Science.gov

Sample records for acidic rare earths

  1. 40 CFR 721.10550 - Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10550 Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (generic). (a) Chemical... as rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (PMN P-05-324) is subject to reporting under this section...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10550 - Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10550 Rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (generic). (a) Chemical... as rare earth salt of a carboxylic acid (PMN P-05-324) is subject to reporting under this section...

  3. Rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, S.; Melnyk, A.J.; Singh, R.D.; Nuttall, K.

    1989-01-01

    For conventional applications, there is limited demand for rare earth elements as well as yttrium and scandium. But the emergence of new high technology applications such as supermagnets, lasers, and superconductors should result in significant demand for some of these elements. This article examines the anticipated applications and demands for rare earth elements over the next decade. It also looks at the implications on the use of available resources. In the context of a growing demand, process methods are reviewed for the recovery of rare earth elements from conventional and unconventional resources. And the article also discusses the challenges facing the mining industry in meeting this opportunity.

  4. Solvent extraction of rare-earth metals by carboxylic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Preez, A.C. du; Preston, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    The solvent extraction of the trivalent lanthanides and yttrium from nitrate media by solutions of carboxylic acids in xylene has been studied. Commercially available carboxylic acids such as Versatic 10 and naphthenic acids were used, as well as model compounds of known structure, such as 2-ethylhexanoic and 3-cyclohexylpropanoic acids. In a few cases, extraction of the metals from sulphate and chloride solutions was also investigated. The dependence of the extraction properties of the carboxylic acids on the atomic number of the lanthanide shows a definite relationship to the steric bulk of the carboxylic acid molecule quantified by means of the steric parameter, E{sub s}{prime} of the substituent alkyl group. The stoichiometries of the extracted complexes for representative light (La), middle (Gd) and heavy (Lu) rare-earth metals were investigated by the slope-analysis technique for a sterically hindered acid (Versatic 10 acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 3.83) and an acid with low steric hindrance (3-cyclohexylpropanoic acid; -E{prime}{sub s} = 0.28). 14 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Global mine production of rare earths was estimated to have declined slightly in 2012 relative to 2011 (Fig. 1). Production in China was estimated to have decreased to 95 from 105 kt (104,700 from 115,700 st) in 2011, while new mine production in the United States and Australia increased.

  6. Modelling of Rare Earth Elements Complexation With Humic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourret, O.; Davranche, M.; Gruau, G.; Dia, A.

    2006-12-01

    The binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) was studied by combining Ultrafiltration and ICP- MS techniques. REE-HA complexation experiments were performed at various pH conditions (ranging from 2 to 10.5) using a standard batch equilibration method. Results show that the amount of REE bound to HA strongly increase with increasing pH. Moreover, a Middle REE (MREE) downward concavity is evidenced by REE distribution patterns at acidic pH. Modelling of the experimental data using Humic Ion Binding Model VI provided a set of log KMA values (i.e. the REE-HA complexation constants specific to Model VI) for the entire REE series. The log KMA pattern obtained displays a MREE downward concavity. Log KMA values range from 2.42 to 2.79. These binding constants are in good agreement with the few existing datasets quantifying the binding of REE with humic substances except a recently published study which evidence a lanthanide contraction effect (i.e. continuous increase of the constant from La to Lu). The MREE downward concavity displayed by REE-HA complexation pattern determined in this study compares well with results from REE-fulvic acid (FA) and REE-acetic acid complexation studies. This similarity in the REE complexation pattern shapes suggests that carboxylic groups are the main binding sites of REE in HA. This conclusion is further supported by a detailed review of published studies for natural, organic-rich, river- and ground-waters which show no evidence of a lanthanide contraction effect in REE pattern shape. Finally, application of Model VI using the new, experimentally determined log KMA values to World Average River Water confirms earlier suggestions that REE occur predominantly as organic complexes (> 60 %) in the pH range between 5-5.5 and 7-8.5 (i.e. in circumneutral pH waters). The only significant difference as compared to earlier model predictions made using estimated log KMA values is that the experimentally determined log KMA values

  7. The Effect of Fulvic Acid on the Leaching of a Weathered Rare-Earth Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xian-ping; Feng, Bo; Wang, Peng-cheng; Zhou, He-peng; Chen, Xiao-ming

    2015-12-01

    The effect of fulvic acid on the leaching of a weathered crust elution-deposited rare-earth ore, using ammonium sulfate as lixiviant, has been investigated. The results show that fulvic acid can enhance the leaching process effectively. With the addition of fulvic acid to the lixiviant at a concentration of 0.1 wt pct, the leaching extraction of rare-earth elements increased by 8.38 pct and the ammonium sulfate concentration decreased by 25 wt pct. Fulvic acid promotes the leaching process. It also reacts with rare-earth ions, forms soluble complexes, reduces the activity of the leached rare-earth ions, and increases the concentration difference of ion diffusion. These results highlight a new approach for making the leaching process of low-grade weathered crust elution-deposited rare-earth ore more efficient and also for lowering the lixiviant consumption.

  8. Separation of the rare earths by anion-exchange in the presence of lactic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faris, J. P.

    1969-01-01

    Investigation of adsorption of rare earths and a few other elements to an anion-exchange resin from mixed solvents containing lactic acid shows that the lanthanides are absorbed more strongly than from the alpha-hydroxyisobutryric acid system, but with less separation between adjacent members of the series.

  9. Rare earth elements recycling from waste phosphor by dual hydrochloric acid dissolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hu; Zhang, Shengen; Pan, Dean; Tian, Jianjun; Yang, Min; Wu, Maolin; Volinsky, Alex A

    2014-05-15

    This paper is a comparative study of recycling rare earth elements from waste phosphor, which focuses on the leaching rate and the technical principle. The traditional and dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid (DHA) methods were compared. The method of dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid has been developed. The Red rare earth phosphor (Y0.95Eu0.05)2O3 in waste phosphor is dissolved during the first step of acid leaching, while the Green phosphor (Ce0.67Tb0.33MgAl11O19) and the Blue phosphor (Ba0.9Eu0.1MgAl10O17) mixed with caustic soda are obtained by alkali sintering. The excess caustic soda and NaAlO2 are removed by washing. The insoluble matter is leached by the hydrochloric acid, followed by solvent extraction and precipitation (the DHA method). In comparison, the total leaching rate of the rare earth elements was 94.6% by DHA, which is much higher than 42.08% achieved by the traditional method. The leaching rate of Y, Eu, Ce and Tb reached 94.6%, 99.05%, 71.45%, and 76.22%, respectively. DHA can decrease the consumption of chemicals and energy. The suggested DHA method is feasible for industrial applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Rare earth lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    In this brief survey, some of the key spectroscopic properties of rare earths are reviewed that account for their versatility, examine recent research trends and developments, and comment upon future projects for rare earth lasers. For gaseous and liquid lasers, other elements and molecules have thus far demonstrated lasing properties more attractive than those available using rare earths. Therefore, remarks shall be limited to solid state lasers.

  11. Adsorption of Salicylhydroxamic Acid on Selected Rare Earth Oxides and Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galt, Greer Elaine

    Adsorption behavior of the anionic collector salicylhydroxamic acid (SHA) on a selected group of rare earth oxides (REOs) and carbonates (RECs) was studied via experimental methods and modelling software. Synthetic oxide and carbonate powders of the rare earth elements cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), europium (Eu), and terbium (Tb) were tested for this research. Studies were conducted at different pH levels to analyze the kinetics of collector adsorption onto the oxide and carbonate surfaces in attempts to optimize recovery parameters for commercial flotation processes using SHA. In addition, thermodynamic software StabCal was implemented to compare theoretical adsorption behavior of collectors SHA and octylhydroxamic acid (OHA) on these four rare earth oxides and carbonates. Theoretical points of zero charge were also estimated via StabCal and compared to experimental values to establish validity. Results for oxides indicate that both the amount and rate of SHA adsorption are highest for lighter REOs, decreasing as ionic diameter increases, a chelation phenomenon common with hydroxamates. However, results for the carbonates exhibit the opposite trend: strongest SHA adsorption was seen in the heavy RECs. This pattern correlates to the increasing stability of the carbonate such that ionic diameter of the REs becomes more amenable to chelation due to differences in bonding chemistry. Overall, adsorption kinetics appear dependent on pH, coordination chemistry, and cation size.

  12. Two types of rare earth-organic frameworks constructed by racemic tartaric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Zhanguo; Lv Yaokang; Cheng Jianwen; Feng Yunlong

    2012-01-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of rare earth oxides with racemic tartaric acid (H{sub 2}tar) yielded 7 rare earth(III) MOFs with general formulas [R{sub 2}(tar){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (R=Y (1), Sm (4), Eu (5), Tb (6), Dy (7)) and [R{sub 2}(tar){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}{center_dot}4nH{sub 2}O (R=La (2), Nd (3)). X-ray powder diffraction analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that they present two different structural types. MOFs 1, 4, 5, 6 and 7 are isostructural and crystallize in the orthorhombic non-centrosymmetric space group Iba2, and feature unusual fsc-3,4-Iba2 topology. MOFs 2 and 3 are isostructural and crystallize in monoclinic P2{sub 1}/c space group and display rare fsx-4,5-P2{sub 1}/c topology containing hydrophilic channels bounded by triple helical chains along a axis. MOFs 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 exhibit intense lanthanide characteristic photoluminescence at room temperature. - Graphical Abstract: [R{sub 2}(tar){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}{center_dot}4nH{sub 2}O (R=La (2), Nd (3)) display rare fsx-4,5-P2{sub 1}/c topology containing hydrophilic channels bounded by triple helical chains along a axis. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of rare earth MOFs were synthesized by hydrothermal conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MOFs feature unusual fsc-3,4-Iba2 and rare fsx-4,5-P2{sub 1}/c topology structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MOFs exhibit intense lanthanide characteristic photoluminescence.

  13. Rare Earth Polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Boskovic, Colette

    2017-09-05

    variable-temperature studies have revealed the temperature dependence of the POM-based sensitization, which is relevant for potential applications in phosphor thermometry. Novel RE-POM coordination polymers demonstrate the promise of higher-dimensional materials for catalytic and sensing applications that can make use of either or both rare earth and polyoxometalate capabilities. Finally, structural, electrochemical, and density functional theory studies on a family of modular RE-POMs that incorporate molybdotungstates with amino acid coligands have revealed how closed Mo-oxo loops that are reduced preferentially can act as electron reservoirs in mixed-metal molybdotungstates. This has important implications for mixed-metal polyoxometalates in redox and photoredox catalysis. Notably, these hybrid RE-POMs are stable in solution and maintain the chirality induced by amino acid ligands. The RE-POMs surveyed in this Account provide a glimpse of possible structural features that are accessible with this family of compounds. The studies of the ensuing chemical and physical properties reveal the promise of RE-POMs for diverse and varied applications and lay an excellent foundation for the future development of this new class of functional materials.

  14. Recovery of rare earth elements from the sulfothermophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria using aqueous acid.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Ayumi; Sawada, Hitomi; Suzuki, Sonoe; Miyashita, Shin-ichi; Inagaki, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Takaiku; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2015-02-01

    The demand for rare earth elements has increased dramatically in recent years because of their numerous industrial applications, and considerable research efforts have consequently been directed toward recycling these materials. The accumulation of metals in microorganisms is a low-cost and environmentally friendly method for the recovery of metals present in the environment at low levels. Numerous metals, including rare earth elements, can be readily dissolved in aqueous acid, but the efficiency of metal biosorption is usually decreased under the acidic conditions. In this report, we have investigated the use of the sulfothermophilic red alga Galdieria sulphuraria for the recovery of metals, with particular emphasis on the recovery of rare earth metals. Of the five different growth conditions investigated where G. sulphuraria could undergo an adaptation process, Nd(III), Dy(III), and Cu(II) were efficiently recovered from a solution containing a mixture of different metals under semi-anaerobic heterotrophic condition at a pH of 2.5. G. sulphuraria also recovered Nd(III), Dy(III), La(III), and Cu(II) with greater than 90% efficiency at a concentration of 0.5 ppm. The efficiency remained unchanged at pH values in the range of 1.5-2.5. Furthermore, at pH values in the range of 1.0-1.5, the lanthanoid ions were collected much more efficiently into the cell fractions than Cu(II) and therefore successfully separated from the Cu(II) dissolved in the aqueous acid. Microscope observation of the cells using alizarin red suggested that the metals were accumulating inside of the cells. Experiments using dead cells suggested that this phenomenon was a biological process involving specific activities within the cells.

  15. Rare earth gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  16. Selective liquid chromatographic separation of yttrium from heavier rare earth elements using acetic acid as a novel eluent.

    PubMed

    Kifle, Dejene; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2013-09-13

    One of the major difficulties in the rare earth elements separation is purification of yttrium from heavy rare earth elements. Thus, an HPLC method using acetic acid as novel eluent was explored for selective separation of yttrium form the heavy rare earth elements. When acetic acid is used as a mobile phase yttrium eluted with the lighter lanthanides. This is contrary to its relative position amongst heavier lanthanides when eluents commonly used for separation of rare earth elements were employed. The shift in elution position of yttrium with acetic acid as eluent may reflect a relatively lower stability constant of the yttrium-AcOH complex (in the same order as for the lighter lanthanides) compared to the corresponding AcOH complexes with heavy lanthanides, enabling selective separation of yttrium from the latter. The method was successfully used for selective separation of yttrium in mixed rare earth sample containing about 80% of yttrium and about 20% of heavy rare earth oxides. Thus, the use of AcOH as eluent is an effective approach for separating and determining the trace amounts of heavy rare earth elements in large amounts of yttrium matrix. Separation was performed on C18 column by running appropriate elution programs. The effluent from the column was monitored with diode array detector at absorbance wavelength of 658nm after post column derivatization with Arsenazo III.

  17. A novel approach for acid mine drainage pollution biomonitoring using rare earth elements bioaccumulated in the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea.

    PubMed

    Bonnail, Estefanía; Pérez-López, Rafael; Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Nieto, José Miguel; DelValls, T Ángel

    2017-09-15

    Lanthanide series have been used as a record of the water-rock interaction and work as a tool for identifying impacts of acid mine drainage (lixiviate residue derived from sulphide oxidation). The application of North-American Shale Composite-normalized rare earth elements patterns to these minority elements allows determining the origin of the contamination. In the current study, geochemical patterns were applied to rare earth elements bioaccumulated in the soft tissue of the freshwater clam Corbicula fluminea after exposure to different acid mine drainage contaminated environments. Results show significant bioaccumulation of rare earth elements in soft tissue of the clam after 14 days of exposure to acid mine drainage contaminated sediment (ΣREE=1.3-8μg/gdw). Furthermore, it was possible to biomonitor different degrees of contamination based on rare earth elements in tissue. The pattern of this type of contamination describes a particular curve characterized by an enrichment in the middle rare earth elements; a homologous pattern (EMREE=0.90) has also been observed when applied NASC normalization in clam tissues. Results of lanthanides found in clams were contrasted with the paucity of toxicity studies, determining risk caused by light rare earth elements in the Odiel River close to the Estuary. The current study purposes the use of clam as an innovative "bio-tool" for the biogeochemical monitoring of pollution inputs that determines the acid mine drainage networks affection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rare earth element partitioning between hydrous ferric oxides and acid mine water during iron oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.; Kimball, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferrous iron rapidly oxidizes to Fe (III) and precipitates as hydrous Fe (III) oxides in acid mine waters. This study examines the effect of Fe precipitation on the rare earth element (REE) geochemistry of acid mine waters to determine the pH range over which REEs behave conservatively and the range over which attenuation and fractionation occur. Two field studies were designed to investigate REE attenuation during Fe oxidation in acidic, alpine surface waters. To complement these field studies, a suite of six acid mine waters with a pH range from 1.6 to 6.1 were collected and allowed to oxidize in the laboratory at ambient conditions to determine the partitioning of REEs during Fe oxidation and precipitation. Results from field experiments document that even with substantial Fe oxidation, the REEs remain dissolved in acid, sulfate waters with pH below 5.1. Between pH 5.1 and 6.6 the REEs partitioned to the solid phases in the water column, and heavy REEs were preferentially removed compared to light REEs. Laboratory experiments corroborated field data with the most solid-phase partitioning occurring in the waters with the highest pH. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis and anticarcinogenic activity of 5-fluorouracil-1-acetic acid complexes with rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Liu-Fang; Yang Zheng-Yin; Peng Zhou-Ren ); Cheng Guo-Quan; Guo Hong-Ying; Sun Al-Li ); Wang QI; He Feng Ying )

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen new solid complexes of 5-fluorouracilacetic acid (FAA) with rare earth metals (RE) have been synthesized. Elemental analysis, IR, UV spectra, TG-DTA, conductance measurements and [sup 1]H NMR spectra have been used to characterise them. The general formula of the complexes is Ln(FAA)[sub 3][center dot]2H[sub 2]O (Ln = La [yields] Yb, Pm not included). The anticarcinogenic activity of La(FAA)[sub 3][center dot]2H[sub 2]O was tested. The results obtained showed that the survival period of mice which had been transplanted with ascites carcinoma (HepA) and then treated with the La complex can be prolonged to 235% of the control but the ligand alone showed little anticarcinogenic activity. Some 42% of EC cancer cell growth can be inhibited by the La complex. the LD[sub 50] is 500 mg kg[sup [minus

  20. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in a passive treatment system built for acid mine drainage remediation.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Valente, Teresa; Marques, Rosa; Sequeira Braga, Maria Amália; Pamplona, Jorge

    2015-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were used to assess attenuation processes in a passive system for acid mine drainage treatment (Jales, Portugal). Hydrochemical parameters and REE contents in water, soils and sediments were obtained along the treatment system, after summer and winter. A decrease of REE contents in the water resulting from the interaction with limestone after summer occurs; in the wetlands REE are significantly released by the soil particles to the water. After winter, a higher water dynamics favors the AMD treatment effectiveness and performance since REE contents decrease along the system; La and Ce are preferentially sequestered by ochre sludge but released to the water in the wetlands, influencing the REE pattern of the creek water. Thus, REE fractionation occurs in the passive treatment systems and can be used as tracer to follow up and understand the geochemical processes that promote the remediation of AMD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Competition between humic acid and carbonates for rare earth elements complexation.

    PubMed

    Pourret, Olivier; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2007-01-01

    The competitive binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) and carbonates was studied experimentally at various pH and alkalinity values by combining ultrafiltration and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. The results show that the REE species occur as binary humate or carbonate complexes but not as ternary REE-carbonate-humate as previously proposed. The results also reveal the strong pH and alkalinity dependence of the competition as well as the existence of a systematic fractionation across the REE series. Specifically, carbonate complexation is at a maximum at pH 10 and increase with increasing alkalinity and with the atomic number of the REE (LuCO(3)>LaCO(3)). Modeling of the data using Model VI and recently published stability constants for complexation of REE by humic acid well reproduced the experimental data, confirming the ability of Model VI to accurately determine REE speciation in natural waters. This modeling also confirms the reliability of recently published stability constants. This work shed more light not only on the competition between carbonates and HA for REE complexation but also on the reliability of WHAM 6 and Model VI for calculating the speciation of REE with organic matter in alkaline organic-rich water.

  2. Rare earth thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G.D.

    1997-09-01

    The author reviews the thermoelectric properties of metallic compounds which contain rare-earth atoms. They are the group of metals with the largest value ever reported of the Seebeck coefficient. An increase by 50% of the Seebeck would make these compounds useful for thermoelectric devices. The largest Seebeck coefficient is found for compounds of cerium (e.g., CePd{sub 3}) and ytterbium (e.g., YbAl{sub 3}). Theoretical predictions are in agreement with the maximum observed Seebeck. The author discusses the theoretical model which has been used to calculate the Seebeck coefficient. He is solving this model for other configurations (4f){sup n} of rare-earth ground states.

  3. Extraction of rare earth metals with 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester in the presence of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid in aqueous phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Fukiko; Goto, Masahiro; Nakashio, Fumiyuki

    1993-07-01

    The extraction equilibria of rare earth metals with 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (commercial name, PC-88A, henceforth abbreviated as HR) dissolved in n-heptane were measured at 303 K. It was found that rare earth metals are extracted with the dimer of the extractant, (HR){sub 2}, as follows. M{sub aq}{sup 3+} + 3(HR){sub 2 org} MR{sub 3} {center_dot} 3HR{sub org} + 3H{sub aq}{sup +} The extraction equilibrium constants of metals were obtained and compared with the extraction equilibrium constants obtained by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (henceforth DZEHPA). Furthermore, the extraction equilibria of rare earth metals with PC-88A in the presence of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (henceforth DTPA) in an aqueous phase were also measured to discuss the effect of DTPA on the extraction of rare earth metals. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Strategic design and refinement of Lewis acid-base catalysis by rare-earth-metal-containing polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Sugawa, Midori; Kikukawa, Yuji; Kamata, Keigo; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2012-06-18

    Efficient polyoxometalate (POM)-based Lewis acid-base catalysts of the rare-earth-metal-containing POMs (TBA(6)RE-POM, RE = Y(3+), Nd(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Tb(3+), or Dy(3+)) were designed and synthesized by reactions of TBA(4)H(4)[γ-SiW(10)O(36)] (TBA = tetra-n-butylammonium) with RE(acac)(3) (acac = acetylacetonato). TBA(6)RE-POM consisted of two silicotungstate units pillared by two rare-earth-metal cations. Nucleophilic oxygen-enriched surfaces of negatively charged POMs and the incorporated rare-earth-metal cations could work as Lewis bases and Lewis acids, respectively. Consequently, cyanosilylation of carbonyl compounds with trimethylsilyl cyanide ((TMS)CN) was efficiently promoted in the presence of the rare-earth-metal-containing POMs via the simultaneous activation of coupling partners on the same POM molecules. POMs with larger metal cations showed higher catalytic activities for cyanosilylation because of the higher activation ability of C═O bonds (higher Lewis acidities) and sterically less hindered Lewis acid sites. Among the POM catalysts examined, the neodymium-containing POM showed remarkable catalytic performance for cyanosilylation of various kinds of structurally diverse ketones and aldehydes, giving the corresponding cyanohydrin trimethylsilyl ethers in high yields (13 substrates, 94-99%). In particular, the turnover frequency (714,000 h(-1)) and the turnover number (23,800) for the cyanosilylation of n-hexanal were of the highest level among those of previously reported catalysts.

  5. Kinetics of Rare Earth Extraction from Baotou Bastnaesite in Hydrochloric Acid and Aluminum Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Li, Mei; Liu, Zhao-Gang; Hu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Mi-Tang

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the leaching kinetics of rare earth from Baotou bastnaesite in a HCl-AlCl3 solution was investigated. In addition, the effects of the HCl and AlCl3 concentrations, liquid to solid ratio, stirring speed, temperature, and time spent on the rare earth extraction were determined. The results indicated that the extraction was nearly independent of the stirring speed when it did not exceed 300 rpm, and the rate of leaching increased with increases in the HCl and AlCl3 concentrations, liquid to solid ratio, temperature, and time. The optimum dissolution conditions were determined under five experimental conditions. After leaching occurred, the progressive dissolution of the bastnaesite phase could be determined. The leaching kinetics was analyzed with a new variant of the shrinking core model in which both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer affected the rare earth extraction. The apparent activation energy was 35.57 kJ/mol, and the Arrhenius constant was 341.58 min-1. An empirical equation was derived to describe the extraction process of rare earth minerals.

  6. Kinetics of Rare Earth Extraction from Baotou Bastnaesite in Hydrochloric Acid and Aluminum Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Li, Mei; Liu, Zhao-Gang; Hu, Yan-Hong; Wang, Mi-Tang

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the leaching kinetics of rare earth from Baotou bastnaesite in a HCl-AlCl3 solution was investigated. In addition, the effects of the HCl and AlCl3 concentrations, liquid to solid ratio, stirring speed, temperature, and time spent on the rare earth extraction were determined. The results indicated that the extraction was nearly independent of the stirring speed when it did not exceed 300 rpm, and the rate of leaching increased with increases in the HCl and AlCl3 concentrations, liquid to solid ratio, temperature, and time. The optimum dissolution conditions were determined under five experimental conditions. After leaching occurred, the progressive dissolution of the bastnaesite phase could be determined. The leaching kinetics was analyzed with a new variant of the shrinking core model in which both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer affected the rare earth extraction. The apparent activation energy was 35.57 kJ/mol, and the Arrhenius constant was 341.58 min-1. An empirical equation was derived to describe the extraction process of rare earth minerals.

  7. Recovery of Rare Earth Elements and Yttrium from Passive-Remediation Systems of Acid Mine Drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayora, Carlos; Macías, Francisco; Torres, Ester; Lozano, Alba; Carrero, Sergio; Nieto, José-Miguel; Pérez-López, Rafael; Fernández-Martínez, Alejandro; Castillo-Michel, Hiram

    2016-08-02

    Rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) are raw materials of increasing importance for modern technologies, and finding new sources has become a pressing need. Acid mine drainage (AMD) is commonly considered an environmental pollution issue. However, REY concentrations in AMD can be several orders of magnitude higher than in naturally occurring water bodies. With respect to shale standards, the REY distribution pattern in AMD is enriched in intermediate and valuable REY, such as Tb and Dy. The objective of the present work is to study the behavior of REY in AMD passive-remediation systems. Traditional AMD passive remediation systems are based on the reaction of AMD with calcite-based permeable substrates followed by decantation ponds. Experiments with two columns simulating AMD treatment demonstrate that schwertmannite does not accumulate REY, which, instead, are retained in the basaluminite residue. The same observation is made in two field-scale treatments from the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB, southwest Spain). On the basis of the amplitude of this process and on the extent of the IPB, our findings suggest that the proposed AMD remediation process can represent a modest but suitable REY source. In this sense, the IPB could function as a giant heap-leaching process of regional scale in which rain and oxygen act as natural driving forces with no energy investment. In addition to having environmental benefits of its treatment, AMD is expected to last for hundreds of years, and therefore, the total reserves are practically unlimited.

  8. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2016-07-12

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  9. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2010-01-01

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  10. Extraction of rare earth elements from a contaminated cropland soil using nitric acid, citric acid, and EDTA.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hailong; Shuai, Weitao; Wang, Xiaojing; Liu, Yangsheng

    2017-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) contamination to the surrounding soil has increased the concerns of health risk to the local residents. Soil washing was first attempted in our study to remediate REEs-contaminated cropland soil using nitric acid, citric acid, and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) for soil decontamination and possible recovery of REEs. The extraction time, washing agent concentration, and pH value of the washing solution were optimized. The sequential extraction analysis proposed by Tessier was adopted to study the speciation changes of the REEs before and after soil washing. The extract containing citric acid was dried to obtain solid for the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. The results revealed that the optimal extraction time was 72 h, and the REEs extraction efficiency increased as the agent concentration increased from 0.01 to 0.1 mol/L. EDTA was efficient to extract REEs over a wide range of pH values, while citric acid was around pH 6.0. Under optimized conditions, the average extraction efficiencies of the major REEs in the contaminated soil were 70.96%, 64.38%, and 62.12% by EDTA, nitric acid, and citric acid, respectively. The sequential extraction analyses revealed that most soil-bounded REEs were mobilized or extracted except for those in the residual fraction. Under a comprehensive consideration of the extraction efficiency and the environmental impact, citric acid was recommended as the most suitable agent for extraction of the REEs from the contaminated cropland soils. The XRF analysis revealed that Mn, Al, Si, Pb, Fe, and REEs were the major elements in the extract indicating a possibile recovery of the REEs.

  11. Degradation of reactive, acid and basic textile dyes in the presence of ultrasound and rare earths [Lanthanum and Praseodymium].

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pankaj; Goyal, Shikha; Patnala, Prem Kishore

    2014-11-01

    Degradation of five textile dyes, namely Reactive Red 141 (RR 141), Reactive Blue 21 (RB 21), Acid Red 114 (AR 114), Acid Blue 113 (AB 113) and Basic Violet 16 (BV 16) in aqueous solution has been carried out with ultrasound (US) and in combination with rare earth ions (La(3+) and Pr(3+)). Kinetic analysis of the data showed a pseudo-first order degradation reaction for all the dyes. The rate constant (k), half life (t1/2) and the process efficiency (φ) for various processes in degradation of dyes under different experimental conditions have been calculated. The influence of concentrations of dyes (16-40mg/L), pH (5, 7 and 9) and rare earth ion concentration (4, 12 and 20mg/L) on the degradation of dyes have also been studied. The degradation percentage increased with increasing rare earth amount and decreased with increasing concentration of dyes. Both horn and bath type sonicators were used at 20kHz and 250W for degradation. The sonochemical degradation rate of dyes in the presence of rare earths was related to the type of chromophoric groups in the dye molecule. Degradation sequence of dyes was further examined through LCMS and Raman spectroscopic techniques, which confirmed the sonochemical degradation of dyes to non-toxic end products.

  12. Metal loading effect on rare earth element binding to humic acid: Experimental and modelling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2010-03-01

    The effect of metal loading on the binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) was studied by combining ultrafiltration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry techniques. REE-HA complexation experiments were performed at pH 3 for REE/C molar ratios ranging from ca 4 × 10 -4 to 2.7 × 10 -2. Results show that the relative amount of REE bound to HA strongly increases with decreasing REE/C. A middle-REE (MREE) downward concavity is shown by patterns at high metal loading, whereas patterns at low metal loading display a regular increase from La to Lu. Humic Ion Model VI modelling are close to the experimental data variations, provided that (i) the ΔLK 2 parameter (i.e. the Model VI parameter taken into account the presence of strong but low density binding sites) is allowed to increase regularly from La to Lu (from 1.1 to 2.1) and (ii) the published log KMA values (i.e. the REE-HA binding constants specific to Model VI) are slightly modified, in particular with respect to heavy REE. Modelling approach provided evidence that logKdREE patterns with varying REE/C likely arises because REE binding to HA occurs through two types of binding sites in different density: (i) a few strong sites that preferentially complex the heavy REE and thus control the logKdREE atterns at low REE/C; (ii) a larger amount of weaker binding sites that preferentially complex the middle-REE and thus control the logKdREE pattern at high REE/C. Hence, metal loading exerts a major effect on HA-mediated REE binding, which could explain the diversity of published conditional constants for REE binding with HA. A literature survey suggests that the few strong sites activated at low REE/C could be multidentate carboxylic sites, or perhaps N-, or P-functional groups. Finally, an examination of the literature field data proposed that the described loading effect could account for much of the variation in REE patterns observed in natural organic-rich waters (DOC > 5 mg L -1 and 4

  13. China's rare-earth industry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tse, Pui-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction China's dominant position as the producer of over 95 percent of the world output of rare-earth minerals and rapid increases in the consumption of rare earths owing to the emergence of new clean-energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict exports of rare earths, have resulted in heightened concerns about the future availability of rare earths. As a result, industrial countries such as Japan, the United States, and countries of the European Union face tighter supplies and higher prices for rare earths. This paper briefly reviews China's rare-earth production, consumption, and reserves and the important policies and regulations regarding the production and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements-lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium (atomic numbers 57-71)-were originally known as the rare earths from their occurrence in oxides mixtures. Recently, some researchers have included two other elements-scandium and yttrium-in their discussion of rare earths. Yttrium (atomic number 39), which lies above lanthanum in transition group III of the periodic table and has a similar 3+ ion with a noble gas core, has both atomic and ionic radii similar in size to those of terbium and dysprosium and is generally found in nature with lanthanides. Scandium (atomic number 21) has a smaller ionic radius than yttrium and the lanthanides, and its chemical behavior is intermediate between that of aluminum and the lanthanides. It is found in nature with the lanthanides and yttrium. Rare earths are used widely in high-technology and clean-energy products because they impart special properties of magnetism, luminescence, and strength. Rare earths are also used in weapon systems to obtain the same properties.

  14. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  15. The Not-So-Rare Earths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muecke, Gunter K.; Moller, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of rare earth elements. Details the physical chemistry of rare earths. Reviews the history of rare earth chemistry and mineralogy. Discusses the mineralogy and crystallography of the formation of rare earth laden minerals found in the earth's crust. Characterizes the geologic history of rare earth elements. (CW)

  16. The Not-So-Rare Earths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muecke, Gunter K.; Moller, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of rare earth elements. Details the physical chemistry of rare earths. Reviews the history of rare earth chemistry and mineralogy. Discusses the mineralogy and crystallography of the formation of rare earth laden minerals found in the earth's crust. Characterizes the geologic history of rare earth elements. (CW)

  17. Extraction of rare earth oxides using supercritical carbon dioxide modified with Tri-n-butyl phosphate–nitric acid adducts

    DOE PAGES

    Baek, Donna L.; Fox, Robert V.; Case, Mary E.; ...

    2016-06-14

    A new tri-n-butylphosphate–nitric acid (TBP–HNO3) adduct was prepared by combining TBP and fuming (90%) HNO3. The adduct was characterized, and its phase-equilibrium behavior in supercritical carbon dioxide is reported. Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was modified with this new adduct [TBP(HNO3)5.2(H2O)1.7], and the extraction efficacies of selected rare earth oxides (Y, Ce, Eu, Tb, and Dy) at 338 K and 34.5 MPa were compared with those obtained using an adduct formed from concentrated (70%) HNO3 and TBP [TBP(HNO3)1.7(H2O)0.6]. All rare earth oxides tested with both adduct species could be extracted with the exception of cerium oxide. Furthermore, the water and acidmore » concentrations in the different adducts were found to play a significant role in rare earth oxide extraction efficiency.« less

  18. Dissolution of the rare-earth mineral bastnaesite by acidic amide ionic liquid for recovery of critical

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Freiderich, John W.; Luo, Huimin; Moyer, Bruce A.; Stankovich, Joseph J.

    2015-08-19

    Rare-earth elements provide the cornerstones to clean sustainable energy and modern technologies such as computers, communications, and transportation. As such, the recovery of rare earths (REs) from minerals such as bastnaesite remains important for modern times. As the light lanthanides (La–Nd) constitute the majority (typically > 98.7 %) of the REs in bastnaesite with the heavy REs (Sm–Lu) contributing the remainder (approximately 1.3 %), an enrichment of heavier REs may serve as an effective means of assisting rare-earth recovery. Such an extractive metallurgy process involving ionic liquids (ILs) leads to an enrichment of heavy REs by nearly an order of magnitude. The acidic IL N,N-dimethylacetamidium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (DMAH+NTf2) in the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMIM+NTf2) dissolves froth flotation bastnaesite, synthetic bastnaesite analogues (RECO3F), RE2O3, and RE2(CO3)3 minerals. Furthermore, an overall reaction for the dissolution of bastnaesite is proposed for this IL system. This IL system may provide the initial stages of a greater RE separation scheme for bastnaesite froth flotation concentrates.

  19. Rare earth speciality inorganic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is a comprehensive review of the rare earth elements which include the Group IIIA elements Sc, Y and the lanthanide elements La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu. It covers their abundances, electronic structure, ionic radii, energy levels, thermodynamic properties, optical applications, separation chemistry, markets and statistics, electronic and magnetic applications, as well as mineral ores that contain rare earths, mixed rare earth chemical, and special uses of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/. 30 references.

  20. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A rare earth optical temperature sensor is disclosed for measuring high temperatures. Optical temperature sensors exist that channel emissions from a sensor to a detector using a light pipe. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform the sensed thermal energy into a narrow band width optical signal that travels to a detector using a light pipe. An optical bandpass filter at the detector removes any noise signal outside of the band width of the signal from the emitter.

  1. Distribution of rare earth elements in an alluvial aquifer affected by acid mine drainage: the Guadiamar aquifer (SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Olías, M; Cerón, J C; Fernández, I; De la Rosa, J

    2005-05-01

    This work analyses the spatial distribution, the origin, and the shale-normalised fractionation patterns of the rare earth elements (REE) in the alluvial aquifer of the Guadiamar River (south-western Spain). This river received notoriety in April 1998 for a spill that spread a great amount of slurry (mainly pyrites) and acid waters in a narrow strip along the river course. Groundwaters and surface waters were sampled to analyse, among other elements, the REEs. Their spatial distribution shows a peak close to the mining region, in an area with low values of pH and high concentrations of sulphates and other metals such as Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Pb, and Cd. The patterns of shale-normalised fractionation at the most-contaminated points show an enrichment in the middle rare earth elements (MREE) with respect to the light (LREE) and heavy (HREE) ones, typical of acid waters. The Ce-anomaly becomes more negative as pH increases, due to the preferential fractionation of Ce in oxyhydroxides of Fe.

  2. Synthesis, structures and properties of two new chiral rare earth-organic frameworks constructed by L/D-tartaric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Gonghao; Zhang, Haitao; Miao, Hao; Wang, Jiahong; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of rare earth cerium with L- or D- tartaric acid afford a pair of novel chiral enantiomer coordination polymers, namely, [Ce(L-tart)(CH{sub 2}OHCH{sub 2}OH)(H{sub 2}O)]Cl (L-1) and [Ce(D-tart)(CH{sub 2}OHCH{sub 2}OH)(H{sub 2}O)]Cl (D-1). Their structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, XRD, IR spectra, and TG analyses. The circular dichroism (CD) spectra and second-harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency measurements proved that they are of structural chirality in the bulk samples. To the best of our knowledge, the enantiomers of L-1 and D-1 are the first 2D chiral dilayer frameworks constructed from L/D-tartrate ligands, ancillary ligand ethanediol and lanthanide ion Ce. - Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal reactions of rare earth cerium with L- or D- tartaric acid afford a pair of novel chiral enantiomer coordination polymers, namely, [Ce(L-tart)(CH{sub 2}OHCH{sub 2}OH)(H{sub 2}O)]Cl (L-1) and [Ce(D-tart)(CH{sub 2}OHCH{sub 2}OH)(H{sub 2}O)]Cl (D-1). Structural analysis indicates that the enantiomers of L-1 and D-1 are the first 2D chiral dilayer frameworks constructed from L/D-tartrate ligands and ancillary ligands ethanediol reacted with lanthanide ions Ce.

  3. SEPARATION OF RARE EARTHS BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Peppard, D.F.; Mason, G.W.

    1960-10-11

    A process is given for separating lanthanide rare earths from each other from an aqueous mineral acid solution, e.g., hydrochloric or nitric acid of a concentration of above 3 M, preferably 12 to 16 M, by extraction with a water- immiscible alkyl phosphate, such as tributyl phosphate or a mixture of mono-, di- and tributyl phosphate, and fractional back-extraction with mineral acid whereby the lanthanides are taken up by the acid in the order of increasing atomic number.

  4. Recycling of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Tom; Bertau, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Any development of an effective process for rare earth (RE) recycling has become more and more challenging, especially in recent years. Since 2011, when commodity prices of REs had met their all-time maximum, prices have dropped rapidly by more than 90 %. An economic process able to offset these fluctuations has to take unconventional methods into account beside well-known strategies like acid/basic leaching or solvent extraction. The solid-state chlorination provides such an unconventional method for mobilizing RE elements from waste streams. Instead of hydrochloric acid this kind of chlorination decomposes NH4Cl thermally to release up to 400 °C hot HCl gas. After cooling the resulting solid metal chlorides may be easily dissolved in pH-adjusted water. Without producing strongly acidic wastes and with NH4Cl as cheap source for hydrogen chloride, solid-state chlorination provides various advantages in terms of costs and disposal. In the course of the SepSELSA project this method was examined, adjusted and optimized for RE recycling from fluorescent lamp scraps as well as Fe14Nd2B magnets. Thereby many surprising influences and trends required various analytic methods to examine the reasons and special mechanisms behind them.

  5. Upconversion of rare Earth nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ling-Dong; Dong, Hao; Zhang, Pei-Zhi; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth nanomaterials, which feature long-lived intermediate energy levels and intraconfigurational 4f-4f transitions, are promising supporters for photon upconversion. Owing to their unique optical properties, rare earth upconversion nanomaterials have found applications in bioimaging, theranostics, photovoltaic devices, and photochemical reactions. Here, we review recent advances in the photon upconversion processes of these nanomaterials. We start by considering energy transfer models involved in the study of upconversion emissions, as well as well-established synthesis strategies to control the size and shape of rare earth upconversion nanomaterials. Progress in engineering energy transfer pathways, which play a dominant role in determining upconversion emission outputs, is then discussed. Lastly, representative optical applications of these materials are considered. The aim of this review is to provide inspiration for researchers to explore novel upconversion nanomaterials and extended optical applications.

  6. Synthesis, structures and properties of two new chiral rare earth-organic frameworks constructed by L/D-tartaric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gonghao; Zhang, Haitao; Miao, Hao; Wang, Jiahong; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Hydrothermal reactions of rare earth cerium with L- or D- tartaric acid afford a pair of novel chiral enantiomer coordination polymers, namely, [Ce(L-tart)(CH2OHCH2OH)(H2O)]Cl (L-1) and [Ce(D-tart)(CH2OHCH2OH)(H2O)]Cl (D-1). Their structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by elemental analyses, XRD, IR spectra, and TG analyses. The circular dichroism (CD) spectra and second-harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency measurements proved that they are of structural chirality in the bulk samples. To the best of our knowledge, the enantiomers of L-1 and D-1 are the first 2D chiral dilayer frameworks constructed from L/D-tartrate ligands, ancillary ligand ethanediol and lanthanide ion Ce.

  7. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  8. Rare earth element scavenging in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Robert H.; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    1990-10-01

    Examinations of rare earth element (REE) adsorption in seawater, using a variety of surface-types, indicated that, for most surfaces, light rare earth elements (LREEs) are preferentially adsorbed compared to the heavy rare earths (HREEs). Exceptions to this behavior were observed only for silica phases (glass surfaces, acid-cleaned diatomaceous earth, and synthetic SiO 2). The affinity of the rare earths for surfaces can be strongly affected by thin organic coatings. Glass surfaces which acquired an organic coating through immersion in Tampa Bay exhibited adsorptive behavior typical of organic-rich, rather than glass, surfaces. Models of rare earth distributions between seawater and carboxylate-rich surfaces indicate that scavenging processes which involve such surfaces should exhibit a strong dependence on pH and carbonate complexation. Scavenging models involving carboxylate surfaces produce relative REE abundance patterns in good general agreement with observed shale-normalized REE abundances in seawater. Scavenging by carboxylate-rich surfaces should produce HREE enrichments in seawater relative to the LREEs and may produce enrichments of lanthanum relative to its immediate trivalent neighbors. Due to the origin of distribution coefficients as a difference between REE solution complexation (which increases strongly with atomic number) and surface complexation (which apparently also increases with atomic number) the relative solution abundance patterns of the REEs produced by scavenging reactions can be quite complex.

  9. Enrichment of rare earth elements as environmental tracers of contamination by acid mine drainage in salt marshes: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Joaquín; Pérez-López, Rafael; Galván, Laura; Nieto, José Miguel; Boski, Tomasz

    2012-09-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) were analyzed in surface sediments from the Guadiana Estuary (SW Iberian Pyrite Belt). NASC (North American Shale Composite) normalized REE patterns show clearly convex curvatures in middle-REE (MREE) with respect to light- and heavy-REE, indicating acid-mixing processes between fluvial waters affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) and seawater. However, REE distributions in the mouth (closer to the coastal area) show slightly LREE-enriched and flat patterns, indicating saline-mixing processes typical of the coastal zone. NASC-normalized ratios (La/Gd and La/Yb) do not discriminate between both mixing processes in the estuary. Instead, a new parameter (E(MREE)) has been applied to measure the curvature in the MREE segment. The values of E(MREE)>0 are indicative of acid signatures and their spatial distribution reveal the existence of two decantation zones from flocculation processes related to drought periods and flood events. Studying REE fractionation through the E(MREE) may serve as a good proxy for AMD-pollution in estuarine environments in relation to the traditional methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adsorption of rare earth ions onto the cell walls of wild-type and lipoteichoic acid-defective strains of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Koide, Remi; Yoshikawa, Ritsuko; Warabino, Yuya; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of cell walls of wild-type and lipoteichoic acid-defective strains of Bacillus subtilis 168 to adsorb rare earth ions. Freeze-dried cell powders prepared from both strains were used for the evaluation of adsorption ability for the rare earth ions, namely, La(III), Eu(III), and Tm(III). The rare earth ions were efficiently adsorbed onto powders of both wild-type strain (WT powder) and lipoteichoic acid-defective strain (∆LTA powder) at pH 3. The maximum adsorption capacities for Tm(III) by WT and ∆LTA powders were 43 and 37 mg g(-1), respectively. Removal (in percent) of Tm(III), La(III), and Eu(III) from aqueous solution by WT powder was greater than by ∆LTA powder. These results indicate that rare earth ions are adsorbed to functional groups, such as phosphate and carboxyl groups, of lipoteichoic acid. We observed coagulated ∆LTA powder in the removal of rare earth ions (1-20 mg L(-1)) from aqueous solution. In contrast, sedimentation of WT powder did not occur under the same conditions. This unique feature of ∆LTA powder may be caused by the difference of the distribution between lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid. It appears that ∆LTA powder is useful for removal of rare earth ions by adsorption, because aggregation allows for rapid separation of the adsorbent by filtration.

  11. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  12. Rare earth element concentrations in dissolved and acid available particulate forms for eastern UK rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, C.

    2007-01-01

    Variations in concentration of yttrium (Y), lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm) and gadolinium (Gd) among rivers of eastern England and the border with Scotland are described in relation to the dissolved (<0.45 µM) fraction and acid-available particulate (AAP) fractions. The rivers cover a range of rural, agricultural and urban/industrial environments. Yttrium and the lanthanides show significant levels of both dissolved and acid-available particulate forms (typically about 40% in the dissolved form). For the dissolved phase, Y and the lanthanides are linearly correlated with each other and with iron: most of this dissolved component may be in a micro-particulate/colloidal form. The Y and lanthanide relationships show marked scatter and there are anomalously high La concentrations at times for the rivers Great Ouse, Thames and Wear that are probably linked to pollutant sources. For the Ouse, and especially for one of its tributaries, the Swale, relatively high Sm concentrations are probably associated with mineralisation within the catchment and contamination of the associated flood plain. For the AAP components, there are strong linear relationships with Y and the lanthanides across all the rivers. There is also a strong link between these AAP associated REE and AAP iron, although the scatter is greater and the industrial rivers have a lower lanthanide to iron ratio, probably due to iron-rich contaminants.

  13. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Wolford, David S.

    2000-01-01

    A new optical temperature sensor suitable for high temperatures (greater than 1700 K) and harsh environments is introduced. The key component of the sensor is the rare earth material contained at the end of a sensor that is in contact with the sample being measured. The measured narrow wavelength band emission from the rare earth is used to deduce the sample temperature. A simplified relation between the temperature and measured radiation was verified experimentally. The upper temperature limit of the sensor is determined by material limits to be approximately 2000 C. The lower limit, determined by the minimum detectable radiation, is found to be approximately 700 K. At high temperatures 1 K resolution is predicted. Also, millisecond response times are calculated.

  14. Extraction of transplutionium and rare-earth elements, molybdenum and iron with zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberman, B. Ya.; Fedorov, Yu. S.; Shmidt, O. V.; Goletsky, N. D.; Sukhareva, S. Yu.; Puzikov, E. A.; Suglobov, D. N.; Mashirov, L. G.; Choppin, G. R.

    2003-01-01

    Zirconium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid (ZS-HDBP) dissolved in dilute tributyl phosphate (TBP) is proposed as a solvent for separation of transplutonium and rare-earth elements (TPE, RE), including yttrium, from high-level waste in the presence of molybdenum and iron. The optimum HDBP:Zr ratio is 9 for RE and TPE extraction and is 12.5 for Mo. IR spectra indicate formation of Zr(DBP)4(HDBP)4 complex as a base of solvation. HNO3 depresses RE and TPE extraction, while Mo extraction is characterised by a minimum at 2.5 mol/L HNO3. Presence of TBP in the solvent, independently of the used diluent, leads to reduction of the distribution coefficients, but ZS-HDBP extraction capacity for the above elements is increased, as well as solubility of their solvates. Two types of complexes M(DBP)3 and MNO3(DBP)2 are formed at RE and TPE extraction by ZS-HDBP in dilute TBP. Molybdenum extraction is based both on cation exchange and on Mo solvation with HDBP as a neutral ligand. Iron extraction is formally similar to that of Mo, being influenced by the latter if both metals are present in the solution.

  15. Dimeric rare-earth BINOLate complexes: activation of 1,4-benzoquinone through Lewis acid promoted potential shifts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jerome R; Booth, Corwin H; Carroll, Patrick J; Walsh, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2013-05-03

    Reaction of p-benzoquinone (BQ) with a series of rare-earth metal/alkali metal/1,1'-BINOLate (REMB) complexes (RE: La, Ce, Pr, Nd; M: Li) results in the largest recorded shift in reduction potential observed for BQ upon complexation. In the case of cerium, the formation of a 2:1 Ce/BQ complex shifts the two-electron reduction of BQ by greater than or equal to 1.6 V to a more favorable potential. Reactivity investigations were extended to other RE(III) (RE = La, Pr, Nd) complexes where the resulting highly electron-deficient quinone ligands afforded isolation of the first lanthanide quinhydrone-type charge-transfer complexes. The large reduction-potential shift associated with the formation of 2:1 Ce/BQ complexes illustrate the potential of Ce complexes to function both as a Lewis acid and an electron source in redox chemistry and organic-substrate activation.

  16. Synthesis and crystal structure of rare earth complexes with o-nitrobenzoic acid and N, N-dimethylformamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lifang; Chen, Yashao; Bao, Lin

    2010-03-01

    The rare-earth compound [Ce 0.5Sm 0.5( o-NBA) 3(DMF) 2] 2 (where o-NBA = o-nitrobenzoic acid, DMF = N, N-dimethylformamide) has been synthesized and structurally characterized. The crystal structure of the compound is characterized by Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), fluorescent emission spectroscopy (FES) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The results show that the compound crystallizes in a triclinic system, space group P-1 with a = 11.8284 (6) Å, b = 12.5082 (7) Å, c = 13.0203 (7) Å, α = 63.9650 (10)°, β = 66.3900 (10)°, γ = 71.7380 (10)°, V = 1563.7 (14) Å 3, Dc = 1.677 g/cm 3, Z = 1, F(0 0 0) = 790. Each Ln (III) atom is bridged by four o-nitro-benzoates and chelated by one o-nitrobenzoate. The Ln (III) atom is eight-coordinated by six oxygen atoms from five o-nitro-benzoates and two oxygen atoms from two DMF molecules. Hydrogen bonds and aromatic π⋯ π stacking interactions assemble the compound into a three-dimensional network. Luminescence measurement shows that the compound emits fluorescence.

  17. Fast preconcentration of trace rare earth elements from environmental samples by di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid grafted magnetic nanoparticles followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ping; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2017-10-01

    In this work, di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (P204) grafted magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by fabricating P204 onto Fe3O4@TiO2 nanoparticles based on Lewis acid-base interaction between Ti and phosphate group under weakly acidic condition. The prepared Fe3O4@TiO2@P204 nanoparticles exhibited excellent selectivity for rare earth elements, and good anti-interference ability. Based on it, a method of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed for fast preconcentration and determination of trace rare earth elements in environmental samples. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limits of rare earth elements were in the range of 0.01 (Tm)-0.12 (Nd) ng L- 1 with an enrichment factor of 100-fold, and the relative standard deviations ranged from 4.9 (Pr) to 10.7% (Er). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of rare earth elements in environmental samples, including river water, lake water, seawater and sediment.

  18. Scarcity of rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    de Boer, M A; Lammertsma, K

    2013-11-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are important for green and a large variety of high-tech technologies and are, therefore, in high demand. As a result, supply with REEs is likely to be disrupted (the degree of depends on the REE) in the near future. The 17 REEs are divided into heavy and light REEs. Other critical elements besides REEs, identified by the European Commission, are also becoming less easily available. Although there is no deficiency in the earth's crust of rare earth oxides, the economic accessibility is limited. The increased demand for REEs, the decreasing export from China, and geopolitical concerns on availability contributed to the (re)opening of mines in Australia and the USA and other mines are slow to follow. As a result, short supply of particularly terbium, dysprosium, praseodymium, and neodymium is expected to be problematic for at least the short term, also because they cannot be substituted. Recycling REEs from electronic waste would be a solution, but so far there are hardly any established REE recycling methods. Decreasing the dependency on REEs, for example, by identifying possible replacements or increasing their efficient use, represents another possibility.

  19. Second-sphere tethering of rare-earth ions to cucurbit[6]uril by iminodiacetic acid involving carboxylic group encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre

    2010-10-04

    The reaction of rare-earth nitrates with iminodiacetic acid (H(2)IDA) in the presence of cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) in water at room temperature yields a family of isomorphous complexes, [M(H(2)IDA)(NO(3))(H(2)O)(6)](NO(3))(2)·CB6·14H(2)O with M = Y (1), Ce (2), Nd (3), Eu (4), Dy (5), Er (6), Tm (7), and Yb (8). In these compounds, the trivalent metal ion is bound to one nitrate ion, six water molecules, and one zwitterionic H(2)IDA molecule. The latter is further partly included in the CB6 cavity, with the ammonium group forming two hydrogen bonds with oxygen atoms of one portal. The uncoordinated carboxylic group is thus encapsulated in CB6 and hydrogen-bonded to the other portal via a water molecule. CB6 is a second-sphere ligand in these complexes, but direct bonding of the metal ion to CB6 can be enforced by using a ligand more deeply imbedded in the cavity, such as 2-pyridylacetate (PA) in [Eu(PA)(CB6)(NO(3))(H(2)O)(5)](NO(3))·10H(2)O (11). When the reaction with H(2)IDA is performed with Lu(III) or Cu(II), no metal complex is isolated, but the inclusion compounds [(H(3)IDA)(2)(CB6)](NO(3))(2)·xH(2)O with x = 6 (9) or 8 (10) are obtained instead, in which the two H(3)IDA(+) cations are attached to the CB6 portals by ammonium-carbonyl hydrogen bonds and are linked to one another inside the cavity by hydrogen bonding between the carboxylic groups. These complexes are compared to that comprising a dicarboxylic acid devoid of an ammonium functionality, [(H(2)AZ)(CB6)]·6H(2)O (12), where H(2)AZ is azelaic acid. The metal ion complexes 1-8 and the organic complexes 9 and 10 display the unprecedented feature of inclusion of carboxylic groups inside the CB6 cavity, with the CB6/acid stoichiometry and the finer details of the host-guest interactions being dependent on the presence of the metal ion.

  20. Selective separation of rare earth metals by solvent extraction in the presence on new hydrophilic chelating polymers functionalized with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. I. Development of new hydrophilic chelating polymers and their adsorption properties for rare earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Hideto; Miyamoto, Yoshikazu; Teramoto, Masaaki

    1996-03-01

    New hydrophilic chelating polymers were synthesized by introducing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) onto water-soluble polyallylamine. The selective separation of rare earth metals by solvent extraction including these chelating polymers in the aqueous phase is the goal of this work. The polymers were characterized by IR analysis, elemental analysis, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) measurement, and pH titration. Two kinds of polymers with different solubilities in water were produced using different solvents. Both polymers were naturally precipitated in the presence of rare earth metals. This suggests that in the solvent extraction system including these chelating polymers, the recovery of the polymers is easy. Adsorption properties of Y{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} on these polymers were also investigated. The separation properties by adsorption on the polymers were comparable to those by EDTA. The chelating polymers had the characteristics that their separation factors decreased by adsorption and the total amount adsorbed increased with increasing pH or initial metal concentrations, although in the presence of EDTA these properties were found to be almost constant.

