down of cell cycle. A decrease in RAS and pMAPK expression was seen in HER2-overexpressing line after treatment. Conclusions The study suggests that zoledronic acid has an antitumor activity in breast cancer cell lines. Its mechanism of action involves the decrease of RAS and RHO, as in osteoclasts. Repeated treatment enhances antitumor activity compared to non-repeated treatment. Repeated treatment has a killing effect on triple-negative lines due to apoptosis activation. Further research is warranted especially in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:23173568

  16. Self-assembling nanoparticles encapsulating zoledronic acid revert multidrug resistance in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gazzano, Elena; Salzano, Giuseppina; Giordano, Antonio; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Ghigo, Dario; Caraglia, Michele; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Riganti, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters makes tumor cells simultaneously resistant to several cytotoxic drugs. Impairing the energy metabolism of multidrug resistant (MDR) cells is a promising chemosensitizing strategy, but many metabolic modifiers are too toxic in vivo. We previously observed that the aminobisphosphonate zoledronic acid inhibits the activity of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), a master regulator of cancer cell metabolism. Free zoledronic acid, however, reaches low intratumor concentration. We synthesized nanoparticle formulations of the aminobisphosphonate that allow a higher intratumor delivery of the drug. We investigated whether they are effective metabolic modifiers and chemosensitizing agents against human MDR cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. At not toxic dosage, nanoparticles carrying zoledronic acid chemosensitized MDR cells to a broad spectrum of cytotoxic drugs, independently of the type of ABC transporters expressed. The nanoparticles inhibited the isoprenoid synthesis and the Ras/ERK1/2-driven activation of HIF-1α, decreased the transcription and activity of glycolytic enzymes, the glucose flux through the glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, the electron flux through the mitochondrial respiratory chain, the synthesis of ATP. So doing, they lowered the ATP-dependent activity of ABC transporters, increasing the chemotherapy efficacy in vitro and in vivo. These effects were more pronounced in MDR cells than in chemosensitive ones and were due to the inhibition of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS), as demonstrated in FPPS-silenced tumors. Our work proposes nanoparticle formulations of zoledronic acid as the first not toxic metabolic modifiers, effective against MDR tumors. PMID:26372812

  17. Effects of bleomycin and antioxidants on the fatty acid profile of testicular cancer cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Cort, A; Ozben, T; Melchiorre, M; Chatgilialoglu, C; Ferreri, C; Sansone, A

    2016-02-01

    Bleomycin is used in chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of patients having testicular germ-cell tumor (TGCT). There is no study in the literature investigating the effects of bleomycin on membrane lipid profile in testicular cancer cells. We investigated membrane fatty acid (FA) profiles isolated, derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography of NTera-2 testicular cancer cells incubated with bleomycin (Bleo) for 24 h in the absence and presence of N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) and curcumin (Cur) as commonly used antioxidant adjuvants. At the same time the MAPK pathway and EGFR levels were followed up. Bleomycin treatment increased significantly saturated fatty acids (SFA) of phospholipids at the expense of monounsaturated (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Bleomycin also led to a significant increase in the trans lipid isomers of oleic and arachidonic acids due to its free radical producing effect. Incubation with bleomycin increased the p38 MAPK and JNK levels and downregulated EGFR pathway. Coincubation of bleomycin with NAC reversed effects caused by bleomycin. Our results highlight the important role of membrane fatty acid remodeling occurring during the use of bleomycin and its concurrent use with antioxidants which can adjuvate the cytotoxic effects of the chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26656160

  18. Highly conductive PEDOT:PSS treated with formic acid for ITO-free polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Mengistie, Desalegn A; Ibrahem, Mohammed A; Wang, Pen-Cheng; Chu, Chih-Wei

    2014-02-26

    We proposed a facile film treatment with formic acid to enhance the conductivity of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) by 4 orders of magnitude. The effect of formic acid concentration on conductivity was investigated; conductivity increased fast with increasing concentration up to 10 M and then increased slightly, the highest conductivity being 2050 S cm(-1) using 26 M concentration. Formic acid treated PEDOT:PSS films also exhibited very high transmittances. The mechanism of conductivity enhancement was explored through SEM, AFM, and XPS. Formic acid with its high dielectric constant screens the charge between PEDOT and PSS bringing about phase separation between them. Increased carrier concentration, removal of PSS from the film, morphology, and conformation change with elongated and better connected PEDOT chains are the main mechanisms of conductivity enhancement. ITO-free polymer solar cells were also fabricated using PEDOT:PSS electrodes treated with different concentrations of formic acid and showed equal performance to that of ITO electrodes. The concentrated acid treatment did not impair the desirable film properties as well as stability and performance of the solar cells. PMID:24460075

  19. The glycerol teichoic acid from the cell wall of Bacillus stearothermophilus B65

    PubMed Central

    Wicken, A. J.

    1966-01-01

    1. A glycerol teichoic acid has been extracted from cell walls of Bacillus stearothermophilus B65 and its structure examined. 2. Trichloroacetic acid-extractable teichoic acid accounted for 68% of the total cell-wall phosphorus and residual material could be hydrolysed to a mixture of products including those characteristic of glycerol teichoic acids. 3. The extracted polymer is composed of glycerol, phosphoric acid, d-glucose and d-alanine. 4. Hydrolysis of the polymer with alkali gave glycerol, 1-O-α-d-glucopyranosylglycerol and its monophosphates, glycerol mono- and di-phosphate, as well as traces of a glucosyldiglycerol triphosphate and a glucosylglycerol diphosphate. 5. The teichoic acid is a polymer of 18 or 19 glycerol phosphate units having α-d-glucopyranosyl residues attached to position 1 of 14 or 15 of the glycerol residues. 6. The glycerol residues are joined by phosphodiester linkages involving positions 2 and 3 in each glycerol. 7. d-Alanine is in ester linkage to the hydroxyl group at position 6 of approximately half of the glucose residues. 8. One in every 13 or 12 polymer molecules bears a phosphomonoester group on position 3 of a glucose residue, the possible significance of which in linkage of the polymer to other wall constituents is discussed. PMID:4290549

  20. Lipoic acid: energy metabolism and redox regulation of transcription and cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Lester; Cadenas, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The role of R-α-lipoic acid as a cofactor (lipoyllysine) in mitochondrial energy metabolism is well established. Lipoic acid non-covalently bound and exogenously administered to cells or supplemented in the diet is a potent modulator of the cell’s redox status. The diversity of beneficial effects of lipoic acid in a variety of tissues can be mechanistically viewed in terms of thiol/disulfide exchange reactions that modulate the environment’s redox and energy status. Lipoic acid-driven thiol/disulfide exchange reactions appear critical for the modulation of proteins involved in cell signaling and transcription factors. This review emphasizes the effects of lipoic acid on PI3K and AMPK signaling and related transcriptional pathways that are integrated by PGC-1α, a critical regulator of energy homoestasis. The effects of lipoic acid on the neuronal energy-redox axis are largely reviewed in terms of their outcomes for aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21297908

  1. A comparative study on glycerol metabolism to erythritol and citric acid in Yarrowia lipolytica yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ludwika; Rakicka, Magdalena; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Rywińska, Anita

    2014-09-01

    Citric acid and erythritol biosynthesis from pure and crude glycerol by three acetate-negative mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica yeast was investigated in batch cultures in a wide pH range (3.0-6.5). Citric acid biosynthesis was the most effective at pH 5.0-5.5 in the case of Wratislavia 1.31 and Wratislavia AWG7. With a decreasing pH value, the direction of biosynthesis changed into erythritol synthesis accompanied by low production of citric acid. Pathways of glycerol conversion into erythritol and citric acid were investigated in Wratislavia K1 cells. Enzymatic activity was compared in cultures run at pH 3.0 and 4.5, that is, under conditions promoting the production of erythritol and citric acid, respectively. The effect of pH value (3.0 and 4.5) and NaCl presence on the extracellular production and intracellular accumulation of citric acid and erythritol was compared as well. Low pH and NaCl resulted in diminished activity of glycerol kinase, whereas such conditions stimulated the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The presence of NaCl strongly influenced enzymes activity - the effective erythritol production was correlated with a high activity of transketolase and erythrose reductase. Therefore, presented results confirmed that transketolase and erythrose reductase are involved in the overproduction of erythritol in the cells of Y. lipolytica yeast. PMID:25041612

  2. Short chain fatty acids and cadmium cytotoxicity in ROS 17/2. 8 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.J.; Angle, C.R.; Swanson, S.A. )

    1991-03-11

    ROS 17/2.8 rat osteosarcoma cells are extremely sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of Cd. In naive cells, sensitivity to Cd is associated with poor inducibility of metallothionein (MT). Treatment of ROS 17/2.8 cells with Na butyrate (NaB) results in increased resistance to Cd cytotoxicity and increased MT gene expression. The relation between the structure of short chain fatty acids and the alterations of Cd cytotoxicity in ROS 17/2.8 cells was investigated by culture of cells in the presence of 1 or 5 mM Na acetate, NaB, methyl butyrate, isobutyric acid, methyl isobutyrate and caproic acid. Among these compounds, only 5 mM NaB significantly increased the survival of ROS cells exposed to 0.1 to 10 {mu}M Cd and only NaB treatment was effective in increasing MT gene inducibility. The role of inhibition of DNA replication by NaB in cell resistance to Cd was examined. Among compounds tested, only 5 mM NaB significantly inhibited DNA synthesis. However, in cells in which DNA synthesis is inhibited by exposure to hydroxyurea, addition and removal of NaB from culture medium modulates cellular resistance to Cd. Hence, the effectiveness of NaB as a modifier of cell response to Cd is not due entirely to changes in cell proliferation. Additionally, rigid structural constraints for effectiveness dictate that only NaB is a potent modifier of resistance to Cd.

  3. Evaluation of endogenous acidic metabolic products associated with carbohydrate metabolism in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Smith, Bruce; Soliman, Karam F A

    2010-06-01

    Tumor cells have a high tolerance for acidic and hypoxic microenvironments, also producing abundant lactic acid through accelerated glycolysis in the presence or absence of O(2). While the accumulation of lactate is thought to be a major contributor to the reduction of pH-circumscribing aggressive tumors, it is not known if other endogenous metabolic products contribute this acidity. Furthermore, anaerobic metabolism in cancer cells bears similarity to homo-fermentative lactic acid bacteria, however very little is known about an alternative pathway that may drive adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production independent of glycolysis. In this study, we quantify over 40 end-products (amines, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, or ketones) produced by malignant neuroblastoma under accelerated glycolysis (+glucose (GLU) supply 1-10 mM) +/- mitochondrial toxin; 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) to abate aerobic respiration to delineate differences between anaerobic vs. aerobic cell required metabolic pathways. The data show that an acceleration of anaerobic glycolysis prompts an expected reduction in extracellular pH (pH(ex)) from neutral to 6.7 +/- 0.006. Diverse metabolic acids associated with this drop in acidity were quantified by ionic exchange liquid chromatography (LC), showing concomitant rise in lactate (Ctrls 7.5 +/- 0.5 mM; +GLU 12.35 +/- 1.3 mM; +GLU + MPP 18.1 +/- 1.8 mM), acetate (Ctrl 0.84 +/- 0.13 mM: +GLU 1.3 +/- 0.15 mM; +GLU + MPP 2.7 +/- 0.4 mM), fumarate, and a-ketoglutarate (<10 microM) while a range of other metabolic organic acids remained undetected. Amino acids quantified by o-phthalaldehyde precolumn derivatization/electrochemical detection-LC show accumulation of L: -alanine (1.6 +/- .052 mM), L: -glutamate (285 +/- 9.7 microM), L: -asparagine (202 +/- 2.1 microM), and L: -aspartate (84.2 +/- 4.9 microM) produced during routine metabolism, while other amino acids remain undetected. In contrast, the data show no evidence for accumulation of acetaldehyde

  4. Genotoxic and cytostatic effects of 6-pentadecyl salicylic anacardic acid in transformed cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Alam-Escamilla, David; Estrada-Muñiz, Elizabet; Solís-Villegas, Erik; Elizondo, Guillermo; Vega, Libia

    2015-01-01

    In Mexico, as in many other countries, traditional medicine is used for the treatment of several diseases. In particular, Amphipterygium adstringens infusion is used for gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastric cancer. Extracts from this tree have microbicidal effects against Helicobacter pylori, an important risk factor for gastric cancer development. Anacardic acids are constituents of A. adstringens, and 6-pentadecyl salicylic acid (6-PSA) is the most abundant. However, there is a lack of information regarding the effects of 6-PSA on cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether 6-PSA has differential effects on the induction of genotoxicity, cytostaticity, and apoptosis in normal human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs), bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of Balb/c mice, and human transformed cell lines derived from both gastric cancer (AGS cells) and leukaemia (K562 cells). Treatment with 6-PSA (30-150 μM) reduced the viability of AGS and K562 cells together with a moderate, but significant, increase in the frequency of micronucleated cells and the induction of DNA breakage (Comet Assay). Moreover, 6-PSA increased the apoptosis rate in both the AGS and K562 cell lines in a caspase 8-dependent manner. In contrast, neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity were observed in PBMCs or bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes of Balb/c mice after treatment with low doses of 6-PSA (0.2-2.0 mg/Kg). Instead, 6-PSA treatment resulted in the inhibition of PBMC proliferation, which was reversible after the compound was removed. Additionally, 6-PSA treatments (2-20 mg/Kg) increased the frequency of mature polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow, suggesting a possible effect on the differentiation process of immune cells. The present results indicate that 6-PSA induces cytotoxicity and moderate genotoxicity, together with an increase in the apoptosis rate, in a caspase 8-dependent manner in gastric cancer cells. In contrast, a low toxicity was observed when

  5. Retinoic acid specifically downregulates Fgf4 and inhibits posterior cell proliferation in the developing mouse autopod

    PubMed Central

    HAYES, CHRISTOPHER; MORRISS-KAY, GILLIAN M.