  1. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  2. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOEpatents

    McCallum, R. William; Ellis, Timothy W.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Hofer, Robert J.; Branagan, Daniel J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  3. Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium and scandium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, rare earths were not mined in the United States. The major supplier, Molycorp, continued to maintain a large stockpile of rare-earth concentrates and compounds. Consumption decreased of refined rare-earth products. The United States remained a major importer and exporter of rare earths in 2005. During the same period, yttrium was not mined or refined in the US. Hence, supply of yttrium compounds for refined yttrium products came from China, France and Japan. Scandium was not also mined. World production was primarily in China, Russia and Ukraine. Demand for rare earths in 2006 is expected to be closely tied to economic conditions in the US.

  4. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  5. Effects of rare earth element lanthanum on rumen methane and volatile fatty acid production and microbial flora in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T T; Zhao, G Y; Zheng, W S; Niu, W J; Wei, C; Lin, S X

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the trial were to study the effects of rare earth element (REE) lanthanum (La) on the in vitro rumen methane (CH4 ) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production and the microbial flora of feeds. Four feed mixtures with different levels of neutral detergent fibre (NDF), that is 20.0% (I), 31.0% (II), 41.9% (III) and 52.7% (IV), were formulated as substrates. Five levels of LaCl3 , that is 0, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 mmol/kg dry matter (DM), were added to the feed mixtures, respectively, as experimental treatments in a two-factor 5 × 4 randomized design. The in vitro incubation lasted for 24 h. The results showed that supplementing LaCl3 increased the total gas (p < 0.001) production and tended to increase the total VFA production (p = 0.072) and decreased the CH4 production (p = 0.001) and the ratios of acetate/propionate (p = 0.019) and CH4 /total VFA (p < 0.001). Interactions between LaCl3 and NDF were significant in total gas production (p = 0.030) and tended to be significant in CH4 production (p = 0.071). Supplementing LaCl3 at the level of 0.8 mmol/g DM decreased the relative abundance of methanogens and protozoa in the total bacterial 16S rDNA analysed using the real-time PCR (p < 0.0001), increased F. succinogenes (p = 0.0003) and decreased R. flavefaciens (p < 0.0001) whereas did not affect R. albus and anaerobic fungi (p > 0.05). It was concluded that LaCl3 decreased the CH4 production without negatively affecting feed digestion through manipulating rumen microbial flora when feed mixtures with different levels of NDF were used as substrates.

  6. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orris, Greta J.; Grauch, Richard I.

    2002-01-01

    Data on rare earth (including yttrium) mines, deposits, and occurrences were compiled as part of an effort by the USGS and the University of Arizona Center for Mineral Resources to summarize current knowledge on the supply and demand outlook and related topics for this group of elements. Economic competition and environmental concerns are increasingly constraining the mining and processing of rare earths from the Mountain Pass mine in California. For many years, the deposit at Mountain Pass was the world's dominant source of rare earth elements and the United States was essentially self-sufficient. Starting approximately 10 years ago, the U.S. has become increasingly dependent (> 90 percent of separated rare earths) upon imports from China, now the dominant source of rare earths. A knowledge of the known economic and noneconomic sources of rare earths is basic to evaluating the outlook for rare earth supply and associated issues.

  7. Rare earth elements: end use and recyclability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth elements are used in mature markets (such as catalysts, glassmaking, lighting, and metallurgy), which account for 59 percent of the total worldwide consumption of rare earth elements, and in newer, high-growth markets (such as battery alloys, ceramics, and permanent magnets), which account for 41 percent of the total worldwide consumption of rare earth elements. In mature market segments, lanthanum and cerium constitute about 80 percent of rare earth elements used, and in new market segments, dysprosium, neodymium, and praseodymium account for about 85 percent of rare earth elements used. Regardless of the end use, rare earth elements are not recycled in large quantities, but could be if recycling became mandated or very high prices of rare earth elements made recycling feasible.

  8. Production and precipitation of rare earth elements in acidic to alkaline coal mine discharges, Appalachian Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, B. W.; Capo, R. C.; Hedin, B. C.; Wallrich, I. L. R.; Hedin, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Abandoned coal mine discharges are a serious threat to ground and surface waters due to their high metal content and often high acidity. However, these discharges represent a potential source of rare earth elements (REE), many of which are considered to be critical resources. Trace element data from 18 coal mine drainage (CMD) sites within the Appalachian Basin suggest CMD is enriched in total REE by 1-4 orders of magnitude relative to concentrations expected in unaffected surface or ground waters. When normalized to the North American Shale Composite (NASC), the discharges generally show a pattern of enrichment in the middle REE, including several identified as critical resources (Nd, Eu, Dy, Tb). In contrast, shale, sandstone and coal samples from Appalachian Basin coal-bearing units have concentrations and patterns similar to NASC, indicating that the REE in CMD are fractionated during interaction with rock in the mine pool. The highest total REE contents (up to 2800 mg/L) are found in low-pH discharges (acid mine drainage, or AMD). A precipitous drop in REE concentration in CMD with pH ≥6.6 suggests adsorption or precipitation of REE in the mine pool at circumneutral pH. Precipitated solids from 21 CMD active and passive treatment sites in the Appalachian Basin, including Fe oxy-hydroxides, Ca-Mg lime slurries, and Si- and Al-rich precipitates, are enriched in total REE content relative to the average CMD discharges by about four orders of magnitude. Similar REE trends in the discharges and precipitates, including MREE enrichment, suggest minimal fractionation of REE during precipitation; direct comparisons over multiple seasonal cycles are needed to confirm this. Although the data are limited, Al-rich precipitates generally have high REE concentrations, while those in iron oxy-hydroxides tend to be lower. Based on the area of mined coal in the Appalachian Basin, estimated infiltration rates, and the mean REE flux from discharges analyzed in this study and

  9. Accumulation of rare earth elements by siderophore-forming Arthrobacter luteolus isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara, India.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, E S Challaraj; Ananthi, T; Anandkumar, B; Maruthamuthu, S

    2012-03-01

    In this study, Arthrobacter luteolus, isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara (Quilon district, Kerala, India), were found to produce catechol-type siderophores. The bacterial strain accumulated rare earth elements such as samarium and scandium. The siderophores may play a role in the accumulation of rare earth elements. Catecholate siderophore and low-molecular-weight organic acids were found to be present in experiments with Arthrobacter luteolus. The influence of siderophore on the accumulation of rare earth elements by bacteria has been extensively discussed.

  10. Mineral resource of the month: rare earths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.

    2004-01-01

    As if classified as a top-secret project, the rare earths have been shrouded in secrecy. The principal ore mineral of the group, bastnäsite, rarely appears in the leading mineralogy texts. The long names of the rare-earth elements and some unusual arrangements of letters, many Scandinavian in origin, may have intimidated even those skilled in phonics. Somewhat obscurely labeled, the rare earths are neither rare nor earths (the historical term for oxides). They are a relatively abundant group of metallic elements that occur in nature as nonmetallic compounds and have hundreds of commercial applications.

  11. Developments in rare earth intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchmayr, H.R.

    1984-09-01

    The magnetic properties of rare earth intermetallics have been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years. However, while the preparation of new intermetallic compounds and the determination of their properties have been the prime concern in former years, more recently the analysis and theoretical explanation of the available data has become most important. Furthermore single crystals have now become available, which permit new experiments. Also many investigations on pseudo-binary systems have permitted the systematic determination of the primary magnetic properties. After a summary of the magnetic properties of intermetallics where the B-moment is zero and nonzero, some examples of pseudobinary systems and especially applications of R-3d multicomponent systems as the basis for advanced permanent magnets are discussed. Finally RE-3d alloys with metalloids and non-metals are discussed with emphasis on the newly developed R-Fe-B permanent magnets.

  12. Enhanced separation of rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, K.; Greenhalgh, M.; Herbst, R. S.; Garn, T.; Welty, A.; Soderstrom, M. D.; Jakovljevic, B.

    2016-09-01

    Industrial rare earth separation processes utilize PC88A, a phosphonic acid ligand, for solvent extraction separations. The separation factors of the individual rare earths, the equipment requirements, and chemical usage for these flowsheets are well characterized. Alternative ligands such as Cyanex® 572 and the associated flowsheets are being investigated at the pilot scale level to determine if significant improvements to the current separation processes can be realized. These improvements are identified as higher separation factors, reduced stage requirements, or reduced chemical consumption. Any of these improvements can significantly affect the costs associated with these challenging separation proccesses. A mid/heavy rare earth element (REE) separations flowsheet was developed and tested for each ligand in a 30 stage mixer-settler circuit to compare the separation performance of PC88A and Cyanex® 572. The ligand-metal complex strength of Cyanex® 572 provides efficient extraction of REE while significantly reducing the strip acid requirements. Reductions in chemical consumption have a significant impact on process economics for REE separations. Partitioning results summarized Table 1 indicate that Cyanex® 572 offers the same separation performance as PC88A while reducing acid consumption by 30% in the strip section for the mid/heavy REE separation. Flowsheet Effluent Compositions PC88A Cyanex® 572 Raffinate Mid REE Heavy REE 99.40% 0.60% 99.40% 0.60% Rich Mid REE Heavy REE 2.20% 97.80% 0.80% 99.20% Liquor Strip Acid Required 3.4 M 2.3 M Table 1 – Flowsheet results comparing separation performance of PC88A and Cyanex® 572 for a mid/heavy REE separation.

  13. Diel behavior of rare earth elements in a mountain stream with acidic to neutral pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammons, C.H.; Wood, S.A.; Nimick, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    Diel (24-h) changes in concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) were investigated in Fisher Creek, a mountain stream in Montana that receives acid mine drainage in its headwaters. Three simultaneous 24-h samplings were conducted at an upstream station (pH = 3.3), an intermediate station (pH = 5.5), and a downstream station (pH = 6.8). The REE were found to behave conservatively at the two upstream stations. At the downstream station, REE partitioned into suspended particles to a degree that varied with the time of day, and concentrations of dissolved REE were 2.9- to 9.4-fold (190% to 830%) higher in the early morning vs. the late afternoon. The decrease in dissolved REE concentrations during the day coincided with a corresponding increase in the concentration of REE in suspended particles, such that diel changes in the total REE concentrations were relatively minor (27% to 55% increase at night). Across the lanthanide series, the heavy REE partitioned into the suspended solid phase to a greater extent than the light REE. Filtered samples from the downstream station showed a decrease in shale-normalized REE concentration across the lanthanide series, with positive anomalies at La and Gd, and a negative Eu anomaly. As the temperature of the creek increased in the afternoon, the slope of the REE profile steepened and the magnitude of the anomalies increased. The above observations are explained by cyclic adsorption of REE onto suspended particles of hydrous ferric and aluminum oxides (HFO, HAO). Conditional partition coefficients for each REE between the suspended solids and the aqueous phase reached a maximum at 1700 hours and a minimum at 0700 hours. This pattern is attributed to diel variations in stream temperature, possibly reinforced by kinetic factors (i.e., slower rates of reaction at night than during the day). Estimates of the enthalpy of adsorption of each REE onto suspended particles based on the field results averaged +82 kJ/mol and are similar in

  14. Diel behavior of rare earth elements in a mountain stream with acidic to neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammons, Christopher H.; Wood, Scott A.; Nimick, David A.

    2005-08-01

    Diel (24-h) changes in concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) were investigated in Fisher Creek, a mountain stream in Montana that receives acid mine drainage in its headwaters. Three simultaneous 24-h samplings were conducted at an upstream station (pH = 3.3), an intermediate station (pH = 5.5), and a downstream station (pH = 6.8). The REE were found to behave conservatively at the two upstream stations. At the downstream station, REE partitioned into suspended particles to a degree that varied with the time of day, and concentrations of dissolved REE were 2.9- to 9.4-fold (190% to 830%) higher in the early morning vs. the late afternoon. The decrease in dissolved REE concentrations during the day coincided with a corresponding increase in the concentration of REE in suspended particles, such that diel changes in the total REE concentrations were relatively minor (27% to 55% increase at night). Across the lanthanide series, the heavy REE partitioned into the suspended solid phase to a greater extent than the light REE. Filtered samples from the downstream station showed a decrease in shale-normalized REE concentration across the lanthanide series, with positive anomalies at La and Gd, and a negative Eu anomaly. As the temperature of the creek increased in the afternoon, the slope of the REE profile steepened and the magnitude of the anomalies increased. The above observations are explained by cyclic adsorption of REE onto suspended particles of hydrous ferric and aluminum oxides (HFO, HAO). Conditional partition coefficients for each REE between the suspended solids and the aqueous phase reached a maximum at 1700 hours and a minimum at 0700 hours. This pattern is attributed to diel variations in stream temperature, possibly reinforced by kinetic factors (i.e., slower rates of reaction at night than during the day). Estimates of the enthalpy of adsorption of each REE onto suspended particles based on the field results averaged +82 kJ/mol and are similar in

  15. Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium and scandium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.; Bleiwas, D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, rare earths were recovered from bastnasite concentrates at the Mountain Pass Mine in California. Consumption of refined rare-earth products decreased in 2011 from 2010. U.S. rare-earth imports originated primarily from China, with lesser amounts from Austria, Estonia, France and Japan. The United States imported all of its demand for yttrium metal and yttrium compounds, with most of it originating from China. Scandium was imported in various forms and processed domestically.

  16. METHOD OF SEPARATING RARE EARTHS BY ION EXCHANGE

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Powell, J.E.

    1960-10-18

    A process is given for separating yttrium and rare earth values having atomic numbers of from 57 through 60 and 68 through 71 from an aqueous solution whose pH value can range from 1 to 9. All rare earths and yttrium are first adsorbed on a cation exchange resin, and they are then eluted with a solution of N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) in the order of decreasing atomic number, yttrium behaving like element 61; the effluents are collected in fractions. The HEDTA is recovered by elution with ammonia solution and the resin is regenerated with sulfuric acid. Rare earths are precipitated from the various effluents with oxalic acid, and each supernatant is passed over cation exchange resin for adsorption of HEDTA and nonprecipitated rare earths: the oxalic acid is not retained by the resin.

  17. Bioleaching of rare earth elements from monazite sand.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Vanessa L; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Three fungal strains were found to be capable of bioleaching rare earth elements from monazite, a rare earth phosphate mineral, utilizing the monazite as a phosphate source and releasing rare earth cations into solution. These organisms include one known phosphate solubilizing fungus, Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015, as well as two newly isolated fungi: an Aspergillus terreus strain ML3-1 and a Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F. Although monazite also contains the radioactive element Thorium, bioleaching by these fungi preferentially solubilized rare earth elements over Thorium, leaving the Thorium in the solid residual. Adjustments in growth media composition improved bioleaching performance measured as rare earth release. Cell-free spent medium generated during growth of A. terreus strain ML3-1 and Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F in the presence of monazite leached rare earths to concentrations 1.7-3.8 times those of HCl solutions of comparable pH, indicating that compounds exogenously released by these organisms contribute substantially to leaching. Organic acids released by the organisms included acetic, citric, gluconic, itaconic, oxalic, and succinic acids. Abiotic leaching with laboratory prepared solutions of these acids was not as effective as bioleaching or leaching with cell-free spent medium at releasing rare earths from monazite, indicating that compounds other than the identified organic acids contribute to leaching performance.

  18. Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides

    DOEpatents

    Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1982-04-14

    An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

  19. Alaska's rare earth deposits and resource potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, James C.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Alaska’s known mineral endowment includes some of the largest and highest grade deposits of various metals, including gold, copper and zinc. Recently, Alaska has also been active in the worldwide search for sources of rare earth elements (REE) to replace exports now being limitedby China. Driven by limited supply of the rare earths, combined with their increasing use in new ‘green’ energy, lighting, transportation, and many other technological applications, the rare earth metals neodymium, europium and, in particular, the heavy rare earth elements terbium, dysprosium and yttrium are forecast to soon be in critical short supply (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010).

  20. Extraction of rare earth oxides using supercritical carbon dioxide modified with Tri-n-butyl phosphate–nitric acid adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Donna L.; Fox, Robert V.; Case, Mary E.; Sinclair, Laura K.; Schmidt, Alex B.; McIlwain, Patrick R.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Wai, Chien M.

    2016-06-14

    A new tri-n-butylphosphate–nitric acid (TBP–HNO3) adduct was prepared by combining TBP and fuming (90%) HNO3. The adduct was characterized, and its phase-equilibrium behavior in supercritical carbon dioxide is reported. Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was modified with this new adduct [TBP(HNO3)5.2(H2O)1.7], and the extraction efficacies of selected rare earth oxides (Y, Ce, Eu, Tb, and Dy) at 338 K and 34.5 MPa were compared with those obtained using an adduct formed from concentrated (70%) HNO3 and TBP [TBP(HNO3)1.7(H2O)0.6]. All rare earth oxides tested with both adduct species could be extracted with the exception of cerium oxide. Furthermore, the water and acid concentrations in the different adducts were found to play a significant role in rare earth oxide extraction efficiency.

  1. Extraction of rare earth oxides using supercritical carbon dioxide modified with Tri-n-butyl phosphate–nitric acid adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Donna L.; Fox, Robert V.; Case, Mary E.; Sinclair, Laura K.; Schmidt, Alex B.; McIlwain, Patrick R.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Wai, Chien M.

    2016-06-14

    A new tri-n-butylphosphate–nitric acid (TBP–HNO3) adduct was prepared by combining TBP and fuming (90%) HNO3. The adduct was characterized, and its phase-equilibrium behavior in supercritical carbon dioxide is reported. Supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was modified with this new adduct [TBP(HNO3)5.2(H2O)1.7], and the extraction efficacies of selected rare earth oxides (Y, Ce, Eu, Tb, and Dy) at 338 K and 34.5 MPa were compared with those obtained using an adduct formed from concentrated (70%) HNO3 and TBP [TBP(HNO3)1.7(H2O)0.6]. All rare earth oxides tested with both adduct species could be extracted with the exception of cerium oxide. Furthermore, the water and acid concentrations in the different adducts were found to play a significant role in rare earth oxide extraction efficiency.

  2. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare-earth elements on ion exchangers in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on anion exchangers and cation exchangers mixed with PbO/sub 2/ in solutions of sulfuric acid has been investigated. A significant difference between the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium elements and rare-earth elements, on the other hand, which has been attributed to the oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state, has been discovered. Methods for the preconcentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare-earth element son anion exchangers in 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions and on cation exchangers in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions have been proposed.

  3. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements on ion exchange resins in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    Th behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in a mixture with PbO/sub 2/ was investigated in sulfuric acid solutions. A substantial difference was detected in the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium and rare earth elements, on the other, associated with oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state. Methods are proposed for the concentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare earth elements on an anion exchange resin in solution of 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and a cation exchange resin in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  4. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING AMERICIUM AND CURIUM FROM RARE EARTH ELEMENTS

    DOEpatents

    Baybarz, R.D.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1963-02-26

    This invention relates to methods of separating americium and curium values from rare earth values. In accordance with the invention americium, curium, and rare earth values are sorbed on an anion exchange resin. A major portion of the rare earth values are selectively stripped from the resin with a concentrated aqueous solution of lithium chloride, and americium, curium, and a minor portion of rare earth values are then stripped from the resin with a dilute aqueous solution of lithium chloride. The americium and curium values are further purified by increasing the concentration of lithium chloride in the solution to at least 8 molar and selectively extracting rare earth values from the resulting solution with a monoalkylphosphoric acid. (AEC)

  5. Rare earth element geochemistry of acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride geothermal systems from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Kemp, A.J.; Sturchio, N.C.

    1997-02-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) in acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride waters and the associated sinters and volcanic rocks from the Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, geothermal system. REE concentrations in the volcanic rocks range from 222 to 347 ppm: their chondrite-normalised REE patterns are typical of upper continental crust, with LREE > HREE and negative Eu anomalies. Total REE concentrations in the fluids range from 3 to 1133 nmol kg{sup -1} ({ge}162 ppm), and {Sigma}REE concentrations in sinter are {ge}181 ppm. REE abundances and patterns in drill core material from YNP indicate some REE mobility. Relative to the host rocks the REE patterns of the fluids are variably depleted in HREEs and LREEs, and usually have a pronounced positive Eu anomaly. This decoupling of Eu from the REE suite suggests that (1) Eu has been preferentially removed either from the host rock glass or from the host rock minerals, or (2) the waters are from a high temperature or reducing environment where Eu{sup 2+} is more soluble than the trivalent REEs. Since the latter is inconsistent with production of acid-sulphate springs in a low temperature, oxidising near-surface environment, we suggest that the positive Eu anomalies in the fluids result from preferential dissolution of a Eu-rich phase in the host rock. Spatial and temporal variations in major element chemistry and pH of the springs sampled from Norris Geyser Basin and Crater Hills accompany variations in REE concentrations and patterns of individual geothermal springs. These are possibly related to changes in subsurface plumbing, which results in variations in mixing and dilution of the geothermal fluids and may have lead to changes in the extent and nature of REE complexing. 37 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema

    Ryan Ott

    2016-07-12

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  7. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  8. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner JR., Karl A.; Beaudry, Bernard J.

    1987-01-06

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  9. Advances in rare earth spectroscopy and applications.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Y; Zilio, S C

    2014-02-01

    Rare earth (RE) elements are prime constituents in a large amount of innovative materials and several technological advances would not be possible without their contribution. In this review, recent progress in the field of rare earth spectroscopy is highlighted, with a special emphasis on clean energy, sensors and telecommunications, providing a broad view on past and recent developments.

  10. Selective separation of rare earth metals by solvent extraction in the presence of new hyrophilic chelating polymers functionalized with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. II. Separation properties by solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Hideto; Miyamoto, Yoshikazu; Teramoto, Masaaki

    1996-03-01

    The selective separation of rare earth metals by solvent extraction including chelating polymers in the aqueous phase was investigated. The chelating polymers were synthesized in this laboratory by introducing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) onto water-soluble polyallylamine. The highest selectivity obtained for the Y/Er separation system was 14.7, which was much higher than that in extraction including EDTA (about 5.0). This means that the number of extraction stages required can be considerably reduced by the addition of chelating polymers. The effects of several experimental conditions such as pH, extractant concentrations, chelating polymer concentrations, and initial total rare earth metal concentrations, chelating polymer concentrations, and initial total rare earth metal concentrations on the separation factors and the distribution ratios for the Y/Er system were studied in detail. Furthermore, this extraction method was applied to other separation systems (Y/Dy, Y/Ho, Y/Tm). A remarkably high separation factor (12.6) was obtained for the Y/Tm system and the Y/Er system, although the separation factors were comparable to those in the presence of EDTA in the Y/Dy and Y/Ho systems.

  11. Rare Earth Metals: Resourcefulness and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2013-10-01

    When we appreciate the digital revolution carried over from the twentieth century with mobile communication and the Internet, and when we enjoy our high-tech lifestyle filled with iDevices, hybrid cars, wind turbines, and solar cells in this new century, we should also appreciate that all of these advanced products depend on rare earth metals to function. Although there are only 136,000 tons of annual worldwide demand, (Cho, Rare Earth Metals, Will We Have Enough?)1 rare earth metals are becoming such hot commodities on international markets, due to not only to their increasing uses, including in most critical military hardware, but also to Chinese growth, which accounts for 95% of global rare earth metal production. Hence, the 2013 technical calendar topic, planned by the TMS/Hydrometallurgy and Electrometallurgy Committee, is particularly relevant, with four articles (including this commentary) contributed to the JOM October Issue discussing rare earth metals' resourcefulness and recovery.

  12. Surface Disturbance Analysis in Rare Earth Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. K.; Yang, L.; Liu, Z. W.

    2017-02-01

    Mining ion-type rare-earth ore made the landscape and ecological environment degraded in mining area, and the tailing produced by rare-earth mining also led large areas land desertification, which resulted in surface temperature variations and significant differences in other types of mining disturbances. In order to analyse surface disturbance of rare-earth mining area, this paper applied the methods based on Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Temperature different Coefficient (TDC) as the ecological disturbance indicator, compared and validated their applicability in Lingbei rare-earth mining area of Southern China. The results illustrated that, compared to NDVI, the TDC which reflected the characteristic of rare-earth mining technology has better discrimination of disturbance, especially for in-situ leach mining area. The places of tailing and the in-situ leach mining plants were the most dramatic mining disturbance. They had the biggest TDC value, followed by orchards and farmlands, reclamation plants, they had relatively small disturbance. And the last was the plant with the smallest TDC value. TDC in rare-earth mining could better correspond to the level of surface ecological disturbance. Therefore, TDC as the indicator of ecological disturbance factor had better performance than NDVI in rare-earth mining area.

  13. [Synthesis, characterization and fluorescence properties of binary and ternary rare earth complexes with N-phenylanthranilic acid and 1, 10-phenanthroline].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-gui; Wu, Hong-ying; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Si-qin; Weng, Shi-fu; Wu, Jin-guang

    2005-03-01

    Some novel binary and ternary complexes of rare earth (Tb) with N-phenylanthranilic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline were synthesized and their compositions were characterized by elemental analysis. The compositions of the complexes have been confirmed to be TbL3. 4H2O and TbL3 phen.2H20 (L: N-phenylanthranilic acid, phen: 1;10-phenanthroline). The spectroscopic properties of the complexes were discussed. The result shows that the luminescence intensities of binary and ternary complexes were decreased by N-phenylanthranilic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline. It is indicated that the intensity of Tb depends on the structure of ligands. The structure, energy transfer and energy matching were studied, and it is concluded that the structure of complex affects the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  14. Extraction Behaviors of Heavy Rare Earths with Organophosphoric Extractants: The Contribution of Extractant Dimer Dissociation, Acid Ionization, and Complexation. A Quantum Chemistry Study.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yu; Chen, Ji; Chen, Li; Su, Wenrou; Liu, Yu; Li, Deqian

    2017-03-30

    Heavy rare earths (HREs), namely Ho(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+), Yb(3+) and Lu(3+), are rarer and more exceptional than light rare earths, due to the stronger extraction capacity for 100 000 extractions. Therefore, their incomplete stripping and high acidity of stripping become problems for HRE separation by organophosphoric extractants. However, the theories of extractant structure-performance relationship and molecular design method of novel HRE extractants are still not perfect. Beyond the coordination chemistry of the HRE-extracted complex, the extractant dimer dissociation, acid ionization, and complexation behaviors can be crucial to HRE extraction and reactivity of ionic species for understanding and further improving the extraction performance. To address the above issues, three primary fundamental processes, including extractant dimer dissociation, acid ionization, and HRE complexation, were identified and investigated systematically. The intrinsic extraction performances of HRE cations with four acidic organophosphoric extractants (P507, P204, P227 and Cyanex 272) were studied by using relativistic energy-consistent 4f core pseudopotentials, combined with density functional theory and a solvation model. Four acidic organophosphoric extractants have been qualified quantitatively from microscopic structures to chemical properties. It has been found that the Gibbs free energy changes of the overall extraction process (sequence: P204 > P227 > P507 > Cyanex 272) and their differences as a function of HREs (sequence: Ho/Er > Er/Tm > Tm/Yb > Yb/Lu) are in good agreement with the experimental maximum extraction capacities and separation factors. These results could provide an important approach to evaluate HRE extractants by the comprehensive consideration of dimer dissociation, acid ionization, and complexation processes. This paper also demonstrates the importance of the P-O bond, the P-C bond, isomer substituent, and solvation effects on the structure

  15. Novel Fiber Preforms: Rare Earth Doping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-21

    measurements were made on a Digilab FTS-15B as KBr While there are many complex multicomponent rare pellets from 3800-4(0cm and as low density poivethvene...earth glasses, phosphates hold special interest as binary pellets t50-500cm ). Spectral resolution was 2 cm- cr rare earth glasses of variable composition...SiO- the glasses have compositions in the range x = 0.009 to 0052. w.hich corresponds to 0.9 to 5.2 molo or up to 23 wt% rare earth oxide as determruned

  16. The rare earth element geochemistry of acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride geothermal systems from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Anita J.; Palmer, Martin R.; Sturchio, Neil C.; Kemp, Anthony J.

    1997-02-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) in acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride waters and the associated sinters and volcanic rocks from the Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, geothermal system. REE concentrations in the volcanic rocks range from 222 to 347 ppm; their chondite-normalised REE patterns are typical of upper continental crust, with LREE > HREE and negative Eu anomalies. Total REE concentrations in the fluids range from 3 to 1133 nmol kg -1 (≥ 162 ppm), and ΣREE concentrations in sinter are ≥ 181 ppm. REE abundances and patterns in drill core material from YNP indicate some REE mobility. Normalisation of REE concentrations in altered Lava Creek Tuff (LCT) from Y-12 drill core to REE concentrations in fresh LCT indicate that the REE overall have been depleted with the exception of Eu, which has been decoupled from the REE series and concentrated in the altered rocks. Relative to the host rocks the REE patterns of the fluids are variably depleted in HREEs and LREEs, and usually have a pronounced positive Eu anomaly. This decoupling of Eu from the REE suite suggests that (1) Eu has been preferentially removed either from the host rock glass or from the host rock minerals, or (2) the waters are from a high temperature or reducing environment where Eu 2+ is more soluble than the trivalent REEs. Since the latter is inconsistent with production of acid-sulphate springs in a low temperature, oxidising near-surface environment, we suggest that the positive Eu anomalies in the fluids result from preferential dissolution of a Eu-rich phase in the host rock. Spatial and temporal variations in major element chemistry and pH of the springs sampled from Norris Geyser Basin and Crater Hills accompany variations in REE concentrations and patterns of individual geothermal springs. These are possibly related to changes in subsurface plumbing, which results in variations in

  17. Mineral resource of the month: rare earth elements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The article provides information on rare earth elements, which are group of 17 natural metallic elements. The rare earth elements are scandium, yttrium and lanthanides and classified into light rare earth elements (LREE) and heavy rate earth elements (HREE). The principal ores of the rare earth elements are identified. An overview of China's production of 97 percent of the rare earths in the world is provided. Commercial applications of rare earths are described.

  18. A new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid modified core-shell silica phase for chelation ion chromatography of alkaline earth, transition and rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    McGillicuddy, Nicola; Nesterenko, Ekaterina P; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Stack, Elaine M; Omamogho, Jesse O; Glennon, Jeremy D; Paull, Brett

    2013-12-20

    Bare core-shell silica (1.7μm) has been modified with iminodiacetic acid functional groups via standard silane chemistry, forming a new N-hydroxyethyliminodiacetic acid (HEIDA) functionalised core-shell stationary phase. The column was applied in high-performance chelation ion chromatography and evaluated for the retention of alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal cations. The influence of nitric acid eluent concentration, addition of complexing agent dipicolinic acid, eluent pH and column temperature on the column performance was investigated. The efficiencies obtained for transition and heavy metal cations (and resultant separations) were comparable or better than those previously obtained for alternative fully porous silica based chelation stationary phases, and a similarly modified monolithic silica column, ranging from ∼15 to 56μm HETP. Increasing the ionic strength of the eluent with the addition of KNO3 (0.75M) and increasing the column temperature (70°C) facilitated the isocratic separation of a mixture of 14 lanthanides and yttrium in under 12min, with HETP averaging 18μm (7μm for Ce(III)).

  19. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOEpatents

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Beaudry, Bernard J.

    1987-01-06

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: La.sub.3-x M.sub.x S.sub.4 where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  20. Separation and preconcentration of the rare-earth elements and yttrium from geological materials by ion-exchange and sequential acid elution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.; Riddle, G.O.; Beech, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The abundance of rare-earth elements (REE) and yttrium in geological materials is generally low, and most samples contain elements that interfere in the determination of the REE and Y, so a separation and/or preconcentration step is often necessary. This is often achieved by ion-exchange chromatography with either nitric or hydrochloric acid. It is advantageous, however, to use both acids sequentially. The final solution thus obtained contains only the REE and Y, with minor amounts of Al, Ba, Ca, Sc, Sr and Ti. Elements that potentially interfere, such as Be, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Th, U, V and Zr, are virtually eliminated. Inductively-coupled argon plasma atomic-emission spectroscopy can then be used for a final precise and accurate measurement. The method can also be used with other instrumental methods of analysis. ?? 1986.

  1. Refining and Mutual Separation of Rare Earths Using Biomass Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Alam, Shafiq

    2013-10-01

    Two different types of adsorption gels were prepared from biomass wastes. The first gel was produced from astringent persimmon peel rich in persimmon tannin, a polyphenol compound, which was prepared by means of simple dehydration condensation reaction using concentrated sulfuric acid for crosslinking. This adsorption gel was intended to be employed for the removal of radioactive elements, uranium (U(VI)) and thorium (Th(IV)), from rare earths. The second gel was prepared from chitosan, a basic polysaccharide, produced from shells of crustaceans such as crabs, shrimps, prawns, and other biomass wastes generated in marine product industry, by immobilizing functional groups of complexanes such as ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid and diethylentriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). This gel was developed for the mutual separation of rare earths. Of the two adsorption gels evaluated, the DTPA immobilized chitosan exhibited the most effective mutual separation among light rare earths.

  2. Recovering heavy rare earth metals from magnet scrap

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Ryan T.; McCallum, Ralph W.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    2017-08-08

    A method of treating rare earth metal-bearing permanent magnet scrap, waste or other material in a manner to recover the heavy rare earth metal content separately from the light rare earth metal content. The heavy rare earth metal content can be recovered either as a heavy rare earth metal-enriched iron based alloy or as a heavy rare earth metal based alloy.

  3. Effects of organic ligands on fractionation of rare earth elements (REEs) in hydroponic plants: an application to the determination of binding capacities by humic acid for modeling.

    PubMed

    Ding, ShiMing; Liang, Tao; Zhang, ChaoSheng; Yan, JunCai; Zhang, ZiLi

    2006-12-01

    Previous studies have revealed the fractionation processes of rare earth elements (REEs) in hydroponic plants, with a heavy REE (HREE, the elements from Gd to Lu) enrichment in leaves. In this study, effects on the HREE enrichment in soybean leaves with additions of carboxylic acids (acetate, malate, citrate, NTA, EDTA and DTPA) and two soil humic acids (HAs) were investigated. REE speciation in carboxylic acid and HA solutions was simulated using Visual MINTEQ and Model V, respectively. The results showed that the effects caused by carboxylic acids were strongly dependent on the differences between their binding strengths for light REEs (LREEs, the elements from La to Eu) and those for HREEs. A good correlation existed between these effects and the changes of free REE ions in solutions. This relationship was also observed for the HA treatments, provided that the intrinsic equilibrium constants of REEs for cation-proton exchange with HA (i.e., pK(MHA)) in Model V were estimated using a free-energy relationship with the stability constants for REE complexation with lactic acid. It is suggested that this set of pK(MHA) values is more suitable for use in Model V for the simulation of REE complexation with HA.

  4. Rare earth elements and permanent magnets (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, Peter C.

    2012-04-01

    Rare earth (RE) magnets have become virtually indispensible in a wide variety of industries such as aerospace, automotive, electronics, medical, and military. RE elements are essential ingredients in these high performance magnets based on intermetallic compounds RECo5, RE2TM17 (TM: transition metal), and RE2TM14B. Rare earth magnets are known for their superior magnetic properties—high induction, and coercive force. These properties arise due to the extremely high magnetocrystalline anisotropy made possible by unique 3d-4f interactions between transition metals and rare earths. For more than 40 years, these magnets remain the number one choice in applications that require high magnetic fields in extreme operating conditions—high demagnetization forces and high temperature. EEC produces and specializes in RECo5 and RE2TM17 type sintered magnets. Samarium and gadolinium are key RE ingredients in the powder metallurgical magnet production processes which include melting, crushing, jet milling, pressing, sintering, and heat treating. The magnetic properties and applications of these magnets will be discussed. We will also briefly discuss the past, current, and future of the permanent magnet business. Currently, over 95% of all pure rare earth oxides are sourced from China, which currently controls the market. We will provide insights regarding current and potential new magnet technologies and designer choices, which may mitigate rare earth supply chain issues now and into the future.

  5. Extraction kinetics of rare earth metals with 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester using a hollow fiber membrane extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Fukiko; Goto, Masahiro; Nakashio, Fumiyuki; Hano, Tadashi

    1995-03-01

    A kinetic study concerning chemical complexation-based solvent extraction of rare earth metals with 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester dissolved as an extractant in n-heptane was carried out using a microporous hydrophobic hollow fiber membrane extractor. The effects of concentration of chemical species in aqueous and organic feed solutions on the apparent permeabilities of metal species for extraction and stripping, respectively, were investigated to clarify the permeation mechanism. From the experimental results it was predicted that the permeation rate is controlled by diffusion of the chemical species in aqueous and organic phases and by interfacial chemical reaction. The experimental data were analyzed by the diffusion model accompanied with an interfacial reaction, taking into account the velocity distributions of the aqueous and organic phases through the inner and outer sides of the hollow fiber.

  6. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Robert A.; Maple, T. Grant; Sklensky, Alden F.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  7. Preparation and processing of rare earth chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschneidner, K. A.

    1998-10-01

    Rare earth chalcogenides are initially prepared by a direct combination of the pure rare earth metal and the pure chalogen element with or without a catalyst. The use of iodine (10 to 100 mg) as a fluxing agent (catalyst), especially to prepare heavy lanthanide chalcogenides, greatly speeds up the formation of the rare earth chalcogenide. The resultant powders are consolidated by melting, pressure assisted sintering (PAS), or pressure assisted reaction sintering (PARS) to obtain near theoretical density solids. Mechanical alloying is a useful technique for preparing ternary alloys. In addition, mechanical alloying and mechanical milling can be used to form metastable allotropic forms of the yttrium and heavy lanthanide sulfides. Chemical analysis techniques are also described because it is strongly recommended that samples prepared by melting should have their chemical compositions verified because of chalogen losses in the melting step.

  8. Process for separation of the rare earths by solvent extraction

    DOEpatents

    Mason, George W.; Lewey, Sonia

    1977-04-05

    Production rates for solvent extraction separation of the rare earths and yttrium from each other can be improved by the substitution of di(2-ethylhexyl) mono-thiophosphoric acid for di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid. The di(2-ethylhexyl) mono-thiophosphoric acid does not form an insoluble polymer at approximately 50% saturation as does the former extractant, permitting higher feed solution concentration and thus greater throughput.

  9. Intermultiplet transitions in rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stirling, W.G.; McEwen, K.A.; Loong, C.K.

    1985-01-01

    We report here on direct observations of intermultiplet (IM) transitions in the rare-earth metals, Pr, Nd and Tb, made using the chopper spectrometers at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source of Argonne National Laboratory. Despite hydrogen contamination of the polycrystalline samples, we have observed inelastic peaks at small Q arising from IM transitions in Pr (approx.260 MeV), Nd (approx.242 MeV) and Tb (approx.256 MeV) although the latter has not yet been observed unambiguously. Future work will investigate the energy level structure and dynamical properties of rare-earth ions in stoichiometric metallic systems. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Synergistic effects in solvent-extraction systems based on alkylsalicylic acids. I. Extraction of trivalent rare-earth metals in the presence of aliphatic amides

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, J.S.; Preez, A.C. du

    1995-07-01

    Aliphatic carboxylic acid amides were found to cause synergistic shifts in the pH{sub 50} values for the extraction of the trivalent rare-earth metals from chloride media by solutions of alkylsalicylic acids in xylene. For the different types of amide examined, the synergistic shifts for the extraction of neodymium by 3,5-diisopropylsalicylic acid (DIPSA) generally decrease in the order: R.CO.NR{sub 2}` > R.CO.NHR` > R.CO.NH{sub 2}, where R and R` are alkyl groups. With the N,N-dialkyl amides (R.CO.NR{sub 2}`) and the N-alkyl amides (R.CO.NHR`), the extent of the synergistic effect decreases with increasing chain-branching in either of the alkyl groups R and R`. For additions to 0.25 M alkylsalicylic acid, the synergistic effect increases with concentrations of up to 0.1 M amide, and decreases with higher concentrations. The extent of the synergistic shift produced by a given amide, as well as the separation in pH{sub 50} values from lanthanum to lutetium, increases with increasing steric bulk of the alkylsalicylic acid used. The separations between adjacent lanthanides are too small to be of any practical interest, however. Measurement of the solubility of salicylic acids (HA) in xylene containing various amounts of N,N-dialkyl amide (L) indicate that essentially complete formation of the HA.L adduct takes place. Treatment of metal-distribution data by slope analysis, and measurement of the solubility of the neodymium-DIPSA complex in xylene in the presence of amide suggest that the mixed-ligand complex has the stoichiometry NdA{sub 3}L{sub 2}. 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 refs.

  11. Replacing the Rare Earth Intellectual Capital

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl

    2011-04-01

    The rare earth crisis slowly evolved during a 10 to 15 year period beginning in the mid-1980s, when the Chinese began to export mixed rare earth concentrates. In the early 1990s, they started to move up the supply chain and began to export the individual rare earth oxides and metals. By the late 1990s the Chinese exported higher value products, such as magnets, phosphors, polishing compounds, catalysts; and in the 21st century they supplied finished products including electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), TVs and monitors, mobile phones, iPods and compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. As they moved to higher value products, the Chinese slowly drove the various industrial producers and commercial enterprises in the US, Europe and Japan out of business by manipulating the rare earth commodity prices. Because of this, the technically trained rare earth engineers and scientists who worked in areas from mining to separations, to processing to production, to manufacturing of semifinished and final products, were laid-off and moved to other fields or they retired. However, in the past year the Chinese have changed their philosophy of the 1970s and 1980s of forming a rare earth cartel to control the rare earth markets to one in which they will no longer supply the rest of the world (ROW) with their precious rare earths, but instead will use them internally to meet the growing demand as the Chinese standard of living increases. To this end, they have implemented and occasionally increased export restrictions and added an export tariff on many of the high demand rare earth elements. Now the ROW is quickly trying to start up rare earth mines, e.g. Molycorp Minerals in the US and Lynas Corp. in Australia, to cover this shortfall in the worldwide market, but it will take about five years for the supply to meet the demand, even as other mines in the ROW become productive. Unfortunately, today there is a serious lack of technically trained

  12. Crystalline rare-earth activated oxyorthosilicate phosphor

    DOEpatents

    McClellan, Kenneth J.; Cooke, D. Wayne

    2004-02-10

    Crystalline, transparent, rare-earth activated lutetium oxyorthosilicate phosphor. The phosphor consists essentially of lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of lutetium gadolinium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Gd.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of gadolinium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Gd(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor may be optically coupled to a photodetector to provide a radiation detector.

  13. Non-rare earth magnetic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, Everett E.; Huba, Zachary J.; Carroll, Kyler J.; Farghaly, Ahmed; Khanna, Shiv N.; Qian, Meichun; Bertino, Massimo

    2017-09-26

    Continuous flow synthetic methods are used to make single phase magnetic metal alloy nanoparticles that do not contain rare earth metals. Soft and hard magnets made from the magnetic nanoparticles are used for a variety of purposes, e.g. in electric motors, communication devices, etc.

  14. Rare earth chemical and physical metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The current state of the rare earth field is reviewed in the areas of basic research, applied research and technology, and commercial utilization. The role of China and its influence, as viewed by an outsider, is briefly summarized. The final third of the paper deals with one aspect of the author's research interests - the quenching of spin fluctuations in exchange enhanced paramagnets.

  15. Selected rare earth sulfides in thermoelectric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Raag, V.; Borodovsky, Y.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses preliminary results on the preparation and the measurement of thermoelectric properties of various rare earth sulfides of the stoichiometry R/sub 2/S/sub 3/. A preparation method that enables the rapid and predictable preparation of the sulfides has been discussed, along with some preliminary results on the measurement of thermoelectric properties of these sulfides.

  16. What about the rare-earth elements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is insufficient understanding of the nutritional physiology of pecan trees and orchards; thus, affecting nutmeat yield and quality, disease resistance and alternate bearing. An analysis of the rare-earth element composition of pecan and related hickory cousins found that they hyperaccumulate ...

  17. Biosorption of metal and salt tolerant microbial isolates from a former uranium mining area. Their impact on changes in rare earth element patterns in acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Haferburg, Götz; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Kothe, Erika

    2007-12-01

    The concentration of metals in microbial habitats influenced by mining operations can reach enormous values. Worldwide, much emphasis is placed on the research of resistance and biosorptive capacities of microorganisms suitable for bioremediation purposes. Using a collection of isolates from a former uranium mining area in Eastern Thuringia, Germany, this study presents three Gram-positive bacterial strains with distinct metal tolerances. These strains were identified as members of the genera Bacillus, Micrococcus and Streptomyces. Acid mine drainage (AMD) originating from the same mining area is characterized by high metal concentrations of a broad range of elements and a very low pH. AMD was analyzed and used as incubation solution. The sorption of rare earth elements (REE), aluminum, cobalt, copper, manganese, nickel, strontium, and uranium through selected strains was studied during a time course of four weeks. Biosorption was investigated after one hour, one week and four weeks by analyzing the concentrations of metals in supernatant and biomass. Additionally, dead biomass was investigated after four weeks of incubation. The maximum of metal removal was reached after one week. Up to 80% of both Al and Cu, and more than 60% of U was shown to be removed from the solution. High concentrations of metals could be bound to the biomass, as for example 2.2 mg/g U. The strains could survive four weeks of incubation. Distinct and different patterns of rare earth elements of the inoculated and non-inoculated AMD water were observed. Changes in REE patterns hint at different binding types of heavy metals regarding incubation time and metabolic activity of the cells.

  18. Determination of thorium and of rare earth elements in cerium earth minerals and ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carron, M.K.; Skinner, D.L.; Stevens, R.E.

    1955-01-01

    The conventional oxalate method for precipitating thorium and the rare earth elements in acid solution exhibits definite solubilities of these elements. The present work was undertaken to establish conditions overcoming these solubilities and to find optimum conditions for precipitating thorium and the rare earth elements as hydroxides and sebacates. The investigations resulted in a reliable procedure applicable to samples in which the cerium group elements predominate. The oxalate precipitations are made from homogeneous solution at pH 2 by adding a prepared solution of anhydrous oxalic acid in methanol instead of the more expensive crystalline methyl oxalate. Calcium is added as a carrier. Quantitative precipitation of thorium and the rare earth elements is ascertained by further small additions of calcium to the supernatant liquid, until the added calcium precipitates as oxalate within 2 minutes. Calcium is removed by precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and rare earths at room temperature by adding ammonium hydroxide to pH > 10. Thorium is separated as the sebacate at pH 2.5, and the rare earths are precipitated with ammonium sebacate at pH 9. Maximum errors for combined weights of thorium and rare earth oxides on synthetic mixtures are ??0.6 mg. Maximum error for separated thoria is ??0.5 mg.

  19. Trace metal and rare earth content of black precipitation events

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Davies, T.D. . School of Environmental Sciences); Tranter, M. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors have used the techniques of non-destructive neutron activation analysis to determine trace metal and rare earth content of black precipitation events occurring in the Cairngorm Mountains in remote areas of Scotland. Thirty-one elements were determined in the particulate matter of snowpack cores that were sliced into sections. An additional analysis was performed for a black acidic snow event. Based on these results and on wind trajectories, increased loadings of many of the heavy metals and rare earth elements appeared to have originated from central Europe. Enrichment factor calculations show anthropogenic emissions for indium, arsenic, zinc, and selenium.

  20. Distribution of rare earth elements in anionic, cationic and particulate fractions in boreal humus-rich streams affected by acid sulphate soils.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mats; Corin, Nina

    2003-01-01

    The abundance, fractionation and physicochemical forms of rare earth elements (REEs) were determined in five boreal humus-rich streams (dissolved organic carbon, DOC = 14-40 mg/l) affected by acid sulphate soils. The sampling was carried out during high-water flow in autumn when the acid sulphate soils are extensively flushed. The analytical procedures included ion-exchange experiments in field and ICP-MS determination. There was a general decrease in pH (range 4.5-6.2) and increase in the REE concentrations (La range 0.82-23 microg/l) as the proportion of the catchment cover of acid sulphate soils increased, explained by high amounts of REEs in the acidic runoff from such soils. In each stream, four different REE fractions were identified: (1) A cationic fraction, which is dominant in the REE-rich runoff from the acid sulphate soils and which is depleted in HREEs due to hydrochemical and/or geochemical processes, (2) an anionic fraction identified as humus-REE complexes, which in general is more abundant the higher the DOC concentrations and which also becomes increasingly abundant across the lanthanide series, (3) a fraction having a well-developed MREE enrichment, presumably consisting of colloidal REEs, and (4) a minor uncharacterised particle-associated fraction. The REE pool in the streams thus consists of several coexisting and contrasting REE species. The identification and quantification of such species is a prerequisite for the precise and accurate characterisation of the REE hydrochemistry of the streams.

  1. Stability constants of some metal complexes of triethylenetetraminehexa-acetic acid and complexometric titration of rare earths and other metals.

    PubMed

    Soucek, D A; Cheng, K L; Droll, H A

    1968-08-01

    The stability constants of some non-protonated 1:1 metal complexes of triethylenetetraminehexa-acetic acid are reported; log K values are Cd 19.8, Co(II) 20.4, Ni 19.9, Pb 19.5, Sm(III) 24.3, Zn 20.1.

  2. Synthesis, Acidity and Catalytic of the Rare Earth Ce Loaded on the Composite Pore Zeolite Catalyst for Hydrogenation Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chunwei; Wu, Wenyuan; Bian, Xue; Pei, Mingyuan; Zhao, Shanlin; Chen, Ping

    2017-07-01

    Composite molecular sieve Y/SBA-15(C-Y) was prepared by microwave method, while Ce was loaded by ion exchange method to the composite molecular sieves (Ce-Y/SBA-15 (C-X)). Productive-type middle distillate hydrocracking catalyst was prepared from C-X and C-Y loaded. FI-IR, XPS, Pyridine IR, and TG-DTG had been used to characterize the C-X's and C-Y's structure and acidity. The results showed that Ce loaded not only had not broken the original structure of C-Y, but also improved silica alumina ratio of C-X, furthermore improved its total acid content. Through polarization and entrainment, Ce increased the skeleton and hydroxyl silicon aluminum hydroxy on electronic probability of migration to the cage, thus enhance the C-X's B acid strength, make it more suitable for heavy oil processing. As compared with C-Y, the selectivity and yield of middle distillates over C-X was 0.7 % and 1.8 % higher, respectively. C-X have the greatest relief wax oil viscosity index, best once cracking selectivity, and lowest levels of diesel oil solidifying point in the three catalysts.

  3. Usage of Dibutyl Phosphoric Acid and Its Zirconium Salt for Extraction of Transplutonium Elements and Rare Earths with Their Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Zilberman, B.Ya.; Fedorov, Yu.S.; Shmidt, O.V.; Goletskiy, N.D.; Shishkin, D.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Rodionov, S.A.; Egorova, O.N.; Palenik, Yu.V.

    2007-07-01

    Dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP) formed by tributyl phosphate (TBP) destruction is soluble both in aqueous alkaline solutions and in organic solvents in acidic media. So, the solvent based on HDBP and its zirconium salt (ZS-HDBP) dissolved in polar diluent, e.g. in diluted TBP, is interesting for radwaste treatment, minimizing the amount of secondary organic wastes. Addition of Zr to 0.2 mol/L HDBP dissolved in 30% TBP results in successful extraction of lanthanides and actinides at the optimum ratio Zr:HDBP=1:(8-9) from 1.5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, followed by their back-washing with 5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. Partitioning of yttrium and cerium RE subgroups (the latter together with TPE) with the separation factor from 5 to 50 is also possible with purification from molybdenum. Strontium is extracted by 0.4 mol/L ZS HDBP from 0.3 mol/L HNO{sub 3} and stripped with 1.5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. ZS-HDBP solution in 30% TBP is also capable of extraction of residual Np, Pu and corrosion-born iron. Stripping of these elements requires salt-free complexants. Solvents containing ZS-HDBP have high capacity, while TBP presence doubles it because of synergetic effect. The maximum solvent loading of 0.2 mol/L ZSHDBP in xylene was found as 8.0 g/L Eu and {approx}6 g/L Mo. The mixture of DTPA and formic acid is suitable for TPE/RE partitioning using ZS-HDBP as a solvent with separation factors for Ce/Am and Eu/Am of 67 and 9, respectively. Two variants of two-cycle flowsheet for TPE and RE partitioning after their joint recovery have been proposed, which differs by order of the cycles with acidic and buffer media at the partitioning. Both variants were successfully tested using simulate solutions on the centrifugal contactor rig with TPE/RE separation factor being {approx}60, the major impurity being Nd. Correction of the solvent composition because of HDBP loss due to its solubility in aqueous phase, especially at acidity less than 0.2 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, was also taken into consideration. Further

  4. Rare-earth oxide nanostructures: rules of rare-earth nitrate thermolysis in octadecylamine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingsheng; Wang, Zhongying; Zhao, Peng; Zheng, Wen; Peng, Qing; Liu, Liqin; Chen, Xueyuan; Li, Yadong

    2010-04-01

    The decomposed regularity of rare-earth nitrates in octadecylamine (ODA) is discussed. The experimental results show that these nitrates can be divided into four types. For rare-earth nitrates with larger RE(3+) ions (RE=rare earth, La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd), the decomposed products exhibited platelike nanostructures. For those with smaller RE(3+) ions (RE=Y, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb), the decomposed products exhibited beltlike nanostructures. For terbium nitrate with a middle RE(3+) ion, the decomposed product exhibited a rodlike nanostructure. The corresponding rare-earth oxides, with the same morphologies as their precursors, could be obtained when these decomposed products were calcined. For cerium nitrate, which showed the greatest differences, flowerlike cerium oxide could be obtained directly from decomposition of the nitrate without further calcination. This regularity is explained on the basis of the lanthanide contraction. Owing to their differences in electron configuration, ionic radius, and crystal structure, such a nitrate family therefore shows different thermolysis properties. In addition, the potential application of these as-obtained rare-earth oxides as catalysts and luminescent materials was investigated. The advantages of this method for rare-earth oxides includes simplicity, high yield, low cost, and ease of scale-up, which are of great importance for their industrial applications.

  5. [Structural and spectral study of a novel rare-earth and 3-bi-pyridine acid polymer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-ping; Zhao, Ling-yan; Zhang, Han-hui; Yang, Qi-yu; Sun, Rui-qing; Fu, Hua-e

    2010-01-01

    A novel zero-dimension coordination polymer Gd2 (In)6 (H2O)4 (1) (In = 3-bipyridine acid) was synthesized under hydrothermal condition. By the analysis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction, the structure of the compound is that two Gd atoms connect with zero-dimension bi- nucleus cluster by the bridged carboxylate of four Ins. Based on the determination of the structure, the 2D correlation FTIR spectra with the perturbations of magnetism and thermal was applied. Under the perturbations of temperature, the vibration of the carboxylate has the very strong response, which is related with the strong coordinating ability of the carboxylate. At the same time, due to the different coordinated mode of the carboxylate with Gd, the response of Gd--O bonds is different under the temperature perturbations. Under the perturbations of magnetism, the vibration of the carboxylate has also the very strong response, which may be related with one-negetive charge of the carboxylate. The 2D correlation ultraviolet spectral with the perturbation of magnetism were investigated. Compared with one-dimension ultraviolet spectral, the transition of the pi electrons in bi-pyridine ring and the charge transition from ligand to the metal have the very strong response. At the same time, the fluorescence spectral and TGA were studied.

  6. Luminescent molecular hybrid system derived from 2-furancarboxylic acid and silylated monomer coordinated to rare earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Yu-Long; Yan, Bing

    2006-04-01

    In this study, silica-based organic-inorganic hybrids were prepared by the sol-gel method. Tetraethoxysilane (abbreviated as TEOS) and a kind of monomer (abbreviated as FA-APES) derived from modified 2-furancarboxylic acid (abbreviated as FA) with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (abbreviated as APES) were used as the inorganic and organic fragments, respectively. Coordination reaction between lanthanides (europium and terbium ions) and sbnd C dbnd O group of the monomer happened simultaneously. And after days of aging process the resultant materials showed characteristic luminescence of lanthanides. The enhancement of luminescence can be seen by the comparison with simply doped lanthanide hybrid systems. And it can be explained by the coordination ability of the organic counterpart. IR, NMR, UV-vis absorption, low-temperature phosphorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy were applied to characterize and the above spectroscopic data revealed that the triplet state energy of organic ligand matches with the emissive energy level of lanthanides (especially of Tb 3+).

  7. Systematic variation of rare earths in monazite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Rose, H.J.; Carron, M.K.

    1953-01-01

    Ten monazites from widely scattered localities have been analyzed for La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Y and Th by means of a combined chemical and emission spectrographic method. The analytical results, calculated to atomic percent of total rare earths (thorium excluded), show a considerable variation in the proportions of every element except praseodymium, which is relatively constant. The general variation trends of the elements may be calculated by assuming that the monazites represent different stages in a fractional precipitation process, and by assuming that there is a gradational increase in the precipitability of rare earth elements with decreasing ionic radius. Fractional precipitation brings about an increase in lanthanum and cerium, little change in praseodymium, and a decrease in neodymium, samarium, gadolinium, and yttrium. Deviations from the calculated lines of variation consist of a simultaneous, abnormal increase or decrease in the proportions of cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium with antipathetic decrease or increase in the proportions of the other elements. These deviations are ascribed to abnormally high or low temperatures that affect the precipitability of the central trio of elements (Ce, Pr, Nd) relatively more than that of the other elements. The following semiquantitative rules have been found useful in describing the composition of rare earths from monazite: 1. 1. The sum of lanthanum and neodymium is very nearly a constant at 42 ?? 2 atomic percent. 2. 2. Praseodymium is very nearly constant at 5 ?? 1 atomic percent. 3. 3. The sum of Ce, Sm, Gd, and Y is very nearly a constant at 53 ?? 3 atomic percent. No correlation could be established between the content of Th and that of any of the rare earth elements. ?? 1953.

  8. Novel Fiber Preforms: Rare Earth Doping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-31

    proposed by the group at Southampton, and future experiments with axial laser heating of terbium metal are planned. As noted, much of the effort during...been doped with terbium , in our learning to control the doping concentration, we have observed bands of undesired microcrystailinity in some terbium ...preforms with terbium (not yet pulled into fibers), and rare earth glasses formed by sol-gel tech- niques. Future efforts will be to prepare fibers

  9. Nitrite complexes of the rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Pouessel, Jacky; Thuéry, Pierre; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Cantat, Thibault

    2014-03-21

    The coordination chemistry of the nitrite anion has been investigated with rare earth elements, and the resulting complexes were structurally characterized. Among them, the first homoleptic examples of nitrite complexes of samarium, ytterbium and yttrium are described. The coordination behavior of the nitrite ion is directly controlled by the ionic radius of the metal cation. While the nitrito ligand is stable in the coordination sphere of cerium(iii), it is readily reduced by SmI2.

  10. Structural properties of rare earth chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, Ramakant; Bhardwaj, Purvee Singh, Sadhna

    2016-05-06

    The pressure induced NaCl (B1) to CsCl (B2) structural phase transition of rare earth mono-chalcogenide (PuTe) has been investigated in this paper. A modified interaction potential model (MIPM) (including the covalency effect) has been developed. Phase transition pressures are associated with a sudden collapse in volume. The phase transition pressures and associated volume collapses obtained from present potential model show a generally good agreement with available experimental data than others.

  11. Rapid method of separating Am(VI) from transplutonium and rare-earth elements on a cation exchanger in phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirova, G.S.; Guseva, L.I.

    1988-07-01

    Measurements have been made on cation-exchanger sorption of americium, other actinoids, and certain rare-earth elements from 0.1-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ when the elements have been oxidized with ammonium persulfate alone or mixed with silver phosphate. There are considerable differences in behavior between the americium and the other elements on account of its being oxidized to a higher valency state. Measurements have been made on the effects of acid and oxidant concentrations and of the oxidation and elution conditions on the americium yield when the exchanger is treated with H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Optimum oxidation conditions have been chosen, and a rapid method has been devised for separating americium(VI) from other transplutonium elements and REE on Dowex 50 /times/ 8, where the eluent is 0.1-1.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ plus 0.05 M (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/.

  12. Anthropogenic Cycles of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, X.; Graedel, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    This research will develop quantitatively resolved anthropogenic cycles and in-use stocks for the rare earth metals specifically cerium, lanthanum and dysprosium in Japan, China, and the U.S. for the year of 2007. Rare earth elements (REE) is a group of 17 scare metals widely used in a growing number of emerging technologies and have been in high demand for emerging technologies as raw materials during past the three decades. New market participants from newly industrializing countries, primarily China, have had strong impacts on the demand of share. Consequently, the importance to sustain a reliable, steady, uninterrupted supply on global market triggered comprehensive research to recognize and understand the life cycles of rare earths. Moreover, because China plays a dominant role in mining production since 1990, it requires the assessment for the countries, which are almost completely dependent on imports from China with respect to rare earth resources. The study aims to analyze the flows and stocks of rare earth elements individually as elemental form in spite of their natural geological co-occurrence and mixed composition in applications. By applying the method of Material Flow Analysis (MFA) work has been done on evaluating current and historical flows of specific technologically significant materials, for example, copper, zinc, nickel, etc., determining the stocks available in different types of reservoirs (e.g., lithosphere, in-use) and the flows among the reservoirs, developing scenarios of possible futures of metal use, and assessing the environmental and policy implications of the results. Therefore, REE as a new target deserves inclusion because of its potential demand-supply conflict and importance to secure the competitive advantage of technical innovation in future. This work will generate a quantitatively resolved anthropogenic life cycle and in-use stocks for REE for the main target countries for a chosen year, 2007, providing flows and stocks from

  13. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Schmidt, Frederick A.

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  14. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  15. Nanocrystalline semiconductor doped rare earth oxide for the photocatalytic degradation studies on Acid Blue 113: A di-azo compound under UV slurry photoreactor.

    PubMed

    Suganya Josephine, G A; Mary Nisha, U; Meenakshi, G; Sivasamy, A

    2015-11-01

    Preventive measures for the control of environmental pollution and its remediation has received much interest in recent years due to the world-wide increase in the contamination of water bodies. Contributions of these harmful effluents are caused by the leather processing, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, textile, agricultural and other chemical industries. Nowadays, advanced oxidation processes considered to be better option for the complete destruction of organic contaminants in water and wastewater. Acid Blue 113 is a most widely used di-azo compound in leather, textile, dying and food industry as a color rending compound. In the present study, we have reported the photo catalytic degradation of Acid Blue 113 using a nanocrystalline semiconductor doped rare earth oxide as a photo catalyst under UV light irradiation. The photocatalyst was prepared by a simple precipitation technique and were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, UV-DRS and FE-SEM analysis. The experimental results proved that the prepared photo catalyst was nanocrystalline and highly active in the UV region. The UV-DRS results showed the band gap energy was 3.15eV for the prepared photo catalyst. The photodegradation efficiency was analyzed by various experimental parameters such as pH, catalyst dosage, variation of substrate concentration and effect of electrolyte addition. The photo degradation process followed a pseudo first order kinetics and was continuously monitored by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The experimental results proved the efficacy of the nanocrystalline zinc oxide doped dysprosium oxide which are highly active under UV light irradiations. It is also suggested that the prepared material would find wider applications in environmental remediation technologies to remove the carcinogenic and toxic moieties present in the industrial effluents.

  16. Rare Earth Element Concentration of Wyoming Thermal Waters Update

    DOE Data Explorer

    Quillinan, Scott; Nye, Charles; Neupane, Hari; McLing, Travis

    2017-06-01

    Updated version of data generated from rare earth element investigation of produced waters. These data represent major, minor, trace, isotopes, and rare earth element concentrations in geologic formations and water associated with oil and gas production.

  17. Compositional and phase relations among rare earth element minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the compositional and phase relationships among minerals in which rare earth elements (REE) occur as essential constituents (e.g., bastnaesite, monazite, xenotime, aeschynite, allanite). Particular consideration is given to the vector representation of complex coupled substitutions in selected REE-bearing minerals and to the REE partitioning between minerals as related to the acid-base tendencies and mineral stabilities. It is shown that the treatment of coupled substitutions as vector quantities facilitates graphical representation of mineral composition spaces.

  18. Preparation of Rare Earth Doped Laser Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Nt’aval Research Labo;atpry. The host crystals include yttrii1 aluminum garnet (y2A14O1 2 ), yttrium lithium fluorides TYLiFk, and barium yttrium DD...are necessary for test lasers at the Naval Research Laboratory. The host crystals include yttrium aluminum garnet (Y2 Al 40 12), yttrium lithium...fluorides (YLiF4 ), and barium yttrium fluoride (BaY2 F8 ). These hosts were doped with single or multiple rare earth elements for lasing action at wave

  19. Rare earth-doped glass microbarcodes

    PubMed Central

    Dejneka, Matthew J.; Streltsov, Alexander; Pal, Santona; Frutos, Anthony G.; Powell, Christy L.; Yost, Kevin; Yuen, Po Ki; Müller, Uwe; Lahiri, Joydeep

    2003-01-01

    The development of ultraminiaturized identification tags has applications in fields ranging from advanced biotechnology to security. This paper describes micrometer-sized glass barcodes containing a pattern of different fluorescent materials that are easily identified by using a UV lamp and an optical microscope. A model DNA hybridization assay using these “microbarcodes” is described. Rare earth-doped glasses were chosen because of their narrow emission bands, high quantum efficiencies, noninterference with common fluorescent labels, and inertness to most organic and aqueous solvents. These properties and the large number (>1 million) of possible combinations of these microbarcodes make them attractive for use in multiplexed bioassays and general encoding. PMID:12515864

  20. Raman Investigations of Rare-Earth Orthovanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, C. C.; Silva, E. N.; Ayala, A. P.; Guedes, I.; Pizani, P. S.; Loong, C. K.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2007-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy has been used to obtain the room-temperature phonon spectra of the series of rare earth orthovanadate single crystals: SmVO4, HoVO4, YbVO4 and LuVO4. The observed Raman frequencies follow the overall mode distribution expected for RVO4 compounds with the tetragonal zircon structure. The variation of the mode frequency with atomic number across the lanthanide orthovanadate series was investigated, and the trend exhibited by the internal modes was explained by considering the force constants of VO4 tetrahedron.

  1. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING YTTRIUM FROM THE RARE EARTHS BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Peppard, D.F.; Mason, G.W.

    1963-11-12

    A process of isolating yttrium from other rare earths present together with it in aqueous solutions is presented. Yttrium and rare earths heavier than yttrium are first extracted with dialkyl phosphoric acid, after adjustment of the acidity to 2 N, and then back-extracted with 5-6 N mineral acid to form a strip solution. Thiocyanate is added to the strip solution and the rare earths heavier than yttrium are then selectively extracted with trialkyl phosphate, dialkyl phosphoric acid, alkyl phosphonate, or dialkyl aryl phosphonate, leaving the yttrium in the aqueous solution. (AEC)

  2. Rare-Earth-Free Traction Motor: Rare Earth-Free Traction Motor for Electric Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Baldor will develop a new type of traction motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs. Unlike today’s large, bulky EV motors which use expensive, imported rare-earth-based magnets, Baldor’s motor could be light, compact, contain no rare earth materials, and have the potential to deliver more torque at a substantially lower cost. Key innovations in this project include the use of a unique motor design, incorporation of an improved cooling system, and the development of advanced materials manufacturing techniques. These innovations could significantly reduce the cost of an electric motor.

  3. Mechanism of Rare Earth Incorporation and Crystal Growth of Rare Earth Containing Type-I Clathrates.

    PubMed

    Prokofiev, Andrey; Svagera, Robert; Waas, Monika; Weil, Matthias; Bernardi, Johannes; Paschen, Silke

    2016-01-06

    Type-I clathrates possess extremely low thermal conductivities, a property that makes them promising materials for thermoelectric applications. The incorporation of cerium into one such clathrate has recently been shown to lead to a drastic enhancement of the thermopower, another property determining the thermoelectric efficiency. Here we explore the mechanism of the incorporation of rare earth elements into type-I clathrates. Our investigation of the crystal growth and the composition of the phase Ba8-x RE x TM y Si46-y (RE = rare earth element; TM = Au, Pd, Pt) reveals that the RE content x is mainly governed by two factors, the free cage space and the electron balance.

  4. The study of rare earth elements in farmer's well waters of the Podwiśniówka acid mine drainage area (south-central Poland).

    PubMed

    Migaszewski, Zdzisław M; Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Migaszewski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    The principal objective of the current study was to elucidate the potential influence of acid mine drainage (AMD) pond on neighboring farmer's wells in the Podwiśniówka area (south-central Poland), using North American Shale Composite (NASC)-normalized rare earth element (REE) concentration profiles. The well waters generally displayed a distinctly positive Eu anomaly similar to that of parent rocks and AMD sediment. In contrast, the AMD pit pond water exhibited the typical roof-shaped NASC-normalized REE concentration pattern with a strong positive Gd anomaly. The low pH (mean of 2.9) of this pond water is induced by oxidation of pyrite that occurs in quartz veins and rocks exposed in the abandoned Podwiśniówka quarry. The principal source of REEs in turn is a crandallite series of aluminum–phosphate–sulfate (APS) minerals (gorceixite with florencite and Ce-bearing goyazite) that prevail in most clayey shales. These data indicate that the REE contents of the AMD pit pond and well waters are linked to bedrock mineralogy and lithology, but not to pyrite mineralization. The diverse REE patterns of NASC-normalized REE concentrations of the AMD and well waters may suggest complex sorption and desorption processes that occur at the rock–water interface influenced by different pH, Eh, temperature, and other factors. This is evidenced by a presence of strong positive Ce anomaly in the rocks, a lack of Ce anomaly in the AMD water and sediment, and the dominant negative anomaly of this element in the well waters. Variations in correlation coefficients (r 2) of REE concentrations between the rocks and the well waters may also result from a different contribution of quartzites, clayey shales, or tuffites to the REE signal of well waters as well as from mixing of shallow groundwater with infiltrating rainwater or meltwater with different REE profiles.

  5. Characterization of a rare earth oxide obtained from xenotime mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Vernilli, Fernando . E-mail: fernando.vernilli@demar.faenquil.br; Camargo Vernilli, Daniela; Ferreira, Bento; Silva, Gilbert

    2007-01-15

    This paper reports on the characterization of a rare earth oxide obtained by hydrometallurgy of the mineral xenotime, an yttrium phosphate containing other rare earths, and comparison with mixtures of rare earth oxides prepared in different ways. The results indicated that hydrometallurgy from xenotime yielded a solid solution of the rare earth oxides. However, when the pure rare earth oxides were simply mixed physically then heat-treated at 1000 deg. C, a similar solid solution was not obtained. On the other hand, when the mixtures were prepared using a co-precipitation process, subsequent heat treatment did produce oxide solid solutions similar to that produced by hydrometallurgy of xenotime.

  6. Reflectives: Phosphors and lasers - shedding light on rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    The first powder electroluminescent phosphor was introduced in 1936. Today, phosphors, particularly those made of high-purity rare earths, have found their way into a variety of products: industrial, commercial, and consumer, alike. The fluorescent lamp industry which remains the leading market for the use of high-purity rare earths, lit the way for the future of rare earths in the optical, x-ray, and display screen applications. Light combined with rare earth materials is also a successful recipe for reflectivity needed in filtering applications such as optics, lasers, and conductors. This article discusses the applications and markets for phosphors and rare earths.

  7. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Imashuku, Susumu Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun

    2013-12-15

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

  8. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Rare Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, J. J.; Anderson, Heidi M.; den Hartog, E. A.; Wickliffe, M. E.; Lawler, J. E.

    1996-10-01

    Accurate absolute atomic transition probabilities for selected neutral and singly ionized rare earth elements including Tm, Dy, and Ho are being measured. The increasing use of rare earths in high intensity discharge lamps provides motivation; the data are needed for diagnosing and modeling the lamps. Radiative lifetimes, measured using time resolved laser induced fluorescence (LIF), are combined with branching fractions, measured using a large Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), to determine accurate absolute atomic transition probabilities. More than 15,000 LIF decay curves from Tm and Dy atoms and ions in slow beams have been recorded and analyzed. Radiative lifetimes for 298 levels of TmI and TmII and for 450 levels of DyI and DyII are determined. Branching fractions are extracted from spectra recorded using the 1.0 m FTS at the National Solar Observatory. Branching fractions and absolute transition probabilities for 500 of the strongest TmI and TmII lines are complete. Representative lifetime and branching fraction data will be presented and discussed. Supported by Osram Sylvania Inc. and the NSF.

  9. Distributions of rare earths and heavy metals in field-grown maize after application of rare earth-containing fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingkai; Zhu, Wangzhao; Wang, Zijian; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2002-07-03

    Rare earths are widely applied in Chinese agriculture to improve crop nutrition through the use of fertilizers, yet little is known of their accumulation in field-grown crops. We have studied the distribution of 16 rare earths (Sc, Y and 14 lanthanide elements) in field-grown maize and the concentration of heavy metals in the grains after application of rare earth-containing fertilizer. When maize entered the vigorous vegetation growth stage (e.g. early stem-elongation stage), rare earth-containing fertilizer was applied to the soil with irrigation water. At 10 days after application of the rare earths, significantly dose-dependent accumulative effects of individual rare earth concentrations in the roots and the plant tops of maize were observed, with the exception of Sc and Lu. At the level of 2 kg rare earths ha(-1), accumulative concentrations of most light rare earths (e.g. La, Ce, Pr and Nd) and Gd in the plant tops were much larger than those in the control. Concentrations of individual rare earths in a field-grown maize after application of rare earths decreased in the order of root>leaf>stem>grain. During the maize growth period, selective accumulation of individual rare earths (e.g. La, Ce) in the roots seemed to be in dynamic equilibrium, and the distribution of these elements in the plant tops was variable. At a dosage of less than 10 kg rare earths ha(-1), no apparent accumulative concentrations of individual rare earths appeared in the maize grains. Under the experimental conditions, application of rare earth-containing fertilizer did not induce an increase in the concentrations of heavy metals in the grains. We conclude that the present dosage of rare earths (<0.23 kg ha(-1) year(-1)) currently applied in China can hardly affect the safety of maize grains in arable soil, even over a long period.

  10. Decomposition of Rare Earth Loaded Resin Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, Stewart L; Rawn, Claudia J

    2010-09-01

    resin is made of sulfonic acid functional groups attached to a styrene divinylbenzene copolymer lattice (long chained hydrocarbon). The metal cation binds to the sulfur group, then during thermal decomposition in air the hydrocarbons will form gaseous species leaving behind a spherical metal-oxide particle. Process development for resin applications with radioactive materials is typically performed using surrogates. For americium and curium, a trivalent metal like neodymium can be used. Thermal decomposition of Nd-loaded resin in air has been studied by Hale. Process conditions were established for resin decomposition and the formation of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. The intermediate product compounds were described using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and wet chemistry. Leskela and Niinisto studied the decomposition of rare earth (RE) elements and found results consistent with Hale. Picart et al. demonstrated the viability of using a resin loading process for the fabrication of uranium-actinide mixed oxide microspheres for transmutation of minor actinides in a fast reactor. For effective transmutation of actinides, it will be desirable to extend the in-reactor burnup and minimize the number of recycles of used actinide materials. Longer burn times increases the chance of Fuel Clad Chemical or Mechanical Interaction (FCCI, FCMI). Sulfur is suspected of contributing to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) thus it is necessary to maximize the removal of sulfur during decomposition of the resin. The present effort extends the previous work by quantifying the removal of sulfur during the decomposition process. Neodymium was selected as a surrogate for trivalent actinide metal cations. As described above Nd was dissolved in nitric acid solution then contacted with the AG-50W resin column. After washing the column, the Nd-resin particles are removed and dried. The Nd-resin, seen in Figure 1 prior to decomposition, is ready to be converted to Nd oxide microspheres.

  11. A COMPARISON OF FAR INFRARED AND RAMAN SPECTRA OF SOME RARE EARTH GARNET SINGLE CRYSTALS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS, *INFRARED SPECTRA), (*GARNET, RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS), (* RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY, RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS), SINGLE CRYSTALS, ALUMINATES...PHONONS, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, YTTERBIUM COMPOUNDS, TERBIUM COMPOUNDS, DYSPROSIUM COMPOUNDS, CANADA

  12. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, A.D.; Modine, F.A.; Lauf, R.J.; Alim, M.A.; Mahan, G.D.; Bartkowiak, M.

    1998-12-29

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2--4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5--4.0% Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, 0.05--0.4% K{sub 2}O, 0.05--0.2% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--0.2% CaO, 0.00005--0.01% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--2% MnO, 0--0.05% MgO, 0--0.5% TiO{sub 3}, 0--0.2% SnO{sub 2}, 0--0.02% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, balance ZnO. 4 figs.

  13. BOREHOLE NEUTRON ACTIVATION: THE RARE EARTHS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Senftle, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron-induced borehole gamma-ray spectroscopy has been widely used as a geophysical exploration technique by the petroleum industry, but its use for mineral exploration is not as common. Nuclear methods can be applied to mineral exploration, for determining stratigraphy and bed correlations, for mapping ore deposits, and for studying mineral concentration gradients. High-resolution detectors are essential for mineral exploration, and by using them an analysis of the major element concentrations in a borehole can usually be made. A number of economically important elements can be detected at typical ore-grade concentrations using this method. Because of the application of the rare-earth elements to high-temperature superconductors, these elements are examined in detail as an example of how nuclear techniques can be applied to mineral exploration.

  14. Rare-earth abundances in chondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, N. M.; Hamilton, P. J.; Onions, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen chondrites, including eight carbonaceous chondrites, were analyzed for rare earth element abundances by isotope dilution. Examination of REE for a large number of individual chondrites shows that only a small proportion of the analyses have flat unfractionated REE patterns within experimental error. While some of the remaining analyses are consistent with magmatic fractionation, many patterns, in particular those with positive Ce anomalies, can not be explained by known magmatic processes. Elemental abundance anomalies are found in all major chondrite classes. The persistence of anomalies in chondritic materials relatively removed from direct condensational processes implies that anomalous components are resistant to equilibrium or were introduced at a late stage of chondrite formation. Large-scale segregation of gas and condensate is implied, and bulk variations in REE abundances between planetary bodies is possible.

  15. Structural transition in rare earth oxide clusters.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, D; Masenelli, B; Mélinon, P; Bernstein, E; Dujardin, C; Ledoux, G; Esnouf, C

    2006-11-07

    Size effects, such as structure transition, have been reported in small clusters of alkali halide compounds. We extend the study to rare earth sesquioxide (Gd(2)O(3)) clusters which are as ionic as the alkali halide compounds, but have a more complicated structure. In a clean and controlled environment (ultra high vacuum), such particles are well crystallized, facetted and tend to adopt a rhombic dodecahedron shape. This indicates the major role of highly ionic bonds in preserving the crystal lattice even at small sizes (a few lattice parameter). Based on both cathodo-luminescence and transmission electron microscopy, we report the existence of a structural transition from bcc to monoclinic at small sizes.

  16. Mechanical properties of rare earth stannate pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, J.; Xiao, B.; Qu, Z. X.; Zhou, R.; Pan, W.

    2011-11-01

    The RE2Sn2O7 series compounds (RE = La, Nb, Sm, Gd, Er, Yb) with a pyrochlore structure are prepared by co-precipitation method. The bulk, shear, Young's moduli, B/G, and Poisson's ratios are calculated using density functional theory and also measured by ultrasonic resonance method. The theoretical values of lattice constants and mechanical moduli are smaller than experimental results. The electronic structures of RE2Sn2O7 are analogous to RE2Zr2O7. La2Sn2O7 exhibits stronger ionic bonds than others. The covalent interactions are slightly enhanced in the heavy rare earth stannate pyrochlores. The Vickers harnesses of RE2Sn2O7 are measured experimentally, which are smaller than theoretical predictions.

  17. Thermoelectric properties of rare earth chalcogenides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Raag, V.; Wood, C.

    1985-01-01

    The rare earth chalcogenides are important thermoelectric materials due to their high melting points, self-doping capabilities, and low thermal conductivities. Lanthanum sulfides and lanthanum tellurides have been synthesized in quartz ampules, hot-pressed into samples, and measured. The n-type Seebeck coefficients, electrical resistivities, and power factors generally all increased as the temperature increased from 200 to 1000 C. The figure-of-merit for nonstoichiometric lanthanum telluride was 0.001/deg C at 1000 C, considerably higher than for silicon-germanium. Thermoelectric measurements were made for LaTe(2) and YbS(1.4), and p-type behavior was observed for these compounds from 300 to 1100 C.

  18. Rare-earth abundances in chondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, N. M.; Hamilton, P. J.; Onions, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen chondrites, including eight carbonaceous chondrites, were analyzed for rare earth element abundances by isotope dilution. Examination of REE for a large number of individual chondrites shows that only a small proportion of the analyses have flat unfractionated REE patterns within experimental error. While some of the remaining analyses are consistent with magmatic fractionation, many patterns, in particular those with positive Ce anomalies, can not be explained by known magmatic processes. Elemental abundance anomalies are found in all major chondrite classes. The persistence of anomalies in chondritic materials relatively removed from direct condensational processes implies that anomalous components are resistant to equilibrium or were introduced at a late stage of chondrite formation. Large-scale segregation of gas and condensate is implied, and bulk variations in REE abundances between planetary bodies is possible.

  19. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOEpatents

    McMillan, April D.; Modine, Frank A.; Lauf, Robert J.; Alim, Mohammad A.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Bartkowiak, Miroslaw

    1998-01-01

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2-4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5-4.0% Co.sub.3 O.sub.4, 0.05-0.4% K.sub.2 O, 0.05-0.2% Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-0.2% CaO, 0.00005-0.01% Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-2% MnO, 0-0.05% MgO, 0-0.5% TiO.sub.3, 0-0.2% SnO.sub.2, 0-0.02% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, balance ZnO.

  20. Gyroscopic g factor of rare earth metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Y.; Chudo, H.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Matsuo, M.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2017-02-01

    We develop the in situ magnetization measurement apparatus for observing the Barnett effect consisting of a fluxgate sensor, a high speed rotor with frequencies of up to 1.5 kHz, and a magnetic shield at room temperature. The effective magnetic field (Barnett field) in a sample arising from rotation magnetizes the sample and is proportional to the rotational frequency. The gyroscopic g factor, g ' , of rare earth metals, in particular, Gd, Tb, and Dy, was estimated to be 2.00 ± 0.08, 1.53 ± 0.17, and 1.15 ± 0.32, respectively, from the slopes of the rotation dependence of the Barnett field. This study provides a technique to determine the g ' factor even in samples where the spectroscopic method may not be available.

  1. Luminescent rare earth nanomaterials for bioprobe applications.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2008-11-14

    Inorganic fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) have initiated an extensive upsurge in biological application research. Just as quantum dots are regarded as a vigorous reinforcement of the organic dye family, rare earth (RE) fluorescent NPs, as another phosphors branch, also possess unique optical characteristics. The advantages of RE NPs in photostability and colorimetric purity make them suitable for bioprobe applications. Since the preparation technologies have been well developed, it is favourable to prompt the research in the interdisciplinary field of biology and material sciences. Herein, we summarize the synthesis and performance, together with bioprobe applications of RE oxide, sulfoxide, vanadate, phosphate, fluoride, and sodium RE fluoride nanomaterials. The prospects of these promising materials as applied in the biological field is described to draw readers' attention and to attract more research interest.

  2. Ferritin protein encapsulated photoluminescent rare earth nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, T.; Yoshimura, H.

    2013-07-01

    Rare earth (yttrium (Y), europium (Eu), and terbium (Tb)) nanoparticles and Eu and Tb doped Y nanoparticles are synthesized in an apoferritin cavity. They exhibit a narrow size distribution and a high stability in an aqueous solution at pH 8.5. Eu and Eu doped Y (Y:Eu) nanoparticles exhibit red photoluminescence (emission peaks: 590 and 614 nm), while Tb and Tb doped Y (Y:Tb) nanoparticles exhibit green photoluminescence (emission peaks: 488, 544, 582, and 618 nm). High-resolution electron microscopy observations reveal that about 5% of the nanoparticles have a lattice structure, while the remaining nanoparticles are amorphous. Electron diffraction of the Y nanoparticles gives lattice spacings corresponding to the cubic structure of yttrium oxide (Y2O3). The most optimal dopant content for luminescence of Y:Eu and Y:Tb nanoparticles in apoferritin cavity are about 60% and 40%, respectively.

  3. Rare earth elements in river waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Steven J.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the input to the oceans of rare earth elements (REE) in the dissolved and the suspended loads of rivers, the REE concentrations were measured in samples of Amazon, Indus, Mississippi, Murray-Darling, and Ohio rivers and in samples of smaller rivers that had more distinct drainage basin lithology and water chemistry. It was found that, in the suspended loads of small rivers, the REE pattern was dependent on drainage basin geology, whereas the suspended loads in major rivers had relatively uniform REE patterns and were heavy-REE depleted relative to the North American Shale composite (NASC). The dissolved loads in the five major rivers had marked relative heavy-REE enrichments, relative to the NASC and the suspended material, with the (La/Yb)N ratio of about 0.4 (as compared with the ratio of about 1.9 in suspended loads).

  4. Parity Violation Experiments with Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry

    1997-10-01

    Since the first suggestions (V. A. Dzuba, V. V. Flambaum, and I. B. Khriplovich, Z. Phys. D1, 243 (1986).), (A. Gongora and P. G. H. Sandars, J. Phys. B 19, L291 (1986).) to search for parity violation in the rare earth atoms, experiments have been carried out by groups in Novosibirsk, Oxford, Hiroshima and Berkeley with Sm, Yb and Dy. The status of these experiments will be reviewed, with some details given on recent Berkeley Dy results ( A.-T. Nguyen, D. Budker, D. DeMille, and M. Zolotorev, Submitted to Phys. Rev. A.). Progress of the Berkeley Yb experiment ( D. DeMille, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4165 (1995).), ( C.J. Bowers, D. Budker, E.D. Commins, D. DeMille, S.J. Freedman, A.-T. Nguyen, S.-Q. Shang, and M. Zolotorev, Phys. Rev. A 53, 3103-9(1996). ) will be described elsewhere at this meeting by C. J. Bowers et al.

  5. Thermoelectric properties of rare earth chalcogenides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Raag, V.; Wood, C.

    1985-01-01

    The rare earth chalcogenides are important thermoelectric materials due to their high melting points, self-doping capabilities, and low thermal conductivities. Lanthanum sulfides and lanthanum tellurides have been synthesized in quartz ampules, hot-pressed into samples, and measured. The n-type Seebeck coefficients, electrical resistivities, and power factors generally all increased as the temperature increased from 200 to 1000 C. The figure-of-merit for nonstoichiometric lanthanum telluride was 0.001/deg C at 1000 C, considerably higher than for silicon-germanium. Thermoelectric measurements were made for LaTe(2) and YbS(1.4), and p-type behavior was observed for these compounds from 300 to 1100 C.

  6. Borehole neutron activation: The rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Mikesell, J.L.; Senftle, F.E.

    1988-02-01

    Neutron-induced borehole gamma-ray spectroscopy has been widely used as a geophysical exploration technique by the petroleum industry, but its use for mineral exploration is not as common. Nuclear methods offer the mining geologist techniques for mineral exploration, for determining stratigraphy and bed correlations, for mapping ore deposits, and for studying mineral concentration gradients. High-resolution detectors are essential for mineral exploration, and by using them as analysis of the major element concentrations in a borehole can usually be made. A number of economically important elements can be detected at typical ore-grade concentrations using this method. Because of the new application of the rare-earth elements to high-temperature superconductors, these elements are examined in detail as an example of how nuclear techniques can assist the mining geologist.

  7. CADMIUM-RARE EARTH BORATE GLASS AS REACTOR CONTROL MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Ploetz, G.L.; Ray, W.E.

    1958-11-01

    A reactor control rod fabricated from a cadmiumrare earth-borate glass is presented. The rare earth component of this glass is selected from among those rare earths having large neutron capture cross sections, such as samarium, gadolinium or europium. Partlcles of this glass are then dispersed in a metal matrix by standard powder metallurgy techniques.

  8. Rare earths and other trace elements in Luna 16 soil.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmke, P. A.; Haskin, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been made of four small samples of material brought to earth by the Luna 16 mission, with the aim to determine rare earths and other trace elements in these samples. The analytical results are tabulated, and the rare earth abundances are compared with the average for chondrites. A comparison is also made with the results of similar analyses of Apollo samples.

  9. Behaviour of Rare Earth Elements during the Earth's core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Pierre; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Boyet, Maud; Hammouda, Tahar; Manthilake, Geeth

    2017-04-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REE) are classified in the refractory group, which means that they have a high temperature condensation and their volatility-controlled fractionation is limited to high-temperature processes. Anomalies have been measured for Eu, Yb and Sm, which are the REE with the lowest condensation temperatures in CAIs and chondrules (e.g. [1]). REE are particularly abundant in the sulfides of enstatite chondrites, 100 to 1000 times the CI value [e.g. 2,3], proving that these elements are not strictly lithophile under extremely reducing conditions. However by investigating experimentally the impact of Earth's core formation on the behavior of Sm and Nd, we have shown the absence of fractionation between Sm and Nd during the segregation of the metallic phase [4]. Recently, Wohlers and Wood [5] proposed that Nd and Sm could be fractionated in presence of a S-rich alloy phase. However, their results were obtained at pressure and temperature conditions below the plausible conditions of the Earth's core formation. Clearly, large pressure range needs to be covered before well-constrained model can be expected. Furthermore, our preliminary metal-silicate partitioning results show that Ce and Eu have higher metal/silicate partition coefficients than their neighboring elements, and that the presence of sulphur enhances the relative difference between partition coefficients. In this presentation, we will present and discuss new metal-silicate partition coefficients of all REE at a deep magma ocean at pressures ranging from those of the uppermost upper mantle ( 5 GPa) to a maximum pressure expected in the range of 20 GPa, temperatures ranging from 2500 to about 3000 K, and oxygen fugacities within IW-1 to IW-5 (1 to 5 orders of magnitude lower than the iron-wüstite buffer). We will discuss the effect of S, as well as the effect of H2O on the behaviour of REE during the Earth's core formation: recent models suggest that contrary to currently accepted beliefs, the

  10. Rare earth element ore geology of carbonatites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Mariano, Anthony N.; Mariano, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 50 years, carbonatites have been the primary source of niobium and rare earth elements (REEs), in particular the light REEs, including La, Ce, Pr, and Nd. Carbonatites are a relatively rare type of igneous rock composed of greater than 50 vol % primary carbonate minerals, primarily calcite and/or dolomite, and contain the highest concentrations of REEs of any igneous rocks. Although there are more than 500 known carbonatites in the world, currently only four are being mined for REEs: the Bayan Obo, Maoniuping, and Dalucao deposits in China, and the Mountain Pass deposit in California, United States. The carbonatite-derived laterite deposit at Mount Weld in Western Australia is also a REE producer. In addition to REEs, carbonatite-related deposits are the primary source of Nb, with the Araxá deposit, a carbonatite-derived laterite in Minas Gerais state, Brazil, being the dominant producer. Other commodities produced from carbonatite-related deposits include phosphates, iron, fluorite, copper, vanadium, titanium, uranium, and calcite.Types of ores include those formed as primary magmatic minerals, from late magmatic hydrothermal fluids, and by supergene enrichment in weathered horizons. Although the principal REE-bearing mineral phases include fluorocarbonates (bastnäsite, parisite, and synchysite), hydrated carbonates (ancylite), and phosphates (monazite and apatite), the dominant mineral exploited at most mines is bastnäsite. Bastnäsite typically is coarse grained and contains approximately 75 wt % RE2O3 (rare earth oxides; REOs). Processes responsible for REE enrichment include fractional crystallization of the carbonatitic magma, enrichment of REEs in orthomagmatic or hydrothermal fluids and subsequent precipitation or subsolidus metasomatic redistribution of REEs, and breakdown of primary carbonatitic mineral phases by chemical weathering and sequestration of REEs in secondary minerals or in association with clays. Carbonatites are primarily

  11. Restoration of rare earth mine areas: organic amendments and phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingyan; Li, Zhaolong; Liu, Wen; Liu, Shenghong; Zhang, Limin; Zhong, Liyan; Luo, Ximei; Liang, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Overexploitation of rare earth mine has caused serious desertification and various environmental issues, and ecological restoration of a mining area is an important concern in China. In this study, experiments involving dry grass landfilling, chicken manure broadcasting, and plant cultivation were carried out to reclaim a rare earth mine area located in Heping County, Guangdong Province, China. The prime focus was to improve soil quality in terms of nutrients, microbial community, enzyme activity, and physicochemical properties so as to reclaim the land. After 2 years of restoration, an increase of organic matter (OM), available potassium (K), available phosphorus (P) levels, and acid phosphatase (ACP) activity and a reduction of the available nitrogen (N) level and urease (URE) activity in soil were achieved compared to the original mined land. The nutrients and enzyme activities in soil with 5 years of restoration were close to or surpass those in the unexploited land as control. The bulk density, total porosity, water holding capacity, pH, and electrical conductivity (EC) of soil were improved, and the number of cultivable microorganisms and the bacterial diversity in soil were greatly increased with time during ecological restoration, especially for surface soil. Furthermore, the artificial vegetation stably grew at the restored mining sites. The results indicated that organic amendments and phytoremediation could ecologically restore the rare earth mining sites and the mined land could finally be planted as farmland.

  12. Antibacterial, Antifungal and Nematicidal Activities of Rare Earth Ions.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Tokumitsu; Ymamoto, Ayumi; Kazaana, Akira; Nakano, Yuta; Nojiri, Yui; Kashiwazaki, Moeko

    2016-12-01

    Despite the name, rare earth elements are relatively abundant in soil. Therefore, these elements might interact with biosphere during the history of life. In this study, we have examined the effect of rare earth ions on the growth of bacteria, fungi and soil nematode. All rare earth ions, except radioactive promethium that we have not tested, showed antibacterial and antifungal activities comparable to that of copper ions, which is widely used as antibacterial metals in our daily life. Rare earth ions also have nematicidal activities as they strongly perturb the embryonic development of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Interestingly, the nematicidal activity increased with increasing atomic number of lanthanide ions. Since the rare earth ions did not show high toxicity to the human lymphoblastoid cell line or even stimulate the growth of the cultured cells at 1 mM, it raised the possibility that we can substitute rare earth elements for the antibacterial metals usually used because of their safety.

  13. Enhanced pinning in mixed rare earth-123 films

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, Judith L [Los Alamos, NM; Foltyn, Stephen R [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-06-16

    An superconductive article and method of forming such an article is disclosed, the article including a substrate and a layer of a rare earth barium cuprate film upon the substrate, the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals capable of yielding a superconductive composition where ion size variance between the two or more rare earth metals is characterized as greater than zero and less than about 10.times.10.sup.-4, and the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals is further characterized as having an enhanced critical current density in comparison to a standard YBa.sub.2Cu.sub.3O.sub.y composition under identical testing conditions.

  14. China’s Rare Earth Policies: Economic Statecraft or Interdependence?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Commission PRC People’s Republic of China REE rare earth element SmCo Samarium Cobalt SOE state-owned enterprise xiv...supply of rare earths for defense purposes. Rare earths are used in two types of commercially available permanent magnet materials: samarium cobalt...to be mined. Oxide: An oxide is any compound of oxygen with another element or radical. SmCo: Samarium cobalt permanent magnet. Tailings: The

  15. SALICYLATE PROCESS FOR THORIUM SEPARATION FROM RARE EARTHS

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, G.A.

    1959-08-25

    The separation of thorium from rare earths is accomplished by forming an aqueous solution of salts of thorium and rare earths and sufficient acetate buffer to provide a pH of between 2 and 5, adding an ammonium salicylate to the aqueous buffered solution, contacting the resultant solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent mixture of an ether and an ester, and separating the solvent extract phase containing thorium salicylate from the aqueous phase containing the rare earths.

  16. Mechanism of Rare Earth Incorporation and Crystal Growth of Rare Earth Containing Type-I Clathrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type-I clathrates possess extremely low thermal conductivities, a property that makes them promising materials for thermoelectric applications. The incorporation of cerium into one such clathrate has recently been shown to lead to a drastic enhancement of the thermopower, another property determining the thermoelectric efficiency. Here we explore the mechanism of the incorporation of rare earth elements into type-I clathrates. Our investigation of the crystal growth and the composition of the phase Ba8–xRExTMySi46–y (RE = rare earth element; TM = Au, Pd, Pt) reveals that the RE content x is mainly governed by two factors, the free cage space and the electron balance. PMID:26823658

  17. Minerals yearbook, 1989: Rare-earth minerals and metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.B.; Templeton, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Domestic consumption of the rare earths was almost double the quantity used in 1988, mine production increased sharply, and the industry performed well amid increased international competition. Traditional markets of the rare earths, such as petroleum catalysts and metallurgical additives, continued a downward trend while new and emerging markets, such as neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets, advanced ceramics, and automotive catalysts, showed strong growth. The television and lamp phosphors market was unchanged, and glass polishing applications increased markedly. Demand for rare earths consumed in high-temperature superconductors was small; however, technologic breakthroughs in 1989 increased the prospects for commercial development of rare-earth superconductors.

  18. The Rare Earth Magnet Industry and Rare Earth Price in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kaihong

    2014-07-01

    In the past four years, the price of rare earth metal fluctuates sharply for many reasons. Currently, it has become more stable and more reasonable. This presentation is focused on the effect about the rare earth metal price. Some motor manufacturers have shifted from rare earth permanent magnet to ferrite magnet. Many motor manufacturers changed the design for the motor cooling system to make the motor function at a lower temperature. Thus the consumption of Dy can be markedly reduced. As for manufacturer of NdFeB magnet, we are also trying to optimize our process to reduce to dependence of HREE such as Dy and Tb. HS process have been introduced to solve the problem. With more and more people focusing and engaging on the REE industry, the price of REE will be more transparent without too many fluctuations. China is considering the problems of balancing the environment, energy sources, and labor sources. The application field about NdFeB such as wind turbine generator, HEV/EV, FA /OA is flourishing.

  19. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  20. Rare earth chalcogenide stoichiometry determination. [of thermoelectric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Rare earth chalcogenides, and particularly lanthanum sulfide, are currently explored as candidate materials for thermoelectric applications. Since the electrical properties of LaS(x) are largely determined by its stoichiometry, a simple and accurate method has been developed for determining the value of x. The procedure involves dissolving a weighted sample in acid and measuring the amount of hydrogen evolved by the lanthanum that is in excess of the 1.500 ratio of S/La. The analytical error in the determination of x in LaS(x) is about 0.001.

  1. Compositional and phase relations among rare earth element minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented that mainly treats minerals in which the rare-earth elements are essential constituents, e.g., bastnaesite, monazite, xenotime, aeschynite, allanite. The chemical mechanisms and limits of REE substitution in some rock-forming minerals (zircon, apatite, titanite, garnet) are also derived. Vector representation of complex coupled substitutions in selected REE-bearing minerals is examined and some comments on REE-partitioning between minerals as related to acid-based tendencies and mineral stabilities are presented. As the same or analogous coupled substitutions involving the REE occur in a wide variety of mineral structures, they are discussed together.

  2. Compositional and phase relations among rare earth element minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented that mainly treats minerals in which the rare-earth elements are essential constituents, e.g., bastnaesite, monazite, xenotime, aeschynite, allanite. The chemical mechanisms and limits of REE substitution in some rock-forming minerals (zircon, apatite, titanite, garnet) are also derived. Vector representation of complex coupled substitutions in selected REE-bearing minerals is examined and some comments on REE-partitioning between minerals as related to acid-based tendencies and mineral stabilities are presented. As the same or analogous coupled substitutions involving the REE occur in a wide variety of mineral structures, they are discussed together.

  3. Charge-separated and molecular heterobimetallic rare earth-rare earth and alkaline earth-rare earth aryloxo complexes featuring intramolecular metal-pi-arene interactions.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Glen B; Junk, Peter C; Moxey, Graeme J; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin; St Prix, Courtney; Zuniga, Maria F

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of a rare earth metal (Ln) and a potential divalent rare earth metal (Ln') or an alkaline earth metal (Ae) with 2,6-diphenylphenol (HOdpp) at elevated temperatures (200-250 degrees C) afforded heterobimetallic aryloxo complexes, which were structurally characterised. A charge-separated species [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] was obtained for a range of metals, demonstrating the similarities between the chemistry of the divalent rare earth metals and the alkaline earth metals. The [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)](+) cation in the heterobimetallic structures is unusual in that it consists solely of bridging aryloxide ligands. A molecular heterobimetallic species [AeEu(Odpp)(4)] (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba) was obtained by treating an alkaline earth metal and Eu metal with HOdpp at elevated temperatures. Similarly, [BaSr(Odpp)(4)] was prepared by treating Ba metal and Sr metal with HOdpp. Treatment of [Ba(2)(Odpp)(4)] with [Mg(Odpp)(2)(thf)(2)] in toluene afforded [Ba(2)(Odpp)(3)][Mg(Odpp)(3)(thf)]. Analogous solution-based syntheses were not possible for [(Ln'/Ae)(2)(Odpp)(3)][Ln(Odpp)(4)] complexes, for which the free-metal route was essential. As a result of the absence of additional donor ligands, the crystal structures of the heterobimetallic complexes feature extensive pi-Ph-metal interactions involving the pendant phenyl groups of the Odpp ligands, thus enabling the large electropositive metal atoms to attain coordination saturation. The charge-separated heterobimetallic species were purified by extraction with toluene/thf mixtures at ambient temperature (Ba-containing compounds) or by extraction with toluene under pressure above the boiling point of the solvent (other products). In donor solvents, heterobimetallic complexes other than those containing barium were found to fragment into homometallic species.

  4. Precise rare earth analysis of geological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations are very informative in revealing chemical fractionation processs in geological systems. The REE's (La-Lu) behavior is characteristic of various primary and secondary minerals which comprise a rock. The REE's contents and their patterns provide a strong fingerprint in distinguishing among various rock types and in understanding the partial melting and/or fractional crystallization of the source region. The REE contents in geological materials are usually at trace levels. To measure all the REE at such levels, radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) has been used with a REE group separation scheme. To maximize detection sensitivites for individual REE, selective ..gamma..-ray/x-ray measurements have been made using normal Ge(Li) and low-energy photon detectors (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometer systems. Using these detection methods an individual REE can be measured at or below the ppB levels; chemical yields of the REE are determined by reactivation.

  5. Chromatographic Techniques for Rare Earth Elements Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Zhang, Huashan; Jiang, Zucheng; Hu, Bin

    2017-04-01

    The present capability of rare earth element (REE) analysis has been achieved by the development of two instrumental techniques. The efficiency of spectroscopic methods was extraordinarily improved for the detection and determination of REE traces in various materials. On the other hand, the determination of REEs very often depends on the preconcentration and separation of REEs, and chromatographic techniques are very powerful tools for the separation of REEs. By coupling with sensitive detectors, many ambitious analytical tasks can be fulfilled. Liquid chromatography is the most widely used technique. Different combinations of stationary phases and mobile phases could be used in ion exchange chromatography, ion chromatography, ion-pair reverse-phase chromatography and some other techniques. The application of gas chromatography is limited because only volatile compounds of REEs can be separated. Thin-layer and paper chromatography are techniques that cannot be directly coupled with suitable detectors, which limit their applications. For special demands, separations can be performed by capillary electrophoresis, which has very high separation efficiency.

  6. Adjustable rare earth quadrupole drift tube magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Tanabe, J.; Halbach, K.; Koehler, G.; Green, M.I.

    1987-03-01

    A prototype permanent-magnet drift tube quadrupole with adjustable field strength has been constructed and tested. The magnet uses iron pole pieces to provide the required field shape along with rare earth permanent-magnet material (samarium cobalt) to energize the magnet. A unique feature of the configuration is the adjustability of the field, accomplished by rotating the outer rings consisting of permanent magnets and iron. In contrast with a previous prototype magnet, this new design uses ball bearings in place of slide bearings to eliminate potential failures. The rotation is now achieved with a bevel gear mechanism. The prototype design also incorporates a new drift tube shell vacuum seal to allow easy disassembly. Tests were made of the magnetic properties and the mechanical performance of this magnet. Field errors are extremely small, and the magnet passed an accelerated ten year lifetime test. It is planned to use this type of magnet to replace 24 of the SuperHILAC prestripper drift tubes.

  7. Lateritic, supergene rare earth element (REE) deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cocker, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Intensive lateritic weathering of bedrock under tropical or sub-tropical climatic conditions can form a variety of secondary, supergene-type deposits. These secondary deposits may range in composition from aluminous bauxites to iron and niobium, and include rare earth elements (REE). Over 250 lateritic deposits of REE are currently known and many have been important sources of REE. In southeastern China, lateritic REE deposits, known as ion-adsorption type deposits, have been the world’s largest source of heavy REE (HREE). The lateritized upper parts of carbonatite intrusions are being investigated for REE in South America, Africa, Asia and Australia, with the Mt. Weld deposit in Australia being brought into production in late 2012. Lateritic REE deposits may be derived from a wide range of primary host rocks, but all have similar laterite and enrichment profiles, and are probably formed under similar climatic conditions. The weathering profile commonly consists of a depleted zone, an enriched zone, and a partially weathered zone which overlie the protolith. Lateritic weathering may commonly extend to depths of 30 to 60 m. REE are mobilized from the breakdown of primary REE-bearing minerals and redeposited in the enriched zone deeper in the weathering horizon as secondary minerals, as colloids, or adsorbed on other secondary minerals. Enrichment of REE may range from 3 to 10 times that of the source lithology; in some instances, enrichment may range up to 100 times.

  8. Rare earth element diffusion in natural enstatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Daniele J.; Liang, Yan

    2007-03-01

    Chemical diffusion coefficients of La, Nd, Eu, Gd, and Yb in natural enstatite have been measured at 850-1250 °C and 1 atm. Anhydrous diffusion experiments were run in Pt capsules in air, or in sealed silica glass capsules under an iron-wüstite (IW) solid buffer. The sources of diffusant were pre-reacted mixtures of synthetic enstatite powder and microcrystalline rare-earth aluminate garnet. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to measure diffusion profiles. For Gd diffusion in air over the temperature range 1000-1250 °C, the following Arrhenius relation is found for diffusion normal to (210): D=2.55×10-9exp(321±85mol /RT)ms-1. There is no significant difference between Gd diffusion in air and under IW-buffered conditions. Behavior similar to Gd is also noted for Nd. The Arrhenius relationship for Eu diffusion in enstatite, normal to (210) and at 850-1150 °C and IW-buffered conditions, is D=6.93×10-6exp(-384±29mol /RT)ms-1. For Eu diffusion in air over the temperature range 1000-1200 °C for the same orientation, the following Arrhenius relation is found: D=1.70×10-8exp(-350±42mol /RT)ms-1. For Eu diffusion under IW-buffered conditions and for experiments run in air, diffusivities normal to (001) are similar to those for diffusion normal to (210). Eu diffusion under IW-buffered conditions is more than an order of magnitude faster than Eu diffusion in air. It is likely that majority of Eu is in the divalent state for diffusion under IW-buffered conditions, but Eu is in the trivalent state for diffusion in air. In the case of Nd and Gd, where valence state does not change under the investigated fO 2 conditions, diffusivities measured for experiments run both in air and under IW-buffered conditions are comparable to those obtained for trivalent Eu. Further, measurements of La, Nd, Eu +3, Gd, and Yb diffusion suggest that diffusion of trivalent REE in enstatite is not sensitive to ionic size, in contrast to that observed for REE diffusion in

  9. Rare earth fluoride nano-/microstructures: hydrothermal synthesis, luminescent properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Xu, Zhenhe; Sun, Yaguang

    2014-02-01

    Rare earth fluoride materials have attracted wide interest and come to the forefront in nanophotonics due to their distinct electrical, optical and magnetic properties as well as their potential applications in diverse fields such as optical telecommunication, lasers, biochemical probes, infrared quantum counters, and medical diagnostics. This review presents a comprehensive overview of the flourishing field of rare earth fluorides materials in the past decade. We summarize the recent research progress on the preparation, morphology, luminescent properties and application of rare earth fluoride-based luminescent materials by hydrothermal systems. Various rare earth fluoride materials are obtained by fine-tuning of experimental conditions, such as capping agents, fluoride source, acidity, temperature and reaction time. The controlled morphology, luminescent properties and application of the rare earth fluorides are briefly discussed with typical examples.

  10. Occupational radiation exposure due to norm in a rare-earth compounds production facility.

    PubMed

    Haridasan, P P; Pillai, P M B; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D

    2008-01-01

    In India, rare-earth compounds are produced from the beach sand mineral monazite. Caustic digestion of the mineral followed by selective acid extraction is the method used to separate composite rare-earth fraction. The composite rare-earth chloride contains low levels of natural radionuclides and is the starting material for individual rare-earth compounds which have wide applications. Activity concentrations in composite rare-earth compounds such as chlorides, fluorides, carbonates and oxides of Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Gd, etc. are presented in this paper. The external gamma exposure rates and airborne activity due to thorium and thoron progeny in the occupational environment are studied. The activity levels in liquid effluent are presented. The potential individual occupational dose is estimated to be 1.9 mSv per annum.

  11. Novel polymerization catalysts and hydride clusters from rare-earth metal dialkyls.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, Masayoshi; Hou, Zhaomin

    2010-04-01

    This Review gives an overview on recent progress in the synthesis and chemistry of rare-earth metal dialkyl complexes bearing monoanionic ancillary ligands, with an emphasis on novel polymerization catalysts. These structurally well-defined and highly reactive compounds are prepared either by alkane elimination reactions between trialkyl rare-earth complexes and acidic neutral ligands, or by the metathetical reactions of rare-earth trihalides with the alkali metal salts of the corresponding ligands. On treatment with an appropriate borate compound, the dialkyl complexes are converted into the corresponding cationic monoalkyl species, which serve as excellent catalysts for the polymerization and copolymerization of a variety of olefins to yield a series of new polymer materials that exhibit novel properties. Alternatively, hydrogenation of the dialkyl rare-earth complexes with H(2) affords a new class of rare-earth polyhydride complexes with unique features in terms of both their structure and reactivity.