    2001-01-01

    Retinoic acid, when administered to pregnant mice on d 11.0 of gestation, causes limb skeletal abnormalities consisting of reduced digital number, shortening of the long bones and delayed ossification. We show here that these effects are correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation within 5 h of retinoic acid administration, specifically in the posterior half of the distal limb bud mesenchyme, from which the distal skeletal elements are generated. There is a specific downregulation of Fgf4, a gene known to be involved in limb bud outgrowth and expressed only in the posterior part of the apical ectodermal ridge; Fgf8, which is expressed throughout the apical ectodermal ridge, is unaffected. The reduction in Fgf4 expression is not accompanied by downregulation of Shh, nor of its receptor and downstream target gene Ptc, suggesting that the skeletal reduction defects induced by retinoic acid are mediated specifically by FGF4-induced skeletogenic mesenchymal cell proliferation. PMID:11430695

  6. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, Maëlle; Majewska, Claire; Brunquers, Amandine; Wongpramud, Sumalee; Valet, Bénédicte; Janssens, Philippe; Dillemans, Monique; Van Nedervelde, Laurence; Gallo, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box). In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells). Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif. PMID:27190515

  7. Tetrahydro-iso-alpha Acids Antagonize Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activity in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lempereur, Maëlle; Majewska, Claire; Brunquers, Amandine; Wongpramud, Sumalee; Valet, Bénédicte; Janssens, Philippe; Dillemans, Monique; Van Nedervelde, Laurence; Gallo, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids commonly called THIAA or Tetra are modified hop acids extracted from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) which are frequently used in brewing industry mainly in order to provide beer bitterness and foam stability. Interestingly, molecular structure of tetrahydro-iso-alpha acids is close to a new type of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) antagonists aimed at disrupting the binding of coactivators containing an LxxLL motif (NR-box). In this work we show that THIAA decreases estradiol-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 (ERα-positive breast cancer cells). Besides, we show that it inhibits ERα transcriptional activity. Interestingly, this extract fails to compete with estradiol for ERα binding and does not significantly impact the receptor turnover rate in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that it does not act like classical antiestrogens. Hence, we demonstrate that THIAA is able to antagonize ERα estradiol-induced recruitment of the LxxLL binding motif. PMID:27190515

  8. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Regulates Both the Survival and Replication of Human β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jide; Dang, Hoa; Chen, Zheying; Guan, Alice; Jin, Yingli; Atkinson, Mark A.; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been shown to inhibit apoptosis of rodent β-cells in vitro. In this study, we show that activation of GABAA receptors (GABAA-Rs) or GABAB-Rs significantly inhibits oxidative stress–related β-cell apoptosis and preserves pancreatic β-cells in streptozotocin-rendered hyperglycemic mice. Moreover, treatment with GABA, or a GABAA-R– or GABAB-R–specific agonist, inhibited human β-cell apoptosis following islet transplantation into NOD/scid mice. Accordingly, activation of GABAA-Rs and/or GABAB-Rs may be a useful adjunct therapy for human islet transplantation. GABA-R agonists also promoted β-cell replication in hyperglycemic mice. While a number of agents can promote rodent β-cell replication, most fail to provide similar activities with human β-cells. In this study, we show that GABA administration promotes β-cell replication and functional recovery in human islets following implantation into NOD/scid mice. Human β-cell replication was induced by both GABAA-R and GABAB-R activation. Hence, GABA regulates both the survival and replication of human β-cells. These actions, together with the anti-inflammatory properties of GABA, suggest that modulation of peripheral GABA-Rs may represent a promising new therapeutic strategy for improving β-cell survival following human islet transplantation and increasing β-cells in patients with diabetes. PMID:23995958

  9. In situ screening assay for cell viability using a dimeric cyanine nucleic acid stain.

    PubMed

    Becker, B; Clapper, J; Harkins, K R; Olson, J A

    1994-08-15

    A rapid and sensitive assay is described for the determination of cell viability of adherent and nonadherent cells that can be performed in situ in 96-well microtiter plates using fluorescence plate scanners. The assay, based on dye exclusion, utilizes a plasma membrane-impermeable, dimeric cyanine dye (YOYO-1). YOYO-1 fluoresces brightly only when bound to nucleic acids. Cells are incubated with YOYO-1, and fluorescence is measured before and after the addition of detergent, which allows the dye to enter the cells. The fluorescence before detergent treatment originates from nonviable cells that have membrane damage and take up YOYO-1. The fluorescence after detergent treatment originates from all cells in the sample. The ratio of the two fluorescence values is used as an indicator of cell viability. The cell viability results of this microplate assay closely resemble those of dye exclusion studies by flow cytometry and are similar but not identical to those of the thiazolyl blue assay, which uses a metabolic indicator of cell death. Because the assay can be performed in situ, without removing the medium, disintegrated cells, cell aggregates, and cells that stick to culture vessel walls are all included in the measurement. PMID:7527190

  10. Method of using alpha-1 acid glycoprotein on T-cells as a marker for alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fudenberg, H.H.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described of diagnosing a dementia of the Alzheimer's type characterized by a change in the percentage of T-cells bearing surface membrane alpha-1 acid glycoprotein which comprises providing T-cells from a subject, determining the percentage of those T cells which bear surface membrane alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, and comparing that percentage of the percentage of T cells which bear the glycoprotein in a control, whereby the dementia is diagnosed.

  11. Acid Gas Removal by Customized Sorbents for Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kapfenberger, J.; Sohnemann, J.; Schleitzer, D.; Loewen, A.

    2002-09-20

    In order to reduce exergy losses, gas cleaning at high temperatures is favored in IGFC systems. As shown by thermodynamic data, separation efficiencies of common sorbents decrease with increasing temperature. Therefore, acid gas removal systems have to be developed for IGFC applications considering sorbent capacity, operation temperature, gasification feedstock composition and fuel cell threshold values.

  12. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF NORMAL HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO TRIVALENT ARSENICALS AND DIMETHYLTHIOARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung is a major target for arsenic carcinogenesis in humans. However, the carcinogenic mode of action of arsenicals is unknown. We investigated, in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS2B) cells, the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAsIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), dimethylarsi...

  13. Survey on aging on electrodes and electrocatalysts in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonehart, P.; Hochmuth, J.

    1981-01-01

    The processes which contribute to the decay in performance of electrodes used in phosphoric acid fuel cell systems are discussed. Loss of catalytic surface area, corrosion of the carbon support, electrode structure degradation, electrolyte degradation, and impurities in the reactant streams are identified as the major areas for concern.

  14. Manual of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant cost model and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. Y.; Alkasab, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Cost analysis of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant includes two parts: a method for estimation of system capital costs, and an economic analysis which determines the levelized annual cost of operating the system used in the capital cost estimation. A FORTRAN computer has been developed for this cost analysis.

  15. Determining surface areas of marine alga cells by acid-base titration method.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Ma, Y; Su, Y

    1997-09-01

    A new method for determining the surface area of living marine alga cells was described. The method uses acid-base titration to measure the surface acid/base amount on the surface of alga cells and uses the BET (Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller) equation to estimate the maximum surface acid/base amount, assuming that hydrous cell walls have carbohydrates or other structural compounds which can behave like surface Brönsted acid-base sites due to coordination of environmental H2O molecules. The method was applied to 18 diverse alga species (including 7 diatoms, 2 flagellates, 8 green algae and 1 red alga) maintained in seawater cultures. For the species examined, the surface areas of individual cells ranged from 2.8 x 10(-8) m2 for Nannochloropsis oculata to 690 x 10(-8) m2 for Dunaliella viridis, specific surface areas from 1,030 m2.g-1 for Dunaliella salina to 28,900 m2.g-1 for Pyramidomonas sp. Measurement accuracy was 15.2%. Preliminary studies show that the method may be more promising and accurate than light/electron microscopic measurements for coarse estimation of the surface area of living algae. PMID:9297794

  16. Sialic acid-dependent cell entry of human enterovirus D68

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yue; Sheng, Ju; Baggen, Jim; Meng, Geng; Xiao, Chuan; Thibaut, Hendrik J.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-11-13

    Human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is a causative agent of childhood respiratory diseases and has now emerged as a global public health threat. Nevertheless, knowledge of the tissue tropism and pathogenesis of EV-D68 has been hindered by a lack of studies on the receptor-mediated EV-D68 entry into host cells. Here we demonstrate that cell surface sialic acid is essential for EV-D68 to bind to and infect susceptible cells. Crystal structures of EV-D68 in complex with sialylated glycan receptor analogues show that they bind into the ‘canyon’ on the virus surface. The sialic acid receptor induces a cascade of conformational changes in the virus to eject a fatty-acid-like molecule that regulates the stability of the virus. Furthermore, virus binding to a sialic acid receptor and to immunoglobulin-like receptors used by most other enteroviruses share a conserved mechanism for priming viral uncoating and facilitating cell entry.