  12. SEPARATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS FROM RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Kohman, T.P.

    1961-11-21

    A process of separating neptunium and plutonium values from rare earths and alkaline earth fission products present on a solid mixed actinide carrier (Th or U(IV) oxalate or fluoride) --fission product carrier (LaF/sub 3/, CeF/sub 3/, SrF/sub 2/, CaF/sub 2/, YF/sub 3/, La oxalate, cerous oxalate, Sr oxalate, Ca oxalate or Y oxalate) by extraction of the actinides at elevated temperature with a solution of ammonium fluoride and/or ammonium oxalate is described. Separation of the fission-product-containing carriers from the actinide solution formed and precipitation of the neptunium and plutonium from the solution with mineral acid are also accomplished. (AEC)

  13. Rare earth element enrichment using membrane based solvent extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makertiharta, I. G. B. N.; Dharmawijaya, P. T.; Zunita, M.; Wenten, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical, catalytic, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of rare earth elements are required in broad applications. Rare earth elements have similar physical and chemical properties thus it is difficult to separate one from each other. Rare earth element is relatively abundant in earth's crust but rarely occur in high concentrated deposits. Traditionally, ion-exchange and solvent extraction techniques have been developed to separate and purify single rare earth solutions or compounds. Recently, membrane starts to gain attention for rare earth separation by combining membrane and proven technologies such as solvent extraction. Membrane-based process offers selective, reliable, energy efficient and easy to scale up separation. During membrane-based separation process, one phase passes through membrane pores while the other phase is rejected. There is no direct mixing of two phases thus the solvent loss is very low. Membrane can also lower solvent physical properties requirement (viscosity, density) and backmixing, eliminate flooding phenomenon and provide large interfacial area for mass transfer. This paper will summarize research efforts in developing membrane technology for rare earth element separation. Special attention will be given to solvent extraction related process as the commonly used method for rare earth element separation. Furthermore, membrane configuration and its potentials will also be discussed.

  14. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.; Jacobs, Ralph R.; Krupke, William F.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  15. How PNNL Extracts Rare Earth Elements from Geothermal Brine

    SciTech Connect

    2016-07-12

    By looking at a problem at a nanoscale level, PNNL researchers are developing an economic way to extract valuable rare earth elements from geothermal fluids. This novel approach may help meet the high demand for rare earth elements that are used in many clean energy technologies.

  16. Rare-earth occurrences in the Pea Ridge tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Vierrether, C.W.; Cornell, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    Tailings from the Pea Ridge iron mine contain significant amounts of apatite, which has rare-earth element values associated with it. In association with the recovery of rare-earth minerals as a secondary resource, the US Bureau of Mines conducted an investigation on the recoverability of the rare-earth minerals from the tailings. The mill tailings were subjected to a phosphate flotation to separate the apatite from other constituents. More than 70-pct recovery of the rare-earth values was achieved. Based on mineralogical characterization and prior analysis of rare-earth-bearing breccia pipe material at Pea Ridge, it is proposed that processing this phosphate concentrate on a vanner table would yield up to a 95-pct recovery of the rare earths in the concentrate, with the apatite reporting to the tailings. Intensive ore microscopy studies of the original tailings to the flotation products led to the identification of monazite, xenotime, and rare-earth-enriched apatite as the major rare-earth-bearing minerals in the tailings.

  17. [Rare-earth metals as a factor in mutagenicity].

    PubMed

    Solovykh, G N; Golinskaia, L V; Kanunikova, E A

    2012-01-01

    Both the regions of the Orenburg Region area and individual examined streams and reservoirs were shown to be characterized by a varying load index for rare earth elements. The total level of rare earth elements was directly correlated with different types of mutations.

  18. Optical Properties of Nd Doped Rare Earth Vanadates (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    common of these is yttrium orthovanadate, other rare earth vanadates such as lutetium vanadate and gadolinium vanadate are being used for their...state laser hosts such as YAG. While the most common of these is yttrium orthovanadate, other rare earth vanadates such as lutetium vanadate and

  19. Effects of Rare Earth Metals on Steel Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fei; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hao-Long; Su, Yen-Hsun; Kuo, Chia-Liang; Su, Yen-Hao; Chen, Shin-Hau; Lin, Kuan-Ju; Hsieh, Ping-Hung; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-05-27

    Rare earth metals are used in semiconductors, solar cells and catalysts. This review focuses on the background of oxide metallurgy technologies, the chemical and physical properties of rare earth (RE) metals, the background of oxide metallurgy, the functions of RE metals in steelmaking, and the influences of RE metals on steel microstructures. Future prospects for RE metal applications in steelmaking are also presented.

  20. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721.6005 Section 721.6005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721.6005 Section 721.6005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721.6005 Section 721.6005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721.6005 Section 721.6005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.6005 - Rare earth phosphate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rare earth phosphate (generic). 721.6005 Section 721.6005 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Substances § 721.6005 Rare earth phosphate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject...

  5. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained.

  6. Google Earth locations of USA and seafloor hydrothermal vents with associated rare earth element data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Andrew Fowler

    2016-02-10

    Google Earth .kmz files that contain the locations of geothermal wells and thermal springs in the USA, and seafloor hydrothermal vents that have associated rare earth element data. The file does not contain the actual data, the actual data is available through the GDR website in two tier 3 data sets entitled "Compilation of Rare Earth Element Analyses from US Geothermal Fields and Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) Hydrothermal Vents" and "Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California"

  7. Rare earth elements in Hamersley BIF minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Minerals from the Hamersley banded iron formation, Western Australia, were analyzed for Y and rare earth elements (YREEs) by laser ablation ICP-MS to investigate diagenetic pathways, from precursor phases to BIF minerals. One group of apatites carries the seawater REE signature, giving evidence that P and REEs, thoroughly scavenged from the water column by Si-ferrihydrite particles, were released upon microbial Fe3+ reductive dissolution of Si-ferrihydrite in pore-water and finally sequestered mainly in authigenic apatite. The absence of fractionation between apatite and seawater suggests that REE were first incorporated into an amorphous calcium phosphate as fully hydrated cations, i.e. as outer-sphere complexes. The iron oxides and carbonates carry only a small fraction of the whole-rock REE budget. Their REE patterns are distinctly enriched in Yb and show some M-type tetrad effect consistent with experimental Kd(REE) between solid and saline solution with low carbonate ion concentrations. It is deduced that hematite formed at an incipient stage of Fe2+-catalyzed dissolution of Si-ferrihydrite, via a dissolution-reprecipitation pathway. The REE pattern of greenalite, found as sub-micron particles in quartz in a chert-siderite sample, is consistent with its authigenic origin by precipitation in pore-water after dissolution of a small amount of Si-ferrihydrite. Magnetite carries very low YREEs (ppb-level), has an homogeneous pattern distinctly enriched in the mid-REEs compared to hematite, and includes a late population depleted in light-REEs, Ba and As. Magnetite forming aggregates and massive laminae is tentatively interpreted as reflecting some fluid-aided hematite-magnetite re-equilibration or transformation at low-grade metamorphic temperatures.

  8. Condensation and fractionation of rare earths in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, A. M.; Grossman, L.

    1979-01-01

    The condensation behavior of the rare earth elements in the solar nebula is calculated on the basis of the most recent thermodynamic data in order to construct a model explaining group II rare earth element patterns in Allende inclusions. Models considered all involve the removal of large fractions of the more refractory heavy rare earth elements in an early condensate, followed by the condensation of the remainder at a lower temperature. It is shown that the model of Boynton (1975) in which one rare earth element component is dissolved nonideally in perovskite according to relative activity coefficients can not reasonably be made to fit the observed group II patterns. A model in which two rare earth components control the patterns and dissolve ideally in perovskite is proposed and shown to be able to account for the 20 patterns by variations of the perovskite removal temperature and the relative proportions of the two components.

  9. Condensation and fractionation of rare earths in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, A. M.; Grossman, L.

    1979-01-01

    The condensation behavior of the rare earth elements in the solar nebula is calculated on the basis of the most recent thermodynamic data in order to construct a model explaining group II rare earth element patterns in Allende inclusions. Models considered all involve the removal of large fractions of the more refractory heavy rare earth elements in an early condensate, followed by the condensation of the remainder at a lower temperature. It is shown that the model of Boynton (1975) in which one rare earth element component is dissolved nonideally in perovskite according to relative activity coefficients can not reasonably be made to fit the observed group II patterns. A model in which two rare earth components control the patterns and dissolve ideally in perovskite is proposed and shown to be able to account for the 20 patterns by variations of the perovskite removal temperature and the relative proportions of the two components.

  10. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF SECOND RARE EARTH SERIES METALS

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.D.; Hayward, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    >This invention relates to a process for alloying the second rare earth series metals with Mo, Nb, or Zr. A halide of the rare earth metal is mixed with about 1 to 20 at.% of an oxide of Mo, Nb, or Zr. Iodine and an alkali or alkaline earth metal are added, and the resulting mixture is heated in an inert atmosphere to 350 deg C. (AEC)

  11. Effects of spraying rare earths on contents of rare Earth elements and effective components in tea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongfeng; Wang, Changhong; Ye, Sheng; Qi, Hongtao; Zhao, Guiwen

    2003-11-05

    Rare earth (RE) fertilizer is widely applied in China to increase the yield and the quality of crops including tea. However, the effects of spraying RE fertilizer on the contents of rare earth elements (REE) and effective components in tea are unknown. The results from basin and field experiments show that the values of the REE concentrations in new shoots of tea plants and the concentration of REE in the soil (REE/REEs) either from control basins or from treatment basins were smaller than those in other parts of tea plant and similar between control and treatment. The longer the interval between spraying RE fertilizer and picking the shoots of tea plants, the less the effects from spraying. About 80% summation operator REE (the sum of the concentrations of 15 REE) in tea, whether it came from spraying or not, was insoluble in the infusion. About 10% the soluble REE of summation operator REE in tea infusion was bound to polysaccharide, and the amount of REE bound polysaccharide decreased over time. At least a 25 day safety interval is needed between spraying and picking if the microelement fertilizer is used, in order to enhance tea output and to ensure tea safety.

  12. Rare earth element deposits in China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xie, Yu-Ling; Hou, Zeng-qian; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Guo, Xiang; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    China is the world’s leading rare earth element (REE) producer and hosts a variety of deposit types. Carbonatite- related REE deposits, the most significant deposit type, include two giant deposits presently being mined in China, Bayan Obo and Maoniuping, the first and third largest deposits of this type in the world, respectively. The carbonatite-related deposits host the majority of China’s REE resource and are the primary supplier of the world’s light REE. The REE-bearing clay deposits, or ion adsorption-type deposits, are second in importance and are the main source in China for heavy REE resources. Other REE resources include those within monazite or xenotime placers, beach placers, alkaline granites, pegmatites, and hydrothermal veins, as well as some additional deposit types in which REE are recovered as by-products. Carbonatite-related REE deposits in China occur along craton margins, both in rifts (e.g., Bayan Obo) and in reactivated transpressional margins (e.g., Maoniuping). They comprise those along the northern, eastern, and southern margins of the North China block, and along the western margin of the Yangtze block. Major structural features along the craton margins provide first-order controls for REE-related Proterozoic to Cenozoic carbonatite alkaline complexes; these are emplaced in continental margin rifts or strike-slip faults. The ion adsorption-type REE deposits, mainly situated in the South China block, are genetically linked to the weathering of granite and, less commonly, volcanic rocks and lamprophyres. Indosinian (early Mesozoic) and Yanshanian (late Mesozoic) granites are the most important parent rocks for these REE deposits, although Caledonian (early Paleozoic) granites are also of local importance. The primary REE enrichment is hosted in various mineral phases in the igneous rocks and, during the weathering process, the REE are released and adsorbed by clay minerals in the weathering profile. Currently, these REE-rich clays are

  13. Rare Earth Elements in Global Aqueous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, C.; Karamalidis, A.; Dzombak, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    We are examining the occurrence and abundance of rare earth elements (REE) associated with produced waters from shale gas development, and factors controlling aqueous REE concentrations in geochemical environments, to provide information for: (1) potential recovery of REE as a valuable byproduct, and (2) utilization of unique REE signatures as a risk assessment tool. REE include the lanthanide series of elements - excluding short-lived, radioactive promethium - and yttrium. These elements are critical to a wide variety of high-tech, energy efficient applications such as phosphors, magnets, and batteries. Escalating costs of REE resulting from divergent supply and demand patterns motivates the first goal. The second goal relates to the search for a reliable, naturally occurring tracer to improve understanding of fluid migration and water-rock interactions during hydraulic fracturing and natural gas recovery. We compiled data from 100 studies of REE occurrence and concentrations in groundwaters, ocean waters, river waters, and lake waters. In the groundwater systems documented, total dissolved REE concentrations ranged over eight orders of magnitude; however the average concentrations across the lanthanides varied by less than two orders of magnitude. This leads to exceptional inter-element correlations, with a median correlation coefficient greater than 0.98, implying potential usefulness of REE ratios for groundwater signatures. Reports describing reactions governing REE solubilization were also investigated. We assembled information about important solution chemistries and performed equilibrium modeling using PHREEQC to examine common hypotheses regarding the factors controlling REE compositions. In particular, effects of pH, Eh, and common complexing ligands were evaluated. Produced and connate waters of the Marcellus shale are well characterized for their major chemical elements. There is a dearth of knowledge, however, regarding the occurrence of REE in

  14. [Content of rare earth elements in wild Hypericum japonicum Thunb].

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen-Lin; Rui, Yu-Kui; Tian, Zhi-Huan

    2009-06-01

    Rare earth elements are important nutritional elements for human health, and today more and more attention has been paid to the effective components in Chinese traditional medicine, especially to rare earth elements. Fifteen rare earth elements in wild hypericum japonicum Thunb were analyzed by the methods of ICP-MS. The results showed that the concentrations of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Tm, Lu and Y ranged from 6 ng x g(-1) x DW to 14 522 ng x g(-1) x DW, and among them the concentrations of La, Ce and Nd were higher than 2 000 ng x g(-1) x DW. Compared with the concentration of rare earth elements in rice, corn, wheat and barley, the total concentration of rare earth elements in hypericum japonicum Thunb was much higher, which could be the mechanism of curative effect of hypericum japonicum Thunb on liverish diseases. The character of elements and the content of rare earth elements in soil should be responsible for the difference, but the distributive mechanism of rare earth elements in hypericum japonicum Thunb should be further studied.

  15. Experimental Parameters Affecting Stripping of Rare Earth Elements from Loaded Sorptive Media in Simulated Geothermal Brines

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dean Stull

    2016-05-24

    Experimental results from several studies exploring the impact of pH and acid volume on the stripping of rare earth elements (REEs) loaded onto ligand-based media via an active column. The REEs in this experiment were loaded onto the media through exposure to a simulated geothermal brine with known mineral concentrations. The data include the experiment results, rare earth element concentrations, and the experimental parameters varied.

  16. Structure and Properties of Rare Earth Aluminosilicate Glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, Jeffrey Todd

    1991-02-01

    Rare earth aluminosilicate (REAS) glasses have been formed using conventional melting techniques. The glass-forming regions of six different ternary systems have been defined with praseodymium, neodymium, samarium, terbium, erbium, or ytterbium oxides, with alumina and silica. The glass-forming regions systematically decreased in size as the atomic number of the particular rare earth in the ternary systems increased. Glasses, of the molar composition 2R_2O_3 -2Al_2O_3 -6SiO_2, were formed with twelve of the fourteen true rare earth oxides in order to investigate further effects related to the identity of the rare earth ion in the glasses. Several properties of the rare earth aluminosilicate glasses were measured. These properties include: thermal expansion, glass transformation temperature, dilatometric softening point, density, molar volume, index of refraction, Vicker's hardness, magnetic susceptibility and the Faraday rotatory response. The structures of rare earth aluminosilicate glasses were investigated using infrared and Raman spectroscopies as well as magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR). MAS-NMR provided information regarding the local environments of silicon and aluminum ions in yttrium aluminosilicate (YAS) glasses. Since the size and valence of the yttrium ion are similar to the true rare earth ions, and the properties of the REAS and YAS glasses are similar, it is believed that the structures of yttrium aluminosilicate glasses are similar to those of the true rare earth aluminosilicate glasses. Several rare earth aluminogermanate glasses, having the molar formula 2R_2O _3-2Al_2O _3-6GeO_2, were also formed using conventional melting techniques. The properties of these glasses were compared and contrasted with those of the REAS glasses. Finally, a chapter on the study of magnetic susceptibility in common insulator glasses was added to the thesis. Several techniques used to measure magnetic susceptibility are reviewed in this chapter

  17. Minerals yearbook, 1988. Rare-earth minerals and metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.B.; Templeton, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Domestic production of rare-earth concentrates decreased in 1988. Foreign sources of processed rare earths obtained a slightly larger share of the U.S. market, while domestic exports saw a marked increase compared to 1987 levels. Rare earths were used in high-technology applications such as laser crystals, high-strength permanent magnets, optical fibers, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, and high-temperature superconductors. Topics discussed in the report include domestic data coverage, legislation and government programs, environmental issues, domestic production, consumption and uses, stocks, prices, foreign trade, world capacity, world review--Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Egypt, Greenland, Japan, Madagascar, Malaysia, Mozambique, Sri Lanka, Thailand--and technology.

  18. The studies of enhanced fluorescence in the two novel ternary rare-earth complex systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Jun; Li, Wen-Xian; Chai, Wen-Juan; Ren, Tie; Shi, Xiao-Yan

    2010-03-01

    Two novel ternary rare-earth complexes SmL(5).L'.(ClO(4))(2).7H(2)O and EuL(5).L'.(ClO(4))(2).6H(2)O (the first ligand L = C(6)H(5)COCH(2)SOCH(2)COC(6)H(5), the second ligand L' = C(6)H(4)OHCOO(-)) were synthesized and characterized by element analysis, molar conductivity, coordination titration analysis, IR, TG-DSC, (1)HNMR and UV spectra. The detailed luminescence studies on the rare-earth complexes showed that the ternary rare-earth complexes presented stronger fluorescence intensities, longer lifetimes, and higher fluorescence quantum efficiencies than the binary rare-earth materials. After the introduction of the second ligand salicylic acid group, the relative emission intensities and fluorescence lifetimes of the ternary complexes LnL(5).L'.(ClO(4))(2).nH(2)O (Ln = Sm, Eu; n=7, 6) enhanced more obviously than the binary complexes LnL(5).(ClO(4))(3).2H(2)O. This indicated that the presence of both organic ligand bis(benzoylmethyl) sulfoxide and the second ligand salicylic acid could sensitize fluorescence intensities of rare-earth ions, and the introduction of salicylic acid group was a benefit for the fluorescence properties of the ternary rare-earth complexes. The fluorescence spectra, fluorescence lifetime and phosphorescence spectra were also discussed.

  19. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  20. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  1. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  2. Rare earths: Market disruption, innovation, and global supply chains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggert, Roderick; Wadia, Cyrus; Anderson, Corby; Bauer, Diana; Fields, Fletcher; Meinert, Lawrence D.; Taylor, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Rare earths, sometimes called the vitamins of modern materials, captured public attention when their prices increased more than ten-fold in 2010 and 2011. As prices fell between 2011 and 2016, rare earths receded from public view—but less visibly they became a major focus of innovative activity in companies, government laboratories and universities. Geoscientists worked to better understand the resource base and improve our knowledge about mineral deposits that will be mines in the future. Process engineers carried out research that is making primary production and recycling more efficient. Materials scientists and engineers searched for substitutes that will require fewer or no rare earths while providing properties comparable or superior to those of existing materials. As a result, even though global supply chains are not significantly different now than they were before the market disruption, the innovative activity motivated by the disruption likely will have far-reaching, if unpredictable, consequences for supply chains of rare earths in the future.

  3. Growth of rare-earth monolayers on synthetic fluorine mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, F.; Han, P. D.; Flynn, C. P.

    1993-05-01

    We have grown single-crystal rare-earth films on cleaved faces of synthetic fluorine mica fluorophlogopite by molecular-beam-epitaxy techniques. This has made it possible to measure material properties such as magnetism in monolayer structures.

  4. Magnetoelastic contribution to thermal expansion of rare-earth zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazei, Z. A.; Kolmakova, N. P.; Shishkina, O. A.

    1998-02-01

    Comparative analysis is performed for the magnetoelastic contributions to thermal expansion of two groups of rare-earth zircons: phosphates RPO 4 (R=Y,Tb-Yb) and vanadates RVO 4 (R=Pr, Nd, Gd-Yb). Significant magnetoelastic anomalies of thermal expansion are observed and magnetoelastic contributions are found in regard to the corrections for the changes of the phonon contributions throughout the series of RPO 4 and RVO 4. Magnetoelastic contributions to thermal expansion are demonstrated to be well accounted for by the temperature dependences of the quadrupole moments of rare-earth ions both in phosphates and vanadates. The fully symmetric magnetoelastic coefficients are determined for all the rare-earth compounds under investigation; they are of the same sign and comparable magnitude in vanadates and phosphates, whereas the magnetoelastic contributions are opposite in sign for two isomorphous groups of rare-earth zircons.

  5. Magneto-Optical Experiments on Rare Earth Garnet Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, B. K.

    1980-01-01

    Describes experiments in which inexpensive or standard laboratory equipment is used to measure several macroscopic magnetic properties of thin rare earth garnet films used in the manufacture of magnetic bubble devices. (Author/CS)

  6. Magneto-Optical Experiments on Rare Earth Garnet Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, B. K.

    1980-01-01

    Describes experiments in which inexpensive or standard laboratory equipment is used to measure several macroscopic magnetic properties of thin rare earth garnet films used in the manufacture of magnetic bubble devices. (Author/CS)

  7. Standard reference water samples for rare earth element determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Antweiler, R.C.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    Standard reference water samples (SRWS) were collected from two mine sites, one near Ophir, CO, USA and the other near Redding, CA, USA. The samples were filtered, preserved, and analyzed for rare earth element (REE) concentrations (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These two samples were acid mine waters with elevated concentrations of REEs (0.45-161 ??g/1). Seventeen international laboratories participated in a 'round-robin' chemical analysis program, which made it possible to evaluate the data by robust statistical procedures that are insensitive to outliers. The resulting most probable values are reported. Ten to 15 of the participants also reported values for Ba, Y, and Sc. Field parameters, major ion, and other trace element concentrations, not subject to statistical evaluation, are provided.

  8. Rare earths: An industry review and market outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Major-Sosias, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    A review of the global rare earths industry from production and trade, to the established and new applications that drive this unique market. The industry has been spurred by increased demand during the 1990`s, which is expected to continue into the twenty-first century. The forecast indicates additional growth, as well as the potential for the rare earths market to evolve slowly into one with a more fundamental structure.

  9. Effects of Rare Earth Metals on Steel Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fei; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hao-Long; Su, Yen-Hsun; Kuo, Chia-Liang; Su, Yen-Hao; Chen, Shin-Hau; Lin, Kuan-Ju; Hsieh, Ping-Hung; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Rare earth metals are used in semiconductors, solar cells and catalysts. This review focuses on the background of oxide metallurgy technologies, the chemical and physical properties of rare earth (RE) metals, the background of oxide metallurgy, the functions of RE metals in steelmaking, and the influences of RE metals on steel microstructures. Future prospects for RE metal applications in steelmaking are also presented. PMID:28773545

  10. Electrical Relaxation in Rare Earth Doped Cadmium Fluoride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    RD-A172 412 ELECTRICAL RELAXATION IN RARE EARTH DOPED CNANIUN idpi FLUORIDE (U NAVAL ACADEMY ANNAPOLIS ND DEPT OF PHYSICS J J FONTANELLA ET AL. Gi SEP...Doped Cadmium Fluoride by John J. Fontanella & Mary C. Wintersgill Prepared for Publication in Crystal Lattice Defects and Amorphous Materials U. S...Include Security Classification) Electrical Relaxation in Rare Earth Doped Cadmium Fluoride (Unclassified) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) John J. Fontanella and

  11. MICROBIALLY MEDIATED LEACHING OF RARE EARTH ELEMENTS FROM RECYCLABLE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D. W.; Fujita, Y.; Daubaras, D. L.; Bruhn, D. F.; Reiss, J. H.; Thompson, V. S.; Jiao, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Bioleaching offers a potential approach for recovery of rare earth elements (REE) from recyclable materials, such as fluorescent lamp phosphors or degraded industrial catalysts. Microorganisms were enriched from REE-containing ores and recyclable materials with the goal of identifying strains capable of extracting REE from solid materials. Over 100 heterotrophic microorganisms were isolated and screened for their ability to produce organic acids capable of leaching REE. The ten most promising isolates were most closely related to Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter and Talaromyces. Of the acids produced, gluconic acid appeared to be the most effective at leaching REE (yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, europium, and terbium) from retorted phosphor powders (RPP), fluidized cracking catalyst (FCC), and europium-doped yttrium oxide (YOEu). We found that an Acinetobacter isolates, BH1, was the most capable strain and able to leach 33% of the total REE content from the FCC material. These results support the continuing evaluation of gluconic acid-producing microbes for large-scale REE recovery from recyclable materials.

  12. Ferroelectricity of domain walls in rare earth iron garnet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. I.; Zvezdin, K. A.; Gareeva, Z. V.; Mazhitova, F. A.; Vakhitov, R. M.; Yumaguzin, A. R.; Zvezdin, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we report on electric polarization arising in a vicinity of Bloch-like domain walls in rare-earth iron garnet films. The domain walls generate an intrinsic magnetic field that breaks an antiferroelectric structure formed in the garnets due to an exchange interaction between rare earth and iron sublattices. We explore 180° domain walls whose formation is energetically preferable in the films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Magnetic and electric structures of the 180° quasi-Bloch domain walls have been simulated at various relations between system parameters. Singlet, doublet ground states of rare earth ions and strongly anisotropic rare earth Ising ions have been considered. Our results show that electric polarization appears in rare earth garnet films at Bloch domain walls, and the maximum of magnetic inhomogeneity is not always linked to the maximum of electric polarization. A number of factors including the temperature, the state of the rare earth ion and the type of a wall influence magnetically induced electric polarization. We show that the value of polarization can be enhanced by the shrinking of the Bloch domain wall width, decreasing the temperature, and increasing the deviations of magnetization from the Bloch rotation that are regulated by impacts given by magnetic anisotropies of the films.

  13. An Overview of Rare Earth Science and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschneidner, Karl, Jr.

    2012-02-01

    Currently rare earth science and technology is robust: this includes all the major branches of science -- biochemistry, chemistry, materials and physics. There are, however, currently some anomalies and distortions especially in the technology and applications sector of the rare earth field, which is caused by the dominance of China on the sales of rare earths and rare earth containing products. For the past 5 to 10 years ˜95% of rare earths utilized in commerce came from China. Although Chinese actions have lead to sudden and large price spikes and export embargoes, the rare earths are still available but at a higher cost. The start up of production in 2011 at mines in the USA and Australia will alleviate this situation in about two years. Basic and applied research on the condensed matter physics/materials science has hardly been impacted by these events, but new research opportunities are opening up especially with regard to the USA's military and energy security. Magnets seems to be the hottest topic, but research on battery materials, phosphors and catalysts are also (or should be) strongly considered.

  14. Current Status on Resource and Recycling Technology for Rare Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Osamu; Okabe, Toru H.

    2014-06-01

    The development of recycling technologies for rare earths is essential for resource security and supply stability because high-quality rare earth mines are concentrated in China and the demand for rare earth metals such as neodymium and dysprosium, used as raw materials in permanent magnets (neodymium magnet), is expected to increase rapidly in the near future. It is also important to establish a recycling-based society from the perspective of the conservation of finite and valuable mineral resources and the reduction of the environmental load associated with mining and smelting. In this article, the current status of rare earth resource as well as that of recycling technology for the magnets is reviewed. The importance of establishing an efficient recycling process for rare earths is discussed from the characteristics of supply chain of rare earths, and the technological bases of the recycling processes for the magnet are introduced. Further, some fundamental researches on the development of new recycling processes based on pyrometallurgical process are introduced, and the features of the recycling processes are evaluated.

  15. Ferroelectricity of domain walls in rare earth iron garnet films.

    PubMed

    Popov, A I; Zvezdin, K A; Gareeva, Z V; Mazhitova, F A; Vakhitov, R M; Yumaguzin, A R; Zvezdin, A K

    2016-11-16

    In this paper, we report on electric polarization arising in a vicinity of Bloch-like domain walls in rare-earth iron garnet films. The domain walls generate an intrinsic magnetic field that breaks an antiferroelectric structure formed in the garnets due to an exchange interaction between rare earth and iron sublattices. We explore 180° domain walls whose formation is energetically preferable in the films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Magnetic and electric structures of the 180° quasi-Bloch domain walls have been simulated at various relations between system parameters. Singlet, doublet ground states of rare earth ions and strongly anisotropic rare earth Ising ions have been considered. Our results show that electric polarization appears in rare earth garnet films at Bloch domain walls, and the maximum of magnetic inhomogeneity is not always linked to the maximum of electric polarization. A number of factors including the temperature, the state of the rare earth ion and the type of a wall influence magnetically induced electric polarization. We show that the value of polarization can be enhanced by the shrinking of the Bloch domain wall width, decreasing the temperature, and increasing the deviations of magnetization from the Bloch rotation that are regulated by impacts given by magnetic anisotropies of the films.

  16. Novel syntergistic agent for selective separation of yttrium from other rare earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Terufumi; Goto, Masahiro; Nakashio, Fumiyuki

    1995-06-01

    An oil-soluble synergistic agent has been developed for the selective separation of yttrium (Y) from the other rare earth metals. The synergistic agent is a polyaminocarboxylic acid alkylderivative and has interfacial activity like that of surfactants. Separation of yttrium from heavy rare earth metals (erbium (Er) and holmium (Ho)) in the presence of the synergistic agent was carried out with a 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester as a carrier using a hollow-fiber membrane extractor. The new agent shows a synergistic effect on the permeation rate of rare earth metals at the oil-water interface. By the addition of a small amount of the agent, the selectivity for yttrium from the two rare earth metals was enhanced remarkably, because of the permeation rate of Y was selectively decreased compared with those of Er and Ho. The synergistic effect is discussed from the viewpoint of the stability constant for rare earth metals and the interfacial activity of the synergistic agent. The difference in interaction between the synergistic agent and rare earth ions at the oil-water interface results in an increase in the separation efficiency.

  17. Fabrication of Superhydrophobic and Luminescent Rare Earth/Polymer complex Films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zefeng; Ye, Weiwei; Luo, Xinran; Wang, Zhonggang

    2016-04-18

    The motivation of this work is to create luminescent rare earth/polymer films with outstanding water-resistance and superhydrophobicity. Specifically, the emulsion polymerization of styrene leads to core particles. Then core-shell-structured polymer nanoparticles are synthesized by copolymerization of styrene and acrylic acid on the core surface. The coordination reaction between carboxylic groups and rare earth ions (Eu(3+) and Tb(3+)) generates uniform spherical rare earth/polymer nanoparticles, which are subsequently complexed with PTFE microparticles to obtain micro-/nano-scaled PTFE/rare earth films with hierarchical rough morphology. The films exhibit large water contact angle up to 161° and sliding angle of about 6°, and can emit strong red and green fluorescence under UV excitation. More surprisingly, it is found that the films maintain high fluorescence intensity after submersed in water and even in aqueous salt solution for two days because of the excellent water repellent ability of surfaces.

  18. Fabrication of Superhydrophobic and Luminescent Rare Earth/Polymer complex Films

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zefeng; Ye, Weiwei; Luo, Xinran; Wang, Zhonggang

    2016-01-01

    The motivation of this work is to create luminescent rare earth/polymer films with outstanding water-resistance and superhydrophobicity. Specifically, the emulsion polymerization of styrene leads to core particles. Then core-shell-structured polymer nanoparticles are synthesized by copolymerization of styrene and acrylic acid on the core surface. The coordination reaction between carboxylic groups and rare earth ions (Eu3+ and Tb3+) generates uniform spherical rare earth/polymer nanoparticles, which are subsequently complexed with PTFE microparticles to obtain micro-/nano-scaled PTFE/rare earth films with hierarchical rough morphology. The films exhibit large water contact angle up to 161° and sliding angle of about 6°, and can emit strong red and green fluorescence under UV excitation. More surprisingly, it is found that the films maintain high fluorescence intensity after submersed in water and even in aqueous salt solution for two days because of the excellent water repellent ability of surfaces. PMID:27086735

  19. Fabrication of Superhydrophobic and Luminescent Rare Earth/Polymer complex Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zefeng; Ye, Weiwei; Luo, Xinran; Wang, Zhonggang

    2016-04-01

    The motivation of this work is to create luminescent rare earth/polymer films with outstanding water-resistance and superhydrophobicity. Specifically, the emulsion polymerization of styrene leads to core particles. Then core-shell-structured polymer nanoparticles are synthesized by copolymerization of styrene and acrylic acid on the core surface. The coordination reaction between carboxylic groups and rare earth ions (Eu3+ and Tb3+) generates uniform spherical rare earth/polymer nanoparticles, which are subsequently complexed with PTFE microparticles to obtain micro-/nano-scaled PTFE/rare earth films with hierarchical rough morphology. The films exhibit large water contact angle up to 161° and sliding angle of about 6°, and can emit strong red and green fluorescence under UV excitation. More surprisingly, it is found that the films maintain high fluorescence intensity after submersed in water and even in aqueous salt solution for two days because of the excellent water repellent ability of surfaces.

  20. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Technology of the Rare Earths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremers, Howard E.

    1985-01-01

    The 17 rare earth elements account for one-fifth of the 83 naturally occurring elements and collectively rank as the 22nd most abundant "element." Properties of these elements (including their chemical similarity), their extraction from the earth, and their uses are discussed. (JN)

  1. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Technology of the Rare Earths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremers, Howard E.

    1985-01-01

    The 17 rare earth elements account for one-fifth of the 83 naturally occurring elements and collectively rank as the 22nd most abundant "element." Properties of these elements (including their chemical similarity), their extraction from the earth, and their uses are discussed. (JN)

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented rare-earth nuclei in rare-earth hosts: Application to /sup 160/Tb

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, W.D.; Roman, P.; Boettcher, M.; Illerhaus, B.; Marshak, H.; Freitag, K.; Herzog, P.

    1988-12-01

    We summarize the application of nuclear magnetic resonance of oriented nuclei to rare-earth impurities implanted in ferromagnetic crystals of heavy rare-earth hosts. The experimental aspects are treated in some detail; we present results obtained on /sup 160/TbTb, and give a formal description of the experiments. A discussion of extension to other, similar systems with applications in nuclear, solid-state, and low-temperature physics is given.

  3. Protecting the environment and public health from rare earth mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiang; Zhang, Guochun; Pan, An; Chen, Fengying; Zheng, Chunli

    2016-11-01

    As increasing demand for green energy and high-tech devices grows, so does the rising prospecting of rare earth metals required for their production. Protecting the environment and public health from rare earth element (REE) mining as well as emerging pollutants is urgently required to achieve sustainable development. This study mapped Earth's hidden REE deposits to identify potential contamination hotspots with the aim of preventing its deleterious effects on the environment. We worry that there would be widespread tailing facilities concomitant with serious pollutions, such as the Bayan Obo tailings site, and argue that a tradeoff between the underground REE exploration and environment conservation should be reached as soon as possible.

  4. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare... production of rare earth metals and mischmetal by primary rare earth metals facilities......

  5. Thermochemical study of rare earth and nitrogen incorporation in glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yahong

    nitrogen content indicate that within the experimental composition range, sites occupied by nitrogen ions are roughly energetically equivalent in a given substitution series. The energetics of difference rare-earth substitution appears to be dominated by differences in the acid/base character of the cations.

  6. Rare earth elements in synthetic zircon. 1. synthesis, and rare earth element and phosphorus doping.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchar, J. M.; Finch, R. J.; Hoskin, W. O.; Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.; Mariano, A. N.; Chemical Engineering; George Washington Univ.; Univ. of Canterbury; Australian National Univ.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

    2001-05-01

    Sedimentary mineral assemblages commonly contain detrital zircon crystals as part of the heavy-mineral fraction. Age spectra determined by U-Pb isotopic analysis of single zircon crystals within a sample may directly image the age composition--but not the chemical composition--of the source region. Rare earth element (REE) abundances have been measured for zircons from a range of common crustal igneous rock types from different tectonic environments, as well as kimberlite, carbonatite, and high-grade metamorphic rocks, to assess the potential of using zircon REE characteristics to infer the rock types present in sediment source regions. Except for zircon with probable mantle affinities, zircon REE abundances and normalized patterns show little intersample and intrasample variation. To evaluate the actual variation in detrital zircon REE composition in a true sediment of known mixed provenance, zircons from a sandstone sample from the Statfjord Formation (North Sea) were analyzed. Despite a provenance including high-grade metasediment and granitoids and a range in zircon age of 2.82 b.y., the zircon REEs exhibit a narrow abundance range with no systematic differences in pattern shape. These evidences show zircon REE patterns and abundances are generally not useful as indicators of provenance.

  7. Instability of some divalent rare earth ions and photochromic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egranov, A. V.; Sizova, T. Yu.; Shendrik, R. Yu.; Smirnova, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    It was shown that the divalent rare earth ions (La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y) in cubic sites in alkaline earth fluorides are unstable with respect to electron autodetachment since its d1(eg) ground state is located in the conduction band which is consistent with the general tendency of these ions in various compounds. The localization of doubly degenerate d1(eg) level in the conduction band creates a configuration instability around the divalent rare earth ion that leading to the formation of anion vacancy in the nearest neighborhood, as was reported in the previous paper [A. Egranov, T. Sizova, Configurational instability at the excited impurity ions in alkaline earth fluorites, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 74 (2013) 530-534]. Thus, the formation of the stable divalent ions as La, Ce, Gd, Tb, Lu, and Y (PC+ centers) in CaF2 and SrF2 crystals during x-ray irradiation occurs via the formation of charged anion vacancies near divalent ions (Re2+va), which lower the ground state of the divalent ion relative to the conductivity band. Photochromic effect occurs under thermally or optically stimulated electron transition from the divalent rare earth ion to the neighboring anion vacancy and reverse under ultraviolet light irradiation. It is shown that the optical absorption of the PC+ centers due to d → d and d → f transitions of the divalent rare-earth ion.

  8. Laminated rare earth structure and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Senor, David J [West Richland, WA; Johnson, Roger N [Richland, WA; Reid, Bruce D [Pasco, WA; Larson, Sandra [Richland, WA

    2002-07-30

    A laminated structure having two or more layers, wherein at least one layer is a metal substrate and at least one other layer is a coating comprising at least one rare earth element. For structures having more than two layers, the coating and metal substrate layers alternate. In one embodiment of the invention, the structure is a two-layer laminate having a rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a metal substrate. In another embodiment of the invention, the structure is a three-layer laminate having the rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a first metal substrate and the coating subsequently abonded to a second metal substrate. The bonding of the coating to the second metal substrate may be accomplished by hot pressing, hot rolling, high deformation rate processing, or combinations thereof. The laminated structure may be used in nuclear components where reactivity control or neutron absorption is desired and in non-nuclear applications such as magnetic and superconducting films.

  9. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOEpatents

    Guon, Jerold; Grantham, LeRoy F.; Specht, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  10. Bis(hydroxylaminato)-mono(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) rare-earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Ajay; Pape, Tania; Willner, Alexander; Mitzel, Norbert W

    2009-08-07

    Salt metathesis reactions involving the anhydrous rare-earth metal trichlorides MCl(3) (M = Y, Ho, Er and Lu) and the N,N-diethylhydroxylaminato potassium salt, KONEt(2) (1), and KC(5)Me(5) result in formation of rare-earth metal hydroxylaminato complexes of the type [(C(5)Me(5))M(mu-eta(1):eta(2)-ONEt(2))(eta(2)-ONEt(2))](2) (M = Y (2a), Ho (2b), Er (2c) and Lu (2d)). Compound 1 was characterised by elemental analysis, compounds 2a and 2d by NMR spectroscopy and compounds 2a-d by elemental analyses, mass-spectrometry and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compounds 2a-d are isostructural in the solid state. Effective saturation of the coordination sphere of the rare-earth metal atoms by the hydroxylaminato groups is achieved by the formation of three-membered MON rings.

  11. High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P.

    2014-09-15

    In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  12. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  13. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  14. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  15. Half-sandwich rare-earth-catalyzed olefin polymerization, carbometalation, and hydroarylation.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, Masayoshi; Guo, Fang; Hou, Zhaomin

    2015-08-18

    The search for new catalysts for more efficient, selective chemical transformations and for the synthesis of new functional materials has been a long-standing research subject in both academia and industry. To develop new generations of catalysts that are superior or complementary to the existing ones, exploring the potential of untapped elements is an important strategy. Rare-earth elements, including scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanides (La-Lu), constitute one important frontier in the periodic table. Rare-earth elements possess unique chemical and physical properties that are different from those of main-group and late-transition metals. The development of rare-earth-based catalysts by taking the advantage of these unique properties is of great interest and importance. The most stable oxidation state of rare-earth metals is 3+, which is difficult to change under many reaction conditions. The oxidative addition and reductive elimination processes often observed in catalytic cycles involving late transition metals are generally difficult in the case of rare-earth complexes. The 18-electron rule that is applicable to late-transition-metal complexes does not fit rare-earth complexes, whose structures are mainly governed by the sterics (rather than the electron numbers) of the ligands. In the lanthanide series (La-Lu), the ionic radius gradually decreases with increasing atomic number because of the influence of the 4f electrons, which show poor shielding of nuclear charge. Rare-earth metal ions generally show strong Lewis acidity and oxophilicity. Rare-earth metal alkyl and hydride species are highly reactive, showing both nucleophilicity and basicity. The combination of these features, such as the strong nucleophilicity and moderate basicity of the alkyl and hydride species and the high stability, strong Lewis acidity, and unsaturated C-C bond affinity of the 3+ metal ions, can make rare-earth metals unique candidates for the formation of excellent single

  16. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  17. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.; Lincoln, Lanny P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  18. Thermal Expansion and Thermal Conductivity of Rare Earth Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2006-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are considered promising candidate materials for environmental barrier coatings applications at elevated temperature for ceramic matrix composites. High temperature thermophysical properties are of great importance for coating system design and development. In this study, the thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of hot-pressed rare earth silicate materials were characterized at temperatures up to 1400 C. The effects of specimen porosity, composition and microstructure on the properties were also investigated. The materials processing and testing issues affecting the measurements will also be discussed.

  19. Rare earth metal trifluoromethanesulfonates catalyzed benzyl-etherification.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Atsushi; Yasuda, Kayo; Abe, Hitoshi; Harayama, Takashi

    2002-03-01

    Rare earth metal trifluoromethanesulfonates [rare earth metal triflate, RE(OTf)3] were found to be efficient catalyst for benzyl-etherification. In the presence of a catalytic amount of RE(OTf)3, condensation of benzyl alcohols and aliphatic alcohols proceeded smoothly to afford the benzyl ethers. The condensation between benzyl alcohols and thiols also proceeded, and thio ethers were obtained in good yield. In these reactions, RE(OTf)3 could be recovered easily after the reactions were completed and could be reused without loss of activity.

  20. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1994-08-09

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

  1. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  2. THE RARE EARTH PEAK: AN OVERLOOKED r-PROCESS DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpower, Matthew R.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Surman, Rebecca E-mail: gail_mclaughlin@ncsu.edu

    2012-06-20

    The astrophysical site or sites responsible for the r-process of nucleosynthesis still remains an enigma. Since the rare earth region is formed in the latter stages of the r-process, it provides a unique probe of the astrophysical conditions during which the r-process takes place. We use features of a successful rare earth region in the context of a high-entropy r-process (S {approx}> 100k{sub B} ) and discuss the types of astrophysical conditions that produce abundance patterns that best match meteoritic and observational data. Despite uncertainties in nuclear physics input, this method effectively constrains astrophysical conditions.

  3. Rare earth elements as a fingerprint of soil components solubilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davranche, M.; Grybos, M.; Gruau, G.; Pédrot, M.; Dia, A.

    2009-04-01

    The retention of rare earth element (REE) in the soil profile are mainly controlled by three factors, (i) the stability of the primary REE-carrying minerals, (ii) the presence of secondary phases as clays and Fe- and Mn-oxyhydroxides and (ii) the concentration of colloidal organic matter (OM). Considering that each soil phases (mineral or organic) displays (ii) various surface properties, such as specific area, surface sites density and nature and (ii) their own REE distribution inherited from the rock weathering, their mobilization through various chemical reactions (dissolution, colloidal release….) may involve the development of various shaped REE patterns in the soil solutions. REE fractionation from the different soil phases may therefore be used to identify the response of the soil system to a particular chemical process such as reductive and/or acidic dissolution. To test this purpose, an organic-rich wetland soil sample was incubated under anaerobic condition at both pH 5 and uncontrolled pH. The REE patterns developed in the soil solution were then compared to the REE patterns obtained through either aerobic at pH 3 and 7 incubations or a chemical reduction experiment (using hydroxylamine). REE patterns in anaerobic and aerobic at pH 7 experiments exhibited the same middle rare earth element (MREE) downward concavity significant of the complexation of REE with soil OM. By contrast, under acidic condition, the REE pattern exhibited a positive Eu anomaly due to the dissolution of soil feldspar. Finally, REE pattern obtained from the chemical reducing experiment showed an intermediary flat shape corresponding to a mixing between the soil organic and mineral phases dissolution. The comparison of the various REE pattern shapes allowed to conclude that (i) biological reduction of wetland soil involved amorphous Fe(III) colloids linked to OM and, (ii) that the REE mobility was controlled by the dynamic of OM in wetland soil. They also evidence the potential of

  4. Effects of citric acid and the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) on the mobility of germanium and rare earth elements in soil and uptake in Phalaris arundinacea.

    PubMed

    Wiche, Oliver; Tischler, Dirk; Fauser, Carla; Lodemann, Jana; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2017-02-03

    Effects of citric acid and desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) on the availability of Ge and selected REEs (La, Nd, Gd, Er) to P. arundinacea were investigated. A soil dissolution experiment was conducted to elucidate the effect of citric acid and DFO-B at different concentrations (1 and 10 mmol l(-1) citric acid) on the release of Ge and REEs from soil. In a greenhouse plants of P. arundinacea were cultivated on soil and on sand cultures to investigate the effects of citric acid and DFO-B on the uptake of Ge and REEs by the plants. Addition of 10 mmol l(-1) citric acid significantly enhanced desorption of Ge and REEs from soil and uptake into soil-grown plants. Applying DFO-B enhanced the dissolution and the uptake of REEs, while no effect on Ge was observed. In sand cultures, presence of citric acid and DFO-B significantly decreased the uptake of Ge and REEs, indicating a discrimination of the formed complexes during uptake. This study clearly indicates that citric acid and the microbial siderophore DFO-B may enhance phytoextraction of Ge and REEs due to the formation of soluble complexes that increase the migration of elements in the rhizosphere.

  5. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-06-15

    The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid-liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic Nanofluid Rare Earth Element Extraction Process Report, Techno Economic Analysis, and Results for Geothermal Fluids

    DOE Data Explorer

    Pete McGrail

    2016-03-14

    This GDR submission is an interim technical report and raw data files from the first year of testing on functionalized nanoparticles for rare earth element extraction from geothermal fluids. The report contains Rare Earth Element uptake results (percent removal, mg Rare Earth Element/gram of sorbent, distribution coefficient) for the elements of Neodymium, Europium, Yttrium, Dysprosium, and Cesium. A detailed techno economic analysis is also presented in the report for a scaled up geothermal rare earth element extraction process. All rare earth element uptake testing was done on simulated geothermal brines with one rare earth element in each brine. The rare earth element uptake testing was conducted at room temperature.

  7. Attenuation of rare earth elements in a boreal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, Mats E.; Österholm, Peter; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Nystrand, Miriam; Peltola, Pasi; Nordmyr, Linda; Boman, Anton

    2012-11-01

    This study focuses on attenuation of rare earth elements (REE) when a boreal creek, acidified and loaded with REE and other metals as a result of wetland drainage, empties into a brackish-water estuary (salinity < 6‰). Surface water was collected in a transect from the creek mouth to the outer estuary, and settling (particulate) material in sediment traps moored at selected locations in the estuary. Ultrafiltration, high-resolution ICP-MS and modeling were applied on the waters, and a variety of chemical reagents were used to extract metals from the settling material. Aluminium, Fe and REE transported by the acidic creek were extensively removed in the inner/central estuary where the acidic water was neutralised, whereas Mn was relatively persistent in solution and thus redistributed to particles and deposited further down the estuary. The REE removal was caused by several contemporary mechanisms: co-precipitation with oxyhydroxides (mainly Al but also Fe), complexation with flocculating humic substances and sorption to suspended particles. Down estuary the dissolved REE pool, remaining after removal, was fractionated: the <1 kDa pool became depleted in the middle REE and the colloidal (0.45 μm-1 kDa) pool depleted in the middle and heavy REE. This fractionation was controlled by the removal process, such that those REE with highest affinity for the settling particles became most depleted in the remaining dissolved pool. Modeling, based on Visual MINTEQ version 3.0 and the Stockholm Humic Model after revision and updating, predicted that the dissolved (<0.45 μm) REE pool in the estuary is bound almost entirely to humic substances. Acid sulphate soils, the source of the REE and other metals in the creek water, are widespread on coastal plains worldwide and therefore the REE attenuation patterns and mechanisms identified in the studied estuary are relevant for recognition of similar geochemical processes and conditions in a variety of coastal locations.

  8. Complex Electronic Structure of Rare Earth Activators in Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Aberg, D.; Yu, S. W.; Zhou, F.

    2015-10-27

    To aid and further the understanding of the microscopic mechanisms behind the scintillator nonproportionality that leads to degradation of the attainable energy resolution, we have developed theoretical and experimental algorithms and procedures to determine the position of the 4f energy levels of rare earth dopants relative to the host band edge states.

  9. Multi-objective optimization of chromatographic rare earth element separation.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Holmqvist, Anders; Nilsson, Bernt

    2015-10-16

    The importance of rare earth elements in modern technological industry grows, and as a result the interest for developing separation processes increases. This work is a part of developing chromatography as a rare earth element processing method. Process optimization is an important step in process development, and there are several competing objectives that need to be considered in a chromatographic separation process. Most studies are limited to evaluating the two competing objectives productivity and yield, and studies of scenarios with tri-objective optimizations are scarce. Tri-objective optimizations are much needed when evaluating the chromatographic separation of rare earth elements due to the importance of product pool concentration along with productivity and yield as process objectives. In this work, a multi-objective optimization strategy considering productivity, yield and pool concentration is proposed. This was carried out in the frame of a model based optimization study on a batch chromatography separation of the rare earth elements samarium, europium and gadolinium. The findings from the multi-objective optimization were used to provide with a general strategy for achieving desirable operation points, resulting in a productivity ranging between 0.61 and 0.75 kgEu/mcolumn(3), h(-1) and a pool concentration between 0.52 and 0.79 kgEu/m(3), while maintaining a purity above 99% and never falling below an 80% yield for the main target component europium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Circular magnetic x-ray dichroism in rare earth compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Jonathan

    1993-09-30

    This report discusses the following topics: Circular magnetic x-ray dichroism at the ER L3 Edge; angular dependence of circular magnetic x-ray dichroism in rare earth compounds: and circular magnetic x-ray dichroism in crystalline and amorphous GDFE2.

  11. Pitfalls of rare earth imaging: conquering the three Ps.

    PubMed

    Lam, R W; Price, S C

    1992-01-01

    Rare earth technology has become the standard in radiographic imaging, but misapplication and insufficient comprehension of the variables of usage create practical problems. Special problem areas are pediatrics, portable radiography and phototimed exposures. These problems, as well as possible solutions, are addressed in this article.

  12. Mass extrapolations in the region of deformed rare Earth nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Borcea, C.; Audi, G.

    1998-12-21

    A procedure based on the regularity property of the mass surface is proposed to make predictions for the masses of neutron rich deformed nuclei in the rare earth region. Tables are given for the estimated masses; they extend up to the presumed limit of the deformation region.

  13. Gas-phase modification of rare-earth intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, R.; Coey, J.M.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Recent work concerning the interstitial modification of permanent magnet alloys based on rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds is reviewed. The crystal structure of the new materials is discussed, then the thermodynamic and statistical aspects of the low-temperature interstitial modification process are considered. Finally, reaction kinetics and thermal stability of the new compounds are discussed and future prospects assessed.

  14. Rare earth transition metal magnesium compounds—An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodewald, Ute Ch.; Chevalier, Bernard; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2007-05-01

    Intermetallic rare earth-transition metal-magnesium compounds play an important role as precipitations in modern light weight alloys and as host materials for hydrogen storage applications. Recent results on the crystal chemistry, the chemical bonding peculiarities, physical properties, and hydrogenation behavior of these materials are reviewed.

  15. Physical and optical properties of rare earth cobalt magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Halbach, K.

    1980-08-01

    Rare Earth Cobalt (REC) permanent magnets have unique properties that permit solutions to some optical tasks that cannot be accomplished with conventional magnets. A review of design and of performance characteristics of these magnets includes an analytical description of the three dimensional fringe fields of REC quadrupoles.

  16. Potential synergy: the thorium fuel cycle and rare earths processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ault, T.; Wymer, R.; Croff, A.; Krahn, S.

    2013-07-01

    The use of thorium in nuclear power programs has been evaluated on a recurring basis. A concern often raised is the lack of 'thorium infrastructure'; however, for at least a part of a potential thorium fuel cycle, this may less of a problem than previously thought. Thorium is frequently encountered in association with rare earth elements and, since the U.S. last systematically evaluated the large-scale use of thorium (the 1970's,) the use of rare earth elements has increased ten-fold to approximately 200,000 metric tons per year. Integration of thorium extraction with rare earth processing has been previously described and top-level estimates have been done on thorium resource availability; however, since ores and mining operations differ markedly, what is needed is process flowsheet analysis to determine whether a specific mining operation can feasibly produce thorium as a by-product. Also, the collocation of thorium with rare earths means that, even if a thorium product stream is not developed, its presence in mining waste streams needs to be addressed and there are previous instances where this has caused issues. This study analyzes several operational mines, estimates the mines' ability to produce a thorium by-product stream, and discusses some waste management implications of recovering thorium. (authors)

  17. Thin Films of the Rare-Earth Metals,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A vacuum thermal method of producing thin films (1-10 mu m) of rare earth metals (Sm, Dy, Tn, and Yb) is described and its efficiency is compared with...existing methods (which are briefly reviewed). A very effective method of obtaining the thin films in question is by reducing the corresponding

  18. Weldability of Rare-Earth-Treated Homogeneous Armor Steel Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1957-07-31

    Treated Heat 0681 Open hearth charge: 50,000 lbs heavy melting molybdenum scrap 40,000 lbs cold pig iron Flux charge: 5,100 lbs limestone 2,600...Record Rare-Earth-Oxide-Treated Heat 0724 Open hearth charge: 50,000 lbs heavy melting molybdenum scrap 40,000 lbs cold pig iron Flux charge

  19. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; rare-earth oxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, W.D.; Christiansen, Grey

    1993-01-01

    Bastnaesite, monazite, and xenotime are currently the most important rare-earth minerals. Bastnaesite occurs as a primary mineral in carbonatites. Monazite and xenotime also can be found in primary deposits but are recovered principally from heavy-mineral placers that are mined for titanium or tin. Each of these minerals has a different composition of the 15 rare-earth elements. World resources of economically exploitable rare-earth oxides (REO) are estimated at 93.4 million metric tons in place, composed of 93 percent in primary deposits and 7 percent in placers. The average mineral composition is 83 percent bastnaesite, 13 percent monazite, and 4 percent of 10 other minerals. Annual global production is about 67,000 metric tons of which 41 percent is from placers and 59 percent is from primary deposits; mining methods consist of open pits (94 percent) and dredging (6 percent). This output could be doubled if the operations that do not currently recover rare earths would do so. Resources are more than sufficient to meet the demand for the predictable future. About 52 percent of the world's REO resources are located in China. Ranking of other countries is as follows: Namibia (22 percent), the United States (15 percent), Australia (6 percent), and India (3 percent); the remainder is in several other countries. Conversely, 38 percent of the production is in China, 33 percent in the United States, 12 percent in Australia, and 5 percent each in Malaysia and India. Several other countries, including Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Sri Lanka, and Thailand, make up the remainder. Markets for rare earths are mainly in the metallurgical, magnet, ceramic, electronic, chemical, and optical industries. Rare earths improve the physical and rolling properties of iron and steel and add corrosion resistance and strength to structural members at high temperatures. Samarium and neodymium are used in lightweight, powerful magnets for electric motors. Cerium and yttrium increase the

  20. Asymmetric Catalysis with bis(hydroxyphenyl)diamides/rare-earth metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2013-01-02

    A series of asymmetric catalysts composed of conformationally flexible amide-based chiral ligands and rare-earth metals was developed for proton-transfer catalysis. These ligands derived from amino acids provide an intriguing chiral platform for the formation of asymmetric catalysts upon complexation with rare-earth metals. The scope of this arsenal of catalysts was further broadened by the development of heterobimetallic catalytic systems. The cooperative function of hydrogen bonding and metal coordination resulted in intriguing substrate specificity and stereocontrol, and the dynamic nature of the catalysts led to a switch of their function. Herein, we summarize our recent exploration of this class of catalysts.

  1. Continental shelves as potential resource of rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Pourret, Olivier; Tuduri, Johann

    2017-07-19

    The results of this study allow the reassessment of the rare earth elements (REE) external cycle. Indeed, the river input to the oceans has relatively flat REE patterns without cerium (Ce) anomalies, whereas oceanic REE patterns exhibit strong negative Ce anomalies and heavy REE enrichment. Indeed, the processes at the origin of seawater REE patterns are commonly thought to occur within the ocean masses themselves. However, the results from the present study illustrate that seawater-like REE patterns already occur in the truly dissolved pool of river input. This leads us to favor a partial or complete removal of the colloidal REE pool during estuarine mixing by coagulation, as previously shown for dissolved humic acids and iron. In this latter case, REE fractionation occurs because colloidal and truly dissolved pools have different REE patterns. Thus, the REE patterns of seawater could be the combination of both intra-oceanic and riverine processes. In this study, we show that the Atlantic continental shelves could be considered potential REE traps, suggesting further that shelf sediments could potentially become a resource for REE, similar to metalliferous deep sea sediments.

  2. High fluorescence emission of carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene/BaTiO{sub 3} nanocomposites and rare earth metal complexes: Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, X. T.; Showkat, A. M.; Wang, Z.; Lim, K. T.

    2015-03-30

    Noble fluorescence nanocomposite compound based on barium titanate nanoparticles (BTO), polystyrene (PSt), and terbium ion (Tb{sup 3+}) was synthesized by a combination of surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and coordinate chemistry. Initially, a modification of surface of BTO was conducted by an exchange process with S-benzyl S’-trimethoxysilylpropyltrithiocarbonate to create macro-initiator for polymerization of styrene. Subsequently, aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-COOH) was generated by substitution reaction between 4-(Chloromethyl) benzoic acid and PSt chains. The coordination of the nanohybrids with Tb{sup 3+} ions afforded fluorescent Tb{sup 3+} tagged aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+}) complexes. Structure, morphology, and fluorescence properties of nanohybrid complexes were investigated by respective physical and spectral studies. FT-IR and SEM analyses confirmed the formation of BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+}nanohybrids. Furthermore, TGA profiles demonstrated the grafting of aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene on BTO surface. Optical properties of BTO-g-PSt-Tb{sup 3+} complexes were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  3. High fluorescence emission of carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene/BaTiO3 nanocomposites and rare earth metal complexes: Preparation and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X. T.; Showkat, A. M.; Wang, Z.; Lim, K. T.

    2015-03-01

    Noble fluorescence nanocomposite compound based on barium titanate nanoparticles (BTO), polystyrene (PSt), and terbium ion (Tb3+) was synthesized by a combination of surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction and coordinate chemistry. Initially, a modification of surface of BTO was conducted by an exchange process with S-benzyl S'-trimethoxysilylpropyltrithiocarbonate to create macro-initiator for polymerization of styrene. Subsequently, aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-COOH) was generated by substitution reaction between 4-(Chloromethyl) benzoic acid and PSt chains. The coordination of the nanohybrids with Tb3+ ions afforded fluorescent Tb3+ tagged aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene grafted barium titanate (BTO-g-PSt-Tb3+) complexes. Structure, morphology, and fluorescence properties of nanohybrid complexes were investigated by respective physical and spectral studies. FT-IR and SEM analyses confirmed the formation of BTO-g-PSt-Tb3+nanohybrids. Furthermore, TGA profiles demonstrated the grafting of aryl carboxylic acid functionalized polystyrene on BTO surface. Optical properties of BTO-g-PSt-Tb3+ complexes were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  4. Bioavailable concentrations of germanium and rare earth elements in soil as affected by low molecular weight organic acids and root exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs; Kummer, Nicolai-Alexeji; Heinemann, Ute; Tesch, Silke; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2014-05-01

    Availability of elements in soil to plant is generally dependent on the solubility and mobility of elements in soil solution which is controlled by soil, elemental properties and plant-soil interactions. Low molecular organic acids or other root exudates may increase mobility and availability of certain elements for plants as an effect of lowering pH in the rhizosphere and complexation. However, these processes take place in a larger volume in soil, therefore to understand their nature, it is also important to know in which layers of the soil what factors modify these processes. In this work the influence of citric acid and root exudates of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) on bioavailable concentrations of germanium, lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium in soil solution and uptake in root and shoot of rape (Brassica napus L.), comfrey (Symphytum officinale L.), common millet (Panicum milliaceum L.) and oat (Avena sativa L.) was investigated. Two different pot experiments were conducted: (1) the mentioned plant species were treated with nutrient solutions containing various amount of citric acid; (2) white lupin was cultivated in mixed culture (0 % lupin, 33 % lupin) with oat (Avena sativa L.) and soil solution was obtained by plastic suction cups placed at various depths. As a result, addition of citric acid significantly increased germanium concentrations in plant tissue of comfrey and rape and increased translocation of germanium, lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium from root to shoot. The cultivation of white lupin in mixed culture with oat led to significantly higher concentrations of germanium and increasing concentrations of lanthan, neodymium, gadolinium and erbium in soil solution and aboveground plant tissue. In these pots concentrations of citric acid in soil solution were significantly higher than in the control. The results show, that low molecular organic acids exuded by plant roots are of great importance for the mobilization of germanium

  5. Rare earth modified silica-aluminas as supports for bifunctional catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Soled, S.L.; McVicker, G.; Miseo, S.

    1996-12-31

    We have explored rare earth oxide-modified amorphous silica-aluminas as {open_quotes}permanent{close_quotes} intermediate strength acids used as supports for bifunctional catalysts. The addition of well dispersed weakly basic rare earth oxides {open_quotes}titrates{close_quotes} the stronger acid sites of amorphous silica-alumina and lowers the acid strength to the level shown by halided aluminas. Physical and chemical probes, as well as model olefin and paraffin isomerization reactions show that acid strength can be adjusted close to that of chlorided and fluorided aluminas. Metal activity is inhibited relative to halided alumina catalysts, which limits the direct metal-catalyzed dehydrocyclization reactions during paraffin reforming but does not interfere with hydroisomerization reactions.

  6. Rare earth elements exploitation, geopolitical implications and raw materials trading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Marie-Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) correspond to seventeen elements of the periodic table. They are used in high technology, cracking, electric cars' magnet, metal alloy for batteries, and also in phone construction or ceramics for electronic card. REEs are an important resource for high technology. This project targets 16 years old students in the subject "personalized aid" and will last six weeks. The purpose of this project is to develop autonomy and research in groups for a transdisciplinary work. This project gathers knowledge in geology, geography and economics. During the first session students analyze the geology applications of the REE. They begin the analysis with learning the composition in different rocks such as basalt and diorite to make the link with crystallization. Then they compare it with adakite to understand the formation of these rocks. In the second session, they study REE exploitation. We can find them as oxides in many deposits. The principal concentrations of rare earth elements are associated with uncommon varieties of igneous rocks, such as carbonatites. They can use Qgis, to localize this high concentration. In the third session, they study the environmental costs of REE exploitation. Indeed, the exploitation produces thorium and carcinogenic toxins: sulphates, ammonia and hydrochloric acid. Processing one ton of rare earths produces 2,000 tons of toxic waste. This session focuses, first, on Baotou's region, and then on an example they are free to choose. In the fourth session, they study the geopolitical issues of REE with a focus on China. In fact this country is the largest producer of REE, and is providing 95% of the overall production. REE in China are at the center of a geopolitical strategy. In fact, China implements a sort of protectionism. Indeed, the export tax on REE is very high so, as a foreign company, it is financially attractive to establish a manufacturing subsidiary in China in order to use REE. As a matter of fact

  7. Interplay of iron and rare-earth magnetic order in rare-earth iron pnictide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei-Lei, Yang; Da-Yong, Liu; Dong-Meng, Chen; Liang-Jian, Zou

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic properties of iron pnictide superconductors with magnetic rare-earth ions under strong magnetic field are investigated based on the cluster self-consistent field method. Starting from an effective Heisenberg model, we present the evolution of magnetic structures on magnetic field in R/FeAsO (R = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, and Tb) and R/Fe2As2 (R = Eu) compounds. It is found that spin-flop transition occurs in both rare-earth and iron layers under magnetic field, in good agreement with the experimental results. The interplay between rare-earth and iron spins plays a key role in the magnetic-field-driven magnetic phase transition, which suggests that the rare-earth layers can modulate the magnetic behaviors of iron layers. In addition, the factors that affect the critical magnetic field for spin-flop transition are also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11104274, 11274310, and 11474287) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 27R1310020A).

  8. Rare earth element content of thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Fowler

    2015-09-23

    Rare earth element measurements for thermal fluids from Surprise Valley, California. Samples were collected in acid washed HDPE bottles and acidified with concentrated trace element clean (Fisher Scientific) nitric acid. Samples were pre-concentratated by a factor of approximately 10 using chelating resin with and IDA functional group and measured on magnetic sector ICP-MS. Samples include Seyferth Hot Springs, Surprise Valley Resort Mineral Well, Leonard's Hot Spring, and Lake City Mud Volcano Boiling Spring.

  9. Systematic variation of rare-earth elements in cerium-earth minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Rose, H.J.; Carron, M.K.; Glass, J.J.

    1957-01-01

    In a continuation of a study reported previously, rare-earth elements and thorium have been determined in monazite, allanite, cerite, bastnaesite, and a number of miscellaneous cerium-earth minerals. A quantity called sigma (???), which is the sum of the atomic percentages of La, Ce, and Pr, is proposed as an index of composition of all cerium-earth minerals with respect to the rare-earth elements. The value of ??? for all of the minerals analysed falls between 58 and 92 atomic per cent. Monazites, allanites, and cerites cover the entire observed range, whereas bastnaesites are sharply restricted to the range between 80 and 92 atomic per cent. The minimum value of ??? for a cerium-earth mineral corresponds to the smallest possible unit-cell size of the mineral. In monazite, this structurally controlled minimum value of ??? is estimated to be around 30 atomic per cent. Neodymium, because of its abundance, and yttrium, because of its small size, have dominant roles in contraction of the structure. In the other direction, the limit of variation in composition will be reached when lanthanum becomes the sole rare-earth element in a cerium-earth mineral. Cerium-earth minerals from alkalic rocks are all characterized by values of ??? greater than 80 atomic per cent, indicating that the processes that formed these rocks were unusually efficient in fractionating the rare-earth elements-efficient in the sense that a highly selected assemblage is produced without eliminating the bulk of these elements. Analyses of inner and outer parts of two large crystals of monazite from different deposits show no difference in ??? in one crystal and a slightly smaller value of ??? in the outer part of the other crystal compared to the inner part. The ??? of monazites from pegmatites that intrude genetically related granitic rocks in North Carolina is found to be either higher or lower than the ??? of monazites in the intruded host rock. These results indicate that the fractionation of the

  10. A novel process for recovering rare earth from weathered black earth

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, R.; Zhu, G.; Zhou, Z.; Xu, Z.

    2000-02-01

    A novel process for recovering rare-earth (RE) elements from weathered-black-earth slime is developed. This process involves the initial removal of Mn by reduction leaching using SO{sub 2} followed by ammonium chloride roasting of the residual solids from the leaching process. The controlled roasting selectively converts RE oxides to water-soluble RE chlorides. The roasted materials are then dispersed in warm water (75 C) to extract RE, while water-insoluble iron oxides remain in gangue sludge, minimizing iron impurities in final RE products and hence simplifying the purification process. Lead chloride precipitates are obtained by cooling the leachate to {minus}10 C, and RE is recovered using oxalic acid precipitation. With this new process, a product of 92 pct purity at a RE recovery greater than 65 pct is obtained. In addition, Mn and Pb are recovered as by-products, with a recovery of 64 and 54 pct, respectively. The effect of operating variables on RE recovery is examined and the process chemistry described.

  11. Geochemical characteristics of dissolved rare earth elements in acid mine drainage from abandoned high-As coal mining area, southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuexian; Wu, Pan

    2017-07-15

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) represents a major source of water pollution in the small watershed of Xingren coalfield in southwestern Guizhou Province. A detailed geochemical study was performed to investigate the origin, distribution, and migration of REEs by determining the concentrations of REEs and major solutes in AMD samples, concentrations of REEs in coal, bedrocks, and sediment samples, and modeling REEs aqueous species. The results highlighted that all water samples collected in the mining area are identified as low pH, high concentrations of Fe, Al, SO4(2-) and distinctive As and REEs. The spatial distributions of REEs showed a peak in where it is nearby the location of discharging of AMD, and then decrease significantly with distance away from the mining areas. Lots of labile REEs have an origin of coal and bedrocks, whereas the acid produced by the oxidation of pyrite is a prerequisite to cause the dissolution of coal and bedrocks, and then promoting REEs release in AMD. The North American Shale Composite (NASC)-normalized REE patterns of coal and bedrocks are enriched in light REEs (LREEs) and middle REEs (MREEs) relative to heavy REEs (HREEs). Contrary to these solid samples, AMD samples showed slightly enrichment of MREEs compared with LREEs and HREEs. This behavior implied that REEs probably fractionate during acid leaching, dissolution of bedrocks, and subsequent transport, so that the MREEs is primarily enriched in AMD samples. Calculation of REEs inorganic species for AMD demonstrated that sulfate complexes (Ln(SO4)(+)and Ln(SO4)2(-)) predominate in these species, accounting for most of proportions for the total REEs species. The high concentrations of dissolved SO4(2-) and low pH play a decisive role in controlling the presence of REEs in AMD, as these conditions are necessary for formation of stable REEs-sulfate complexes in current study. The migration and transportation of REEs in AMD are more likely constrained by adsorption and co

  12. The formation of crystals in glasses containing rare earth oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd; Hrma, Pavel; Crum, Jarrod; Siong, Khoo Kok; Ngatiman, Mohammad Fadzlee; Said, Riduan Mt

    2014-02-01

    Korean spent nuclear fuel will reach the capacity of the available temporary storage by 2016. Pyroprocessing and direct disposal seems to be an alternative way to manage and reuse spent nuclear fuel while avoiding the wet reprocessing technology. Pyroprocessing produces several wastes streams, including metals, salts, and rare earths, which must be converted into stabilized form. A suitable form for rare earth immobilization is borosilicate glass. The borosilicate glass form exhibits excellent durability, allows a high waste loading, and is easy to process. In this work, we combined the rare earths waste of composition (in wt%) 39.2Nd2O3-22.7CeO2-11.7La2O3-10.9PrO2-1.3Eu2O3-1.3Gd2O3-8.1Sm2O3-4.8Y2O3 with a baseline glass of composition 60.2SiO2-16.0B2O3-12.6Na2O-3.8Al2O3-5.7CaO-1.7ZrO2. Crystallization in waste glasses occurs as the waste loading increases. It may produce complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. To study crystal formation, we initially made glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% of La2O3 and then glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% of the complete rare earth mix. Samples were heat-treated for 24 hours at temperatures 800°C to 1150°C in 50°C increments. Quenched samples were analyzed using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Stillwellite (LaBSiO5) and oxyapatite (Ca2La8Si6O26) were found in glasses containing La2O3, while oxyapatite (Ca2La8Si6O26 and NaNd9Si6O26) precipitated in glasses with additions of mixed rare earths. The liquidus temperature (TL) of the glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% La2O3 were 800°C, 959°C and 986°C, respectively; while TL was 825°C, 1059°C and 1267°C for glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% addition of mixed rare earth oxides. The component coefficients TB2O3, TSiO2, TCaO, and TRE2O3 were also evaluated using a recently published study.

  13. Rare Earth Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie T.; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study presents a spectral emittance model for films and cylinders of rare earth doped yttrium aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical film spectral emittances was found for erbium and holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. For operating conditions of interest, the film emitter experiences a linear temperature variation whereas the cylinder emitter has a more advantageous uniform temperature. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For holminum aluminum garnet film the efficiency is 0.35 at 1446K but only 0.27 at 1270 K.

  14. Thermochemistry of Rare Earth Silicates for Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are promising candidates as environmental protective coatings (EBCs) for silica-forming ceramics and composites in combustion environments since they are predicted to have lower reactivity with the water vapor combustion products. The reactivity of rare earth silicates is assessed by the thermodynamic activity of the silica component which is best measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS). Here, we discuss a novel method based on a reducing agent to increase the partial pressure of SiO(g) which is then used to calculate thermodynamic activity of silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems. After the KEMS measurements, samples were probed by X-ray diffraction and their phase content was calculated from Rietveld refinement.

  15. Rare Earth Nanoprobes for Functional Biomolecular Imaging and Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Naczynski, Dominik J.; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Moghe, Prabhas V.

    2014-01-01

    Contrast agents designed to visualize the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer pathogenesis and progression have deepened our understanding of disease complexity and accelerated the development of enhanced drug strategies targeted to specific biochemical pathways. For the next generation probes and imaging systems to be viable, they must exhibit enhanced sensitivity and robust quantitation of morphologic and contrast features, while offering the ability to resolve the disease-specific molecular signatures that may be critical to reconstitute a more comprehensive portrait of pathobiology. This feature article provides an overview on the design and advancements of emerging biomedical optical probes in general and evaluates the promise of rare earth nanoprobes, in particular, for molecular imaging and theranostics. Combined with new breakthroughs in nanoscale probe configurations, and improved dopant compositions, and multimodal infrared optical imaging, rare-earth nanoprobes can be used to address a wide variety of biomedical challenges, including deep tissue imaging, real-time drug delivery tracking and multispectral molecular profiling. PMID:24921049

  16. Electronic and vibrational spectra of some rare earth trifluoromethanesulfonates crystals.

    PubMed

    Paul, P; Ghosh, M; Neogy, D; Mallick, P K

    2011-01-01

    The Raman and infrared spectra of some rare earth (dysprosium and terbium) trifluoromethanesulfonates crystals have been analyzed. Different vibrational frequencies of trifluoromethanesulfonate ions (CF3SO3-) are identified and assigned to different vibrations of the SO3 and CF3 groups. Electronic transitions of R3+ ions (R=Dy, Tb) in these salts have been assigned to transitions from the ground to different energy levels of the ground multiplet. The electronic energy levels of the rare earth ions are also determined theoretically with the help of single electron crystal field theory. They are found to yield results not only in good agreement with the observed spectral data but also in good conformity with those obtained previously from magnetic measurements.

  17. Electronic and vibrational spectra of some rare earth trifluoromethanesulfonates crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, P.; Ghosh, M.; Neogy, D.; Mallick, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    The Raman and infrared spectra of some rare earth (dysprosium and terbium) trifluoromethanesulfonates crystals have been analyzed. Different vibrational frequencies of trifluoromethanesulfonate ions (CF 3SO 3-) are identified and assigned to different vibrations of the SO 3 and CF 3 groups. Electronic transitions of R 3+ ions (R = Dy, Tb) in these salts have been assigned to transitions from the ground to different energy levels of the ground multiplet. The electronic energy levels of the rare earth ions are also determined theoretically with the help of single electron crystal field theory. They are found to yield results not only in good agreement with the observed spectral data but also in good conformity with those obtained previously from magnetic measurements.

  18. A divalent rare earth oxide semiconductor: Yttrium monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminaga, Kenichi; Sei, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Tajiri, Hiroo; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2016-03-21

    Rare earth oxides are usually widegap insulators like Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} with closed shell trivalent rare earth ions. In this study, solid phase rock salt structure yttrium monoxide, YO, with unusual valence of Y{sup 2+} (4d{sup 1}) was synthesized in a form of epitaxial thin film by pulsed laser deposition method. YO has been recognized as gaseous phase in previous studies. In contrast with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, YO was dark-brown colored and narrow gap semiconductor. The tunable electrical conductivity ranging from 10{sup −1} to 10{sup 3} Ω{sup −1 }cm{sup −1} was attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies serving as electron donor. Weak antilocalization behavior observed in magnetoresistance indicated significant role of spin-orbit coupling as a manifestation of 4d electron carrier.

  19. Rare-Earth Activated Nitride Phosphors: Synthesis, Luminescence and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Rong-Jun; Hirosaki, Naoto; Li, Yuanqiang; Takeda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Nitridosilicates are structurally built up on three-dimensional SiN4 tetrahedral networks, forming a very interesting class of materials with high thermomechanical properties, hardness, and wide band gap. Traditionally, nitridosilicates are often used as structural materials such as abrasive particles, cutting tools, turbine blade, etc. Recently, the luminescence of rare earth doped nitridosilicates has been extensively studied, and a novel family of luminescent materials has been developed. This paper reviews the synthesis, luminescence and applications of nitridosilicate phosphors, with emphasis on rare earth nitrides in the system of M-Si-Al-O-N (M = Li, Ca, Sr, Ba, La) and their applications in white LEDs. These phosphors exhibit interesting luminescent properties, such as red-shifted excitation and emission, small Stokes shift, small thermal quenching, and high conversion efficiency, enabling them to use as down-conversion luminescent materials in white LEDs with tunable color temperature and high color rendering index.

  20. Pressure and temperature induced elastic properties of rare earth chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shriya, S.; Singh, N.; Sapkale, R.; Varshney, M.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    The pressure and temperature dependent mechanical properties as Young modulus, Thermal expansion coefficient of rare earth REX (RE = La, Pr, Eu; X = O, S, Se, and Te) chalcogenides are studied. The rare earth chalcogenides showed a structural phase transition (B1-B2). Pressure dependence of Young modulus discerns an increase in pressure inferring the hardening or stiffening of the lattice as a consequence of bond compression and bond strengthening. Suppressed Young modulus as functions of temperature infers the weakening of the lattice results in bond weakening in REX. Thermal expansion coefficient demonstrates that REX (RE = La, Pr, Eu; X = O, S, Se, and Te) chalcogenides is mechanically stiffened, and thermally softened on applied pressure and temperature.

  1. Heterometallic rare earth/group II metal chalcogenolate clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Berardini, M.; Emge, T.; Brennan, J.G. )

    1994-07-27

    Heterometallic Group II/rare earth (RE) thiolates, selenolates, and tellurolates have a broad range of potential applications in the rapidly developing field of RE-doped semiconductor technology . Given the tendency of RE chalcogenolates to form polymetallic species with bridging chalcogenolate ligands, we reasoned that RE complexes of the heavier chalcogenolates could be stabilized by bridging the chalcogenide to a softer Group II metal to form heterometallic compounds. In this paper, we show that such stabilization is significant, and we describe the isolation and structural characterization of the first two examples of a broad class of heterometallic chalcogenolate complexes having the general formula MM[prime](EPh)[sub x](L)[sub y] [M = Zn, Cd, Hg; M[prime] = divalent (x = 4) or trivalent (x = 5) rare earth; E = S, Se, Te; L = THF, pyridine]. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Rare-earth magnet ingestion: a childhood danger reaches adolescence.

    PubMed

    Agha, Beesan Shalabi; Sturm, Jesse J; Costello, Brian E

    2013-10-01

    Ingestion of multiple magnets may cause serious gastrointestinal morbidity, such as pressure necrosis, perforation, fistula formation, or intestinal obstruction due to forceful attraction across bowel wall. Although the consequences of multiple magnet ingestion are well documented in young children, the current popularity of small, powerful rare-earth magnets marketed as "desk toys" has heightened this safety concern in all pediatric age groups. A recent US Consumer Product Safety Commission product-wide warning additionally reports the adolescent practice of using toy high-powered, ball-bearing magnets to simulate tongue and lip piercings, a behavior that may increase risk of inadvertent ingestion. We describe 2 cases of older children (male; aged 10 and 13 years, respectively) with unintentional ingestion of multiple rare-earth magnets. Health care providers should be alerted to the potential for misuse of these high-powered, ball-bearing magnets among older children and adolescents.

  3. The rare earths in modern science and technology. Vol. 3

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, G.J.; Ryhne, J.J.; Silber, H.B.

    1982-01-01

    There is no other source book covering current activity in rare earth research as current or as comprehensive as The Rare Earths in Modern Science and Technology. Volume 3 of this series further expands and updates the excellent coverage of the field established in the previous two volumes. It brings together the investigative work of a significant cross section of the scientific and industrial community, including contributions from specialists in chemistry, physics, and materials science. The contributors represent an international gathering, including the first contributions to the series by scientists from the People's Republic of China. Topics examined include bioinorganic chemistry, organometallic and coordination chemistry, spectroscopy, phase equilibria and thermodynamics, structural and solid state chemistry, magnetic properties, hydrides, purification and analysis, and new applications.

  4. Pressure and temperature induced elastic properties of rare earth chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Shriya, S.; Sapkale, R. Varshney, Dinesh; Singh, N.; Varshney, M.

    2016-05-06

    The pressure and temperature dependent mechanical properties as Young modulus, Thermal expansion coefficient of rare earth REX (RE = La, Pr, Eu; X = O, S, Se, and Te) chalcogenides are studied. The rare earth chalcogenides showed a structural phase transition (B1–B2). Pressure dependence of Young modulus discerns an increase in pressure inferring the hardening or stiffening of the lattice as a consequence of bond compression and bond strengthening. Suppressed Young modulus as functions of temperature infers the weakening of the lattice results in bond weakening in REX. Thermal expansion coefficient demonstrates that REX (RE = La, Pr, Eu; X = O, S, Se, and Te) chalcogenides is mechanically stiffened, and thermally softened on applied pressure and temperature.

  5. Magnetomigration of rare-earth ions in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Franczak, Agnieszka; Binnemans, Koen; Jan Fransaer

    2016-10-05

    The effects of external inhomogenous (gradient) magnetic fields on the movement of the rare-earth ions: Dy(3+), Gd(3+) and Y(3+), in initially homogeneous aqueous solutions have been investigated. Differences in the migration of rare-earth ions in gradient magnetic fields were observed, depending on the magnetic character of the ions: paramagnetic ions of Dy(3+) and Gd(3+) move towards regions of the sample where the magnetic field gradient is the strongest, while diamagnetic ions of Y(3+) move in the opposite direction. It has been showed that the low magnetic field gradients, such the ones generated by permanent magnets, are sufficient to observe the magnetomigration effects of the ions in solution. The present work clearly establishes the behavior of magnetically different ions in initially homogeneous aqueous solutions exposed to magnetic field gradients. To this avail, a methodology for measuring the local concentration differences of metal ions in liquid samples was developed.

  6. A divalent rare earth oxide semiconductor: Yttrium monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminaga, Kenichi; Sei, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Tajiri, Hiroo; Oka, Daichi; Fukumura, Tomoteru; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    Rare earth oxides are usually widegap insulators like Y2O3 with closed shell trivalent rare earth ions. In this study, solid phase rock salt structure yttrium monoxide, YO, with unusual valence of Y2+ (4d1) was synthesized in a form of epitaxial thin film by pulsed laser deposition method. YO has been recognized as gaseous phase in previous studies. In contrast with Y2O3, YO was dark-brown colored and narrow gap semiconductor. The tunable electrical conductivity ranging from 10-1 to 103 Ω-1 cm-1 was attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies serving as electron donor. Weak antilocalization behavior observed in magnetoresistance indicated significant role of spin-orbit coupling as a manifestation of 4d electron carrier.

  7. Contamination in the Rare-Earth Element Orthophosphate Reference Samples

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, John J.; Hanchar, John M.; Picolli, Phillip M.; Schrier, Marc D.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Jarosewich, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Several of the fourteen rare-earth element (plus Sc and Y) orthophosphate standards grown at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 1980s and widely distributed by the Smithsonian Institution’s Department of Mineral Sciences, are significantly contaminated by Pb. The origin of this impurity is the Pb2P2O7 flux that is derived from the thermal decomposition of PbHPO4. The lead pyrophosphate flux is used to dissolve the oxide starting materials at elevated temperatures (≈1360 °C) prior to the crystal synthesis. Because these rare-earth element standards are extremely stable under the electron beam and considered homogenous, they have been of enormous value to electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). The monoclinic, monazite structure, orthophosphates show a higher degree of Pb incorporation than the tetragonal xenotime structure, orthophosphates. This paper will attempt to describe and rationalize the extent of the Pb contamination in these otherwise excellent materials. PMID:27446762

  8. On the structural phase transition in rare earth elpasolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selgert, P.; Lingner, C.; Lüthi, B.

    1984-09-01

    The structural phase transition in two representatives of the rare earth elpasolite fluorides, Rb2NaHoF6 and Rb2NaTmF6, are studied in detail. The symmetry of the soft mode is determined from Raman spectra, X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data to be Γ{4/+}. From the temperature dependence of the elastic constants of both compounds, estimates of various phase transition parameters are given, e.g. strain soft mode coupling constant and soft mode frequency. The softening of the elastic constants for T>T c is explained by the strain coupling to the fluctuations of the soft mode coordinates. The energy of the soft phonon at the zone boundary is estimated from the data and compared with that of K2ReCl6. The phase transition mechanisms in rare earth elpasolites and hexahalometallates are discussed.

  9. Recent developments of rare-earth-free hard-magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Pan, DeSheng; Li, ShaoJie; Zhang, ZhiDong

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in rare-earth-free hard-magnetic materials including magnetic bulk, thin films, nanocomposites and nanostructures are introduced. Since the costs of the rare-earth metals boosts up the price of the high-performance rare-earth permanent magnets, there is a much revived interest in various types of hard-magnetic materials based on rare-earth-free compounds. The 3d transition metals and their alloys with large coercivity and high Curie temperatures (working temperatures) are expected to overcome the disadvantages of rare-earth magnets. Making rare-earth-free magnets with a large energy product to meet tomorrow's energy needs is still a challenge.

  10. Magnetostatic Effects in the Nucleation of Rare Earth Ferromagnetic Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Durfee, C. S.; Flynn, C. P.

    2001-07-30

    It has been reported that superheating, supercooling, and explosive kinetics coupled to other degrees of freedom occur at the ferromagnetic transitions of Er and Dy, and that metastable phases occur during the transition kinetics of Er. We explain these observations in terms of magnetostatic energy, which requires highly eccentric nuclei in the homogeneous nucleation of magnetic transitions in heavy rare earths. The magnetostatics favor transitions through ferrimagnetic intermediaries. The unusual kinetics derive from effective spin lattice relaxation.

  11. Distribution coefficients of rare earth ions in cubic zirconium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, H.; Luther, K.-D.; Assmus, W.

    1994-08-01

    Cubic zirconium dioxide crystals are grown with the skull melting technique. The effective distribution coefficients for Nd(exp 3+), Sm(exp 3+) and Er(sup 3+) as dopants are determined experimentally as a function of the crystal growth velocity. With the Burton-Prim-Slichter theory, the equilibrium distribution coefficients can be calculated. The distribution coefficients of all other trivalent rare earth ions can be estimated by applying the correlation towards the ionic radii.

  12. Lanthanide contraction and magnetism in the heavy rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Hughes, I D; Däne, M; Ernst, A; Hergert, W; Lüders, M; Poulter, J; Staunton, J B; Svane, A; Szotek, Z; Temmerman, W M

    2007-04-05

    The heavy rare earth elements crystallize into hexagonally close packed (h.c.p.) structures and share a common outer electronic configuration, differing only in the number of 4f electrons they have. These chemically inert 4f electrons set up localized magnetic moments, which are coupled via an indirect exchange interaction involving the conduction electrons. This leads to the formation of a wide variety of magnetic structures, the periodicities of which are often incommensurate with the underlying crystal lattice. Such incommensurate ordering is associated with a 'webbed' topology of the momentum space surface separating the occupied and unoccupied electron states (the Fermi surface). The shape of this surface-and hence the magnetic structure-for the heavy rare earth elements is known to depend on the ratio of the interplanar spacing c and the interatomic, intraplanar spacing a of the h.c.p. lattice. A theoretical understanding of this problem is, however, far from complete. Here, using gadolinium as a prototype for all the heavy rare earth elements, we generate a unified magnetic phase diagram, which unequivocally links the magnetic structures of the heavy rare earths to their lattice parameters. In addition to verifying the importance of the c/a ratio, we find that the atomic unit cell volume plays a separate, distinct role in determining the magnetic properties: we show that the trend from ferromagnetism to incommensurate ordering as atomic number increases is connected to the concomitant decrease in unit cell volume. This volume decrease occurs because of the so-called lanthanide contraction, where the addition of electrons to the poorly shielding 4f orbitals leads to an increase in effective nuclear charge and, correspondingly, a decrease in ionic radii.

  13. High temperature thermodynamic behavior of the rare earth oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a review of work on rare earth (RE) oxide systems. These studies are divided into three parts: a systematic study of the decomposition of RE oxides (M-O systems); some studies of ternary systems (M/sub 1/-M/sub 2/-O); studies of the complex system (M/sub 1/-M/sub 2/-M/sub 3/...M/sub n/-O). Various results and applications of these studies are discussed. 6 figures.

  14. Modulated magnetic phases in rare earth metallic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, T. )

    1994-04-08

    Neutron scattering has played a key role in the microscopic understanding of the static and dynamic properties of magnetic materials. Modulated magnetic structures first discovered in the late fifties can no longer be referred to as exotic; more than a hundred such phases have already been found in a variety of magnetic systems. Neutron and x-ray magnetic scattering have played a complementary role in the recent discovery and understanding of the modulated magnetic phases in rare earth metallic systems.

  15. Anisotropy and Microstructure of Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    impurities, particularly calcium, magnesium aluminium, platinum and other refractory metals. Calcium-oxid precipitates are found in rare earth magnets...these compounds naturally not good. Therefore MM-Fe-B magnets might have magnet data at room temperature which are better then that of a ferrite ...different coercivity mechanisms, (e.g. rapidly quenched Nd-Fe-B magnets, Sm2 Co1, based materials but also ferrites ) are therefore in progress. 6

  16. Temperature-dependent Sellmeier equations for rare-earth sesquioxides.

    PubMed

    Zelmon, David E; Northridge, Jessica M; Haynes, Nicholas D; Perlov, Dan; Petermann, Klaus

    2013-06-01

    High-power lasers are making increasing demands on laser hosts especially in the area of thermal management. Traditional hosts, such as YAG, are unsuitable for many high-power applications and therefore, new hosts are being developed including rare-earth sesquioxides. We report new measurements of the refractive indices of these materials as functions of wavelength and temperature, which will aid in the design of laser cavities and other nonlinear optical elements.

  17. Ion probe measurement of rare earth elements in biogenic phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Grandjean, P.; Albarede, F. )

    1989-12-01

    The rare earth element (REE) distributions in individuals fish teeth and conodonts have been measured by ion probe. Concentrations and La/Yb ratios show little variations, except in the enamel, which suggests that REE uptake from the sedimented biogenic debris takes place at the water-sediment interface as an essentially quantitative process without fractionation. Late diagenetic disturbances remained of marginal importance. Hence, REE in phosphatic debris might reflect the input from the overlying water column.

  18. Observation of anomalous phonons in orthorhombic rare-earth manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Chen, H. Y.; Tyson, T. A.; Liu, Z. X.; Bai, J. M.; Wang, L. P.; Choi, Y. J.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2010-12-01

    We observe the appearance of a phonon near the lock-in temperature in orthorhombic REMnO3 (RE denotes rare earth) (RE: Lu and Ho) and anomalous phonon hardening in orthorhombic LuMnO3. The anomalous phonon occurs at the onset of spontaneous polarization. No such changes were found in incommensurate orthorhombic DyMnO3. These observations directly reveal different electric polarization mechanisms in the E-type and incommensurate-type orthorhombic REMnO3.

  19. Trade Group Rules Against China in Rare Earths Dispute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-04-01

    The World Trade Organization (WTO) has ruled against China in a trade dispute over rare earth elements (REE) as well as tungsten and molybdenum, the group announced on 26 March. The European Union, Japan, and the United States brought trade cases against China in March 2012 concerning alleged unfair export restraints on the materials (see Eos, 93(13), 134-135, doi:10.1029/2012EO130002).

  20. The Synthesis and Characterization of Some Rare Earth Arsenides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-10

    Kobzenko, V. B. Chernogorenko, S. N. L’vov, M. I. Lesnaya, and K. A. Lynchak, "Equilibrium Diagram and Properties of Alloys of the As-Nd System...Stolchiometry and Structure on Physical Properties of the Rare Earth Arsen des .................................... 24 CHAPTER 3 OBJECTIVE AND TECHNICAL...Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) ..... ........ ... .......... . 67 CHAPTER 6 DISCUSSION..... ........... - .... .... . .... .. ..... 71 6.1 Properties of HoAs(Nd

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang; Yan, Bing

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF{sub 5} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7} (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba{sub 2}LaF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er), Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed.

  2. Low frequency ultrasound (42 kHz) assisted degradation of Acid Blue 113 in the presence of visible light driven rare earth nanoclusters loaded TiO2 nanophotocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Panneerselvam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Rozas, Oscar; Mansilla, Héctor D; Gracia-Pinilla, M A; Anandan, Sambandam

    2014-09-01

    An attempt has been made to render the visible light driven photocatalytic activity to the TiO2 nanocatalysts by loading 1 wt% of rare earth (RE) nanoclusters (Gd(3+), Nd(3+) and Y(3+)) using a low frequency (42 kHz) producing commercial sonicator. The STEM-HAADF analysis confirms that the RE nanoclusters were residing at the surface of the TiO2. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses confirm that the loading of RE nanoclusters cannot make any significant changes in the crystal structure of TiO2. However, the optical properties of the resulted nanocatalysts were significantly modified and the nanocatalysts were employed to study the sonocatalytic, photocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic decolorization as well as mineralization of Acid Blue 113 (AB113). Among the experimented nanocatalysts maximum degradation of AB113 was achieved in the presence Y(3+)-TiO2 nanocatalysts. The decolorization of AB113 in the presence and absence of Y(3+) loaded TiO2 ensues the following order sonolysis

  3. Rare earth element mobility in the Roffna Gneiss, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocke, Robert D.; Hanson, Gilbert N.; Grünenfelder, Marc

    1987-02-01

    The Roffna Gneiss, a deformed Hercynian granite porphyry within the Penninic nappes of eastern Switzerland, underwent extreme cataclasis with the progressive development of phengite towards the margins of the nappe under conditions of the glaucophane schist to greenschist facies. This resulted in the selective mobilization of major and trace elements over distances of 10's to 100's of meters and the resetting of the Rb — Sr whole rock isotopic systems some 100 my ago. The component ratios and compositionvolume relationships of progressively deformed gneiss samples studied here suggest that this process was essentially isovolumetric. The mineralogy of the deformation sequence appears to have been controlled by a reaction involving the breakdown of microcline, albite and biotite and the formation of phengite and quartz. The fluids introduced Mg and H2O, promoting the development of phengite, and removed the Na being released by the breakdown of albite. The fluids were most probably derived from the surrounding Triassic carbonates and quartzites. These relatively high fO2 and carbonate rich fluids also introduced rare earth elements (REE) into the gneiss. The gneiss was progressively enriched in Eu up to 60%, Y up to 40%, and Yb up to 100%. These enrichments are associated with the development of epitaxial xenotime around zircon in the most phengite-rich sample. While the REE were mobile, uranium and thorium were essentially immobile. The formation of xenotime was suggested to explain the observed heavy REE enrichment when large differences in the REE contents were found for replicate analyses using HF and then lithium metaborate for dissolution. These differences arose because xenotime, like monazite, can be difficult (if not impossible) to dissolve in hydrofluoric acid. Due to the possibility of incomplete sample dissolution, we now recommend fusion with lithium metaborate for all REE, Lu — Hf or Sm — Nd studies.

  4. Rare Earth Doped IR Fiber Lasers For Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterowitz, Leon; Allen, Roger

    1989-06-01

    Trivalent rare earth doped lasers in fluorozirconate glasses and fibers that lase between 2 and 3 μm are reviewed. There have been a large number of laser-fiber optic systems below 2pm developed for clinical microsurgery at a variety of sites. The required flexibility of the fiber optic waveguide varies with the clinical use, such as: intraocular (through a small diameter rigid tube), endoscopically accessible pulmonary and gastric mucosa (through a port of a fiber-optic endoscope of intermediate flexibility), and intra-arterial (as an integral part of a flexible catheter, which in the case of the coronaries must be very flexible so as to negotiate abrupt bends and bifurcations without damage to the vessels). Laser energy absorbed by tissue is capable of coagulation of tissue (denaturation of structural proteins), melting of fatty deposits or other structures (solid or gel to liquid phase transitions), as well as direct breakage of chemical bonds by high energy photons. It is of general interest to develop a pulsed laser system transmitted through flexible fiber optics that is capable of precise ablation of targeted tissue with minimal damage to the remaining tissue. Ideally, the device should be able to ablate any tissue because of the general absorptive properties of tissue, and not a specific chromophore such as melanin or hemoglobin, the concentration of which varies widely among tissues. Two obvious ubiquitous chromophores have been widely discussed: 1) proteins and nucleic acids whose high concentration and absorption coefficients lead to strong tissue absorption in the ultraviolet and 2) water whose strong infrared absorption bands have been widely utilized in CO2 laser surgery. Non-linear absorption occurring at very high power densities (~1 GW/cm2) has been shown to be very effective for non-invasive ocular (an optically transparent field) microsurgery at the image plane of a slit lamp, but this approach appears impractical in fiber optic systems because

  5. Magnetism of perovskite cobaltites with Kramers rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jirák, Z. Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Novák, P.; Šantavá, E.; Fujishiro, H.

    2014-05-07

    The band-gap insulators RECoO{sub 3} (RE = Nd{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, and Dy{sup 3+}) with Co{sup 3+} ions stabilized in the non-magnetic low-spin state have been investigated by specific heat measurements. The experiments evidence an antiferromagnetic ordering of the rare earths with Néel temperature of T{sub N} = 1.25, 1.50, and 3.60 K for NdCoO{sub 3}, SmCoO{sub 3}, and DyCoO{sub 3}, respectively. With increasing external field, the lambda peak in specific heat, indicative of the transition, shifts to lower temperatures and vanishes for field of about 3 T. Starting from this point, a broader Schottky peak is formed, centered in 1 K range, and its position is moved to higher temperatures proportionally to applied field. The origin of the peak is in Zeeman splitting of the ground Kramers doublet, and the gradual shift with field defines effective g-factors for the rare-earth pseudospins in studied compounds. The results obtained are confronted with the calculations of crystal field splitting of the rare-earth multiplets.

  6. Alternatives to Rare Earth Permanent Magnets for Energy Harvesting Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazdozian, Helena; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Direct-drive permanent magnet generators (DDPMGs) offer increased reliability and efficiency over the more commonly used geared doubly-fed induction generator, yet are only employed in less than 1 percent of utility scale wind turbines in the U.S. One major barrier to increased deployment of DDPMGs in the U.S. wind industry is NdFeB permanent magnets (PMs), which contain critical rare earth elements Nd and Dy. To allow for the use of rare earth free PMs, the magnetic loading, defined as the average magnetic flux density over the rotor surface, must be maintained. Halbach cylinders are employed in 3.5kW Halbach PMGs (HPMGs) of varying slot-to-pole ratio to concentrate the magnetic flux output by a lower energy density PM over the rotor surface. We found that for high pole and slot number, the increase in magnetic loading is sufficient to allow for the use of strontium iron oxide hard ferrite PMs and achieved rated performance. Joule losses in the stator windings were found to increase for the hard ferrite PMs due to increased inductance in the stator windings. However, for scaling of the HPMG designs to 3MW, rated performance and high efficiency were achieved, demonstrating the potential for elimination for rare earth PMs in commercial scale wind turbines. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1069283 and a Barbara and James Palmer Endowment at Iowa State University.

  7. Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Castleman, A. W.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REs) consist of a very important group in the periodic table that is vital to many modern technologies. The mining process, however, is extremely damaging to the environment, making them low yield and very expensive. Therefore, mimicking the properties of REs in a superatom framework is especially valuable but at the same time, technically challenging and requiring advanced concepts about manipulating properties of atom/molecular complexes. Herein, by using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we provide original idea and direct experimental evidence that chosen boron-doped clusters could mimic the magnetic characteristics of REs. Specifically, the neutral LaB and NdB clusters are found to have similar unpaired electrons and magnetic moments as their isovalent REs (namely Nd and Eu, respectively), opening up the great possibility in accomplishing rare earth mimicry. Extension of the superatom concept into the rare earth group not only further shows the power and advance of this concept but also, will stimulate more efforts to explore new superatomic clusters to mimic the chemistry of these heavy atoms, which will be of great importance in designing novel building blocks in the application of cluster-assembled nanomaterials. Additionally, based on these experimental findings, a novel “magic boron” counting rule is proposed to estimate the numbers of unpaired electrons in diatomic LnB clusters. PMID:25848014

  8. Correlations in rare-earth transition-metal permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Skomski, R. Manchanda, P.; Kashyap, A.

    2015-05-07

    It is investigated how electron-electron correlations affect the intrinsic properties of rare-earth transition-metal magnets. Focusing on orbital moment and anisotropy, we perform model calculations for 3d-4f alloys and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for NdCo{sub 5}. On an independent-electron level, the use of a single Slater determinant with broken spin symmetry introduces Hund's rule correlations, which govern the behavior of rare-earth ions and of alloys described by the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and LSDA + U approximations to DFT. By contrast, rare-earth ions in intermetallics involve configuration interactions between two or more Slater determinants and lead to phenomena such as spin-charge distribution. Analyzing DFT as a Legendre transformation and using Bethe's crystal-field theory, we show that the corresponding density functionals are very different from familiar LSDA-type expressions and outline the effect of spin-charge separation on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  9. Uncovering the end uses of the rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoyue; Graedel, T E

    2013-09-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) are a group of fifteen elements with unique properties that make them indispensable for a wide variety of emerging and conventional established technologies. However, quantitative knowledge of REE remains sparse, despite the current heightened interest in future availability of the resources. Mining is heavily concentrated in China, whose monopoly position and potential restriction of exports render primary supply vulnerable to short term disruption. We have drawn upon the published literature and unpublished materials in different languages to derive the first quantitative annual domestic production by end use of individual rare earth elements from 1995 to 2007. The information is illustrated in Sankey diagrams for the years 1995 and 2007. Other years are available in the supporting information. Comparing 1995 and 2007, the production of the rare earth elements in China, Japan, and the US changed dramatically in quantities and structure. The information can provide a solid foundation for industries, academic institutions and governments to make decisions and develop strategies.

  10. Three-tier rare-earth imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Brodeur, A.E.; Silberstein, M.J.; Graviss, E.R.; Ferguson, T.L.; Ortmeyer, K.M.; Nalesnik, W.J.

    1981-04-01

    The increased efficiency of gadolinium oxysulfide intensifying screens as compared to calcium tungstate screens depends primarily on increased absorption of x-ray photons coupled with a twofold increase in light output. Whether this increased efficiency can be effectively used in a routine diagnostic department to significantly decrease radiation dose was the subject of this study. Consecutive radiographic examinations (5806) were conducted using these rare earth screens. Each radiographic room used three individual rare earth screen/orthochromatic film combinations in order to obtain different speeds. These were labeled A, B, and C and ranged from par speed high detail to ultra high speed with less detail but correspondingly less patient radiation exposure. The system selected for a particular examination was based on the radiologists' requirements for imaging of anatomic detail. Those examinations requiring less detailed resolution (such as bone alignment through a wet plaster cast) were assigned the fastest speed available. The use of a rare earth/3-tier system resulted in an overall reduction in radiation exposure of about 80%.

  11. Microstructural defects in some rare earth laves phase single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Y.J.; Abell, J.S. . School of Metallurgy and Materials.)

    1993-08-15

    With the extensive research in magnetic behavior of rare earth intermetallic compounds, more specific microstructural characterization on the available single crystals is obviously necessary because many interpretations of the physical property measurements can be particularly dependent on the knowledge of the microstructural defects, impurity distributions, etc. Among the more interesting and also the most extensively investigated rare earth intermetallics are RAl[sub 2](R = rare earth elements) compounds, which have the C15 cubic Laves phase structure with the tetrahedra of smaller Al atoms residing at the four corners of the cubic cell. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the nature of the magnetism of RAl[sub 2] single crystals by neutron diffraction, e.g. heat capacity measurements, x-ray topography, etc., little work has been performed on characterization of microstructural defects and their effects on physical property measurements. In this work, the authors report a microstructural study on as-grown single crystals of CeAl[sub 2] and TbAl[sub 2] by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The presence of (001) growth faults in CeAl[sub 2] single crystals and (111) planar defects in TbAl[sub 2] single crystals have been identified, and the possible formation mechanism and the influence on the magnetic properties are discussed.

  12. Correlations in rare-earth transition-metal permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, R.; Manchanda, P.; Kashyap, A.

    2015-05-01

    It is investigated how electron-electron correlations affect the intrinsic properties of rare-earth transition-metal magnets. Focusing on orbital moment and anisotropy, we perform model calculations for 3d-4f alloys and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for NdCo5. On an independent-electron level, the use of a single Slater determinant with broken spin symmetry introduces Hund's rule correlations, which govern the behavior of rare-earth ions and of alloys described by the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and LSDA + U approximations to DFT. By contrast, rare-earth ions in intermetallics involve configuration interactions between two or more Slater determinants and lead to phenomena such as spin-charge distribution. Analyzing DFT as a Legendre transformation and using Bethe's crystal-field theory, we show that the corresponding density functionals are very different from familiar LSDA-type expressions and outline the effect of spin-charge separation on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  13. Properties of rare-earth iron garnets from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, Ryan; Xu, Bin; Xu, Changsong; Xu, Hu; Bellaiche, L.

    2017-01-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of rare-earth iron garnets (RIG), which contain 160 atoms per unit cell, are systematically investigated for rare-earth elements varying from La to Lu (and including Y), by performing spin polarized density-functional calculations. The effects of 4 f electrons (as core or as valence electrons) on the lattice constant, internal coordinates, and bond lengths are found to be rather small, with these predicted structural properties agreeing rather well with available experiments. On the other hand, treating such electrons as valence electrons is essential to interpret the total magnetization measured in some RIG at low temperature, the different orientation and magnitude of the magnetizations that Fe and rare-earth ions can adopt and to also explain why some RIG have a compensation temperature while others do not. The magnetic exchange couplings and orbital-projected density of states are also reported for two representative materials, namely Gd3Fe5O12 and Nd3Fe5O12 , when accounting for their 4 f electrons.

  14. Development of rare earth regenerator materials in fine wire form

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, T.; Seuntjens, J.M.

    1997-06-01

    The use of rare earth metals, both in the pure and alloyed state, have been examined for use as regenerators in cryocooler applications and as the working material in active magnetic refrigerators. In both applications there is a requirement for the rare earth material to have a constant and uniform cross section, an average size on the order of 50-200 microns in diameter, and low levels of impurities. Existing powder production methods have drawbacks such as oxygen contamination, non-uniform size, inconsistent cross sections, and low production yields. A novel approach for the production of rare earth metals and alloys in fine wire form has been developed. This is accomplished by assembling a copperjacket and niobium barrier around a RE ingot, extruding the assembly, and reducing it with standard wire drawing practices. Strand anneals are utilized between drawing passes when necessary in order to recrystallize the RE core and restore ductility. The copperjacket is removed by chemical means at final size, leaving the Nb barrier in place as a protective coating. This process has been applied to gadolinium, dysprosium and a GdDy alloy.

  15. Effect of rare earth oxides for improvement of MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Ken-ichiro; Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Koichi; Mitsushima, Shigenori; Kamiya, Nobuyuki

    The solubility of rare earth metal oxides and their effect on the NiO solubility have been discussed to stabilize the cathode of molten carbonate fuel cells. The solubility of Ho, Yb, and Nd oxides were 4.4 × 10 -4, 3.4 × 10 -4, and 1.3 × 10 -3 (mole fraction) at 923 K, respectively. The solubilities of NiO in (Li 0.52/Na 0.48) 2CO 3 with the saturated Ho, Yb, and Nd were 1.57 × 10 -5, 1.41 × 10 -5, and 9.5 × 10 -6, respectively. Among these three, Nd, which has the highest solubility in the carbonates, reduced the NiO solubility most; although, the La reduced the NiO solubility more than Nd. The logarithm of the solubility of the rare earth metal oxides has a linear relation to the Coulomb force ratio between the rare earth metal and the alkaline metal. Following this relation, the La should have the highest solubility among all the lanthanides. The basicity which NiO solubility closely relates has a linear relationship to the Coulomb force parameter of the melts. Based on these two models, the La would be the best additive to reduce the NiO solubility in Li/Na eutectic carbonate melt, among all the lanthanides.