  17. Sialic acid-dependent cell entry of human enterovirus D68

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Yue; Sheng, Ju; Baggen, Jim; Meng, Geng; Xiao, Chuan; Thibaut, Hendrik J.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-11-13

    Human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is a causative agent of childhood respiratory diseases and has now emerged as a global public health threat. Nevertheless, knowledge of the tissue tropism and pathogenesis of EV-D68 has been hindered by a lack of studies on the receptor-mediated EV-D68 entry into host cells. Here we demonstrate that cell surface sialic acid is essential for EV-D68 to bind to and infect susceptible cells. Crystal structures of EV-D68 in complex with sialylated glycan receptor analogues show that they bind into the ‘canyon’ on the virus surface. The sialic acid receptor induces a cascade of conformational changes inmore » the virus to eject a fatty-acid-like molecule that regulates the stability of the virus. Furthermore, virus binding to a sialic acid receptor and to immunoglobulin-like receptors used by most other enteroviruses share a conserved mechanism for priming viral uncoating and facilitating cell entry.« less

  18. Hydroxycinnamate conjugates as potential monolignol replacements: In vitro lignification and cell wall studies with rosmarinic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plasticity of lignin biosynthesis should permit the inclusion of new compatible phenolic monomers such as rosmarinic acid (RA) and analogous catechol derivatives to create cell wall lignins that are less recalcitrant to biomass processing. In vitro lignin polymerization experiments revealed that...

  19. Metabolomic profiling of amino acids and beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in youth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In longitudinal studies of adults, elevated amino acid (AA) concentrations predicted future type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of the present investigation was to examine whether increased plasma AA concentrations are associated with impaired beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity ...

  20. The food additive vanillic acid controls transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice

    PubMed Central

    Gitzinger, Marc; Kemmer, Christian; Fluri, David A.; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Trigger-inducible transcription-control devices that reversibly fine-tune transgene expression in response to molecular cues have significantly advanced the rational reprogramming of mammalian cells. When designed for use in future gene- and cell-based therapies the trigger molecules have to be carefully chosen in order to provide maximum specificity, minimal side-effects and optimal pharmacokinetics in a mammalian organism. Capitalizing on control components that enable Caulobacter crescentus to metabolize vanillic acid originating from lignin degradation that occurs in its oligotrophic freshwater habitat, we have designed synthetic devices that specifically adjust transgene expression in mammalian cells when exposed to vanillic acid. Even in mice transgene expression was robust, precise and tunable in response to vanillic acid. As a licensed food additive that is regularly consumed by humans via flavoured convenience food and specific fresh vegetable and fruits, vanillic acid can be considered as a safe trigger molecule that could be used for diet-controlled transgene expression in future gene- and cell-based therapies. PMID:22187155

  1. Sialic acid-dependent cell entry of human enterovirus D68.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Sheng, Ju; Baggen, Jim; Meng, Geng; Xiao, Chuan; Thibaut, Hendrik J; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Rossmann, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is a causative agent of childhood respiratory diseases and has now emerged as a global public health threat. Nevertheless, knowledge of the tissue tropism and pathogenesis of EV-D68 has been hindered by a lack of studies on the receptor-mediated EV-D68 entry into host cells. Here we demonstrate that cell surface sialic acid is essential for EV-D68 to bind to and infect susceptible cells. Crystal structures of EV-D68 in complex with sialylated glycan receptor analogues show that they bind into the 'canyon' on the virus surface. The sialic acid receptor induces a cascade of conformational changes in the virus to eject a fatty-acid-like molecule that regulates the stability of the virus. Thus, virus binding to a sialic acid receptor and to immunoglobulin-like receptors used by most other enteroviruses share a conserved mechanism for priming viral uncoating and facilitating cell entry. PMID:26563423

  2. Sialic acid-dependent cell entry of human enterovirus D68

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue; Sheng, Ju; Baggen, Jim; Meng, Geng; Xiao, Chuan; Thibaut, Hendrik J.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is a causative agent of childhood respiratory diseases and has now emerged as a global public health threat. Nevertheless, knowledge of the tissue tropism and pathogenesis of EV-D68 has been hindered by a lack of studies on the receptor-mediated EV-D68 entry into host cells. Here we demonstrate that cell surface sialic acid is essential for EV-D68 to bind to and infect susceptible cells. Crystal structures of EV-D68 in complex with sialylated glycan receptor analogues show that they bind into the ‘canyon' on the virus surface. The sialic acid receptor induces a cascade of conformational changes in the virus to eject a fatty-acid-like molecule that regulates the stability of the virus. Thus, virus binding to a sialic acid receptor and to immunoglobulin-like receptors used by most other enteroviruses share a conserved mechanism for priming viral uncoating and facilitating cell entry. PMID:26563423

  3. The effect of pH on the toxicity of fatty acids and fatty acid amides to rainbow trout gill cells.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Matthew J; Voronca, Delia C; Chapman, Robert W; Moeller, Peter D R

    2014-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) expose aquatic organisms to multiple physical and chemical stressors during an acute time period. Algal toxins themselves may be altered by water chemistry parameters affecting their bioavailability and resultant toxicity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two abiotic parameters (pH, inorganic metal salts) on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids, two classes of lipids produced by harmful algae, including the golden alga, Prymnesium parvum, that are toxic to aquatic organisms. Rainbow trout gill cells were used as a model of the fish gill and exposed to single compounds and mixtures of compounds along with variations in pH level and concentration of inorganic metal salts. We employed artificial neural networks (ANNs) and standard ANOVA statistical analysis to examine and predict the effects of these abiotic parameters on the toxicity of fatty acid amides and fatty acids. Our results demonstrate that increasing pH levels increases the toxicity of fatty acid amides and inhibits the toxicity of fatty acids. This phenomenon is reversed at lower pH levels. Exposing gill cells to complex mixtures of chemical factors resulted in dramatic increases in toxicity compared to tests of single compounds for both the fatty acid amides and fatty acids. These findings highlight the potential of physicochemical factors to affect the toxicity of chemicals released during algal blooms and demonstrate drastic differences in the effect of pH on fatty acid amides and fatty acids. PMID:24240104

  4. Production of 13S-hydroxy-9(Z)-octadecenoic acid from linoleic acid by whole recombinant cells expressing linoleate 13-hydratase from Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Young; Lee, Seon-Hwa; Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Park, Jin-Byung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2015-08-20