  16. Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Castleman, A W

    2015-04-21

    Rare earth elements (REs) consist of a very important group in the periodic table that is vital to many modern technologies. The mining process, however, is extremely damaging to the environment, making them low yield and very expensive. Therefore, mimicking the properties of REs in a superatom framework is especially valuable but at the same time, technically challenging and requiring advanced concepts about manipulating properties of atom/molecular complexes. Herein, by using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we provide original idea and direct experimental evidence that chosen boron-doped clusters could mimic the magnetic characteristics of REs. Specifically, the neutral LaB and NdB clusters are found to have similar unpaired electrons and magnetic moments as their isovalent REs (namely Nd and Eu, respectively), opening up the great possibility in accomplishing rare earth mimicry. Extension of the superatom concept into the rare earth group not only further shows the power and advance of this concept but also, will stimulate more efforts to explore new superatomic clusters to mimic the chemistry of these heavy atoms, which will be of great importance in designing novel building blocks in the application of cluster-assembled nanomaterials. Additionally, based on these experimental findings, a novel "magic boron" counting rule is proposed to estimate the numbers of unpaired electrons in diatomic LnB clusters.

  17. Rare-earth distribution behaviour and lattice parameter changes on rare-earth substituted garnet single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, H.; Numazawa, T.; Sato, M.

    1994-08-01

    The selection of rare-earth substituted Ga and Al garnets in solid solution and their growth to single crystals using the conventional Czochralski technique is described. The crystals grown were investigated for their distribution behavior and lattice parameter changes in order to understand their characteristics in the solid solution. Investigation was by means of an ICP chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis with powdered samples ground from wafers taken from both the tops and tails of the crystals grown.

  18. Investigations into Rare Earth Oxide Use and Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryce, Owen

    2010-05-01

    The use of tracers which are applied to soils (distinguishable from tracers naturally present in soils) is increasing. Rare earth oxides (REOs) are the most prevalent of the sediment tracers used to tag soils in this manner. REOs have been applied in a host of different countries, at a range of scales e.g. over watersheds in the USA (Polyakov and Nearing, 2004; Kimoto et al., 2006); to examine rill erosion in China (Li et al., 2006); and to investigate the importance of topographical features in arable fields in the EU (Stevens and Quinton, 2008). Many successful experiments have been conducted using the suit of REO tracers, yielding important information on the behaviour of eroding sediments. However, the majority of publications have focused upon application of REO tracers, applying the tagging and extraction methods developed by Zhang et al., (2001, 2003). Furthermore, the techniques presently being used are known to generate methodological inaccuracies, such as tracer enrichment and non-uniform REO distributions on experimental plots, and analytical interferences when ICP-MS is used for tracer quantification. Unanswered questions regarding the use of REO tracers include: i) what is the effect upon soil of REO tagging?; ii) how is a uniform distribution of REOs in tagged soil achieved? iii) which is the most suitable way of applying REOs, to experimental plots of different scale, and to meet different objectives?; iv) which REOs are unsuitable for sediment tracing?; v) what is the most precise and efficient method of extracting REO tracers from sediments? vi) is the transport behaviour of REO tracers comparable to untagged soils? In an attempt to answer some of these questions, investigations have been conducted into the effect upon soil particle size of different methods of REO tagging. The ability of these methods to provide uniform distributions of REOs in the tagged soil was calculated. The accuracy and precision of published (Zhang et al., 2003; Stevens and

  19. Experimental productivity rate optimization of rare earth element separation through preparative solid phase extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Max-Hansen, Mark; Jönsson, Christian; Borg, Niklas; Nilsson, Bernt

    2014-06-27

    Separating individual rare earth elements from a complex mixture with several elements is difficult and this is emphasized for the middle elements: Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium. In this study we have accomplished an overloaded one-step separation of these rare earth elements through preparative ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with an bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid impregnated column and nitric acid as eluent. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry unit was used for post column element detection. The main focus was to optimize the productivity rate, subject to a yield requirement of 80% and a purity requirement of 99% for each element, by varying the flow rate and batch load size. The optimal productivity rate in this study was 1.32kgSamarium/(hmcolumn(3)), 0.38kgEuropium/(hmcolumn(3)) and 0.81kgGadolinium/(hmcolumn(3)).

  20. Coal fly ash as a resource for rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Franus, Wojciech; Wiatros-Motyka, Małgorzata M; Wdowin, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) have been recognised as critical raw materials, crucial for many clean technologies. As the gap between their global demand and supply increases, the search for their alternative resources becomes more and more important, especially for the countries which depend highly on their import. Coal fly ash (CFA), which when not utilised is considered waste, has been regarded as the possible source of many elements, including REE. Due to the increase in the energy demand, CFA production is expected to grow, making research into the use of this material a necessity. As Poland is the second biggest coal consumer in the European Union, the authors have studied different coal fly ashes from ten Polish power plants for their rare earth element content. All the fly ashes have a broadly similar distribution of rear earth elements, with light REE being dominant. Most of the samples have REE content relatively high and according to Seredin and Dai (Int J Coal Geol 94: 67-93, 2012) classification can be considered promising REE raw materials.

  1. Low temperature route for the synthesis of rare earth transition metal borides and their hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Kramp, S.; Febri, M.; Joubert, J.C.

    1997-10-01

    Synthesis of rare earth-based alloys by the ORD technique consists in the reduction of rare earth oxides in a melt of calcium under argon, and simultaneous diffusion-reaction of the just formed rare earth metal with the other elements. This method has been applied with success to numerous ternary borides containing transition metals such as the magnetic alloys Y{sub 2}Co{sub 14}B, LnCo{sub 4}B, and YCo{sub 3}B{sub 2}. By using a small excess of Ca, boride particles grow in a viscous slurry media containing unreacted (melted) Ca and nanosize CaO particles. Single phase boride alloys can be obtained at 1000{degrees}C as loose micrometer-size particles of very high crystal quality as confirmed by the sharp diffraction peaks on the corresponding X-ray diagrams. Particles can be easily recovered by gentle wishing in diluted weak acid solution, and dried under vacuum at room temperature. This rather low temperature technique is particularly adapted to the synthesis of incongruent melting phases, as well as for the alloys containing volatile rare earth elements (Sm, Yb, Tb,...).

  2. A Low Temperature Route for the Synthesis of Rare Earth Transition Metal Borides and Their Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramp, S.; Febri, M.; Joubert, J. C.

    1997-10-01

    Synthesis of rare earth-based alloys by the ORD technique consists in the reduction of rare earth oxides in a melt of calcium under argon, and simultaneous diffusion-reaction of the just formed rare earth metal with the other elements. This method has been applied with success to numerous ternary borides containing transition metals such as the magnetic alloys Y2Co14B, LnCo4B, and YCo3B2. By using a small excess of Ca, boride particles grow in a viscous slurry media containing unreacted (melted) Ca and nanosize CaO particles. Single phase boride alloys can be obtained at 1000°C as loose micrometer-size particles of very high crystal quality as confirmed by the sharp diffraction peaks on the corresponding X-ray diagrams. Particles can be easily recovered by gentle washing in diluted weak acid solution, and dried under vacuum at room temperature. This rather low temperature technique is particularly adapted to the synthesis of incongruent melting phases, as well as for the alloys containing volatile rare earth elements (Sm, Yb, Tb,…).

  3. 77 FR 58578 - Certain Sintered Rare Earth Magnets, Methods of Making Same and Products Containing Same...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... COMMISSION Certain Sintered Rare Earth Magnets, Methods of Making Same and Products Containing Same... the sale within the United States after importation of certain sintered rare earth magnets, methods of... after importation of certain sintered rare earth magnets, methods of making same and products...

  4. Rare Earth Elements in National Defense: Background, Oversight Issues, and Options for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-17

    production to meet demands), 23 materials were found to represent a potential shortfall. This study included all rare earth elements, except promethium ...retrieving them are challenging. Rare earths are divided into two groups: light rare earths (lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium , and

  5. The formation of crystals in glasses containing rare earth oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd; Hrma, Pavel; Crum, Jarrod; Siong, Khoo Kok; Ngatiman, Mohammad Fadzlee; Said, Riduan Mt

    2014-02-12

    Korean spent nuclear fuel will reach the capacity of the available temporary storage by 2016. Pyroprocessing and direct disposal seems to be an alternative way to manage and reuse spent nuclear fuel while avoiding the wet reprocessing technology. Pyroprocessing produces several wastes streams, including metals, salts, and rare earths, which must be converted into stabilized form. A suitable form for rare earth immobilization is borosilicate glass. The borosilicate glass form exhibits excellent durability, allows a high waste loading, and is easy to process. In this work, we combined the rare earths waste of composition (in wt%) 39.2Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–22.7CeO{sub 2}–11.7La{sub 2}O{sub 3}–10.9PrO{sub 2}–1.3Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}–1.3Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–8.1Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–4.8Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} with a baseline glass of composition 60.2SiO{sub 2}–16.0B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–12.6Na{sub 2}O–3.8Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–5.7CaO–1.7ZrO{sub 2}. Crystallization in waste glasses occurs as the waste loading increases. It may produce complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. To study crystal formation, we initially made glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and then glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% of the complete rare earth mix. Samples were heat-treated for 24 hours at temperatures 800°C to 1150°C in 50°C increments. Quenched samples were analyzed using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Stillwellite (LaBSiO{sub 5}) and oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) were found in glasses containing La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26} and NaNd{sub 9}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) precipitated in glasses with additions of mixed rare earths. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) of the glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were 800°C, 959°C and 986°C, respectively; while T{sub L} was 825°C, 1059°C and 1267°C for glasses

  6. Pb and rare earth element diffusion in xenotime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Diffusion of Pb and the rare earth elements Sm, Dy and Yb have been characterized in synthetic xenotime under dry conditions. The synthetic xenotime was grown via a Na 2CO 3-MoO 3 flux method. The sources of diffusant for the rare earth diffusion experiments were REE phosphate powders, with experiments run using sources containing a single REE. For Pb, the source consisted a mixture of YPO 4 and PbTiO 3. Experiments were performed by placing source and xenotime in Pt capsules, and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 30 min to several weeks, at temperatures from 1000 to 1500 °C. The REE and Pb distributions in the xenotime were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relations are obtained for diffusion in xenotime, normal to (101): D=1.5×10exp⁡(-441±12 kJmol/R⁢T)ms.D=9.0×10exp⁡(-349±16 kJmol/R⁢T)ms.D=3.9×10exp⁡(-362±13 kJmol/R⁢T)ms. Diffusivities among the REE do not differ greatly in xenotime over the investigated temperature range, in contrast to findings for the REE in zircon [Cherniak, D.J., Hanchar, J.M., Watson, E.B., 1997. Rare earth diffusion in zircon. Chem. Geol. 134, 289-301.], where the LREE diffuse more slowly, and with higher activation energies for diffusion, than the heavier rare earths. In zircon, these differences among diffusion of the rare earths are attributed to the relatively large size of the REE with respect to Zr, for which they likely substitute in the zircon lattice. With the systematic increase in ionic radius from the heavy to lighter REE, this size mismatch becomes more pronounced and diffusivities of the LREE are as consequence slower. Although xenotime is isostructural with zircon, the REE are more closely matched in size to Y, so in xenotime this effect appears much smaller and the REE diffuse at similar rates. In addition, the process of diffusion in xenotime likely involves simple REE + 3 → Y + 3 exchange, without charge compensation as needed

  7. Biological applications of rare-earth based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bouzigues, Cedric; Gacoin, Thierry; Alexandrou, Antigoni

    2011-11-22

    Biomedicine and cell and molecular biology require powerful imaging techniques of the single molecule scale to the whole organism, either for fundamental science or diagnosis. These applications are however often limited by the optical properties of the available probes. Moreover, in cell biology, the measurement of the cell response with spatial and temporal resolution is a central instrumental problem. This has been one of the main motivations for the development of new probes and imaging techniques either for biomolecule labeling or detection of an intracellular signaling species. The weak photostability of genetically encoded probes or organic dyes has motivated the interest for different types of nanoparticles for imaging such as quantum dots, nanodiamonds, dye-doped silica particles, or metallic nanoparticles. One of the most active fields of research in the past decade has thus been the development of rare-earth based nanoparticles, whose optical properties and low cytotoxicity are promising for biological applications. Attractive properties of rare-earth based nanoparticles include high photostability, absence of blinking, extremely narrow emission lines, large Stokes shifts, long lifetimes that can be exploited for retarded detection schemes, and facile functionalization strategies. The use of specific ions in their compositions can be moreover exploited for oxidant detection or for implementing potent contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. In this review, we present these different applications of rare-earth nanoparticles for biomolecule detection and imaging in vitro, in living cells or in small animals. We highlight how chemical composition tuning and surface functionalization lead to specific properties, which can be used for different imaging modalities. We discuss their performances for imaging in comparison with other probes and to what extent they could constitute a central tool in the future of molecular and cell biology. © 2011 American

  8. Hydrometallurgical separation of rare earth elements, cobalt and nickel from spent nickel-metal-hydride batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Luiz Eduardo Oliveira Carmo; Mansur, Marcelo Borges

    The separation of rare earth elements, cobalt and nickel from NiMH battery residues is evaluated in this paper. Analysis of the internal content of the NiMH batteries shows that nickel is the main metal present in the residue (around 50% in weight), as well as potassium (2.2-10.9%), cobalt (5.1-5.5%), rare earth elements (15.3-29.0%) and cadmium (2.8%). The presence of cadmium reveals that some Ni-Cd batteries are possibly labeled as NiMH ones. The leaching of nickel and cobalt from the NiMH battery powder with sulfuric acid is efficient; operating variables temperature and concentration of H 2O 2 has no significant effect for the conditions studied. A mixture of rare earth elements is separated by precipitation with NaOH. Finally, solvent extraction with D2EHPA (di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid) followed by Cyanex 272 (bis-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid) can separate cadmium, cobalt and nickel from the leach liquor. The effect of the main operating variables of both leaching and solvent extraction steps are discussed aiming to maximize metal separation for recycling purposes.

  9. Spiral formation during Czochralski growth of rare-earth scandates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uecker, R.; Wilke, H.; Schlom, D. G.; Velickov, B.; Reiche, P.; Polity, A.; Bernhagen, M.; Rossberg, M.

    2006-09-01

    Single crystals of the rare-earth scandates DyScO 3, GdScO 3, SmScO 3, and NdScO 3 were grown by the Czochralski technique. The influence of the absorption of radiant heat in the growing crystals on interface stability was investigated. Numerical simulations were performed to calculate the influence of thermal instabilities close to the growth interface on the axial symmetry of the flow field, which eventually leads to spiral growth. To inhibit spiral formation, a conical baffle was utilized to intensifying the buoyant-thermocapillary convection.

  10. Observation of Anomalous Phonons in Orthorhombic Rare-earth Manganites

    SciTech Connect

    P Gao; H Chen; T Tyson; Z Liu; J Bai; L Wang; Y Chio; S Cheong

    2011-12-31

    We observe the appearance of a phonon near the lock-in temperature in orthorhombic REMnO{sub 3} (RE denotes rare earth) (RE: Lu and Ho) and anomalous phonon hardening in orthorhombic LuMnO{sub 3}. The anomalous phonon occurs at the onset of spontaneous polarization. No such changes were found in incommensurate orthorhombic DyMnO{sub 3}. These observations directly reveal different electric polarization mechanisms in the E-type and incommensurate-type orthorhombic REMnO{sub 3}.

  11. Are rare-earth nanoparticles suitable for in vivo applications?

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyan; Hou, Yi; Gao, Mingyuan

    2014-10-29

    Rare earth (RE) nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their unique optical and magnetic properties associated with f-electrons. The recent accomplishments in RE nanoparticle synthesis have aroused great interest of scientists to further explore their biomedical applications. This Research News summarizes recent achievements in controlled synthesis of magnetic and luminescent RE nanoparticles, surface modification, and toxicity studies of RE nanomaterials, and highlights state-of-the-art in in vivo applications of RE nanoparticles. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Recycling of rare earth particle by mini-hydrocyclones.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Feng; Fu, Jian; Cheng, Hao; Cui, Zhengwei

    2017-03-01

    Mini-hydrocyclones were applied to separate the fine rare earth particles from the suspensions. The effects of the flow rate, split ratio, and feed concentration on the total separation efficiency and grade separation efficiency were studied. The combined effects of the flow rate (1200-1600L/h), split ratio (20-60%) and concentration (0.6-1.0wt%) on the total separation efficiency in mini-hydrocyclones were investigated using a response surface methodology. The optimum operating parameters for a total separation efficiency of 92.5% were: feed flow rate=1406L/h, split ratio=20%, and feed concentration=1wt%.

  13. Rare earth element patterns in biotite, muscovite and tourmaline minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.

    1986-04-21

    Rare earth element concentrations in the minerals biotite and muscovite from the mica schist country rocks of the Etta pegmatite and tourmalines from the Bob Ingersoll pegmatite have been measured by INAA and CNAA. The concentrations range from 10/sup -4/ g/g to 10/sup -10g//sub g/. The REE patterns of biotite, muscovite and tourmaline reported herein are highly fractionated from light to heavy REE. The REE concentrations in biotite and muscovite are high and indigenous. The pegmatite tourmalines contain low concentrations of REE. Variations in tourmaline REE patterns reflect the geochemical evolution of pegmatite melt/fluid system during crystallization.

  14. On the brittle nature of rare earth pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Shriya, S.; Sapkale, R.; Varshney, Dinesh E-mail: sapkale.raju@rediffmail.com; Singh, N.; Varshney, M.

    2016-05-23

    The high-pressure structural phase transition and pressure as well temperature induced elastic properties in ReY; (Re = La, Sc, Pr; Y = N, P, As, Sb, Bi) pnictides have been performed using effective interionic interaction potential with emphasis on charge transfer interactions and covalent contribution. Estimated values of phase transition pressure and the volume discontinuity in pressure-volume phase diagram indicate the structural phase transition from NaCl to CsCl structure. From the investigations of elastic constants the pressure (temperature) dependent volume collapse/expansion, second order Cauchy discrepancy, anisotropy, hardness and brittle/ductile nature of rare earth pnictides are computed.

  15. Small hole polarons in rare-earth titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Bjaalie, L.; Moetakef, P.; Cain, T. A.; Janotti, A.; Himmetoglu, B.; Stemmer, S.; Van de Walle, C. G.; Ouellette, D. G.; Allen, S. J.

    2015-06-08

    We investigate the behavior of hole polarons in rare-earth titanates by combining optical conductivity measurements with first-principles hybrid density functional calculations. Sr-doped GdTiO{sub 3} (Gd{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3}) was grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We show that a feature in the optical conductivity that was previously identified with the Mott-Hubbard gap is actually associated with the excitation of a small polaron. The assignment is based on an excellent match between the experimental spectra and first-principles calculations for polaron excitation mechanisms.

  16. Double-exchange mechanism in rare-earth compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gulacsi, M.

    2015-03-15

    We show that double-exchange mechanism is responsible for ferromagnetism in low dimensional rare-earth compounds. We use the bosonized version of the one-dimensional Anderson lattice model in Toulouse limit to characterize the properties of the emerging ferromagnetic phase. We give a comprehensive description of the ferromagnetic ordering of the correlated electrons which appears at intermediate couplings and doping. The obtained ferromagnetic phase transitions have been identified to be an order–disorder transition of the quantum random transverse-field Ising type.

  17. Synthesis and luminescence of some rare earth metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, Mikhail N.; Pushkarev, Anatoly P.

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper the synthesis, photoand electroluminescent properties of new rare earth metal complexes prepared and studied at the Razuvaev Institute of Organometallic Chemistry during the last decade are reviewed. The obtained compounds give luminescence in UV, visible and NIR regions. The substituted phenolates, naphtholates, mercaptobenzothiazolate, 8-oxyquinolinolate, polyfluorinated alcoholates and chalcogenophosphinates were used as ligands. The synthesis and structure of unusual three-nuclear sulfidenitride clusters of Nd and Dy are described. The new excitation mechanism of ytterbium phenolates and naphtholates, which includes the stage of reversible reduction of Yb to divalent state and oxidation of the ligands in the excitation process, is discussed.

  18. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Feromagnetic Rare-Earth Cobalite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Rare-Earth manganites and cobalites with the perovskite structure have been a subject of great recent interest because their electrical resistance changes significantly when a magnetic field is applied...we have studied the Hall effect in thin film La(sub 0.5)Ca(sub 0.5)CoO(sub 3) material and have obtained convincing evidence fo the so called anomalous Hall effect, typical for magnetic metals...Our results suggest that near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature, the dominant electron scattering mechanism is the spin fluctuation.

  19. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.M.

    1988-11-10

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 1/) in single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/ and Er/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 11/) in single crystals of ErPO/sub 4/. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs.

  20. Magnetism in rare-earth quasicrystals: RKKY interactions and ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiem, Stefanie; Chalker, J. T.

    2015-04-01

    We study magnetism in simple models for rare-earth quasicrystals, by considering Ising spins on a quasiperiodic tiling, coupled via RKKY interactions. Computing these interactions from a tight-binding model on the tiling, we find that they are frustrated and strongly dependent on the local environment. Although such features are often associated with spin glass behaviour, we show using Monte Carlo simulations that the spin system has a phase transition to a low-temperature state with long-range quasiperiodic magnetic order.

  1. Raman Investigations of Rare Earth Arsenate Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, G; Santos, C. C.; Ayala, A. P.; Guedes, I.; Boatner, Lynn A; Loong, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    Polarized Raman Spectroscopy was used to investigate the room-temperature phonon characteristics of a series of rare-earth arsenate (REAsO4, RE = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Tm, Yb, and Lu) single crystals. The Raman data were interpreted in a systematic manner based on the known tetragonal zircon structure of these compounds, and assignments and correlations were made for the observed bands. We found that the wavenumber of the internal modes of the AsO4 tetrahedron increased with increasing atomic number, and for three out of four lattice wavenumbers observed, this tendency was not nearly so marked as in the case of the internal mode wavenumber.

  2. Fundamental magnetic studies of iron-rare-earth-metalloid alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjipanayis, G.C.

    1990-01-01

    Objective was to understand strongly magnetic rare earth-transition metal compounds and alloys, with potential use as hard or semi-hard permanent magnet materials. Efforts were focused on three areas: search for Fe-rich new phases and compounds with high magnetization, anisotropy, and Curie temperature; use of rapid solidification (melt-spinning) to produce fine grain and high coercivity; and relation of hard magnetic properties to microstructure and domain structure. Coercivities of up to 10 to 15 kOe have been produced.

  3. Crystal growth of pyrochlore rare-earth stannates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, D.; Wang, S.; Boothroyd, A. T.

    2017-06-01

    We report crystal growth of several rare-earth stannates RE2Sn2O7 (RE=Pr, Tb, Ho, Dy, Yb and Lu) using the flux technique. Different combinations of flux were tried, and a Na2B4O7-NaF (1.2:1) mixture was found to be suitable for crystal growth. X-ray diffraction and thermal characterisation data are presented, as well as some initial measurements of magnetic and thermodynamic properties of the crystals. Little effect was observed with changing oxygen content by Sc substitution for Sn.

  4. Rare earth element content of cryptocrystalline magnesites of Konya, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Zedef, Veysel; Russell, Michael

    2016-04-18

    We examined the rare earth element content of several cryptocrystalline magnesites as well as hydromagnesite, host rock serpentinites, lake water and hot spring water from Turkey. Southwestern Turkey hosts cryptocrystalline magnesites, sedimentary magnesites with presently forming, biologically mediated hydromagnesites and travertines. Our results show the REE content of the minerals, rocks and waters are well below detection limits. One hydromagnesite sample from Lake Salda has slightly high La (2.38ppb), Ce (3.91 ppb) and Nd (1.68 ppb) when compared to other samples, but these are also still below detection limits of the method we followed.

  5. Synthesis of nanocrystalline rare earth oxides by glycothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Hosokawa, Saburo; Iwamoto, Shinji; Inoue, Masashi

    2008-11-03

    The reaction of yttrium acetate hydrate in 1,2-propanediol at 300 deg. C yielded a product containing acetate groups and glycol moieties. From this product, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} was directly crystallized at 400 deg. C without the formation of a carbonate oxide phase. The thus-obtained Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples had a small crystallite size (2.2 nm) and significantly large surface area (280 m{sup 2}/g). Other nanocrystalline rare earth (Gd-Yb) oxides were also obtained by this method.

  6. Rare Earth Elements reveal past earthquakes on limestone normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manighetti, I.; Boucher, E.; Chauvel, C.; Schlagenhauf, A.; Benedetti, L.

    2009-12-01

    In 2008, we suggested that the chemical composition of the rocks which form well preserved, seismically exhumed fault scarps might record past major earthquakes (Carcaillet et al., 2008) because those scarp surfaces consist of a vertical succession of zones that have been exposed at different times by the repeating earthquakes, thus weathered over different time spans. In this pioneer study, we validated this hypothesis using the changes in chemical compositions (major and trace elements) of 15 carbonate rock samples collected from the base to the top of the seismically exhumed, 10 m-high Magnola normal fault scarp (Abruzzes, Central Italy). However, the number of available samples was insufficient to fully assess the validity of the model. Here we present trace element data on 27 additional samples collected systematically every 25 cm along the Magnola scarp, as well as on 7 scarp samples buried below the colluvium hence representing the first 4 meters of the scarp before exhumation. The scarp rocks buried in the first meter of the ground appear significantly enriched in Rare Earth elements (REE): they contain 60% more REE than the rocks located either deeper in the ground or immediately above the ground level. This concentration peak most probably results from enrichment of the scarp rocks by interaction with the impurity-doped, acidic, upper soil. Above the ground surface and along the scarp, most element concentrations (70%) decrease up-dip, generally by more than 50%; we attribute this trend to leaching and dissolution-recrystallization of purer calcite through time. The top of the scarp having been exposed for a longer period of time, its surface lost more of the trace elements contained in the rocks. However, the upward decrease in REE contents is not linear and 4 REE concentration peaks can be recognized along the exposed scarp. The position of these 4 peaks coincide with the zones identified by Schlagenhauf et al. (2009) and Palumbo et al. (2004) as

  7. Loparite, a rare-earth ore (Ce, Na, Sr, Ca)(Ti, Nb, Ta, Fe+3)O3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.; Sinha, S.P.; Kosynkin, V.D.

    1997-01-01

    The mineral loparite (Ce, NA, Sr, Ca)(Ti, Nb, Ta, Fe+3)O3 is the principal ore of the light-group rare-earth elements (LREE) in Russia. The complex oxide has a perovskite (ABO3) structure with coupled substitutions, polymorphism, defect chemistry and a tendency to become metamict. The A site generally contains weakly bonded, easily exchanged cations of the LREE, Na and Ca. The B site generally contains smaller, highly charged cations of Ti, Nb or Fe+3. Mine production is from Russia's Kola Peninsula. Ore is beneficiated to produce a 95% loparite concentrate containing 30% rare-earth oxides. Loparite concentrate is refined by either a chlorination process or acid decomposition process to recover rare-earths, titanium, niobium and tantalum. Rare-earths are separated by solvent extraction and selective precipitation/dissolution. The concentrate is processed at plants in Russia, Estonia and Kazakstan.

  8. Loparite, a rare-earth ore (Ce, Na, Sr, Ca)(Ti, Nb, Ta, Fe+3)O3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.; Sinha, Shyama P.; Kosynkin, Valery D.

    1997-01-01

    The mineral loparite (Ce, NA, Sr, Ca)(Ti, Nb, Ta, Fe+3)O3 is the principal ore of the light-group rare-earth elements (LREE) in Russia. The complex oxide has a perovskite (ABO3) structure with coupled substitutions, polymorphism, defect chemistry and a tendency to become metamict. The A site generally contains weakly bonded, easily exchanged cations of the LREE, Na and Ca. The B site generally contains smaller, highly charged cations of Ti, Nb or Fe+3. Mine production is from Russia's Kola Peninsula. Ore is beneficiated to produce a 95% loparite concentrate containing 30% rare-earth oxides. Loparite concentrate is refined by either a chlorination process or acid decomposition process to recover rare-earths, titanium, niobium and tantalum. Rare-earths are separated by solvent extraction and selective precipitation/dissolution. The concentrate is processed at plants in Russia, Estonia and Kazakstan.

  9. Intermediate phases in some rare earth-ruthenium systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharifrazi, P.; Raman, A.; Mohanty, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    The phase equilibria and crystal structures of intermediate phases were investigated in eight representative RE-Ru systems using powder X-ray diffraction and metallographic techniques. The Fe3C, Mn5C2 and Er5Ru3 structures occur in all but the Ce-Ru systems. Phases analogous to Er5Ru3 possess an unknown crystal structure similar to Er5Rh3(I). MgCu2 and MgZn2 type Laves phases are encountered in the light rare earth and heavy rare earth systems, respectively, and RERu2 phases, where RE = Nd and Sm, possess both the Laves phase structures. An intermediate phase, NdRu, with an unknown structure, occurs only in the Nd-Ru system. A bcc structure with 40 atoms per unit cell is encountered in the phases Er3Ru2 and Y3Ru2. The behavior of cerium in Ce-Ru alloys is unique in that four unidentified structures, not encountered in other RE-Ru systems, have been encountered. Also a phase designated as Ce3Ru is found with the Th7Fe3 type structure.

  10. Rare Earth Elements in Alberta Oil Sand Process Streams

    DOE PAGES

    Roth, Elliot; Bank, Tracy; Howard, Bret; ...

    2017-04-05

    The concentrations of rare earth elements in Alberta, Canada oil sands and six oil sand waste streams were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP–MS). The results indicate that the rare earth elements (REEs) are largely concentrated in the tailings solvent recovery unit (TSRU) sample compared to the oil sand itself. The concentration of lanthanide elements is ~1100 mg/kg (1100 ppm or 0.11 weight %), which represents a >20× increase in the concentration compared to the oil sand itself and a >7× increase compared to the North American Shale Composite (NASC). The process water, which is used to extractmore » the oil from oil sands, and the water fraction associated with the different waste streams had very low concentrations of REEs that were near or below the detection limits of the instrument, with the highest total concentration of REEs in the water fraction being less than 10 μg/L (ppb). Size and density separations were completed, and the REEs and other potentially interesting and valuable metals, such as Ti and Zr, were concentrated in different fractions. These results give insights into the possibility of recovering REEs from waste streams generated from oil sand processing.« less

  11. Precise trace rare earth analysis by radiochemical neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.; Weimer, W.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1981-06-01

    A rare earth group separation scheme followed by normal Ge(Li), low energy photon detector (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometry significantly enhances the detection sensitivity of individual rare earth elements (REE) at or below the ppB level. Based on the selected ..gamma..-ray energies, normal Ge(Li) counting is favored for /sup 140/La, /sup 170/Tb, and /sup 169/Yb; LEPD is favored for low ..gamma..-ray energies of /sup 147/Nd, /sup 153/Sm, /sup 166/Ho, and /sup 169/Yb; and noncoincidence counting is favored for /sup 141/Ce, /sup 143/Ce, /sup 142/Pr, /sup 153/Sm, /sup 171/Er, and /sup 175/Yb. The detection of radionuclides /sup 152m/Eu, /sup 159/Gd, and /sup 177/Lu is equally sensitive by normal Ge(Li) and noncoincidence counting; /sup 152/Eu is equally sensitive by LEPD and normal Ge(Li); and /sup 153/Gd and /sup 170/Tm is equally favored by all the counting modes. Overall, noncoincidence counting is favored for most of the REE. Precise measurements of the REE were made in geological and biological standards.

  12. [Infrared multiphoton quantum cutting phenomena of rare earth materials].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Guo-Jian; Zhang, Yun-Zhi; Deng, Zhi-Wei; Hu, Li-Li; Li, Song; Yu, Chun-Lei; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Cui, Jian-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Duan; Zhou, Hong-Yu; Wu, Zheng-Long

    2012-10-01

    Infrared quantum cutting of rare earth ion is an international hot research field. It is significant for the enhancement of solar cell efficiency and for the reduction of solar cell price. The present paper summarizes the research significance of infrared quantum cutting of rare earth ion. Based on the summarization of general principle and loss mechanism of solar cell, the possible method to enhance the solar cell efficiency by infrared quantum cutting is analyzed. Meanwhile, the present paper summarizes the infrared quantum cutting phenomena of Er3+ ion single-doped material. There is intense 4I13/2 --> 4I15/2 infrared quantum cutting luminescence of Er3+ ion when the 2H11/2 energy level is excited. The intense {2H11/2 --> 4I9/2, 4I15/2 --> 4I13/2} cross energy transfer is the main reason for the result in the high quantum cutting efficiency when the 2H11/2 energy level is excited.

  13. RARE EARTH ELEMENT IMPACTS ON BIOLOGICAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Y.; Barnes, J.; Fox, S.

    2016-09-01

    Increasing demand for rare earth elements (REE) is expected to lead to new development and expansion in industries processing and or recycling REE. For some industrial operators, sending aqueous waste streams to a municipal wastewater treatment plant, or publicly owned treatment works (POTW), may be a cost effective disposal option. However, wastewaters that adversely affect the performance of biological wastewater treatment at the POTW will not be accepted. The objective of our research is to assess the effects of wastewaters that might be generated by new rare earth element (REE) beneficiation or recycling processes on biological wastewater treatment systems. We have been investigating the impact of yttrium and europium on the biological activity of activated sludge collected from an operating municipal wastewater treatment plant. We have also examined the effect of an organic complexant that is commonly used in REE extraction and separations; similar compounds may be a component of newly developed REE recycling processes. Our preliminary results indicate that in the presence of Eu, respiration rates for the activated sludge decrease relative to the no-Eu controls, at Eu concentrations ranging from <10 to 660 µM. Yttrium appears to inhibit respiration as well, although negative impacts have been observed only at the highest Y amendment level tested (660 µM). The organic complexant appears to have a negative impact on activated sludge activity as well, although results are variable. Ultimately the intent of this research is to help REE industries to develop environmentally friendly and economically sustainable beneficiation and recycling processes.

  14. Assessing rare earth elements in quartz rich geological samples.

    PubMed

    Santoro, A; Thoss, V; Ribeiro Guevara, S; Urgast, D; Raab, A; Mastrolitti, S; Feldmann, J

    2016-01-01

    Sodium peroxide (Na2O2) fusion coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Tandem Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS) measurements was used to rapidly screen quartz-rich geological samples for rare earth element (REE) content. The method accuracy was checked with a geological reference material and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) measurements. The used mass-mode combinations presented accurate results (only exception being (157)Gd in He gas mode) with recovery of the geological reference material QLO-1 between 80% and 98% (lower values for Lu, Nd and Sm) and in general comparable to INAA measurements. Low limits of detection for all elements were achieved, generally below 10 pg g(-1), as well as measurement repeatability below 15%. Overall, the Na2O2/ICP-MS/MS method proved to be a suitable lab-based method to quickly and accurately screen rock samples originating from quartz-rich geological areas for rare earth element content; particularly useful if checking commercial viability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal chemistry of hydrothermally grown ternary alkali rare earth fluorides.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Colin D; Comer, Sara; Fulle, Kyle; Sanjeewa, Liurukara D; Kolis, Joseph W

    2015-12-01

    The structural variations of several alkali metal rare earth fluoride single crystals are summarized. Two different stoichiometric formulations are considered, namely those of ARE2F7 and ARE3F10 (A = K, Rb, Cs; RE = Y, La-Lu), over a wide range of ionic radii of both the alkali and rare earth (RE) ions. Previously reported and several new single-crystal structures are considered. The new single crystals are grown using hydrothermal methods and the structures are compared with literature reports of structures grown from both melts and hydrothermal fluids. The data reported here are combined with the literature data to gain a greater understanding of structural subtleties surrounding these systems. The work underscores the importance of the size of the cations to the observed structure type and also introduces synthetic technique as a contributor to the same. New insights based on single-crystal structure analysis in the work introduce a new disordered structure type in the case of ARE2F7, and examine the trends and boundaries of the ARE3F10 stoichiometry. Such fundamental structural information is useful in understanding the potential applications of these compounds as optical materials.

  16. Sublattice Magnetic Relaxation in Rare Earth Iron Garnets

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Walsh, Brian

    2013-07-08

    The magnetic properties of rare earth garnets make them attractive materials for applications ranging from optical communications to magnetic refrigeration. The purpose of this research was to determine the AC magnetic properties of several rare earth garnets, in order to ascertain the contributions of various sublattices. Gd3Fe5O¬12, Gd3Ga5O12, Tb3Fe5O12, Tb3Ga5O12, and Y3Fe5O12 were synthesized by a solid state reaction of their oxides and verified by x-ray diffraction. Frequency-dependent AC susceptibility and DC magnetization were measured versus temperature (10 – 340 K). Field cooling had little effect on AC susceptibility, but large effect on DC magnetization, increasing magnetization at the lowest temperature and shifting the compensation point to lower temperatures. Data suggest that interaction of the two iron lattices results in the two frequency dependent magnetic relaxations in the iron garnets, which were fit using the Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius laws.

  17. (Magnetic studies of iron-rare-earth-metalloid alloys)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This research is focused on studying new phases and microstructures of rare-earth and transition-metal alloys and compounds. In particular we investigate several classes of materials which are expected to have high magnetizations and coercivities, which are necessary conditions for high performance permanent magnet and related applications. Hard and semi-hard magnetic materials form the basis of much of the electric power and information storage industries and the discovery of new and less expensive materials with outstanding properties is of great interest. Our work is centered on two general types of problems. One is the growth and control of the microstructure of thin films with specified magnetic anisotropies. Particular attention is paid to nanoscale variations in atomic order in multilayered samples to achieve the desired properties. The second type of problem involves fundamental electronic structure and its relation to the magnetic properties of new Fe-and Co-rich phases containing rare earths. These studies involve a variety of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations.

  18. Multicomponent, Rare-Earth-Doped Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming

    2005-01-01

    Multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type thermal-barrier coating materials have been developed in an effort to obtain lower thermal conductivity, greater phase stability, and greater high-temperature capability, relative to those of the prior thermal-barrier coating material of choice, which is yttria-partially stabilized zirconia. As used here, "thermal-barrier coatings" (TBCs) denotes thin ceramic layers used to insulate air-cooled metallic components of heat engines (e.g., gas turbines) from hot gases. These layers are generally fabricated by plasma spraying or physical vapor deposition of the TBC materials onto the metal components. A TBC as deposited has some porosity, which is desirable in that it reduces the thermal conductivity below the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the fully dense form of the material. Undesirably, the thermal conductivity gradually increases because the porosity gradually decreases as a consequence of sintering during high-temperature service. Because of these and other considerations such as phase transformations, the maximum allowable service temperature for yttria-partially stabilized zirconia TBCs lies in the range of about 1,200 to 1,300 C. In contrast, the present multicomponent, rare-earth-doped, perovskite-type TBCs can withstand higher temperatures.

  19. Solidification Characteristics of Wrought Magnesium Alloys Containing Rare Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaid, A.; Czerwinski, F.; Zavadil, R.; Aniolek, M.; Hadadzadeh, A.

    A significant barrier preventing use of magnesium sheet in automotive light-weighting initiatives is its high manufacturing cost and very limited formability at room temperature. This barrier can be overcome by the use of twin roll casting technology and new magnesium alloys, specifically designed for twin roll casting. Recent studies have shown that magnesium, when alloyed with rare earth elements, gave rise to weakening of the basal texture resulting in improved room temperature formability. In this research, a combination of calculations using the FACTsage software and examinations using a number of experimental techniques was explored to determine the solidification characteristics of wrought magnesium alloys containing rare earth metal of neodymium: ZEK100, Mg-1Zn-0.5Nd and Mg-1Zn-1Nd. As predicted by the FACTsage software, the solidification under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions affects the type and volume fractions of phases formed for a given chemical composition of the alloy. The thermal analysis identified temperatures of metallurgical reactions taking place during solidification and their changes with neodymium content. As verified by controlled solidification experiments the cooling rate during solidification affected the refinement level of the alloy microstructure, a volume fraction of intermetallic precipitates and their distribution. This research will help to design new magnesium alloys, specifically optimized for twin roll casting.

  20. Spectroscopy of rare earth ions in opaque solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, B.W.

    1992-12-31

    Up to now, the field of optical spectroscopy of transitions within the well-shielded 4f shell of rare earth ions in solids has had only transparent samples to work with. With recent improvements in sensitivity of our spectrometer, we have been able to observe, in reflection, f {yields} f transitions in opaque materials, including metals. This requires a sensitivity approaching the short noise limit, which is obtained using a photodiode array in conjunction with diffusion of the light to smooth out any spatial structure. In this work, we discuss searches for f {yields} f transitions in various metals containing rare earth ions, and report the first such observation in an intermetallic compound. In addition, a simple theory of reflection lineshapes from opaque materials is developed. This theory is based on a classical electron oscillator model for an f {yields} f transition, which modifies the complex index of refraction of the material near the resonance frequency. On using the Fresnel reflection equations, various lineshapes, including very asymmetric ones, can be produced, depending on the unperturbed index of refraction.

  1. Undercooled rapidly solidified titanium-rare earth alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kral, M.V.; Hofmeister, W.H.; Wittig, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The microstructural effects of undercooling on eight titanium-rare earth alloys were investigated. Electromagnetic levitation allowed cooling of the liquid well below the liquidus prior to nucleation/solidification. For each alloy, a series of samples was splat quenched with systematically varied undercoolings. The resulting materials were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in the as-quenched and annealed states. Typically, rapid solidification of titanium-rare earth alloys results in supersaturation of {alpha} Ti and precipitation occurs during annealing treatments. In these experiments, evidence of precipitation during cooling through the {beta}/{alpha} transus was observed and has been attributed to an interphase boundary precipitation mechanism. The results of undercooling/splat quench experiments were utilized to select materials for undercool/rapid quench technology (URQT) processing. This novel technique combines electromagnetic levitation, an ultrahigh (10{sup {minus}8} torr) vacuum system and a three meter drop tube with melt spinning via a variable speed copper wheel. Materials processed by this method exhibited homogeneous solidification microstructures uncharacteristic of conventional melt spinning, and small (1 nm) interphase boundary precipitates in the as-quenched state.

  2. Magnetoelectric and magnetoelastic properties of rare-earth ferroborates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadomtseva, A. M.; Popov, Yu. F.; Vorob'ev, G. P.; Pyatakov, A. P.; Krotov, S. S.; Kamilov, K. I.; Ivanov, V. Yu.; Mukhin, A. A.; Zvezdin, A. K.; Kuz'menko, A. M.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Gudim, I. A.; Temerov, V. L.

    2010-06-01

    The magnetic, electric, magnetoelectric, and magnetoelastic properties of rare-earth ferroborates RFe3(BO3)4 (R =Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) as well as yttrium ferroborate YFe3(BO3)4 have been studied comprehensively. A strong dependence not only of the magnetic but also magnetoelectric properties on the type of rare-earth ion, specifically, on its anisotropy, which determines the magnetic structure and the large contribution to the electric polarization, has been found. This is manifested in the strong temperature dependence of the polarization below the Néel point TN and its specific field dependence, which is determined by the competition between the external and exchange f-d fields. A close correlation has been found between the magnetoelastic properties of ferroborates and the magnetoelastic and magnetic anomalies at magnetic-field induced phase transitions. It is found that in easy-plane ferroborates, together with magnetic-field induced electric polarization spontaneous polarization also arises below the Néel point. The ferroelectric ordering in ferroborates is of extrinsic character, giving rise to strong magnetoelectric coupling below TN. Aside from the antiferromagnetic phase transition, the particulars of the structural phase transition accompanied by anomalies of the dielectric and magnetoelectric properties are examined for the first time. The character of the dielectric anomalies at a structural transition is analyzed for the first time on the basis of Landau's approach.

  3. Homometallic rare-Earth metal phosphinidene clusters: synthesis and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Luo, Gen; Hong, Jianquan; Zhou, Xigeng; Weng, Linhong; Luo, Yi; Zhang, Lixin

    2014-01-20

    Two new trinuclear μ3 -bridged rare-earth metal phosphinidene complexes, [{L(Ln)(μ-Me)}3 (μ3 -Me)(μ3 -PPh)] (L=[PhC(NC6 H4 iPr2 -2,6)2 ](-) , Ln=Y (2 a), Lu (2 b)), were synthesized through methane elimination of the corresponding carbene precursors with phenylphosphine. Heating a toluene solution of 2 at 120 °C leads to an unprecedented ortho CH bond activation of the PhP ligand to form the bridged phosphinidene/phenyl complexes. Reactions of 2 with ketones, thione, or isothiocyanate show clear phospha-Wittig chemistry, giving the corresponding organic phosphinidenation products and oxide (sulfide) complexes. Reaction of 2 with CS2 leads to the formation of novel trinuclear rare-earth metal thione dianion clusters, for which a possible pathway was determined by DFT calculation. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Impurity-sensitized luminescence of rare earth-doped materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smentek, Lidia . E-mail: smentek1@aol.com

    2005-02-15

    The accuracy of the theoretical model of impurity-sensitized luminescence in rare earth-doped materials presented here is adjusted to the demands of precise modern experimental techniques. The description is formulated within the double perturbation theory, and it is based on the assumption that electrostatic interactions between the subsystems that take part in the luminescence process are the most important ones. The amplitude of the energy transfer is determined by the contributions that represent the perturbing influence of the crystal-field potential and also electron correlation effects taken into account within the rare earth ions. In this way, the model is defined beyond the standard free ionic system and single configuration approximations. The new contributions to the energy transfer amplitude are expressed in the terms of effective tensor operators, and they contain the perturbing influence of various excited configurations. In order to maintain the high accuracy of the model, the radial integrals of all effective operators are defined within the so-called perturbed function approach. This means that they are evaluated for the complete radial basis sets of one electron functions of given symmetry, including the continuum.

  5. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  6. Rare earth elements and neodymium isotopes in sedimentary organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freslon, Nicolas; Bayon, Germain; Toucanne, Samuel; Bermell, Sylvain; Bollinger, Claire; Chéron, Sandrine; Etoubleau, Joel; Germain, Yoan; Khripounoff, Alexis; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; Rouget, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    We report rare earth element (REE) and neodymium (Nd) isotope data for the organic fraction of sediments collected from various depositional environments, i.e. rivers (n = 25), estuaries (n = 18), open-ocean settings (n = 15), and cold seeps (n = 12). Sedimentary organic matter (SOM) was extracted using a mixed hydrogen peroxide/nitric acid solution (20%-H2O2-0.02 M-HNO3), after removal of carbonate and oxy-hydroxide phases with dilute hydrochloric acid (0.25 M-HCl). A series of experimental tests indicate that extraction of sedimentary organic compounds using H2O2 may be complicated occasionally by partial dissolution of sulphide minerals and residual carbonates. However, this contamination is expected to be minor for REE because measured concentrations in H2O2 leachates are about two-orders of magnitude higher than in the above mentioned phases. The mean REE concentrations determined in the H2O2 leachates for samples from rivers, estuaries, coastal seas and open-ocean settings yield relatively similar levels, with ΣREE = 109 ± 86 ppm (mean ± s; n = 58). The organic fractions leached from cold seep sediments display even higher concentration levels (285 ± 150 ppm; mean ± s; n = 12). The H2O2 leachates for most sediments exhibit remarkably similar shale-normalized REE patterns, all characterized by a mid-REE enrichment compared to the other REE. This suggests that the distribution of REE in leached sedimentary organic phases is controlled primarily by biogeochemical processes, rather than by the composition of the source from which they derive (e.g. pore, river or sea-water). The Nd isotopic compositions for organic phases leached from river sediments are very similar to those for the corresponding detrital fractions. In contrast, the SOM extracted from marine sediments display εNd values that typically range between the εNd signatures for terrestrial organic matter (inferred from the analysis of the sedimentary detrital fractions) and marine organic matter

  7. Bioleaching of rare earth elements from waste phosphors and cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, David W.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Daubaras, Dayna L.; Jiao, Yongqin; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2016-08-22

    Four microbial cultures were evaluated for organic acid production and their potential utility for leaching of rare earth elements (REE) from retorted phosphor powder (RPP) and spent fluidized cracking catalyst (FCC). Three of the cultures (2 bacterial, 1 fungal) were isolated from environmental and industrial materials known to contain rare earth elements. The other was the well-known and industrially important bacterium Gluconobacter oxydans. Gluconic acid was the predominant identified organic acid produced by all of the cultures; citric and acetic acid were among the other acids detected. There was also maximum REE leaching by cell free culture supernatants obtained with Gluconobacter and the FCC; 49% of total REE was recovered, with preferential recovery of lanthanum over cerium. The phosphor powder was more difficult to leach; only ~2 % total REE was leached from RPP with Gluconobacter. Tests with the RPP indicated that the extent of REE solubilization was similar whether whole cell cultures or cell-free supernatants were used. However, Gluconobacter cell-free culture supernatants with 10-15 mM gluconic acid outperformed abiotically prepared leaching solutions with 30 mM gluconic acid concentrations. Abiotic tests showed that increasing gluconic acid concentrations increased leaching efficiency; for example, total REE leaching from FCC increased from 24 to 36 to 45% when gluconic acid was increased from 10 to 30 to 90 mM. Our research shows that utilizing microorganisms that produce gluconic acid can result in effective leaching of REE from waste materials, and optimizing gluconic acid production will improve recovery.

  8. Bioleaching of rare earth elements from waste phosphors and cracking catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Reed, David W.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Daubaras, Dayna L.; ...

    2016-08-22

    Four microbial cultures were evaluated for organic acid production and their potential utility for leaching of rare earth elements (REE) from retorted phosphor powder (RPP) and spent fluidized cracking catalyst (FCC). Three of the cultures (2 bacterial, 1 fungal) were isolated from environmental and industrial materials known to contain rare earth elements. The other was the well-known and industrially important bacterium Gluconobacter oxydans. Gluconic acid was the predominant identified organic acid produced by all of the cultures; citric and acetic acid were among the other acids detected. There was also maximum REE leaching by cell free culture supernatants obtained withmore » Gluconobacter and the FCC; 49% of total REE was recovered, with preferential recovery of lanthanum over cerium. The phosphor powder was more difficult to leach; only ~2 % total REE was leached from RPP with Gluconobacter. Tests with the RPP indicated that the extent of REE solubilization was similar whether whole cell cultures or cell-free supernatants were used. However, Gluconobacter cell-free culture supernatants with 10-15 mM gluconic acid outperformed abiotically prepared leaching solutions with 30 mM gluconic acid concentrations. Abiotic tests showed that increasing gluconic acid concentrations increased leaching efficiency; for example, total REE leaching from FCC increased from 24 to 36 to 45% when gluconic acid was increased from 10 to 30 to 90 mM. Our research shows that utilizing microorganisms that produce gluconic acid can result in effective leaching of REE from waste materials, and optimizing gluconic acid production will improve recovery.« less

  9. Rare earths exposure and male infertility: the injury mechanism study of rare earths on male mice and human sperm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Xiao, Heng-Jun; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-Ling; Long, He-Ming; Liu, Song-Hao

    2015-02-01

    The weight; testis/body coefficient; levels of LDH, SDH, SODH, G-6PD, and testosterone; cell cycle; and cell apoptosis of the male mice were influenced after being treated with 200 mg/[kg/day] of rare earths suspension for 3 weeks. The "Raman fingerprints" of the human sperm DNA exposed to 0.040 mg/ml CeCl3 were very different from those of the untreated; the Raman bands at 789 cm(-1) (backbone phosphodiester), PO4 backbone at 1,094 cm(-1), methylene deformation mode at 1,221 cm(-1), methylene deformation mode at 1,485 cm(-1), and amide II at 1,612 cm(-1), of which intensities and shifts were changed, might be the diagnostic biomarkers or potential therapeutic targets. The injury mechanism might be that the rare earths influence the oxidative stress and blood testosterone barrier, tangle the big biomolecule concurrently, which might cause the testicular cells and vascular system disorder and/or dysfunction, and at the same time change the physical and chemical properties of the sperm directly.

  10. Application of Freeze-Dried Powders of Genetically Engineered Microbial Strains as Adsorbents for Rare Earth Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi; Masuda, Reiko; Yamazaki, Yuki; Horiuchi, Kaoru; Miyashita, Mari; Kasahara, Jun; Tanaka, Tatsuhito; Yamamoto, Hiroki

    2016-10-12

    The adsorption behaviors of the rare earth metal ions onto freeze-dried powders of genetically engineered microbial strains were compared. Cell powders obtained from four kinds of strains, Bacillus subtilis 168 wild type (WT), lipoteichoic acid-defective (ΔLTA), wall teichoic acid-defective (ΔWTA), and cell wall hydrolases-defective (EFKYOJLp) strains, were used as an adsorbent of the rare earth metal ions at pH 3. The adsorption ability of the rare earth metal ions was in the order of EFKYOJLp > WT > ΔLTA > ΔWTA. The order was the same as the order of the phosphorus quantity of the strains. This result indicates that the main adsorption sites for the ions are the phosphate groups and the teichoic acids, LTA and WTA, that contribute to the adsorption of the rare earth metal ions onto the cell walls. The contribution of WTA was clearly greater than that of LTA. Each microbial powder was added to a solution containing 16 kinds of rare earth metal ions, and the removals (%) of each rare earth metal ion were obtained. The scandium ion showed the highest removal (%), while that of the lanthanum ion was the lowest for all the microbial powders. Differences in the distribution coefficients between the kinds of lanthanide ions by the EFKYOJLp and ΔWTA powders were greater than those of the other strains. Therefore, the EFKYOJLp and ΔWTA powders could be applicable for the selective extraction of the lanthanide ions. The ΔLTA powder coagulated by mixing with a rare earth metal ion, although no sedimentation of the WT or ΔWTA powder with a rare earth metal ion was observed under the same conditions. The EFKYOJLp powder was also coagulated, but its flocculating activity was lower than that of ΔLTA. The ΔLTA and EFKYOJLp powders have a long shape compared to those of the WT or ΔWTA strain. The shapes of the cells will play an important role in the sedimentation of the microbial powders with rare earth metal ions. As the results, three kinds of the genetically

  11. Targeting heavy rare earth elements in carbonatite complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broom-Fendley, S.; Wall, F.; Gunn, A. G.; Dowman, E.

    2012-04-01

    The world's main sources of the rare earth elements (REE) are concentrated in carbonatite complexes. These have the advantages of high grade and tonnage, combined with low thorium contents, yet they are generally enriched in light rare earths (LREE). The heavy rare earths (HREE, which include Eu-Lu and Y) are more highly sought after because of their role in new and green technologies. HREE are predominantly extracted from ion-adsorption clays in China. These are small, low grade deposits, which are often illegally mined by artisans. Increased government control, environmental legislation and local demand for REE in China have led to high prices and global concerns about the security of supply of the HREE. Alternative sources of the HREE are poorly documented. We present a review of such targets, including: (1) 'abnormal' carbonatites; (2) areas around LREE-rich complexes such as breccia, fenite and latter stage veins; and (3) weathered carbonatites. At Lofdal, Namibia, carbonatite dykes contain xenotime-(Y) together with LREE minerals. The original chemistry of the carbonatite magma, coupled with late-stage magma and fluid evolution, seem to be controlling factors [1, 2]. The Khibina carbonatite, Kola Peninsula, Russia, is an example of where early LREE carbonatites become increasing HREE-enriched as magmas evolve to carbo-hydrothermal fluids [3]. Around carbonatite complexes in Malawi HREE enrichment can be found in breccia and in fenite. Breccia around Songwe shows areas with high Y/La ratios within the matrix caused by narrow zones of xenotime enrichment. Fenite around Kangankunde and Chilwa Island has higher HREE:LREE ratios than the carbonatite [4]. At weathered complexes, such as at Mount Weld in Western Australia, changes in both HREE concentration and LREE:HREE ratios are observed. In currently unworked sections of the deposit, the HREE mineral churchite (YPO4.H2O) has formed concentrations due to groundwater flow [5]. These areas of enrichment are

  12. Investigation of recovery and recycling of rare earth elements from waste fluorescent lamp phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eduafo, Patrick Max

    Characterization techniques and experimental measurements were used to evaluate a process for recycling rare earth elements (REEs) from spent fluorescent lamp phosphors. QEMSCAN analysis revealed that over 60% of the rare earth bearing minerals was less than 10 microm. A representative sample of the as-received feed contained 14.59 wt% total rare earth elements (TREE) and upon sieving to below 75 microm, the grade increased to 19.60 wt% REE with 98.75% recovery. Based on experimental work, a new process for extracting the chief REEs from end of life fluorescent lamps has been developed. The proposed flowsheet employs a three-stage leaching and precipitation process for selective extraction and recovery of the REEs. Hydrochloric acid was used as lixiviant in batch leach experiments on the phosphor powder. The maximum extraction obtained was 100% for both yttrium and europium under the following leaching conditions: 2.5 M HCl, 70°C, 1 hour, 180 g/L and 600 rpm. However, the solubility of cerium, lanthanum and terbium remained low at these conditions. Kinetic data of the leaching of yttrium and europium showed best fit to the logarithmic rate expression of the empirical model of leaching. Activation energy was calculated to be 77.49 kJ/mol for Y and 72.75 kJ/mol for Eu in the temperature range of 298 to 343 K. Precipitation tests demonstrate that at least 50% excess the stoichiometric amount of oxalic acid is needed to recover yttrium and europium efficiently to produce a pure (Y, Eu) mixed oxide. Total recovery of the REEs was achieved even at very low pH or without any base added. Over 99% pure mixed rare earth oxide at 99% recovery has been attained. An economic assessment of the developed process using operating and capital cost have be undertaken and based on the analysis of the three economic scenarios, two are economic and one is non-economic.

  13. Acoustic and Thermal Vibrational Behavior of Rare Earth Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Senin, H. B.; Kancono, W.; Sidek, H. A. A.

    2007-05-09

    The ultrasonic wave velocity and the thermal expansion of the rare earth glasses have been measured as functions of temperature and pressure to test predictions of the soft potential model for the acoustic and thermal properties. The longitudinal ultrasonic wave velocities increase under pressure. The hydrostatic pressure derivative of the bulk modulus is positive: these glasses show a normal elastic response as compressed. However, the pressure derivative of the shear modulus is negative and small, indicating weak softening of shear modes under pressure. The results found are used to determine the Gruneisen parameters. This is to obtain the acoustic mode contribution to thermal expansion. After subtraction of the relaxation and anharmonic contributions, the temperature dependence of the shear wave ultrasound velocity follows a linear law as predicted by the Soft Potential Model.

  14. Actinides and Rare Earths Topical Conference (Code AC)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2009-11-24

    Actinide and the Rare Earth materials exhibit many unique and diverse physical, chemical and magnetic properties, in large part because of the complexity of their f electronic structure. This Topical Conference will focus upon the chemistry, physics and materials science in Lanthanide and Actinide materials, driven by 4f and 5f electronic structure. Particular emphasis will be placed upon 4f/5f magnetic structure, surface science and thin film properties. For the actinides, fundamental actinide science and its role in resolving technical challenges posed by actinide materials will be stressed. Both basic and applied experimental approaches, including synchrotron-radiation-based investigations, as well as theoretical modeling and computational simulations, are planned to be part of the Topical Conference. Of particular importance are the issues related to the potential renaissance in Nuclear Fuels, including synthesis, oxidation, corrosion, intermixing, stability in extreme environments, prediction of properties via benchmarked simulations, separation science, environmental impact and disposal of waste products.

  15. Gaps and pseudogaps in perovskite rare earth nickelates

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S. James; Ouellette, Daniel G.; Kally, James; Kozhanov, Alex; Hauser, Adam J.; Mikheev, Evgeny; Zhang, Jack Y.; Moreno, Nelson E.; Son, Junwoo; Stemmer, Susanne; Balents, Leon

    2015-06-01

    We report on tunneling measurements that reveal the evolution of the quasiparticle state density in two rare earth perovskite nickelates, NdNiO{sub 3} and LaNiO{sub 3}, that are close to a bandwidth controlled metal to insulator transition. We measure the opening of a sharp gap of ∼30 meV in NdNiO{sub 3} in its insulating ground state. LaNiO{sub 3}, which remains a correlated metal at all practical temperatures, exhibits a pseudogap of the same order. The results point to both types of gaps arising from a common origin, namely, a quantum critical point associated with the T = 0 K metal-insulator transition. The results support theoretical models of the quantum phase transition in terms of spin and charge instabilities of an itinerant Fermi surface.

  16. Rare earth elements in parasol mushroom Macrolepiota procera.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, Jerzy; Sapkota, Atindra; Mędyk, Małgorzata; Feng, Xinbin

    2017-04-15

    This study aimed to investigate occurrence and distribution of 16 rare earth elements (REEs) in edible saprobic mushroom Macrolepiota procera, and to estimate possible intake and risk to human consumer. Mushrooms samples were collected from sixteen geographically diverse sites in the northern regions of Poland. The results showed that for Ce as the most abundant among the RREs in edible caps, the mean concentration was at 0.18±0.29mgkg(-1)dry biomass. The mean concentration for Σ16 REEs determined in caps of fungus was 0.50mgkg(-1)dry biomass and in whole fruiting bodies was 0.75mgkg(-1)dry biomass. From a point of view by consumer, the amounts of REEs contained in edible caps of M. procera could be considered small. Hence, eating a tasty caps of this fungus would not result in a health risk for consumer because of exposure to the REEs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Study on laser drilling in rare-earth magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Guozhong; Liu Limin; Li Changjiang

    1996-12-31

    A Nd/YAG pulse laser is used to drill in Sm-Co and Nd-Fe-B permanent magnetic rotor. The experimental studies and analysis on the morphology and the phase composition of the drilled rotor are described. In the center of the drilled rotor, there is a hole which diameter is equal roughly to the girdle size of the Gauss laser beam. The hole wall is rapid fused amorphous matter, which morphology and composition are obviously different from that before hole drilling. The grain in heat-affected zone dined, but the composition has not changed. The experimental results show that the reasonable selection of laser parameters according to physical properties of materials is necessary in order to improve product quality and production efficiency and that the lower laser power, the narrower pulse and the multiple-drilling and advantageous to the processing for hard-brittle materials as rare-earth magnets.

  18. Rapidly solidified Mg-Al-Zn-rare earth alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.F.; Das, S.K.; Raybould, D.

    1987-01-01

    Among the light metal alloys, magnesium is the lightest structural material except for beryllium, and yet magnesium alloys have not seen extensive use because of their poor strength and corrosion resistance. Rapid solidification technology offers a possible solution to these problems. A number of Mg-Al-Zn alloys containing rare earth (RE) elements (e.g. Ce, Pr, Y, and Nd) have been investigated using rapid solidification processing for possible structural applications. The processing consists of planar flow or jet casting into ribbons, pulverization of ribbon to powder, and consolidation of powder into bulk shapes. The mechanical properties of some of these alloys show attractive combinations of strength, ductility and corrosion resistance. The microstructures of these alloys are correlated with their mechanical properties. The rapidly solidified Mg-Al-Zn-RE alloys show great potential for applications in automotive and aerospace industries. 7 references.

  19. Rare-earth phosphors for remote thermographic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W. ); Franks, L.A.; Borella, H.M.; Lutz, S.S.; Turley, W.D. ); Noel, B.W.; Beasley, A. )

    1989-04-01

    Numerous phosphors with rare-earth dopants have emissions that are strongly dependent on temperature and are therefore useful for remote-temperature measurement, especially in moving, confined, or hazardous systems. The emission properties of various phosphors of this type were measured from room temperature to {approximately}1,200{degree}C, along with data relative to their stability under thermal cycling. For practical temperature monitoring applications, thermographic phosphors must remain relatively stable under the conditions they must experience during the measurement. One important consideration then, is any change in fluorescent properties that might accompany temperature cycling. The phosphors that had the most stable behavior under cycling were La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu, YVO{sub 4}:Eu, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu, and YVO{sub 4}:Dy. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Circular magnetic x-ray dichroism for rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, H.; Wang, X.; Harmon, B.N. ); Carra, P. )

    1994-11-15

    Circular magnetic x-ray dichroism is a promising new tool for the study of spin and orbital moments in ferromagnetically ordered materials. For rare-earth systems the [ital L][sub 2] and [ital L][sub 3] edge dichroic spectra give information about the magnetic properties of the 5[ital d] conduction electrons. This article addresses a few of the key issues concerning the interpretation of the spectra. In particular, the quadrupole nature of the dichroic spectra below the [ital L] absorption edges and its angular dependence is discussed. The important role of the 4[ital f]-5[ital d] exchange in causing a large and important spin dependence in the 2[ital p]--5[ital d] matrix elements is likewise examined.

  1. Radiative performance of rare earth garnet thin film selective emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, R.A.; Chubb, D.L.; Good, B.S.

    1994-08-01

    In this paper the authors present the first emitter efficiency results for the thin film 40 percent Er-1.5 percent Ho YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Y3Al5O12) and 25 percent Ho YAG selective emitter at 1500 K with a platinum substrate. Spectral emittance and emissive power measurements were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.2 microns). Emitter efficiency and power density are significantly improved with the addition of multiple rare earth dopants. Predicted efficiency results are presented for an optimized (equal power density in the Er, (4)I[sub 15/2]-(4)I[sub 13/2] at 1.5 microns, and Ho, (5)I[sub 7]-(5)I[sub 8] at 2.0 micron emission bands) Er-Ho YAG thin film selective emitter.

  2. Rare-Earth Metal Postmetallocene Catalysts with Chelating Amido Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianshu; Jenter, Jelena; Roesky, Peter W.

    This review deals with the synthesis and the catalytic application of noncyclopentadienyl complexes of the rare-earth elements. The main topics of the review are amido metal complexes with chelating bidentate ligands, which show the most similarities to cyclopentadienyl ligands. Benzamidinates and guanidinates will be reviewed in a separate contribution within this book. Beside the synthesis of the complexes, the broad potential of these compounds in homogeneous catalysis is demonstrated. Most of the reviewed catalytic transformations are either C-C multiple bond transformation such as the hydroamination and hydrosilylation or polymerization reaction of polar and nonpolar monomers. In this area, butadiene and isoprene, ethylene, as well as lactides and lactones were mostly used as monomers.

  3. Reactive recording with rare-earth transition metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jooho; Kuwahara, Masashi; Atoda, Nobufumi; Tominaga, Junji

    2001-10-01

    Reactive recording was achieved with typical rare-earth transition metal (RE-TM) for magneto-optical recording. Almost the same carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) and much higher modulation were obtained by the reactive recording, compared with conventional phase change (PC) recording. By applying this recording material to a super-resolution near-field structure for terabyte recording, CNR below 100-nm-mark length signal, readout durability, and power margin were greatly improved. To identify the recording mechanism, we examined the magnetic and thermo-optical properties, finding that the film properties of amorphous RE-TM are steeply changed at ˜773 K by crystallization and thermal-activated reaction with dielectric layers.

  4. Rare earth elements activate endocytosis in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong; Li, Jigang; Zhou, Qing; Yang, Guangmei; Ding, Xiao Lan; Li, Xiaodong; Cai, Chen Xin; Zhang, Zhao; Wei, Hai Yan; Lu, Tian Hong; Deng, Xing Wang; Huang, Xiao Hua

    2014-01-01

    It has long been observed that rare earth elements (REEs) regulate multiple facets of plant growth and development. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, using electron microscopic autoradiography, we show the life cycle of a light REE (lanthanum) and a heavy REE (terbium) in horseradish leaf cells. Our data indicate that REEs were first anchored on the plasma membrane in the form of nanoscale particles, and then entered the cells by endocytosis. Consistently, REEs activated endocytosis in plant cells, which may be the cellular basis of REE actions in plants. Moreover, we discovered that a portion of REEs was successively released into the cytoplasm, self-assembled to form nanoscale clusters, and finally deposited in horseradish leaf cells. Taken together, our data reveal the life cycle of REEs and their cellular behaviors in plant cells, which shed light on the cellular mechanisms of REE actions in living organisms. PMID:25114214

  5. Orthodontic rare earth magnets--in vitro assessment of cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bondemark, L; Kurol, J; Wennberg, A

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare in vitro the cytotoxic effects of uncoated and parylene-coated rare earth magnets, used in orthodontics. Cytotoxicity of samarium-cobalt magnets (SmCo5 and Sm2Co17) and neodymium-iron-boron magnets (Nd2Fe14B) was assessed by two in vitro methods, the millipore filter method and an extraction method. Orthodontic stainless steel brackets served as controls. Uncoated SmCo5-magnets showed high cytotoxicity while uncoated Sm2Co17-magnets demonstrated moderate cytotoxicity. Uncoated neodymium-iron-boron magnets, as well as parylene coated Sm2Co17-magnets and parylene-coated neodymium-iron-boron magnets, showed negligible cytotoxicity. Short-term exposure to a static magnetic field did not cause any cytotoxic effect on the cells.

  6. Uncovering the Global Life Cycles of the Rare Earth Elements

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoyue; Graedel, T. E.

    2011-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) are a group of fifteen elements with unique properties that make them indispensable for a wide variety of emerging, critical technologies. Knowledge of the life cycles of REE remains sparse, despite the current heightened interest in their future availability. Mining is heavily concentrated in China, whose monopoly position and potential restriction of exports render primary supplies vulnerable to short and long-term disruption. To provide an improved perspective we derived the first quantitative life cycles (for the year 2007) for ten REE: lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy), and yttrium (Y). Of these REE, Ce and Nd in-use stocks are highest; the in-use stocks of most REE show significant accumulation in modern society. Industrial scrap recycling occurs only from magnet manufacture. We believe there is no post-customer recycling of any of these elements. PMID:22355662

  7. Sonochemical synthesis of mesoporous transition metal and rare earth oxides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqin; Yin, Lunxiang; Gedanken, Arahon

    2002-11-01

    Straight-extended layered mesostructures based on transItion metal (Fe, Cr) and rare earth (Y, Ce, La, Sm, Er) oxides are synthesized by sonication for 3 h. After a longer period of sonication (6 h), hexagonal mesostructures based on Y- and Er-oxides are obtained. The surface areas of the Y-based hexagonal mesophases before and after extraction are 46.5, 256 m2/g, respectively. For Er-based hexagonal mesophases, the surface areas before and after extraction are 157 and 225 m2/g. The pore sizes after extraction are 5.0 and 2.2 nm for Y- and Er-based mesophases, respectively. Hexagonal mesostructures are also obtained for Zr-based material after sonication for 3 h and the hexagonal structure is still maintained after calcinations at 400 degrees C for 4 h, although the surface area is only 35 m2/g.

  8. Vanadium oxide bronzes containing rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, V.L.; Zubkov, V.G.; Fedyukov, A.S.; Zainulin, Yu.G.

    1988-05-01

    We attempted to make phases having the general formula Ln/sub x/V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ (Ln = La, Eu, Yb) without success; the specimens usually consisted of three phases: the rare-earth orthovanadate LnVO/sub 4/, vanadium(V) oxide, and VO/sub 2/. To shift the process to give Ln/sub x/V/sub 2/O/sub 5/, heat treatment was applied to mixtures of the initial high-purity substances. The x-ray patterns were recorded with a DRON-UM1 apparatus with Cr K..cap alpha.. radiation and were processed by the Poroshok program. The IR spectra were recorded with UR-20 spectrometer with oil mulls.

  9. Rare Earth core/shell nanobarcodes for multiplexed trace biodetection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Li, Xiaomin; Shen, Dengke; Zhou, Lei; Zhu, Dan; Fan, Chunhai; Zhang, Fan

    2015-06-02

    Multiplexed detection technology has been attractive for its simultaneous assay of several analytes, which play significant roles in applications such as screening for combinatorial chemistry, genetic analysis, and clinical diagnostics. This work reports a novel and potentially powerful encoding system based upon dispersible suspension arrays of multilayer rare earth core/shell nanoparticles that are capable of multiplexed, high-sensitivity reporting for biomolecule detection by the Z-contrast imaging. These nanobarcode arrays are encoded by nanostructure design based on different atomic numbers. With the well-resolved high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) decoding technique, many thousands of unique nanobarcodes can be identified by multilayer core/shell nanostructure. Their applications to multiplexed biodetection of DNA demonstrated the highly sensitive (picomole) features of this novel nanobarcode system.

  10. Radiative Performance of Rare Earth Garnet Thin Film Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present the first emitter efficiency results for the thin film 40 percent Er-1.5 percent Ho YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet, Y3Al5O12) and 25 percent Ho YAG selective emitter at 1500 K with a platinum substrate. Spectral emittance and emissive power measurements were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.2 microns). Emitter efficiency and power density are significantly improved with the addition of multiple rare earth dopants. Predicted efficiency results are presented for an optimized (equal power density in the Er, (4)I(sub 15/2)-(4)I(sub 13/2) at 1.5 microns, and Ho, (5)I(sub 7)-(5)I(sub 8) at 2.0 micron emission bands) Er-Ho YAG thin film selective emitter.

  11. Exposure, metabolism, and toxicity of rare earths and related compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, S; Suzuki, K T

    1996-01-01

    For the past three decades, most attention in heavy metal toxicology has been paid to cadmium, mercury, lead, chromium, nickel, vanadium, and tin because these metals widely polluted the environment. However, with the development of new materials in the last decade, the need for toxicological studies on those new materials has been increasing. A group of rare earths (RE) is a good example. Although some RE have been used for superconductors, plastic magnets, and ceramics, few toxicological data are available compared to other heavy metals described above. Because chemical properties of RE are very similar, it is plausible that their binding affinities to biomolecules, metabolism, and toxicity in the living system are also very similar. In this report, we present an overview of the metabolism and health hazards of RE and related compounds, including our recent studies. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C PMID:8722113

  12. Uncovering the global life cycles of the rare earth elements.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoyue; Graedel, T E

    2011-01-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) are a group of fifteen elements with unique properties that make them indispensable for a wide variety of emerging, critical technologies. Knowledge of the life cycles of REE remains sparse, despite the current heightened interest in their future availability. Mining is heavily concentrated in China, whose monopoly position and potential restriction of exports render primary supplies vulnerable to short and long-term disruption. To provide an improved perspective we derived the first quantitative life cycles (for the year 2007) for ten REE: lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy), and yttrium (Y). Of these REE, Ce and Nd in-use stocks are highest; the in-use stocks of most REE show significant accumulation in modern society. Industrial scrap recycling occurs only from magnet manufacture. We believe there is no post-customer recycling of any of these elements.

  13. Uncovering the Global Life Cycles of the Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaoyue; Graedel, T. E.

    2011-11-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) are a group of fifteen elements with unique properties that make them indispensable for a wide variety of emerging, critical technologies. Knowledge of the life cycles of REE remains sparse, despite the current heightened interest in their future availability. Mining is heavily concentrated in China, whose monopoly position and potential restriction of exports render primary supplies vulnerable to short and long-term disruption. To provide an improved perspective we derived the first quantitative life cycles (for the year 2007) for ten REE: lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy), and yttrium (Y). Of these REE, Ce and Nd in-use stocks are highest; the in-use stocks of most REE show significant accumulation in modern society. Industrial scrap recycling occurs only from magnet manufacture. We believe there is no post-customer recycling of any of these elements.

  14. Rare Earth Fluorescent Nanomaterials for Enhanced Development of Latent Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Li, Ming; Yu, Aoyang; Wu, Jian; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-30

    The most commonly found fingerprints at crime scenes are latent and, thus, an efficient method for detecting latent fingerprints is very important. However, traditional developing techniques have drawbacks such as low developing sensitivity, high background interference, complicated operation, and high toxicity. To tackle this challenge, we have synthesized two kinds of rare earth fluorescent nanomaterials, including the fluoresce red-emitting YVO4:Eu nanocrystals and green-emitting LaPO4:Ce,Tb nanobelts, and then used them as fluorescent labels for the development of latent fingerprints with high sensitivity, high contrast, high selectivity, high efficiency, and low background interference, on various substrates including noninfiltrating materials, semi-infiltrating materials, and infiltrating materials.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Rare Earth Doped Fluoride Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsohn, Luiz G.; Kucera, Courtney J.; James, Tiffany L.; Sprinkle, Kevin B.; DiMaio, Jeffrey R.; Kokuoz, Baris; Yazgan-Kukouz, Basak; DeVol, Timothy A.; Ballato, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the synthesis, structure and applications of metal fluoride nanoparticles, with particular focus on rare earth (RE) doped fluoride nanoparticles obtained by our research group. Nanoparticles were produced by precipitation methods using the ligand ammonium di-n-octadecyldithiophosphate (ADDP) that allows the growth of shells around a core particle while simultaneously avoiding particle aggregation. Nanoparticles were characterized on their structure, morphology, and luminescent properties. We discuss the synthesis, properties, and application of heavy metal fluorides; specifically LaF3:RE and PbF2, and group IIA fluorides. Particular attention is given to the synthesis of core/shell nanoparticles, including selectively RE-doped LaF3/LaF3, and CaF2/CaF2 core/(multi-)shell nanoparticles, and the CaF2-LaF3 system.

  16. Pressure-induced exotic states in rare earth hexaborides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Finding the exotic phenomena in strongly correlated electron systems (SCESs) and understanding the corresponding microphysics have long been the research frontiers of condensed matter physics. The remarkable examples for the intriguing phenomena discovered in past years include unconventional superconductivity, heavy Fermion behaviors, giant magneto-resistance and so on. A fascinating type of rare earth hexaboride RB6 (R  =  Sm, Yb, Eu and Ce) belongs to a strongly correlated electron system (SCES), but shows unusual ambient-pressure and high-pressure behaviors beyond the phenomena mentioned above. Particularly, the recent discovery of the coexistence of an unusual metallic surface state and an insulating bulk state in SmB6, known to be a Kondo insulator decades ago, by theoretical calculations and many experimental measurements creates new interest for the investigation of the RB6. This significant progress encourages people to revisit the RB6 with an attempt to establish a new physics that links the SCES and the unusual metallic surface state which is a common feature of a topological insulator (TI). It is well known that pressure has the capability of tuning the electronic structure and modifying the ground state of solids, or even inducing a quantum phase transition which is one of the kernel issues in studies of SCESs. In this brief review, we will describe the progress in high pressure studies on the RB6 based on our knowledge and research interests, mainly focusing on the pressure-induced phenomena in YbB6 and SmB6, especially on the quantum phase transitions and their connections with the valence state of the rare earth ions. Moreover, some related high-pressure results obtained from CeB6 and EuB6 are also included. Finally, a summary is given in the conclusions and perspectives section.

  17. Rare earth activated yttrium aluminate phosphors with modulated luminescence.

    PubMed

    Muresan, L E; Popovici, E J; Perhaita, I; Indrea, E; Oro, J; Casan Pastor, N

    2016-06-01

    Yttrium aluminate (Y3 A5 O12 ) was doped with different rare earth ions (i.e. Gd(3+) , Ce(3+) , Eu(3+) and/or Tb(3+) ) in order to obtain phosphors (YAG:RE) with general formula,Y3-x-a Gdx REa Al5 O12 (x = 0; 1.485; 2.97 and a = 0.03). The synthesis of the phosphor samples was done using the simultaneous addition of reagents technique. This study reveals new aspects regarding the influence of different activator ions on the morpho-structural and luminescent characteristics of garnet type phosphor. All YAG:RE phosphors are well crystallized powders containing a cubic-Y3 Al5 O12 phase as major component along with monoclinic-Y4 Al2 O9 and orthorhombic-YAlO3 phases as the impurity. The crystallites dimensions of YAG:RE phosphors vary between 38 nm and 88 nm, while the unit cell slowly increase as the ionic radius of the activator increases. Under UV excitation, YAG:Ce exhibits yellow emission due to electron transition in Ce(3+) from the 5d level to the ground state levels ((2) F5/2 , (2) F7/2 ). The emission intensity of Ce(3+) is enhanced in the presence of the Tb(3+) ions and is decreased in the presence of Eu(3+) ions due to some radiative or non-radiative processes that take place between activator ions. By varying the rare earth ions, the emission colour can be modulated from green to white and red. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Pressure-induced exotic states in rare earth hexaborides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Finding the exotic phenomena in strongly correlated electron systems (SCESs) and understanding the corresponding microphysics have long been the research frontiers of condensed matter physics. The remarkable examples for the intriguing phenomena discovered in past years include unconventional superconductivity, heavy Fermion behaviors, giant magneto-resistance and so on. A fascinating type of rare earth hexaboride RB6 (R  =  Sm, Yb, Eu and Ce) belongs to a strongly correlated electron system (SCES), but shows unusual ambient-pressure and high-pressure behaviors beyond the phenomena mentioned above. Particularly, the recent discovery of the coexistence of an unusual metallic surface state and an insulating bulk state in SmB6, known to be a Kondo insulator decades ago, by theoretical calculations and many experimental measurements creates new interest for the investigation of the RB6. This significant progress encourages people to revisit the RB6 with an attempt to establish a new physics that links the SCES and the unusual metallic surface state which is a common feature of a topological insulator (TI). It is well known that pressure has the capability of tuning the electronic structure and modifying the ground state of solids, or even inducing a quantum phase transition which is one of the kernel issues in studies of SCESs. In this brief review, we will describe the progress in high pressure studies on the RB6 based on our knowledge and research interests, mainly focusing on the pressure-induced phenomena in YbB6 and SmB6, especially on the quantum phase transitions and their connections with the valence state of the rare earth ions. Moreover, some related high-pressure results obtained from CeB6 and EuB6 are also included. Finally, a summary is given in the conclusions and perspectives section.

  19. 40 CFR 721.10423 - Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Complex strontium aluminate, rare... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10423 Complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped... substances identified generically as complex strontium aluminate, rare earth doped (PMNs P-12-22, P-12-23,...

  20. Rare Earth elements in individual minerals in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Crozaz, Ghislaine

    1993-01-01

    Shergottites (i.e., Shergotty, Zagami, EETA79001, ALHA77005, and LEW88516) are an important set of achondrites because they comprise the majority of the SNC group of meteorites (nine, in total, known to us), which are likely to be samples of the planet Mars. Study of these meteorites may therefore provide valuable information about petrogenetic processes on a large planetary body other than Earth. Rare earth element (REE) distributions between various mineral phases were found to be useful in geochemically modeling the petrogenesis of various rock types (terrestrial and meteoritic). However, with the exception of a few ion microprobe studies and analyses of mineral separates, there has previously not been any comprehensive effort to characterize and directly compare REE in individual minerals in each of the five known shergottites. Ion microprobe analyses were made on thin sections of each of the shergottites. Minerals analyzed were pyroxenes (pigeonite and augite), maskelynite, and whitlockite. The REE concentrations in each mineral type in each shergottite is given.

  1. Heat capacities, order-disorder transitions, and thermodynamic properties of rare-earth orthoferrites and rare-earth iron garnets

    SciTech Connect

    Parida, S.C. Rakshit, S.K.; Singh, Ziley

    2008-01-15

    Rare-earth orthoferrites, RFeO{sub 3}, and rare-earth iron garnets (RIGs) R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (R=rare-earth elements) were prepared by citrate-nitrate gel combustion method and characterized by X-ray diffraction method. Isobaric molar heat capacities of these oxides were determined by using differential scanning calorimetry from 130 to 860 K. Order-disorder transition temperatures were determined from the heat capacity measurements. The Neel temperatures (T{sub N}) due to antiferromagentic to paramagnetic transitions in orthoferrites and the Curie temperatures (T{sub C}) due to ferrimagnetic to paramagnetic transitions in garnets were determined from the heat capacity data. Both T{sub N} and T{sub C} systematically decrease with increasing atomic number of R across the series. Lattice, electronic and magnetic contributions to the total heat capacity were calculated. Debye temperatures as a function of absolute temperature were calculated for these compounds. Thermodynamic functions like C{sub p,m}{sup o}, S{sub m}{sup o}, H{sup o}, G{sup o}, (H{sub T}{sup o}-H{sub 0}{sup o}), (H{sub T}{sup o}-H{sub 298.15K}{sup o}), -(G{sub T}{sup o}-H{sub 298.15K}{sup o})/T, {delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup o}, and {delta}{sub f}G{sub m}{sup o} have been generated for the compounds RFeO{sub 3}(s) and R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}(s) based on the experimental data obtained in this study and the available data in the literature. - Graphical abstract: Plot of molar heat capacities (C{sub p,m}{sup o}) of R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}(s) (R=Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) against temperature (T). The inset shows the magnified portion of the heat capacity plot near the transition region indicating nearly same values of Curie temperatures for different R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}(s)

  2. Luminescence of Rare-Earth-Doped Nanoparticles with Aromatic Linker Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senty, Tess; Yalamanchi, Mohita; Zhang, Yanwei; Leach, Anya; Seehra, Mohindar; Shi, Xiaodong; Bristow, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Rare-earth-doped vanadate glasses retain their luminescence when formed as shells around magnetic cores [1]. This property has prompted speculation that composite magneto-photoluminescent (CMPL) structures can be used in biological applications. For example, CMPL nanoparticles can be magnetically tuned to separate cells, proteins and nucleic acids [2]. A crucial step in realizing this goal is to attach organic linkers (between the rare-earth-doped shell and bio-probes), which do not affect the luminescence. We demonstrate with IR spectroscopy that Eu:YVO4 nanoparticles treated with benzoic acid, 3-nitro 4-chloro-benzoic acid and 3,4-dimethoxy benzoic acid all result in the modification of the surface states, replacing the native metal-hydroxyl bond with a longer chain aromatic linker, which can be later functionalized. Photoluminescence spectra under UV-excitation show that the dominant ^5D0 -> ^7F2 transition at ˜620 nm is unaffected by the chemical treatment. The result provides a platform to facilitate the attachment of bio-probes to Eu:YVO4 nanoparticles and related CMPL nanostructures with Fe2O4 cores. [1] N. B. McDowell et al, J. Appl. Phys. 107, 09B327 (2010). [2] T. R. Sathe et al, Anal. Chem. 78, 5627 (2006).

  3. Concentrations of rare-earth elements in soils of the Prioksko-Terrasnyi state biospheric reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelomov, L. V.; Asainova, Zh. S.; Yoshida, S.; Ivanov, I. V.

    2012-10-01

    The concentrations of rare-earth elements were studied in the profiles of soddy podburs and mucky-humus gley soils. The soil horizons differed significantly in the contents of Corg (0-26%), the physical clay (<0.01 mm) fraction (3-31%), the acidity (pH 4 to 5.5), and the presence/absence of Al-Fe-humus accumulations. The most significant relationship was observed between the concentrations of rare-earth elements and the physical clay content, particularly for Nd: x(Nd, mg/kg) = 7 + 1.6 y (fraction <0.01 mm, %). Weak biogenic accumulations in the upper horizons were observed for Nd, Ce, and Dy; Nd, Pr, and La accumulated in the Al-Fe-humus illuvial horizon. The concentrations of rare-earth elements in the studied soils formed the following sequence (mg/kg): Nd (20-101)-Ce (10-44)-La, Sm, Gd, Dy, Yb (3-20)-Pr (1-4)-Ho (0.1-0.4)-Tm, Lu, and Tl (0.0). A clear trend was observed to higher contents of even-numbered elements as compared with odd-numbered elements, excluding La.

  4. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium.

  5. Dynamics of dipolar defects in rare earth-doped alkaline-earth fluoride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, Forrest Taylor

    Alkaline-earth fluoride crystals such as SrF2 provide an excellent sample material for investigating the physics of point defects in crystal lattices. High quality crystals are easily grown, and they readily accept many dopant ions into the lattice, particularly rare earth ions. Rare earth dopant ions (typically trivalent) occupy substitutional sites in the lattice by replacing a Sr2+ ion. Due to the extra charge of the rare earth ion, charge compensation is often provided by an extra fluoride ion (F--) located in a nearby interstitial position. If located in the nearest-neighbor (nn) interstitial position, it forms a defect with C4n symmetry; if located in the next-nearest-neighbor (nnn) intersitial position, it forms a defect with C3n symmetry. Given sufficient thermal energy, this interstitial F ion can move to adjacent interstitial sites and hence reorient the defect. The rate w at which the ion moves from one interstitial site to another is well described by a simple Arrhenius expression: w=n0e-E/kT , where n0 is the attack frequency of the F-- and E is the activation energy. This motion can profoundly affect both the electronic polarizability of the material and the polarization of light emitted or absorbed by the rare earth ion. This thesis describes the normal mode motion of interstitial ions which may occupy either nn or nnn interstitial sites. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), I observed the relative populations of nn and nnn defects in SrF2 doped with Gd3+ as a function of temperature. These measurements show that dipolar reorientation of the nnn F occurs through the nn interstitial position. Not all interstitial F-- motion is thermally driven. Fluorescence depolarization measurements of SrF2:Pr3+ indicate that optically stimulating a Pr3+ may induce interstitial motion of a nn F--. Such motion was confirmed by showing that nn defects in SrF2:Pr3+ may be polarized at very low temperatures when the sample is illuminated with resonant light. I

  6. Physical and electrochemical properties of alkaline earth doped, rare earth vanadates

    SciTech Connect

    Adijanto, Lawrence; Balaji Padmanabhan, Venu; Holmes, Kevin J.; Gorte, Raymond J.; Vohs, John M.

    2012-06-15

    The effect of partial substitution of alkaline earth (AE) ions, Sr{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}, for the rare earth (RE) ions, La{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+}, and Sm{sup 3+}, on the physical properties of REVO{sub 4} compounds were investigated. The use of the Pechini method to synthesize the vanadates allowed for high levels of AE substitution to be obtained. Coulometric titration was used to measure redox isotherms for these materials and showed that the addition of the AE ions increased both reducibility and electronic conductivity under typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode conditions, through the formation of compounds with mixed vanadium valence. In spite of their high electronic conductivity, REVO{sub 4}-yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite anodes exhibited only modest performance when used in SOFCs operating with H{sub 2} fuel at 973 K due to their low catalytic activity. High performance was obtained, however, after the addition of a small amount of catalytically active Pd to the anode. - Graphical abstract: Coulometric titration isotherms for ({open_square}) LaVO{sub 4}, ( White-Circle ) PrVO{sub 4}, ( Lozenge ) CeVO{sub 4}, ( Black-Up-Pointing-Triangle ) Ce{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, and ( Black-Square ) Ce{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}VO{sub 3.85}, at 973 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Infiltration procedures were used to prepare SOFC anodes from various vanadates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doping of Alkaline Earth to Rare Earth Vanadates showed to improve conductivity and chemical stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline Earth Doped Rare Earth Vanadates-YSZ composites showed conductivities as high as 5 S cm{sup -1} at 973 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As with other ceramic anodes, the addition of a catalyst was required to achieve low anode impedance.

  7. Characterization and Recovery of Rare Earths from Coal and By-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Granite, Evan J.; Roth, Elliot; Alvin, Mary Anne

    2016-03-25

    Coal is a precious resource, both in the United States and around the world. The United States has a 250-year supply of coal, and generates between 30 - 40% of its electricity through coal combustion. Approximately 1 Gt of coal has been mined annually in the US, although the 2015 total will likely be closer to 900 Mt (http://www.eia.gov/coal/production/quarterly/). Most of the coal is burned for power generation, but substantial quantities are also employed in the manufacture of steel, chemicals, and activated carbons. Coal has a positive impact upon many industries, including mining, power, rail transportation, manufacturing, chemical, steel, activated carbon, and fuels. Everything that is in the earth’s crust is also present within coal to some extent, and the challenge is always to utilize abundant domestic coal in clean and environmentally friendly manners. In the case of the rare earths, these valuable and extraordinarily useful elements are present within the abundant coal and coal by-products produced domestically and world-wide. These materials include the coals, as well as the combustion by-products such as ashes, coal preparation wastes, gasification slags, and mining by-products. All of these materials can be viewed as potential sources of rare earth elements. Most of the common inorganic lanthanide compounds, such as the phosphates found in coal, have very high melting, boiling, and thermal decomposition temperatures, allowing them to concentrate in combustion and gasification by-products. Furthermore, rare earths have been found in interesting concentrations in the strata above and below certain coal seams. Much of the recent research on coal utilization in the United States has focused upon the capture of pollutants such as acid gases, particulates, and mercury, and the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. The possible recovery of rare earth and other critical elements from abundant coal and by-products is an exciting new research area, representing a

  8. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    PubMed

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-02

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available.

  9. Rare Earth Elements in National Defense: Background, Oversight Issues, and Options for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    refined metals, and is the majority producer of the world’s two strongest magnets ( samarium cobalt (SmCo) and neodymium iron boron (NeFeB) permanent...light rare earths (lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium ) and heavy rare earths (europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium... samarium cobalt (SmCo), and neodymium iron boron (NdFeB). NdFeB magnets, considered the world’s strongest permanent magnets, dominate rare earth magnet

  10. Methods for preparation of nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates for lighting applications

    DOEpatents

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manoharan, Mohan; Martins Loureiro, Sergio Paulo; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2013-04-16

    Disclosed here are methods for the preparation of optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates. The optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates may be used as one or more of quantum-splitting phosphor, visible-light emitting phosphor, vacuum-UV absorbing phosphor, and UV-emitting phosphor. Also disclosed herein are discharge lamps comprising the optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates provided by these methods.

  11. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline rare earth phosphate nanostructure. The method comprising: providing a rare earth metal precursor solution and providing a phosphate precursor solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal precursor solution and the phosphate precursor solution, wherein metal cations of the metal precursor solution and phosphate ions of the phosphate precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline rare earth metal phosphate nanostructure.

  12. Minerals yearbook, 1993: Rare earths, the lanthanides, yttrium, and scandium. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1995-03-01

    Domestic mine production of rare earths decreased in 1993. The domestic economy continued to recover slowly during the year and inflation rose a modest 2.5%. Estimated domestic apparent consumption decreased 21%; however, earnings by the major domestic processor reportedly increased amid a slight decline in sales. Demand increased for rare earths used in petroleum fluid cracking catalysts, automotive catalytic converters, permanent magnets, and television and lighting phosphors. Demand decreased for rare earths in automotive UV glass applications.

  13. Carbon footprint assessment of recycling technologies for rare earth elements: A case study of recycling yttrium and europium from phosphor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Allen H; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Huang, Lance H; Su, Chao-Chin

    2017-02-01

    Rare earth elements are key raw materials in high-technology industries. Mining activities and manufacturing processes of such industries have caused considerable environmental impacts, such as soil erosion, vegetation destruction, and various forms of pollution. Sustaining the long-term supply of rare earth elements is difficult because of the global shortage of rare earth resources. The diminishing supply of rare earth elements has attracted considerable concern because many industrialized countries regarded such elements as important strategic resources for economic growth. This study aims to explore the carbon footprints of yttrium and europium recovery techniques from phosphor. Two extraction recovery methods, namely, acid extraction and solvent extraction, were selected for the analysis and comparison of carbon footprints. The two following functional units were used: (1) the same phosphor amounts for specific Y and Eu recovery concentrations, and (2) the same phosphor amounts for extraction. For acid extraction method, two acidic solutions (H2SO4 and HCl) were used at two different temperatures (60 and 90°C). For solvent extraction method, acid leaching was performed followed by ionic liquid extraction. Carbon footprints from acid and solvent extraction methods were estimated to be 10.1 and 10.6kgCO2eq, respectively. Comparison of the carbon emissions of the two extraction methods shows that the solvent extraction method has significantly higher extraction efficiency, even though acid extraction method has a lower carbon footprint. These results may be used to develop strategies for life cycle management of rare earth resources to realize sustainable usage.

  14. Rare-earth metal diisopropylamide-catalyzed intramolecular hydroamination.

    PubMed

    Spallek, Tatiana; Anwander, Reiner

    2016-10-18

    Rare-earth metal diisopropylamide complexes LiLn(NiPr2)4(THF) (Ln = Sc, Y, La), [LiY(NiPr2)4]n, NaLn(NiPr2)4(THF) (Ln = Sc, Y), Sc(NiPr2)3(THF) and Ce(NiPr2)4 were screened as catalysts for the intramolecular hydroamination/cyclization (IHC) of 1-amino-2,2-dimethyl-4-pentene, 1-amino-2,2-diphenyl-4-pentene, and 1-amino-2,2-diphenyl-5-hexene at ambient and moderately increased temperature of 60 °C in C6D6. The lithium ate complexes displayed the most efficient precatalysts with high conversion rates at 60 °C for the phenyl-substituted substrates and Ln = Y and La, affording turnover frequencies Nt as high as 164 h(-1). The catalytic activity could be increased by employing THF-free complex [LiY(NiPr2)4]n (Nt = 45.8 h(-1) at 26 °C; 34.1 h(-1) for LiY(NiPr2)4(THF)). In situ generation of putative LiY(NiPr2)4(THF) from YCl3(THF)3.3 and four equivalents of LiNiPr2 (LDA) in C6D6 generated a catalyst revealing Nt comparable to pre-isolated crystallized LiY(NiPr2)4(THF) but yielding even higher substrate conversion. The IHC reactions were also examined for rare-earth metal bis(trimethylsilyl)amide catalysts Ln[N(SiMe3)2]3 (Ln = Sc, Y, La) as well as for LDA using the same reaction conditions, revealing overall superior activity of the silylamide derivatives but poor performance of LDA compared to the rare-earth metal diisopropylamide complexes LiLn(NiPr2)4(THF). Cyclization of 1-amino-2,2-diphenyl-5-hexene to the 6-membered heterocycle 2-methyl-4,4-diphenylpiperidine by lanthanum derivative LiLa(NiPr2)4(THF) was accompanied by a competitive isomerization reaction affording max. 20% of 1-amino-2,2-diphenyl-4-hexene after 2 h at 60 °C. Crystalline tetravalent Ce(NiPr2)4 showed a better IHC performance than crystalline trivalent Sc(NiPr2)3(THF) as preliminary examined for 1-amino-2,2-diphenyl-4-pentene at 26 °C (Nt = 5.6 and 0.9 h(-1), respectively), but cyclization came to a halt after 2 h, probably due to decomposition of the catalyst.

  15. Energetics of Rare Earth Doped Uranium Oxide Solid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei

    The physical and chemical properties of UO2 nuclear fuels are affected as fission products accumulate during irradiation. The lanthanides, a main group of fission products, form extensive solid solutions with uranium oxide in the fluorite structure. Thermodynamic studies of such solid solutions had been performed to obtain partial molar free energies of oxygen as a function of dopant concentration and temperature; however, direct measurement of formation enthalpies was hampered by the refractory nature of these oxides. In this work, high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry was utilized to study the thermochemistry of various rare earth doped uranium oxide LnxU 1-xO2-0.5x+y (Ln = La, Y, Nd) over a wide range of dopant concentrations and oxygen contents. The sintered solid solutions were carefully characterized to determine their phase purity, chemical composition, and uranium oxidation state, with most of the materials in the oxygen excess regime. The enthalpies of formation of LnxU1-xO2-0.5x+y were calculated from the calorimetric data. The oxidation enthalpies of these solid solutions are similar to that of UO2. The formation enthalpies from constituent oxides (LnO1.5, UO2, and UO3) become increasingly negative with addition of dopant cations and appear relatively independent of the uranium oxidation state (oxygen content) when the type and concentration of the dopants are the same. This is valid in the oxygen excess regime; thus an estimation of formation enthalpies of LnxU1-xO2 materials can be made. The formation enthalpies from elements of hyperstoichiometric LnxU1-xO 2-0.5x+y materials obtained from calorimetric measurements are in good agreement with those calculated from free energy data. A direct comparison between the formation enthalpies from calorimetric study and computational research using density functional theory was also performed. The experimental and computational energies of LnxU 1-xO2 (Ln = La, Y, Nd) generally agree within 10 k

  16. Combinatorial investigation of rare-earth free permanent magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fackler, Sean Wu

    The combinatorial high throughput method allows one to rapidly study a large number of samples with systematically changing parameters. We apply this method to study Fe-Co-V alloys as alternatives to rare-earth permanent magnets. Rare-earth permanent magnets derive their unmatched magnetic properties from the hybridization of Fe and Co with the f-orbitals of rare-earth elements, which have strong spin-orbit coupling. It is predicted that Fe and Co may also have strong hybridization with 4d and 5d refractory transition metals with strong spin-orbit coupling. Refractory transition metals like V also have the desirable property of high temperature stability, which is important for permanent magnet applications in traction motors. In this work, we focus on the role of crystal structure, composition, and secondary phases in the origin of competitive permanent magnetic properties of a particular Fe-Co-V alloy. Fe38Co52V10, compositions are known as Vicalloys. Fe-CoV composition spreads were sputtered onto three-inch silicon wafers and patterned into discrete sample pads forming a combinatorial library. We employed highthroughput screening methods using synchrotron X-rays, wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, and magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) to rapidly screen crystal structure, composition, and magnetic properties, respectively. We found that in-plane magnetic coercive fields of our Vicalloy thin films agree with known bulk values (300 G), but found a remarkable eight times increase of the out-of-plane coercive fields (˜2,500 G). To explain this, we measured the switching fields between in-plane and out-of-plane thin film directions which revealed that the Kondorsky model of 180° domain wall reversal was responsible for Vicalloy's enhanced out-of-plane coercive field and possibly its permanent magnetic properties. The Kondorsky model suggests that domain-wall pinning is the origin of Vicalloy's permanent magnetic properties, in contrast to strain, shape, or

  17. Rare earth elements geochemistry in springs from Taftan geothermal area SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Ata; Ghoreyshinia, Sayedkazem; Mehrabi, Behzad; Delavari, Morteza

    2015-10-01

    Concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) were determined in springs and andesitic-dacitic rocks of Taftan geothermal field. Hydrochemical results of major ions indicate that thermal springs are Na-SO4-Cl and Ca-SO4-Cl types. Concentrations of REEs are in ranges of 10- 4 to 1.2 and 49 to ~ 62 times of chondrite for springwater and rock samples, respectively. The thermal (STS and TTS) and the cold (APS) springs with low pH values exhibit a very high REE contents (0.64 to 3.15 mg/l). Saturation index indicates that Fe and Al phases can control dissolved REE concentration in FTS and PF cold springs. The speciation of REE complexes indicates dominant presence of LnSO4+ and free ion in the Taftan thermal springs. In APS cold spring with pH ~ 4, fluoride complexes are dominate over the free ion and sulfate species, while in PF and FTS cold springs with pH 6.4 and 7, respectively, carbonate complexes (LnCO3+) are predominant species. Chondrite-normalized pattern for the low-pH waters show very distinctive gull-wing patterns, characteristic feature of acid-sulfate geothermal systems, and are similar to those of the host rocks. Chemical characteristics of rare earth elements in spring and volcanic rock samples indicate that REEs are originated from the andesitic-dacitic host rocks. Whole-rock-normalized REE patterns and petrographic evidences show that rare earth elements leached mainly from marginal alteration of minerals and matrix decomposition in volcanic rocks. In chondrite-normalized REE patterns, significant negative Eu anomaly in the cold springs compare to the thermal and acidic springs indicates that alteration of plagioclase is more intense in the later, corresponding to increasing in temperature and acidic state of reactant water.

  18. [Determination of trace rare earth in fossil of dinosaurian egg by laser thermal lens spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yan, H; Zheng, Y; Yan, S

    1997-10-01

    Determination of trace rare earth in fossil of dinosaurian egg by LTLS (Laser thermal lens spectrometry) is presented in this paper. The trace rare earth in fossil of dinosaurian egg was separated and concentrated with ion exchange method. The measure conditions and effect factors are discussedian. The LTLS was applied to the determination of trace rare earth in fossil of dinosaurian egg with satisfactory results. It provides the reference data for the studies on the fossil of dinosaurian egg and an analytical method for the determination of rare earth in geochemical sample.

  19. Calculation of binary phase diagrams between the actinide elements, rare earth elements, and transition metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Selle, J E

    1992-06-26

    Attempts were made to apply the Kaufman method of calculating binary phase diagrams to the calculation of binary phase diagrams between the rare earths, actinides, and the refractory transition metals. Difficulties were encountered in applying the method to the rare earths and actinides, and modifications were necessary to provide accurate representation of known diagrams. To calculate the interaction parameters for rare earth-rare earth diagrams, it was necessary to use the atomic volumes for each of the phases: liquid, body-centered cubic, hexagonal close-packed, and face-centered cubic. Determination of the atomic volumes of each of these phases for each element is discussed in detail. In some cases, empirical means were necessary. Results are presented on the calculation of rare earth-rare earth, rare earth-actinide, and actinide-actinide diagrams. For rare earth-refractory transition metal diagrams and actinide-refractory transition metal diagrams, empirical means were required to develop values for the enthalpy of vaporization for rare earth elements and values for the constant (C) required when intermediate phases are present. Results of using the values determined for each element are presented.

  20. Synthesis, structure and reactivity of rare-earth metal complexes containing anionic phosphorus ligands.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianshu; Kaercher, Sabrina; Roesky, Peter W

    2014-01-07

    A comprehensive review of structurally characterized rare-earth metal complexes containing anionic phosphorus ligands is presented. Since rare-earth elements form hard ions and phosphorus is considered as a soft ligand, the rare-earth metal phosphorus coordination is regarded as a less favorite combination. Three classes of phosphorus ligands, (1) the monoanionic organophosphide ligands (PR2(-)) bearing one negative charge on the phosphorus atom; (2) the dianionic phosphinidene (PR(2-)) and P(3-) ligands; and (3) the pure inorganic polyphosphide ligands (Pn(x-)), are included here. Particular attention has been paid to the synthesis, structure, and reactivity of the rare-earth metal phosphides.

  1. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, James B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass. CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities or rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  2. Rare-earth metal prices in the USA ca. 1960 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Rare-earth metal prices were compiled from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Although commercial demand for rare-earth metals began in 1908, as the alloy mischmetal, commercial quantities of a wide range of individual rare-earth metals were not available until the late 1950s. The discovery of a large, high-grade rare-earth deposit at Mountain Pass, CA, USA, in 1949, was significant because it led to the production of commercial quantities of rare-earth elements that reduced prices and encouraged wider application of the materials. The availability of ore from Mountain Pass, and other large rare-earth deposits, especially those in Australia and China, has provided the world with abundant resources for rare-earth metal production. This availability, coupled with improved technology from Government and private-sector metallurgical research, has resulted in substantial decreases in rare-earth metal prices since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Price series for the individual rare-earth metals (except promethium) are quoted on a kilogram basis from the late 1950s and early 1960s through 1994. Prices are given in US dollars on an actual and constant dollar basis. Industrial and economic factors affecting prices during this time period are examined.

  3. Monolithically integrated active waveguides and lasers using rare-earth doped spin-on glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Sullivan, C.T.; Vawter, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    This LDRD program No. 3505.230 explored a new approach to monolithic integration of active waveguides and rare-earth solid state lasers directly onto III-V substrates. It involved selectively incorporating rare-earth ions into spin-on glasses (SOGs) that could be solvent cast and then patterned with conventional microelectronic processing. The patterned, rare-earth spin-on glasses (RESOGs) were to be photopumped by laser diodes prefabricated on the wafer and would serve as directly integrated active waveguides and/or rare-earth solid state lasers.

  4. Physical and electrochemical properties of alkaline earth doped, rare earth vanadates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adijanto, Lawrence; Balaji Padmanabhan, Venu; Holmes, Kevin J.; Gorte, Raymond J.; Vohs, John M.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of partial substitution of alkaline earth (AE) ions, Sr2+ and Ca2+, for the rare earth (RE) ions, La3+, Ce3+, Pr3+, and Sm3+, on the physical properties of REVO4 compounds were investigated. The use of the Pechini method to synthesize the vanadates allowed for high levels of AE substitution to be obtained. Coulometric titration was used to measure redox isotherms for these materials and showed that the addition of the AE ions increased both reducibility and electronic conductivity under typical solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode conditions, through the formation of compounds with mixed vanadium valence. In spite of their high electronic conductivity, REVO4-yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite anodes exhibited only modest performance when used in SOFCs operating with H2 fuel at 973 K due to their low catalytic activity. High performance was obtained, however, after the addition of a small amount of catalytically active Pd to the anode.

  5. Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Fractured Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Kim, Y.; Lee, K.