    Linoleate 13-hydratase from Lactobacillus acidophilus LMG 11470 converted linoleic acid to hydroxyl fatty acid, which was identified as 13S-hydroxy-9(Z)-octadecenoic acid (13-HOD) by GC-MS and NMR. The expression of linoleate 13-hydratase gene in Escherichia coli was maximized by using pACYC plasmid and super optimal broth with catabolite repression (SOC) medium containing 40mM Mg(2+). To optimize induction conditions, recombinant cells were cultivated at 37°C, 1mM isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside was added at 2h, and the culture was further incubated at 16°C for 18h. Recombinant cells expressing linoleate 13-hydratase from L. acidophilus were obtained under the optimized expression conditions and used for 13-HOD production from linoleic acid. The optimal reaction conditions were pH 6.0, 40°C, 0.25% (v/v) Tween 40, 25gl(-1) cells, and 100gl(-1) linoleic acid, and under these conditions, whole recombinant cells produced 79gl(-1) 13-HOD for 3h with a conversion yield of 79% (w/w), a volumetric productivity of 26.3gl(-1)h(-1), and a specific productivity of 1.05g g-cells(-1)h(-1). To the best of our knowledge, the recombinant cells produced hydroxy fatty acid with the highest concentration and productivity reported so far. PMID:26015260

  5. Organic acids from lignocellulose: Candida lignohabitans as a new microbial cell factory.

    PubMed

    Bellasio, Martina; Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael; Marx, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Biorefinery applications require microbial cell factories for the conversion of various sugars derived from lignocellulosic material into value-added chemicals. Here, the capabilities of the yeast Candida lignohabitans to utilize a range of such sugars is characterized. Substrates efficiently converted by this yeast include the pentoses xylose and arabinose. Genetic engineering of C. lignohabitans with the isolated endogenous GAP promoter and GAP terminator was successful. GFP expression was used as a proof of functionality for the isolated transcription elements. Expression of lactate dehydrogenase and cis-aconitate decarboxylase resulted in stable and reproducible production of lactic acid and itaconic acid, respectively. The desired organic acids were accumulated converting pure sugars as well as lignocellulosic hydrolysates. C. lignohabitans proved therefore to be a promising reliable microbial host for production of organic acids from lignocellulosic material. PMID:25651876

  6. Tetrazine-Containing Amino Acid for Peptide Modification and Live Cell Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhongqiu; Zhou, Lanxia; Li, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Dong, Shouliang

    2015-01-01

    A novel amino acid derivative 3-(4-(1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine-3-yl) phenyl)-2-aminopropanoic acid was synthesized in this study. The compound possessed better water-solubility and was synthesized more easily compared with the well-known and commercially available 3-(p-benzylamino)-1, 2, 4, 5-tetrazine. Tetrazine-containing amino acid showed excellent stability in biological media and might be used for cancer cell labeling. Moreover, the compound remained relatively stable in 50% TFA/DCM with little decomposition after prolonged exposure at room temperature. The compound could be utilized as phenylalanine or tyrosine analogue in peptide modification, and the tetrazine-containing peptide demonstrated more significant biological activity than that of the parent peptide. The combination of tetrazine group and amino acid offered broad development prospects of the bioorthogonal labeling and peptide synthesis. PMID:26536589

  7. Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein and lipid transport in human intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montoudis, Alain; Delvin, Edgard; Menard, Daniel

    2006-01-06

    Intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a 14-15 kDa cytoplasmic molecule highly expressed in the enterocyte. Although different functions have been proposed for various FABP family members, the specific function of I-FABP in human intestine remains unclear. Here, we studied the role of I-FABP in molecularly modified normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC-6). cDNA transfection resulted in 90-fold I-FABP overexpression compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector. The high-resolution immunogold technique revealed labeling mainly in the cytosol and confirmed the marked phenotype abundance of I-FABP in cDNA transfected cells. I-FABP overexpression was not associated with alterations in cell proliferation and viability. Studies using these transfected cells cultured with [{sup 14}C]oleic acid did not reveal higher efficiency in de novo synthesis or secretion of triglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesteryl esters compared to cells treated with empty pQCXIP vector only. Similarly, the incubation with [{sup 35}S]methionine did not disclose a superiority in the biogenesis of apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, A-IV, B-48, and B-100. Finally, cells transfected with I-FABP did not exhibit an increased production of chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Our observations establish that I-FABP overexpression in normal HIEC-6 is not related to cell proliferation, lipid esterification, apo synthesis, and lipoprotein assembly, and, therefore, exclude its role in intestinal fat transport.

  8. Retinoic acid modulates RAR alpha and RAR beta receptors in human glioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, A F; Leonard, N; Lacombe, J; Zassadowski, F; Padua, R A; Degos, L; Daumas-Duport, C; Chomienne, C

    1999-01-01

    To identify retinoic acid (RA) signalling pathways involved in growth and differentiation in cells of the glial lineage, two human glioma ceh lines were studied. The three RA receptors (RARs) mRNAs were constitutively expressed, and of the three RXRs, RXR beta appeared predominant. Western blotting analysis confirmed the constitutive expression of RAR alpha and RAR beta. Treatment with all-trans-RA induced morphological changes in the two cell lines, which progressed from their normal pattern of randomly oriented spindle-shaped cells to fibroblast-like glial cells. RA up-regulated RAR alpha and RAR beta mRNAs in both cell lines. Interestingly, RA treatment up-regulated RAR beta proteins but not RAR alpha proteins, suggesting post-transcriptional regulations of RAR transcripts in glioma cells. PMID:10652610

  9. Visualization of Phosphatidic Acid Fluctuations in the Plasma Membrane of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz-Nogueira, José P.; Díez-Guerra, F. Javier; Llopis, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We developed genetically-encoded fluorescent sensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer to monitor phosphatidic acid (PA) fluctuations in the plasma membrane using Spo20 as PA-binding motif. Basal PA levels and phospholipase D activity varied in different cell types. In addition, stimuli that activate PA phosphatases, leading to lower PA levels, increased lamellipodia and filopodia formation. Lower PA levels were observed in the leading edge than in the trailing edge of migrating HeLa cells. In MSC80 and OLN93 cells, which are stable cell lines derived from Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes, respectively, a higher ratio of diacylglycerol to PA levels was demonstrated in the membrane processes involved in myelination, compared to the cell body. We propose that the PA sensors reported here are valuable tools to unveil the role of PA in a variety of intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:25025521

  10. Extinction of cells of cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis in the presence of humic acid under illumination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing-kun; Tanji, Yasunori; Unno, Hajime

    2006-10-01

    Laboratory experiments targeting the effect of humic acid (HA) on the cell lysis of cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis have been performed. Light irradiation was found to be an important factor for the cell lysis phenomenon, whereas intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) might be a chemical factor for the process. An exogenous H2O2 concentration of 1.0 mg l(-1) was determined as the threshold for cell survival. Our results indicated that HA or its possible product(s) of photochemical reaction can induce damage to intracellular catalase under artificial illumination, which leads intracellular H2O2 to be accumulated to an abnormally high concentration, eventually resulting in cell death. Moreover, H2O2 released into the culture from dead cells can damage other cells, which in turn brings about the population extinction. PMID:16505991

  11. Acid electrolyte fuel cell technology program. [for application to the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The development of an acid electrolyte fuel cell was investigated to provide a cost effective electrical power system for the space shuttle orbiter. Previous investigation showed the life capability of the fuel cell was improved by proper prehumidification of the reactant gases. Breadboard models were developed which incorporate reactant prehumidification and have a life duration time of 2000 hours. Fuel cell performance was found to be invariant with cell life, and reactant consumption was unchanged from start to end of life. Satisfactory start and stop procedures are demonstrated along with scale-up capabilities for the number of cells in a stack, and for cell active areas. Safety design features, which operate to isolate the affected module from the remainder of the system, to eliminate single point failure modes from affecting the entire electrical power system are included.

  12. IL-33 enhances retinoic acid signaling on CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Gajardo, Tania; Pérez, Francisco; Terraza, Claudia; Campos-Mora, Mauricio; Noelle, Randolph J; Pino-Lagos, Karina

    2016-09-01

    Several molecules have been described as CD4+ T cells differentiation modulators and among them retinoic acid (RA) and more recently, IL-33, have been studied. Due to the similarities in T helper cell skewing properties between RA and IL-33, we asked whether IL-33 intersects, directly or indirectly, the RA signaling pathway. Total CD4+ T cells from DR5-luciferase mice were activated in the presence of RA with or without IL-33, and RA signaling was visualized using ex vivo imaging. Our results demonstrate that IL-33 itself is able to trigger RA signaling on CD4+ T cells, which is highly increased when IL-33 is added in conjunction with RA. This study presents IL-33 as a potential player that may synergize with RA in controlling T cell differentiation, and suggests that IL-33 may be an attractive target in controlling T cell differentiation in vivo. PMID:27322964

  13. Ferulic acid inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis via blockage of PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Gong, Xia; Jiang, Rong; Li, Hongzhong; Du, Weimin; Kuang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid, a ubiquitous phenolic acid abundant in corn, wheat and flax, has potent anti-tumor effect in various cancer cell lines. However, the anti-tumor effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma remains unclear. Therefore, we conduct current study to examine the effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. In present study, ferulic acid inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both 143B and MG63 osteosarcoma cells dose-dependently, indicated by MTT assay and Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection. Additionally, ferulic acid induced G0/G1 phase arrest and down-regulated the expression of cell cycle-related protein, CDK 2, CDK 4, CDK 6, confirmed by flow cytometry assay and western blotting. Moreover, ferulic acid upregulated Bax, downregulated Bcl-2, and subsequently enhanced caspase-3 activity. More importantly, ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited PI3K/Akt activation. Using adenoviruses expressing active Akt, the anti-proliferation and pro-apoptosis of ferulic acid were reverted. Our results demonstrated that ferulic acid might inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis via inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cells. Ferulic acid is a novel therapeutic agent for osteosarcoma. PMID:27158383

  14. Ferulic acid inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis via blockage of PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Gong, Xia; Jiang, Rong; Li, Hongzhong; Du, Weimin; Kuang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid, a ubiquitous phenolic acid abundant in corn, wheat and flax, has potent anti-tumor effect in various cancer cell lines. However, the anti-tumor effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma remains unclear. Therefore, we conduct current study to examine the effect of ferulic acid on osteosarcoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. In present study, ferulic acid inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both 143B and MG63 osteosarcoma cells dose-dependently, indicated by MTT assay and Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection. Additionally, ferulic acid induced G0/G1 phase arrest and down-regulated the expression of cell cycle-related protein, CDK 2, CDK 4, CDK 6, confirmed by flow cytometry assay and western blotting. Moreover, ferulic acid upregulated Bax, downregulated Bcl-2, and subsequently enhanced caspase-3 activity. More importantly, ferulic acid dose-dependently inhibited PI3K/Akt activation. Using adenoviruses expressing active Akt, the anti-proliferation and pro-apoptosis of ferulic acid were reverted. Our results demonstrated that ferulic acid might inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis via inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway in osteosarcoma cells. Ferulic acid is a novel therapeutic agent for osteosarcoma. PMID:27158383

  15. Dietary supplementation with docosahexanoic acid (DHA) increases red blood cell membrane flexibility in mice with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Wandersee, Nancy J.; Maciaszek, Jamie L.; Giger, Katie M.; Hanson, Madelyn S.; Zheng, Suilan; Guo, YiHe; Mickelson, Barbara; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Lykotrafitis, George; Low, Philip S.; Hogg, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Humans and mice with sickle cell disease (SCD) have rigid red blood cells (RBCs). Omega-3 fatty acids, such as docosahexanoic acid (DHA), may influence RBC deformability via incorporation into the RBC membrane. In this study, sickle cell (SS) mice were fed natural ingredient rodent diets supplemented with 3% DHA (DHA diet) or a control diet matched in total fat (CTRL diet). After 8 weeks of feeding, we examined the RBCs for: 1) stiffness, as measured by atomic force microscopy; 2) deformability, as measured by ektacytometry; and 3) percent irreversibly sickled RBCs on peripheral blood smears. Using atomic force microscopy, stiffness is increased and deformability decreased in RBCs from SS mice fed CTRL diet compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, RBCs from SS mice fed DHA diet had markedly decreased stiffness and increased deformability compared to RBCs from SS mice fed CTRL diet. Furthermore, examination of peripheral blood smears revealed less irreversibly sickled RBCs in SS mice fed DHA diet as compared to CTRL diet. In summary, our findings indicate that DHA supplementation improves RBC flexibility and reduces irreversibly sickled cells by 40% in SS mice. These results point to potential therapeutic benefits of dietary omega-3 fatty acids in SCD. PMID:25488613

  16. Impact of volatile fatty acids on microbial electrolysis cell performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Hafez, Hisham; Nakhla, George

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the performance of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) fed with three common fermentation products: acetate, butyrate, and propionate. Each substrate was fed to the reactor for three consecutive-batch cycles. The results showed high current densities for acetate, but low current densities for butyrate and propionate (maximum values were 6.0 ± 0.28, 2.5 ± 0.06, 1.6 ± 0.14 A/m(2), respectively). Acetate also showed a higher coulombic efficiency of 87 ± 5.7% compared to 72 ± 2.0 and 51 ± 6.4% for butyrate and propionate, respectively. This paper also revealed that acetate could be easily oxidized by anode respiring bacteria in MEC, while butyrate and propionate could not be oxidized to the same degree. The utilization rate of the substrates in MEC followed the order: acetate > butyrate > propionate. The ratio of suspended biomass to attached biomass was approximately 1:4 for all the three substrates. PMID:26159302

  17. Effect of fatty acids on growth of Japanese encephalitis virus cultivated in BHK-21 cells and phospholipid metabolism of the infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Makino, S; Jenkin, H M

    1975-01-01

    Growth of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in BHK-21 cells was stimulated in the presence of 20 to 40 mug of the sodium salt of oleic acid (cis-9-octadecenoic acid, 9-18:1) per ml supplemented in Waymouth medium. The stimulatory effect of the salt was highest when 9-18:1 was added after adsorption of the virus. Study of the effect of other fatty acids on growth of JEV showed the following results: the longer the chain length of the saturated fatty acid salt, the higher the stimulatory effect on viral growth. In contrast, polyunsaturated fatty acids had an inhibitory effect on viral growth. The effect of isomeric cis-octadecenoic acids on viral growth was variable, depending upon the position of the double bond. The cis-6-octadecenoic acid had the highest inhibitory effect on growth of JEV compared to other isomeric octadecenoic acids. The sodium salt of (1-14C) cis-9-octadecenoic acid (9-18:1, 20 mug/ml) was rapidly incorporated into control and JEV-infected cells. Specific radioactivity in phosphatidylcholine dropped 12 to 24 h after virus inoculation, whereas synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine increased 12 to 24 h after virus inoculation in infected cells compared to uninfected cells. Results from these studies suggest that phospholipid metabolism of infected cells is markedly changed, which can be associated with altered fatty acid metabolism when using labeled 9-18:1 fatty acid as a marker. PMID:1167607

  18. Role of intracellular calcium and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in acid-induced DNA damage in Barrett's cells and Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms whereby acid reflux may accelerate the progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. Acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to cause DNA damage in Barrett's cells. We have previously shown that NADPH oxidase NOX5-S is responsible for acid-induced H2O2 production in Barrett's cells and in EA cells. In this study we examined the role of intracellular calcium and NADPH oxidase NOX5-S in acid-induced DNA damage in a Barrett's EA cell line FLO and a Barrett's cell line CP-A. We found that pulsed acid treatment significantly increased tail moment in FLO and CP-A cells and histone H2AX phosphorylation in FLO cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased intracellular Ca2+ in FLO cells, an increase that is blocked by Ca2+-free medium with EGTA and thapsigargin. Acid-induced increase in tail moment was significantly decreased by NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium in FLO cells, and by blockade of intracellular Ca2+ increase or knockdown of NOX5-S with NOX5 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) in FLO and CP-A cells. Acid-induced increase in histone H2AX phosphorylation was significantly decreased by NOX5 siRNA in FLO cells. Conversely, overexpression of NOX5-S significantly increased tail moment and histone H2AX phosphorylation in FLO cells. We conclude that pulsed acid treatment causes DNA damage via increase of intracellular calcium and activation of NOX5-S. It is possible that in BE acid reflux increases intracellular calcium, activates NOX5-S, and increases ROS production, which causes DNA damage, thereby contributing to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:24699332

  19. Uptake of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells by the monocarboxylic acid transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Osamu; Tsukagoshi, Kensuke; Endo, Tetsuya

    2008-03-15

    The cellular uptake mechanism of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), a phenoxyacetic acid derivative, was investigated using Caco-2 epithelial cells. The cells were incubated with 50 {mu}M MCPA at pH 6.0 and 37 deg. C, and the uptake of MCPA from the apical membranes was measured. The uptake of MCPA was significantly decreased by incubation at low temperature (4 {sup o}C) and markedly increased by lowering the extracellular pH. Pretreatment with a protonophore, carbonylcyanide-p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (25 {mu}M), or metabolic inhibitors, 2,4-dinitrophenol (1 mM) and sodium azide (10 mM), significantly decreased the uptake of MCPA by 53%, 45% and 48%, respectively. Coincubation of MCPA with 10 mM L-lactic acid or {alpha}-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate, which is a substrate or an inhibitor of the monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCTs), significantly decreased the uptake of MCPA by 31% and 20%, respectively, and coincubation with benzoic acid profoundly decreased the uptake by 68%. In contrast, coincubation with succinic acid (a dicarboxylic acid) did not affect the uptake. Kinetic analysis of initial MCPA uptake suggested that MCPA is taken up via a carrier-mediated process [K{sub m} = 1.37 {+-} 0.15 mM, V{sub max} = 115 {+-} 6 nmol (mg protein){sup -1} (3 min){sup -1}]. Lineweaver-Burk plots show that benzoic acid competitively inhibits the uptake of MCPA with a K{sub i} value of 4.68 {+-} 1.76 mM. A trans-stimulation effect on MCPA uptake was found in cells preloaded with benzoic acid. These results suggest that the uptake of MCPA from the apical membrane of Caco-2 cells is mainly mediated by common MCTs along with benzoic acid but also in part by L-lactic acid.

  20. Characterization of low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel and differential stem cell responses in the hydrogel microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungju; Park, Yongdoo; Tae, Giyoong; Lee, Kyu Back; Hwang, Chang Mo; Hwang, Soon Jung; Kim, In Sook; Noh, Insup; Sun, Kyung

    2009-03-15

    Hyaluronic acid is a natural glycosaminoglycan involved in biological processes. Low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (10 and 50 kDa)-based hydrogel was synthesized using derivatized hyaluronic acid. Hyaluronic acid was acrylated by two steps: (1) introduction of an amine group using adipic acid dihydrazide, and (2) acrylation by N-acryloxysuccinimide. Injectable hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel was prepared by using acrylated hyaluronic acid and poly(ethylene glycol) tetra-thiols via Michael-type addition reaction. Mechanical properties of the hydrogel were evaluated by varying the molecular weight of acrylated hyaluronic acid (10 and 50 kDa) and the weight percent of hydrogel. Hydrogel based on 50-kDa hyaluronic acid showed the shortest gelation time and the highest complex modulus. Next, human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in cell-adhesive RGD peptide-immobilized hydrogels together with bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). Cells cultured in the RGD/BMP-2-incorporated hydrogels showed proliferation rates higher than that of control or RGD-immobilized hydrogels. Real-time RT-PCR showed that the expression of osteoblast marker genes such as CBFalpha1 and alkaline phosphatase was increased in hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel, and the expression level was dependent on the molecular weight of hyaluronic acid, RGD peptide, and BMP-2. This study indicates that low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel can be applied to tissue regeneration as differentiation guidance materials of stem cells. PMID:18384163

  1. Dietary unsaturated fatty acids differently affect catecholamine handling by adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Andreia; Correia, Gustavo; Coelho, Marisa; Araújo, João Ricardo; Pinho, Maria João; Teixeira, Ana Luisa; Medeiros, Rui; Ribeiro, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Catecholamines (CA) play an important role in cardiovascular (CDV) disease risk. Namely, noradrenaline (NA) levels positively correlate whereas adrenaline (AD) levels negatively correlate with obesity and/or CDV disease. Western diets, which are tipically rich in Ω-6 fatty acids (FAs) and deficient in Ω-3 FAs, may contribute to the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes and/or coronary artery disease. Taking this into consideration and the fact that our group has already described that saturated FAs affect catecholamine handling by adrenal chromaffin cells, this work aimed to investigate the effect of unsaturated FAs upon catecholamine handling in the same model. Our results showed that chronic exposure to unsaturated FAs differently modulated CA cellular content and release, regardless of both FA series and number of carbon atoms. Namely, the Ω-6 arachidonic and linoleic acids, based on their effect on CA release and cellular content, seemed to impair NA and AD vesicular transport, whereas γ-linolenic acid selectively impaired AD synthesis and release. Within the Ω-9 FAs, oleic acid was devoid of effect, and elaidic acid behaved similarly to γ-linolenic acid. Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (Ω-3 series) impaired the synthesis and release of both NA and AD. These results deserve attention and future development, namely, in what concerns the mechanisms involved and correlative effects in vivo. PMID:25727966

  2. Teichoic, teichulosonic and teichuronic acids in the cell wall of Brevibacterium aurantiacum VKM Ac-2111(Т).

    PubMed

    Shashkov, Alexander S; Potekhina, Natalia V; Senchenkova, Sofya N; Evtushenko, Lyudmila I

    2016-02-01

    Two different teichoic acids, along with a teichulosonic and a teichuronic acids, were identified in the cell wall of Brevibacterium aurantiacum VKM Ac-2111(Т). One teichoic acid is 1,3-poly(glycerol phosphate) with 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranose and L-glutamic acid as non-stoichiometric substituents at O-2 of the glycerol residue. The second one is a poly(glycosylglycerol phosphate) with -4)-α-D-Galp-(1 → 2)-sn-Gro-(3-P- and/or -6)-α-D-Galp-(1 → 2)-sn-Gro-(3-P- units in the main chain. The structure of the first has not been reported so far, while the latter one is new for actinobacteria. The teichulosonic acid with α-3-deoxy-β-D-glycero-D-galacto-non-2-ulopyranosonic acid (Kdn) and β-D-glucopyranose residues in the backbone represents a novel polymer: → 8)-α-Kdn-(2 → 6)-β-D-Glcp-(1 →. The teichuronic acid has also hitherto unknown structure: → 3)-β-D-Galf(2OAc)0.3-(1 → 3)-β-D-GlcpА-(1 → and is found in members of the genus Brevibacterium for the first time. The polymer structures were elucidated using 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy: (1)H,(1)H COSY, TOCSY, ROESY, (1)H,(13)C HSQC, HSQC-TOCSY, and (1)H,(13)C and (1)H,(31)P HMBC. PMID:26765252

  3. Alpha lipoic acid inhibits proliferation and epithelial mesenchymal transition of thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Lim, Seonhee; Choi, Hyun-Jeung; Sim, Soyoung; Kim, Tae Yong; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    The naturally occurring short-chain fatty acid, α-lipoic acid (ALA) is a powerful antioxidant which is clinically used for treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Recent studies suggested the possibility of ALA as a potential anti-cancer agent, because it could activate adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibit transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway. In this study, we evaluate the effects of ALA on thyroid cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We performed in vitro cell proliferation analysis using BCPAP, HTH-83, CAL-62 and FTC-133 cells. ALA suppressed thyroid cancer cell proliferation through activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-S6 signaling pathway. Low-dose ALA, which had minimal effects on cell proliferation, also decreased cell migration and invasion of BCPAP, CAL-62 and HTH-83 cells. ALA inhibited epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) evidently by increase of E-cadherin and decreases of activated β-catenin, vimentin, snail, and twist in these cells. ALA suppressed TGFβ production and inhibited induction of p-Smad2 and twist by TGFβ1 or TGFβ2. These findings indicate that ALA reduces cancer cell migration and invasion through suppression of TGFβ production and inhibition of TGFβ signaling pathways in thyroid cancer cells. ALA also significantly suppressed tumor growth in mouse xenograft model using BCPAP and FTC-133 cells. This is the first study to show anti-cancer effect of ALA on thyroid cancer cells. ALA could be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of advanced thyroid cancer, possibly as an adjuvant therapy with other systemic therapeutic agents. PMID:26463583

  4. Adipocyte amino acid sensing controls adult germline stem cell number via the amino acid response pathway and independently of Target of Rapamycin signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Alissa R; Laws, Kaitlin M; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    How adipocytes contribute to the physiological control of stem cells is a critical question towards understanding the link between obesity and multiple diseases, including cancers. Previous studies have revealed that adult stem cells are influenced by whole-body physiology through multiple diet-dependent factors. For example, nutrient-dependent pathways acting within the Drosophila ovary control the number and proliferation of germline stem cells (GSCs). The potential role of nutrient sensing by adipocytes in modulating stem cells in other organs, however, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that amino acid sensing by adult adipocytes specifically modulates the maintenance of GSCs through a Target of Rapamycin-independent mechanism. Instead, reduced amino acid levels and the consequent increase in uncoupled tRNAs trigger activation of the GCN2-dependent amino acid response pathway within adipocytes, causing increased rates of GSC loss. These studies reveal a new step in adipocyte-stem cell crosstalk. PMID:25359724

  5. Adipocyte amino acid sensing controls adult germline stem cell number via the amino acid response pathway and independently of Target of Rapamycin signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Alissa R.; Laws, Kaitlin M.; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    How adipocytes contribute to the physiological control of stem cells is a critical question towards understanding the link between obesity and multiple diseases, including cancers. Previous studies have revealed that adult stem cells are influenced by whole-body physiology through multiple diet-dependent factors. For example, nutrient-dependent pathways acting within the Drosophila ovary control the number and proliferation of germline stem cells (GSCs). The potential role of nutrient sensing by adipocytes in modulating stem cells in other organs, however, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report that amino acid sensing by adult adipocytes specifically modulates the maintenance of GSCs through a Target of Rapamycin-independent mechanism. Instead, reduced amino acid levels and the consequent increase in uncoupled tRNAs trigger activation of the GCN2-dependent amino acid response pathway within adipocytes, causing increased rates of GSC loss. These studies reveal a new step in adipocyte-stem cell crosstalk. PMID:25359724

  6. Stimulation of proximal tubular cell apoptosis by albumin-bound fatty acids mediated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma.

    PubMed

    Arici, Mustafa; Chana, Ravinder; Lewington, Andrew; Brown, Jez; Brunskill, Nigel John

    2003-01-01

    In nephrotic syndrome, large quantities of albumin enter the kidney tubule. This albumin carries with it a heavy load of fatty acids to which the proximal tubule cells are exposed at high concentration. It is postulated that exposure to fatty acids in this way is injurious to proximal tubule cells. This study has examined the ability of fatty acids to interact with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) in primary cultures of human proximal tubule cells. Luciferase reporter assays in transiently transfected human proximal tubule cells were used to show that albumin bound fatty acids and other agonists activate PPARgamma in a dose-dependent manner. One of the consequences of this activation is apoptosis of the cells as determined by changes in cell morphology, evidence of PARP cleavage, and appearance of DNA laddering. Overexpression of PPARgamma in these cells also results in enhanced apoptosis. Both fatty acid-induced PPAR activation and apoptosis in these cells can be blocked by PPAR response element decoy oligonucleotides. Activation of PPARgamma by the specific agonist PGJ(2) is associated with inhibition of cell proliferation, whereas activation by albumin bound fatty acids is accompanied by increased proliferation. However, the net balance of apoptosis/proliferation favors deletion of cells. These results implicate albumin-bound fatty acids as important mediators of tubular injury in nephrosis and provide fresh impetus for pursuit of lipid-lowering strategies in proteinuric renal disease. PMID:12506134

  7. Fatty Acid Esters of Phloridzin Induce Apoptosis of Human Liver Cancer Cells through Altered Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sandhya V. G.; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Phloridzin (phlorizin or phloretin 2′-O-glucoside) is known for blocking intestinal glucose absorption. We have investigated the anticarcinogenic effect of phloridzin and its novel derivatives using human cancer cell lines. We have synthesised novel acylated derivatives of phloridzin with six different long chain fatty acids by regioselective enzymatic acylation using Candida Antarctica lipase B. The antiproliferative effects of the new compounds were investigated in comparison with the parent compounds, phloridzin, aglycone phloretin, the six free fatty acids and chemotherapeutic drugs (sorafenib, doxorubicin and daunorubicin) using human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells, human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells and acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells along with normal human and rat hepatocytes. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited significantly the growth of the two carcinoma and leukemia cells while similar treatment doses were not toxic to normal human or rat hepatocytes. The antiproliferative potency of fatty esters of phloridzin was comparable to the potency of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited DNA topoisomerases IIα activity that might induce G0/G1 phase arrest, induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-3, and decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells. Based on the high selectivity on cancer cells, decosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ester of phloridzin was selected for gene expression analysis using RT2PCR human cancer drug target array. Antiproliferative effect of DHA ester of phloridzin could be related to the down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (BCL2), growth factor receptors (EBFR family, IGF1R/IGF2, PDGFR) and its downstream signalling partners (PI3k/AKT/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MAPK), cell cycle machinery (CDKs, TERT, TOP2A, TOP2B) as well as epigenetics regulators (HDACs). These results suggest that fatty esters of phloridzin have potential chemotherapeutic effects mediated

  8. Carnosic acid induces autophagic cell death through inhibition of the Akt/mTOR pathway in human hepatoma cells.