    2003-12-01

    An understanding of the geochemistry of potential host rocks is very important in the site evaluation for construction of an underground geologic repository for radioactive waste. Because of similar valence and ionic radii and high similarity in electronic structure with trivalent actinides (such as Am3+ and Cm3+), the rare earth elements (REEs) have been used to predict the behavior of actinide-series elements in solution. For Am and Cm, which occur only in the trivalent states in most waste-disposal repository environments, the analogy with the REEs is particularly relevant. Krauskopf calculated the retardation factors for radionuclides in various rock materials based on some compiled data. But, in general, because the transuranic actinides do not occur naturally in appreciable quantities, their behaviors in repository environments cannot be predicted from evidence of their movement in geologic environments (mainly in groundwater) over geologic timespans. Predictions about long-term future behavior of transuranic actinides have therefore been made by extrapolation from short-term observations of their chemical properties in laboratory experiments or in field tests, but such extrapolation is fraught with uncertainty. In order to verify the behavior of Eu in various geological environments, we estimated the abundance of rare earth elements in three gneiss bodies originated from different geological environments and volcanic tuff. We also carried out some leaching experiment of fracture-filling calcite precipitated due to changes of geochemical environment in paleo-groundwater. Of the three gneisses, two gneisses are granitic-granodioritic origin and the other is tonaltic-trondjemitic origin. As a result, we could observe that Eu had a close relationship with fracture-filling calcite precipitation due to water-rock interaction. Our results show that Eu is the most variable element of REEs for the hydrogeological environment such as change of oxidation-reduction and

  6. Magneto-structural correlations in rare-earth cobalt pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Corey Mitchell

    Magnetic materials are used in many applications such as credit cards, hard drives, electric motors, sensors, etc. Although a vast range of magnetic solids is available for these purposes, our ability to improve their efficiency and discover new materials remains paramount to the sustainable progress and economic profitability in many technological areas. The search for magnetic solids with improved performance requires fundamental understanding of correlations between the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of existing materials, as well as active exploratory synthesis that targets the development of new magnets. Some of the strongest permanent magnets, Nd 2Fe14B, SmCo5, and Sm2Co17, combine transition and rare-earth metals, benefiting from the strong exchange between the 4f and 3d magnetic sublattices. Although these materials have been studied in great detail, the development of novel magnets requires thorough investigation of other 3d-4 f intermetallics, in order to gain further insights into correlations between their crystal structures and magnetic properties. Among many types of intermetallic materials, ternary pnictides RCo 2Pn2 (R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd; Pn = P, As) are of interest because, despite their simple crystal structures, they contain two magnetic sublattices, exchange interactions between which may lead to rich and unprecedented magnetic behavior. Nevertheless, magnetism of these materials was studied only to a limited extent, especially as compared to the extensive studies of their silicide and germanide analogues. The ThCr2Si2 structure type, to which these ternary pnictides belong, is one of the most ubiquitous atomic arrangements encountered among intermetallic compounds. It accounts for over 1000 known intermetallics and has received increased attention due to the recently discovered FeAs-based superconductors. This dissertation is devoted to the investigation of

  7. Molecular nitrides with titanium and rare-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Caballo, Jorge; García-Castro, María; Martín, Avelino; Mena, Miguel; Pérez-Redondo, Adrián; Yélamos, Carlos

    2011-07-18

    A series of titanium-group 3/lanthanide metal complexes have been prepared by reaction of [{Ti(η(5)-C(5)Me(5))(μ-NH)}(3)(μ(3)-N)] (1) with halide, triflate, or amido derivatives of the rare-earth metals. Treatment of 1 with metal halide complexes [MCl(3)(thf)(n)] or metal trifluoromethanesulfonate derivatives [M(O(3)SCF(3))(3)] at room temperature affords the cube-type adducts [X(3)M{(μ(3)-NH)(3)Ti(3)(η(5)-C(5)Me(5))(3)(μ(3)-N)}] (X = Cl, M = Sc (2), Y (3), La (4), Sm (5), Er (6), Lu (7); X = OTf, M = Y (8), Sm (9), Er (10)). Treatment of yttrium (3) and lanthanum (4) halide complexes with 3 equiv of lithium 2,6-dimethylphenoxido [LiOAr] produces the aryloxido complexes [(ArO)(3)M{(μ(3)-NH)(3)Ti(3)(η(5)-C(5)Me(5))(3)(μ(3)-N)}] (M = Y (11), La (12)). Complex 1 reacts with 0.5 equiv of rare-earth bis(trimethylsilyl)amido derivatives [M{N(SiMe(3))(2)}(3)] in toluene at 85-180 °C to afford the corner-shared double-cube nitrido compounds [M(μ(3)-N)(3)(μ(3)-NH)(3){Ti(3)(η(5)-C(5)Me(5))(3)(μ(3)-N)}(2)] (M = Sc (13), Y (14), La (15), Sm (16), Eu (17), Er (18), Lu (19)) via NH(SiMe(3))(2) elimination. A single-cube intermediate [{(Me(3)Si)(2)N}Sc{(μ(3)-N)(2)(μ(3)-NH)Ti(3)(η(5)-C(5)Me(5))(3)(μ(3)-N)}] (20) was obtained by the treatment of 1 with 1 equiv of the scandium bis(trimethylsilyl)amido derivative [Sc{N(SiMe(3))(2)}(3)]. The X-ray crystal structures of 2, 7, 11, 14, 15, and 19 have been determined. The thermal decomposition in the solid state of double-cube nitrido complexes 14, 15, and 18 has been investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) measurements, as well as by pyrolysis experiments at 1100 °C under different atmospheres (Ar, H(2)/N(2), NH(3)) for the yttrium complex 14.

  8. Diagenetic uptake of rare earth elements by conodont apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Algeo, T. J.; Cao, L.; Zhao, L.; Chen, Z. Q.; Li, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The rare earth element (REE) composition of bioapatite has long been used as a proxy for ancient seawater chemistry and paleomarine environmental reconstruction, based on the assumption of preservation of a hydrogenous (seawater-derived) REE signal. Recent work, however, has begun to question the provenance of REEs in conodonts, emphasizing the importance of REEs released by the lithogenous fraction of the sediment and subsequently adsorbed onto conodont apatite in the burial environment. Here, we investigate patterns of REE and trace-element abundance in conodonts and their host sediments from the Early to Late Ordovician Huanghuachang and Chenjiahe sections of Hubei Province, South China. Several lines of evidence indicate that REEs in the conodont samples were acquired mainly from clay minerals in the host sediment during burial diagenesis: (1) REEs in conodonts show a strong positive correlation to Th and other lithogenic elements; (2) conodonts and whole-rock samples show general patterns of REE and trace-element enrichment that are highly similar to each other and bear no resemblance to seawater elemental concentrations; (3) similar patterns are observed in Triassic conodonts and whole-rock samples; and (4) Y/Ho ratios in conodonts are mostly <40 (mean ~33), values that are consistent with derivation of >90% of REEs from lithogenous sources. Conodonts show pronounced middle rare earth element (MREE) enrichment, a pattern that is unambiguously of diagenetic origin owing to its association with lower Y/Ho ratios. With increasing MREE enrichment of conodont samples, U concentrations and LaN/YbN ratios shift from high to low, and Mn concentrations from low to high. These patterns suggest that conodont diagenesis was initiated at shallow burial depths under suboxic conditions (i.e., in the zone of Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction) but continued at greater burial depths, with most acquisition of secondary REEs at later diagenetic stages. Our findings indicate that (1

  9. Rare earth elements in scleractinian cold-water corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddatz, J.; Liebetrau, V.; Hathorne, E. C.; Rüggeberg, A.; Dullo, W.; Frank, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Rare Earth Elements (REE) have a great potential to trace continental input, particle scavenging and the oxidation state of seawater. These REE are recorded in the skeleton of the cosmopolitan cold-water corals Lophelia pertusa. Here we use an online preconcentration ICP-MS method (Hathorne et al. 2012) to measure REE concentrations in seawater and associated cold-water coral carbonates in order to investigate their seawater origin. Scleractinian cold-water corals were collected in-situ and alive and with corresponding seawater samples covering from the European Continental Margin. The seawater REE patterns are characterized by the typical negative cerium anomaly of seawater, but are distinct for the northern Norwegian Margin and the Oslo Fjord, probably related to continental input. Initial results for the corresponding coral samples suggest that these distinct REE patterns of ambient seawater are recorded by the coral skeletons although some fractionation during incorporation into the aragonite occurs. This indicates that scleractinian cold-water corals can serve as a valuable archive for seawater derived REE signatures, as well radiogenic Nd isotope compositions. In a second step we analysed fossil coral samples from various locations, which were oxidatively and reductively cleaned prior to analysis. Initial results reveal that sediment-buried fossil (early Pleistocene to Holocene) coral samples from the Norwegian Margin and the Porcupine Seabight (Challenger Mound, IODP Site 1317) do not show the expected seawater REE patterns. In particular, the fossil coral-derived REE patterns lack a negative cerium anomaly suggesting that fossil coral-REE patterns do not represent ambient seawater. Thus, we suggest that the oxidative-reductive cleaning method widely used for cleaning of marine carbonates such as foraminifera prior to measurements of seawater-derived trace metal and isotope compositions are not sufficient for REE and Nd isotopes in sediment-buried coral

  10. The adsorption of rare earth ions using carbonized polydopamine nano shells

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Xiaoqi; Luo, Huimin; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; ...

    2016-01-07

    Herein we report the structure effects of nano carbon shells prepared by carbonized polydopamine for rare earth elements (REEs) adsorption for the first time. The solid carbon sphere, 60 nm carbon shell and 500 nm carbon shell were prepared and investigated for adsorption and desorption of REEs. The adsorption of carbon shells for REEs was found to be better than the solid carbon sphere. The effect of acidities on the adsorption and desorption properties was discussed in this study. The good adsorption performance of carbon shells can be attributed to their porous structure, large specific surface area, amine group andmore » carbonyl group of dopamine.« less

  11. Quantitative aspects of rare earth metal determinations using capillary electrophoresis with indirect absorbance detection

    SciTech Connect

    Colburn, B.A.; Starnes, S.D.; Sepaniak, M.J.

    1995-04-01

    The practical utility of capillary zone electrophoresis with indirect absorbance detection is examined for the separation and quantitation of rare earth metals. Various imidazole derivatives are investigated as to their suitability as running buffer (displaceable) detection ions with {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid functioning as a chelating agent to enhance separations. Parameters important for quantitative analysis, such as limits of detection, relative standard deviation of peak areas, efficiency, resolution, peak shape and linear dynamic range are presented. The influence of sample matrix, method of injection, and background ion identity on these parameters are investigated and discussed.

  12. The adsorption of rare earth ions using carbonized polydopamine nano shells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaoqi; Luo, Huimin; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Liu, Rui; Hou, Xisen; Dai, Sheng

    2016-01-07

    Herein we report the structure effects of nano carbon shells prepared by carbonized polydopamine for rare earth elements (REEs) adsorption for the first time. The solid carbon sphere, 60 nm carbon shell and 500 nm carbon shell were prepared and investigated for adsorption and desorption of REEs. The adsorption of carbon shells for REEs was found to be better than the solid carbon sphere. The effect of acidities on the adsorption and desorption properties was discussed in this study. The good adsorption performance of carbon shells can be attributed to their porous structure, large specific surface area, amine group and carbonyl group of dopamine.

  13. Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals: high temperature solution synthesis, characterization and luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Yan, Bing; Zhang, Qiang

    2013-04-01

    A high temperature solution system with BaCO3/RECl3·xH2O in oleic acid/1-octadecene has been developed to prepare barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals: tetragonal phase of BaREF5 (RE = Pr, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Tm, Lu, Y), pure cubic phase Ba2REF7 (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb), and BaREF5 (RE = Ce, Gd) colloidal nanocrystals. In addition, it is proved that the functionalization of these nanocrystals by means of doping with Eu, Tb, and Yb, Er/Tm ion pair can obtain red, green, and visible-to-the-naked-eye green/blue upconversion emissions.

  14. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Fatin Adila; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Idris, Mohd Sobri

    2016-07-19

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO{sub 3} (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO{sub 3} downshifted the Curie temperature (T{sub C}). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, T{sub C} where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-doped BaTiO{sub 3}, Er-doped BaTiO{sub 3}, Sm-doped BaTiO{sub 3}, Nd-doped BaTiO{sub 3} and Ce-doped BaTiO{sub 3} had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as T{sub C} also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO{sub 3} except for Er-doped BaTiO{sub 3}.

  15. Complex magnetic properties in multilayer rare earth oxypnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiakui; Marcinkova, Andrea; Chen, Chih-Wei; Morosan, Emilia; Morosan Group Team

    2014-03-01

    Intensive research interest on layered transition metal pnictide materials was stimulated by the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe-pnictides a few years ago. To study the relationship between superconductivity, crystal structure and magnetism, and to search for novel superconductors of better application potential, more transition metal pnictides are worth investigating. In this talk, I will discuss physical properties of members of a particular class of layered oxypnictides, with four transition metal pnictogen layers per unit cell. While varying the rare earth ion, we find that one compound is a low temperature superconductor (Tc 1.7 K), and others show diverse magnetic properties, including ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic order, or spin glass behavior. I will show our observation from measurements of DC and AC magnetization, specific heat and resistivity. The understanding of the physical properties of these isostructual compounds may serve as a guide in the search for superconductivity in these systems. This work is supported by MURI-AFOSR and Rice University.

  16. Spin Hall torques generated by rare-earth thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Neal; Jadaun, Priyamvada; Heron, John T.; Jermain, Colin L.; Gibbons, Jonathan; Collette, Robyn; Buhrman, R. A.; Schlom, D. G.; Ralph, D. C.

    2017-02-01

    We report an initial experimental survey of spin Hall torques generated by the rare-earth metals Gd, Dy, Ho, and Lu, along with comparisons to first-principles calculations of their spin Hall conductivities. Using spin torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR) measurements and dc-biased ST-FMR, we estimate lower bounds for the spin Hall torque ratio, ξSH, of ≈0.04 for Gd, ≈0.05 for Dy, ≈0.14 for Ho, and ≈0.014 for Lu. The variations among these elements are qualitatively consistent with results from first principles [density-functional theory (DFT) in the local density approximation with a Hubbard-U correction]. The DFT calculations indicate that the spin Hall conductivity is enhanced by the presence of the partially filled f orbitals in Dy and Ho, which suggests a strategy to further strengthen the contribution of the f orbitals to the spin Hall effect by shifting the electron chemical potential.

  17. Magnetic strength and corrosion of rare earth magnets.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Khalid A; Drummond, James L; Graber, Thomas; BeGole, Ellen

    2006-09-01

    Rare earth magnets have been used in orthodontics, but their corrosion tendency in the oral cavity limits long-term clinical application. The aim of this project was to evaluate several; magnet coatings and their effects on magnetic flux density. A total of 60 neodymium-iron-boron magnets divided into 6 equal groups--polytetrafluoroethylene-coated (PTFE), parylene-coated, and noncoated--were subjected to 4 weeks of aging in saline solution, ball milling, and corrosion testing. A significant decrease in magnet flux density was recorded after applying a protective layer of parylene, whereas a slight decrease was found after applying a protective layer of PTFE. After 4 weeks of aging, the coated magnets were superior to the noncoated magnets in retaining magnetism. The corrosion-behavior test showed no significant difference between the 2 types of coated magnets, and considerable amounts of iron-leached ions were seen in all groups. Throughout the processes of coating, soaking, ball milling, and corrosion testing, PTFE was a better coating material than parylene for preserving magnet flux density. However, corrosion testing showed significant metal leaching in all groups.

  18. Size distribution of rare earth elements in coal ash

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Clinton T.; Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Adams, Monique; Holland, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are utilized in various applications that are vital to the automotive, petrochemical, medical, and information technology industries. As world demand for REEs increases, critical shortages are expected. Due to the retention of REEs during coal combustion, coal fly ash is increasingly considered a potential resource. Previous studies have demonstrated that coal fly ash is variably enriched in REEs relative to feed coal (e.g, Seredin and Dai, 2012) and that enrichment increases with decreasing size fractions (Blissett et al., 2014). In order to further explore the REE resource potential of coal ash, and determine the partitioning behavior of REE as a function of grain size, we studied whole coal and fly ash size-fractions collected from three U.S commercial-scale coal-fired generating stations burning Appalachian or Powder River Basin coal. Whole fly ash was separated into , 5 um, to 5 to 10 um and 10 to 100 um particle size fractions by mechanical shaking using trace-metal clean procedures. In these samples REE enrichments in whole fly ash ranges 5.6 to 18.5 times that of feedcoals. Partitioning results for size separates relative to whole coal and whole fly ash will also be reported. 

  19. Origin of heavy rare earth mineralization in South China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cheng; Kynický, Jindřich; Smith, Martin P.; Kopriva, Antonin; Brtnický, Martin; Urubek, Tomas; Yang, Yueheng; Zhao, Zheng; He, Chen; Song, Wenlei

    2017-01-01

    Heavy rare earth elements (HREE) are dominantly mined from the weathering crusts of granites in South China. Although weathering processes occur globally, no economic HREE resources of this type have yet been found outside China. Here, we report the occurrence of unidentified REE minerals in the granites from South Chinese deposits. They contain high levels of both HREE and light REE, but are strongly depleted in Ce, implying high oxidation state. These REE minerals show higher initial Nd isotope than primary REE-rich minerals (ɛNd(t)=0.9±0.8 versus −11.5±0.5). The mineralized weathering crusts inherited REE signature of the granites, but show more Ce depletion and more overall concentration of the REE. We propose, therefore, that highly oxidized, REE-rich fluids, derived from external, isotopically depleted sources, metasomatized the granites, which resulted in Ce depletion as Ce4+ and enrichment of the remaining REE, especially the HREE, contributing to formation of a globally important REE resource. PMID:28220784

  20. Origin of heavy rare earth mineralization in South China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Kynický, Jindřich; Smith, Martin P; Kopriva, Antonin; Brtnický, Martin; Urubek, Tomas; Yang, Yueheng; Zhao, Zheng; He, Chen; Song, Wenlei

    2017-02-21

    Heavy rare earth elements (HREE) are dominantly mined from the weathering crusts of granites in South China. Although weathering processes occur globally, no economic HREE resources of this type have yet been found outside China. Here, we report the occurrence of unidentified REE minerals in the granites from South Chinese deposits. They contain high levels of both HREE and light REE, but are strongly depleted in Ce, implying high oxidation state. These REE minerals show higher initial Nd isotope than primary REE-rich minerals (ɛNd(t)=0.9±0.8 versus -11.5±0.5). The mineralized weathering crusts inherited REE signature of the granites, but show more Ce depletion and more overall concentration of the REE. We propose, therefore, that highly oxidized, REE-rich fluids, derived from external, isotopically depleted sources, metasomatized the granites, which resulted in Ce depletion as Ce(4+) and enrichment of the remaining REE, especially the HREE, contributing to formation of a globally important REE resource.

  1. Origin of heavy rare earth mineralization in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cheng; Kynický, Jindřich; Smith, Martin P.; Kopriva, Antonin; Brtnický, Martin; Urubek, Tomas; Yang, Yueheng; Zhao, Zheng; He, Chen; Song, Wenlei

    2017-02-01

    Heavy rare earth elements (HREE) are dominantly mined from the weathering crusts of granites in South China. Although weathering processes occur globally, no economic HREE resources of this type have yet been found outside China. Here, we report the occurrence of unidentified REE minerals in the granites from South Chinese deposits. They contain high levels of both HREE and light REE, but are strongly depleted in Ce, implying high oxidation state. These REE minerals show higher initial Nd isotope than primary REE-rich minerals (εNd(t)=0.9+/-0.8 versus -11.5+/-0.5). The mineralized weathering crusts inherited REE signature of the granites, but show more Ce depletion and more overall concentration of the REE. We propose, therefore, that highly oxidized, REE-rich fluids, derived from external, isotopically depleted sources, metasomatized the granites, which resulted in Ce depletion as Ce4+ and enrichment of the remaining REE, especially the HREE, contributing to formation of a globally important REE resource.

  2. Raman scattering study of rare-earth hexaboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogita, N.; Nagai, S.; Udagawa, M.; Iga, F.; Sera, M.; Oguchi, T.; Akimitsu, J.; Kunii, S.

    2005-04-01

    The excitation-energy, polarization, pressure, and temperature dependences of Raman scattering spectra have been measured for the RB6 crystals ( R=Ca, La, Ce, Pr, Sm, Gd, Dy, and Yb). In the Raman spectra, the extra peaks have been clearly observed at around 200 cm-1, except for the Raman-active phonons and CEF excitations. The extra peaks show anomalous behavior in the temperature, polarization, and lattice parameter dependences. These anomalous behaviors originate from the vibration of the rare-earth ions in octahedral B 6 cage, and the extra peaks can be assigned as the second-order Raman excitations of T 1u[3]. To check the validity of our assignment, we have measured the pressure dependence. In this paper, the results of the “ extra peaks” at about 200 cm -1, and pressure dependence of SmB 6 are presented. The sample preparation and experimental details are explained in our previous report [3]. The Pm3m symmetry of RB 6 gives us the phonon numbers at Brilloiun zone center; Γ=A1g+Eg+T1g+T2g+3T1u+T2u. The Raman-active phonons are A1g, Eg, and T2g, which are the vibration of boron octahedra. In cubic symmetry, all Raman-active phonons appear in the (x+y,x+y) polarization geometry. In the notation of (x,y), x and y denote the polarization directions of incident and scattered light, respectively. x and y correspond to the crystal axes of [1 0 0] and [0 1 0], respectively. Fig. 1 shows the Raman spectra of trivalent RB6 at room temperature in the energy region below T2g phonons ( ≃700 cm-1). Each spectrum is depicted in the order of the decreasing lattice parameters from top to bottom. As shown in Fig. 1, the energy of T2g phonon decreases with increasing lattice parameter, and this is normal dependence. However, the extra peaks (arrows) show an anti-trend for T2g phonon's. Focusing on the size of cage space consisting of surrounding borons for rare earth ion a-rR( a and rR are lattice parameter and ionic radius, respectively), the energy of the peaks is

  3. Spectroscopy of Luminescent Crystals Containing Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng-Ling; Lii, Kwang-Hwa; Chang, Bor-Chen

    2013-06-01

    We have studied the spectroscopy of luminescent crystals containing rare earth elements such as KEuGe_2O_6, Cs_3EuSi_6O_{15}, K_4[(UO_2)Eu_2(Ge_2O_7)_2], and R_2(C_8H_{10}O_4)_3 (R= Y, Tb, or Eu). The emission and excitation spectra of these compounds were recorded at ambient temperature. These spectra are consistent with the structures which were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystals containing hybrid luminescent centers were also synthesized and interesting energy transfer mechanisms were observed. For example, dramatic luminescence quenching was found in KEu_xNd_{1-x}Ge_2O_6 (x= 0.98, 0.96, 0.94, and 0.84) as well as in Cs_3Eu_{0.98}Nd_{0.02}Si_6O_{15}, while different compositions of Y_xEu_yTb_{2-x-y}(C_8H_{10}O_4)_3 exhibit different emission colors. Emission lifetimes were also measured for these compounds, and the results shed light on the energy transfer mechanisms. Detailed results of our research will be presented. P.-L. Chen, P.-Y. Chiang, H.-C. Yeh, B.-C. Chang, and K.-H. Lii, Dalton Trans., 1721 (2008). M.-Y. Hung, Y.-H. Chen, B.-C. Chang, and K.-H. Lii, Chem. Mater. 17, 5743 (2005).

  4. A novel sequential process for remediating rare-earth wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingcan; Jang, Min; Kang, Kyounglim; Kim, Dukmin; Snyder, Shane A; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2016-02-01

    A novel and economic sequential process consisting of precipitation, adsorption, and oxidation was developed to remediate actual rare-earth (RE) wastewater containing various toxic pollutants, including radioactive species. In the precipitation step, porous air stones (PAS) containing waste oyster shell (WOS), PASWOS, was prepared and used to precipitate most heavy metals with >97% removal efficiencies. The SEM-EDS analysis revealed that PAS plays a key role in preventing the surface coating of precipitants on the surface of WOS and in releasing the dissolved species of WOS successively. For the adsorption step, a polyurethane (PU) impregnated by coal mine drainage sludge (CMDS), PUCMDS, was synthesized and applied to deplete fluoride (F), arsenic (As), uranium (U), and thorium (Th) that remained after precipitation. The continuous-mode sequential process using PAS(WOS), PU(CMDS), and ozone (O3) had 99.9-100% removal efficiencies of heavy metals, 99.3-99.9% of F and As, 95.8-99.4% of U and Th, and 92.4% of COD(Cr) for 100 days. The sequential process can treat RE wastewater economically and effectively without stirred-tank reactors, pH controller, continuous injection of chemicals, and significant sludge generation, as well as the quality of the outlet met the EPA recommended limits.

  5. Ordered bimetallic coordination networks featuring rare earth and silver cations.

    PubMed

    Merkens, Carina; Englert, Ulli

    2012-04-21

    Three lanthanide complexes of the ditopic ligand 3-cyanopentane-2,4-dionate (acacCN) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Longer intermolecular contacts result in ninefold coordination of the cation in Ce(acacCN)(3)(H(2)O)(2), whereas mononuclear complexes of the same stoichiometry with coordination number eight are obtained for the smaller Eu(III) and Yb(III) cations. Reaction of these labile compounds with AgPF(6) leads to re-organization of the coordination sphere of the rare earth cations: neutral extended structures are formed in which the peripheric -CN moieties of Ln(acacCN)(4) anions coordinate to silver cations. The initially formed heterometallic networks show additional coordination of water or inclusion of solvent molecules; three different structure types, two of them as isomorphous pairs, have been characterized. In the case of Eu(III) and Yb(III), these solids are instable when stored in their mother liquor and undergo a slow aging process, finally resulting in phase pure stable and solvent-free 3D networks Ln(acacCN)(4)Ag.

  6. Review on dielectric properties of rare earth doped barium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Fatin Adila; Osman, Rozana Aina Maulat; Idris, Mohd Sobri

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) were studied due to high permittivity, excellent electrical properties and have wide usage in various applications. This paper reviewed on the electrical properties of RE doped BaTiO3 (RE: Lanthanum (La), Erbium (Er), Samarium (Sm), Neodymium (Nd), Cerium (Ce)), processing method, phase transition occurred and solid solution range for complete study. Most of the RE doped BaTiO3 downshifted the Curie temperature (TC). Transition temperature also known as Curie temperature, TC where the ceramics had a transition from ferroelectric to a paraelectric phase. In this review, the dielectric constant of La-doped BaTiO3, Er-doped BaTiO3, Sm-doped BaTiO3, Nd-doped BaTiO3 and Ce-doped BaTiO3 had been proved to increase and the transition temperature or also known as TC also lowered down to room temperature as for all the RE doped BaTiO3 except for Er-doped BaTiO3.

  7. Radiation effects on rare earth permanent magnets. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, H.B.

    1988-06-01

    With continuing improvements in rare earth permanent magnet (REPM) technology, applications for their use are being discovered that were previously not possible. Two such applications for permanent magnets are in focusing elements for linear accelerators and ion sources, and in insertion devices (wigglers and undulators) used to produce synchrotron radiation. However, these magnetic transport elements are subjected to high radiation levels. Consequently, there is considerable interest in the United States and abroad to discover and quantify the effects of radiation on REPMs. Using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) 100-MeV Linac, four different samples of REPM were irradiated to one to two gigarads of exposed dose from a bremsstrahlung production target in an attempt to simulate the consequences of beam spills of a high energy primary electron beam. Of the samples irradiated, Sm2Co17 proved to be the most resistant to gamma radiation. The electron transport code CYLTRAN of the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS), which is an electron and photon Monte Carlo simulation code, was used to determine the angular and energy spectra for both electrons and photons produced by the target used at the LLNL Linac.

  8. Structural relationships in rare earth-transition metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, B. D.; Viccaro, P. J.; Shenoy, G. K.

    1980-01-01

    Several structural types of form AB/sub 2/, AB/sub 3/, A/sub 2/B/sub 7/, and AB/sub 5/ (A = rare earth, B = transition metal) are known to be closely related, with local environments which are very similar among the different compounds. Based on these relationships, we suggest that hydride phases A/sub l/B/sub m/H/sub n/ should be related according to the relationships n(AB/sub 3/) = 1/3n(AB/sub 5/) + 2/3n(AB/sub 2/) and n(A/sub 2/B/sub 7/) = n(AB/sub 5/) + n(AB/sub 2/) where the n(AB/sub m/) are observed hydrogen phase concentrations. It is shown that the phases observed in pressure-composition isotherms for AB/sub 3/ and A/sub 2/B/sub 7/ systems can be understood from this viewpoint. A discussion is given of the maximum hydrogen concentration possible in the compounds having these structure types.

  9. Proton damage measurements of rare earth oxide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerman, W.A.; Fisher, J.H.; Shelby, G.A. ); Holland, L.R.; Jenkins, G.M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-04-01

    This paper reports on the development of a measurement technique to determine the degradation in light output under exposure to 3 MeV protons. The rare earth oxide scintillators included Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S doped with Pr. Tb, and Eu; Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S doped with Tb and Eu; Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG) doped with Ce; and ZnS doped with Ag. Four scintillator samples were painted on a rotatable water cooled turret used to measure the proton beam current with thermocouples for temperature monitoring. The data acquisition and storage system consists of an ACRO module interfaced to a Macintosh SE/30 computer running LabVIEW software. Results indicate that the YAG doped with Ce scintillator coating withstood a proton dose an order of magnitude large than that tolerated by the other phosphor compounds. This fact has significant implication for the use of this material for experimental scintillator applications.

  10. Artificially produced rare-earth free cosmic magnet

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Akihiro; Sharma, Parmanand; Sato, Kazuhisa; Takeuchi, Akira; Zhang, Yan; Takenaka, Kana

    2015-01-01

    Chemically ordered hard magnetic L10-FeNi phase of higher grade than cosmic meteorites is produced artificially. Present alloy design shortens the formation time from hundreds of millions of years for natural meteorites to less than 300 hours. Electron diffraction detects four-fold 110 superlattice reflections and a high chemical order parameter (S  0.8) for the developed L10-FeNi phase. The magnetic field of more than 3.5 kOe is required for the switching of magnetization. Experimental results along with computer simulation suggest that the ordered phase is formed due to three factors related to the amorphous state: high diffusion rates of the constituent elements at lower temperatures when crystallizing, a large driving force for precipitation of the L10 phase, and the possible presence of L10 clusters. Present results can resolve mineral exhaustion issues in the development of next-generation hard magnetic materials because the alloys are free from rare-earth elements, and the technique is well suited for mass production. PMID:26567704

  11. The chemistry of rare earth elements in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, J. W.; Bartholomay, H. A.; Fegley, B.

    1984-01-01

    The high concentration of rare earth elements (REE) in primitive CaS suggests that the REE along with the other normally lithophile elements form stable sulfides under the unusual conditions which existed during the formation of enstatite chrondites. In order to acquire a more quantitative framework in which to interpret these data, the behavior of the REE in systems with solar, or slightly fractionated solar, composition is being studied. These new data introduce modest changes in the behavior of some of the REE when compared to previous studies. For example, the largest differences are in the stabilities of the gaseous monoxides of Ce, Eu, Tb, Ho, and Tm, all of which now appear to be less stable than previously thought, and YbO(g) which is somewhat more stable. Much more significant are the changes in REE distribution in the gas phase in fractionated systems, especially those made more reducing by changing the C/O ratio from the solar value of 0.6 to about 1.0. In almost all cases, the exceptions being Eu, Tm and Yb whose elemental gaseous species dominate, the monosulfides become more abundant. Moreover, the solid oxides of Eu, Tm and Yb become less stable under more reducing conditions which, in effect, should reduce the condensation temperature of all REE in more reduced systems.

  12. Synthesis, structure, and physical properties of new rare earth ferrocenoylacetonates.

    PubMed

    Koroteev, Pavel S; Dobrokhotova, Zhanna V; Ilyukhin, Andrey B; Efimov, Nikolay N; Rouzières, Mathieu; Kiskin, Mikhail A; Clérac, Rodolphe; Novotortsev, Vladimir M

    2016-04-21

    New ferrocenoylacetonate complexes of several rare earth elements, [Ln(fca)3(bpy)]·MeC6H5 (Ln = Pr (), Eu (), Gd (), Tb (), Dy (), Ho (), Y (); bpy - 2,2'-bipyridine; Hfca - FcCOCH2COMe) as well as scandium ferrocenoylacetonate [Sc(fca)3]·0.5MeC6H5 (), were synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the crystal lattice of the isostructural complexes , two [Ln(fca)3(bpy)] molecules form a pair due to stacking interactions between the bpy ligands. The Ln(3+) ions are coordinated in a square antiprism geometry with a coordination number of 8. The Sc(3+) ions in complex are coordinated in an octahedral geometry. Thermolysis of complexes was studied under air and argon atmospheres; in the first case, it affords perovskites LnFeO3 as one of the products. Complexes display single-molecule magnet properties, and the effective relaxation barrier for the Dy complex , was found to be Δeff/kB = 241 K, which is one of the highest values obtained for a mononuclear β-diketonate lanthanide complex.

  13. Rare earth patterns in shergottite phosphates and residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laul, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Leaching experiments with 1M HCl on ALHA 77005 powder show that rare earth elements (REE) are concentrated in accessory phosphate phases (whitlockite, apatite) that govern the REE patterns of bulk shergottites. The REE patterns of whitlockite are typically light REE-depleted with a negative Eu anomaly and show a hump at the heavy REE side, while the REE pattern of apatite (in Shergotty) is light REE-enriched. Parent magmas are calculated from the modal compositions of residues of ALHA 77005, Shergotty, and EETA 79001. The parent magmas lack a Eu anomaly, indicating that plagioclase was a late-stage crystallizing phase and that it probably crystallized before the phosphates. The parent magmas of ALHA 77005 and Shergotty have similar REE patterns, with a subchondritic Nd/Sm ratio. However, the Sm/Nd isotopoics require a light REE-depleted source for ALHA 77005 (if the crystallization age is less than 600 Myr) and a light REE-enriched source for Shergotty. Distant Nd and Sr isotopic signatures may suggest different source regions for shergottites.

  14. The chemistry of rare earth elements in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, J. W.; Bartholomay, H. A.; Fegley, B.

    1984-01-01

    The high concentration of rare earth elements (REE) in primitive CaS suggests that the REE along with the other normally lithophile elements form stable sulfides under the unusual conditions which existed during the formation of enstatite chrondites. In order to acquire a more quantitative framework in which to interpret these data, the behavior of the REE in systems with solar, or slightly fractionated solar, composition is being studied. These new data introduce modest changes in the behavior of some of the REE when compared to previous studies. For example, the largest differences are in the stabilities of the gaseous monoxides of Ce, Eu, Tb, Ho, and Tm, all of which now appear to be less stable than previously thought, and YbO(g) which is somewhat more stable. Much more significant are the changes in REE distribution in the gas phase in fractionated systems, especially those made more reducing by changing the C/O ratio from the solar value of 0.6 to about 1.0. In almost all cases, the exceptions being Eu, Tm and Yb whose elemental gaseous species dominate, the monosulfides become more abundant. Moreover, the solid oxides of Eu, Tm and Yb become less stable under more reducing conditions which, in effect, should reduce the condensation temperature of all REE in more reduced systems.

  15. Sensing Using Rare-Earth-Doped Upconversion Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuwei; Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui

    2013-01-01

    Optical sensing plays an important role in theranostics due to its capability to detect hint biochemical entities or molecular targets as well as to precisely monitor specific fundamental psychological processes. Rare-earth (RE) doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are promising for these endeavors due to their unique frequency converting capability; they emit efficient and sharp visible or ultraviolet (UV) luminescence via use of ladder-like energy levels of RE ions when excited at near infrared (NIR) light that are silent to tissues. These features allow not only a high penetration depth in biological tissues but also a high detection sensitivity. Indeed, the energy transfer between UCNPs and biomolecular or chemical indicators provide opportunities for high-sensitive bio- and chemical-sensing. A temperature-sensitive change of the intensity ratio between two close UC bands promises them for use in temperature mapping of a single living cell. In this work, we review recent investigations on using UCNPs for the detection of biomolecules (avidin, ATP, etc.), ions (cyanide, mecury, etc.), small gas molecules (oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, etc.), as well as for in vitro temperature sensing. We also briefly summarize chemical methods in synthesizing UCNPs of high efficiency that are important for the detection limit. PMID:23650480

  16. Rare earth doped upconverting particles for different photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Madhab; Gangadharan, Ajith Kumar; Sardar, Dhiraj Kumar

    2013-03-01

    Trivalent rare earth ions especially erbium (Er3+) and ytterbium (Yb3+) co-doped in various host nanoparticles are known for their extraordinary spectroscopic properties. A thorough optical characterization including the absolute upconversion quantum yield (QY) measurement is of critical importance in evaluating their potential for various photonic applications. In this paper, we will be presenting a measured absolute upconversion QYs for Yb3+ and Er3+ doped in La2O2S under 980 and 1550 nm excitation at various power densities. Comparison of absolute QYs for different concentrations of Yb3+ and Er3+ doped in La2O2S will be made for all the upconversion emissions with respect to reported most efficient upconverting phosphor NaYF4 doped with 20% Yb3+ and 2% Er3+. Furthermore, applications of these phosphors in different areas such as bio-imaging, solar cell, security, etc. will be explored depending on the measured absolute upconversion quantum yields. In addition, preliminary results on in vitro imaging using upconverting nanoparticles as a contrast agent will be reported. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (PREM) Grant No. DMR-0934218.

  17. Magnetostriction of some rare earth-aluminum Laves phase compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pourarian, F.; Wallace, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the linear and volume magnetostriction of RAl2 cubic Laves compounds in which R is one of the rare earth elements Gd, Dy, Ho or Er, at temperatures between 4.2 K and the Curie temperature of each compound, are reported. Magnetic fields up to 2.5 Tesla were applied, and magnetostriction was measured using standard strain gage techniques. Saturation magnetostrictions of 17 x 10 to the -6th, -1420 x 10 to the -6th, 60 x 10 to the -6th and -920 x 10 to the -6th are determined at 4.2 K for GdAl2, DyAl2, HoAl2 and ErAl2, respectively. Large forced magnetostriction is observed in GdAl2 above the saturation field and the strain temperature dependence shows a decrease in magnitude below 40 K. A linear dependence of magnetostriction on magnetic field was observed for DyAl2 above 40 K, and the observed temperature dependence is interpreted in terms of the lowest order single-ion magnetoelastic theory. An observed decrease in the magnitude of the strain of HoAl2 below 15 K is associated with a change of the easy direction of magnetization, while in the case of ErAl2, magnetostriction is observed to occur normally up to the Curie temperature. Large volume magnetostriction is obtained for all the compounds with the exception of GdAl2.

  18. Rare earth patterns in shergottite phosphates and residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laul, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Leaching experiments with 1M HCl on ALHA 77005 powder show that rare earth elements (REE) are concentrated in accessory phosphate phases (whitlockite, apatite) that govern the REE patterns of bulk shergottites. The REE patterns of whitlockite are typically light REE-depleted with a negative Eu anomaly and show a hump at the heavy REE side, while the REE pattern of apatite (in Shergotty) is light REE-enriched. Parent magmas are calculated from the modal compositions of residues of ALHA 77005, Shergotty, and EETA 79001. The parent magmas lack a Eu anomaly, indicating that plagioclase was a late-stage crystallizing phase and that it probably crystallized before the phosphates. The parent magmas of ALHA 77005 and Shergotty have similar REE patterns, with a subchondritic Nd/Sm ratio. However, the Sm/Nd isotopoics require a light REE-depleted source for ALHA 77005 (if the crystallization age is less than 600 Myr) and a light REE-enriched source for Shergotty. Distant Nd and Sr isotopic signatures may suggest different source regions for shergottites.

  19. Magnetostriction of some rare earth-aluminum Laves phase compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pourarian, F.; Wallace, W. E.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the linear and volume magnetostriction of RAl2 cubic Laves compounds in which R is one of the rare earth elements Gd, Dy, Ho or Er, at temperatures between 4.2 K and the Curie temperature of each compound, are reported. Magnetic fields up to 2.5 Tesla were applied, and magnetostriction was measured using standard strain gage techniques. Saturation magnetostrictions of 17 x 10 to the -6th, -1420 x 10 to the -6th, 60 x 10 to the -6th and -920 x 10 to the -6th are determined at 4.2 K for GdAl2, DyAl2, HoAl2 and ErAl2, respectively. Large forced magnetostriction is observed in GdAl2 above the saturation field and the strain temperature dependence shows a decrease in magnitude below 40 K. A linear dependence of magnetostriction on magnetic field was observed for DyAl2 above 40 K, and the observed temperature dependence is interpreted in terms of the lowest order single-ion magnetoelastic theory. An observed decrease in the magnitude of the strain of HoAl2 below 15 K is associated with a change of the easy direction of magnetization, while in the case of ErAl2, magnetostriction is observed to occur normally up to the Curie temperature. Large volume magnetostriction is obtained for all the compounds with the exception of GdAl2.

  20. Proposal for laser cooling of rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, Olivier; Hong, Ye; Wyart, Jean-François; Lepers, Maxence

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of laser cooling relies on the existence of an almost closed optical-transition cycle in the energy spectrum of the considered species. In this respect, rare-earth elements exhibit many transitions which are likely to induce noticeable leaks from the cooling cycle. In this work, to determine whether laser cooling of singly ionized erbium Er+ is feasible, we have performed accurate electronic-structure calculations of energies and spontaneous-emission Einstein coefficients of Er+, using a combination of ab initio and least-squares-fitting techniques. We identify five weak closed transitions suitable for laser cooling, the broadest of which is in the kilohertz range. For the strongest transitions, by simulating the cascade dynamics of spontaneous emission, we show that repumping is necessary, and we discuss possible repumping schemes.We expect our detailed study on Er+ to give good insight into the laser cooling of neighboring ions such as Dy+. Supported by ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'' (ANR), under the project COPOMOL (Contract No. ANR-13-IS04-0004-01).

  1. Separation/Preconcentration Techniques for Rare Earth Elements Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Jiang, Zucheng

    2016-10-01

    The main aim of this chapter exactly characterizes the contribution. The analytical chemistry of the rare earth elements (REEs) very often is highly complicated and the determination of a specific element is impossible without a sample pre-concentration. Sample preparation can be carried out either by separation of the REEs from the matrix or by concentrating the REEs. The separation of REEs from each other is mainly made by chromatography. At the beginning of REE analysis, the method of precipitation/coprecipitation was applied for the treatment of REE mixtures. The method is not applicable for the separation of trace amounts of REEs. The majority of the methods used are based on the distribution of REEs in a two-phase system, a liquid-liquid or a liquid-solid system. Various techniques have been developed for the liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), in particular the liquid phase micro-extraction. The extraction is always combined with a pre-concentration of the REEs in a single drop of extractant or in a hollow fiber filled with the extractant. Further modified techniques for special applications and for difficult REE separation have been developed. Compared to the LLE, the solid phase micro-extraction is preferred. The method is robust and easy to handle, in which the solid phase loaded with the REEs can be used directly for subsequent determination methods. At present, very new solid materials, like nanotubes, are developed and tested for solid phase extraction.

  2. Lunar anorthosites: rare-Earth and other elemental abundances.

    PubMed

    Wakita, H; Schmitt, R A

    1970-11-27

    Elemental abundances of major (Ti, Al, Fe, and Ca), minor (Na, Mn, and Cr), and trace elements [14 rare-earth elements (REE), Y, In, Cd, Rb, Cs, Ba, Co, and Sc] in lunar anorthosites separated from Apollo 11 sample 10085 coarse fines have been determined by means of instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The REE distribution pattern of lunar anorthosites, relative to ordinary chondrites, has a positive Eu anomaly. On the assumption that (i) the lunar composition is similar to that of ordinary chondritic meteorites low in total Fe ( approximately 13 percent); (ii) lunar anorthosites are derived from highland cratering events and are representative of the highlands; and (iii) the moon differentiated into olivine, hypersthene, and basaltic and anorthositic phases, and plagioclase crysstallization began after approximately 93 percent solidification, then mass balance calculations yield approximately 30-kilometer and approximately 10-kilometer thicknesses for the lunar highlands for the melting and chemical differentiation of the entire moon and of the upper 200 kilometers, respectively. Corresponding thicknesses of the basaltic basement rocks were approximately 5 kilometers and approximately 2 kilometers, respectively. Alternatively, if the anorthosites of this study are representative of the highlands and the onset of plagioclase crystallization occurred after approximately 50 percent solidification of the initially melted moon, calculations with REE and Ba partition coefficients suggest that the REE and Ba abundances in the primeval moon were similar to those observed in basaltic achondrites.

  3. Pulsed field magnetization in rare-earth kagome systems.

    PubMed

    Hoch, M J R; Zhou, H D; Mun, E; Harrison, N

    2016-02-03

    The rare-earth kagome systems R 3Ga5SiO14 (R  =  Nd or Pr) exhibit cooperative paramagnetism at low temperatures. Evidence for correlated spin clusters in these weakly frustrated systems has previously been obtained from neutron scattering and from ESR and NMR results. The present pulsed field (0-60 T, 25 ms) magnetization measurements made on single crystals of Nd3Ga5SiO14 (NGS) and Pr3Ga5SiO14 (PGS) at temperatures down to 450 mK have revealed striking differences in the magnetic responses of the two materials. For NGS the magnetization shows a low field plateau, saturation in high transient fields, and significant hysteresis while the PGS magnetization does not saturate in transient fields up to 60 T and shows no hysteresis or plateaus. Nd(3+) is a Kramers ion while Pr(3+) is a non-Kramers ion and the crystal field effects are quite different in the two systems. For the conditions used in the experiments the magnetization behavior is not in agreement with Heisenberg model predictions for kagome systems in which easy-axis anisotropy is much larger than the exchange coupling. The extremely slow spin dynamics found below 4 K in NGS is, however, consistent with the model for Kramers ions and provides a basis for explaining the pulsed field magnetization features.

  4. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N. europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.

  5. Effects of simulated rare earth recycling wastewaters on biological nitrification

    DOE PAGES

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; ...

    2015-07-16

    Current efforts to increase domestic availability of rare-earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing efforts will result in increased generation of associated wastewaters. In some cases disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological wastewater treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50 and 100 ppm), and the REE extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions above 10 ppm inhibited N.more » europaea activity, even when initially virtually all of the REE was insoluble. The provision of TBP together with Eu increased inhibition of nitrite production by the N. europaea, although TBP alone did not substantially alter nitrifying activity N. winogradskyi was more sensitive to the stimulated wastewaters, with even 10 ppm Eu or Y inducing significant inhibition, and a complete shutdown of nitrifying activity occurred in the presence of the TBP. To analyze the availability of REEs in aqueous solutions, REE solubility has been calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, which is typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but may also be influenced by the formation of a phosphate phase.« less

  6. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms.

  7. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the Rare Earth orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Terminello, L.J.; Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the Rare Earth (RE) 3d levels yields sharp peaks near the edges as a result of strong, quasi-atomic 3d{sup 10}4f{sup n} {yields} 3d-{sup 9}4f{sup n+1} transitions and these transitions exhibit a wealth of spectroscopic features. The XAS measurements of single crystal REPO{sub 4} (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er) at the 3d edge were performed in the total yield mode at beam line 8-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The XAS spectra of the RE ions in the orthophosphate matrix generally resemble the XAS of the corresponding RE metal. This is not unexpected and emphasizes the major contribution of the trivalent state to the electronic transitions at the RE 3d edges. These spectra unequivocally identify the transitions originating from well-characterized RE cores and correlate well with previous theoretical investigations.

  8. Rare earths in the Leadville Limestone and its marble derivates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvis, J.C.; Wildeman, T.R.; Banks, N.G.

    1975-01-01

    Samples of unaltered and metamorphosed Leadville Limestone (Mississippian, Colorado) were analyzed by neutron activation for ten rare-earth elements (REE). The total abundance of the REE in the least-altered limestone is 4-12 ppm, and their distribution patterns are believed to be dominated by the carbonate minerals. The abundances of the REE in the marbles and their sedimentary precursors are comparable, but the distribution patterns are not. Eu is enriched over the other REE in the marbles, and stratigraphically upward in the formation (samples located progressively further from the heat source), the light REE become less enriched relative to the heavy REE. The Eu anomaly is attributed to its ability, unique among the REE, to change from the 3+ to 2+ oxidation state. Whether this results in preferential mobilization of the other REE or whether this reflects the composition of the pore fluid during metamorphism is unknown. Stratigraphically selective depletion of the heavy REE may be attributed to more competition for the REE between fluid and carbonate minerals in the lower strata relative to the upper strata. This competition could have been caused by changes in the temperature of the pore fluid or to the greater resistance to solution of the dolomite in the lower parts of the formation than the calcite in the upper parts. ?? 1975.

  9. Environmental Defects And Economic Impact On Global Market Of Rare Earth Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampides, G.; Vatalis, K.; Karayannis, V.; Baklavaridis, A.

    2016-11-01

    Rare earth elements include the 14 lanthanides as well as lanthanium and often yttrium. Actually, most of them are not very rare and occur widely dispersed in a variety of rocks. Rare earth metals are vital to some of the world's faster growing industries: catalysts, Nd-magnets, ceramics, glass, metallurgy, battery alloys, electronics and phosphors. Worldwide, the main countries for distribution of rare earths deposits include China, USA, Russia, Brasil, India, Australia, Greenland and Malaysia. The mining and processing of rare earth metals usually result in significant environmental defects. Many deposits are associated with high concentrations of radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium, which requires separate treatment and disposal. The accumulation of rare earth elements in soils has occurred due to pollution caused by the exploitation of rare earth resources and the wide use of rare earths as fertilizers in agriculture. This accumulation has a toxic effect on the soil microfauna community. However, there are large differences in market prices due to the degree of purity determined by the specifications in the applications. The main focus of this article is to overview Rare Earth Metals’ overall impact on global economy and their environmental defects on soils during processing techniques and as they are used as fertilizers.

  10. Processing of Phosphorus Slag with Recovery of Rare Earth Metals and Obtaining Silicon Containing Cake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshigina, Zaure; Abisheva, Zinesh; Bochevskaya, Yelena; Akcil, Ata; Sharipova, Aynash; Sargelova, Elmira

    2016-10-01

    The present research is devoted to the processing of slag generating during the yellow phosphorus production. In this paper are presented studies on leaching of phosphorus production slag by nitric acid with recovery of rare earth metals (REMs) into solution. REMs recovery into the solution achieved 98 % during the leaching process with using 7.5 mol/L of HNO3, liquid-to-solid ratio is 2.6:1, temperature is 60°C, process duration is 1 hour and stirrer speed is 500 rpm. Behaviour during the leaching of associated components such as calcium, aluminium, and iron was studied. After the leaching cake contains ∼⃒75-85 % of SiO2 and it might be useful for obtaining of precipitated silicon dioxide. With the purpose of separation from the impurities, recovery and concentrating of REMs, the obtained solution after leaching was subjected to extraction processing methods. The influence of ratio of organic and aqueous phases (O: A) on the extraction of rare earth metals by tributyl phosphate (TBP) with concentrations from 20 up to 100 % was studied. The REMs extraction with increasing TBP concentration under changes O:A ratio from 1:20 down to 1:1 into the organic phase from the solutions after nitric acid leaching increased from 22.2 up to 99.3%. The duration effect of REMs extraction process was studied by tributyl phosphate. It is revealed that with increasing of duration of the extraction process from 10 to 30 minutes REMs recovery into the organic phase almost did not changed. The behaviour of iron in the extraction process by TBP was studied. It was found that such accompanying components as calcium and aluminium by tributyl phosphate didn't extracted. To construct isotherm of REMs extraction of by tributyl phosphate was used variable volume method. It was calculated three-step extraction is needed for REMs recovery from the solutions after nitric acid leaching of phosphorus production slag. The process of the three-steps counter current extraction of rare earth

  11. Deep-sea mud in the Pacific Ocean as a potential resource for rare-earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yasuhiro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Nakamura, Kentaro; Takaya, Yutaro; Kitamura, Kenichi; Ohta, Junichiro; Toda, Ryuichi; Nakashima, Takuya; Iwamori, Hikaru

    2011-08-01

    World demand for rare-earth elements and the metal yttrium--which are crucial for novel electronic equipment and green-energy technologies--is increasing rapidly. Several types of seafloor sediment harbour high concentrations of these elements. However, seafloor sediments have not been regarded as a rare-earth element and yttrium resource, because data on the spatial distribution of these deposits are insufficient. Here, we report measurements of the elemental composition of over 2,000 seafloor sediments, sampled at depth intervals of around one metre, at 78 sites that cover a large part of the Pacific Ocean. We show that deep-sea mud contains high concentrations of rare-earth elements and yttrium at numerous sites throughout the eastern South and central North Pacific. We estimate that an area of just one square kilometre, surrounding one of the sampling sites, could provide one-fifth of the current annual world consumption of these elements. Uptake of rare-earth elements and yttrium by mineral phases such as hydrothermal iron-oxyhydroxides and phillipsite seems to be responsible for their high concentration. We show that rare-earth elements and yttrium are readily recovered from the mud by simple acid leaching, and suggest that deep-sea mud constitutes a highly promising huge resource for these elements.

  12. [Indirect determination of rare earth elements in Chinese herbal medicines by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chao; Lu, Jian-Ping; Xue, Min-Hua; Tan, Fang-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    Based on their similarity in chemical properties, rare earth elements were able to form stable coordinated compounds with arsenazo III which were extractable into butanol in the presence of diphenylguanidine. The butanol was removed under reduced pressure distillation; the residue was dissolved with diluted hydrochloric acid. As was released with the assistance of KMnO4 and determined by hydrogen generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry in terms of rare earth elements. When cesium sulfate worked as standard solution, extraction conditions, KMnO4 amount, distillation temperature, arsenazo III amount, interfering ions, etc were optimized. The accuracy and precision of the method were validated using national standard certified materials, showing a good agreement. Under optimum condition, the linear relationship located in 0.2-25 microg x mL(-1) and detection limit was 0.44 microg x mL(-1). After the herbal samples were digested with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, the rare earth elements were determined by this method, showing satisfactory results with relative standard deviation of 1.3%-2.5%, and recoveries of 94.4%-106.0%. The method showed the merits of convenience and rapidness, simple instrumentation and high accuracy. With the rare earths enriched into organic phase, the separation of analytes from matrix was accomplished, which eliminated the interference. With the residue dissolved by diluted hydrochloric acid after the solvent was removed, aqueous sample introduction eliminated the impact of organic phase on the tubing connected to pneumatic pump.

  13. Effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure of rare-earth phosphate glasses using high and low energy X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Alisha J; Cole, Jacqueline M; FitzGerald, Vicky; Honkimaki, Veijo; Roberts, Mark A; Brennan, Tessa; Martin, Richard A; Saunders, George A; Newport, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    Rare-earth co-doping in inorganic materials has a long-held tradition of facilitating highly desirable optoelectronic properties for their application to the laser industry. This study concentrates specifically on rare-earth phosphate glasses, (R2O3)x(R'2O3)y(P2O5)(1-(x+y)), where (R, R') denotes (Ce, Er) or (La, Nd) co-doping and the total rare-earth composition corresponds to a range between metaphosphate, RP3O9, and ultraphosphate, RP5O14. Thereupon, the effects of rare-earth co-doping on the local structure are assessed at the atomic level. Pair-distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data (Q(max) = 28 Å(-1)) is employed to make this assessment. Results reveal a stark structural invariance to rare-earth co-doping which bears testament to the open-framework and rigid nature of these glasses. A range of desirable attributes of these glasses unfold from this finding; in particular, a structural simplicity that will enable facile molecular engineering of rare-earth phosphate glasses with 'dial-up' lasing properties. When considered together with other factors, this finding also demonstrates additional prospects for these co-doped rare-earth phosphate glasses in nuclear waste storage applications. This study also reveals, for the first time, the ability to distinguish between P-O and P[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonding in these rare-earth phosphate glasses from X-ray diffraction data in a fully quantitative manner. Complementary analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on single rare-earth phosphate glasses of similar rare-earth composition to the co-doped materials is also presented in this context. In a technical sense, all high-energy X-ray diffraction data on these glasses are compared with analogous low-energy diffraction data; their salient differences reveal distinct advantages of high-energy X-ray diffraction data for the study of amorphous materials.

  14. Hydrothermal method of synthesis of rare-earth tantalates and niobates

    DOEpatents

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S.; Martin, James E

    2012-10-16

    A hydrothermal method of synthesis of a family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  15. Molten metal containment vessel with rare earth oxysulfide protective coating thereon and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, Oscar H.; Curtis, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    An improved molten metal containment vessel is disclosed in which wetting of the vessel's inner wall surfaces by molten metal is inhibited by coating at least the inner surfaces of the containment vessel with one or more rare earth oxysulfide or rare earth sulfide compounds to inhibit wetting and or adherence by the molten metal to the surfaces of the containment vessel.

  16. 78 FR 42974 - Certain Sintered Rare Earth Magnets, Methods of Making Same and Products Containing Same...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Sintered Rare Earth Magnets, Methods of Making Same and Products Containing Same... the sale within the United States after importation of certain sintered rare earth magnets, methods...

  17. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary...

  18. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary...

  19. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary...

  20. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary...