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Sample records for acidic ribosomal proteins

  1. Acidic Ribosomal Proteins from the Extreme ’Halobacterium cutirubrum’,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the extreme halophilic bacterium, Halobacterium cutirubrum. The identification of the protein moieties involved in these and other interactions in...the halophile ribosome requires a rapid and reproducible screening method for the separation, enumeration and identification of these acidic...polypeptides in the complex ribosomal protein mixtures. In this paper the authors present the results of analyses of the halophile ribosomal proteins using a

  2. NH2-Terminal Amino Acid Distribution and Amino Acid Composition of Streptococcus faecalis R Soluble and Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.; Murray, Cheryl L.; Rabinowitz, Jesse C.

    1973-01-01

    The NH2-terminal amino acid distribution of Streptococcus faecalis R soluble and ribosomal proteins isolated from cells at different stages of growth on either folate-sufficient or folate-deficient medium was determined by the dinitrophenyl method. The NH2-terminal residues do not follow the random distribution observed for the total amino acid composition of S. faecalis soluble and ribosomal proteins. Methionine and alanine occur most frequently; serine, threonine, aspartic and glutamic acids, and glycine are also present at the NH2-terminal position of S. faecalis R proteins. The absence of folic acid yields cells that are incapable of formylating methionyl-transfer ribonucelic acid tRNAfMet, but does not affect either the qualitative or quantitative NH2-terminal distribution of total soluble or total ribosomal proteins compared to cells grown with folate. A small quantitative difference was observed in the frequency of distribution of certain amino acids at the NH2-termini between log and stationary phase soluble proteins. The amino acid residues found at the NH2-terminal position of S. faecalis proteins are qualitatively similar to those reported for several other organisms. PMID:4200842

  3. Protein Synthesis with Ribosomes Selected for the Incorporation of β-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In an earlier study, β3-puromycin was used for the selection of modified ribosomes, which were utilized for the incorporation of five different β-amino acids into Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The selected ribosomes were able to incorporate structurally disparate β-amino acids into DHFR, in spite of the use of a single puromycin for the selection of the individual clones. In this study, we examine the extent to which the structure of the β3-puromycin employed for ribosome selection influences the regio- and stereochemical preferences of the modified ribosomes during protein synthesis; the mechanistic probe was a single suppressor tRNACUA activated with each of four methyl-β-alanine isomers (1–4). The modified ribosomes were found to incorporate each of the four isomeric methyl-β-alanines into DHFR but exhibited a preference for incorporation of 3(S)-methyl-β-alanine (β-mAla; 4), i.e., the isomer having the same regio- and stereochemistry as the O-methylated β-tyrosine moiety of β3-puromycin. Also conducted were a selection of clones that are responsive to β2-puromycin and a demonstration of reversal of the regio- and stereochemical preferences of these clones during protein synthesis. These results were incorporated into a structural model of the modified regions of 23S rRNA, which included in silico prediction of a H-bonding network. Finally, it was demonstrated that incorporation of 3(S)-methyl-β-alanine (β-mAla; 4) into a short α-helical region of the nucleic acid binding domain of hnRNP LL significantly stabilized the helix without affecting its DNA binding properties. PMID:25982410

  4. Protein Synthesis with Ribosomes Selected for the Incorporation of β-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Maini, Rumit; Chowdhury, Sandipan Roy; Dedkova, Larisa M; Roy, Basab; Daskalova, Sasha M; Paul, Rakesh; Chen, Shengxi; Hecht, Sidney M

    2015-06-16

    In an earlier study, β³-puromycin was used for the selection of modified ribosomes, which were utilized for the incorporation of five different β-amino acids into Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The selected ribosomes were able to incorporate structurally disparate β-amino acids into DHFR, in spite of the use of a single puromycin for the selection of the individual clones. In this study, we examine the extent to which the structure of the β³-puromycin employed for ribosome selection influences the regio- and stereochemical preferences of the modified ribosomes during protein synthesis; the mechanistic probe was a single suppressor tRNA(CUA) activated with each of four methyl-β-alanine isomers (1-4). The modified ribosomes were found to incorporate each of the four isomeric methyl-β-alanines into DHFR but exhibited a preference for incorporation of 3(S)-methyl-β-alanine (β-mAla; 4), i.e., the isomer having the same regio- and stereochemistry as the O-methylated β-tyrosine moiety of β³-puromycin. Also conducted were a selection of clones that are responsive to β²-puromycin and a demonstration of reversal of the regio- and stereochemical preferences of these clones during protein synthesis. These results were incorporated into a structural model of the modified regions of 23S rRNA, which included in silico prediction of a H-bonding network. Finally, it was demonstrated that incorporation of 3(S)-methyl-β-alanine (β-mAla; 4) into a short α-helical region of the nucleic acid binding domain of hnRNP LL significantly stabilized the helix without affecting its DNA binding properties.

  5. Beta-methylthio-aspartic acid: identification of a novel posttranslational modification in ribosomal protein S12 from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalak, J. A.; Walsh, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    Utilizing microscale chemical derivatization reactions and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we have identified a novel posttranslational modification of aspartic acid, beta-methylthio-aspartic acid. The modified residue is located at position 88 in ribosomal protein S12 from Escherichia coli, a phylogenetically conserved protein that has been implicated in maintaining translational accuracy of the ribosome. PMID:8844851

  6. Ribosome-inactivating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms. PMID:24071927

  7. Stable binding of the eukaryotic acidic phosphoproteins to the ribosome is not an absolute requirement for in vivo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Remacha, M; Santos, C; Bermejo, B; Naranda, T; Ballesta, J P

    1992-06-15

    The genes encoding the four acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins have been inactivated in Saccharomyces cerevisae by recombination with truncated genes carrying different genetic markers. By crossing single haploid disruptants, strains harboring two simultaneously inactivated acidic protein genes were constructed. None of the six possible double disruptions was lethal, but the simultaneous inactivation of either YP1 alpha and YP1 beta(L44') or YP2 alpha(L44) and YP2 beta(L45) caused an important decrease in the cell growth rate. Ribosomes isolated from these slow-growing strains did not contain acidic proteins, not even the two polypeptides whose genes were still intact, although these proteins were present in the cell extracts and they seem to be able to form high-molecular weight protein complexes. Transformation of a slow-growing double transformant with a plasmid containing one of the disrupted genes restored the presence of the acidic proteins in the ribosomes and normal growth rates. The particles of the slow-growing strains were active in an in vitro amino acid polymerizing system, although their activity could be stimulated by the exogenous addition of the missing proteins. These results indicate that in the absence of either YP1 alpha and YP1 beta(L44') or YP2 alpha (L44) and YP2 beta(L45), the remaining acidic proteins are unable to interact with the ribosome in a stable manner, but that a strong interaction of these ribosomal components with the particle is not an absolute requirement for in vivo and in vitro protein synthesis.

  8. Enhanced D-amino acid incorporation into protein by modified ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Dedkova, Larisa M; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Golovine, Serguei Y; Hecht, Sidney M

    2003-06-04

    By overexpression of modified Escherichia coli 23S rRNAs from multicopy plasmids, ribosomes were prepared that contained mutations in two regions (2447-2450 and 2457-2462) of 23S rRNA. Following mutagenesis and selection, two clones with mutations in the 2447-2450 region (peptidyltransferase center) and six with mutations in the 2457-2462 region (helix 89) were characterized. The mutations were shown to exhibit a high level of homology. Cell-free protein synthesizing systems prepared from these clones were found to exhibit significantly enhanced incorporation of d-methionine and d-phenylalanine into protein. The incorporations involved positions 10, 22, and 54 of E. coli dihydrofolate reductase and positions 247 and 250 of Photinus pyralis firefly luciferase. Interestingly, some of the derived proteins containing the d-amino acids (notably DHFR analogues altered at position 10) functioned as well as those containing the respective l-amino acids, while substitution at other positions resulted in proteins having greatly diminished activity.

  9. BALANCED PRODUCTION OF RIBOSOMAL PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Robert P.

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes contain one molecule each of 79 different proteins. The genes encoding these proteins are usually at widely scattered loci and have distinctive promoters with certain common features. This minireview discusses the means by which cells manage to balance the production of ribosomal proteins so as to end up with equimolar quantities in the ribosome. Regulation at all levels of gene expression, from transcription to protein turnover, is considered. PMID:17689889

  10. Structural characterization of yeast acidic ribosomal P proteins forming the P1A-P2B heterocomplex.

    PubMed

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Liljas, Anders; Grankowski, Nikodem

    2003-04-01

    Acidic ribosomal P proteins form a distinct lateral protuberance on the 60S ribosomal subunit. In yeast, this structure is composed of two heterocomplexes (P1A-P2B and P1B-P2A) attached to the ribosome with the aid of the P0 protein. In solution, the isolated P proteins P1A and P2B have a flexible structure with some characteristics of a molten globule [Zurdo, J., et al. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 8935-8943]. In this report, the structure of P1A-P2B heterocomplex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is investigated by means of size-exclusion chromatography, chemical cross-linking, circular dichroism, light scattering, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The circular dichroism experiment shows that the complex could be ranked in the tertiary class of all-alpha proteins, with an average alpha-helical content of approximately 65%. Heat and urea denaturation experiments reveal that the P1A-P2B complex, unlike the isolated proteins, has a full cooperative transition which can be fitted into a two-state folding-unfolding model. The behavior of the complex in the presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol also resembles a two-state folding-unfolding transition, further supporting the idea that the heterocomplex contains well-packed side chains. In conclusion, the P1A-P2B heterocomplex, unlike the isolated proteins, has a well-defined hydrophobic core. Consequently, the complex can put up its structure without additional ribosomal components, so the heterodimeric complex reflects the intrinsic properties of the two analyzed proteins, indicating thus that this is the only possible configuration of the P1A and P2B proteins on the ribosomal stalk structure.

  11. Modular organization of residue-level contacts shape the selection pressure on individual amino acid sites of ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Saurav; Kundu, Sudip

    2017-02-22

    Understanding the molecular evolution of macromolecular complexes in the light of their structure, assembly and stability is of central importance. Here we address how the modular organization of native molecular contacts shapes the selection pressure on individual residue sites of ribosomal complexes. The bacterial ribosomal complex is represented as a residue contact network where nodes represent amino acid/nucleotide residues and edges represent their van der Waals interactions. We find statistically overrepresented native amino acid-nucleotide contacts (OaantC, one amino acid contacts one or multiple nucleotides, inter-nucleotide contacts are disregarded). Contact number is defined as the number of nucleotides contacted. Involvement of individual amino acids in OaantCs with smaller contact numbers is more random, while only a few amino acids significantly contribute to OaantCs with higher contact numbers. An investigation of structure, stability and assembly of bacterial ribosome depicts the involvement of these OaantCs in diverse biophysical interactions stabilizing the complex, including high-affinity protein-RNA contacts, inter-protein cooperativity, inter-subunit bridge, packing of multiple ribosomal RNA domains etc. Amino acid-nucleotide constituents of OaantCs with higher contact numbers are generally associated with significantly slower substitution rates compared to that of OaantCs with smaller contact numbers. This evolutionary rate heterogeneity emerges from the strong purifying selection pressure that conserves the respective amino acid physicochemical properties relevant to the stabilizing interaction with OaantC nucleotides. An analysis of relative molecular orientations of OaantC residues and their interaction energetics provides the biophysical ground of purifying selection conserving OaantC amino acid physicochemical properties.

  12. Topography and stoichiometry of acidic proteins in large ribosomal subunits from Artemia salina as determined by crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiumi, T.; Wahba, A.J.; Traut, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The 60S subunits isolated from Artemia salina ribosomes were treated with the crosslinking reagent 2-iminothiolane under mild conditions. Proteins were extracted and fractions containing crosslinked acidic proteins were obtained by stepwise elution from CM-cellulose. Each fraction was analyzed by diagonal (two-dimensional nonreducing-reducing) NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Crosslinked proteins below the diagonal were radioiodinated and identified by two-dimensional acidic urea-NaDodSO/sub 4/ gel electrophoresis. Each of the acidic proteins P1 and P2 was crosslinked individually to the same third protein, PO. The fractions containing acidic proteins were also analyzed by two-dimensional nonequilibrium isoelectric focusing-NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two crosslinked complexes were observed that coincide in isoelectric positions with monomeric P1 and P2, respectively. Both P1 and P2 appear to form crosslinked homodimers. These results suggest the presence in the 60S subunit of (P1)/sub 2/ and (P2)/sub 2/ dimers, each of which is anchored to PO. Protein PO appears to play the same role as L10 in Escherichia coli ribosomes and may form a pentameric complex with the two dimers in the 60S subunits.

  13. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-05-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing.

  14. The exchangeable yeast ribosomal acidic protein YP2beta shows characteristics of a partly folded state under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Zurdo, J; Sanz, J M; González, C; Rico, M; Ballesta, J P

    1997-08-05

    The eukaryotic acidic ribosomal P proteins, contrary to the standard r-proteins which are rapidly degraded in the cytoplasm, are found forming a large cytoplasmic pool that exchanges with the ribosome-bound proteins during translation. The native structure of the P proteins in solution is therefore an essential determinant of the protein-protein interactions that take place in the exchange process. In this work, the structure of the ribosomal acidic protein YP2beta from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and sedimentation equilibrium techniques. We have established the fact that YP2beta bears a 22% alpha-helical secondary structure and a noncompact tertiary structure under physiological conditions (pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C); the hydrophobic core of the protein appears to be solvent-exposed, and very low cooperativity is observed for heat- or urea-induced denaturation. Moreover, the 1H-NMR spectra show a small signal dispersion, and virtually all the amide protons exchange with the solvent on a very short time scale, which is characteristic of an open structure. At low pH, YP2beta maintains its secondary structure content, but there is no evidence for tertiary structure. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces a higher amount of alpha-helical structure but also disrupts any trace of the remaining tertiary fold. These results indicate that YP2beta may have a flexible structure in the cytoplasmic pool, with some of the characteristics of a "molten globule", and also point out the physiological relevance of such flexible protein states in processes other than protein folding.

  15. Supernumerary proteins of mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Oliver; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2014-04-01

    Messenger RNAs encoded by mitochondrial genomes are translated on mitochondrial ribosomes that have unique structure and protein composition compared to prokaryotic and cytoplasmic ribosomes. Mitochondrial ribosomes are a patchwork of core proteins that share homology with prokaryotic ribosomal proteins and new, supernumerary proteins that can be unique to different organisms. In mammals, there are specific supernumerary ribosomal proteins that are not present in other eukaryotes. Here we discuss the roles of supernumerary proteins in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression and compare them among different eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we consider if differences in the structure and organization of mitochondrial genomes may have contributed to the acquisition of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins with new functions. The distinct and diverse compositions of mitochondrial ribosomes illustrate the high evolutionary divergence found between mitochondrial genetic systems. Elucidating the role of the organism-specific supernumerary proteins may provide a window into the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression through evolution in response to distinct evolutionary paths taken by mitochondria in different organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Frontiers of Mitochondrial Research. © 2013.

  16. Hold on to your friends: Dedicated chaperones of ribosomal proteins: Dedicated chaperones mediate the safe transfer of ribosomal proteins to their site of pre-ribosome incorporation.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Benjamin; Mitterer, Valentin; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes are assembled from their components, the ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins, in a tremendously complex, multi-step process, which primarily takes place in the nuclear compartment. Therefore, most ribosomal proteins have to travel from the cytoplasm to their incorporation site on pre-ribosomes within the nucleus. However, due to their particular characteristics, such as a highly basic amino acid composition and the presence of unstructured extensions, ribosomal proteins are especially prone to aggregation and degradation in their unassembled state, hence specific mechanisms must operate to ensure their safe delivery. Recent studies have uncovered a group of proteins, termed dedicated chaperones, specialized in accompanying and guarding individual ribosomal proteins. In this essay, we review how these dedicated chaperones utilize different folds to interact with their ribosomal protein clients and how they ensure their soluble expression and interconnect their intracellular transport with their efficient assembly into pre-ribosomes.

  17. An Evolutionary Strategy for All-Atom Folding of the 60-Amino-Acid Bacterial Ribosomal Protein L20

    PubMed Central

    Schug, A.; Wenzel, W.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated an evolutionary algorithm for de novo all-atom folding of the bacterial ribosomal protein L20. We report results of two simulations that converge to near-native conformations of this 60-amino-acid, four-helix protein. We observe a steady increase of “native content” in both simulated ensembles and a large number of near-native conformations in their final populations. We argue that these structures represent a significant fraction of the low-energy metastable conformations, which characterize the folding funnel of this protein. These data validate our all-atom free-energy force field PFF01 for tertiary structure prediction of a previously inaccessible structural family of proteins. We also compare folding simulations of the evolutionary algorithm with the basin-hopping technique for the Trp-cage protein. We find that the evolutionary algorithm generates a dynamic memory in the simulated population, which leads to faster overall convergence. PMID:16565067

  18. Paradigms of ribosome synthesis: Lessons learned from ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome in all cells is manufactured via the intricate process of translation by multimolecular factories called ribosomes. Nevertheless, these ribonucleoprotein particles, the largest of their kind, also have an elaborate assembly line of their own. Groundbreaking discoveries that bacterial ribosomal subunits can be self-assembled in vitro jumpstarted studies on how ribosomes are constructed. Until recently, ribosome assembly has been investigated almost entirely in vitro with bacterial small subunits under equilibrium conditions. In light of high-resolution ribosome structures and a more sophisticated toolkit, the past decade has been defined by a burst of kinetic studies in vitro and, importantly, also a shift to examining ribosome maturation in living cells, especially in eukaryotes. In this review, we summarize the principles governing ribosome assembly that emerged from studies focusing on ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA. Understanding these paradigms has taken center stage, given the linkage between anomalous ribosome biogenesis and proliferative disorders. PMID:26779413

  19. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

  20. Chloroplast ribosomes and protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, E H; Boynton, J E; Gillham, N W

    1994-01-01

    Consistent with their postulated origin from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria, chloroplasts of plants and algae have ribosomes whose component RNAs and proteins are strikingly similar to those of eubacteria. Comparison of the secondary structures of 16S rRNAs of chloroplasts and bacteria has been particularly useful in identifying highly conserved regions likely to have essential functions. Comparative analysis of ribosomal protein sequences may likewise prove valuable in determining their roles in protein synthesis. This review is concerned primarily with the RNAs and proteins that constitute the chloroplast ribosome, the genes that encode these components, and their expression. It begins with an overview of chloroplast genome structure in land plants and algae and then presents a brief comparison of chloroplast and prokaryotic protein-synthesizing systems and a more detailed analysis of chloroplast rRNAs and ribosomal proteins. A description of the synthesis and assembly of chloroplast ribosomes follows. The review concludes with discussion of whether chloroplast protein synthesis is essential for cell survival. PMID:7854253

  1. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Shang, Chenjing; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M

    2016-08-22

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are widespread among higher plants of different taxonomic orders. In this study, we report on the RIP sequences found in the genome/transcriptome of several important Rosaceae species, including many economically important edible fruits such as apple, pear, peach, apricot, and strawberry. All RIP domains from Rosaceae share high sequence similarity with conserved residues in the catalytic site and the carbohydrate binding sites. The genomes of Malus domestica and Pyrus communis contain both type 1 and type 2 RIP sequences, whereas for Prunus mume, Prunus persica, Pyrus bretschneideri, and Pyrus communis a complex set of type 1 RIP sequences was retrieved. Heterologous expression and purification of the type 1 as well as the type 2 RIP from apple allowed to characterize the biological activity of the proteins. Both RIPs from Malus domestica can inhibit protein synthesis. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that RIPs from Rosaceae possess three-dimensional structures that are highly similar to the model proteins and can bind to RIP substrates. Screening of the recombinant type 2 RIP from apple on a glycan array revealed that this type 2 RIP interacts with terminal sialic acid residues. Our data suggest that the RIPs from Rosaceae are biologically active proteins.

  2. β-Boswellic acid, a bioactive substance used in food supplements, inhibits protein synthesis by targeting the ribosomal machinery.

    PubMed

    Casapullo, A; Cassiano, C; Capolupo, A; Del Gaudio, F; Esposito, R; Tosco, A; Riccio, R; Monti, M C

    2016-09-01

    The Boswellia gum resin extracts have been used in traditional medicines because of their remarkable anti-inflammatory properties. Nowadays, these extracts are on the market as food supplements. β-Boswellic acid (βBA) is one of the main pentacyclic triterpene components, among the family of BAs, of the Boswellia gum resins. BAs have been broadly studied and are well known for their wide anti-inflammatory and potential anticancer properties. In this paper, a mass spectrometry-based chemoproteomic approach has been applied to characterize the whole βBA interacting profile. Among the large numbers of proteins fished out, proteasome, 14-3-3 and some ribosomal proteins were considered the most interesting targets strictly connected to the modulation of the cancer progression. In particular, because of their recent assessment as innovative chemotherapeutic targets, the ribosomal proteins were considered the most attractive βBA partners, and the biological role of their interaction with the natural compound has been evaluated. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Graack, H R; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) are the counterparts in that organelle of the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins in the host. Although the MRPs fulfil similar functions in protein biosynthesis, they are distinct in number, features and primary structures from the latter. Most progress in the eludication of the properties of individual MRPs, and in the characterization of the corresponding genes, has been made in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). To date, 50 different MRPs have been determined, although biochemical data and mutational analysis propose a total number which is substantially higher. Surprisingly, only a minority of the MRPs that have been characterized show significant sequence similarities to known ribosomal proteins from other sources, thus limiting the deduction of their functions by simple comparison of amino acid sequences. Further, individual MRPs have been characterized functionally by mutational studies, and the regulation of expression of MRP genes has been described. The interaction of the mitochondrial ribosomes with transcription factors specific for individual mitochondrial mRNAs, and the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus for the co-ordinated expression of ribosomal constituents, are other aspects of current MRP research. Although the mitochondrial translational system is still far from being described completely, the yeast MRP system serves as a model for other organisms, including that of humans. PMID:9445368

  4. Effect of acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein mRNA 5'-untranslated region on gene expression and protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, B; Remacha, M; Ortiz-Reyes, B; Santos, C; Ballesta, J P

    1994-02-11

    Constructions were made from genes encoding ribosomal acidic phosphoproteins YP1 beta (L44') and YP2 beta (L45) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which different parts of the 5'-untranslated regions were included. The constructs were inserted into centromeric plasmids under the control of the GAL1 promoter and expressed in yeast strains in which the genes coding for each acidic protein family, P1 and P2, had been disrupted. Deletions in the 5' region of the two genes have been found to oppositely affect their expression. Deletion of most of this region strongly stimulates the expression of YP2 beta (L45), increasing the translation efficiency of the mRNA, and generating a 6-fold excess of protein in the cell. A similar deletion in the rpYP1 beta gene represses the expression of the protein, reducing drastically the amount of the mRNA in the cell. The overexpression of rpYP2 beta affects the cell growth by inhibiting protein synthesis at the level of initiation. Reduction of the YP2 beta(L45) overproduction by growing in controlled concentrations of glucose abolishes the inhibitory effect. The excess protein, probably as a high molecular weight complex, apparently interferes with the joining of the 60 S subunit to the initiation complex generating the accumulation of polysome half-mers. In addition, the results indicate the existence of a regulatory mechanism by which each one of the two acidic proteins controls the expression of the other polypeptide. YP1 beta(L44') represses the expression of YP2 beta(L45), while this protein stimulates the expression of YP1 beta(L44').

  5. Salicylic acid-related cotton (Gossypium arboreum) ribosomal protein GaRPL18 contributes to resistance to Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qian; Yang, Zhaoen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Butt, Hamama Islam; Chen, Eryong; He, Shoupu; Zhang, Chaojun; Zhang, Xueyan; Li, Fuguang

    2017-03-03

    Verticillium dahliae is a phytopathogenic fungal pathogen that causes vascular wilt diseases responsible for considerable decreases in cotton yields. The complex mechanism underlying cotton resistance to Verticillium wilt remains uncharacterized. Identifying an endogenous resistance gene may be useful for controlling this disease. We cloned the ribosomal protein L18 (GaRPL18) gene, which mediates resistance to Verticillium wilt, from a wilt-resistant cotton species (Gossypium arboreum). We then characterized the function of this gene in cotton and Arabidopsis thaliana plants. GaRPL18 encodes a 60S ribosomal protein subunit important for intracellular protein biosynthesis. However, previous studies revealed that some ribosomal proteins are also inhibitory toward oncogenesis and congenital diseases in humans and play a role in plant disease defense. Here, we observed that V. dahliae infections induce GaRPL18 expression. Furthermore, we determined that the GaRPL18 expression pattern is consistent with the disease resistance level of different cotton varieties. GaRPL18 expression is upregulated by salicylic acid (SA) treatments, suggesting the involvement of GaRPL18 in the SA signal transduction pathway. Virus-induced gene silencing technology was used to determine whether the GaRPL18 expression level influences cotton disease resistance. Wilt-resistant cotton species in which GaRPL18 was silenced became more susceptible to V. dahliae than the control plants because of a significant decrease in the abundance of immune-related molecules. We also transformed A. thaliana ecotype Columbia (Col-0) plants with GaRPL18 according to the floral dip method. The plants overexpressing GaRPL18 were more resistant to V. dahliae infections than the wild-type Col-0 plants. The enhanced resistance of transgenic A. thaliana plants to V. dahliae is likely mediated by the SA pathway. Our findings provide new insights into the role of GaRPL18, indicating that it plays a crucial role in

  6. Ribosomal acidic phosphoproteins P1 and P2 are not required for cell viability but regulate the pattern of protein expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Remacha, M; Jimenez-Diaz, A; Bermejo, B; Rodriguez-Gabriel, M A; Guarinos, E; Ballesta, J P

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with either three inactivated genes (triple disruptants) or four inactivated genes (quadruple disruptants) encoding the four acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins, YP1 alpha, YP1 beta, YP2 alpha, and YP2 beta, present in this species have been obtained. Ribosomes from the triple disruptants and, obviously, those from the quadruple strain do not have bound P proteins. All disrupted strains are viable; however, they show a cold-sensitive phenotype, growing very poorly at 23 degrees C. Cell extracts from the quadruple-disruptant strain are about 30% as active as the control in protein synthesis assays and are stimulated by the addition of free acidic P proteins. Strains lacking acidic proteins do not have a higher suppressor activity than the parental strains, and cell extracts derived from the quadruple disruptant do not show a higher degree of misreading, indicating that the absence of acidic proteins does not affect the accuracy of the ribosomes. However, the patterns of protein expressed in the cells as well as in the cell-free protein system are affected by the absence of P proteins from the particles; a wild-type pattern is restored upon addition of exogenous P proteins to the cell extract. In addition, strains carrying P-protein-deficient ribosomes are unable to sporulate but recover this capacity upon transformation with one of the missing genes. These results indicate that acidic proteins are not an absolute requirement for protein synthesis but regulate the activity of the 60S subunit, affecting the translation of certain mRNAs differently. PMID:7651393

  7. Vaccination with Leishmania infantum Acidic Ribosomal P0 but Not with Nucleosomal Histones Proteins Controls Leishmania infantum Infection in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lais; Abbehusen, Melissa; Teixeira, Clarissa; Cunha, Jurema; Nascimento, Ivan P.; Fukutani, Kyioshi; dos-Santos, Washington; Barral, Aldina; de Oliveira, Camila Indiani; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Soto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Cláudia Ida

    2015-01-01

    Background Several intracellular Leishmania antigens have been identified in order to find a potential vaccine capable of conferring long lasting protection against Leishmania infection. Histones and Acid Ribosomal proteins are already known to induce an effective immune response and have successfully been tested in the cutaneous leishmaniasis mouse model. Here, we investigate the protective ability of L. infantum nucleosomal histones (HIS) and ribosomal acidic protein P0 (LiP0) against L. infantum infection in the hamster model of visceral leishmaniasis using two different strategies: homologous (plasmid DNA only) or heterologous immunization (plasmid DNA plus recombinant protein and adjuvant). Methodology/Principal Findings Immunization with both antigens using the heterologous strategy presented a high antibody production level while the homologous strategy immunized group showed predominantly a cellular immune response with parasite load reduction. The pcDNA-LiP0 immunized group showed increased expression ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/TGF-β in the lymph nodes before challenge. Two months after infection hamsters immunized with the empty plasmid presented a pro-inflammatory immune response in the early stages of infection with increased expression ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/TGF-β, whereas hamsters immunized with pcDNA-HIS presented an increase only in the ratio IFN-γ/ TGF-β. On the other hand, hamsters immunized with LiP0 did not present any increase in the IFN-γ/TGF-β and IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio independently of the immunization strategy used. Conversely, five months after infection, hamsters immunized with HIS maintained a pro-inflammatory immune response (ratio IFN-γ/ IL-10) while pcDNA-LiP0 immunized hamsters continued showing a balanced cytokine profile of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover we observed a significant reduction in parasite load in the spleen, liver and lymph node in this group compared with controls. Conclusions

  8. Vaccination with Leishmania infantum acidic ribosomal P0 but not with nucleosomal histones proteins controls Leishmania infantum infection in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lais; Abbehusen, Melissa; Teixeira, Clarissa; Cunha, Jurema; Nascimento, Ivan P; Fukutani, Kyioshi; dos-Santos, Washington; Barral, Aldina; de Oliveira, Camila Indiani; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Soto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Cláudia Ida

    2015-02-01

    Several intracellular Leishmania antigens have been identified in order to find a potential vaccine capable of conferring long lasting protection against Leishmania infection. Histones and Acid Ribosomal proteins are already known to induce an effective immune response and have successfully been tested in the cutaneous leishmaniasis mouse model. Here, we investigate the protective ability of L. infantum nucleosomal histones (HIS) and ribosomal acidic protein P0 (LiP0) against L. infantum infection in the hamster model of visceral leishmaniasis using two different strategies: homologous (plasmid DNA only) or heterologous immunization (plasmid DNA plus recombinant protein and adjuvant). Immunization with both antigens using the heterologous strategy presented a high antibody production level while the homologous strategy immunized group showed predominantly a cellular immune response with parasite load reduction. The pcDNA-LiP0 immunized group showed increased expression ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/TGF-β in the lymph nodes before challenge. Two months after infection hamsters immunized with the empty plasmid presented a pro-inflammatory immune response in the early stages of infection with increased expression ratio of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/TGF-β, whereas hamsters immunized with pcDNA-HIS presented an increase only in the ratio IFN-γ/ TGF-β. On the other hand, hamsters immunized with LiP0 did not present any increase in the IFN-γ/TGF-β and IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio independently of the immunization strategy used. Conversely, five months after infection, hamsters immunized with HIS maintained a pro-inflammatory immune response (ratio IFN-γ/ IL-10) while pcDNA-LiP0 immunized hamsters continued showing a balanced cytokine profile of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover we observed a significant reduction in parasite load in the spleen, liver and lymph node in this group compared with controls. Our results suggest that vaccination with L. infantum LiP0

  9. Cloning and Characterization of the Acidic Ribosomal Protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum, a New 17-Kilodalton Antigen▿

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Jeffrey W.; Kwon, James P.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Bern, Caryn; Moss, Delynn M.; Freeman, Amanda R.; Jones, Cara C.; Arrowood, Michael J.; Won, Kimberly Y.; Lammie, Patrick J.; Gilman, Robert H.; Mead, Jan R.

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium infection is commonly observed among children and immunocompromised individuals in developing countries, but large-scale outbreaks of disease among adults have not been reported. In contrast, outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis in the United States and Canada are increasingly common among patients of all ages. Thus, it seems likely that residents of regions where Cryptosporidium is highly endemic acquire some level of immunity, while residents of the developed world do not. A new immunodominant Cryptosporidium parvum antigen in the 15- to 17-kDa size range was identified as the Cryptosporidium parvum 60S acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2). We developed a recombinant protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for serologic population surveillance for antibodies that was 89% sensitive and 92% specific relative to the results of the large-format Western blot assay. The human IgG response is directed almost exclusively toward the highly conserved, carboxy-terminal 15 amino acids of the protein. Although IgG antibody cross-reactivity was documented with sera from patients with acute babesiosis, the development of an anti-CpP2 antibody response in our Peru study population correlated better with Cryptosporidium infection than with infection by any other parasitic protozoan. In Haiti, the prevalence of antibodies to CpP2 plateaus at 11 to 20 years of age. Because anti-CpP2 IgG antibodies were found only among residents of countries in the developing world where Cryptosporidium infection occurs early and often, we propose that this response may be a proxy for the intensity of infection and for acquired immunity. PMID:20410328

  10. RPG: the Ribosomal Protein Gene database

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Akihiro; Yoshihama, Maki; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2004-01-01

    RPG (http://ribosome.miyazaki-med.ac.jp/) is a new database that provides detailed information about ribosomal protein (RP) genes. It contains data from humans and other organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharo myces cerevisiae, Methanococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli. Users can search the database by gene name and organism. Each record includes sequences (genomic, cDNA and amino acid sequences), intron/exon structures, genomic locations and information about orthologs. In addition, users can view and compare the gene structures of the above organisms and make multiple amino acid sequence alignments. RPG also provides information on small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that are encoded in the introns of RP genes. PMID:14681386

  11. RPG: the Ribosomal Protein Gene database.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Akihiro; Yoshihama, Maki; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2004-01-01

    RPG (http://ribosome.miyazaki-med.ac.jp/) is a new database that provides detailed information about ribosomal protein (RP) genes. It contains data from humans and other organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharo myces cerevisiae, Methanococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli. Users can search the database by gene name and organism. Each record includes sequences (genomic, cDNA and amino acid sequences), intron/exon structures, genomic locations and information about orthologs. In addition, users can view and compare the gene structures of the above organisms and make multiple amino acid sequence alignments. RPG also provides information on small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) that are encoded in the introns of RP genes.

  12. Biochemical characterization of 60S acidic ribosomal P proteins associated with CK-II from bamboo shoots and potent inhibitors of their phosphorylation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, T; Kosuge, S; Sakamoto, S; Funayama, S; Komiyama, K; Ohtsuki, K

    1999-07-01

    Three effective phosphate acceptors (35, 15 and 13 kDa polypeptides) for casein kinase II (CK-II) in the Superdex CK-II fraction prepared from a 0.5 M NaCl extract of bamboo shoots were selectively purified by glycyrrhizin (GL)-affinity column chromatography (HPLC). These three proteins (p35, p15 and p13) were identified as 60S acidic ribosomal P proteins by determination of their partial N-terminal sequences. CK-II was associated with p35 since the GL-affinity fraction was coprecipitated with an anti-serum against Drosophila CK-IIbeta. Moreover, a derivative (oGA) of glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) and several polyphenol-containing anti-oxidative compounds [quercetin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and two isoflavones, i.e., 3',4',7-trihydroxyisoflavone (3',4',7-THI) and 8-chloro-3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyisoflavone (8C-3',4',5,7-THI)] inhibited the CK-II-mediated phosphorylation of 60S acidic ribosomal P proteins in vitro. Quercetin was found to be the most effective compound on CK-II activity since its ID50 was approx. 50 nM. These results suggest that (i) GL-affinity column chromatography is useful for the selective purification of 60S acidic ribosomal P proteins as a heterocomplex associated with CK-II from various cell sources; (ii) natural anti-oxidative compounds with polyphenols, but not GL and GA, act as potent CK-II suppressors; and (iii) CK-II mediates the regulation of the physiological functions of 60S acidic ribosomal P proteins in growing plant cells.

  13. Modular Organization of Residue-Level Contacts Shapes the Selection Pressure on Individual Amino Acid Sites of Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Saurav

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the molecular evolution of macromolecular complexes in the light of their structure, assembly, and stability is of central importance. Here, we address how the modular organization of native molecular contacts shapes the selection pressure on individual residue sites of ribosomal complexes. The bacterial ribosomal complex is represented as a residue contact network where nodes represent amino acid/nucleotide residues and edges represent their van der Waals interactions. We find statistically overrepresented native amino acid–nucleotide contacts (OaantC, one amino acid contacts one or multiple nucleotides, internucleotide contacts are disregarded). Contact number is defined as the number of nucleotides contacted. Involvement of individual amino acids in OaantCs with smaller contact numbers is more random, whereas only a few amino acids significantly contribute to OaantCs with higher contact numbers. An investigation of structure, stability, and assembly of bacterial ribosome depicts the involvement of these OaantCs in diverse biophysical interactions stabilizing the complex, including high-affinity protein–RNA contacts, interprotein cooperativity, intersubunit bridge, packing of multiple ribosomal RNA domains, etc. Amino acid–nucleotide constituents of OaantCs with higher contact numbers are generally associated with significantly slower substitution rates compared with that of OaantCs with smaller contact numbers. This evolutionary rate heterogeneity emerges from the strong purifying selection pressure that conserves the respective amino acid physicochemical properties relevant to the stabilizing interaction with OaantC nucleotides. An analysis of relative molecular orientations of OaantC residues and their interaction energetics provides the biophysical ground of purifying selection conserving OaantC amino acid physicochemical properties. PMID:28338825

  14. Evaluation of DNA encoding acidic ribosomal protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum as a potential vaccine candidate for cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro; Priest, Jeffrey W; Ehigiator, Humphrey N; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R

    2011-11-15

    The Cryptosporidium parvum acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2) is an important immunodominant marker in C. parvum infection. In this study, the CpP2 antigen was evaluated as a vaccine candidate using a DNA vaccine model in adult C57BL/6 IL-12 knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding CpP2 (CpP2-DNA) cloned into the pUMVC4b vector induced a significant anti-CpP2 IgG antibody response that was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Compared to control KO mice immunized with plasmid alone, CpP2-immunized mice demonstrated specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation as well as enhanced IFN-γ production to recombinant CpP2. Further, parasite loads in CpP2 DNA-immunized mice were compared to control mice challenged with C. parvum oocysts. Although a trend in reduction of infection was observed in the CpP2 DNA-immunized mice, differences between groups were not statistically significant. These results suggest that a DNA vaccine encoding the C. parvum P2 antigen is able to provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and has the potential to generate protective immunity against C. parvum infection but may require using alternative vectors or adjuvant to generate a more potent and balanced response.

  15. Import of ribosomal proteins into yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Hansen, Katja G; Garth, Christoph; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of baker's yeast contain at least 78 protein subunits. All but one of these proteins are nuclear-encoded, synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes, and imported into the matrix for biogenesis. The import of matrix proteins typically relies on N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequences that form positively charged amphipathic helices. Interestingly, the N-terminal regions of many ribosomal proteins do not closely match the characteristics of matrix targeting sequences, suggesting that the import processes of these proteins might deviate to some extent from the general import route. So far, the biogenesis of only two ribosomal proteins, Mrpl32 and Mrp10, was studied experimentally and indeed showed surprising differences to the import of other preproteins. In this review article we summarize the current knowledge on the transport of proteins into the mitochondrial matrix, and thereby specifically focus on proteins of the mitochondrial ribosome.

  16. High efficacy of a 20 amino acid peptide of the acidic ribosomal protein P0 against the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mallon, Alina; Encinosa, Pedro E; Méndez-Pérez, Lídice; Bello, Yamil; Rodríguez Fernández, Rafmary; Garay, Hilda; Cabrales, Ania; Méndez, Luis; Borroto, Carlos; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Current strategies to control cattle ticks use integrated control programs (ICP) that include vaccination. Reduction in the use of chemicals and in the cost of tick control, the delay or elimination of acaricide resistance and the decreasing of environmental pollution are the advantages of using these programs. This integrated program is potentially applicable to all genotypes of chemical resistant ticks. However, the problem here is to improve the efficacy of anti-tick vaccines. The P0 protein is a structural component of the ribosome of all organisms. We have identified an immunogenic region of ribosomal protein P0 from Rhipicephalus spp. ticks that is not very conserved compared to the orthologous protein in their hosts. A synthetic 20 amino acid peptide from this sequence was effective as a vaccine against Rhipicephalus sanguineus infestations in an immunization and challenge experiment using rabbits. In this paper, the same peptide used as vaccine against the cattle tick Rhipicephalus Boophilus microplus shows a significant diminution in the number of engorged females recovered, in the weight of females and the weight of egg masses. The number of eggs hatched was also significantly reduced for the vaccinated group, with an overall effectivity for the antigen pP0 of 96%. These results, together with the conserved sequence of the P0 peptide among ticks, suggest that this antigen could be a good broad spectrum vaccine candidate. It would be expected to be active against many species of ticks and thus has promise in an ICP for effective control of ticks and thereby to improve the efficiency and productivity of the livestock industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. The Ribosome Modulates Nascent Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Christian M.; Goldman, Daniel H.; Chodera, John D.; Tinoco, Ignacio; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are synthesized by the ribosome and generally must fold to become functionally active. Although it is commonly assumed that the ribosome affects the folding process, this idea has been extremely difficult to demonstrate. We have developed an experimental system to investigate the folding of single ribosome-bound stalled nascent polypeptides with optical tweezers. In T4 lysozyme, synthesized in a reconstituted in vitro translation system, the ribosome slows the formation of stable tertiary interactions and the attainment of the native state relative to the free protein. Incomplete T4 lysozyme polypeptides misfold and aggregate when free in solution, but they remain folding-competent near the ribosomal surface. Altogether, our results suggest that the ribosome not only decodes the genetic information and synthesizes polypeptides, but also promotes efficient de novo attainment of the native state. PMID:22194581

  18. Ribosome-associated protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Brandman, Onn; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis by the ribosome can fail for numerous reasons including faulty mRNA, insufficient availability of charged tRNAs and genetic errors. All organisms have evolved mechanisms to recognize stalled ribosomes and initiate pathways for recycling, quality control and stress signaling. Here we review the discovery and molecular dissection of the eukaryotic ribosome-associated quality-control pathway for degradation of nascent polypeptides arising from interrupted translation. PMID:26733220

  19. The quantitative assessment of the role played by basic amino acid clusters in the nuclear uptake of human ribosomal protein L7.

    PubMed

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Lee, I-Fang; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we used a multiple copy (EGFP)(3) reporter system to establish a numeric nuclear index system to assess the degree of nuclear import. The system was first validated by a FRAP assay, and then was applied to evaluate the essential and multifaceted nature of basic amino acid clusters during the nuclear import of ribosomal protein L7. The results indicate that the sequence context of the basic cluster determines the degree of nuclear import, and that the number of basic residues in the cluster is irrelevant; rather the position of the pertinent basic residues is crucial. Moreover, it also found that the type of carrier protein used by basic cluster has a great impact on the degree of nuclear import. In case of L7, importin β2 or importin β3 are preferentially used by clusters with a high import efficiency, notwithstanding that other importins are also used by clusters with a weaker level of nuclear import. Such a preferential usage of multiple basic clusters and importins to gain nuclear entry would seem to be a common practice among ribosomal proteins in order to ensure their full participation in high rate ribosome synthesis.

  20. The quantitative assessment of the role played by basic amino acid clusters in the nuclear uptake of human ribosomal protein L7

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Lee, I-Fang; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-02-15

    In this study, we used a multiple copy (EGFP){sub 3} reporter system to establish a numeric nuclear index system to assess the degree of nuclear import. The system was first validated by a FRAP assay, and then was applied to evaluate the essential and multifaceted nature of basic amino acid clusters during the nuclear import of ribosomal protein L7. The results indicate that the sequence context of the basic cluster determines the degree of nuclear import, and that the number of basic residues in the cluster is irrelevant; rather the position of the pertinent basic residues is crucial. Moreover, it also found that the type of carrier protein used by basic cluster has a great impact on the degree of nuclear import. In case of L7, importin β2 or importin β3 are preferentially used by clusters with a high import efficiency, notwithstanding that other importins are also used by clusters with a weaker level of nuclear import. Such a preferential usage of multiple basic clusters and importins to gain nuclear entry would seem to be a common practice among ribosomal proteins in order to ensure their full participation in high rate ribosome synthesis. - Highlights: ► We introduce a numeric index system that represents the degree of nuclear import. ► The rate of nuclear import is dictated by the sequence context of the basic cluster. ► Importin β2 and β3 were mainly responsible for the N4 mediated nuclear import.

  1. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  2. The other lives of ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that ribosomal proteins are the constituents of an organelle that is present in every cell, they show a surprising level of regulation, and several of them have also been shown to have other extra-ribosomal functions, such in replication, transcription, splicing or even ageing. This review provides a comprehensive summary of these important aspects. PMID:20650820

  3. Ribosomal Protein S14 Unties the MDM2-p53 Loop Upon Ribosomal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Jun-ming; Zhang, Qi; Lu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The MDM2-p53 feedback loop is crucially important for restricting p53 level and activity during normal cell growth and proliferation, and is thus subjected to dynamic regulation in order for cells to activate p53 upon various stress signals. Several ribosomal proteins, such as RPL11, RPL5, RPL23, RPL26, or RPS7, have been shown to play a role in regulation of this feedback loop in response to ribosomal stress. Here, we identify another ribosomal protein S14, which is highly associated with 5q-syndrome, as a novel activator of p53 by inhibiting MDM2 activity. We found that RPS14, but not RPS19, binds to the central acidic domain of MDM2, like RPL5 and RPL23, and inhibits its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity toward p53. This RPS14-MDM2 binding was induced upon ribosomal stress caused by actinomycin D or mycophenolic acid. Overexpression of RPS14, but not RPS19, elevated p53 level and activity, leading to G1 or G2 arrest. Conversely, knockdown of RPS14 alleviated p53 induction by these two reagents. Interestingly, knockdown of either RPS14 or RPS19 caused a ribosomal stress that led to p53 activation, which was impaired by further knocking down the level of RPL11 or RPL5. Together, our results demonstrate that RPS14 and RPS19 play distinct roles in regulating the MDM2-p53 feedback loop in response to ribosomal stress. PMID:22391559

  4. A new system for naming ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Ban, Nenad; Beckmann, Roland; Cate, Jamie H D; Dinman, Jonathan D; Dragon, François; Ellis, Steven R; Lafontaine, Denis L J; Lindahl, Lasse; Liljas, Anders; Lipton, Jeffrey M; McAlear, Michael A; Moore, Peter B; Noller, Harry F; Ortega, Joaquin; Panse, Vikram Govind; Ramakrishnan, V; Spahn, Christian M T; Steitz, Thomas A; Tchorzewski, Marek; Tollervey, David; Warren, Alan J; Williamson, James R; Wilson, Daniel; Yonath, Ada; Yusupov, Marat

    2014-02-01

    A system for naming ribosomal proteins is described that the authors intend to use in the future. They urge others to adopt it. The objective is to eliminate the confusion caused by the assignment of identical names to ribosomal proteins from different species that are unrelated in structure and function. In the system proposed here, homologous ribosomal proteins are assigned the same name, regardless of species. It is designed so that new names are similar enough to old names to be easily recognized, but are written in a format that unambiguously identifies them as 'new system' names.

  5. Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits.

    PubMed

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Erik D; Szal, Teresa; Florin, Tanja; Jewett, Michael C; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-08-06

    The ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis. In all kingdoms of life it is composed of two subunits, each built on its own ribosomal RNA (rRNA) scaffold. The independent but coordinated functions of the subunits, including their ability to associate at initiation, rotate during elongation, and dissociate after protein release, are an established model of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the bipartite nature of the ribosome is presumed to be essential for biogenesis, since dedicated assembly factors keep immature ribosomal subunits apart and prevent them from translation initiation. Free exchange of the subunits limits the development of specialized orthogonal genetic systems that could be evolved for novel functions without interfering with native translation. Here we show that ribosomes with tethered and thus inseparable subunits (termed Ribo-T) are capable of successfully carrying out protein synthesis. By engineering a hybrid rRNA composed of both small and large subunit rRNA sequences, we produced a functional ribosome in which the subunits are covalently linked into a single entity by short RNA linkers. Notably, Ribo-T was not only functional in vitro, but was also able to support the growth of Escherichia coli cells even in the absence of wild-type ribosomes. We used Ribo-T to create the first fully orthogonal ribosome-messenger RNA system, and demonstrate its evolvability by selecting otherwise dominantly lethal rRNA mutations in the peptidyl transferase centre that facilitate the translation of a problematic protein sequence. Ribo-T can be used for exploring poorly understood functions of the ribosome, enabling orthogonal genetic systems, and engineering ribosomes with new functions.

  6. Illuminating parasite protein production by ribosome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Marilyn; Myler, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    While technologies for global enumeration of transcript abundance are well-developed, those that assess protein abundance require tailoring to penetrate to low abundance proteins. Ribosome profiling circumvents this challenge by measuring global protein production via sequencing small mRNA fragments protected by the assembled ribosome. This powerful approach is now being applied to protozoan parasites, including trypanosomes and Plasmodium. It has been used to identify new protein coding sequences (CDSs) and clarify the boundaries of previously annotated CDSs in Trypanosoma brucei. Ribosome profiling has demonstrated that translation efficiencies vary widely between genes and, for trypanosomes at least, for the same gene across stages. The ribosomal proteins are themselves subjected to translational control, suggesting a means of reinforcing global translational regulation. PMID:27061497

  7. Comparative anatomy of a regulatory ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Worbs, Michael; Wahl, Markus C; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M

    2002-08-01

    Ribosomal protein L4 is a crucial folding mediator and an important architectural component of the large ribosomal subunit. Furthermore, Escherichia coli L4 produced in excess of its rRNA binding sites downregulates the transcription and translation of its own S10 operon, encoding 11 ribosomal proteins. Genetic experiments and the crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima L4 had implicated separable regions on L4 in ribosome association and expression control while RNA competition experiments and the regulatory capacity of heterologous L4 had suggested an overlap of the protein sequences involved in the two functions. We report herein that contrary to other foreign bacterial L4 proteins, L4 from T. maritima only weakly controlled expression of the S10 operon in E. coli. Also, wildtype T. maritima L4 was more weakly associated with E. coli ribosomes than with the E. coli analog. Rational mutageneses were performed to try to increase the regulatory competence of T. maritima L4. The ribosome incorporation of the mutant proteins was also investigated. Two different deletions removing T. maritima-specific sequences had little effects on regulation although one did improve ribosome association. Interestingly, a set of multiple mutations, which rendered the region around helices alpha4 and alpha5 in T. maritima L4 more E. coli-like, had no influence on the incorporation of the protein into the large ribosomal subunit but considerably improved its regulatory potential. Therefore, the area around helices alpha4 and alpha5, which is critical for the initial folding steps of the large subunit, is also a central element of autogenous control, presumably by contacting the S10 mRNA leader. Ribosome association is compounded at later stages of assembly by additional rRNA contacts through L4 areas which do not participate in regulation. Similarly, sequences outside the alpha4/alpha5 region aid expression control.

  8. Regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis in an Escherichia coli mutant missing ribosomal protein L1.

    PubMed Central

    Jinks-Robertson, S; Nomura, M

    1981-01-01

    In an Escherichia coli B strain missing ribosomal protein L1, the synthesis rate of L11 is 50% greater than that of other ribosomal proteins. This finding is in agreement with the previous conclusion that L1 regulates synthesis of itself and L11 and indicates that this regulation is important for maintaining the balanced synthesis of ribosomal proteins under physiological conditions. PMID:7009590

  9. Reconstitution of functional eukaryotic ribosomes from Dictyostelium discoideum ribosomal proteins and RNA.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S

    1997-08-08

    40 and 60 S ribosomal subunits have been reconstituted in vitro from purified ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins of Dictyostelium discoideum. The functionality of the reconstituted ribosomes was demonstrated in in vitro mRNA-directed protein synthesis. The reassembly proceeded well with immature precursors of ribosomal RNA but poorly if at all with mature cytoplasmic RNA species. Reassembly also required a preparation of small nuclear RNA(s), acting as morphopoietic factor(s).

  10. Functional Importance of Mobile Ribosomal Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kai-Chun; Wen, Jin-Der; Yang, Lee-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although the dynamic motions and peptidyl transferase activity seem to be embedded in the rRNAs, the ribosome contains more than 50 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins), whose functions remain largely elusive. Also, the precise forms of some of these r-proteins, as being part of the ribosome, are not structurally solved due to their high flexibility, which hinders the efforts in their functional elucidation. Owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule techniques, and theoretical modeling, much has been learned about the dynamics of these r-proteins. Surprisingly, allosteric regulations have been found in between spatially separated components as distant as those in the opposite sides of the ribosome. Here, we focus on the functional roles and intricate regulations of the mobile L1 and L12 stalks and L9 and S1 proteins. Conformational flexibility also enables versatile functions for r-proteins beyond translation. The arrangement of r-proteins may be under evolutionary pressure that fine-tunes mass distributions for optimal structural dynamics and catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  11. (1)H, (15)N, (13)C resonance assignments for pyrazinoic acid binding domain of ribosomal protein S1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Biling; Fu, Jinglin; Guo, Chenyun; Wu, Xueji; Lin, Donghai; Liao, Xinli

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtRpsA) binds to ribosome and mRNA, and plays significant role in the regulation of translation initiation, conventional protein synthesis and transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) mediated trans-translation. It has been identified as the target of pyrazinoic acid (POA), a bactericidal moiety from hydrolysis of pyrazinamide, which is a mainstay of combination therapy for tuberculosis. POA prevented the interactions between the C-terminal S1 domain of MtRpsA (residues 280-368, MtRpsA(CTD)_S1) and tmRNA; so that POA can inhibit the trans-translation, which is a key component of multiple quality control pathways in bacteria. However, the details of molecular mechanism and dynamic characteristics for MtRpsA(CTD)_S1 interactions with POA, tmRNA or mRNA are still unclear. Here we present the (1)H, (15)N, (13)C resonance assignments of MtRpsA(CTD)_S1 as well as the secondary structure information based on backbone chemical shifts, which lay foundation for further solution structure determination, dynamic properties characterization and interactions investigation between MtRpsA(CTD)_S1 and tmRNA, RNA or POA.

  12. Identification of a new in-frame deletion of six amino acids in ribosomal protein S19 in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Cmejlova, Jana; Cerna, Zdena; Votava, Tomas; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Cmejla, Radek

    2006-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) is currently the only gene associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a rare congenital pure red cell aplasia characterized by normochromic macrocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and normocellular bone marrow with a selective deficiency of erythroid precursors. RPS19 is mutated in 25% of DBA patients, but its role in DBA pathogenesis remains elusive. We have identified a novel heterozygous microdeletion in RPS19 in a DBA patient presenting with profound anemia after birth. The deletion of 18 nucleotides (233-250; A in start codon is +1) in exon 4 leads to the elimination of 6 amino acids 78IYGGRQ83, affecting the most conserved stretch of three amino acids (YGG) in RPS19. The mutated allele was not detected in the patient's family members, indicating de novo mutation. Both alleles were expressed at the same level. Using an immunofluorescence technique, the mutated RPS19 protein localized to nucleoli, and its intracellular distribution did not differ from the wild-type RPS19. The deletion of only a few amino acids of this protein with a preserved reading frame is rare, and this type of a mutation could be very helpful in further experiments to define the role of the RPS19 protein in DBA pathogenesis.

  13. Post-translational Modification of Ribosomal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arragain, Simon; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Blondin, Geneviève; Douki, Thierry; Clemancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Forouhar, Farhad; Neely, Helen; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Hunt, John F.; Mulliez, Etienne; Fontecave, Marc; Atta, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of ribosomal proteins are important for the accuracy of the decoding machinery. A recent in vivo study has shown that the rimO gene is involved in generation of the 3-methylthio derivative of residue Asp-89 in ribosomal protein S12 (Anton, B. P., Saleh, L., Benner, J. S., Raleigh, E. A., Kasif, S., and Roberts, R. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 1826–1831). This reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by MiaB on the C2 of adenosine 37 near the anticodon of several tRNAs. We present spectroscopic evidence that Thermotoga maritima RimO, like MiaB, contains two [4Fe-4S] centers, one presumably bound to three invariant cysteines in the central radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) domain and the other to three invariant cysteines in the N-terminal UPF0004 domain. We demonstrate that holo-RimO can specifically methylthiolate the aspartate residue of a 20-mer peptide derived from S12, yielding a mixture of mono- and bismethylthio derivatives. Finally, we present the 2.0 Å crystal structure of the central radical AdoMet and the C-terminal TRAM (tRNA methyltransferase 2 and MiaB) domains in apo-RimO. Although the core of the open triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel of the radical AdoMet domain was conserved, RimO showed differences in domain organization compared with other radical AdoMet enzymes. The unusually acidic TRAM domain, likely to bind the basic S12 protein, is located at the distal edge of the radical AdoMet domain. The basic S12 protein substrate is likely to bind RimO through interactions with both the TRAM domain and the concave surface of the incomplete TIM barrel. These biophysical results provide a foundation for understanding the mechanism of methylthioation by radical AdoMet enzymes in the MiaB/RimO family. PMID:20007320

  14. Interrelationships between yeast ribosomal protein assembly events and transient ribosome biogenesis factors interactions in early pre-ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Steffen; Ohmayer, Uli; Neueder, Andreas; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Hochmuth, Eduard; Deutzmann, Rainer; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Early steps of eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis require a large set of ribosome biogenesis factors which transiently interact with nascent rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA). Most likely, concomitant with that initial contacts between ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) and ribosome precursors (pre-ribosomes) are established which are converted into robust interactions between pre-rRNA and r-proteins during the course of ribosome maturation. Here we analysed the interrelationship between r-protein assembly events and the transient interactions of ribosome biogenesis factors with early pre-ribosomal intermediates termed 90S pre-ribosomes or small ribosomal subunit (SSU) processome in yeast cells. We observed that components of the SSU processome UTP-A and UTP-B sub-modules were recruited to early pre-ribosomes independently of all tested r-proteins. On the other hand, groups of SSU processome components were identified whose association with early pre-ribosomes was affected by specific r-protein assembly events in the head-platform interface of the SSU. One of these components, Noc4p, appeared to be itself required for robust incorporation of r-proteins into the SSU head domain. Altogether, the data reveal an emerging network of specific interrelationships between local r-protein assembly events and the functional interactions of SSU processome components with early pre-ribosomes. They point towards some of these components being transient primary pre-rRNA in vivo binders and towards a role for others in coordinating the assembly of major SSU domains.

  15. Crystal Structures of the uL3 Mutant Ribosome: Illustration of the Importance of Ribosomal Proteins for Translation Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mailliot, Justine; Garreau de Loubresse, Nicolas; Yusupova, Gulnara; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D; Yusupov, Marat

    2016-05-22

    The ribosome has been described as a ribozyme in which ribosomal RNA is responsible for peptidyl-transferase reaction catalysis. The W255C mutation of the universally conserved ribosomal protein uL3 has diverse effects on ribosome function (e.g., increased affinities for transfer RNAs, decreased rates of peptidyl-transfer), and cells harboring this mutation are resistant to peptidyl-transferase inhibitors (e.g., anisomycin). These observations beg the question of how a single amino acid mutation may have such wide ranging consequences. Here, we report the structure of the vacant yeast uL3 W255C mutant ribosome by X-ray crystallography, showing a disruption of the A-site side of the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC). An additional X-ray crystallographic structure of the anisomycin-containing mutant ribosome shows that high concentrations of this inhibitor restore a "WT-like" configuration to this region of the PTC, providing insight into the resistance mechanism of the mutant. Globally, our data demonstrate that ribosomal protein uL3 is structurally essential to ensure an optimal and catalytically efficient organization of the PTC, highlighting the importance of proteins in the RNA-centered ribosome.

  16. Crystal Structures of the uL3 Mutant Ribosome: Illustration of the Importance of Ribosomal Proteins for Translation Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mailliot, Justine; de Loubresse, Nicolas Garreau; Yusupova, Gulnara; Meskauskas, Arturas; Dinman, Jonathan D.; Yusupov, Marat

    2017-01-01

    The ribosome has been described as a ribozyme in which ribosomal RNA is responsible for peptidyl-transferase reaction catalysis. The W255C mutation of the universally conserved ribosomal protein uL3 has diverse effects on ribosome function (e.g., increased affinities for transfer RNAs, decreased rates of peptidyl-transfer), and cells harboring this mutation are resistant to peptidyl-transferase inhibitors (e.g., anisomycin). These observations beg the question of how a single amino acid mutation may have such wide ranging consequences. Here, we report the structure of the vacant yeast uL3 W255C mutant ribosome by X-ray crystallography, showing a disruption of the A-site side of the peptidyl-transferase center (PTC). An additional X-ray crystallographic structure of the anisomycin-containing mutant ribosome shows that high concentrations of this inhibitor restore a “WT-like” configuration to this region of the PTC, providing insight into the resistance mechanism of the mutant. Globally, our data demonstrate that ribosomal protein uL3 is structurally essential to ensure an optimal and catalytically efficient organization of the PTC, highlighting the importance of proteins in the RNA-centered ribosome. PMID:26906928

  17. Immediate-type hypersensitivity reaction to ingestion of mycoprotein (Quorn) in a patient allergic to molds caused by acidic ribosomal protein P2.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Michael; Trüeb, Ralph M; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara K; Vieths, Stefan; Wuethrich, Brunello

    2003-05-01

    Quorn is the brand name for a line of foods made with so-called "mycoprotein," which springs from the mold Fusarium venenatum. Since the introduction on the food market, there have been complaints from consumers reporting adverse gastrointestinal reactions after ingestion of mycoprotein. To date, it is not clear whether the reported symptoms are IgE-mediated. The aim of the study was to describe for the first time a case history of an asthmatic patient with severe hypersensitivity reactions to ingested mycoprotein and to identify and characterize the potential allergen that might be responsible for this. The sensitization pattern of the asthmatic subject was characterized, and food allergy to mycoprotein was assessed by double-blinded placebo-controlled food challenge. Afterward, specific IgE antibodies of the serum of this patient were used to screen a Fusarium culmorum cDNA expression library. The coding sequence of one enriched cDNA-clone was expressed in Escherichia coli to produce a recombinant protein that was further purified and immunologically characterized. The patient showed high sensitization to many known aeroallergens but apart from Quorn not to any other tested food samples. The deduced amino acid sequence of the enriched cDNA-clone (Fus c 1) showed large identity to the 60S acidic ribosomal protein P2 which is highly conserved among several species and also described as minor allergen in other mold species. The frequency of IgE reactivity of sera from F culmorum -sensitized subjects to rFus c 1 was approximately 35%. By enzyme allergosorbent test inhibition, we found 65% inhibition of mycoprotein IgE reactivity by rFus c 1. On the opposite we found reduced IgE reactivity of rFus c 1 of 68% by using mycoprotein as inhibitor. Sensitization to mold allergens by the respiratory tract and subsequent oral ingestion of cross-reactive proteins may lead to severe food-allergic reactions. Thus, the 60S acidic ribosomal protein P2 of F venenatum probably is

  18. Insights into the Mechanism of Ribosomal Incorporation of Mammalian L13a Protein during Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Priyanka; Basu, Abhijit; Biswas, Aditi; Poddar, Darshana; Andrews, Joel; Barik, Sailen; Komar, Anton A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to prokaryotes, the precise mechanism of incorporation of ribosomal proteins into ribosomes in eukaryotes is not well understood. For the majority of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins, residues critical for rRNA binding, a key step in the hierarchical assembly of ribosomes, have not been well defined. In this study, we used the mammalian ribosomal protein L13a as a model to investigate the mechanism(s) underlying eukaryotic ribosomal protein incorporation into ribosomes. This work identified the arginine residue at position 68 of L13a as being essential for L13a binding to rRNA and incorporation into ribosomes. We also demonstrated that incorporation of L13a takes place during maturation of the 90S preribosome in the nucleolus, but that translocation of L13a into the nucleolus is not sufficient for its incorporation into ribosomes. Incorporation of L13a into the 90S preribosome was required for rRNA methylation within the 90S complex. However, mutations abolishing ribosomal incorporation of L13a did not affect its ability to be phosphorylated or its extraribosomal function in GAIT element-mediated translational silencing. These results provide new insights into the mechanism of ribosomal incorporation of L13a and will be useful in guiding future studies aimed at fully deciphering mammalian ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23689135

  19. Identification and characterization of a Dictyostelium discoideum ribosomal protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Szymkowski, D E; Deering, R A

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a developmentally repressed large-subunit ribosomal protein gene of Dictyostelium discoideum based on sequence similarity to other ribosomal proteins. Protein rpl7 is homologous to large subunit ribosomal proteins from the rat and possibly to Mycoplasma capricolum and Escherichia coli, but is not similar to three sequenced ribosomal proteins in Dictyostelium. The rpl7 gene is present at one copy per genome, as are six other cloned Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms exist for ribosomal protein genes rpl7, rp1024, and rp110 in strain HU182; most Dictyostelium ribosomal protein genes examined are linked no closer than 30-100 kb to each other in the genome. Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins are known to be developmentally regulated, and levels of rpl7 transcript gradually decrease during the 24-hour development cycle. This drop correlates with that of rp1024, indicating these and other ribosomal protein genes may be coordinately regulated. To determine the cellular location of the protein, we raised antibodies to an rpl7-derived branched synthetic peptide. These antibodies cross-reacted with one protein of the expected size in a ribosomal protein fraction of Dictyostelium, indicating that the product of gene rpl7 is localized in the ribosome. Images PMID:1975664

  20. Structural and functional analyses of a yeast mitochondrial ribosomal protein homologous to ribosomal protein S15 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H; Ellis, S R

    1990-01-01

    We have purified a small subunit mitochondrial ribosomal protein, MRPS28p, from the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sequence from the amino terminus of MRPS28p was used to design a degenerate oligonucleotide that was complementary to the MRPS28 gene. The MRPS28 gene was isolated and its sequence determined. The MRPS28 sequence encodes a 28 kDa protein that has a region of homology with ribosomal protein S15 of E. coli. This region spans the entire length of the E. coli protein, but as MRPS28p is larger, includes only the portion of the MRPS28p sequence from amino acids 150 to 238. Based on this homology, we predict that MRPS28p, like E. coli S15, interacts directly with small subunit rRNA and functions as an early protein in ribosome assembly. Cells carrying a disrupted chromosomal copy of MRPS28 are unable to respire and spontaneously lose portions of their mitochondrial genomes at a high frequency. These phenotypes are consistent with an essential role for MRPS28p in the assembly and/or function of the mitochondrial ribosome. Images PMID:2263452

  1. Mutational analysis of the ribosomal protein Rpl10 from yeast.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Anne; Bussiere, Cyril; Johnson, Arlen W

    2007-11-09

    Yeast Rpl10 belongs to the L10e family of ribosomal proteins. In the large (60 S) subunit, Rpl10 is positioned in a cleft between the central protuberance and the GTPase-activating center. It is loaded into the 60 S subunit at a late step in maturation. We have shown previously that Rpl10 is required for the release of the Crm1-dependent nuclear export adapter Nmd3, an event that also requires the cytoplasmic GTPase Lsg1. Here we have carried out an extensive mutational analysis of Rpl10 to identify mutations that would allow us to map activities to distinct domains of the protein to begin to understand the molecular interaction between Rpl10 and Nmd3. We found that mutations in a central loop (amino acids 102-112) had a significant impact on the release of Nmd3. This loop is unstructured in the crystal and solution structures of prokaryotic Rpl10 orthologs. Thus, the loop is not necessary for stable interaction of Rpl10 with the ribosome, suggesting that it plays a dynamic role in ribosome function or regulating the association of other factors. We also found that mutant Rpl10 proteins were engineered to be unable to bind to the ribosome accumulated in the nucleus. This was unexpected and may suggest a nuclear role for Rpl10.

  2. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  3. Potential extra-ribosomal functions of ribosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Zhu, Yi-Fei; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Rong; Jia, Zhengping

    2015-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs), are essential components of the ribosomes, the molecular machines that turn mRNA blueprints into proteins, as they serve to stabilize the structure of the rRNA, thus improving protein biosynthesis. In addition, growing evidence suggests that RPs can function in other cellular roles. In the present review, we summarize several potential extra-ribosomal functions of RPs in ribosomal biogenesis, transcription activity, translation process, DNA repair, replicative life span, adhesive growth, and morphological transformation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the future in-depth studies are needed to identify these novel secondary functions of RPs in S. cerevisiae.

  4. Stepwise splitting of ribosomal proteins from yeast ribosomes by LiCl.

    PubMed

    Piir, Kerli; Tamm, Tiina; Kisly, Ivan; Tammsalu, Triin; Remme, Jaanus

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies have revealed that the core of the ribosome structure is conserved among ribosomes of all kingdoms. Kingdom-specific ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) are located in peripheral parts of the ribosome. In this work, the interactions between rRNA and r-proteins of eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosome were investigated applying LiCl induced splitting and quantitative mass spectrometry. R-proteins were divided into four groups according to their binding properties to the rRNA. Most yeast r-proteins are removed from rRNA by 0.5-1 M LiCl. Eukaryote-specific r-proteins are among the first to dissociate. The majority of the strong binders are known to be required for the early ribosome assembly events. As compared to the bacterial ribosome, yeast r-proteins are dissociated from rRNA at lower ionic strength. Our results demonstrate that the nature of protein-RNA interactions in the ribosome is not conserved between different kingdoms.

  5. Antibiotic-induced ribosomal assembly defects result from changes in the synthesis of ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Siibak, Triinu; Peil, Lauri; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Tats, Age; Remm, Maido; Wilson, Daniel N; Tenson, Tanel; Remme, Jaanus

    2011-04-01

    Inhibitors of protein synthesis cause defects in the assembly of ribosomal subunits. In response to treatment with the antibiotics erythromycin or chloramphenicol, precursors of both large and small ribosomal subunits accumulate. We have used a pulse-labelling approach to demonstrate that the accumulating subribosomal particles maturate into functional 70S ribosomes. The protein content of the precursor particles is heterogeneous and does not correspond with known assembly intermediates. Mass spectrometry indicates that production of ribosomal proteins in the presence of the antibiotics correlates with the amounts of the individual ribosomal proteins within the precursor particles. Thus, treatment of cells with chloramphenicol or erythromycin leads to an unbalanced synthesis of ribosomal proteins, providing the explanation for formation of assembly-defective particles. The operons for ribosomal proteins show a characteristic pattern of antibiotic inhibition where synthesis of the first proteins is inhibited weakly but gradually increases for the subsequent proteins in the operon. This phenomenon most likely reflects translational coupling and allows us to identify other putative coupled non-ribosomal operons in the Escherichia coli chromosome. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 and uL22 of Escherichia coli contribute to ribosome assembly and protein translation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Marlon G; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Kondopaka, Maithri; Pascual, Clarence; Zengel, Janice M; Lindahl, Lasse

    2016-07-08

    Nearly half of ribosomal proteins are composed of a domain on the ribosome surface and a loop or extension that penetrates into the organelle's RNA core. Our previous work showed that ribosomes lacking the loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 or uL22 are still capable of entering polysomes. However, in those experiments we could not address the formation of mutant ribosomes, because we used strains that also expressed wild-type uL4 and uL22. Here, we have focused on ribosome assembly and function in strains in which loop deletion mutant genes are the ONLY: sources of uL4 or uL22 protein. The uL4 and uL22 loop deletions have different effects, but both mutations result in accumulation of immature particles that do not accumulate in detectable amounts in wild-type strains. Thus, our results suggest that deleting the loops creates kinetic barriers in the normal assembly pathway, possibly resulting in assembly via alternate pathway(s). Furthermore, deletion of the uL4 loop results in cold-sensitive ribosome assembly and function. Finally, ribosomes carrying either of the loop-deleted proteins responded normally to the secM translation pausing peptide, but the uL4 mutant responded very inefficiently to the cmlA(crb) pause peptide. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. β-Puromycin selection of modified ribosomes for in vitro incorporation of β-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Dedkova, Larisa M; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Paul, Rakesh; del Rosario, Melissa; Zhang, Liqiang; Chen, Shengxi; Feder, Glen; Hecht, Sidney M

    2012-01-10

    Ribosomally mediated protein biosynthesis is limited to α-L-amino acids. A strong bias against β-L-amino acids precludes their incorporation into proteins in vivo and also in vitro in the presence of misacylated β-aminoacyl-tRNAs. Nonetheless, earlier studies provide some evidence that analogues of aminoacyl-tRNAs bearing β-amino acids can be accommodated in the ribosomal A-site. Both functional and X-ray crystallographic data make it clear that the exclusion of β-L-amino acids as participants in protein synthesis is a consequence of the architecture of the ribosomal peptidyltransferase center (PTC). To enable the reorganization of ribosomal PTC architecture through mutagenesis of 23S rRNA, a library of modified ribosomes having modifications in two regions of the 23S rRNA (2057-2063 and 2496-2507 or 2582-2588) was prepared. A dual selection procedure was used to obtain a set of modified ribosomes able to carry out protein synthesis in the presence β-L-amino acids and to provide evidence for the utilization of such amino acids, in addition to α-L-amino acids. β-Puromycin, a putative mimetic for β-aminoacyl-tRNAs, was used to select modified ribosome variants having altered PTC architectures, thus potentially enabling incorporation of β-L-amino acids. Eight types of modified ribosomes altered within the PTC have been selected by monitoring improved sensitivity to β-puromycin in vivo. Two of the modified ribosomes, having 2057AGCGUGA2063 and 2502UGGCAG2507 or 2502AGCCAG2507, were able to suppress UAG codons in E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and scorpion Opisthorcanthus madagascariensis peptide IsCT mRNAs in the presence of β-alanyl-tRNA(CUA).

  8. Proteomic characterization of archaeal ribosomes reveals the presence of novel archaeal-specific ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Viter; Fröhlich, Thomas; Armache, Jean-Paul; Sohmen, Daniel; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Berninghausen, Otto; Thomm, Michael; Beckmann, Roland; Arnold, Georg J; Wilson, Daniel N

    2011-02-04

    Protein synthesis occurs in macromolecular particles called ribosomes. All ribosomes are composed of RNA and proteins. While the protein composition of bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes has been well-characterized, a systematic analysis of archaeal ribosomes has been lacking. Here we report the first comprehensive two-dimensional PAGE and mass spectrometry analysis of archaeal ribosomes isolated from the thermophilic Pyrobaculum aerophilum and the thermoacidophilic Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Crenarchaeota. Our analysis identified all 66 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of the P. aerophilum small and large subunits, as well as all but two (62 of 64; 97%) r-proteins of the S. acidocaldarius small and large subunits that are predicted genomically. Some r-proteins were identified with one or two lysine methylations and N-terminal acetylations. In addition, we identify three hypothetical proteins that appear to be bona fide r-proteins of the S. acidocaldarius large subunit. Dissociation of r-proteins from the S. acidocaldarius large subunit indicates that the novel r-proteins establish tighter interactions with the large subunit than some integral r-proteins. Furthermore, cryo electron microscopy reconstructions of the S. acidocaldarius and P. aerophilum 50S subunits allow for a tentative localization of the binding site of the novel r-proteins. This study illustrates not only the potential diversity of the archaeal ribosomes but also the necessity to experimentally analyze the archaeal ribosomes to ascertain their protein composition. The discovery of novel archaeal r-proteins and factors may be the first step to understanding how archaeal ribosomes cope with extreme environmental conditions.

  9. Sequestration of Ribosome during Protein Aggregate Formation: Contribution of ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Bani K.; Mondal, Surojit; Banerjee, Senjuti; Ghosh, Amar Nath; Barat, Chandana

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms underlying protein aggregation and cytotoxicity of the protein aggregates is crucial in the prevention of several diseases in humans. Ribosome, the cellular protein synthesis machine is capable of acting as a protein folding modulator. The peptidyltransferase center residing in the domain V of large ribosomal subunit 23S rRNA is the centre for the protein folding ability of the ribosome and is also the cellular target of several antiprion compounds. Our in vitro studies unexpectedly reveal that the partial unfolding or aggregation of lysozyme under reducing conditions in presence of the ribosome can induce aggregation of ribosomal components. Electrostatic interactions complemented by specific rRNA-protein interaction drive the ribosome-protein aggregation process. Under similar conditions the rRNA, especially the large subunit rRNA and in vitro transcribed RNA corresponding to domain V of 23S rRNA (bDV RNA) stimulates lysozyme aggregation leading to RNA-protein aggregate formation. Protein aggregation during the refolding of non-disulfide containing protein BCAII at high concentrations also induces ribosome aggregation. BCAII aggregation was also stimulated in presence of the large subunit rRNA. Our observations imply that the specific sequestration of the translation machine by aggregating proteins might contribute to their cytotoxicity. PMID:28169307

  10. Functional analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein Rpl3p in ribosome synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Iván V.; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis in eukaryotes requires a multitude of trans-acting factors. These factors act at many steps as the pre-ribosomal particles travel from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. In contrast to the well-studied trans-acting factors, little is known about the contribution of the ribosomal proteins to ribosome biogenesis. Herein, we have analysed the role of ribosomal protein Rpl3p in 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. In vivo depletion of Rpl3p results in a deficit in 60S ribosomal subunits and the appearance of half-mer polysomes. This phenotype is likely due to the instability of early and intermediate pre-ribosomal particles, as evidenced by the low steady-state levels of 27SA3, 27SBS and 7SL/S precursors. Furthermore, depletion of Rpl3p impairs the nucleocytoplasmic export of pre-60S ribosomal particles. Interestingly, flow cytometry analysis indicates that Rpl3p-depleted cells arrest in the G1 phase. Altogether, we suggest that upon depletion of Rpl3p, early assembly of 60S ribosomal subunits is aborted and subsequent steps during their maturation and export prevented. PMID:17569673

  11. Convergent evolution led ribosome inactivating proteins to interact with ribosomal stalk.

    PubMed

    Lapadula, Walter J; Sanchez-Puerta, M Virginia; Ayub, Maximiliano Juri

    2012-03-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) inhibit protein synthesis by depurinating an adenine on the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL) of the large subunit ribosomal RNA. Several RIPs interact with the C-terminal end of ribosomal stalk P proteins, and this interaction is required for their full activity. In contrast, the activity of Pokeweed Antiviral Protein is not affected by blocking this stalk component. Here, we provide evidence from phylogenetic analyses and sequence alignments suggesting that the interaction with the C-terminal end of P proteins evolved independently in different RIPs by convergent evolution.

  12. Complete amino acid sequence of luffin-b, a ribosome-inactivating protein from sponge gourd (Luffa cylindrica) seeds.

    PubMed

    Islam, M R; Hirayama, H; Funatsu, G

    1991-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of luffin-b has been determined. All the twenty-seven tryptic peptides were isolated by reverse-phase HPLC from the tryptic digests of intact luffin-b and one of its CNBr fragments (CB4), and sequenced using the DABITC/PITC double coupling method. The overlap of these peptides was achieved by analyzing the CNBr fragments and their chymotryptic peptides. Luffin-b consists of 250 amino acid residues with a relative molecular mass of 27,275 Da. Investigation for glycosylation sites indicated that Asn at positions 2, 78, and 85 might carry sugars. Sequence comparison with luffin-a showed that amino acid substitution occurred in 55 positions. Luffin-b contains three glycosylation sites instead of the six sites in luffin-a, of which two were found to be conserved.

  13. Ribosomal History Reveals Origins of Modern Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world. PMID:22427882

  14. Ribosomal history reveals origins of modern protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world.

  15. Ribosome-Inactivating and Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schrot, Joachim; Weng, Alexander; Melzig, Matthias F.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are toxins that act as N-glycosidases (EC 3.2.2.22). They are mainly produced by plants and classified as type 1 RIPs and type 2 RIPs. There are also RIPs and RIP related proteins that cannot be grouped into the classical type 1 and type 2 RIPs because of their different sizes, structures or functions. In addition, there is still not a uniform nomenclature or classification existing for RIPs. In this review, we give the current status of all known plant RIPs and we make a suggestion about how to unify those RIPs and RIP related proteins that cannot be classified as type 1 or type 2 RIPs. PMID:26008228

  16. Reductive alkylation of ribosomes as a probe to the topography of ribosomal proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Graham; Crichton, Robert R.

    1974-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomes were treated with a number of different aldehydes of various sizes in the presence of NaBH4. After incorporation of either 3H or 14C, the ribosomal proteins were separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and the extent of alkylation of the lysine residues in each protein was measured. The same pattern of alkylation was observed with the four reagents used, namely formaldehyde, acetone, benzaldehyde and 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde. Every protein in 30S and 50S subunits was modified, although there was considerable variation in the degree of alkylation of individual proteins. A topographical classification of ribosomal proteins is presented, based on the degree of exposure of lysine residues. The data indicate that every protein of the ribosome has at least one lysine residue exposed at or near the surface of the ribonucleo-protein complex. PMID:4462744

  17. On the Ribosomal Density that Maximizes Protein Translation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2016-01-01

    During mRNA translation, several ribosomes attach to the same mRNA molecule simultaneously translating it into a protein. This pipelining increases the protein translation rate. A natural and important question is what ribosomal density maximizes the protein translation rate. Using mathematical models of ribosome flow along both a linear and a circular mRNA molecules we prove that typically the steady-state protein translation rate is maximized when the ribosomal density is one half of the maximal possible density. We discuss the implications of our results to endogenous genes under natural cellular conditions and also to synthetic biology. PMID:27861564

  18. Ribosome Inactivating Proteins from an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Lapadula, Walter Jesús; Ayub, Maximiliano Juri

    2017-09-15

    Ribosome Inactivating Proteins (RIPs) are rRNA N-glycosidases that inhibit protein synthesis through the elimination of a single adenine residue from 28S rRNA. Many of these toxins have been characterized in depth from a biochemical and molecular point of view. In addition, their potential use in medicine as highly selective toxins is being explored. In contrast, the evolutionary history of RIP encoding genes has remained traditionally underexplored. In recent years, accumulation of large genomic data has fueled research on this issue and revealed unexpected information about the origin and evolution of RIP toxins. In this review we summarize the current evidence available on the occurrence of different evolutionary mechanisms (gene duplication and losses, horizontal gene transfer, synthesis de novo and domain combination) involved in the evolution of the RIP gene family. Finally, we propose a revised nomenclature for RIP genes based on their evolutionary history. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal protein L26 is not essential for ribosome assembly and function.

    PubMed

    Babiano, Reyes; Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2012-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. Here, we study the evolutionarily conserved L26 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which assembles into pre-60S ribosomal particles in the nucle(ol)us. Yeast L26 is one of the many ribosomal proteins encoded by two functional genes. We have disrupted both genes; surprisingly, the growth of the resulting rpl26 null mutant is apparently identical to that of the isogenic wild-type strain. The absence of L26 minimally alters 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Polysome analysis revealed the appearance of half-mers. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing indicated that L26 is mainly required to optimize 27S pre-rRNA maturation, without which the release of pre-60S particles from the nucle(ol)us is partially impaired. Ribosomes lacking L26 exhibit differential reactivity to dimethylsulfate in domain I of 25S/5.8S rRNAs but apparently are able to support translation in vivo with wild-type accuracy. The bacterial homologue of yeast L26, L24, is a primary rRNA binding protein required for 50S ribosomal subunit assembly in vitro and in vivo. Our results underscore potential differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosome assembly. We discuss the reasons why yeast L26 plays such an apparently nonessential role in the cell.

  20. The Leishmania infantum acidic ribosomal protein P0 administered as a DNA vaccine confers protective immunity to Leishmania major infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Iborra, Salvador; Soto, Manuel; Carrión, Javier; Nieto, Ana; Fernández, Edgar; Alonso, Carlos; Requena, Jose M

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we examined the immunogenic properties of the Leishmania infantum acidic ribosomal protein P0 (LiP0) in the BALB/c mouse model. The humoral and cellular responses induced by the administration of the LiP0 antigen, either as soluble recombinant LiP0 (rLiP0) or as a plasmid DNA formulation (pcDNA3-LiP0), were determined. Also, the immunological response associated with a prime-boost strategy, consisting of immunization with pcDNA3-LiP0 followed by a boost with rLiP0, was assayed. Immunization with rLiP0 induced a predominant Th2-like humoral response, but no anti-LiP0 antibodies were induced after immunization with pcDNA3-LiP0, whereas a strong humoral response consisting of a mixed immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a)-IgG1 isotype profile was induced in mice immunized with the prime-boost regime. For all three immunization protocols, rLiP0-stimulated production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in both splenocytes and lymph node cells from immunized mice was observed. However, it was only when mice were immunized with pcDNA3-LiP0 that noticeable protection against L. major infection was achieved, as determined by both lesion development and parasite burden. Immunization of mice with LiP0-DNA primes both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, which, with the L. major challenge, were boosted to produce significant levels of IL-12-dependent, antigen-specific IFN-gamma. Taken together, these data indicate that genetic vaccination with LiP0 induces protective immunological effector mechanisms, yet the immunological response elicited by LiP0 is not sufficient to keep the infection from progressing.

  1. Assembly of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal stalk: binding of P1 proteins is required for the interaction of P2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Zurdo, J; Parada, P; van den Berg, A; Nusspaumer, G; Jimenez-Diaz, A; Remacha, M; Ballesta, J P

    2000-08-01

    The yeast ribosomal stalk is formed by a protein pentamer made of the 38 kDa P0 and four 12 kDa acidic P1/P2. The interaction of recombinant acidic proteins P1 alpha and P2 beta with ribosomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae D4567, lacking all the 12 kDa stalk components, has been used to study the in vitro assembly of this important ribosomal structure. Stimulation of the ribosome activity was obtained by incubating simultaneously the particles with both proteins, which were nonphosphorylated initially and remained unmodified afterward. The N-terminus state, free or blocked, did not affect either the binding or reactivating activity of both proteins. Independent incubation with each protein did not affect the activity of the particles, however, protein P2 beta alone was unable to bind the ribosome whereas P1 alpha could. The binding of P1 alpha alone is a saturable process in acidic-protein-deficient ribosomes and does not take place in complete wild-type particles. Binding of P1 proteins in the absence of P2 proteins takes also place in vivo, when protein P1 beta is overexpressed in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, protein P2 beta is not detected in the ribosome in the P1-deficient D67 strain despite being accumulated in the cytoplasm. The results confirm that neither phosphorylation nor N-terminal blocking of the 12 kDa acidic proteins is required for the assembly and function of the yeast stalk. More importantly, and regardless of the involvement of other elements, they indicate that stalk assembling is a coordinated process, in which P1 proteins would provide a ribosomal anchorage to P2 proteins, and P2 components would confer functionality to the complex.

  2. Direct Interaction of the N-Terminal Domain of Ribosomal Protein S1 with Protein S2 in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Manoharadas, Salim; Kaberdina, Anna C.; Vesper, Oliver; Moll, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the high resolution structure available for the E. coli ribosome, hitherto the structure and localization of the essential ribosomal protein S1 on the 30 S subunit still remains to be elucidated. It was previously reported that protein S1 binds to the ribosome via protein-protein interaction at the two N-terminal domains. Moreover, protein S2 was shown to be required for binding of protein S1 to the ribosome. Here, we present evidence that the N-terminal domain of S1 (amino acids 1–106; S1106) is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with protein S2 as well as for ribosome binding. We show that over production of protein S1106 affects E. coli growth by displacing native protein S1 from its binding pocket on the ribosome. In addition, our data reveal that the coiled-coil domain of protein S2 (S2α2) is sufficient to allow protein S1 to bind to the ribosome. Taken together, these data uncover the crucial elements required for the S1/S2 interaction, which is pivotal for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs in Gram-negative bacteria. The results are discussed in terms of a model wherein the S1/S2 interaction surface could represent a possible target to modulate the selectivity of the translational machinery and thereby alter the translational program under distinct conditions. PMID:22412910

  3. Functions of Ribosomal Proteins in Assembly of Eukaryotic Ribosomes In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79–80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type–specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth. PMID:25706898

  4. Functions of ribosomal proteins in assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Jesús; Karbstein, Katrin; Woolford, John L

    2015-01-01

    The proteome of cells is synthesized by ribosomes, complex ribonucleoproteins that in eukaryotes contain 79-80 proteins and four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) more than 5,400 nucleotides long. How these molecules assemble together and how their assembly is regulated in concert with the growth and proliferation of cells remain important unanswered questions. Here, we review recently emerging principles to understand how eukaryotic ribosomal proteins drive ribosome assembly in vivo. Most ribosomal proteins assemble with rRNA cotranscriptionally; their association with nascent particles is strengthened as assembly proceeds. Each subunit is assembled hierarchically by sequential stabilization of their subdomains. The active sites of both subunits are constructed last, perhaps to prevent premature engagement of immature ribosomes with active subunits. Late-assembly intermediates undergo quality-control checks for proper function. Mutations in ribosomal proteins that affect mostly late steps lead to ribosomopathies, diseases that include a spectrum of cell type-specific disorders that often transition from hypoproliferative to hyperproliferative growth.

  5. Role of ribosomal protein mutations in tumor development (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GOUDARZI, KAVEH M.; LINDSTRÖM, MIKAEL S.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomes are cellular machines essential for protein synthesis. The biogenesis of ribosomes is a highly complex and energy consuming process that initiates in the nucleolus. Recently, a series of studies applying whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of ribosomal protein gene mutations in different cancer types. Mutations in ribosomal protein genes have for example been found in endometrial cancer (RPL22), T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (RPL10, RPL5 and RPL11), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RPS15), colorectal cancer (RPS20), and glioma (RPL5). Moreover, patients suffering from Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutant ribosomal proteins are also at higher risk for developing leukemia, or solid tumors. Different experimental models indicate potential mechanisms whereby ribosomal proteins may initiate cancer development. In particular, deregulation of the p53 tumor suppressor network and altered mRNA translation are mechanisms likely to be involved. We envisage that changes in expression and the occurrence of ribosomal protein gene mutations play important roles in cancer development. Ribosome biology constitutes a re-emerging vital area of basic and translational cancer research. PMID:26892688

  6. Ribosomal proteins: toward a next generation standard for prokaryotic systematics?

    PubMed

    Ramulu, Hemalatha Golaconda; Groussin, Mathieu; Talla, Emmanuel; Planel, Remi; Daubin, Vincent; Brochier-Armanet, Céline

    2014-06-01

    The seminal work of Carl Woese and co-workers has contributed to promote the RNA component of the small subunit of the ribosome (SSU rRNA) as a "gold standard" of modern prokaryotic taxonomy and systematics, and an essential tool to explore microbial diversity. Yet, this marker has a limited resolving power, especially at deep phylogenetic depth and can lead to strongly biased trees. The ever-larger number of available complete genomes now calls for a novel standard dataset of robust protein markers that may complement SSU rRNA. In this respect, concatenation of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) is being growingly used to reconstruct large-scale prokaryotic phylogenies, but their suitability for systematic and/or taxonomic purposes has not been specifically addressed. Using Proteobacteria as a case study, we show that amino acid and nucleic acid r-protein sequences contain a reliable phylogenetic signal at a wide range of taxonomic depths, which has not been totally blurred by mutational saturation or horizontal gene transfer. The use of accurate evolutionary models and reconstruction methods allows overcoming most tree reconstruction artefacts resulting from compositional biases and/or fast evolutionary rates. The inferred phylogenies allow clarifying the relationships among most proteobacterial orders and families, along with the position of several unclassified lineages, suggesting some possible revisions of the current classification. In addition, we investigate the root of the Proteobacteria by considering the time-variation of nucleic acid composition of r-protein sequences and the information carried by horizontal gene transfers, two approaches that do not require the use of an outgroup and limit tree reconstruction artefacts. Altogether, our analyses indicate that r-proteins may represent a promising standard for prokaryotic taxonomy and systematics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers—termed here escortins—to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03473.001 PMID:25144938

  8. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-08-21

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers-termed here escortins-to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. Copyright © 2014, Schütz et al.

  9. Ribosome recycling: An essential process of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Michael C; Kaji, Hideko; Kaji, Akira

    2007-01-01

    A preponderance of textbooks outlines cellular protein synthesis (translation) in three basic steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. However, researchers in the field of translation accept that a vital fourth step exists; this fourth step is called ribosome recycling. Ribosome recycling occurs after the nascent polypeptide has been released during the termination step. Despite the release of the polypeptide, ribosomes remain bound to the mRNA and tRNA. It is only during the fourth step of translation that ribosomes are ultimately released from the mRNA, split into subunits, and are free to bind new mRNA, thus the term "ribosome recycling." This step is essential to the viability of cells. In bacteria, it is catalyzed by two proteins, elongation factor G and ribosome recycling factor, a near perfect structural mimic of tRNA. Eukaryotic organelles such as mitochondria and chloroplasts possess ribosome recycling factor and elongation factor G homologues, but the nature of ribosome recycling in eukaryotic cytoplasm is still under investigation. In this review, the discovery of ribosome recycling and the basic mechanisms involved are discussed so that textbook writers and teachers can include this vital step, which is just as important as the three conventional steps, in sections dealing with protein synthesis.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of ribosomal protein gene coregulation

    PubMed Central

    Reja, Rohit; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Ghosh, Sujana; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The 137 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) of Saccharomyces provide a model for gene coregulation. We examined the positional and functional organization of their regulators (Rap1 [repressor activator protein 1], Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1), the transcription machinery (TFIIB, TFIID, and RNA polymerase II), and chromatin at near-base-pair resolution using ChIP-exo, as RPGs are coordinately reprogrammed. Where Hmo1 is enriched, Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1 cross-linked broadly to promoter DNA in an RPG-specific manner and demarcated by general minor groove widening. Importantly, Hmo1 extended 20–50 base pairs (bp) downstream from Fhl1. Upon RPG repression, Fhl1 remained in place. Hmo1 dissociated, which was coupled to an upstream shift of the +1 nucleosome, as reflected by the Hmo1 extension and core promoter region. Fhl1 and Hmo1 may create two regulatable and positionally distinct barriers, against which chromatin remodelers position the +1 nucleosome into either an activating or a repressive state. Consistent with in vitro studies, we found that specific TFIID subunits, in addition to cross-linking at the core promoter, made precise cross-links at Rap1 sites, which we interpret to reflect native Rap1–TFIID interactions. Our findings suggest how sequence-specific DNA binding regulates nucleosome positioning and transcription complex assembly >300 bp away and how coregulation coevolved with coding sequences. PMID:26385964

  11. Molecular mechanisms of ribosomal protein gene coregulation.

    PubMed

    Reja, Rohit; Vinayachandran, Vinesh; Ghosh, Sujana; Pugh, B Franklin

    2015-09-15

    The 137 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) of Saccharomyces provide a model for gene coregulation. We examined the positional and functional organization of their regulators (Rap1 [repressor activator protein 1], Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1), the transcription machinery (TFIIB, TFIID, and RNA polymerase II), and chromatin at near-base-pair resolution using ChIP-exo, as RPGs are coordinately reprogrammed. Where Hmo1 is enriched, Fhl1, Ifh1, Sfp1, and Hmo1 cross-linked broadly to promoter DNA in an RPG-specific manner and demarcated by general minor groove widening. Importantly, Hmo1 extended 20-50 base pairs (bp) downstream from Fhl1. Upon RPG repression, Fhl1 remained in place. Hmo1 dissociated, which was coupled to an upstream shift of the +1 nucleosome, as reflected by the Hmo1 extension and core promoter region. Fhl1 and Hmo1 may create two regulatable and positionally distinct barriers, against which chromatin remodelers position the +1 nucleosome into either an activating or a repressive state. Consistent with in vitro studies, we found that specific TFIID subunits, in addition to cross-linking at the core promoter, made precise cross-links at Rap1 sites, which we interpret to reflect native Rap1-TFIID interactions. Our findings suggest how sequence-specific DNA binding regulates nucleosome positioning and transcription complex assembly >300 bp away and how coregulation coevolved with coding sequences. © 2015 Reja et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Ribosomal vaccines. I. Immunogenicity of ribosomal fractions isolated from Salmonella typhimurium and Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W

    1972-06-01

    The immunogenicity of ribosomes and ribosomal subfractions isolated from Yersina pestis and Salmonella typhimurium has been studied. Ribosomes and ribosomal protein isolated from S. typhimurium protected mice against lethal challenge. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid isolated by phenol extraction failed to induce any significant level of protection in mice. None of the ribosomes or ribosomal subfractions isolated from Y. pestis were effective in inducing immunity to lethal challenge. These results suggest that the immunogen of the ribosomal vaccine is protein.

  13. Prefabrication of a ribosomal protein subcomplex essential for eukaryotic ribosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Cohue; Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Chang, Yiming; Panse, Vikram G

    2016-01-01

    Spatial clustering of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) through tertiary interactions is a striking structural feature of the eukaryotic ribosome. However, the functional importance of these intricate inter-connections, and how they are established is currently unclear. Here, we reveal that a conserved ATPase, Fap7, organizes interactions between neighboring r-proteins uS11 and eS26 prior to their delivery to the earliest ribosome precursor, the 90S. In vitro, uS11 only when bound to Fap7 becomes competent to recruit eS26 through tertiary contacts found between these r-proteins on the mature ribosome. Subsequently, Fap7 ATPase activity unloads the uS11:eS26 subcomplex onto its rRNA binding site, and therefore ensures stoichiometric integration of these r-proteins into the 90S. Fap7-depletion in vivo renders uS11 susceptible to proteolysis, and precludes eS26 incorporation into the 90S. Thus, prefabrication of a native-like r-protein subcomplex drives efficient and accurate construction of the eukaryotic ribosome. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21755.001 PMID:27929371

  14. Large Ribosomal Protein 4 Increases Efficiency of Viral Recoding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Green, Lisa; Houck-Loomis, Brian; Yueh, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Expression of retroviral replication enzymes (Pol) requires a controlled translational recoding event to bypass the stop codon at the end of gag. This recoding event occurs either by direct suppression of termination via the insertion of an amino acid at the stop codon (readthrough) or by alteration of the mRNA reading frame (frameshift). Here we report the effects of a host protein, large ribosomal protein 4 (RPL4), on the efficiency of recoding. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay, we found that transfection of cells with a plasmid encoding RPL4 cDNA increases recoding efficiency in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal enhancement of nearly twofold. Expression of RPL4 increases recoding of reporters containing retroviral readthrough and frameshift sequences, as well as the Sindbis virus leaky termination signal. RPL4-induced enhancement of recoding is cell line specific and appears to be specific to RPL4 among ribosomal proteins. Cotransfection of RPL4 cDNA with Moloney murine leukemia proviral DNA results in Gag processing defects and a reduction of viral particle formation, presumably caused by the RPL4-dependent alteration of the Gag-to-Gag-Pol ratio required for virion assembly and release. PMID:22718819

  15. Cotranslational Protein Folding inside the Ribosome Exit Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Ola B; Hedman, Rickard; Marino, Jacopo; Wickles, Stephan; Bischoff, Lukas; Johansson, Magnus; Müller-Lucks, Annika; Trovato, Fabio; Puglisi, Joseph D; O'Brien, Edward P; Beckmann, Roland; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2015-09-08

    At what point during translation do proteins fold? It is well established that proteins can fold cotranslationally outside the ribosome exit tunnel, whereas studies of folding inside the exit tunnel have so far detected only the formation of helical secondary structure and collapsed or partially structured folding intermediates. Here, using a combination of cotranslational nascent chain force measurements, inter-subunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on single translating ribosomes, molecular dynamics simulations, and cryoelectron microscopy, we show that a small zinc-finger domain protein can fold deep inside the vestibule of the ribosome exit tunnel. Thus, for small protein domains, the ribosome itself can provide the kind of sheltered folding environment that chaperones provide for larger proteins. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cotranslational Protein Folding inside the Ribosome Exit Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ola B.; Hedman, Rickard; Marino, Jacopo; Wickles, Stephan; Bischoff, Lukas; Johansson, Magnus; Müller-Lucks, Annika; Trovato, Fabio; Puglisi, Joseph D.; O’Brien, Edward P.; Beckmann, Roland; von Heijne, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Summary At what point during translation do proteins fold? It is well established that proteins can fold cotranslationally outside the ribosome exit tunnel, whereas studies of folding inside the exit tunnel have so far detected only the formation of helical secondary structure and collapsed or partially structured folding intermediates. Here, using a combination of cotranslational nascent chain force measurements, inter-subunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on single translating ribosomes, molecular dynamics simulations, and cryoelectron microscopy, we show that a small zinc-finger domain protein can fold deep inside the vestibule of the ribosome exit tunnel. Thus, for small protein domains, the ribosome itself can provide the kind of sheltered folding environment that chaperones provide for larger proteins. PMID:26321634

  17. Functional dichotomy of ribosomal proteins during the synthesis of mammalian 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Choesmel, Valérie; Faubladier, Marlène; Fichant, Gwennaële; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2010-09-06

    Our knowledge of the functions of metazoan ribosomal proteins in ribosome synthesis remains fragmentary. Using siRNAs, we show that knockdown of 31 of the 32 ribosomal proteins of the human 40S subunit (ribosomal protein of the small subunit [RPS]) strongly affects pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing, which often correlates with nucleolar chromatin disorganization. 16 RPSs are strictly required for initiating processing of the sequences flanking the 18S rRNA in the pre-rRNA except at the metazoan-specific early cleavage site. The remaining 16 proteins are necessary for progression of the nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation steps and for nuclear export. Distribution of these two subsets of RPSs in the 40S subunit structure argues for a tight dependence of pre-rRNA processing initiation on the folding of both the body and the head of the forming subunit. Interestingly, the functional dichotomy of RPS proteins reported in this study is correlated with the mutation frequency of RPS genes in Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

  18. In vivo assembling of bacterial ribosomal protein L11 into yeast ribosomes makes the particles sensitive to the prokaryotic specific antibiotic thiostrepton.

    PubMed

    García-Marcos, Alberto; Morreale, Antonio; Guarinos, Esther; Briones, Elisa; Remacha, Miguel; Ortiz, Angel R; Ballesta, Juan P G

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomal stalk protein L12 and its bacterial orthologue L11 play a central role on ribosomal conformational changes during translocation. Deletion of the two genes encoding L12 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in a very slow-growth phenotype. Gene RPL12B, but not the RPL12A, cloned in centromeric plasmids fully restored control protein level and the growth rate when expressed in a L12-deprived strain. The same strain has been transformed to express Escherichia coli protein EcL11 under the control of yeast RPL12B promoter. The bacterial protein has been found in similar amounts in washed ribosomes from the transformed yeast strain and from control E. coli cells, however, EcL11 was unable to restore the defective acidic protein stalk composition caused by the absence of ScL12 in the yeast ribosome. Protein EcL11 induced a 10% increase in L12-defective cell growth rate, although the in vitro polymerizing capacity of the EcL11-containing ribosomes is restored in a higher proportion, and, moreover, the particles became partially sensitive to the prokaryotic specific antibiotic thiostrepton. Molecular dynamic simulations using modelled complexes support the correct assembly of bacterial L11 into the yeast ribosome and confirm its direct implication of its CTD in the binding of thiostrepton to ribosomes.

  19. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  20. Disassembly of yeast 80S ribosomes into subunits is a concerted action of ribosome-assisted folding of denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-22

    It has been shown by several groups that ribosome can assist folding of denatured protein in vitro and the process is conserved across the species. Domain V of large ribosomal rRNA which occupies the intersubunit side of the large subunit was identified as the key player responsible for chaperoning the folding process. Thus, it is conceivable that denatured protein needs to access the intersubunit space of the ribosome in order to get folded. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of release of the protein from the eukaryotic ribosome following reactivation. We have observed significant splitting of yeast 80S ribosome when incubated with the denatured BCAII protein. Energy-free disassembly mechanism functions in low Mg(+2) ion concentration for prokaryotic ribosomes. Eukaryotic ribosomes do not show significant splitting even at low Mg(+2) ion concentration. In this respect, denatured protein-induced disassembly of eukaryotic ribosome without the involvement of any external energy source is intriguing. For prokaryotic ribosomes, it was reported that the denatured protein induces ribosome splitting into subunits in order to access domain V-rRNA. In contrast, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA-mediated protein folding and subsequent separation of the subunits by which release of the activated-protein occurs.

  1. Characteristics and clustering of human ribosomal protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kyota; Washio, Takanori; Uechi, Tamayo; Yoshihama, Maki; Kenmochi, Naoya; Tomita, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    Background The ribosome is a central player in the translation system, which in mammals consists of four RNA species and 79 ribosomal proteins (RPs). The control mechanisms of gene expression and the functions of RPs are believed to be identical. Most RP genes have common promoters and were therefore assumed to have a unified gene expression control mechanism. Results We systematically analyzed the homogeneity and heterogeneity of RP genes on the basis of their expression profiles, promoter structures, encoded amino acid compositions, and codon compositions. The results revealed that (1) most RP genes are coordinately expressed at the mRNA level, with higher signals in the spleen, lymph node dissection (LND), and fetal brain. However, 17 genes, including the P protein genes (RPLP0, RPLP1, RPLP2), are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. (2) Most promoters have GC boxes and possible binding sites for nuclear respiratory factor 2, Yin and Yang 1, and/or activator protein 1. However, they do not have canonical TATA boxes. (3) Analysis of the amino acid composition of the encoded proteins indicated a high lysine and arginine content. (4) The major RP genes exhibit a characteristic synonymous codon composition with high rates of G or C in the third-codon position and a high content of AAG, CAG, ATC, GAG, CAC, and CTG. Conclusion Eleven of the RP genes are still identified as being unique and did not exhibit at least some of the above characteristics, indicating that they may have unknown functions not present in other RP genes. Furthermore, we found sequences conserved between human and mouse genes around the transcription start sites and in the intronic regions. This study suggests certain overall trends and characteristic features of human RP genes. PMID:16504170

  2. Comprehensive Analysis of Phosphorylated Proteins of E. coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Soung, George Y.; Miller, Jennifer L.; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in twenty-four E. coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Specific detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr, or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and the loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given site of the phosphorylation in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins. PMID:19469554

  3. Comprehensive analysis of phosphorylated proteins of Escherichia coli ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Soung, George Y; Miller, Jennifer L; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C

    2009-07-01

    Phosphorylation of bacterial ribosomal proteins has been known for decades; however, there is still very limited information available on specific locations of the phosphorylation sites in ribosomal proteins and the role they might play in protein synthesis. In this study, we have mapped the specific phosphorylation sites in 24 Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins by tandem mass spectrometry. Detection of phosphorylation was achieved by either phosphorylation specific visualization techniques, ProQ staining, and antibodies for phospho-Ser, Thr, and Tyr; or by mass spectrometry equipped with a capability to detect addition and loss of the phosphate moiety. Enrichment by immobilized metal affinity and/or strong cation exchange chromatography was used to improve the success of detection of the low abundance phosphopeptides. We found the small subunit (30S) proteins S3, S4, S5, S7, S11, S12, S13, S18, and S21 and the large subunit (50S) proteins L1, L2, L3, L5, L6, L7/L12, L13, L14, L16, L18, L19, L21, L22, L28, and L31 to be phosphorylated at one or more residues. Potential roles for each specific site in ribosome function were deduced through careful evaluation of the given phosphorylation sites in 3D-crystal structure models of ribosomes and the previous mutational studies of E. coli ribosomal proteins.

  4. Structural basis for the interaction of protein S1 with the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Arenz, Stefan; Coudevylle, Nicolas; Temmel, Hannes; Wilson, Daniel N; Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Moll, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the multi-domain protein S1 is essential for translation initiation, as it recruits the mRNA and facilitates its localization in the decoding centre. In sharp contrast to its functional importance, S1 is still lacking from the high-resolution structures available for Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus ribosomes and thus the molecular mechanism governing the S1-ribosome interaction has still remained elusive. Here, we present the structure of the N-terminal S1 domain D1 when bound to the ribosome at atomic resolution by using a combination of NMR, X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Together with biochemical assays, the structure reveals that S1 is anchored to the ribosome primarily via a stabilizing π-stacking interaction within the short but conserved N-terminal segment that is flexibly connected to domain D1. This interaction is further stabilized by salt bridges involving the zinc binding pocket of protein S2. Overall, this work provides one hitherto enigmatic piece in the 'ribosome puzzle', namely the detailed molecular insight into the topology of the S1-ribosome interface. Moreover, our data suggest novel mechanisms that have the potential to modulate protein synthesis in response to environmental cues by changing the affinity of S1 for the ribosome. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Functional Interaction between Ribosomal Protein L6 and RbgA during Ribosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joseph H.; Williamson, James R.; Britton, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    RbgA is an essential GTPase that participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis and its homologs are implicated in mitochondrial and eukaryotic large subunit assembly. How RbgA functions in this process is still poorly understood. To gain insight into the function of RbgA we isolated suppressor mutations that partially restored the growth of an RbgA mutation (RbgA-F6A) that caused a severe growth defect. Analysis of these suppressors identified mutations in rplF, encoding ribosomal protein L6. The suppressor strains all accumulated a novel ribosome intermediate that migrates at 44S in sucrose gradients. All of the mutations cluster in a region of L6 that is in close contact with helix 97 of the 23S rRNA. In vitro maturation assays indicate that the L6 substitutions allow the defective RbgA-F6A protein to function more effectively in ribosome maturation. Our results suggest that RbgA functions to properly position L6 on the ribosome, prior to the incorporation of L16 and other late assembly proteins. PMID:25330043

  6. Ribosome biogenesis; the KsgA protein throws a methyl-mediated switch in ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Chand S; Brown, Eric D

    2008-12-01

    Many trans-acting factors that aid in ribosome biogenesis have been identified in higher organisms but relatively few such factors are known in prokaryotes. In bacteria, the list of such factors includes ATP-energized helicases and chaperones as well as an emerging cadre of switch GTPases. The KsgA protein is a universally conserved methyltransferase that dimethylates both A1518 and A1519 of the 16S rRNA of the small ribosomal subunit. Methylation has long been thought to be solely for fine-tuning of protein translation. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Connolly et al. present data suggesting KsgA might function in the assembly of the small subunit of the ribosome. Indeed, the work indicates that KsgA might have a checkpoint role in ribosome biogenesis where methylation by this protein marks the completion of its assembly role. These findings open our thinking to new candidate assembly factors and provide a new direction for understanding ribosome assembly.

  7. Functional interaction between ribosomal protein L6 and RbgA during ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Megha; Jain, Nikhil; Davis, Joseph H; Williamson, James R; Britton, Robert A

    2014-10-01

    RbgA is an essential GTPase that participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit in Bacillus subtilis and its homologs are implicated in mitochondrial and eukaryotic large subunit assembly. How RbgA functions in this process is still poorly understood. To gain insight into the function of RbgA we isolated suppressor mutations that partially restored the growth of an RbgA mutation (RbgA-F6A) that caused a severe growth defect. Analysis of these suppressors identified mutations in rplF, encoding ribosomal protein L6. The suppressor strains all accumulated a novel ribosome intermediate that migrates at 44S in sucrose gradients. All of the mutations cluster in a region of L6 that is in close contact with helix 97 of the 23S rRNA. In vitro maturation assays indicate that the L6 substitutions allow the defective RbgA-F6A protein to function more effectively in ribosome maturation. Our results suggest that RbgA functions to properly position L6 on the ribosome, prior to the incorporation of L16 and other late assembly proteins.

  8. Ribosome-inactivating proteins from plant cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, L; Bolognesi, A; Cenini, P; Falasca, A I; Minghetti, A; Garofano, L; Guicciardi, A; Lappi, D; Miller, S P; Stirpe, F

    1989-01-01

    1. Ribosome-inactivating proteins were found in high amounts in one line of cells of Phytolacca americana (pokeweed) cultured in vitro and, in less quantity, in lines of Saponaria officinalis (soapwort) and of Zea mays (corn) cells. 2. The main ribosome-inactivating protein from pokeweed cells was purified to homogeneity. It is a protein with Mr 29,000 and basic pI, similar to the 'pokeweed antiviral protein' (PAP), a ribosome-inactivating protein from pokeweed leaves. We propose to call the pokeweed antiviral protein isolated from pokeweed cells PAP-C. 3. PAP-C inactivates ribosomes in a less-than-equimolar ratio, thus inhibiting protein synthesis by a rabbit reticulocyte lysate with an IC50 (concentration causing 50% inhibition) of 0.067 nM (2 ng/ml), and modifies rRNA in a manner apparently identical to that of ricin and other ribosome-inactivating proteins. It inhibits protein synthesis by intact cells with an IC50 of 0.7-3.4 microM, and is toxic to mice with an LD50 of 0.95 mg/kg. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2930487

  9. Structures of Eukaryotic Ribosomal Stalk Proteins and Its Complex with Trichosanthin, and Their Implications in Recruiting Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins to the Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Andrew K. H.; Wong, Eddie C. K.; Lee, Ka-Ming; Wong, Kam-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) are RNA N-glycosidases that inactivate ribosomes by specifically depurinating a conserved adenine residue at the α-sarcin/ricin loop of 28S rRNA. Recent studies have pointed to the involvement of the C-terminal domain of the eukaryotic stalk proteins in facilitating the toxic action of RIPs. This review highlights how structural studies of eukaryotic stalk proteins provide insights into the recruitment of RIPs to the ribosomes. Since the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic stalk proteins is involved in specific recognition of elongation factors and some eukaryote-specific RIPs (e.g., trichosanthin and ricin), we postulate that these RIPs may have evolved to hijack the translation-factor-recruiting function of ribosomal stalk in reaching their target site of rRNA. PMID:25723321

  10. Structures of eukaryotic ribosomal stalk proteins and its complex with trichosanthin, and their implications in recruiting ribosome-inactivating proteins to the ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andrew K H; Wong, Eddie C K; Lee, Ka-Ming; Wong, Kam-Bo

    2015-02-25

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) are RNA N-glycosidases that inactivate ribosomes by specifically depurinating a conserved adenine residue at the α-sarcin/ricin loop of 28S rRNA. Recent studies have pointed to the involvement of the C-terminal domain of the eukaryotic stalk proteins in facilitating the toxic action of RIPs. This review highlights how structural studies of eukaryotic stalk proteins provide insights into the recruitment of RIPs to the ribosomes. Since the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic stalk proteins is involved in specific recognition of elongation factors and some eukaryote-specific RIPs (e.g., trichosanthin and ricin), we postulate that these RIPs may have evolved to hijack the translation-factor-recruiting function of ribosomal stalk in reaching their target site of rRNA.

  11. Fusidic acid targets elongation factor G in several stages of translocation on the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Borg, Anneli; Holm, Mikael; Shiroyama, Ikue; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Pavlov, Michael; Sanyal, Suparna; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2015-02-06

    The antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) targets elongation factor G (EF-G) and inhibits ribosomal peptide elongation and ribosome recycling, but deeper mechanistic aspects of FA action have remained unknown. Using quench flow and stopped flow experiments in a biochemical system for protein synthesis and taking advantage of separate time scales for inhibited (10 s) and uninhibited (100 ms) elongation cycles, a detailed kinetic model of FA action was obtained. FA targets EF-G at an early stage in the translocation process (I), which proceeds unhindered by the presence of the drug to a later stage (II), where the ribosome stalls. Stalling may also occur at a third stage of translocation (III), just before release of EF-G from the post-translocation ribosome. We show that FA is a strong elongation inhibitor (K50% ≈ 1 μm), discuss the identity of the FA targeted states, and place existing cryo-EM and crystal structures in their functional context.

  12. The nucleic acid-binding zinc finger protein of potato virus M is translated by internal initiation as well as by ribosomal frameshifting involving a shifty stop codon and a novel mechanism of P-site slippage.

    PubMed

    Gramstat, A; Prüfer, D; Rohde, W

    1994-09-25

    The genes for the capsid protein CP and the nucleic acid-binding 12K protein (pr12) of potato virus M (PVM) constitute the 3' terminal gene cluster of the PVM RNA genome. Both proteins are presumably translated from a single subgenomic RNA. We have identified two translational strategies operating in pr12 gene expression. Internal initiation at the first and the second AUG codon of the pr12 coding sequence results in the synthesis of the 12K protein. In addition the protein is produced as a CP/12K transframe protein by ribosomal frameshifting. For these studies parts of the CP and pr12 coding sequences including the putative frameshift region were introduced into an internal position of the beta-glucuronidase gene. Mutational analyses in conjunction with in vitro translation experiments identified a homopolymeric string of four adenosine nucleotides which together with a 3' flanking UGA stop codon were required for efficient frameshifting. The signal AAAAUGA is the first frameshift signal with a shifty stop codon to be analyzed in the eukaryotic system. Substitution of the four consecutive adenosine nucleotides by UUUU increased the efficiency of frameshifting, while substitution by GGGG or CCCC dramatically reduced the synthesis of the transframe protein. Also, UAA and UAG could replace the opal stop codon without effect on the frameshifting event, but mutation of UGA to the sense codon UGG inhibited transframe protein formation. These findings suggest that the mechanism of ribosomal frameshifting at the PVM signal is different from the one described by the 'simultaneous slippage' model in that only the string of four adenosine nucleotides represents the slippery sequence involved in a -1 P-site slippage.

  13. Optimized plasmid systems for the incorporation of multiple different unnatural amino acids by evolved orthogonal ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Christoph; Hahn, Liljan E; Neumann, Heinz

    2014-08-18

    Incorporation of multiple different unnatural amino acids into the same polypeptide remains a significant challenge. Orthogonal ribosomes, which are evolvable as they direct the translation of a single dedicated orthogonal mRNA, can provide an avenue to produce such polypeptides routinely. Recent advances in engineering orthogonal ribosomes have created a prototype system to enable genetically encoded introduction of two different functional groups, albeit with limited efficiency. Here, we systematically investigated the limiting factors of this system by using assays to measure the levels and activities of individual components; we identified Methanosarcina barkeri PylRS as a limiting factor for protein yield. Balancing the expression levels of individual components significantly improved growth rate and protein yield. This optimization of the system is likely to increase the scope of evolved orthogonal ribosome-mediated incorporation of multiple different unnatural amino acids.

  14. Cryo-EM structure of the spinach chloroplast ribosome reveals the location of plastid-specific ribosomal proteins and extensions.

    PubMed

    Graf, Michael; Arenz, Stefan; Huter, Paul; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Nováček, Jiří; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-12-15

    Ribosomes are the protein synthesizing machines of the cell. Recent advances in cryo-EM have led to the determination of structures from a variety of species, including bacterial 70S and eukaryotic 80S ribosomes as well as mitoribosomes from eukaryotic mitochondria, however, to date high resolution structures of plastid 70S ribosomes have been lacking. Here we present a cryo-EM structure of the spinach chloroplast 70S ribosome, with an average resolution of 5.4 Å for the small 30S subunit and 3.6 Å for the large 50S ribosomal subunit. The structure reveals the location of the plastid-specific ribosomal proteins (RPs) PSRP1, PSRP4, PSRP5 and PSRP6 as well as the numerous plastid-specific extensions of the RPs. We discover many features by which the plastid-specific extensions stabilize the ribosome via establishing additional interactions with surrounding ribosomal RNA and RPs. Moreover, we identify a large conglomerate of plastid-specific protein mass adjacent to the tunnel exit site that could facilitate interaction of the chloroplast ribosome with the thylakoid membrane and the protein-targeting machinery. Comparing the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome with that of the spinach chloroplast ribosome provides detailed insight into the co-evolution of RP and rRNA.

  15. Amino acid incorporation by ribosomes and polyribosomes from wheat chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Hadziyev, D.; Zalik, Saul

    1970-01-01

    Sucrose-gradient and analytical ultracentrifugation showed that chloroplast polyribosomes from 4-day-old seedlings had mono-, di-, tri-, tetra- and traces of penta-ribosomes, in contrast with those from 7-day-old seedlings in which only the mono-, di- and traces of tri-ribosomes were present. Without Mg2+ the polyribosomes dissociated into ribosomal subunits. The rate of l-[U-14C]phenylalanine incorporation was threefold greater for preparations from 4- than from 7-day-old seedlings. Incorporation by the latter was stimulated by polyuridylic acid. The rates of incorporation were similar whether the reaction mixture contained chloroplast or wheat-germ transfer RNA and amino acid synthetases purified on methylated albumin-on-kieselguhr and Sephadex G-75 columns respectively. The cofactor requirement was the same as for isolated intact chloroplasts. Osmotic rupture of chloroplasts with and without Triton X-100 revealed the presence of free and bound ribosomes. Free single ribosomes isolated by osmotic shrinkage or prepared by pancreatic ribonuclease digestion of chloroplast polyribosomes had negligible incorporation activity. This activity was increased by washing or by polyuridylic acid, but was still only a fraction of that given by polyribosomes. A comparison of incorporation activity of chloroplast polyribosomes with those from the surrounding cytoplasm showed the former to be 20 times more active. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 9. PMID:5411422

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis 135 ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Jesuino, Rosália S A; Pereira, Maristela; Felipe, M Sueli S; Azevedo, Maristella O; Soares, Célia M A

    2004-06-01

    A 630 bp cDNA encoding an L35 ribosomal protein of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, designated as Pbl35, was cloned from a yeast expression library. Pbl35 encodes a polypeptide of 125 amino acids, with a predicted molecular mass of 14.5 kDa and a pI of 11.0. The deduced PbL35 shows significant conservation in respect to other described ribosomal L35 proteins from eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Motifs of ribosomal proteins are present in PbL35, including a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) that could be related to the protein addressing to the nucleolus for the ribosomal assembly. The mRNA for PbL35, about 700 nucleotides in length, is expressed at a high level in P. brasiliensis. The PbL35 and the deduced amino acid sequence constitute the first description of a ribosomal protein in P. brasiliensis. The cDNA was deposited in GenBank under accession number AF416509.

  17. Overexpressed ribosomal proteins suppress defective chaperonins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M Anaul; Sherman, Fred

    2008-12-01

    The chaperonin Cct complex of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is composed of eight different subunits encoded by eight essential genes, CCT1-CCT8. This Cct complex is responsible for the folding of a number of proteins including actin and tubulin. We have isolated and characterized 22 multicopy suppressors of the temperature-sensitive allele, cct4-1, which encodes an altered protein with a G345D replacement that diminishes ATP hydrolysis. Fourteen of the suppressors encode ribosomal proteins, four have roles in ribosome biogenesis, two have phosphatase activities, one is involved in protein synthesis and one of the suppressors corresponded to Cct4p. Some of the suppressors also acted on certain cct1, cct2, cct3 and cct6 mutations. We suggest that certain overexpressed ribosomal and other proteins can act as weak chaperones, phenotypically alleviating the partial defects of mutationally altered Cct subunits.

  18. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Liam K. R.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to an in vitro translation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosome in vitro. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection. PMID:27006457

  19. Resonance assignment of the ribosome binding domain of E. coli ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Pierre; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Uzan, Marc; Bontems, François; Sizun, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is an essential actor for protein synthesis in Escherichia coli. It is involved in mRNA recruitment by the 30S ribosomal subunit and recognition of the correct start codon during translation initiation. E. coli S1 is a modular protein that contains six repeats of an S1 motif, which have distinct functions despite structural homology. Whereas the three central repeats have been shown to be involved in mRNA recognition, the two first repeats that constitute the N-terminal domain of S1 are responsible for binding to the 30S subunit. Here we report the almost complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment of two fragments of the 30S binding region of S1. The first fragment comprises only the first repeat. The second corresponds to the entire ribosome binding domain. Since S1 is absent from all high resolution X-ray structures of prokaryotic ribosomes, these data provide a first step towards atomic level structural characterization of this domain by NMR. Chemical shift analysis of the first repeat provides evidence for structural divergence from the canonical OB-fold of an S1 motif. In contrast the second domain displays the expected topology for an S1 motif, which rationalizes the functional specialization of the two subdomains.

  20. [Protein L16 of the Escherichia coli ribosome: possible role in protein biosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Maĭmets, T O; Ustav, M B; Remme, Ia L; Villems, R L

    1984-01-01

    We show that Escherichia coli 50S ribosomal subunits depleted of protein L16 can nevertheless catalyze the transfer of the peptide moiety from fMet-tRNA to puromycin, being, however, unable to use a fragment CACCA-Phe as an acceptor substrate. On the other hand, we found that protein L16 as well as its large fragment (amino acids 10-136) both interact with tRNA in solution (Kd approximately 10(-7) M). Moreover, L16 interacts with CACCA-Phe in solution as well as protects 3' end of tRNA from the enzymatic degradation. We suggest that L16, although not being the peptidyl transferase as such, is involved in the binding of the 3' end cytidines of tRNA into the ribosomal A site.

  1. The Ribosomal Protein Rpl22 Controls Ribosome Composition by Directly Repressing Expression of Its Own Paralog, Rpl22l1

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Monique N.; Schreiber, Katherine H.; Zhang, Yong; Duc, Anne-Cécile E.; Rao, Shuyun; Hale, J. Scott; Academia, Emmeline C.; Shah, Shreya R.; Morton, John F.; Holstein, Carly A.; Martin, Dan B.; Kaeberlein, Matt; Ladiges, Warren C.; Fink, Pamela J.; MacKay, Vivian L.; Wiest, David L.; Kennedy, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Most yeast ribosomal protein genes are duplicated and their characterization has led to hypotheses regarding the existence of specialized ribosomes with different subunit composition or specifically-tailored functions. In yeast, ribosomal protein genes are generally duplicated and evidence has emerged that paralogs might have specific roles. Unlike yeast, most mammalian ribosomal proteins are thought to be encoded by a single gene copy, raising the possibility that heterogenous populations of ribosomes are unique to yeast. Here, we examine the roles of the mammalian Rpl22, finding that Rpl22−/− mice have only subtle phenotypes with no significant translation defects. We find that in the Rpl22−/− mouse there is a compensatory increase in Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1) expression and incorporation into ribosomes. Consistent with the hypothesis that either ribosomal protein can support translation, knockdown of Rpl22l1 impairs growth of cells lacking Rpl22. Mechanistically, Rpl22 regulates Rpl22l1 directly by binding to an internal hairpin structure and repressing its expression. We propose that ribosome specificity may exist in mammals, providing evidence that one ribosomal protein can influence composition of the ribosome by regulating its own paralog. PMID:23990801

  2. Ribosome Dwell Times and the Protein Copy Number Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorissen, Mieke; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2012-09-01

    Translation is the cellular process in which ribosomes make proteins from information encoded on messenger RNA (mRNA). We model translation with an exclusion process taking into account the experimentally determined, non-exponential, waiting time between steps of a ribosome. From numerical simulations using realistic parameter values, we determine the distribution P( E) of the number of proteins E produced by one mRNA. We find that for small E this distribution is not geometric. We present a simplified and analytically solvable model that relates P( E) to the distributions of the times to produce the first E proteins.

  3. Dissecting the transcriptional phenotype of ribosomal protein deficiency: implications for Diamond-Blackfan Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Aspesi, Anna; Pavesi, Elisa; Robotti, Elisa; Crescitelli, Rossella; Boria, Ilenia; Avondo, Federica; Moniz, Hélène; Da Costa, Lydie; Mohandas, Narla; Roncaglia, Paola; Ramenghi, Ugo; Ronchi, Antonella; Gustincich, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Marengo, Emilio; Ellis, Steven R.; Follenzi, Antonia; Santoro, Claudio; Dianzani, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Defects in genes encoding ribosomal proteins cause Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA), a red cell aplasia often associated with physical abnormalities. Other bone marrow failure syndromes have been attributed to defects in ribosomal components but the link between erythropoiesis and the ribosome remains to be fully defined. Several lines of evidence suggest that defects in ribosome synthesis lead to “ribosomal stress” with p53 activation and either cell cycle arrest or induction of apoptosis. Pathways independent of p53 have also been proposed to play a role in DBA pathogenesis. We took an unbiased approach to identify p53-independent pathways activated by defects in ribosome synthesis by analyzing global gene expression in various cellular models of DBA. Ranking-Principal Component Analysis (Ranking-PCA) was applied to the identified datasets to determine whether there are common sets of genes whose expression is altered in these different cellular models. We observed consistent changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular amino acid metabolic process, negative regulation of cell proliferation and cell redox homeostasis. These data indicate that cells respond to defects in ribosome synthesis by changing the level of expression of a limited subset of genes involved in critical cellular processes. Moreover, our data support a role for p53-independent pathways in the pathophysiology of DBA. PMID:24835311

  4. Dissecting the transcriptional phenotype of ribosomal protein deficiency: implications for Diamond-Blackfan Anemia.

    PubMed

    Aspesi, Anna; Pavesi, Elisa; Robotti, Elisa; Crescitelli, Rossella; Boria, Ilenia; Avondo, Federica; Moniz, Hélène; Da Costa, Lydie; Mohandas, Narla; Roncaglia, Paola; Ramenghi, Ugo; Ronchi, Antonella; Gustincich, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Marengo, Emilio; Ellis, Steven R; Follenzi, Antonia; Santoro, Claudio; Dianzani, Irma

    2014-07-25

    Defects in genes encoding ribosomal proteins cause Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA), a red cell aplasia often associated with physical abnormalities. Other bone marrow failure syndromes have been attributed to defects in ribosomal components but the link between erythropoiesis and the ribosome remains to be fully defined. Several lines of evidence suggest that defects in ribosome synthesis lead to "ribosomal stress" with p53 activation and either cell cycle arrest or induction of apoptosis. Pathways independent of p53 have also been proposed to play a role in DBA pathogenesis. We took an unbiased approach to identify p53-independent pathways activated by defects in ribosome synthesis by analyzing global gene expression in various cellular models of DBA. Ranking-Principal Component Analysis (Ranking-PCA) was applied to the identified datasets to determine whether there are common sets of genes whose expression is altered in these different cellular models. We observed consistent changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular amino acid metabolic process, negative regulation of cell proliferation and cell redox homeostasis. These data indicate that cells respond to defects in ribosome synthesis by changing the level of expression of a limited subset of genes involved in critical cellular processes. Moreover, our data support a role for p53-independent pathways in the pathophysiology of DBA. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Ribosomal Proteins Control or Bypass p53 during Nucleolar Stress

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Annapina; Russo, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    The nucleolus is the site of ribosome biogenesis, a complex process that requires the coordinate activity of all three RNA polymerases and hundreds of non-ribosomal factors that participate in the maturation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and assembly of small and large subunits. Nevertheless, emerging studies have highlighted the fundamental role of the nucleolus in sensing a variety of cellular stress stimuli that target ribosome biogenesis. This condition is known as nucleolar stress and triggers several response pathways to maintain cell homeostasis, either p53-dependent or p53-independent. The mouse double minute (MDM2)-p53 stress signaling pathways are activated by multiple signals and are among the most important regulators of cellular homeostasis. In this review, we will focus on the role of ribosomal proteins in p53-dependent and p53-independent response to nucleolar stress considering novel identified regulators of these pathways. We describe, in particular, the role of ribosomal protein uL3 (rpL3) in p53-independent nucleolar stress signaling pathways. PMID:28085118

  6. Thermus thermophilus L11 methyltransferase, PrmA, is dispensable for growth and preferentially modifies free ribosomal protein L11 prior to ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Dale M; Gregory, Steven T; Thompson, Jill; Suh, Moo-Jin; Limbach, Patrick A; Dahlberg, Albert E

    2004-09-01

    The ribosomal protein L11 in bacteria is posttranslationally trimethylated at multiple amino acid positions by the L11 methyltransferase PrmA, the product of the prmA gene. The role of L11 methylation in ribosome function or assembly has yet to be determined, although the deletion of Escherichia coli prmA has no apparent phenotype. We have constructed a mutant of the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus in which the prmA gene has been disrupted with the htk gene encoding a heat-stable kanamycin adenyltransferase. This mutant shows no growth defects, indicating that T. thermophilus PrmA, like its E. coli homolog, is dispensable. Ribosomes prepared from this mutant contain unmethylated L11, as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and are effective substrates for in vitro methylation by cloned and purified T. thermophilus PrmA. MALDI-TOF MS also revealed that T. thermophilus L11 contains a total of 12 methyl groups, in contrast to the 9 methyl groups found in E. coli L11. Finally, we found that, as with the E. coli methyltransferase, the ribosomal protein L11 dissociated from ribosomes is a more efficient substrate for in vitro methylation by PrmA than intact 70S ribosomes, suggesting that methylation in vivo occurs on free L11 prior to its incorporation into ribosomes.

  7. Ribosome-messenger recognition: mRNA target sites for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Boni, I V; Isaeva, D M; Musychenko, M L; Tzareva, N V

    1991-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is known to play an important role in translational initiation, being directly involved in recognition and binding of mRNAs by 30S ribosomal particles. Using a specially developed procedure based on efficient crosslinking of S1 to mRNA induced by UV irradiation, we have identified S1 binding sites on several phage RNAs in preinitiation complexes. Targets for S1 on Q beta and fr RNAs are localized upstream from the coat protein gene and contain oligo(U)-sequences. In the case of Q beta RNA, this S1 binding site overlaps the S-site for Q beta replicase and the site for S1 binding within a binary complex. It is reasonable that similar U-rich sequences represent S1 binding sites on bacterial mRNAs. To test this idea we have used E. coli ssb mRNA prepared in vitro with the T7 promoter/RNA polymerase system. By the methods of toeprinting, enzymatic footprinting, and UV crosslinking we have shown that binding of the ssb mRNA to 30S ribosomes is S1-dependent. The oligo(U)-sequence preceding the SD domain was found to be the target for S1. We propose that S1 binding sites, represented by pyrimidine-rich sequences upstream from the SD region, serve as determinants involved in recognition of mRNA by the ribosome. Images PMID:2011495

  8. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawarden, Sanjaya C; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A

    2014-02-20

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the ribosomal RNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to observe real-time encounters between Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5' domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free-energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-colour FRET and molecular dynamics simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. These protein-guided dynamics offer an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes.

  9. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawarden, Sanjaya C.; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-02-01

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the ribosomal RNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to observe real-time encounters between Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5' domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free-energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-colour FRET and molecular dynamics simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. These protein-guided dynamics offer an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes.

  10. Crosslinking of Ribosomal Proteins to RNA in Maize Ribosomes by UV-B and Its Effects on Translation1[w

    PubMed Central

    Casati, Paula; Walbot, Virginia

    2004-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) photons can cause substantial cellular damage in biomolecules, as is well established for DNA. Because RNA has the same absorption spectrum for UV as DNA, we have investigated damage to this cellular constituent. In maize (Zea mays) leaves, UV-B radiation damages ribosomes by crosslinking cytosolic ribosomal proteins S14, L23a, and L32, and chloroplast ribosomal protein L29 to RNA. Ribosomal damage accumulated during a day of UV-B exposure correlated with a progressive decrease in new protein production; however, de novo synthesis of some ribosomal proteins is increased after 6 h of UV-B exposure. After 16 h without UV-B, damaged ribosomes were eliminated and translation was restored to normal levels. Ribosomal protein S6 and an S6 kinase are phosphorylated during UV-B exposure; these modifications are associated with selective translation of some ribosomal proteins after ribosome damage in mammalian fibroblast cells and may be an adaptation in maize. Neither photosynthesis nor pigment levels were affected significantly by UV-B, demonstrating that the treatment applied is not lethal and that maize leaf physiology readily recovers. PMID:15466230

  11. RNA editing in six mitochondrial ribosomal protein genes of Didymium iridis.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Peter G; Silliker, Margaret E

    2010-06-01

    Similarity searches with Didymium iridis mitochondrial genomic DNA identified six possible ribosomal protein-coding regions, however, each region contained stop codons that would need to be removed by RNA editing to produce functional transcripts. RT-PCR was used to amplify these regions from total RNA for cloning and sequencing. Six functional transcripts were verified for the following ribosomal protein genes: rpS12, rpS7, rpL2, rpS19, rpS3, and rpL16. The editing events observed, such as single C and U nucleotide insertions and a dinucleotide insertion, were consistent with previously observed editing patterns seen in D. iridis. Additionally, a new form of insertional editing, a single A insertion, was observed in a conserved region of the rpL16 gene. While the majority of codons created by editing specify hydrophobic amino acids, a greater proportion of the codons created in these hydrophilic ribosomal proteins called for positively charged amino acids in comparison to the previously characterized hydrophobic respiratory protein genes. This first report of edited soluble mitochondrial ribosomal proteins in myxomycetes expands upon the RNA editing patterns previously seen; there was: a greater proportion of created codons specifying positively charged amino acids, a shift in the codon position edited, and the insertion of single A nucleotides.

  12. Regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Allen, Todd D; Watkins, Tonya; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M

    2004-09-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the S10 and spc ribosomal protein (r-protein) operons in Vibrio cholerae. Both operons are under autogenous control; they are mediated by r-proteins L4 and S8, respectively. Our results suggest that Escherichia coli-like strategies for regulating r-protein synthesis extend beyond the enteric members of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria.

  13. Regulation of Ribosomal Protein Synthesis in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Todd D.; Watkins, Tonya; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the S10 and spc ribosomal protein (r-protein) operons in Vibrio cholerae. Both operons are under autogenous control; they are mediated by r-proteins L4 and S8, respectively. Our results suggest that Escherichia coli-like strategies for regulating r-protein synthesis extend beyond the enteric members of the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. PMID:15317799

  14. Ribosome-inactivating proteins: from toxins to useful proteins.

    PubMed

    Stirpe, Fiorenzo

    2013-06-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) either single-chain (type 1) or two-chain (type 2) are frequent in plants, often in multiple forms. They are RNA N-glycosidases, have antiviral, antifungal and insecticidal activity. Their expression in plants is increased under stressful conditions. They are investigated for practical applications in medicine and in agriculture. In medicine, RIPs have been linked to, or fused with, appropriate antibodies or other carriers to form "immunotoxins" or other conjugates specifically toxic to the cells target of the carrier, with the aim of eliminating malignant or other undesired cells. In agriculture, it has been observed that an enhanced expression of RIPs confers to plants an increased resistance to viruses, fungi, insects, and also to drought and salinity.

  15. Inactivation of Ribosomal Protein Genes in Bacillus subtilis Reveals Importance of Each Ribosomal Protein for Cell Proliferation and Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Akanuma, Genki; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Natori, Yousuke; Yano, Koichi; Suzuki, Shota; Omata, Shuya; Ishizuka, Morio; Sekine, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Among the 57 genes that encode ribosomal proteins in the genome of Bacillus subtilis, a Gram-positive bacterium, 50 genes were targeted by systematic inactivation. Individual deletion mutants of 16 ribosomal proteins (L1, L9, L15, L22, L23, L28, L29, L32, L33.1, L33.2, L34, L35, L36, S6, S20, and S21) were obtained successfully. In conjunction with previous reports, 22 ribosomal proteins have been shown to be nonessential in B. subtilis, at least for cell proliferation. Although several mutants that harbored a deletion of a ribosomal protein gene did not show any significant differences in any of the phenotypes that were tested, various mutants showed a reduced growth rate and reduced levels of 70S ribosomes compared with the wild type. In addition, severe defects in the sporulation frequency of the ΔrplA (L1) mutant and the motility of the ΔrpsU (S21) mutant were observed. These data provide the first evidence in B. subtilis that L1 and S21 are required for the progression of cellular differentiation. PMID:23002217

  16. A Molecular Titration System Coordinates Ribosomal Protein Gene Transcription with Ribosomal RNA Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Albert, Benjamin; Knight, Britta; Merwin, Jason; Martin, Victoria; Ottoz, Diana; Gloor, Yvonne; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Rudner, Adam; Shore, David

    2016-11-17

    Cell growth potential is determined by the rate of ribosome biogenesis, a complex process that requires massive and coordinated transcriptional output. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosome biogenesis is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. Although evidence for a system that coordinates ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein gene (RPG) transcription has been described, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that an interaction between the RPG transcriptional activator Ifh1 and the rRNA processing factor Utp22 serves to coordinate RPG transcription with that of rRNA. We demonstrate that Ifh1 is rapidly released from RPG promoters by a Utp22-independent mechanism following growth inhibition, but that its long-term dissociation requires Utp22. We present evidence that RNA polymerase I activity inhibits the ability of Utp22 to titrate Ifh1 from RPG promoters and propose that a dynamic Ifh1-Utp22 interaction fine-tunes RPG expression to coordinate RPG and rRNA transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ribosomal protein deficiency causes Tp53-independent erythropoiesis failure in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Gnaneshwar V; Chakraborty, Anirban; Uechi, Tamayo; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is an inherited genetic disease caused by mutations in ribosomal protein genes. The disease is characterized by bone marrow failure, congenital anomalies, and a severe erythroid defect. The activation of the TP53 pathway has been suggested to be critical for the pathophysiology of Diamond-Blackfan anemia. While this pathway plays a role in the morphological defects that associate with ribosomal protein loss-of-function in animal models, its role in the erythroid defects has not been clearly established. To understand the specificity of erythroid defects in Diamond-Blackfan anemia, we knocked down five RP genes (two Diamond-Blackfan anemia-associated and three non-Diamond-Blackfan anemia-associated) in zebrafish and analyzed the effects on the developmental and erythroid phenotypes in the presence and absence of Tp53. The co-inhibition of Tp53 activity rescued the morphological deformities but did not alleviate the erythroid aplasia indicating that ribosomal protein deficiency causes erythroid failure in a Tp53-independent manner. Interestingly, treatment with L-Leucine or L-Arginine, amino acids that augment mRNA translation via mTOR pathway, rescued the morphological defects and resulted in a substantial recovery of erythroid cells. Our results suggest that altered translation because of impaired ribosome function could be responsible for the morphological and erythroid defects in ribosomal protein-deficient zebrafish. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides whose members target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed by three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here, we describe the detailed structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases, MdnC and MdnB, interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein/protein interactions key to the chemistry, suggest an origin of the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds. PMID:27669417

  19. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-11-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein-protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  20. Epigenetic engineering of ribosomal RNA genes enhances protein production.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Raffaella; Lienemann, Philipp; Fussenegger, Martin

    2009-08-14

    Selection of mammalian high-producer cell lines remains a major challenge for the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes encode the major component of the ribosome but many rRNA gene copies are not transcribed due to epigenetic silencing by the nucleolar remodelling complex (NoRC) [6], which may limit the cell's full production capacity. Here we show that the knockdown of TIP5, a subunit of NoRC, decreases the number of silent rRNA genes, upregulates rRNA transcription, enhances ribosome synthesis and increases production of recombinant proteins. However, general enhancement of rRNA transcription rate did not stimulate protein synthesis. Our data demonstrates that the number of transcriptionally competent rRNA genes limits efficient ribosome synthesis. Epigenetic engineering of ribosomal RNA genes offers new possibilities for improving biopharmaceutical manufacturing and provides novel insights into the complex regulatory network which governs the translation machinery in normal cellular processes as well as in pathological conditions like cancer.

  1. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Sharkey et al.

  2. Single Molecule Force Measurement for Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Sotaro

    2008-04-01

    The ribosome is a molecular machine that translates the genetic code described on the messenger RNA (mRNA) into an amino acid sequence through repetitive cycles of transfer RNA (tRNA) selection, peptide bond formation and translocation. Although the detailed interactions between the translation components have been revealed by extensive structural and biochemical studies, it is not known how the precise regulation of macromolecular movements required at each stage of translation is achieved. Here we demonstrate an optical tweezer assay to measure the rupture force between a single ribosome complex and mRNA. The rupture force was compared between ribosome complexes assembled on an mRNA with and without a strong Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence. The removal of the SD sequence significantly reduced the rupture force, indicating that the SD interactions contribute significantly to the stability of the ribosomal complex on the mRNA in a pre-peptidyl transfer state. In contrast, the post-peptidyl transfer state weakened the rupture force as compared to the complex in a pre-peptidyl transfer state and it was the same for both the SD-containing and SD-deficient mRNAs. The results suggest that formation of the first peptide bond destabilizes the SD interaction, resulting in the weakening of the force with which the ribosome grips an mRNA. This might be an important requirement to facilitate movement of the ribosome along mRNA during the first translocation step. In this article, we discuss about the above new results including the introduction of the ribosome translation mechanism and the optical tweezer method.

  3. Dietary protein intake and skeletal-muscle protein metabolism in rats. Studies with salt-washed ribosomes and transfer factors

    PubMed Central

    Alexis, S. D.; Basta, S.; Young, Vernon R.

    1972-01-01

    1. Aspects of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in vitro were studied in young rats given a low-protein diet for up to 10 days and during re-feeding with an adequate diet. 2. Partially purified muscle transfer factors (transferases I and II), crude and purified (NH4Cl-washed) ribosomes and a pH5 enzyme fraction were prepared for this purpose. 3. A marked decrease in the capacity of crude ribosomes to carry out cell-free polypeptide synthesis occurred within 4 days of feeding the low-protein diet. 4. The capacity of salt-washed ribosomes to promote amino acid polymerization, in the presence of added transfer factors and aminoacyl-tRNA, was only slightly decreased by the dietary treatment. 5. However, the capacity of salt-washed ribosomes to bind 14C-labelled aminoacyl-tRNA was decreased by feeding the low-protein diet. 6. The capacity of the pH5 enzyme fraction to promote amino acid incorporation in a complete cell-free system was decreased within 2 days of feeding the low-protein diet. There is no evidence that the change is associated with aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase or binding enzyme activities of the pH5 fractions. 7. These changes are discussed in relation to the diminished rate of protein synthesis in the intact muscle cell when rats are given a low-protein diet. PMID:4634827

  4. Charge segregation and low hydrophobicity are key features of ribosomal proteins from different organisms.

    PubMed

    Fedyukina, Daria V; Jennaro, Theodore S; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-03-07

    Ribosomes are large and highly charged macromolecular complexes consisting of RNA and proteins. Here, we address the electrostatic and nonpolar properties of ribosomal proteins that are important for ribosome assembly and interaction with other cellular components and may influence protein folding on the ribosome. We examined 50 S ribosomal subunits from 10 species and found a clear distinction between the net charge of ribosomal proteins from halophilic and non-halophilic organisms. We found that ∼67% ribosomal proteins from halophiles are negatively charged, whereas only up to ∼15% of ribosomal proteins from non-halophiles share this property. Conversely, hydrophobicity tends to be lower for ribosomal proteins from halophiles than for the corresponding proteins from non-halophiles. Importantly, the surface electrostatic potential of ribosomal proteins from all organisms, especially halophiles, has distinct positive and negative regions across all the examined species. Positively and negatively charged residues of ribosomal proteins tend to be clustered in buried and solvent-exposed regions, respectively. Hence, the majority of ribosomal proteins is characterized by a significant degree of intramolecular charge segregation, regardless of the organism of origin. This key property enables the ribosome to accommodate proteins within its complex scaffold regardless of their overall net charge.

  5. Charge Segregation and Low Hydrophobicity Are Key Features of Ribosomal Proteins from Different Organisms*

    PubMed Central

    Fedyukina, Daria V.; Jennaro, Theodore S.; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes are large and highly charged macromolecular complexes consisting of RNA and proteins. Here, we address the electrostatic and nonpolar properties of ribosomal proteins that are important for ribosome assembly and interaction with other cellular components and may influence protein folding on the ribosome. We examined 50 S ribosomal subunits from 10 species and found a clear distinction between the net charge of ribosomal proteins from halophilic and non-halophilic organisms. We found that ∼67% ribosomal proteins from halophiles are negatively charged, whereas only up to ∼15% of ribosomal proteins from non-halophiles share this property. Conversely, hydrophobicity tends to be lower for ribosomal proteins from halophiles than for the corresponding proteins from non-halophiles. Importantly, the surface electrostatic potential of ribosomal proteins from all organisms, especially halophiles, has distinct positive and negative regions across all the examined species. Positively and negatively charged residues of ribosomal proteins tend to be clustered in buried and solvent-exposed regions, respectively. Hence, the majority of ribosomal proteins is characterized by a significant degree of intramolecular charge segregation, regardless of the organism of origin. This key property enables the ribosome to accommodate proteins within its complex scaffold regardless of their overall net charge. PMID:24398678

  6. Ribosome-inactivating proteins: potent poisons and molecular tools.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-11-15

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms.

  7. N(α)-Acetylation of yeast ribosomal proteins and its effect on protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kamita, Masahiro; Kimura, Yayoi; Ino, Yoko; Kamp, Roza M; Polevoda, Bogdan; Sherman, Fred; Hirano, Hisashi

    2011-04-01

    N(α)-Acetyltransferases (NATs) cause the N(α)-acetylation of the majority of eukaryotic proteins during their translation, although the functions of this modification have been largely unexplored. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), four NATs have been identified: NatA, NatB, NatC, and NatD. In this study, the N(α)-acetylation status of ribosomal protein was analyzed using NAT mutants combined with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). A total of 60 ribosomal proteins were identified, of which 17 were N(α)-acetylated by NatA, and two by NatB. The N(α)-acetylation of two of these, S17 and L23, by NatA was not previously observed. Furthermore, we tested the effect of ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation on protein synthesis using the purified ribosomes from each NAT mutant. It was found that the protein synthesis activities of ribosomes from NatA and NatB mutants were decreased by 27% and 23%, respectively, as compared to that of the normal strain. Furthermore, we have shown that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation by NatA influences translational fidelity in the presence of paromomycin. These results suggest that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation is necessary to maintain the ribosome's protein synthesis function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Complete amino acid sequence of luffin-a, a ribosome-inactivating protein from the seeds of sponge gourd (Luffa cylindrica).

    PubMed

    Islam, M R; Nishida, H; Funatsu, G

    1990-11-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of luffin-a has been determined. Twenty-two peptides were isolated from the tryptic digest of luffin-a and sequenced employing the DABITC/PITC double coupling method. Overlaping of these peptides was achieved by analyzing the chymotryptic peptides or CNBr-fragments of luffin-a and their S. aureus V8 protease peptides. Luffin-a consists of 248 amino acid residues and its relative molecular mass is calculated to be 27,021 Da, excluding the attached sugar chains reasoned to be present at each Asn residue of positions 28, 33, 77, 84, 206, and 227. A comparison with the sequence of ricin A-chain showed 33% sequence identity indicating that these proteins are homologous.

  9. An extra-ribosomal function of ribosomal protein L13a in macrophage resolves inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Darshana; Basu, Abhijit; Baldwin, William; Kondratov, Roman V; Barik, Sailen; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is an obligatory attempt of the immune system to protect the host from infections. However, unregulated synthesis of pro-inflammatory products can have detrimental effects. Although mechanisms that lead to inflammation are well appreciated, those that restrain it are not adequately understood. Creating macrophage-specific L13a-knockout (KO) mice here we report that depletion of ribosomal protein L13a abrogates the endogenous translation control of several chemokines in macrophages. Upon LPS-induced endotoxemia these animals displayed symptoms of severe inflammation caused by widespread infiltration of macrophages in major organs causing tissue injury and reduced survival rates. Macrophages from these KO animals show unregulated expression of several chemokines e.g. CXCL13, CCL22, CCL8 and CCR3. These macrophages failed to show L13a-dependent RNA binding complex formation on target mRNAs. In addition, increased polyribosomal abundance of these mRNAs shows a defect in translation control in the macrophages. Thus, our studies provide the first evidence of an essential extra-ribosomal function of ribosomal protein L13a in resolving physiological inflammation in a mammalian host. PMID:23460747

  10. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C.; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the rRNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to observe real-time encounters between ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5′ domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-color FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. This protein-guided dynamics offers an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes. PMID:24522531

  11. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D.

    2016-11-11

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein–protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  12. Streptomycin affinity depends on 13 amino acids forming a loop in homology modelled ribosomal S12 protein (rpsL gene) of Lysinibacillus sphaericus DSLS5 associated with marine sponge (Tedania anhelans).

    PubMed

    Suriyanarayanan, Balasubramanian; Lakshmi, Praveena Pothuraju; Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini; Dhevendaran, Kandasamy; Priya, Balakrishnan; Krishna, Shivaani

    2016-06-01

    Streptomycin, an antibiotic used against microbial infections, inhibits the protein synthesis by binding to ribosomal protein S12, encoded by rpsL12 gene, and associated mutations cause streptomycin resistance. A streptomycin resistant, Lysinibacillus sphaericus DSLS5 (MIC >300 µg/mL for streptomycin), was isolated from a marine sponge (Tedania anhelans). The characterisation of rpsL12 gene showed a region having similarity to long terminal repeat sequences of murine lukemia virus which added 13 amino acids for loop formation in RpsL12; in addition, a K56R mutation which corresponds to K43R mutation present in streptomycin-resistant Escherichia coli is also present. The RpsL12 protein was modelled and compared with that of Lysinibacillus boronitolerans, Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The modelled proteins docked with streptomycin indicate compound had less affinity. The effect of loop on streptomycin resistance was analysed by constructing three different models of RpsL12 by, (i) removing both loop and mutation, (ii) removing the loop alone while retaining the mutation and (iii) without mutation having loop. The results showed that the presence of loop causes streptomycin resistance (decreases the affinity), and it further enhanced in the presence of mutation at 56th codon. Further study will help in understanding the evolution of streptomycin resistance in organisms.

  13. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  14. A Plasma Protein Indistinguishable from Ribosomal Protein S19

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Umeko; Chen, Jun; Ota, Yoshihiko; Jia, Nan; Arima, Hidetoshi; Nishiura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuro

    2010-01-01

    A monocyte-chemoattracting factor is generated during blood coagulation and during clotting of platelet-rich plasma. This chemotactic factor attracts monocytes as a ligand of the C5a receptor; however, it inhibits C5a-induced neutrophil chemotaxis as an apparent receptor antagonist. The curious dual function of the serum monocyte chemotactic factor resembles that of the cross-linked homodimer of ribosomal protein S19 (RP S19). Indeed, the inactive precursor of the monocyte chemotactic factor was present in plasma, and the precursor molecule and RP S19, as well as the active form and the RP S19 dimer, were indistinguishable in terms of immunological reactivity and molecular size. Coagulation factor XIIIa, plasma transglutaminase, and membrane phosphatidylserine on the activated platelets were required for conversion of the precursor to the active form. In addition, the precursor molecule in plasma could be replaced by wild-type recombinant RP S19 but not by mutant forms of it. These results indicate that a molecule indistinguishable from RP S19 was present in plasma, and that the RP S19-like molecule was converted to the active form by a transglutaminase-catalyzed reaction on a scaffold that included the phosphatidylserine-exposed platelet membrane. PMID:20093496

  15. Plants Producing Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins in Traditional Medicine.

    PubMed

    Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Maiello, Stefania; Battelli, Maria Giulia; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2016-11-18

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are enzymes that deadenylate nucleic acids and are broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Many plants that contain RIPs are listed in the pharmacopoeias of folk medicine all over the world, mostly because of their toxicity. This review analyses the position occupied in traditional medicine by plants from which RIPs have been isolated. The overview starts from the antique age of the Mediterranean area with ancient Egypt, followed by the Greek and Roman classic period. Then, the ancient oriental civilizations of China and India are evaluated. More recently, Unani medicine and European folk medicine are examined. Finally, the African and American folk medicines are taken into consideration. In conclusion, a list of RIP-expressing plants, which have been used in folk medicine, is provided with the geographical distribution and the prescriptions that are recommended by traditional healers. Some final considerations are provided on the present utilization of such herbal treatments, both in developing and developed countries, often in the absence of scientific validation. The most promising prospect for the medicinal use of RIP-expressing plants is the conjugation of purified RIPs to antibodies that recognise tumour antigens for cancer therapy.

  16. The immunodominant T helper 2 (Th2) response elicited in BALB/c mice by the Leishmania LiP2a and LiP2b acidic ribosomal proteins cannot be reverted by strong Th1 inducers.

    PubMed

    Iborra, S; Abánades, D R; Parody, N; Carrión, J; Risueño, R M; Pineda, M A; Bonay, P; Alonso, C; Soto, M

    2007-11-01

    The search for disease-associated T helper 2 (Th2) Leishmania antigens and the induction of a Th1 immune response to them using defined vaccination protocols is a potential strategy to induce protection against Leishmania infection. Leishmania infantum LiP2a and LiP2b acidic ribosomal protein (P proteins) have been described as prominent antigens during human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. In this study we demonstrate that BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major develop a Th2-like humoral response against Leishmania LiP2a and LiP2b proteins and that the same response is induced in BALB/c mice when the parasite P proteins are immunized as recombinant molecules without adjuvant. The genetic immunization of BALB/c mice with eukaryotic expression plasmids coding for these proteins was unable to redirect the Th2-like response induced by these antigens, and only the co-administration of the recombinant P proteins with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) promoted a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response. According to the preponderance of a Th2 or mixed Th1/Th2 responses elicited by the different regimens of immunization tested, no evidence of protection was observed in mice after challenge with L. major. Although alterations of the clinical outcome were not detected in mice presensitized with the P proteins, the enhanced IgG1 and interleukin (IL)-4 response against total Leishmania antigens in these mice may indicate an exacerbation of the disease.

  17. The Ribosomal Protein uL22 Modulates the Shape of the Protein Exit Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Wekselman, Itai; Zimmerman, Ella; Davidovich, Chen; Belousoff, Matthew; Matzov, Donna; Krupkin, Miri; Rozenberg, Haim; Bashan, Anat; Friedlander, Gilgi; Kjeldgaard, Jette; Ingmer, Hanne; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M; Yonath, Ada

    2017-08-01

    Erythromycin is a clinically useful antibiotic that binds to an rRNA pocket in the ribosomal exit tunnel. Commonly, resistance to erythromycin is acquired by alterations of rRNA nucleotides that interact with the drug. Mutations in the β hairpin of ribosomal protein uL22, which is rather distal to the erythromycin binding site, also generate resistance to the antibiotic. We have determined the crystal structure of the large ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans with a three amino acid insertion within the β hairpin of uL22 that renders resistance to erythromycin. The structure reveals a shift of the β hairpin of the mutated uL22 toward the interior of the exit tunnel, triggering a cascade of structural alterations of rRNA nucleotides that propagate to the erythromycin binding pocket. Our findings support recent studies showing that the interactions between uL22 and specific sequences within nascent chains trigger conformational rearrangements in the exit tunnel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Depurination of ribosomal RNA and inhibition of viral RNA translation by an antiviral protein of Celosia cristata.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, V K; Tumer, Nilgun E; Kapoor, H C

    2002-10-01

    An antiviral protein (25 kD) isolated from leaves of Celosia cristata (CCP 25) was tested for depurination study on ribosomal RNA from yeast. Ribosomal RNA yielded 360 nucleotide base fragment after treatment with CCP 25 indicating that CCP 25 was a ribosome inactivating protein. CCP 25 also inhibited translation of brome mosaic virus (BMV) and pokeweed mosaic virus (PMV) RNAs in rabbit reticulocyte translation system. The radioactive assay showed that incorporation of [35S]-methionine was less in translation proteins of BMV nucleic acid when CCP 25 was added to translation system. This indicated that antiviral protein from Celosia cristata not only depurinated ribosomal RNA but also inhibited translation of viral RNA in vitro.

  19. Protein-directed ribosomal frameshifting temporally regulates gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Napthine, Sawsan; Ling, Roger; Finch, Leanne K.; Jones, Joshua D.; Bell, Susanne; Brierley, Ian; Firth, Andrew E.

    2017-01-01

    Programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting is a mechanism of gene expression, whereby specific signals within messenger RNAs direct a proportion of translating ribosomes to shift −1 nt and continue translating in the new reading frame. Such frameshifting normally occurs at a set ratio and is utilized in the expression of many viral genes and a number of cellular genes. An open question is whether proteins might function as trans-acting switches to turn frameshifting on or off in response to cellular conditions. Here we show that frameshifting in a model RNA virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, is trans-activated by viral protein 2A. As a result, the frameshifting efficiency increases from 0 to 70% (one of the highest known in a mammalian system) over the course of infection, temporally regulating the expression levels of the viral structural and enzymatic proteins. PMID:28593994

  20. Mechanism of tetracycline resistance by ribosomal protection protein Tet(O).

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Atkinson, Gemma C; Thakor, Nehal S; Allas, Ular; Lu, Chuao-chao; Chan, Kwok-Yan; Tenson, Tanel; Schulten, Klaus; Wilson, Kevin S; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Frank, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Tetracycline resistance protein Tet(O), which protects the bacterial ribosome from binding the antibiotic tetracycline, is a translational GTPase with significant similarity in both sequence and structure to the elongation factor EF-G. Here, we present an atomic model of the Tet(O)-bound 70S ribosome based on our cryo-electron microscopic reconstruction at 9.6-Å resolution. This atomic model allowed us to identify the Tet(O)-ribosome binding sites, which involve three characteristic loops in domain 4 of Tet(O). Replacements of the three amino-acid tips of these loops by a single glycine residue result in loss of Tet(O)-mediated tetracycline resistance. On the basis of these findings, the mechanism of Tet(O)-mediated tetracycline resistance can be explained in molecular detail.

  1. Roles of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in maturation and transport of pre-18S rRNA and ribosome function.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Pöll, Gisela; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2005-10-28

    Despite the rising knowledge about ribosome function and structure and how ribosomal subunits assemble in vitro in bacteria, the in vivo role of many ribosomal proteins remains obscure both in pro- and eukaryotes. Our systematic analysis of yeast ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of the small subunit revealed that most eukaryotic r-proteins fulfill different roles in ribosome biogenesis, making them indispensable for growth. Different r-proteins control distinct steps of nuclear and cytoplasmic pre-18S rRNA processing and, thus, ensure that only properly assembled ribosomes become engaged in translation. Comparative analysis of dynamic and steady-state maturation assays revealed that several r-proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of pre-18S rRNA, suggesting that they form an interaction platform with the export machinery. In contrast, the presence of other r-proteins is mainly required before nuclear export is initiated. Our studies draw a correlation between the in vitro assembly, structural localization, and in vivo function of r-proteins.

  2. The structure of SAV1646 from Staphylococcus aureus belonging to a new `ribosome-associated' subfamily of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Chirgadze, Yuri N; Clarke, Teresa E; Romanov, Vladimir; Kisselman, Gera; Wu-Brown, Jean; Soloveychik, Maria; Chan, Tiffany S Y; Gordon, Roni D; Battaile, Kevin P; Pai, Emil F; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y

    2015-02-01

    The crystal structure of the SAV1646 protein from the pathogenic microorganism Staphylococcus aureus has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution. The 106-amino-acid protein forms a two-layer sandwich with α/β topology. The protein molecules associate as dimers in the crystal and in solution, with the monomers related by a pseudo-twofold rotation axis. A sequence-homology search identified the protein as a member of a new subfamily of yet uncharacterized bacterial `ribosome-associated' proteins with at least 13 members to date. A detailed analysis of the crystal protein structure along with the genomic structure of the operon containing the sav1646 gene allowed a tentative functional model of this protein to be proposed. The SAV1646 dimer is assumed to form a complex with ribosomal proteins L21 and L27 which could help to complete the assembly of the large subunit of the ribosome.

  3. Repressed synthesis of ribosomal proteins generates protein-specific cell cycle and morphological phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Mamata; Bommakanti, Ananth; Shamsuzzaman, Md.; Gregory, Brian; Samsel, Leigh; Zengel, Janice M.; Lindahl, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    The biogenesis of ribosomes is coordinated with cell growth and proliferation. Distortion of the coordinated synthesis of ribosomal components affects not only ribosome formation, but also cell fate. However, the connection between ribosome biogenesis and cell fate is not well understood. To establish a model system for inquiries into these processes, we systematically analyzed cell cycle progression, cell morphology, and bud site selection after repression of 54 individual ribosomal protein (r-protein) genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that repression of nine 60S r-protein genes results in arrest in the G2/M phase, whereas repression of nine other 60S and 22 40S r-protein genes causes arrest in the G1 phase. Furthermore, bud morphology changes after repression of some r-protein genes. For example, very elongated buds form after repression of seven 60S r-protein genes. These genes overlap with, but are not identical to, those causing the G2/M cell cycle phenotype. Finally, repression of most r-protein genes results in changed sites of bud formation. Strikingly, the r-proteins whose repression generates similar effects on cell cycle progression cluster in the ribosome physical structure, suggesting that different topological areas of the precursor and/or mature ribosome are mechanistically connected to separate aspects of the cell cycle. PMID:24109599

  4. Repressed synthesis of ribosomal proteins generates protein-specific cell cycle and morphological phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Mamata; Bommakanti, Ananth; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Gregory, Brian; Samsel, Leigh; Zengel, Janice M; Lindahl, Lasse

    2013-12-01

    The biogenesis of ribosomes is coordinated with cell growth and proliferation. Distortion of the coordinated synthesis of ribosomal components affects not only ribosome formation, but also cell fate. However, the connection between ribosome biogenesis and cell fate is not well understood. To establish a model system for inquiries into these processes, we systematically analyzed cell cycle progression, cell morphology, and bud site selection after repression of 54 individual ribosomal protein (r-protein) genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that repression of nine 60S r-protein genes results in arrest in the G2/M phase, whereas repression of nine other 60S and 22 40S r-protein genes causes arrest in the G1 phase. Furthermore, bud morphology changes after repression of some r-protein genes. For example, very elongated buds form after repression of seven 60S r-protein genes. These genes overlap with, but are not identical to, those causing the G2/M cell cycle phenotype. Finally, repression of most r-protein genes results in changed sites of bud formation. Strikingly, the r-proteins whose repression generates similar effects on cell cycle progression cluster in the ribosome physical structure, suggesting that different topological areas of the precursor and/or mature ribosome are mechanistically connected to separate aspects of the cell cycle.

  5. Molecular characterization of a human gene for S28 ribosomal binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.; Borst, D.E.; Chader, G.J.

    1994-09-01

    The mechanism of ribosome action and the ribosomal binding proteins which cooperatively interact in the working of this structure are not completely understood. Theoretically, mutations in genes that encode these proteins may compromise the efficiency of protein synthesis and therefore lead to a functional disorder. In the course of our search for human genes which show homology to the C. elegans CED-4 death gene, we have serendipitously identified one of the human S28 ribosomal binding protein genes as a random fragment fused to the end of one of our putative CED-4 positive homologue clones. The cloned S28 fragment consists of 381 nucleotides with a putative open reading frame of 113 amino acids. Sequence comparisons to GenBank revealed significant homologies to ribosomal binding protein genes in other species (including the rat S28 ribosomal binding protein gene) indicating that the S28 gene sequence is highly conserved. This finding is confirmed by zooblot analysis. Significant homologies also exist to two human expressed tagged sites (HUMRIBPROB; L05091 and HSAFIF072; Z21908). Analysis of the putative S28 peptide sequence allows insights into possible functional regions of the protein. The identification of 8 distinct bands upon Southern analysis of the S28 fragments suggests that there are multiple copies of the S28 gene in the human genome. Mapping of the S28 fragment on somatic cell hybrid panels identified distinct S28 gene loci on chromosomes 1, 2, 7, 10, 11, 12, 17 expression in adult tissues (pancreas, kidney, muscle, liver, lung, placenta, brain, heart, and retina) as well as in fetal tissues (kidney, liver, lung, brain, and heart).

  6. Ubiquitination of newly synthesized proteins at the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Canadeo, Larissa A; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2015-07-01

    Newly synthesized proteins can be misfolded or damaged because of errors during synthesis or environmental insults (e.g., heat shock), placing a significant burden on protein quality control systems. In addition, numerous human diseases are associated with a deficiency in eliminating aberrant proteins or accumulation of aggregated proteins. Understanding the mechanisms of protein quality control and disposal pathways for misfolded proteins is therefore crucial for therapeutic intervention in these diseases. Quality control processes function at many points in the life cycle of proteins, and a subset act at the actual site of protein synthesis, the ribosome. Here we summarize recent advances in the role of the ubiquitin proteasome system in protein quality control during the process of translation.

  7. Ubiquitination of Newly Synthesized Proteins at the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Canadeo, Larissa A.; Huibregtse, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    Newly synthesized proteins can be misfolded or damaged because of errors during synthesis or environmental insults (e.g., heat shock), placing a significant burden on protein quality control systems. In addition, numerous human diseases are associated with a deficiency in eliminating aberrant proteins or accumulation of aggregated proteins. Understanding the mechanisms of protein quality control and disposal pathways for misfolded proteins is therefore crucial for therapeutic intervention in these diseases. Quality control processes function at many points in the life cycle of proteins, and a subset act at the actual site of protein synthesis, the ribosome. Here we summarize recent advances in the role of the ubiquitin proteasome system in protein quality control during the process of translation. PMID:25701549

  8. Dimorphism of ribosomal protein L8 among different laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, J; Ono, B

    1980-12-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used in a comparative study of ribosomal proteins from various strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results demonstrated a case of dimorphism of L8 protein of 60S ribosomal subunit. Of eight strains examined, two strains were one type and six were the other type. The former, which was tentatively designated as altered (A) type, was more acidic than the latter, common (C) type, as shown by mobility difference in pH gradient gel. Heterozygous (A/C) diploid cells contained both types of L8 protein and gave rise to tetrads of 2:2 segregation for A and C types, indicating that the difference of mobility was reflection of the allelic difference of the gene coding for L8 protein.

  9. Protein folding: When ribosomes pick the structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivertsson, Elin M.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Anfinsen's principle tells us that the folded structure of a protein is determined solely by its sequence. Now, it has been shown that the rate at which a polypeptide chain is synthesized in the cell can affect which of two alternative folded structures it adopts.

  10. RNA-protein distance patterns in ribosomes reveal the mechanism of translational attenuation.

    PubMed

    Yu, DongMei; Zhang, Chao; Qin, PeiWu; Cornish, Peter V; Xu, Dong

    2014-11-01

    Elucidating protein translational regulation is crucial for understanding cellular function and drug development. A key molecule in protein translation is ribosome, which is a super-molecular complex extensively studied for more than a half century. The structure and dynamics of ribosome complexes were resolved recently thanks to the development of X-ray crystallography, Cryo-EM, and single molecule biophysics. Current studies of the ribosome have shown multiple functional states, each with a unique conformation. In this study, we analyzed the RNA-protein distances of ribosome (2.5 MDa) complexes and compared these changes among different ribosome complexes. We found that the RNA-protein distance is significantly correlated with the ribosomal functional state. Thus, the analysis of RNA-protein binding distances at important functional sites can distinguish ribosomal functional states and help understand ribosome functions. In particular, the mechanism of translational attenuation by nascent peptides and antibiotics was revealed by the conformational changes of local functional sites.

  11. Expression Trend of Selected Ribosomal Protein Genes in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiang-Ru; Sim, Edmund Ui-Hang; Ling, Teck-Yee; Tiong, Thung-Sing; Subramaniam, Selva Kumar; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ribosomal proteins are traditionally associated with protein biosynthesis until recent studies that implicated their extraribosomal functions in human diseases and cancers. Our previous studies using GeneFishing™ DEG method and microarray revealed underexpression of three ribosomal protein genes, RPS26, RPS27, and RPL32 in cancer of the nasopharynx. Herein, we investigated the expression pattern and nucleotide sequence integrity of these genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma to further delineate their involvement in tumourigenesis. The relationship of expression level with clinicopathologic factors was also statistically studied. Methods: Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction was performed on nasopharyngeal carcinoma and their paired normal tissues. Expression and sequence of these three genes were analysed. Results: All three ribosomal protein genes showed no significant difference in transcript expressions and no association could be established with clinicopathologic factors studied. No nucleotide aberrancy was detected in the coding regions of these genes. Conclusion: There is no early evidence to substantiate possible involvement of RPS26, RPS27, and RPL32 genes in NPC tumourigenesis. PMID:23613646

  12. Structure determination of archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a reveals a novel protein fold

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yingang; Song, Xiaxia; Lin, Jinzhong; Xuan, Jinsong; Cui, Qiu; Wang, Jinfeng

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a has no homology to known proteins. • Three dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of L46a were determined by NMR. • The structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. • A potential rRNA-binding surface on L46a was identified. • The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed. - Abstract: Three archaea-specific ribosomal proteins recently identified show no sequence homology with other known proteins. Here we determined the structure of L46a, the most conserved one among the three proteins, from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 using NMR spectroscopy. The structure presents a twisted β-sheet formed by the N-terminal part and two helices at the C-terminus. The L46a structure has a positively charged surface which is conserved in the L46a protein family and is the potential rRNA-binding site. Searching homologous structures in Protein Data Bank revealed that the structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. The backbone dynamics identified by NMR relaxation experiments reveal significant flexibility at the rRNA binding surface. The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed by fitting the structure into a previous electron microscopy map of the ribosomal 50S subunit, which indicated that L46a contacts to domain I of 23S rRNA near a multifunctional ribosomal protein L7ae.

  13. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6, an evolutionarily conserved regulator of ribosome biogenesis and protein translation

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Jin, Zhaoqing; Yang, Xiaohan; Li, Jian-Feng; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) as one of the molecular links between abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and its regulation on protein translation. Moreover, we identified Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 6 (eIF6) as an interacting partner of RACK1. Because the interaction between RACK1 and eIF6 in mammalian cells is known to regulate the ribosome assembly step of protein translation initiation, it was hypothesized that the same process of protein translation in Arabidopsis is also regulated by RACK1 and eIF6. In this article, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of eIF6 in different species from different lineages and discovered some intriguing differences in protein phosphorylation sites that may contribute to its action in ribosome assembly and biogenesis. In addition, we discovered that, distinct from non-plant organisms in which eIF6 is encoded by a single gene, all sequenced plant genomes contain two or more copies of eIF6 genes. While one copy of plant eIF6 is expressed ubiquitously and might possess the conserved function in ribosome biogenesis and protein translation, the other copy seems to be only expressed in specific organs and therefore may have gained some new functions. We proposed some important studies that may help us better understand the function of eIF6 in plants.

  14. [C-terminal fragment of ribosomal protein S15 is located at the decoding site of the human ribosome].

    PubMed

    Khaĭrulina, Iu S; Molotkov, M V; Bulygin, K N; Graĭfer, D M; Ven'iaminova, A G; Karpova, G G

    2008-01-01

    Protein S15 is a characteristic component of the mammalian 80S ribosome that neighbors mRNA codon at the decoding site and the downstream triplets. In this study we determined S15 protein fragments located close to mRNA positions +4 to +12 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site codon on the human ribosome. For cross-linking to ribosomal protein S15, a set of mRNA was used that contained triplet UUU/UUC at the 5'-termini and a perfluorophenyl azide-modified uridine in position 3' of this triplet. The locations of mRNA analogues on the ribosome were governed by tRNAPhe cognate to the UUU/UUC triplet targeted to the P site. Cross-linked S15 protein was isolated from the irradiated with mild UV light complexes of 80S ribosomes with tRNAPhe and mRNA analogues with subsequent cleavage with CNBr that splits polypeptide chain after methionines. Analysis of modified oligopeptides resulted from the cleavage revealed that in all cases cross-linking site was located in C-terminal fragment 111-145 of protein S15 indicating that this fragment is involved in formation of decoding site of the eukaryotic ribosome.

  15. The unfolded protein response triggers site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Lisa; Mak, Raymond; Webb, Kristofor; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Zuzow, Nathan; Riviere, Paul; Yang, Bing; Fenech, Emma; Tang, Xin; Lindsay, Scott A.; Christianson, John C.; Hampton, Randolph Y.; Wasserman, Steven A.; Bennett, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insults to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis activate the unfolded protein response (UPR), which elevates protein folding and degradation capacity and attenuates protein synthesis. While a role for ubiquitin in regulating the degradation of misfolded ER-resident proteins is well described, ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translational reprogramming during the UPR remains uncharacterized. Using global quantitative ubiquitin proteomics, we identify evolutionarily conserved, site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins. We demonstrate that these events occur on assembled cytoplasmic ribosomes and are stimulated by both UPR activation and translation inhibition. We further show that ER stress-stimulated regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation occurs on a timescale similar to eIF2α phosphorylation, is dependent upon PERK signaling, and is required for optimal cell survival during chronic UPR activation. In total, these results reveal regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation as a previously uncharacterized and important facet of eukaryotic translational control. PMID:26051182

  16. Dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins in Holozoa.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Bettina M; Hausdorf, Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    We studied the highly dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) in Holozoa. Most major clades within Holozoa are characterized by gains and/or losses of MRPs. The usefulness of gains of MRPs as rare genomic changes in phylogenetics is undermined by the high frequency of secondary losses. However, phylogenetic analyses of the MRP sequences provide evidence for the Acrosomata hypothesis, a sister group relationship between Ctenophora and Bilateria. An extensive restructuring of the mitochondrial genome and, as a consequence, of the mitochondrial ribosomes occurred in the ancestor of metazoans. The last MRP genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome were either moved to the nuclear genome or were lost. The strong decrease in size of the mitochondrial genome was probably caused by selection for rapid replication of mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis in the metazoan ancestor. A phylogenetic analysis of MRPL56 sequences provided evidence for a horizontal gene transfer of the corresponding MRP gene between metazoans and Dictyostelidae (Amoebozoa). The hypothesis that the requisition of additional MRPs compensated for a loss of rRNA segments in the mitochondrial ribosomes is corroborated by a significant negative correlation between the number of MRPs and length of the rRNA. Newly acquired MRPs evolved faster than bacterial MRPs and positions in eukaryote-specific MRPs were more strongly affected by coevolution than positions in prokaryotic MRPs in accordance with the necessity to fit these proteins into the pre-existing structure of the mitoribosome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolution of Drosophila ribosomal protein gene core promoters

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaotu; Zhang, Kangyu; Li, Xiaoman

    2011-01-01

    The coordinated expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) has been well documented in many species. Previous analyses of RPG promoters focus only on Fungi and mammals. Recognizing this gap and using a comparative genomics approach, we utilize a motif-finding algorithm that incorporates cross-species conservation to identify several significant motifs in Drosophila RPG promoters. As a result, significant differences of the enriched motifs in RPG promoter are found among Drosophila, Fungi, and mammals, demonstrating the evolutionary dynamics of the ribosomal gene regulatory network. We also report a motif present in similar numbers of RPGs among Drosophila species which does not appear to be conserved at the individual RPG gene level. A module-wise stabilizing selection theory is proposed to explain this observation. Overall, our results provide significant insight into the fast-evolving nature of transcriptional regulation in the RPG module. PMID:19059316

  18. Evolution of Drosophila ribosomal protein gene core promoters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaotu; Zhang, Kangyu; Li, Xiaoman

    2009-03-01

    The coordinated expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) has been well documented in many species. Previous analyses of RPG promoters focus only on Fungi and mammals. Recognizing this gap and using a comparative genomics approach, we utilize a motif-finding algorithm that incorporates cross-species conservation to identify several significant motifs in Drosophila RPG promoters. As a result, significant differences of the enriched motifs in RPG promoter are found among Drosophila, Fungi, and mammals, demonstrating the evolutionary dynamics of the ribosomal gene regulatory network. We also report a motif present in similar numbers of RPGs among Drosophila species which does not appear to be conserved at the individual RPG gene level. A module-wise stabilizing selection theory is proposed to explain this observation. Overall, our results provide significant insight into the fast-evolving nature of transcriptional regulation in the RPG module.

  19. Deletion of L4 domains reveals insights into the importance of ribosomal protein extensions in eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Gamalinda, Michael; Woolford, John L

    2014-11-01

    Numerous ribosomal proteins have a striking bipartite architecture: a globular body positioned on the ribosomal exterior and an internal loop buried deep into the rRNA core. In eukaryotes, a significant number of conserved r-proteins have evolved extra amino- or carboxy-terminal tail sequences, which thread across the solvent-exposed surface. The biological importance of these extended domains remains to be established. In this study, we have investigated the universally conserved internal loop and the eukaryote-specific extensions of yeast L4. We show that in contrast to findings with bacterial L4, deleting the internal loop of yeast L4 causes severely impaired growth and reduced levels of large ribosomal subunits. We further report that while depleting the entire L4 protein blocks early assembly steps in yeast, deletion of only its extended internal loop affects later steps in assembly, revealing a second role for L4 during ribosome biogenesis. Surprisingly, deletion of the entire eukaryote-specific carboxy-terminal tail of L4 has no effect on viability, production of 60S subunits, or translation. These unexpected observations provide impetus to further investigate the functions of ribosomal protein extensions, especially eukaryote-specific examples, in ribosome assembly and function. © 2014 Gamalinda and Woolford; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Nuclear and nucleolar targeting of human ribosomal protein S6.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C; Lipsius, E; Kruppa, J

    1995-01-01

    Chimeric proteins were constructed to define the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of human ribosomal protein S6. The complete cDNA sequence, different cDNA fragments and oligonucleotides of the human ribosomal proteins S6, respectively, were joined to the 5' end of the entire LacZ gene of Escherichia coli by using recombinant techniques. The hybrid genes were transfected into L cells, transiently expressed, and the intracellular location of the fusion proteins was determined by their beta-galactosidase activity. Three NLSs were identified in the C-terminal half of the S6 protein. Deletion mutagenesis demonstrated that a single NLS is sufficient for targeting the corresponding S6-beta-galactosidase chimera into the nucleus. Removal of all three putative NLSs completely blocked the nuclear import of the resulting S6-beta-galactosidase fusion protein, which instead became evenly distributed in the cytoplasm. Chimeras containing deletion mutants of S6 with at least one single NLS or unmodified S6 accumulated in the nucleolus. Analysis of several constructs reveals the existence of a specific domain that is essential but not sufficient for nucleolar accumulation of S6. Images PMID:8590812

  1. Ribosome profiling: a Hi-Def monitor for protein synthesis at the genome-wide scale.

    PubMed

    Michel, Audrey M; Baranov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome profiling or ribo-seq is a new technique that provides genome-wide information on protein synthesis (GWIPS) in vivo. It is based on the deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments allowing the measurement of ribosome density along all RNA molecules present in the cell. At the same time, the high resolution of this technique allows detailed analysis of ribosome density on individual RNAs. Since its invention, the ribosome profiling technique has been utilized in a range of studies in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Several studies have adapted and refined the original ribosome profiling protocol for studying specific aspects of translation. Ribosome profiling of initiating ribosomes has been used to map sites of translation initiation. These studies revealed the surprisingly complex organization of translation initiation sites in eukaryotes. Multiple initiation sites are responsible for the generation of N-terminally extended and truncated isoforms of known proteins as well as for the translation of numerous open reading frames (ORFs), upstream of protein coding ORFs. Ribosome profiling of elongating ribosomes has been used for measuring differential gene expression at the level of translation, the identification of novel protein coding genes and ribosome pausing. It has also provided data for developing quantitative models of translation. Although only a dozen or so ribosome profiling datasets have been published so far, they have already dramatically changed our understanding of translational control and have led to new hypotheses regarding the origin of protein coding genes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Ribosome profiling: a Hi-Def monitor for protein synthesis at the genome-wide scale

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Audrey M; Baranov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome profiling or ribo-seq is a new technique that provides genome-wide information on protein synthesis (GWIPS) in vivo. It is based on the deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments allowing the measurement of ribosome density along all RNA molecules present in the cell. At the same time, the high resolution of this technique allows detailed analysis of ribosome density on individual RNAs. Since its invention, the ribosome profiling technique has been utilized in a range of studies in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Several studies have adapted and refined the original ribosome profiling protocol for studying specific aspects of translation. Ribosome profiling of initiating ribosomes has been used to map sites of translation initiation. These studies revealed the surprisingly complex organization of translation initiation sites in eukaryotes. Multiple initiation sites are responsible for the generation of N-terminally extended and truncated isoforms of known proteins as well as for the translation of numerous open reading frames (ORFs), upstream of protein coding ORFs. Ribosome profiling of elongating ribosomes has been used for measuring differential gene expression at the level of translation, the identification of novel protein coding genes and ribosome pausing. It has also provided data for developing quantitative models of translation. Although only a dozen or so ribosome profiling datasets have been published so far, they have already dramatically changed our understanding of translational control and have led to new hypotheses regarding the origin of protein coding genes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23696005

  3. Transactivation of programmed ribosomal frameshifting by a viral protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanhua; Treffers, Emmely E.; Napthine, Sawsan; Tas, Ali; Zhu, Longchao; Sun, Zhi; Bell, Susanne; Mark, Brian L.; van Veelen, Peter A.; van Hemert, Martijn J.; Firth, Andrew E.; Brierley, Ian; Snijder, Eric J.; Fang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) is a widely used translational mechanism facilitating the expression of two polypeptides from a single mRNA. Commonly, the ribosome interacts with an mRNA secondary structure that promotes −1 frameshifting on a homopolymeric slippery sequence. Recently, we described an unusual −2 frameshifting (−2 PRF) signal directing efficient expression of a transframe protein [nonstructural protein 2TF (nsp2TF)] of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) from an alternative reading frame overlapping the viral replicase gene. Unusually, this arterivirus PRF signal lacks an obvious stimulatory RNA secondary structure, but as confirmed here, can also direct the occurrence of −1 PRF, yielding a third, truncated nsp2 variant named “nsp2N.” Remarkably, we now show that both −2 and −1 PRF are transactivated by a protein factor, specifically a PRRSV replicase subunit (nsp1β). Embedded in nsp1β’s papain-like autoproteinase domain, we identified a highly conserved, putative RNA-binding motif that is critical for PRF transactivation. The minimal RNA sequence required for PRF was mapped within a 34-nt region that includes the slippery sequence and a downstream conserved CCCANCUCC motif. Interaction of nsp1β with the PRF signal was demonstrated in pull-down assays. These studies demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that a protein can function as a transactivator of ribosomal frameshifting. The newly identified frameshifting determinants provide potential antiviral targets for arterivirus disease control and prevention. Moreover, protein-induced transactivation of frameshifting may be a widely used mechanism, potentially including previously undiscovered viral strategies to regulate viral gene expression and/or modulate host cell translation upon infection. PMID:24825891

  4. A general procedure for the production of antibody reagents against eukaryotic ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Giorgio; Bottarelli, Lorena; Ottonello, Simone

    2005-08-01

    Despite recent progress in the structural and functional analysis of bacterial and archaeal ribosomes, the structure and biogenesis of eukaryotic ribosomes still awaits a detailed characterization. Ribosomal protein-specific antibodies would be valuable tools for such studies, but their production is commonly hindered by the poor expression and solubility of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in E. coli. We report here an improved general procedure for the over-production of recombinant eukaryotic ribosomal proteins and for the generation of the corresponding polyclonal antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of detection of the antibodies produced by this procedure are documented.

  5. A novel RNA-binding motif in omnipotent suppressors of translation termination, ribosomal proteins and a ribosome modification enzyme?

    PubMed

    Koonin, E V; Bork, P; Sander, C

    1994-06-11

    Using computer methods for database search, multiple alignment, protein sequence motif analysis and secondary structure prediction, a putative new RNA-binding motif was identified. The novel motif is conserved in yeast omnipotent translation termination suppressor SUP1, the related DOM34 protein and its pseudogene homologue; three groups of eukaryotic and archaeal ribosomal proteins, namely L30e, L7Ae/S6e and S12e; an uncharacterized Bacillus subtilis protein related to the L7A/S6e group; and Escherichia coli ribosomal protein modification enzyme RimK. We hypothesize that a new type of RNA-binding domain may be utilized to deliver additional activities to the ribosome.

  6. Ribosomes containing mutants of L4 ribosomal protein from Thermus thermophilus display multiple defects in ribosomal functions and sensitivity against erythromycin

    PubMed Central

    TSAGKALIA, AIKATERINI; LEONTIADOU, FOTINI; XAPLANTERI, MARIA A.; PAPADOPOULOS, GEORGIOS; KALPAXIS, DIMITRIOS L.; CHOLI-PAPADOPOULOU, THEODORA

    2005-01-01

    Protein L4 from Thermus thermophilus (TthL4) was heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli cells. To study the implication of the extended loop of TthL4 in the exit-tunnel and peptidyltransferase functions, the highly conserved E56 was replaced by D or Q, while the semiconserved G55 was changed to E or S. Moreover, the sequence -G55E56- was inverted to -E55G56-. When we incorporated these mutants into E. coli ribosomes and investigated their impact on poly(Phe) synthesis, high variations in the synthetic activity and response to erythromycin of the resulting ribosomes were observed. In the absence of erythromycin, ribosomes harboring mutations G55E and E56D in TthL4 protein were characterized by low activity in synthesizing poly(Phe) and decreased capability in binding tRNA at the A site. On the other hand, ribosomes possessing mutations G55E, G55S, G55E-E56G, or E56Q in TthL4 protein were unexpectedly more sensitive to erythromycin. Evidence in support of these findings was drawn by in vivo experiments, assessing the erythromycin sensitivity of E. coli cells expressing wild-type or mutant TthL4 proteins. Our results emphasize the role of the extended loop of L4 ribosomal protein in the exit-tunnel and peptidyltransferase center functions. PMID:16244130

  7. Role of ribosomal protein S12 in peptide chain elongation: analysis of pleiotropic, streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, J M; Young, R; Dennis, P P; Nomura, M

    1977-01-01

    Some of the spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli strain C600 exhibit pleiotropic effects in addition to the antibiotic resistance. These effects include decreased growth rates, reduced levels of certain enzymes, and poor support of bacteriophage growth. One of these mutants, strain SM3, was studied further. We have examined the question of whether the reduced growth rate of the mutant SM3 is related to the reduction in relative amounts of ribosomes or to the reduction in the efficiency of ribosomes in protein synthesis. Measurements of alpha, the differential synthesis rate of ribosomal protein, revealed that the protein synthesis effeciency of ribosomes from the mutant strain SM3 was reduced about twofold relative to that of the parent strain C600. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase and of the synthesis time of several different molecular-weight classes of proteins indicated that the mutation resulted in a marked reduction in the peptide chain growth rate. This reduction in the chain growth rate probably accounted for most of the observed reduction in the growth rate of the mutant strain. These experimental results show that the strA gene product, the S12 protein of the 30S subunit, is involved in some aspect of protein chain elongation. Presumably this involvement occurs during the messenger ribonucleic acid-directed binding of transfer ribonucleic acid to the ribosome. PMID:321423

  8. Role of ribosomal protein S12 in peptide chain elongation: analysis of pleiotropic, streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zengel, J M; Young, R; Dennis, P P; Nomura, M

    1977-03-01

    Some of the spontaneous streptomycin-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli strain C600 exhibit pleiotropic effects in addition to the antibiotic resistance. These effects include decreased growth rates, reduced levels of certain enzymes, and poor support of bacteriophage growth. One of these mutants, strain SM3, was studied further. We have examined the question of whether the reduced growth rate of the mutant SM3 is related to the reduction in relative amounts of ribosomes or to the reduction in the efficiency of ribosomes in protein synthesis. Measurements of alpha, the differential synthesis rate of ribosomal protein, revealed that the protein synthesis effeciency of ribosomes from the mutant strain SM3 was reduced about twofold relative to that of the parent strain C600. Measurements of the induction lag for beta-galactosidase and of the synthesis time of several different molecular-weight classes of proteins indicated that the mutation resulted in a marked reduction in the peptide chain growth rate. This reduction in the chain growth rate probably accounted for most of the observed reduction in the growth rate of the mutant strain. These experimental results show that the strA gene product, the S12 protein of the 30S subunit, is involved in some aspect of protein chain elongation. Presumably this involvement occurs during the messenger ribonucleic acid-directed binding of transfer ribonucleic acid to the ribosome.

  9. Vaccination with the Leishmania infantum acidic ribosomal P0 protein plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides induces protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis in C57BL/6 mice but does not prevent progressive disease in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Iborra, Salvador; Carrión, Javier; Anderson, Charles; Alonso, Carlos; Sacks, David; Soto, Manuel

    2005-09-01

    We have examined the efficacy of the administration in mice of a molecularly defined vaccine based on the Leishmania infantum acidic ribosomal protein P0 (rLiP0). Two different challenge models of murine cutaneous leishmaniasis were used: (i) subcutaneous inoculation of L. major parasites in susceptible BALB/c mice (a model widely used for vaccination analysis) and (ii) the intradermal inoculation of a low infective dose in resistant C57BL/6 mice (a model that more accurately reproduces the L. major infection in natural reservoirs and in human hosts). First, we demonstrated that C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with LiP0-DNA or rLiP0 protein plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) were protected against the development of dermal pathology and showed a reduction in the parasite load. This protection was associated with production of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in the dermal site. Secondly, we showed that immunization with rLiP0 plus CpG ODN is able to induce only partial protection in BALB/c, since these mice finally developed a progressive disease. Further, we demonstrated that LiP0 vaccination induces a Th1 immunological response in both strains of mice. In both cases, the antibodies against LiP0 were predominantly of the immunoglobulin G2a isotype, which was correlated with an rLiP0-stimulated production of IFN-gamma in draining lymph nodes. Finally, we demonstrated that LiP0 vaccination does not prevent the Th2 response induced by L. major infection in BALB/c mice. Taken together, these data indicate that the BALB/c model of cutaneous leishmaniasis may undervalue the potential efficacy of some vaccines based on defined proteins, making C57BL/6 a suitable alternative model to test vaccine candidates.

  10. Fusidic Acid Targets Elongation Factor G in Several Stages of Translocation on the Bacterial Ribosome*

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Anneli; Holm, Mikael; Shiroyama, Ikue; Hauryliuk, Vasili; Pavlov, Michael; Sanyal, Suparna; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2015-01-01

    The antibiotic fusidic acid (FA) targets elongation factor G (EF-G) and inhibits ribosomal peptide elongation and ribosome recycling, but deeper mechanistic aspects of FA action have remained unknown. Using quench flow and stopped flow experiments in a biochemical system for protein synthesis and taking advantage of separate time scales for inhibited (10 s) and uninhibited (100 ms) elongation cycles, a detailed kinetic model of FA action was obtained. FA targets EF-G at an early stage in the translocation process (I), which proceeds unhindered by the presence of the drug to a later stage (II), where the ribosome stalls. Stalling may also occur at a third stage of translocation (III), just before release of EF-G from the post-translocation ribosome. We show that FA is a strong elongation inhibitor (K50% ≈ 1 μm), discuss the identity of the FA targeted states, and place existing cryo-EM and crystal structures in their functional context. PMID:25451927

  11. Coordinated Ribosomal L4 Protein Assembly into the Pre-Ribosome Is Regulated by Its Eukaryote-Specific Extension.

    PubMed

    Stelter, Philipp; Huber, Ferdinand M; Kunze, Ruth; Flemming, Dirk; Hoelz, André; Hurt, Ed

    2015-06-04

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires nuclear import and hierarchical incorporation of ∼80 ribosomal proteins (RPs) into the ribosomal RNA core. In contrast to prokaryotes, many eukaryotic RPs possess long extensions that interdigitate in the mature ribosome. RpL4 is a prime example, with an ∼80-residue-long surface extension of unknown function. Here, we identify assembly chaperone Acl4 that initially binds the universally conserved internal loop of newly synthesized RpL4 via its superhelical TPR domain, thereby restricting RpL4 loop insertion at its cognate nascent rRNA site. RpL4 release from Acl4 is orchestrated with pre-ribosome assembly, during which the eukaryote-specific RpL4 extension makes several distinct interactions with the 60S surface, including a co-evolved site on neighboring RpL18. Consequently, mutational inactivation of this contact site, on either RpL4 or RpL18, impairs RpL4-Acl4 disassembly and RpL4 pre-ribosome incorporation. We propose that hierarchical ribosome assembly can be achieved by eukaryotic RP extensions and dedicated assembly chaperones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Two Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins act as RNases for specific classes of mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 leads to the stabilization of pre-spore specific mRNAs during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The purification of S6 kinase has allowed the identification of protein S11 as the mRNase specific for pre-spore mRNAs. Methylation of ribosomal protein S31 leads to the destabilization of ribosomal protein mRNAs. The purification of S31 methyltransferase has allowed the identification of protein S29 as the mRNAse specific for ribosomal protein mRNAs. PMID:12392449

  13. Two Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins act as RNases for specific classes of mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 leads to the stabilization of pre-spore specific mRNAs during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The purification of S6 kinase has allowed the identification of protein S11 as the mRNase specific for pre-spore mRNAs. Methylation of ribosomal protein S31 leads to the destabilization of ribosomal protein mRNAs. The purification of S31 methyltransferase has allowed the identification of protein S29 as the mRNAse specific for ribosomal protein mRNAs.

  14. Positive modulation of RNA polymerase III transcription by ribosomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dieci, Giorgio; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Ottonello, Simone

    2009-02-06

    A yeast nuclear fraction of unknown composition, named TFIIIE, was reported previously to enhance transcription of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes in vitro. We show that TFIIIE activity co-purifies with a specific subset of ribosomal proteins (RPs) which, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, generally interact with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, but not with a Pol II-specific promoter. Only Rpl6Ap and Rpl6Bp, among the tested RPs, were found associated to a TATA-containing tRNA{sup Ile}(TAT) gene. The RPL6A gene also emerged as a strong multicopy suppressor of a conditional mutation in the basal transcription factor TFIIIC, while RPL26A and RPL14A behaved as weak suppressors. The data delineate a novel extra-ribosomal role for one or a few RPs which, by influencing 5S rRNA and tRNA synthesis, could play a key role in the coordinate regulation of the different sub-pathways required for ribosome biogenesis and functionality.

  15. Association of protein biogenesis factors at the yeast ribosomal tunnel exit is affected by the translational status and nascent polypeptide sequence.

    PubMed

    Raue, Uta; Oellerer, Stefan; Rospert, Sabine

    2007-03-16

    Ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors (RPBs) act during a short but critical period of protein biogenesis. The action of RPBs starts as soon as a nascent polypeptide becomes accessible from the outside of the ribosome and ends upon termination of translation. In yeast, RPBs include the chaperones Ssb1/2 and ribosome-associated complex, signal recognition particle, nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC), the aminopeptidases Map1 and Map2, and the Nalpha-terminal acetyltransferase NatA. Here, we provide the first comprehensive analysis of RPB binding at the yeast ribosomal tunnel exit as a function of translational status and polypeptide sequence. We measured the ratios of RPBs to ribosomes in yeast cells and determined RPB occupation of translating and non-translating ribosomes. The combined results imply a requirement for dynamic and coordinated interactions at the tunnel exit. Exclusively, NAC was associated with the majority of ribosomes regardless of their translational status. All other RPBs occupied only ribosomal subpopulations, binding with increased apparent affinity to randomly translating ribosomes as compared with non-translating ones. Analysis of RPB interaction with homogenous ribosome populations engaged in the translation of specific nascent polypeptides revealed that the affinities of Ssb1/2, NAC, and, as expected, signal recognition particle, were influenced by the amino acid sequence of the nascent polypeptide. Complementary cross-linking data suggest that not only affinity of RPBs to the ribosome but also positioning can be influenced in a nascent polypeptide-dependent manner.

  16. Truncation of the Mrp20 protein reveals new ribosome-assembly subcomplex in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasvinder; Stuart, Rosemary A

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal protein 20 (Mrp20) is a component of the yeast mitochondrial large (54S) ribosomal subunit and is homologous to the bacterial L23 protein, located at the ribosomal tunnel exit site. The carboxy-terminal mitochondrial-specific domain of Mrp20 was found to have a crucial role in the assembly of the ribosomes. A new, membrane-bound, ribosomal-assembly subcomplex composed of known tunnel-exit-site proteins, an uncharacterized ribosomal protein, MrpL25, and the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx), Prx1, accumulates in an mrp20ΔC yeast mutant. Finally, data supporting the idea that the inner mitochondrial membrane acts as a platform for the ribosome assembly process are discussed.

  17. Proteins at the Polypeptide Tunnel Exit of the Yeast Mitochondrial Ribosome*

    PubMed Central

    Gruschke, Steffi; Gröne, Kerstin; Heublein, Manfred; Hölz, Stefanie; Israel, Lars; Imhof, Axel; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Ott, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria requires the synthesis of proteins encoded in the mitochondrial DNA. The mitochondrial translation machinery differs significantly from that of the bacterial ancestor of the organelle. This is especially evident from many mitochondria-specific ribosomal proteins. An important site of the ribosome is the polypeptide tunnel exit. Here, nascent chains are exposed to an aqueous environment for the first time. Many biogenesis factors interact with the tunnel exit of pro- and eukaryotic ribosomes to help the newly synthesized proteins to mature. To date, nothing is known about the organization of the tunnel exit of mitochondrial ribosomes. We therefore undertook a comprehensive approach to determine the composition of the yeast mitochondrial ribosomal tunnel exit. Mitochondria contain homologues of the ribosomal proteins located at this site in bacterial ribosomes. Here, we identified proteins located in their proximity by chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry. Our analysis revealed a complex network of interacting proteins including proteins and protein domains specific to mitochondrial ribosomes. This network includes Mba1, the membrane-bound ribosome receptor of the inner membrane, as well as Mrpl3, Mrpl13, and Mrpl27, which constitute ribosomal proteins exclusively found in mitochondria. This unique architecture of the tunnel exit is presumably an adaptation of the translation system to the specific requirements of the organelle. PMID:20404317

  18. Cloning and characterization of nuclear genes for two mitochondrial ribosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kitakawa, M; Grohmann, L; Graack, H R; Isono, K

    1990-01-01

    The genes for two large subunit proteins, YmL8 and YmL20, of the mitochondrial ribosome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were cloned by hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotide mixtures corresponding to their N-terminal amino acid sequences. They were termed MRP-L8 and MRP-L20, respectively, and their nucleotide sequences were determined using a DNA sequencer. The MRP-L8 gene was found to encode a 26.8-kDa protein whose deduced amino acid sequence has a high degree of similarity to ribosomal protein L17 of Escherichia coli. The gene MRP-L20 was found to encode a 22.3-kDa protein with a presequence consisting of 18 amino acid residues. By Southern blot hybridization to the yeast chromosomes separated by field-inversion gel electrophoresis, the MRP-L8 and MRP-L20 genes were located on chromosomes X and XI, respectively. Gene disruption experiments indicate that their products, YmL8 and YmL20 proteins, are essential for the mitochondrial function and the absence of these proteins causes instability of the mitochondrial DNA. Images PMID:2183197

  19. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures.

    PubMed

    Slinger, Betty L; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M

    2015-12-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition.

  20. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Betty L.; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition. PMID:26675164

  1. Fluorescent protein tagging confirms the presence of ribosomal proteins at Drosophila polytene chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Preethi; Matina, Tina; Wen, Jikai

    2013-01-01

    Most ribosomal proteins (RPs) are stoichiometrically incorporated into ribosomal subunits and play essential roles in ribosome biogenesis and function. However, a number of RPs appear to have non-ribosomal functions, which involve direct association with pre-mRNA and transcription factors at transcription sites. The consensus is that the RPs found at these sites are off ribosomal subunits, but observation that different RPs are usually found together suggests that ribosomal or ribosomal-like subunits might be present. Notably, it has previously been reported that antibodies against 20 different RPs stain the same Pol II transcription sites in Drosophila polytene chromosomes. Some concerns, however, were raised about the specificity of the antibodies. To investigate further whether RPs are present at transcription sites in Drosophila, we have generated several transgenic flies expressing RPs (RpS2, RpS5a, RpS9, RpS11, RpS13, RpS18, RpL8, RpL11, RpL32, and RpL36) tagged with either green or red fluorescent protein. Imaging of salivary gland cells showed that these proteins are, as expected, abundant in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleolus. However, these RPs are also apparent in the nucleus in the region occupied by the chromosomes. Indeed, polytene chromosome immunostaining of a representative subset of tagged RPs confirms the association with transcribed loci. Furthermore, characterization of a strain expressing RpL41 functionally tagged at its native genomic locus with YFP, also showed apparent nuclear accumulation and chromosomal association, suggesting that such a nuclear localization pattern might be a shared feature of RPs and is biologically important. We anticipate that the transgenes described here should provide a useful research tool to visualize ribosomal subunits in Drosophila tissues and to study the non-ribosomal functions of RPs. PMID:23638349

  2. The three-dimensional structure of the RNA-binding domain of ribosomal protein L2; a protein at the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, A; Nakashima, T; Taniguchi, M; Hosaka, H; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    1999-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L2 is the largest protein component in the ribosome. It is located at or near the peptidyl transferase center and has been a prime candidate for the peptidyl transferase activity. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and plays a crucial role in its assembly. The three-dimensional structure of the RNA-binding domain of L2 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined at 2.3 A resolution by X-ray crystallography using the selenomethionyl MAD method. The RNA-binding domain of L2 consists of two recurring motifs of approximately 70 residues each. The N-terminal domain (positions 60-130) is homologous to the OB-fold, and the C-terminal domain (positions 131-201) is homologous to the SH3-like barrel. Residues Arg86 and Arg155, which have been identified by mutation experiments to be involved in the 23S rRNA binding, are located at the gate of the interface region between the two domains. The molecular architecture suggests how this important protein has evolved from the ancient nucleic acid-binding proteins to create a 23S rRNA-binding domain in the very remote past. PMID:10075918

  3. The yeast omnipotent suppressor SUP46 encodes a ribosomal protein which is a functional and structural homolog of the Escherichia coli S4 ram protein.

    PubMed

    Vincent, A; Liebman, S W

    1992-10-01

    The accurate synthesis of proteins is crucial to the existence of a cell. In yeast, several genes that affect the fidelity of translation have been identified (e.g., omnipotent suppressors, antisuppressors and allosuppressors). We have found that the dominant omnipotent suppressor SUP46 encodes the yeast ribosomal protein S13. S13 is encoded by two similar genes, but only the sup46 copy of the gene is able to fully complement the recessive phenotypes of SUP46 mutations. Both copies of the S13 genes contain introns. Unlike the introns of other duplicated ribosomal protein genes which are highly diverged, the duplicated S13 genes have two nearly identical DNA sequences of 25 and 31 bp in length within their introns. The SUP46 protein has significant homology to the S4 ribosomal protein in prokaryotic-type ribosomes. S4 is encoded by one of the ram (ribosomal ambiguity) genes in Escherichia coli which are the functional equivalent of omnipotent suppressors in yeast. Thus, SUP46 and S4 demonstrate functional as well as sequence conservation between prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomal proteins. SUP46 and S4 are most similar in their central amino acid sequences. Interestingly, the alterations resulting from the SUP46 mutations and the segment of the S4 protein involved in binding to the 16S rRNA are within this most conserved region.

  4. Proteins on ribosome surface: Measurements of protein exposure by hot tritium bombardment technique

    PubMed Central

    Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Kolb, Vyacheslav A.; Spirin, Alexander S.

    1997-01-01

    The hot tritium bombardment technique [Goldanskii, V. I., Kashirin, I. A., Shishkov, A. V., Baratova, L. A. & Grebenshchikov, N. I. (1988) J. Mol. Biol. 201, 567–574] has been applied to measure the exposure of proteins on the ribosomal surface. The technique is based on replacement of hydrogen by high energy tritium atoms in thin surface layer of macromolecules. Quantitation of tritium radioactivity of each protein has revealed that proteins S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21 of the small subunit, and proteins L7/L12, L9, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, and L27 of the large subunit are well exposed on the surface of the Escherichia coli 70 S ribosome. Proteins S8, S10, S12, S16, S17, L14, L20, L29, L30, L31, L32, L33, and L34 have virtually no groups exposed on the ribosomal surface. The remaining proteins are found to be exposed to lesser degree than the well exposed ones. No additional ribosomal proteins was exposed upon dissociation of ribosomes into subunits, thus indicating the absence of proteins on intersubunit contacting surfaces. PMID:9371771

  5. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Philip J.; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria. PMID:27494928

  6. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Philip J; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria.

  7. Molecular evolution of the mammalian ribosomal protein gene, RPS14.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, D D; Roufa, D J

    1991-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S14 genes (RPS14) in eukaryotic species from protozoa to primates exhibit dramatically different intron-exon structures yet share homologous polypeptide-coding sequences. To recognize common features of RPS14 gene architectures in closely related mammalian species and to evaluate similarities in their noncoding DNA sequences, we isolated the intron-containing S14 locus from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell DNA by using a PCR strategy and compared it with human RPS14. We found that rodent and primate S14 genes are composed of identical protein-coding exons interrupted by introns at four conserved DNA sites. However, the structures of corresponding CHO and human RPS14 introns differ significantly. Nonetheless, individual intron splice donor, splice acceptor, and upstream flanking motifs have been conserved within mammalian S14 homologues as well as within RPS14 gene fragments PCR amplified from other vertebrate genera (birds and bony fish). Our data indicate that noncoding, intronic DNA sequences within highly conserved, single-copy ribosomal protein genes are useful molecular landmarks for phylogenetic analysis of closely related vertebrate species.

  8. Interplay between trigger factor and other protein biogenesis factors on the ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Thomas; Holtkamp, Wolf; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Nascent proteins emerging from translating ribosomes in bacteria are screened by a number of ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors, among them the chaperone trigger factor (TF), the signal recognition particle (SRP) that targets ribosomes synthesizing membrane proteins to the membrane and the modifying enzymes, peptide deformylase (PDF) and methionine aminopeptidase (MAP). Here, we examine the interplay between these factors both kinetically and at equilibrium. TF rapidly scans the ribosomes until it is stabilized on ribosomes presenting TF-specific nascent chains. SRP binding to those complexes is strongly impaired. Thus, TF in effect prevents SRP binding to the majority of ribosomes, except those presenting SRP-specific signal sequences, explaining how the small amount of SRP in the cell can be effective in membrane targeting. PDF and MAP do not interfere with TF or SRP binding to translating ribosomes, indicating that nascent-chain processing can take place before or in parallel with TF or SRP binding.

  9. Ribosomal proteins produced in excess are degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Reitsma, Justin M.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential process that consumes prodigious quantities of cellular resources. Ribosomal proteins cannot be overproduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because the excess proteins are rapidly degraded. However, the responsible quality control (QC) mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of multiple proteins of the small and large yeast ribosomal subunits is suppressed. Rpl26 overexpressed from a plasmid can be detected in the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, but it largely fails to assemble into ribosomes and is rapidly degraded. However, if the endogenous RPL26 loci are deleted, plasmid-encoded Rpl26 assembles into ribosomes and localizes to the cytosol. Chemical and genetic perturbation studies indicate that overexpressed ribosomal proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome system and not by autophagy. Inhibition of the proteasome led to accumulation of multiple endogenous ribosomal proteins in insoluble aggregates, consistent with the operation of this QC mechanism in the absence of ribosomal protein overexpression. Our studies reveal that ribosomal proteins that fail to assemble into ribosomes are rapidly distinguished from their assembled counterparts and ubiquitinated and degraded within the nuclear compartment. PMID:27385339

  10. Deficient glutamate biosynthesis triggers a concerted upregulation of ribosomal protein genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Nortes, Tamara; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Sarmiento-Mañús, Raquel; Candela, Héctor; Micol, José Luis

    2017-07-21

    Biomass production requires the coordination between growth and metabolism. In a large-scale screen for mutants affected in leaf morphology, we isolated the orbiculata1 (orb1) mutants, which exhibit a pale green phenotype and reduced growth. The combination of map-based cloning and next-generation sequencing allowed us to establish that ORB1 encodes the GLUTAMATE SYNTHASE 1 (GLU1) enzyme, also known as FERREDOXIN-DEPENDENT GLUTAMINE OXOGLUTARATE AMINOTRANSFERASE 1 (Fd-GOGAT1). We performed an RNA-seq analysis to identify global gene expression changes in the orb1-3 mutant. We found altered expression levels of genes encoding enzymes involved in nitrogen assimilation and amino acid biosynthesis, such as glutamine synthetases, asparagine synthetases and glutamate dehydrogenases, showing that the expression of these genes depends on the levels of glutamine and/or glutamate. In addition, we observed a concerted upregulation of genes encoding subunits of the cytosolic ribosome. A gene ontology (GO) analysis of the differentially expressed genes between Ler and orb1-3 showed that the most enriched GO terms were 'translation', 'cytosolic ribosome' and 'structural constituent of ribosome'. The upregulation of ribosome-related functions might reflect an attempt to keep protein synthesis at optimal levels even when the pool of glutamate is reduced.

  11. Dynamics of Ribosomal Protein S1 on a Bacterial Ribosome with Cross-Linking and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Lauber, Matthew A.; Rappsilber, Juri; Reilly, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 has been shown to be a significant effector of prokaryotic translation. The protein is in fact capable of efficiently initiating translation, regardless of the presence of a Shine-Dalgarno sequence in mRNA. Structural insights into this process have remained elusive, as S1 is recalcitrant to traditional techniques of structural analysis, such as x-ray crystallography. Through the application of protein cross-linking and high resolution mass spectrometry, we have detailed the ribosomal binding site of S1 and have observed evidence of its dynamics. Our results support a previous hypothesis that S1 acts as the mRNA catching arm of the prokaryotic ribosome. We also demonstrate that in solution the major domains of the 30S subunit are remarkably flexible, capable of moving 30–50Å with respect to one another. PMID:23033476

  12. Conjugates of amino acids and peptides with 5-o-mycaminosyltylonolide and their interaction with the ribosomal exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Anna; Makarov, Gennady; Tereshchenkov, Andrey; Korshunova, Galina; Sumbatyan, Nataliya; Golovin, Andrey; Svetlov, Maxim; Bogdanov, Alexey

    2013-11-20

    During protein synthesis the nascent polypeptide chain (NC) extends through the ribosomal exit tunnel (NPET). Also, the large group of macrolide antibiotics binds in the nascent peptide exit tunnel. In some cases interaction of NC with NPET leads to the ribosome stalling, a significant event in regulation of translation. In other cases NC-ribosome interactions lead to pauses in translation that play an important role in cotranslational folding of polypeptides emerging from the ribosome. The precise mechanism of NC recognition in NPET as well as factors that determine NC conformation in the ribosomal tunnel are unknown. A number of derivatives of the macrolide antibiotic 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide (OMT) containing N-acylated amino acid or peptide residues were synthesized in order to study potential sites of NC-NPET interactions. The target compounds were prepared by conjugation of protected amino acids and peptides with the C23 hydroxyl group of the macrolide. These OMT derivatives showed high although varying abilities to inhibit the firefly luciferase synthesis in vitro. Three glycil-containing derivatives appeared to be strong inhibitors of translation, more potent than parental OMT. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of complexes of tylosin, OMT, and some of OMT derivatives with the large ribosomal subunit of E. coli illuminated a plausible reason for the high inhibitory activity of Boc-Gly-OMT. In addition, the MD study detected a new putative site of interaction of the nascent polypeptide chain with the NPET walls.

  13. The conformation of a nascent polypeptide inside the ribosome tunnel affects protein targeting and protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Janine H.; Woolhead, Cheryl A.; Bernstein, Harris D.

    2010-01-01

    In this report we describe insights into the function of the ribosome tunnel that were obtained through an analysis of an unusual 25 residue N-terminal motif (EspP1-25) associated with the signal peptide of the E. coli EspP protein. It was previously shown that EspP1-25 inhibits signal peptide recognition by the signal recognition particle (SRP), and we now show that fusion of EspP1-25 to a cytoplasmic protein causes it to aggregate. We obtained two lines of evidence that both of these effects are attributable to the conformation of EspP1-25 inside the ribosome tunnel. First, we found that mutations in EspP1-25 that abolished its effects on protein targeting and protein folding altered the crosslinking of short nascent chains to ribosomal components. Second, we found that a mutation in L22 that distorts the tunnel mimicked the effects of the EspP1-25 mutations on protein biogenesis. Our results provide evidence that the conformation of a polypeptide inside the ribosome tunnel can influence protein folding under physiological conditions and suggest that ribosomal mutations might increase the solubility of at least some aggregation-prone proteins produced in E. coli. PMID:20804452

  14. Effects on translation pausing of alterations in protein and RNA components of the ribosome exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Marlon G; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M

    2008-09-01

    Amino acids are polymerized into peptides in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The nascent peptides then pass through the exit tunnel before they reach the extraribosomal environment. A number of nascent peptides interact with the exit tunnel and stall elongation at specific sites within their peptide chain. Several mutational changes in RNA and protein components of the ribosome have previously been shown to interfere with pausing. These changes are localized in the narrowest region of the tunnel, near a constriction formed by ribosomal proteins L4 and L22. To expand our knowledge about peptide-induced pausing, we performed a comparative study of pausing induced by two peptides, SecM and a short peptide, Crb(CmlA), that requires chloramphenicol as a coinducer of pausing. We analyzed the effects of 15 mutational changes in L4 and L22, as well as the effects of methylating nucleotide A2058 of 23S rRNA, a nucleotide previously implicated in pausing and located close to the L4-L22 constriction. Our results show that methylation of A2058 and most mutational changes in L4 and L22 have differential effects on pausing in response to Crb(CmlA) and SecM. Only one change, a 6-amino-acid insertion after amino acid 72 in L4, affects pausing in both peptides. We conclude that the two peptides interact with different regions of the exit tunnel. Our results suggest that either the two peptides use different mechanisms of pausing or they interact differently but induce similar inhibitory conformational changes in functionally important regions of the ribosome.

  15. Effects on Translation Pausing of Alterations in Protein and RNA Components of the Ribosome Exit Tunnel▿

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Marlon G.; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are polymerized into peptides in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The nascent peptides then pass through the exit tunnel before they reach the extraribosomal environment. A number of nascent peptides interact with the exit tunnel and stall elongation at specific sites within their peptide chain. Several mutational changes in RNA and protein components of the ribosome have previously been shown to interfere with pausing. These changes are localized in the narrowest region of the tunnel, near a constriction formed by ribosomal proteins L4 and L22. To expand our knowledge about peptide-induced pausing, we performed a comparative study of pausing induced by two peptides, SecM and a short peptide, CrbCmlA, that requires chloramphenicol as a coinducer of pausing. We analyzed the effects of 15 mutational changes in L4 and L22, as well as the effects of methylating nucleotide A2058 of 23S rRNA, a nucleotide previously implicated in pausing and located close to the L4-L22 constriction. Our results show that methylation of A2058 and most mutational changes in L4 and L22 have differential effects on pausing in response to CrbCmlA and SecM. Only one change, a 6-amino-acid insertion after amino acid 72 in L4, affects pausing in both peptides. We conclude that the two peptides interact with different regions of the exit tunnel. Our results suggest that either the two peptides use different mechanisms of pausing or they interact differently but induce similar inhibitory conformational changes in functionally important regions of the ribosome. PMID:18586934

  16. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 and uL22 of Escherichia coli contribute to ribosome assembly and protein translation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Marlon G.; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Kondopaka, Maithri; Pascual, Clarence; Zengel, Janice M.; Lindahl, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of ribosomal proteins are composed of a domain on the ribosome surface and a loop or extension that penetrates into the organelle's RNA core. Our previous work showed that ribosomes lacking the loops of ribosomal proteins uL4 or uL22 are still capable of entering polysomes. However, in those experiments we could not address the formation of mutant ribosomes, because we used strains that also expressed wild-type uL4 and uL22. Here, we have focused on ribosome assembly and function in strains in which loop deletion mutant genes are the only sources of uL4 or uL22 protein. The uL4 and uL22 loop deletions have different effects, but both mutations result in accumulation of immature particles that do not accumulate in detectable amounts in wild-type strains. Thus, our results suggest that deleting the loops creates kinetic barriers in the normal assembly pathway, possibly resulting in assembly via alternate pathway(s). Furthermore, deletion of the uL4 loop results in cold-sensitive ribosome assembly and function. Finally, ribosomes carrying either of the loop-deleted proteins responded normally to the secM translation pausing peptide, but the uL4 mutant responded very inefficiently to the cmlAcrb pause peptide. PMID:27257065

  17. An inventory of yeast proteins associated with nucleolar and ribosomal components

    PubMed Central

    Staub, Eike; Mackowiak, Sebastian; Vingron, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Background Although baker's yeast is a primary model organism for research on eukaryotic ribosome assembly and nucleoli, the list of its proteins that are functionally associated with nucleoli or ribosomes is still incomplete. We trained a naïve Bayesian classifier to predict novel proteins that are associated with yeast nucleoli or ribosomes based on parts lists of nucleoli in model organisms and large-scale protein interaction data sets. Phylogenetic profiling and gene expression analysis were carried out to shed light on evolutionary and regulatory aspects of nucleoli and ribosome assembly. Results We predict that, in addition to 439 known proteins, a further 62 yeast proteins are associated with components of the nucleolus or the ribosome. The complete set comprises a large core of archaeal-type proteins, several bacterial-type proteins, but mostly eukaryote-specific inventions. Expression of nucleolar and ribosomal genes tends to be strongly co-regulated compared to other yeast genes. Conclusion The number of proteins associated with nucleolar or ribosomal components in yeast is at least 14% higher than known before. The nucleolus probably evolved from an archaeal-type ribosome maturation machinery by recruitment of several bacterial-type and mostly eukaryote-specific factors. Not only expression of ribosomal protein genes, but also expression of genes encoding the 90S processosome, are strongly co-regulated and both regulatory programs are distinct from each other. PMID:17067374

  18. Ribosomal Protein S14 Negatively Regulates c-Myc Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Hao, Qian; Liao, Jun-ming; Liao, Peng; Lu, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The ribosomal gene RPS14 is associated with the cancer-prone 5q-syndrome, which is caused by an interstitial deletion of the long arm of human chromosome 5. Previously, we found that ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) binds to and inactivates MDM2, consequently leading to p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and growth inhibition. However, it remains elusive whether RPS14 regulates cell proliferation in a p53-independent manner. Here, we show that RPS14 interacts with the Myc homology box II (MBII) and the C-terminal basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-LZ) domains of the oncoprotein c-Myc. Further, RPS14 inhibited c-Myc transcriptional activity by preventing the recruitment of c-Myc and its cofactor, TRRAP, to the target gene promoters, as thus suppressing c-Myc-induced cell proliferation. Also, siRNA-mediated RPS14 depletion elevated c-Myc transcriptional activity determined by its target gene, Nucleolin, expression. Interestingly, RPS14 depletion also resulted in the induction of c-Myc mRNA and subsequent protein levels. Consistent with this, RPS14 promoted c-Myc mRNA turnover through an Argonaute 2 (Ago2)- and microRNA-mediated pathway. Taken together, our study demonstrates that RPS14 negates c-Myc functions by directly inhibiting its transcriptional activity and mediating its mRNA degradation via miRNA. PMID:23775087

  19. Mutant forms of Escherichia coli protein L25 unable to bind to 5S rRNA are incorporated efficiently into the ribosome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Anikaev, A Y; Korepanov, A P; Korobeinikova, A V; Kljashtorny, V G; Piendl, W; Nikonov, S V; Garber, M B; Gongadze, G M

    2014-08-01

    5S rRNA-binding ribosomal proteins of the L25 family are an evolutional acquisition of bacteria. Earlier we showed that (i) single replacements in the RNA-binding module of the protein of this family result in destabilization or complete impossibility to form a complex with 5S rRNA in vitro; (ii) ΔL25 ribosomes of Escherichia coli are less efficient in protein synthesis in vivo than the control ribosomes. In the present work, the efficiency of incorporation of the E. coli protein L25 with mutations in the 5S rRNA-binding region into the ribosome in vivo was studied. It was found that the mutations in L25 that abolish its ability to form the complex with free 5S rRNA do not prevent its correct and efficient incorporation into the ribosome. This is supported by the fact that even the presence of a very weakly retained mutant form of the protein in the ribosome has a positive effect on the activity of the translational machinery in vivo. All this suggests the existence of an alternative incorporation pathway for this protein into the ribosome, excluding the preliminary formation of the complex with 5S rRNA. At the same time, the stable L25-5S rRNA contact is important for the retention of the protein within the ribosome, and the conservative amino acid residues of the RNA-binding module play a key role in this.

  20. Structural insights into the interaction of the ribosomal P stalk protein P2 with a type II ribosome-inactivating protein ricin

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaojiao; Zhu, Yuwei; Wang, Chongyuan; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is a type II ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) that depurinates A4324 at the sarcin-ricin loop of 28 S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), thus inactivating the ribosome by preventing elongation factors from binding to the GTPase activation centre. Recent studies have disclosed that the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) of eukaryotic ribosomal P stalk proteins is involved in the process that RIPs target ribosome. However, the details of the molecular interaction between ricin and P stalk proteins remain unknown. Here, we report the structure of ricin-A chain (RTA) in a complex with the CTD of the human ribosomal protein P2. The structure shows that the Phe111, Leu113 and Phe114 residues of P2 insert into a hydrophobic pocket formed by the Tyr183, Arg235, Phe240 and Ile251 residues of RTA, while Asp115 of P2 forms hydrogen bonds with Arg235 of RTA. The key residues in RTA and P2 for complex formation were mutated, and their importance was determined by pull-down assays. The results from cell-free translation assays further confirmed that the interaction with P stalk proteins is essential for the inhibition of protein synthesis by RTA. Taken together, our results provide a structural basis that will improve our understanding of the process by which ricin targets the ribosome, which will benefit the development of effective small-molecule inhibitors for use as therapeutic agents. PMID:27886256

  1. Erythromycin- and chloramphenicol-induced ribosomal assembly defects are secondary effects of protein synthesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Siibak, Triinu; Peil, Lauri; Xiong, Liqun; Mankin, Alexander; Remme, Jaanus; Tenson, Tanel

    2009-02-01

    Several protein synthesis inhibitors are known to inhibit ribosome assembly. This may be a consequence of direct binding of the antibiotic to ribosome precursor particles, or it could result indirectly from loss of coordination in the production of ribosomal components due to the inhibition of protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that erythromycin and chloramphenicol, inhibitors of the large ribosomal subunit, affect the assembly of both the large and small subunits. Expression of a small erythromycin resistance peptide acting in cis on mature ribosomes relieves the erythromycin-mediated assembly defect for both subunits. Erythromycin treatment of bacteria expressing a mixture of erythromycin-sensitive and -resistant ribosomes produced comparable effects on subunit assembly. These results argue in favor of the view that erythromycin and chloramphenicol affect the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit indirectly.

  2. Histone deacetylase 6 associates with ribosomes and regulates de novo protein translation during arsenite stress.

    PubMed

    Kappeler, Kyle V; Zhang, Jack; Dinh, Thai Nho; Strom, Joshua G; Chen, Qin M

    2012-05-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is known as a cytoplasmic enzyme that regulates cell migration, cell adhesion, and degradation of misfolded proteins by deacetylating substrates such as α-tubulin and Hsp90. When HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to 1-200μM sodium arsenite, we observed perinuclear localization of HDAC6 within 30 min. Although the overall level of HDAC6 protein did not change, sodium arsenite caused an increase of HDAC6 in ribosomal fractions. Separation of ribosomal subunits versus intact ribosomes or polysomes indicated that HDAC6 was mainly detected in 40/43S fractions containing the small ribosomal subunit in untreated cells but was associated with 40/43S and 60/80S ribosomal fractions in arsenite-treated cells. Immunocytochemistry studies revealed that arsenite caused colocalization of HDAC6 with the ribosomal large and small subunit protein L36a and S6. Both L36a and S6 were detected in the immunocomplex of HDAC6 isolated from arsenite-treated cells. The observed physical interaction of HDAC6 with ribosomes pointed to a role of HDAC6 in stress-induced protein translation. Among arsenite stress-induced proteins, de novo Nrf2 protein translation was inhibited by Tubastatin A. These data demonstrate that HDAC6 was recruited to ribosomes, physically interacted with ribosomal proteins, and regulated de novo protein translation in keratinocytes responding to arsenite stress.

  3. Maximizing Protein Translation Rate in the Ribosome Flow Model: The Homogeneous Case.

    PubMed

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    Gene translation is the process in which intracellular macro-molecules, called ribosomes, decode genetic information in the mRNA chain into the corresponding proteins. Gene translation includes several steps. During the elongation step, ribosomes move along the mRNA in a sequential manner and link amino-acids together in the corresponding order to produce the proteins. The homogeneous ribosome flow model (HRFM) is a deterministic computational model for translation-elongation under the assumption of constant elongation rates along the mRNA chain. The HRFM is described by a set of n first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations, where n represents the number of sites along the mRNA chain. The HRFM also includes two positive parameters: ribosomal initiation rate and the (constant) elongation rate. In this paper, we show that the steady-state translation rate in the HRFM is a concave function of its parameters. This means that the problem of determining the parameter values that maximize the translation rate is relatively simple. Our results may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms and evolution of translation-elongation. We demonstrate this by using the theoretical results to estimate the initiation rate in M. musculus embryonic stem cell. The underlying assumption is that evolution optimized the translation mechanism. For the infinite-dimensional HRFM, we derive a closed-form solution to the problem of determining the initiation and transition rates that maximize the protein translation rate. We show that these expressions provide good approximations for the optimal values in the n-dimensional HRFM already for relatively small values of n. These results may have applications for synthetic biology where an important problem is to re-engineer genomic systems in order to maximize the protein production rate.

  4. Maximizing protein translation rate in the non-homogeneous ribosome flow model: a convex optimization approach

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    Translation is an important stage in gene expression. During this stage, macro-molecules called ribosomes travel along the mRNA strand linking amino acids together in a specific order to create a functioning protein. An important question, related to many biomedical disciplines, is how to maximize protein production. Indeed, translation is known to be one of the most energy-consuming processes in the cell, and it is natural to assume that evolution shaped this process so that it maximizes the protein production rate. If this is indeed so then one can estimate various parameters of the translation machinery by solving an appropriate mathematical optimization problem. The same problem also arises in the context of synthetic biology, namely, re-engineer heterologous genes in order to maximize their translation rate in a host organism. We consider the problem of maximizing the protein production rate using a computational model for translation–elongation called the ribosome flow model (RFM). This model describes the flow of the ribosomes along an mRNA chain of length n using a set of n first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. It also includes n + 1 positive parameters: the ribosomal initiation rate into the mRNA chain, and n elongation rates along the chain sites. We show that the steady-state translation rate in the RFM is a strictly concave function of its parameters. This means that the problem of maximizing the translation rate under a suitable constraint always admits a unique solution, and that this solution can be determined using highly efficient algorithms for solving convex optimization problems even for large values of n. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the optimal translation rate can be computed based only on the optimal initiation rate and the elongation rate of the codons near the beginning of the ORF. We discuss some applications of the theoretical results to synthetic biology, molecular evolution, and functional genomics. PMID

  5. Sucralose activates an ERK1/2-ribosomal protein S6 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Marcy L; Kalwat, Michael A; McGlynn, Kathleen; Cobb, Melanie H

    2017-02-01

    The sweetener sucralose can signal through its GPCR receptor to induce insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells, but the downstream signaling pathways involved are not well-understood. Here we measure responses to sucralose, glucagon-like peptide 1, and amino acids in MIN6 β cells. Our data suggest a signaling axis, whereby sucralose induces calcium and cAMP, activation of ERK1/2, and site-specific phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Interestingly, sucralose acted independently of mTORC1 or ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK). These results suggest that sweeteners like sucralose can influence β-cell responses to secretagogues like glucose through metabolic as well as GPCR-mediated pathways. Future investigation of novel sweet taste receptor signaling pathways in β cells will have implications for diabetes and other emergent fields involving these receptors.

  6. Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins: From Plant Defense to Tumor Attack

    PubMed Central

    de Virgilio, Maddalena; Lombardi, Alessio; Caliandro, Rocco; Fabbrini, Maria Serena

    2010-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are EC3.2.32.22 N-glycosidases that recognize a universally conserved stem-loop structure in 23S/25S/28S rRNA, depurinating a single adenine (A4324 in rat) and irreversibly blocking protein translation, leading finally to cell death of intoxicated mammalian cells. Ricin, the plant RIP prototype that comprises a catalytic A subunit linked to a galactose-binding lectin B subunit to allow cell surface binding and toxin entry in most mammalian cells, shows a potency in the picomolar range. The most promising way to exploit plant RIPs as weapons against cancer cells is either by designing molecules in which the toxic domains are linked to selective tumor targeting domains or directly delivered as suicide genes for cancer gene therapy. Here, we will provide a comprehensive picture of plant RIPs and discuss successful designs and features of chimeric molecules having therapeutic potential. PMID:22069572

  7. Identification of an unconventional nuclear localization signal in human ribosomal protein S2

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, M.; Reimers, K.; Wirz, W.; Gressner, A.M.; Mueller, R.; Kiefer, P. . E-Mail: pkiefer@ukaachen.de

    2005-09-16

    Ribosomal proteins must be imported into the nucleus after being synthesized in the cytoplasm. Since the rpS2 amino acid sequence does not contain a typical nuclear localization signal, we used deletion mutant analysis and rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeric proteins to identify the nuclear targeting domains in rpS2. Nuclear rpS2 is strictly localized in the nucleoplasm and is not targeted to the nucleoli. Subcellular localization analysis of deletion mutants of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeras identified a central domain comprising 72 amino acids which is necessary and sufficient to target the chimeric {beta}-galactosidase to the nucleus. The nuclear targeting domain shares no significant similarity to already characterized nuclear localization signals in ribosomal proteins or other nuclear proteins. Although a Nup153 fragment containing the importin{beta} binding site fused to VP22 blocks nuclear import of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase fusion proteins, nuclear uptake of rpS2 could be mediated by several import receptors since it binds to importin{alpha}/{beta} and transportin.

  8. Ribosomal protein gene mapping and human chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmochi, N.; Goodman, N.; Page, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    In Drosophila, the Minute phenotype (reduced body size, diminished viability and fertility, and short, thin bristles) results from heterozygous deficiencies (deletions) at any one of 50 loci scattered about the genome. A handful of these Minute loci have been molecularly characterized, and all have been found to encode ribosomal proteins. Thus, the Minute phenotype appears to result from reduced protein synthetic capacity in flies with one rather than two copies of a given ribosomal protein (rp) gene. We are pursuing the possibility that similar reductions in protein synthetic capacity--again resulting from rp gene deficiencies--might underlie phenotypes associated with certain chromosomal disorders in humans. We and our colleagues have reported findings consistent with a role for RPS4 deficiency in the etiology of certain features of Turner syndrome, a complex human disorder classically associated with an XO karyotype. We are intrigued by the possibility that deficiencies of other human rp genes might cause phenotypic abnormalities similar to those seen in Turner syndrome--just as deficiencies of any of a number of Drosophila rp genes cause the Minute phenotype. We must first learn the chromosomal map position of each of the estimated 83 human rp genes. The task of mapping the functional (intron-containing) rp genes is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes elsewhere in the genome. To date, we have assigned (or confirmed the previous assignment of) 38 rp genes to individual human chromosomes by PCR analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids containing subsets of human chromosomes, with all but four chromosomes carrying at least one rp gene. We have also identified more than 100 large-insert human YAC (yeast artificial chromosome) clones that contain individual rp genes. Such screening of YAC libraries will result in precise positioning of the rp genes on the emerging physical map of the human genome.

  9. Incorporation of β-amino acids into dihydrofolate reductase by ribosomes having modifications in the peptidyltransferase center.

    PubMed

    Maini, Rumit; Nguyen, Dan T; Chen, Shengxi; Dedkova, Larisa M; Chowdhury, Sandipan Roy; Alcala-Torano, Rafael; Hecht, Sidney M

    2013-03-01

    Ribosomes containing modifications in three regions of 23S rRNA, all of which are in proximity to the ribosomal peptidyltransferase center (PTC), were utilized previously as a source of S-30 preparations for in vitro protein biosynthesis experiments. When utilized in the presence of mRNAs containing UAG codons at predetermined positions+β-alanyl-tRNA(CUA), the modified ribosomes produced enhanced levels of full length proteins via UAG codon suppression. In the present study, these earlier results have been extended by the use of substituted β-amino acids, and direct evidence for β-amino acid incorporation is provided. Presently, five of the clones having modified ribosomes are used in experiments employing four substituted β-amino acids, including α-methyl-β-alanine, β,β-dimethyl-β-alanine, β-phenylalanine, and β-(p-bromophenyl)alanine. The β-amino acids were incorporated into three different positions (10, 18 and 49) of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and their efficiencies of suppression of the UAG codons were compared with those of β-alanine and representative α-l-amino acids. The isolated proteins containing the modified β-amino acids were subjected to proteolytic digestion, and the derived fragments were characterized by mass spectrometry, establishing that the β-amino acids had been incorporated into DHFR, and that they were present exclusively in the anticipated peptide fragments. DHFR contains glutamic acid in position 17, and it has been shown previously that Glu-C endoproteinase can hydrolyze DHFR between amino acids residues 17 and 18. The incorporation of β,β-dimethyl-β-alanine into position 18 of DHFR prevented this cleavage, providing further evidence for the position of incorporation of the β-amino acid.

  10. Inactivation of ribosomes by an inhibitor of protein synthesis from Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Brigotti, M; Nanetti, A; Montanaro, L; Sperti, S

    1993-01-01

    Sonic extracts of Salmonella enteritidis contain a factor which inhibits protein synthesis in cell-free systems by irreversibly inactivating ribosomes. The extent of the inactivation of ribosomes depends on the system used to assay protein synthesis, natural mRNA translation being more strongly inhibited than poly(U) translation. The inhibitory power of the Salmonella factor is destroyed by trypsin and by 5% mercaptoethanol. Placental RNase inhibitor is unable to protect ribosomes from inactivation.

  11. Characterization and analysis of ribosomal proteins in two marine calanoid copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Huang, Yousong; Yi, Xiaoyan; Chen, Hongju; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2016-11-01

    Copepods are among the most abundant and successful metazoans in the marine ecosystem. However, genomic resources related to fundamental cellular processes are still limited in this particular group of crustaceans. Ribosomal proteins are the building blocks of ribosomes, the primary site for protein synthesis. In this study, we characterized and analyzed the cDNAs of cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) of two calanoid copepods, Pseudodiaptomus poplesia and Acartia pacifica. We obtained 79 cRP cDNAs from P. poplesia and 67 from A. pacifica by cDNA library construction/sequencing and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Analysis of the nucleic acid composition showed that the copepod cRP-encoding genes had higher GC content in the protein-coding regions (CDSs) than in the untranslated regions (UTRs), and single nucleotide repeats (>3 repeats) were common, with "A" repeats being the most frequent, especially in the CDSs. The 3'-UTRs of the cRP genes were significantly longer than the 5'-UTRs. Codon usage analysis showed that the third positions of the codons were dominated by C or G. The deduced amino acid sequences of the cRPs contained high proportions of positively charged residues and had high pI values. This is the first report of a complete set of cRP-encoding genes from copepods. Our results shed light on the characteristics of cRPs in copepods, and provide fundamental data for further studies of protein synthesis in copepods. The copepod cRP information revealed in this study indicates that additional comparisons and analysis should be performed on different taxonomic categories such as orders and families.

  12. Are there proteins between the ribosomal subunits? Hot tritium bombardment experiments.

    PubMed

    Yusupov, M M; Spirin, A S

    1986-03-03

    The hot tritium bombardment technique [(1976) Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 228, 1237-1238] was used for studying the surface localization of ribosomal proteins on Escherichia coli ribosomes. The degree of tritium labeling of proteins was considered as a measure of their exposure (surface localization). Proteins S1, S4, S7, S9 and/or S11, S12 and/or L20, S13, S18, S20, S21, L5, L6, L7/L12, L10, L11, L16, L17, L24, L26 and L27 were shown to be the most exposed on the ribosome surface. The sets of exposed ribosomal proteins on the surface of 70 S ribosomes, on the one hand, and the surfaces of 50 S and 30 S ribosomal subunits in the dissociated state, on the other, were compared. It was found that the dissociation of ribosomes into subunits did not result in exposure of additional ribosomal proteins. The conclusion was drawn that proteins are absent from the contacting surfaces of the ribosomal subunits.

  13. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    PubMed

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  14. The P1/P2 proteins of the human ribosomal stalk are required for ribosome binding and depurination by ricin in human cells

    PubMed Central

    May, Kerrie L.; Li, Xiao-Ping; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco; Ballesta, Juan P.G.; Grela, Przemysław; Tchórzewski, Marek; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2012-01-01

    Ricin A chain (RTA) depurinates the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of 28S ribosomal RNA and inhibits protein synthesis in mammalian cells. In yeast, the ribosomal stalk facilitates the interaction of RTA with the ribosome and subsequent depurination. Despite homology between the stalk structures from yeast and humans there are notable differences. The human ribosomal stalk contains two identical heterodimers of P1/P2 bound to P0, while the yeast stalk consists of two different heterodimers, P1α/P2β and P2α/P1β, bound to P0. RTA exhibits higher activity towards mammalian ribosomes than ribosomes from other organisms, suggesting that the mode of interaction with ribosomes may vary. Here we examine whether the human ribosomal stalk proteins facilitate the interaction of RTA with human ribosomes and subsequent depurination of the SRL. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown of P1/P2 expression in human cells, we demonstrate that the depurination activity of RTA is lower when P1 and P2 protein levels are reduced. Ribosomes from P1/P2-depleted cells have a reduced ability to bind RTA by Biacore analysis, which correlates with reduced depurination activity both in vitro and inside cells. RTA interacts directly with recombinant human P1/P2 dimer, further demonstrating the importance of the human P1/P2 proteins in enabling RTA to bind and depurinate human ribosomes. PMID:22909382

  15. Ricin A chain can be chemically cross-linked to the mammalian ribosomal proteins L9 and L10e.

    PubMed

    Vater, C A; Bartle, L M; Leszyk, J D; Lambert, J M; Goldmacher, V S

    1995-05-26

    Indirect immunofluorescence studies revealed that when fixed, permeabilized cultured human cells were incubated with ricin A chain, the toxin molecule localized in a staining pattern indicative of binding to the endoplasmic reticulum and to nucleoli. Chemical cross-linking experiments were performed to identify the cellular components that mediated the binding of ricin A chain. Conjugates were formed between 125I-labeled ricin A chain and two proteins present in preparations of total cell membranes and in samples of purified mammalian ribosomes. Specificity of the ricin A chain-ribosome interaction was demonstrated by inhibition of formation of the complexes by excess unlabeled ricin A chain, but not by excess unlabeled gelonin, another ribosome-inactivating protein. Complexes of ricin A chain cross-linked to the ribosomal proteins were purified and subjected to proteolytic digestion with trypsin. Amino acid sequencing of internal tryptic peptides enabled identification of the ricin A chain-binding proteins as L9 and L10e of the mammalian large ribosomal subunit.

  16. Ribosomal protein methylation in Escherichia coli: the gene prmA, encoding the ribosomal protein L11 methyltransferase, is dispensable.

    PubMed

    Vanet, A; Plumbridge, J A; Guérin, M F; Alix, J H

    1994-12-01

    The prmA gene, located at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome, is the genetic determinant of ribosomal protein L11-methyltransferase activity. Mutations at this locus, prmA1 and prmA3, result in a severely undermethylated form of L11. No effect, other than the lack of methyl groups on L11, has been ascribed to these mutations. DNA sequence analysis of the mutant alleles prmA1 and prmA3 detected point mutations near the C-terminus of the protein and plasmids overproducing the wild-type and the two mutant proteins have been constructed. The wild-type PrmA protein could be crosslinked to its radiolabelled substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), by u.v. irradiation indicating that it is the gene for the methyltransferase rather than a regulatory protein. One of the mutant proteins, PrmA3, was also weakly crosslinked to SAM. Both mutant enzymes when expressed from the overproducing plasmids were capable of catalysing the incorporation of 3H-labelled methyl groups from SAM to L11 in vitro. This confirmed the observation that the mutant proteins possess significant residual activity which could account for their lack of growth phenotype. However, a strain carrying an in vitro-constructed null mutation of the prmA gene, transferred to the E. coli chromosome by homologous recombination, was perfectly viable.

  17. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins induced by auxins in maize embryonic tissues. [Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, L.; Aguilar, R.; Mendez, A.P.; de Jimenez, E.S.

    1990-11-01

    The effect of auxin on ribosomal protein phosphorylation of germinating maize (Zea mays) tissues was investigated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of ({sup 32}P) ribosomal protein patterns for natural and synthetic auxin-treated tissues were performed. Both the rate of {sup 32}P incorporation and the electrophoretic patterns were dependent on {sup 32}P pulse length, suggesting that active protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation occurred in small and large subunit proteins, in control as well as in auxin-treated tissues. The effect of ribosomal protein phosphorylation on in vitro translation was tested. Measurements of poly(U) translation rates as a function of ribosome concentration provided apparent K{sub m} values significantly different for auxin-treated and nontreated tissues. These findings suggest that auxin might exert some kind of translational control by regulating the phosphorylated status of ribosomal proteins.

  18. Phosphorylation of Ribosomal Proteins Induced by Auxins in Maize Embryonic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Laura; Aguilar, Raúl; Méndez, Alma Pérez; de Jiménez, Estela Sánchez

    1990-01-01

    The effect of auxin on ribosomal protein phosphorylation of germinating maize (Zea mays) tissues was investigated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of [32P] ribosomal protein patterns for natural and synthetic auxin-treated tissues were performed. Both the rate of 32P incorporation and the electrophoretic patterns were dependent on 32P pulse length, suggesting that active protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation occurred in small and large subunit proteins, in control as well as in auxin-treated tissues. The effect of ribosomal protein phosphorylation on in vitro translation was tested. Measurements of poly(U) translation rates as a function of ribosome concentration provided apparent Km values significantly different for auxin-treated and nontreated tissues. These findings suggest that auxin might exert some kind of translational control by regulating the phosphorylated status of ribosomal proteins. Images Figure 3 PMID:16667828

  19. Cross-species conservation of complementary amino acid-ribonucleobase interactions and their potential for ribosome-free encoding

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, John G. D.; Sherman, Rachel M.; Wang, Victoria M. Y.; Newman, Grace A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of amino acid-RNA nucleobase interactions in the evolution of RNA translation and protein-mRNA autoregulation remains an open area of research. We describe the inference of pairwise amino acid-RNA nucleobase interaction preferences using structural data from known RNA-protein complexes. We observed significant matching between an amino acid’s nucleobase affinity and corresponding codon content in both the standard genetic code and mitochondrial variants. Furthermore, we showed that knowledge of nucleobase preferences allows statistically significant prediction of protein primary sequence from mRNA using purely physiochemical information. Interestingly, ribosomal primary sequences were more accurately predicted than non-ribosomal sequences, suggesting a potential role for direct amino acid-nucleobase interactions in the genesis of amino acid-based ribosomal components. Finally, we observed matching between amino acid-nucleobase affinities and corresponding mRNA sequences in 35 evolutionarily diverse proteomes. We believe these results have important implications for the study of the evolutionary origins of the genetic code and protein-mRNA cross-regulation. PMID:26656258

  20. Isolation and characterization of ribosome-inactivating proteins from Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daoning; Halaweish, Fathi T

    2007-03-01

    Due to their RNA-N-glycosidase activity, ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are attractive candidates as antitumor and antiviral agents in biomedical and agricultural research. We have isolated and characterized two such proteins, foetidissimin II and texanin, from two Cucurbitaceae species. Foetidissimin II, obtained from the roots of Cucurbita foetidissima, was identified as a type-2 RIP, with a molecular weight of 61 kDa, as estimated by gel electrophoresis. It is composed of two chains, a 29-kDa chain A, and a 32-kDa chain B. Texanin, isolated from the fruits of Cucurbita texana, is a type-I RIP, with a single chain of molecular weight 29.7 kDa, as estimated by MALDI-TOF-MS. Both proteins exhibit RNA-N-glycosidase activity, with aniline playing a critical role in rRNA cleavage. The IC50 value of foetidissimin II, determined by cell-free protein-synthesis inhibition, was 0.251 muM. In an in vitro cytotoxicity assay, foetidissimin II exhibited IC50 values of ca. 70 nM to both adenocarcinoma and erythroleukemia cells. Texanin exhibited a weaker anticancer activity against erythroleukemia cells, with an IC50 value of 95 microM, but no activity against adenocarcinoma cells. The N-terminal sequences of both proteins were compared with those of reported RIPs.

  1. Ribosomally encoded antibacterial proteins and peptides from Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Mot, René

    2014-07-01

    Members of the Pseudomonas genus produce diverse secondary metabolites affecting other bacteria, fungi or predating nematodes and protozoa but are also equipped with the capacity to secrete different types of ribosomally encoded toxic peptides and proteins, ranging from small microcins to large tailocins. Studies with the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa have revealed that effector proteins of type VI secretion systems are part of the antibacterial armamentarium deployed by pseudomonads. A novel class of antibacterial proteins with structural similarity to plant lectins was discovered by studying antagonism among plant-associated Pseudomonas strains. A genomic perspective on pseudomonad bacteriocinogeny shows that the modular architecture of S pyocins of P. aeruginosa is retained in a large diversified group of bacteriocins, most of which target DNA or RNA. Similar modularity is present in as yet poorly characterized Rhs (recombination hot spot) proteins and CDI (contact-dependent inhibition) proteins. Well-delimited domains for receptor recognition or cytotoxicity enable the design of chimeric toxins with novel functionalities, which has been applied successfully for S and R pyocins. Little is known regarding how these antibacterials are released and ultimately reach their targets. Other remaining issues concern the identification of environmental triggers activating these systems and assessment of their ecological impact in niches populated by pseudomonads. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Transfer RNA-mediated regulation of ribosome dynamics during protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fei, Jingyi; Richard, Arianne C; Bronson, Jonathan E; Gonzalez, Ruben L

    2011-08-21

    Translocation of tRNAs through the ribosome during protein synthesis involves large-scale structural rearrangement of the ribosome and ribosome-bound tRNAs that is accompanied by extensive and dynamic remodeling of tRNA-ribosome interactions. How the rearrangement of individual tRNA-ribosome interactions influences tRNA movement during translocation, however, remains largely unknown. To address this question, we used single-molecule FRET to characterize the dynamics of ribosomal pretranslocation (PRE) complex analogs carrying either wild-type or systematically mutagenized tRNAs. Our data reveal how specific tRNA-ribosome interactions regulate the rate of PRE complex rearrangement into a critical, on-pathway translocation intermediate and how these interactions control the stability of the resulting configuration. Notably, our results suggest that the conformational flexibility of the tRNA molecule has a crucial role in directing the structural dynamics of the PRE complex during translocation.

  3. Generation of chemically engineered ribosomes for atomic mutagenesis studies on protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Matthias D; Chirkova, Anna; Voegele, Paul; Polacek, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The protocol describes the site-specific chemical modification of 23S rRNA of Thermus aquaticus ribosomes. The centerpiece of this 'atomic mutagenesis' approach is the site-specific incorporation of non-natural nucleoside analogs into 23S rRNA in the context of the entire 70S ribosome. This technique exhaustively makes use of the available crystallographic structures of the ribosome for designing detailed biochemical experiments aiming at unraveling molecular insights of ribosomal functions. The generation of chemically engineered ribosomes carrying a particular non-natural 23S rRNA residue at the site of interest, a procedure that typically takes less than 2 d, allows the study of translation at the molecular level and goes far beyond the limits of standard mutagenesis approaches. This methodology, in combination with the presented tests for ribosomal functions adapted to chemically engineered ribosomes, allows unprecedented molecular insight into the mechanisms of protein biosynthesis.

  4. Mutations in ribosomal proteins S4 and S12 influence the higher order structure of 16 S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Allen, P N; Noller, H F

    1989-08-05

    We have studied the effects of protein mutations on the higher order structure of 16 S rRNA in Escherichia coli ribosomes, using a set of structure-sensitive chemical probes. Ten mutant strains were studied, which contained alterations in ribosomal proteins S4 and S12, including double mutants containing both altered S4 and S12. Two ribosomal ambiguity (ram) S4 mutant strains, four streptomycin resistant (SmR) S12 mutant strains, one streptomycin pseudodependent (SmP) S12 mutant strain, one streptomycin dependent (SmD) S12 mutant strain and two streptomycin independent (Sm1) double mutants (containing both-SmD and ram mutations) were probed and compared to an isogenic wild-type strain. In ribosomes from strains containing S4 ram mutations, nucleotides A8 and A26 become more reactive to dimethyl sulfate (DMS) at their N-1 positions. In ribosomes from strains bearing the SmD allele, A908, A909, A1413 and G1487 are significantly less reactive to chemical probes. These same effects are observed when the S4 and S12 mutations are present simultaneously in the double mutants. An interesting correlation is found between the reactivity of A908 and the miscoding potential of SmR, SmD, SmP and wild-type ribosomes; the reactivity of A908 increases as the translational error frequency of the ribosomes increases. In the case of ram ribosomes, the reactivity of A908 resembles that of wild-type, unless tRNA is bound, in which case it becomes hyper-reactive. Similarly, streptomycin has little effect on A908 in wild-type ribosomes unless tRNA is bound, in which case its reactivity increases to resemble that of ram ribosomes with bound tRNA. Finally, interaction of streptomycin with SmP and SmD ribosomes causes the reactivity of A908 to increase to near-wild-type levels. A simple model is proposed, in which the reactivity of A908 reflects the position of an equilibrium between two conformational states of the 30 S subunit, one of which is DMS-reactive, and the other DMS

  5. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  6. Ribosomal protein S6 associates with alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 and mediates expression from alphavirus messages.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stephanie A; Berglund, Peter; Beard, Clayton W; Johnston, Robert E

    2006-08-01

    Although alphaviruses dramatically alter cellular function within hours of infection, interactions between alphaviruses and specific host cellular proteins are poorly understood. Although the alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) is an essential component of the viral replication complex, it also has critical auxiliary functions that determine the outcome of infection in the host. To gain a better understanding of nsP2 function, we sought to identify cellular proteins with which Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 interacted. We demonstrate here that nsP2 associates with ribosomal protein S6 (RpS6) and that nsP2 is present in the ribosome-containing fractions of a polysome gradient, suggesting that nsP2 associates with RpS6 in the context of the whole ribosome. This result was noteworthy, since viral replicase proteins have seldom been described in direct association with components of the ribosome. The association of RpS6 with nsP2 was detected throughout the course of infection, and neither the synthesis of the viral structural proteins nor the presence of the other nonstructural proteins was required for RpS6 interaction with nsP2. nsP1 also was associated with RpS6, but other nonstructural proteins were not. RpS6 phosphorylation was dramatically diminished within hours after infection with alphaviruses. Furthermore, a reduction in the level of RpS6 protein expression led to diminished expression from alphavirus subgenomic messages, whereas no dramatic diminution in cellular translation was observed. Taken together, these data suggest that alphaviruses alter the ribosome during infection and that this alteration may contribute to differential translation of host and viral messages.

  7. [Binding of human ribosomal protein S13 to the central domain of 18S rRNA].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2011-01-01

    Human ribosomal protein S13 is a structural element of the small subunit of ribosome. It is a homologue of eubacterial ribosomal protein S15, and, besides, it possesses an extended N-terminal region, characteristic of the S15p family in eukaryotes and archaea. In the present study, we investigated binding of recombinant ribosomal protein S13 and its mutants containing deletions or substitutions of amino acid residues in different regions with an RNA transcript corresponding to a fragment of the central domain of 18S rRNA. We found that replacement of ultra-conservative residues H101 and D108 as well as deletions of either 29 C-terminal or 27 N-terminal residues substantially reduced affinity of the protein to the RNA transcript. Deletion of 54 C-terminal or 80 N-terminal residues completely deprived the protein of binding capacity. Using a footprinting assay, we identified sites in the RNA transcript changing their accessibilities to action of hydroxyl radicals under binding of either full-length protein S13 or its mutant lacking 27 N-terminal residues. It is shown that these sites are located mainly in helix H22 of the 18S rRNA and in the region of its junction with helix H20 and are consistent predominantly with contacts of the rRNA with the conserved part of the protein. We concluded that binding of ribosomal protein S13 to 18S rRNA is provided mainly by conserved motifs of the protein corresponding to those motifs in its eubacterial homologue that are involved in the interaction with 16S rRNA in the 30S subunit. Role of the N-terminal region of the protein in its binding to the central domain of 18S rRNA is discussed.

  8. Eukaryote-specific motif of ribosomal protein S15 neighbors A site codon during elongation and termination of translation.

    PubMed

    Khairulina, Julia; Graifer, Dmitri; Bulygin, Konstantin; Ven'yaminova, Aliya; Frolova, Ludmila; Karpova, Galina

    2010-07-01

    The eukaryotic ribosomal protein S15 is a key component of the decoding site in contrast to its prokaryotic counterpart, S19p, which is located away from the mRNA binding track on the ribosome. Here, we determined the oligopeptide of S15 neighboring the A site mRNA codon on the human 80S ribosome with the use of mRNA analogues bearing perfluorophenyl azide-modified nucleotides in the sense or stop codon targeted to the 80S ribosomal A site. The protein was cross-linked to mRNA analogues in specific ribosomal complexes that were obtained in the presence of eRF1 in the experiments with mRNAs bearing stop codon. Digestion of modified S15 with various specific proteolytic agents followed by identification of the resulting modified oligopeptides showed that cross-link was in C-terminal fragment in positions 131-145, most probably, in decapeptide 131-PGIGATHSSR-140. The position of cross-linking site on the S15 protein did not depend on the nature of the A site-bound codon (sense or stop codon) and on the presence of polypeptide chain release factor eRF1 in the ribosomal complexes with mRNA analogues bearing a stop codon. The results indicate an involvement of the mentioned decapeptide in the formation of the ribosomal decoding site during elongation and termination of translation. Alignment of amino acid sequences of eukaryotic S15 and its prokaryotic counterpart, S19p from eubacteria and archaea, revealed that decapeptide PGIGATHSSR in positions 131-140 is strongly conserved in eukaryotes and has minor variations in archaea but has no homology with any sequence in C-terminal part of eubacterial S19p, which suggests involvement of the decapeptide in the translation process in a eukaryote-specific manner.

  9. Identification and characterization of transcription factor IIIA and ribosomal protein L5 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Olivier; Yukawa, Yasushi; Prieto, José-Luis; Vaillant, Isabelle; Sugiura, Masahiro; Tourmente, Sylvette

    2003-01-01

    Thus far, no transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) from higher plants has been cloned and characterized. We have cloned and characterized TFIIIA and ribosomal protein L5 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Primary sequence comparison revealed a high divergence of AtTFIIIA and a relatively high conservation of AtL5 when compared with other organisms. The AtTFIIIA cDNA encodes a protein with nine Cys2-His2-type zinc fingers, a 23 amino acid spacer between fingers 1 and 2, a 66 amino acid spacer between fingers 4 and 5, and a 50 amino acid non-finger C-terminal tail. Aside from the amino acids required for proper zinc finger folding, AtTFIIIA is highly divergent from other known TFIIIAs. AtTFIIIA can bind 5S rDNA, as well as 5S rRNA, and efficiently stimulates the transcription of an Arabidopsis 5S rRNA gene in vitro. AtL5 identity was confirmed by demonstrating that this protein binds to 5S rRNA but not to 5S rDNA. Protoplast transient expression assays with green fluorescent protein fusion proteins revealed that AtTFIIIA is absent from the cytoplasm and concentrated at several nuclear foci including the nucleolus. AtL5 protein accumulates in the nucleus, especially in the nucleolus, and is also present in the cytoplasm. PMID:12711688

  10. Organization of proteins in mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes: accessibility to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination

    SciTech Connect

    Denslow, N.D.; O'Brien, T.W.

    1984-08-10

    To assess the relative exposure of individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) in the large and small subunits of the bovine mitochondrial ribosome, double label iodination technique was used. Regions of r-proteins exposed in purified ribosomal subunits were labeled with /sup 131/I using the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination system, and additional reactive groups available upon denaturing the r-proteins in urea were labeled with /sup 125/I using the chloramine-T mediated reaction. The ratio of /sup 131/I to /sup 125/I incorporated into individual proteins under these conditions is representative of the degree of exposure for each of the proteins in the subunits. In this manner, the r-proteins have been grouped into 3 classes depending on their degree of exposure: high exposure, intermediate exposure, and essentially buried. While both subunits have a few proteins in the highly exposed group, and a large number of proteins in the intermediate exposure group, only the large ribosomal subunit has an appreciable number of proteins which appear essentially buried. The more buried proteins may serve mainly structural roles, perhaps acting as assembly proteins, since many from this group bind to ribosomal RNA. The more superficially disposed proteins may comprise binding sites for macromolecules that interact with ribosomes during protein synthesis, as well as stabilizing the association of the large and small subribosomal particles.

  11. What makes ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation sensitive to amino acid limitation?

    PubMed

    Elf, Johan; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-06-01

    Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with "regulatory" codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal) determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response). The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated) can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the same amino acid. We

  12. What Makes Ribosome-Mediated Transcriptional Attenuation Sensitive to Amino Acid Limitation?

    PubMed Central

    Elf, Johan; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-01-01

    Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with “regulatory” codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal) determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response). The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated) can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the same amino acid

  13. Escherichia coli Ribosomal Protein S1 Unfolds Structured mRNAs Onto the Ribosome for Active Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Mélodie; Korepanov, Alexey; Fuchsbauer, Olivier; Fechter, Pierre; Haller, Andrea; Fabbretti, Attilio; Choulier, Laurence; Micura, Ronald; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Romby, Pascale; Springer, Mathias; Marzi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of translation initiation is well appropriate to adapt cell growth in response to stress and environmental changes. Many bacterial mRNAs adopt structures in their 5′ untranslated regions that modulate the accessibility of the 30S ribosomal subunit. Structured mRNAs interact with the 30S in a two-step process where the docking of a folded mRNA precedes an accommodation step. Here, we used a combination of experimental approaches in vitro (kinetic of mRNA unfolding and binding experiments to analyze mRNA–protein or mRNA–ribosome complexes, toeprinting assays to follow the formation of ribosomal initiation complexes) and in vivo (genetic) to monitor the action of ribosomal protein S1 on the initiation of structured and regulated mRNAs. We demonstrate that r-protein S1 endows the 30S with an RNA chaperone activity that is essential for the docking and the unfolding of structured mRNAs, and for the correct positioning of the initiation codon inside the decoding channel. The first three OB-fold domains of S1 retain all its activities (mRNA and 30S binding, RNA melting activity) on the 30S subunit. S1 is not required for all mRNAs and acts differently on mRNAs according to the signals present at their 5′ ends. This work shows that S1 confers to the ribosome dynamic properties to initiate translation of a large set of mRNAs with diverse structural features. PMID:24339747

  14. A ribosome-inactivating protein in a Drosophila defensive symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Phineas T.; Peng, Fangni; Boulanger, Martin J.; Perlman, Steve J.

    2016-01-01

    Vertically transmitted symbionts that protect their hosts against parasites and pathogens are well known from insects, yet the underlying mechanisms of symbiont-mediated defense are largely unclear. A striking example of an ecologically important defensive symbiosis involves the woodland fly Drosophila neotestacea, which is protected by the bacterial endosymbiont Spiroplasma when parasitized by the nematode Howardula aoronymphium. The benefit of this defense strategy has led to the rapid spread of Spiroplasma throughout the range of D. neotestacea, although the molecular basis for this protection has been unresolved. Here, we show that Spiroplasma encodes a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) related to Shiga-like toxins from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and that Howardula ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is depurinated during Spiroplasma-mediated protection of D. neotestacea. First, we show that recombinant Spiroplasma RIP catalyzes depurination of 28S rRNAs in a cell-free assay, as well as Howardula rRNA in vitro at the canonical RIP target site within the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of 28S rRNA. We then show that Howardula parasites in Spiroplasma-infected flies show a strong signal of rRNA depurination consistent with RIP-dependent modification and large decreases in the proportion of 28S rRNA intact at the α-sarcin/ricin loop. Notably, host 28S rRNA is largely unaffected, suggesting targeted specificity. Collectively, our study identifies a novel RIP in an insect defensive symbiont and suggests an underlying RIP-dependent mechanism in Spiroplasma-mediated defense. PMID:26712000

  15. Cloning and characterization of 40S ribosomal protein S4 gene from Culex pipiens pallens.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaobang; Wang, Weijie; Zhang, Donghui; Jiao, Jianhua; Tan, Wenbin; Sun, Yan; Ma, Lei; Zhu, Changliang

    2007-02-01

    The 40S ribosomal protein S4 gene (RPS4) has been cloned from Culex pipiens pallens. An open reading frame (ORF) of 789 bp was found to encode a putative 262 amino acid protein. The deduced amino acid sequence shares 96% and 91% identity with RPS4 genes from Aedes and Anopheles respectively. Transcript expression of RPS4 was determined by real-time PCR in all life stages of deltamethrin-susceptible and -resistant strains. The results demonstrated that this gene is expressed at all developmental stages. Meanwhile, in pupae and adults, RPS4 is overexpressed in deltamethrin-resistant strain than in -susceptible strain. Our data for the first time suggests that increased expression of the RPS4 gene may play some role in the development of deltamethrin resistance in C. pipiens pallens.

  16. Phosphorylated proteins of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome: implications in protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer L.; Cimen, Huseyin; Koc, Hasan; Koc, Emine C.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouse of eukaryotic cells, have their own translation machinery that is solely responsible for synthesis of 13 mitochondrially-encoded protein subunits of oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Phosphorylation is a well-known post-translational modification in regulation of many processes in mammalian mitochondria including oxidative phosphorylation. However, there is still very limited knowledge on phosphorylation of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and their role(s) in ribosome function. In this study, we have identified the mitochondrial ribosomal proteins that are phosphorylated at serine, threonine or tyrosine residues. Twenty-four phosphorylated proteins were visualized by phosphorylation-specific techniques including in vitro radiolabeling, residue specific antibodies for phosphorylated residues, or ProQ phospho dye and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Translation assays with isolated ribosomes that were phosphorylated in vitro by kinases PKA, PKCδ, or Abl Tyr showed up to 30% inhibition due to phosphorylation. Findings from this study should serve as the framework for future studies addressing the regulation mechanisms of mitochondrial translation machinery by phosphorylation and other post-translational modifications. PMID:19702336

  17. Rates of synthesis and degradation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Altruda, F; Lodish, H F

    1981-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) continued during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum concurrently with extensive turnover of ribosomes synthesized during both growth and developmental stages. We show here that the rate of synthesis of 26S and 17S ribosomal RNA during differentiation was less than 15% of that in growing cells, and by the time of sorocarp formation only about 25% of the cellular ribosomes had been synthesized during differentiation. Ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were utilized in messenger RNA translation to the same extent; about 50% of each class were on polyribosomes. Ribosome degradation is apparently an all-or-nothing process, since virtually all 80S monosomes present in developing cells could be incorporated into polysomes when growth conditions were restored. By several criteria, ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were functionally indistinguishable. Our data, together with previously published information on changes in the messenger RNA population during differentiation, indicate that synthesis of new ribosomes is not necessary for translation of developmentally regulated messenger RNA. We also establish that the overall rate of messenger RNA synthesis during differentiation is less than 15% of that in growing cells.

  18. Rates of synthesis and degradation of ribosomal ribonucleic acid during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, G; Altruda, F; Lodish, H F

    1981-01-01

    Synthesis of ribosomes and ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) continued during differentiation of Dictyostelium discoideum concurrently with extensive turnover of ribosomes synthesized during both growth and developmental stages. We show here that the rate of synthesis of 26S and 17S ribosomal RNA during differentiation was less than 15% of that in growing cells, and by the time of sorocarp formation only about 25% of the cellular ribosomes had been synthesized during differentiation. Ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were utilized in messenger RNA translation to the same extent; about 50% of each class were on polyribosomes. Ribosome degradation is apparently an all-or-nothing process, since virtually all 80S monosomes present in developing cells could be incorporated into polysomes when growth conditions were restored. By several criteria, ribosomes synthesized during growth and differentiation were functionally indistinguishable. Our data, together with previously published information on changes in the messenger RNA population during differentiation, indicate that synthesis of new ribosomes is not necessary for translation of developmentally regulated messenger RNA. We also establish that the overall rate of messenger RNA synthesis during differentiation is less than 15% of that in growing cells. PMID:6965093

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine ribosomal protein L21.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wu-Sheng; Chun, Ju-Lan; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Ahn, Jin-Seop; Kim, Min-Kyu; Hwang, In-Sul; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Hwang, Seong-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Woong

    2017-01-04

    Ribosomal protein L21 (RPL21) is a structural component of the 60S subunit of the eukaryotic ribosome. This protein plays an important role in protein synthesis and the occurrence of hereditary diseases. Pig is a common laboratory model, however, to the best of our knowledge, its RPL21 gene has not been cloned to date. In this study, we cloned and identified the full-length sequence of the pig RPL21 gene for the first time. Then we studied its expression pattern and function by overexpression or knockdown approach. As a result, we obtained a 604-bp segment that contains a 483-bp open reading frame encoding 160 amino acids. We found the pig RPL21 gene is located in the "+" strand of chromosome 11, which spans 2167 bp from 4199792 to 4201958. Pig RPL21 protein has nine strands and two helices in its secondary structure. Pig RPL21 is predominantly expressed in the ovary and lung compared to the kidney, small intestine and skin but expressed at lower levels in the heart and liver. Furthermore, we found RPL21 expression level is closely connected with cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest. These results are intended to provide valid information for the further study of pig RPL21.

  20. Effects of chronic ethanol feeding on the protein composition of mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Cahill, A; Cunningham, C C

    2000-10-01

    Chronic ethanol feeding has been shown to decrease the number of functionally active mitochondrial ribosomes by 55%. In this work, 55S mitochondrial ribosomes were isolated from rat liver and their constitutive proteins characterized by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and quantified by densitometry. A total of 86 proteins were found to be associated with the mitochondrial ribosome. This compares with 70 isolated from cytoplasmic ribosomes. In addition, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins were found to be significantly less basic than their cytoplasmic counterparts. Chronic ethanol feeding was found to significantly decrease the levels of a number of constitutive proteins of the mitochondrial ribosome when compared to those isolated from pair-fed controls. Sucrose density gradient analyses revealed a significant decrease in the number of intact 55S ribosomes. It is suggested that ethanol-elicited alterations in specific constitutive proteins of the mitochondrial ribosome may lead to impaired assembly of the monosome and that this may result in lower levels of those displaying functional activity.

  1. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by their dedicated chaperones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausch, Patrick; Singh, Ujjwala; Ahmed, Yasar Luqman; Pillet, Benjamin; Murat, Guillaume; Altegoer, Florian; Stier, Gunter; Thoms, Matthias; Hurt, Ed; Sinning, Irmgard; Bange, Gert; Kressler, Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Exponentially growing yeast cells produce every minute >160,000 ribosomal proteins. Owing to their difficult physicochemical properties, the synthesis of assembly-competent ribosomal proteins represents a major challenge. Recent evidence highlights that dedicated chaperone proteins recognize the N-terminal regions of ribosomal proteins and promote their soluble expression and delivery to the assembly site. Here we explore the intuitive possibility that ribosomal proteins are captured by dedicated chaperones in a co-translational manner. Affinity purification of four chaperones (Rrb1, Syo1, Sqt1 and Yar1) selectively enriched the mRNAs encoding their specific ribosomal protein clients (Rpl3, Rpl5, Rpl10 and Rps3). X-ray crystallography reveals how the N-terminal, rRNA-binding residues of Rpl10 are shielded by Sqt1's WD-repeat β-propeller, providing mechanistic insight into the incorporation of Rpl10 into pre-60S subunits. Co-translational capturing of nascent ribosomal proteins by dedicated chaperones constitutes an elegant mechanism to prevent unspecific interactions and aggregation of ribosomal proteins on their road to incorporation.

  2. Evolution of protein-coupled RNA dynamics during hierarchical assembly of ribosomal complexes.

    PubMed

    Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C; Kim, Hajin; Lai, Jonathan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Rappé, Mollie C; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A

    2017-09-08

    Assembly of 30S ribosomes involves the hierarchical addition of ribosomal proteins that progressively stabilize the folded 16S rRNA. Here, we use three-color single molecule FRET to show how combinations of ribosomal proteins uS4, uS17 and bS20 in the 16S 5' domain enable the recruitment of protein bS16, the next protein to join the complex. Analysis of real-time bS16 binding events shows that bS16 binds both native and non-native forms of the rRNA. The native rRNA conformation is increasingly favored after bS16 binds, explaining how bS16 drives later steps of 30S assembly. Chemical footprinting and molecular dynamics simulations show that each ribosomal protein switches the 16S conformation and dampens fluctuations at the interface between rRNA subdomains where bS16 binds. The results suggest that specific protein-induced changes in the rRNA dynamics underlie the hierarchy of 30S assembly and simplify the search for the native ribosome structure.Ribosomes assemble through the hierarchical addition of proteins to a ribosomal RNA scaffold. Here the authors use three-color single-molecule FRET to show how the dynamics of the rRNA dictate the order in which multiple proteins assemble on the 5' domain of the E. coli 16S rRNA.

  3. Eukaryote-specific extensions in ribosomal proteins of the small subunit: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Komar, Anton A

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures of yeast ribosomes have improved our understanding of the architecture and organization of eukaryotic rRNA and proteins, as well as eukaryote-specific extensions present in some conserved ribosomal proteins. Despite this progress, assignment of specific functions to individual proteins and/or eukaryote-specific protein extensions remains challenging. It has been suggested that eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved proteins from the small ribosomal subunit may facilitate eukaryote-specific reactions in the initiation phase of protein synthesis. This review summarizes emerging data describing the structural and functional significance of eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved small ribosomal subunit proteins, particularly their possible roles in recruitment and spatial organization of eukaryote-specific initiation factors. PMID:26779416

  4. Analysis of Ribosome Inactivating Protein (RIP): A Bioinformatics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jothi, G. Edward Gnana; Majilla, G. Sahaya Jose; Subhashini, D.; Deivasigamani, B.

    2012-10-01

    In spite of the medical advances in recent years, the world is in need of different sources to encounter certain health issues.Ribosome Inactivating Proteins (RIPs) were found to be one among them. In order to get easy access about RIPs, there is a need to analyse RIPs towards constructing a database on RIPs. Also, multiple sequence alignment was done towards screening for homologues of significant RIPs from rare sources against RIPs from easily available sources in terms of similarity. Protein sequences were retrieved from SWISS-PROT and are further analysed using pair wise and multiple sequence alignment.Analysis shows that, 151 RIPs have been characterized to date. Amongst them, there are 87 type I, 37 type II, 1 type III and 25 unknown RIPs. The sequence length information of various RIPs about the availability of full or partial sequence was also found. The multiple sequence alignment of 37 type I RIP using the online server Multalin, indicates the presence of 20 conserved residues. Pairwise alignment and multiple sequence alignment of certain selected RIPs in two groups namely Group I and Group II were carried out and the consensus level was found to be 98%, 98% and 90% respectively.

  5. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-04-16

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well.

  6. Removal of protein S1 from Escherichia coli ribosomes without the use of affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Baranovskaya, Marianna D; Ugarov, Victor I; Chetverina, Helena V; Chetverin, Alexander B

    2017-01-15

    The paper reports an inexpensive and efficient procedure for the removal of protein S1 from E. coli ribosomes. It comprises incubation of ribosomes in a pyrimidine polyribonucleotide solution followed by centrifugation of the sample through a sucrose cushion. To avoid co-sedimentation of the S1-bound polypyrimidine with the ribosomes, its length should not exceed several hundred nucleotides. Unlike popular affinity chromatography through a poly(U) Sepharose or poly(U) cellulose column, the method tolerates limited polyribonucleotide degradation by eventual traces of ribonucleases, and can readily be incorporated into standard protocols for the isolation of ribosomes by centrifugation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of ribosome-inactivating proteins on Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens translation systems.

    PubMed Central

    Girbés, T; Barbieri, L; Ferreras, M; Arias, F J; Rojo, M A; Iglesias, R; Alegre, C; Escarmis, C; Stirpe, F

    1993-01-01

    The effects of 30 type 1 and of 2 (ricin and volkensin) type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) on Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens cell-free translation systems were compared with the effects on a rabbit reticulocyte translation system. The depurinating activity of RIPs on E. coli ribosomes was also evaluated. Only six type 1 RIPs inhibited endogenous mRNA-directed translational activity of E. coli lysates, with submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Four RIPs had similar activities on poly(U)-directed phenylalanine polymerization by E. coli ribosomes, and three RIPs inhibited poly(U)-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis by A. tumefaciens ribosomes, with submicromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations. Images PMID:8407849

  8. Translation of CGA codon repeats in yeast involves quality control components and ribosomal protein L1.

    PubMed

    Letzring, Daniel P; Wolf, Andrew S; Brule, Christina E; Grayhack, Elizabeth J

    2013-09-01

    Translation of CGA codon repeats in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is inefficient, resulting in dose-dependent reduction in expression and in production of an mRNA cleavage product, indicative of a stalled ribosome. Here, we use genetics and translation inhibitors to understand how ribosomes respond to CGA repeats. We find that CGA codon repeats result in a truncated polypeptide that is targeted for degradation by Ltn1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in nonstop decay, although deletion of LTN1 does not improve expression downstream from CGA repeats. Expression downstream from CGA codons at residue 318, but not at residue 4, is improved by deletion of either ASC1 or HEL2, previously implicated in inhibition of translation by polybasic sequences. Thus, translation of CGA repeats likely causes ribosomes to stall and exploits known quality control systems. Expression downstream from CGA repeats at amino acid 4 is improved by paromomycin, an aminoglycoside that relaxes decoding specificity. Paromomycin has no effect if native tRNA(Arg(ICG)) is highly expressed, consistent with the idea that failure to efficiently decode CGA codons might occur in part due to rejection of the cognate tRNA(Arg(ICG)). Furthermore, expression downstream from CGA repeats is improved by inactivation of RPL1B, one of two genes encoding the universally conserved ribosomal protein L1. The effects of rpl1b-Δ and of either paromomycin or tRNA(Arg(ICG)) on CGA decoding are additive, suggesting that the rpl1b-Δ mutant suppresses CGA inhibition by means other than increased acceptance of tRNA(Arg(ICG)). Thus, inefficient decoding of CGA likely involves at least two independent defects in translation.

  9. In vitro selection and evolution of functional proteins by using ribosome display

    PubMed Central

    Hanes, Jozef; Plückthun, Andreas

    1997-01-01

    We report here a system with which a correctly folded complete protein and its encoding mRNA both remain attached to the ribosome and can be enriched for the ligand-binding properties of the native protein. We have selected a single-chain fragment (scFv) of an antibody 108-fold by five cycles of transcription, translation, antigen-affinity selection, and PCR. The selected scFv fragments all mutated in vitro by acquiring up to four unrelated amino acid exchanges over the five generations, but they remained fully compatible with antigen binding. Libraries of native folded proteins can now be screened and made to evolve in a cell-free system without any transformation or constraints imposed by the host cell. PMID:9144168

  10. Functional link between ribosome formation and biogenesis of iron-sulfur proteins.

    PubMed

    Yarunin, Alexander; Panse, Vikram Govind; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Dez, Christophe; Tollervey, David; Hurt, Eduard C

    2005-02-09

    In genetic screens for ribosomal export mutants, we identified CFD1, NBP35 and NAR1 as factors involved in ribosome biogenesis. Notably, these components were recently reported to function in extramitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biosynthesis. In particular, Nar1 was implicated to generate the Fe-S clusters within Rli1, a potential substrate protein of unknown function. We tested whether the Fe-S protein Rli1 functions in ribosome formation. We report that rli1 mutants are impaired in pre-rRNA processing and defective in the export of both ribosomal subunits. In addition, Rli1p is associated with both pre-40S particles and mature 40S subunits, and with the eIF3 translation initiation factor complex. Our data reveal an unexpected link between ribosome biogenesis and the biosynthetic pathway of cytoplasmic Fe-S proteins.

  11. Functional link between ribosome formation and biogenesis of iron–sulfur proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yarunin, Alexander; Panse, Vikram Govind; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Dez, Christophe; Tollervey, David; Hurt, Ed

    2005-01-01

    In genetic screens for ribosomal export mutants, we identified CFD1, NBP35 and NAR1 as factors involved in ribosome biogenesis. Notably, these components were recently reported to function in extramitochondrial iron–sulfur (Fe–S) cluster biosynthesis. In particular, Nar1 was implicated to generate the Fe–S clusters within Rli1, a potential substrate protein of unknown function. We tested whether the Fe–S protein Rli1 functions in ribosome formation. We report that rli1 mutants are impaired in pre-rRNA processing and defective in the export of both ribosomal subunits. In addition, Rli1p is associated with both pre-40S particles and mature 40S subunits, and with the eIF3 translation initiation factor complex. Our data reveal an unexpected link between ribosome biogenesis and the biosynthetic pathway of cytoplasmic Fe–S proteins. PMID:15660135

  12. Ribosomal proteins as biomarkers for bacterial identification by mass spectrometry in the clinical microbiology laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Stéphanie; Ferroni, Agnès; Lotz, Aurélie; Jolley, Keith A.; Guérin, Philippe; Leto, Julie; Dauphin, Brunhilde; Jamet, Anne; Maiden, Martin C.J.; Nassif, Xavier; Armengaud, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid method for identification of microorganisms that is increasingly used in microbiology laboratories. This identification is based on the comparison of the tested isolate mass spectrum with reference databases. Using Neisseria meningitidis as a model organism, we showed that in one of the available databases, the Andromas database, 10 of the 13 species-specific biomarkers correspond to ribosomal proteins. Remarkably, one biomarker, ribosomal protein L32, was subject to inter-strain variability. The analysis of the ribosomal protein patterns of 100 isolates for which whole genome sequences were available, confirmed the presence of inter-strain variability in the molecular weight of 29 ribosomal proteins, thus establishing a correlation between the sequence type (ST) and/or clonal complex (CC) of each strain and its ribosomal protein pattern. Since the molecular weight of three of the variable ribosomal proteins (L30, L31 and L32) was included in the spectral window observed by MALDI-TOF MS in clinical microbiology, i.e., 3640–12000 m/z, we were able by analyzing the molecular weight of these three ribosomal proteins to classify each strain in one of six subgroups, each of these subgroups corresponding to specific STs and/or CCs. Their detection by MALDI-TOF allows therefore a quick typing of N. meningitidis isolates. PMID:23916798

  13. Cell-free synthesis of tryptophanase from Escherichia coli. Use of ribonucleic acid isolated from induced cells and a comparison of the product from a system employing ribosomes with that from one employing ribosomes and exogenous ribonucleic acid

    PubMed Central

    Parish, J. H.; Bashar, S. A. M. Khairul; Brown, N. L.; Brown, Marjorie

    1971-01-01

    1. Polyribosomes and RNA were isolated from cultures in which tryptophanase (EC 4.2.1.–) was induced. The polyribosomes were incubated under conditions of protein synthesis, in the presence of a radioactive amino acid and a post-ribosomal supernatant fraction obtained from repressed cells. The RNA preparations were incubated under conditions of protein synthesis in the presence of a radioactive amino acid and a supernatant fraction containing ribosomes from repressed cells. 2. The system was characterized and the synthesis of a radioactive protein with the same chromatographic properties as tryptophanase was demonstrated. This synthesis was shown to be time-dependent and required the presence of RNA from induced cultures, ribosomes and an energy supply; it was inhibited by chloramphenicol. 3. The maximum activity for the synthesis of this protein was found to be associated with 23S rRNA isolated from sucrose gradients. 4. The N-terminal amino acid of tryptophanase was labelled in the protein synthesized in this system but not in the protein synthesized by polyribosomes (without added RNA). Conversely, the C-terminal amino acid of tryptophanase was labelled in the polyribosome system but not in the RNA-containing system. 5. Tryptic digests of protein labelled in vitro were compared with those of tryptophanase. No labelled tryptic peptides were identified other than tryptophanase tryptic peptides. An analysis of the results implied that in the polyribosome system almost the complete tryptophanase subunit chain was labelled but that in the RNA-containing system these chains were incompletely synthesized. 6. Sucrose-gradient analysis of protein synthesized in the RNA-containing system suggested that it cannot be converted into structures with the same sedimentation properties as native tryptophanase. 7. The significance of these results for the assay of tryptophanase mRNA and for an understanding of the control of the translation of this mRNA in vivo is discussed

  14. Production of ribosome-inactivating protein from hairy root cultures of Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roem.

    PubMed

    di Toppi, L S; Gorini, P; Properzi, G; Barbieri, L; Spanò, L

    1996-09-01

    Transformed root lines of Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roem. (Cucurbitaceae) were established by inoculation of in vitro grown plantlets with wild type Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain 1855. Cloned lines of hairy roots were tested for the presence of ribosome-inactivating proteins; crude extracts inhibited protein synthesis in a reaction mixture based on rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Inhibitory activity increased during culture period, reaching a maximum value in the stationary phase. No activity could be detected in the culture medium, nor in extracts from callus and/or suspension cultures. A ribosome-inactivating protein having specific activity of 62,100 U mg protein(-1) and a molecular mass of 26-28,000 Da was purified to homogeneity. The protein showed N-glycosidase activity on rat liver ribosomes. The results demonstrate that hairy root cultures can be successfully utilized for the in vitro production of ribosome-inactivating proteins.

  15. Chloroplast ribosomal proteins of Chlamydomonas synthesized in the cytoplasm are made as precursors

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Polyadenylated RNA from Chlamydomonas was translated in a cell-free rabbit reticulocyte system that employed [35S]methionine. Antibodies made to four chloroplast ribosomal proteins synthesized in the cytoplasm and imported into the organelle were used for indirect immunoprecipitation of the labeled translation products, which were subsequently visualized on fluorographs of SDS gels. The cytoplasmically synthesized chloroplast ribosomal proteins were first seen as precursors with apparent molecular weights of 1,000 to 6,000 greater than their respective mature forms. Processing of the ribosomal protein precursors to mature proteins was affected by adding a postribosomal supernatant that had been extracted from cells of Chlamydomonas. In contrast to the chloroplast ribosomal proteins synthesized in the cytoplasm, two such proteins made within the chloroplast were found to be synthesized in mature form in cell-free wheat germ translation systems programmed with nonpolyadenylated RNA. PMID:6202701

  16. Proteomic profiling of the mitochondrial ribosome identifies Atp25 as a composite mitochondrial precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Sommer, Frederik; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-10-15

    Whereas the structure and function of cytosolic ribosomes are well characterized, we only have a limited understanding of the mitochondrial translation apparatus. Using SILAC-based proteomic profiling, we identified 13 proteins that cofractionated with the mitochondrial ribosome, most of which play a role in translation or ribosomal biogenesis. One of these proteins is a homologue of the bacterial ribosome-silencing factor (Rsf). This protein is generated from the composite precursor protein Atp25 upon internal cleavage by the matrix processing peptidase MPP, and in this respect, it differs from all other characterized mitochondrial proteins of baker's yeast. We observed that cytosolic expression of Rsf, but not of noncleaved Atp25 protein, is toxic. Our results suggest that eukaryotic cells face the challenge of avoiding negative interference from the biogenesis of their two distinct translation machineries.

  17. Protein quality control at the ribosome: focus on RAC, NAC and RQC.

    PubMed

    Gamerdinger, Martin

    2016-10-15

    The biogenesis of new polypeptides by ribosomes and their subsequent correct folding and localization to the appropriate cellular compartments are essential key processes to maintain protein homoeostasis. These complex mechanisms are governed by a repertoire of protein biogenesis factors that directly bind to the ribosome and chaperone nascent polypeptide chains as soon as they emerge from the ribosomal tunnel exit. This nascent chain 'welcoming committee' regulates multiple co-translational processes including protein modifications, folding, targeting and degradation. Acting at the front of the protein production line, these ribosome-associated protein biogenesis factors lead the way in the cellular proteostasis network to ensure proteome integrity. In this article, I focus on three different systems in eukaryotes that are critical for the maintenance of protein homoeostasis by controlling the birth, life and death of nascent polypeptide chains.

  18. The Arabidopsis TOR Kinase Specifically Regulates the Expression of Nuclear Genes Coding for Plastidic Ribosomal Proteins and the Phosphorylation of the Cytosolic Ribosomal Protein S6.

    PubMed

    Dobrenel, Thomas; Mancera-Martínez, Eder; Forzani, Céline; Azzopardi, Marianne; Davanture, Marlène; Moreau, Manon; Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Chicher, Johana; Langella, Olivier; Zivy, Michel; Robaglia, Christophe; Ryabova, Lyubov A; Hanson, Johannes; Meyer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is an energy consuming process that has to be fine-tuned at both the cell and organism levels to match the availability of resources. The target of rapamycin kinase (TOR) is a key regulator of a large range of biological processes in response to environmental cues. In this study, we have investigated the effects of TOR inactivation on the expression and regulation of Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins at different levels of analysis, namely from transcriptomic to phosphoproteomic. TOR inactivation resulted in a coordinated down-regulation of the transcription and translation of nuclear-encoded mRNAs coding for plastidic ribosomal proteins, which could explain the chlorotic phenotype of the TOR silenced plants. We have identified in the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of this set of genes a conserved sequence related to the 5' terminal oligopyrimidine motif, which is known to confer translational regulation by the TOR kinase in other eukaryotes. Furthermore, the phosphoproteomic analysis of the ribosomal fraction following TOR inactivation revealed a lower phosphorylation of the conserved Ser240 residue in the C-terminal region of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6). These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis using an antibody that specifically recognizes phosphorylated Ser240 in RPS6. Finally, this antibody was used to follow TOR activity in plants. Our results thus uncover a multi-level regulation of plant ribosomal genes and proteins by the TOR kinase.

  19. The Arabidopsis TOR Kinase Specifically Regulates the Expression of Nuclear Genes Coding for Plastidic Ribosomal Proteins and the Phosphorylation of the Cytosolic Ribosomal Protein S6

    PubMed Central

    Dobrenel, Thomas; Mancera-Martínez, Eder; Forzani, Céline; Azzopardi, Marianne; Davanture, Marlène; Moreau, Manon; Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Chicher, Johana; Langella, Olivier; Zivy, Michel; Robaglia, Christophe; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Hanson, Johannes; Meyer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Protein translation is an energy consuming process that has to be fine-tuned at both the cell and organism levels to match the availability of resources. The target of rapamycin kinase (TOR) is a key regulator of a large range of biological processes in response to environmental cues. In this study, we have investigated the effects of TOR inactivation on the expression and regulation of Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins at different levels of analysis, namely from transcriptomic to phosphoproteomic. TOR inactivation resulted in a coordinated down-regulation of the transcription and translation of nuclear-encoded mRNAs coding for plastidic ribosomal proteins, which could explain the chlorotic phenotype of the TOR silenced plants. We have identified in the 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of this set of genes a conserved sequence related to the 5′ terminal oligopyrimidine motif, which is known to confer translational regulation by the TOR kinase in other eukaryotes. Furthermore, the phosphoproteomic analysis of the ribosomal fraction following TOR inactivation revealed a lower phosphorylation of the conserved Ser240 residue in the C-terminal region of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6). These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis using an antibody that specifically recognizes phosphorylated Ser240 in RPS6. Finally, this antibody was used to follow TOR activity in plants. Our results thus uncover a multi-level regulation of plant ribosomal genes and proteins by the TOR kinase. PMID:27877176

  20. Specific contacts between protein S4 and ribosomal RNA are required at multiple stages of ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Megan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2013-04-01

    Assembly of bacterial 30S ribosomal subunits requires structural rearrangements to both its 16S rRNA and ribosomal protein components. Ribosomal protein S4 nucleates 30S assembly and associates rapidly with the 5' domain of the 16S rRNA. In vitro, transformation of initial S4-rRNA complexes to long-lived, mature complexes involves refolding of 16S helix 18, which forms part of the decoding center. Here we use targeted mutagenesis of Geobacillus stearothermophilus S4 to show that remodeling of S4-rRNA complexes is perturbed by ram alleles associated with reduced translational accuracy. Gel mobility shift assays, SHAPE chemical probing, and in vivo complementation show that the S4 N-terminal extension is required for RNA binding and viability. Alanine substitutions in Y47 and L51 that interact with 16S helix 18 decrease S4 affinity and destabilize the helix 18 pseudoknot. These changes to the protein-RNA interface correlate with no growth (L51A) or cold-sensitive growth, 30S assembly defects, and accumulation of 17S pre-rRNA (Y47A). A third mutation, R200A, over-stabilizes the helix 18 pseudoknot yet results in temperature-sensitive growth, indicating that complex stability is finely tuned by natural selection. Our results show that early S4-RNA interactions guide rRNA folding and impact late steps of 30S assembly.

  1. Molecular insights into replication initiation by Qβ replicase using ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Daijiro; Yamashita, Seisuke; Tomita, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1, consisting of six contiguous OB-folds, is the largest ribosomal protein and is essential for translation initiation in Escherichia coli. S1 is also one of the three essential host-derived subunits of Qβ replicase, together with EF-Tu and EF-Ts, for Qβ RNA replication in E. coli. We analyzed the crystal structure of Qβ replicase, consisting of the virus-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (β-subunit), EF-Tu, EF-Ts and the N-terminal half of S1, which is capable of initiating Qβ RNA replication. Structural and biochemical studies revealed that the two N-terminal OB-folds of S1 anchor S1 onto the β-subunit, and the third OB-fold is mobile and protrudes beyond the surface of the β-subunit. The third OB-fold mainly interacts with a specific RNA fragment derived from the internal region of Qβ RNA, and its RNA-binding ability is required for replication initiation of Qβ RNA. Thus, the third mobile OB-fold of S1, which is spatially anchored near the surface of the β-subunit, primarily recruits the Qβ RNA toward the β-subunit, leading to the specific and efficient replication initiation of Qβ RNA, and S1 functions as a replication initiation factor, beyond its established function in protein synthesis. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Structure and function of ribosomal protein S4 genes on the human and mouse sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Zinn, A R; Alagappan, R K; Brown, L G; Wool, I; Page, D C

    1994-04-01

    The human sex-linked genes RPS4X and RPS4Y encode distinct isoforms of ribosomal protein S4. Insufficient expression of S4 may play a role in the development of Turner syndrome, the complex human phenotype associated with monosomy X. In mice, the S4 protein is encoded by an X-linked gene, Rps4, and is identical to human S4X; there is no mouse Y homolog. We report here the organization of the human RPS4X and RPS4Y and mouse Rps4 genes. Each gene comprises seven exons; the positions of introns are conserved. The 5' flanking sequences of human RPS4X and mouse Rps4 are very similar, while RPS4Y diverges shortly upstream of the transcription start site. In chickens, S4 is encoded by a single gene that is not sex linked. The chicken protein differs from human S4X by four amino acid substitutions, all within a region encoded by a single exon. Three of the four substitutions are also present in human S4Y, suggesting that the chicken S4 gene may have arisen by recombination between S4X- and S4Y-like sequences. Using isoform-specific antisera, we determined that human S4X and S4Y are both present in translationally active ribosomes. S4Y is about 10 to 15% as abundant as S4X in ribosomes from normal male placental tissue and 46,XY cultured cells. In 49,XYYYY cells, S4Y is about half as abundant as S4X. In 49,XXXXY cells, S4Y is barely detectable. These results bear on the hypothesized role of S4 deficiency in Turner syndrome.

  3. The RNA-binding protein Gemin5 binds directly to the ribosome and regulates global translation

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnación

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial roles in all organisms. The protein Gemin5 harbors two functional domains. The N-terminal domain binds to snRNAs targeting them for snRNPs assembly, while the C-terminal domain binds to IRES elements through a non-canonical RNA-binding site. Here we report a comprehensive view of the Gemin5 interactome; most partners copurified with the N-terminal domain via RNA bridges. Notably, Gemin5 sediments with the subcellular ribosome fraction, and His-Gemin5 binds to ribosome particles via its N-terminal domain. The interaction with the ribosome was lost in F381A and Y474A Gemin5 mutants, but not in W14A and Y15A. Moreover, the ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 bind directly with Gemin5, and conversely, Gemin5 mutants impairing the binding to the ribosome are defective in the interaction with L3 and L4. The overall polysome profile was affected by Gemin5 depletion or overexpression, concomitant to an increase or a decrease, respectively, of global protein synthesis. Gemin5, and G5-Nter as well, were detected on the polysome fractions. These results reveal the ribosome-binding capacity of the N-ter moiety, enabling Gemin5 to control global protein synthesis. Our study uncovers a crosstalk between this protein and the ribosome, and provides support for the view that Gemin5 may control translation elongation. PMID:27507887

  4. Crystal structure of Gib2, a signal-transducing protein scaffold associated with ribosomes in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Ero, Rya; Dimitrova, Valya Tenusheva; Chen, Yun; Bu, Wenting; Feng, Shu; Liu, Tongbao; Wang, Ping; Xue, Chaoyang; Tan, Suet Mien; Gao, Yong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    The atypical Gβ-like/RACK1 Gib2 protein promotes cAMP signalling that plays a central role in regulating the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans. Gib2 contains a seven-bladed β transducin structure and is emerging as a scaffold protein interconnecting signalling pathways through interactions with various protein partners. Here, we present the crystal structure of Gib2 at a 2.2-Å resolution. The structure allows us to analyse the association between Gib2 and the ribosome, as well as to identify the Gib2 amino acid residues involved in ribosome binding. Our studies not only suggest that Gib2 has a role in protein translation but also present Gib2 as a physical link at the crossroads of various regulatory pathways important for the growth and virulence of C. neoformans. PMID:25732347

  5. Crystal structure of Gib2, a signal-transducing protein scaffold associated with ribosomes in Cryptococcus neoformans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ero, Rya; Dimitrova, Valya Tenusheva; Chen, Yun; Bu, Wenting; Feng, Shu; Liu, Tongbao; Wang, Ping; Xue, Chaoyang; Tan, Suet Mien; Gao, Yong-Gui

    2015-03-01

    The atypical Gβ-like/RACK1 Gib2 protein promotes cAMP signalling that plays a central role in regulating the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans. Gib2 contains a seven-bladed β transducin structure and is emerging as a scaffold protein interconnecting signalling pathways through interactions with various protein partners. Here, we present the crystal structure of Gib2 at a 2.2-Å resolution. The structure allows us to analyse the association between Gib2 and the ribosome, as well as to identify the Gib2 amino acid residues involved in ribosome binding. Our studies not only suggest that Gib2 has a role in protein translation but also present Gib2 as a physical link at the crossroads of various regulatory pathways important for the growth and virulence of C. neoformans.

  6. Crystal structure of Gib2, a signal-transducing protein scaffold associated with ribosomes in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Ero, Rya; Dimitrova, Valya Tenusheva; Chen, Yun; Bu, Wenting; Feng, Shu; Liu, Tongbao; Wang, Ping; Xue, Chaoyang; Tan, Suet Mien; Gao, Yong-Gui

    2015-03-03

    The atypical Gβ-like/RACK1 Gib2 protein promotes cAMP signalling that plays a central role in regulating the virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans. Gib2 contains a seven-bladed β transducin structure and is emerging as a scaffold protein interconnecting signalling pathways through interactions with various protein partners. Here, we present the crystal structure of Gib2 at a 2.2-Å resolution. The structure allows us to analyse the association between Gib2 and the ribosome, as well as to identify the Gib2 amino acid residues involved in ribosome binding. Our studies not only suggest that Gib2 has a role in protein translation but also present Gib2 as a physical link at the crossroads of various regulatory pathways important for the growth and virulence of C. neoformans.

  7. Ribosomes specifically bind to mammalian mitochondria via protease-sensitive proteins on the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, James A; Payne, R Mark

    2004-03-12

    The interaction of ribosomes with specific components of membranes is one of the central themes to the co-translational targeting and import of proteins. To examine ribosome binding to mammalian mitochondria, we used ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs) to follow the in vitro binding of ribosomes that correspond to the initial targeting stage of proteins. Mitochondria were found to contain a limited number of RNC binding sites on the outer membrane. It required more than twice the amount of non-translating ribosomes to inhibit RNC binding by one-half, indicating that RNCs have a competitive binding advantage. In addition, we found that RNCs bind mainly through the ribosomal component and not the nascent chain. RNCs bind via protease-sensitive proteins on the outer membrane, as well as by protease-insensitive components suggesting that two classes of receptors exist. We also show that binding is sensitive to cation conditions. Nearly all of the binding was inhibited in 0.5 m KCl, indicating that they interact with the membrane primarily through electrostatic interactions. In addition, disruption of RNC structure by removing magnesium causes the complete inhibition of binding under normal binding conditions indicating that it is the intact ribosome that is crucial for binding and not the nascent chain. These findings support the hypothesis that the outer mitochondrial membrane contains receptors specific for ribosomes, which would support the conditions necessary for co-translational import.

  8. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein Stm1p facilitates ribosome preservation during quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, Natalya; Chanchorn, Ekkawit; Van Dyke, Michael W.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p confers increased resistance to the macrolide starvation-mimic rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p maintains 80S ribosome integrity during stationary phase-induced quiescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates polysome formation following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p facilitates protein synthesis following quiescence exit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stm1p is a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation. -- Abstract: Once cells exhaust nutrients from their environment, they enter an alternative resting state known as quiescence, whereby proliferation ceases and essential nutrients are obtained through internal stores and through the catabolism of existing macromolecules and organelles. One example of this is ribophagy, the degradation of ribosomes through the process of autophagy. However, some ribosomes need to be preserved for an anticipated recovery from nutrient deprivation. We found that the ribosome-associated protein Stm1p greatly increases the quantity of 80S ribosomes present in quiescent yeast cells and that these ribosomes facilitate increased protein synthesis rates once nutrients are restored. These findings suggest that Stm1p can act as a ribosome preservation factor under conditions of nutrient deprivation and restoration.

  9. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 mediates compensatory renal hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinxian; Chen, Jianchun; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying renal hypertrophy and progressive nephron damage remains poorly understood. Here we generated congenic ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) knockin mice expressing non-phosphorylatable rpS6 and found that uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy was significantly blunted in these knockin mice. Uninephrectomy-induced increases in cyclin D1 and decreases in cyclin E in the remaining kidney were attenuated in the knockin mice compared to their wild-type littermates. Uninephrectomy induced rpS6 phosphorylation in the wild type mice; however, no rpS6 phosphorylation was detected in uninephrectomized or sham-operated knockin mice. Nonetheless, uninephrectomy stimulated comparable 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in both knockin and wild type mice, indicating that mTORC1 was still activated in the knockin mice. Moreover, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin prevented both rpS6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, significantly blunted uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy in wild type mice, but did not prevent residual renal hypertrophy despite inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in uninephrectomized knockin mice. Thus, both genetic and pharmacological approaches unequivocally demonstrate that phosphorylated rpS6 is a downstream effector of the mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway mediating renal hypertrophy. Hence, rpS6 phosphorylation facilitates the increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in cyclin E1 that underlie the hypertrophic nature of uninephrectomy-induced kidney growth. PMID:25229342

  10. Revisiting the mechanism of macrolide-antibiotic resistance mediated by ribosomal protein L22.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean D; Sauer, Robert T

    2008-11-25

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance can occur by many mechanisms. An intriguing class of mutants is resistant to macrolide antibiotics even though these drugs still bind to their targets. For example, a 3-residue deletion (DeltaMKR) in ribosomal protein L22 distorts a loop that forms a constriction in the ribosome exit tunnel, apparently allowing nascent-chain egress and translation in the presence of bound macrolides. Here, however, we demonstrate that DeltaMKR and wild-type ribosomes show comparable macrolide sensitivity in vitro. In Escherichia coli, we find that this mutation reduces antibiotic occupancy of the target site on ribosomes in a manner largely dependent on the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. We propose a model for antibiotic resistance in which DeltaMKR ribosomes alter the translation of specific proteins, possibly via changes in programmed stalling, and modify the cell envelope in a manner that lowers steady-state macrolide levels.

  11. Revisiting the mechanism of macrolide-antibiotic resistance mediated by ribosomal protein L22

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean D.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance can occur by many mechanisms. An intriguing class of mutants is resistant to macrolide antibiotics even though these drugs still bind to their targets. For example, a 3-residue deletion (ΔMKR) in ribosomal protein L22 distorts a loop that forms a constriction in the ribosome exit tunnel, apparently allowing nascent-chain egress and translation in the presence of bound macrolides. Here, however, we demonstrate that ΔMKR and wild-type ribosomes show comparable macrolide sensitivity in vitro. In Escherichia coli, we find that this mutation reduces antibiotic occupancy of the target site on ribosomes in a manner largely dependent on the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. We propose a model for antibiotic resistance in which ΔMKR ribosomes alter the translation of specific proteins, possibly via changes in programmed stalling, and modify the cell envelope in a manner that lowers steady-state macrolide levels. PMID:19015512

  12. Crystal Structure of Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Ricin A Chain in Complex with the C-Terminal Peptide of the Ribosomal Stalk Protein P2

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Wei; Tang, Yun-Sang; Sze, See-Yuen; Zhu, Zhen-Ning; Wong, Kam-Bo; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is a type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP), containing a catalytic A chain and a lectin-like B chain. It inhibits protein synthesis by depurinating the N-glycosidic bond at α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of the 28S rRNA, which thereby prevents the binding of elongation factors to the GTPase activation center of the ribosome. Here, we present the 1.6 Å crystal structure of Ricin A chain (RTA) complexed to the C-terminal peptide of the ribosomal stalk protein P2, which plays a crucial role in specific recognition of elongation factors and recruitment of eukaryote-specific RIPs to the ribosomes. Our structure reveals that the C-terminal GFGLFD motif of P2 peptide is inserted into a hydrophobic pocket of RTA, while the interaction assays demonstrate the structurally untraced SDDDM motif of P2 peptide contributes to the interaction with RTA. This interaction mode of RTA and P protein is in contrast to that with trichosanthin (TCS), Shiga-toxin (Stx) and the active form of maize RIP (MOD), implying the flexibility of the P2 peptide-RIP interaction, for the latter to gain access to ribosome. PMID:27754366

  13. Massively convergent evolution for ribosomal protein gene content in plastid and mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F; Martin, William F

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force.

  14. Massively Convergent Evolution for Ribosomal Protein Gene Content in Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F.; Martin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force. PMID:24259312

  15. Maximizing protein translation rate in the non-homogeneous ribosome flow model: a convex optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Poker, Gilad; Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-11-06

    Translation is an important stage in gene expression. During this stage, macro-molecules called ribosomes travel along the mRNA strand linking amino acids together in a specific order to create a functioning protein. An important question, related to many biomedical disciplines, is how to maximize protein production. Indeed, translation is known to be one of the most energy-consuming processes in the cell, and it is natural to assume that evolution shaped this process so that it maximizes the protein production rate. If this is indeed so then one can estimate various parameters of the translation machinery by solving an appropriate mathematical optimization problem. The same problem also arises in the context of synthetic biology, namely, re-engineer heterologous genes in order to maximize their translation rate in a host organism. We consider the problem of maximizing the protein production rate using a computational model for translation-elongation called the ribosome flow model (RFM). This model describes the flow of the ribosomes along an mRNA chain of length n using a set of n first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. It also includes n + 1 positive parameters: the ribosomal initiation rate into the mRNA chain, and n elongation rates along the chain sites. We show that the steady-state translation rate in the RFM is a strictly concave function of its parameters. This means that the problem of maximizing the translation rate under a suitable constraint always admits a unique solution, and that this solution can be determined using highly efficient algorithms for solving convex optimization problems even for large values of n. Furthermore, our analysis shows that the optimal translation rate can be computed based only on the optimal initiation rate and the elongation rate of the codons near the beginning of the ORF. We discuss some applications of the theoretical results to synthetic biology, molecular evolution, and functional genomics. © 2014 The

  16. Studies on the Assembly Characteristics of Large Subunit Ribosomal Proteins in S. cerevisae

    PubMed Central

    Ohmayer, Uli; Gamalinda, Michael; Sauert, Martina; Ossowski, Julius; Pöll, Gisela; Linnemann, Jan; Hierlmeier, Thomas; Perez-Fernandez, Jorge; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Leger-Silvestre, Isabelle; Faubladier, Marlène; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Woolford, John; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    During the assembly process of ribosomal subunits, their structural components, the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and the ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) have to join together in a highly dynamic and defined manner to enable the efficient formation of functional ribosomes. In this work, the assembly of large ribosomal subunit (LSU) r-proteins from the eukaryote S. cerevisiae was systematically investigated. Groups of LSU r-proteins with specific assembly characteristics were detected by comparing the protein composition of affinity purified early, middle, late or mature LSU (precursor) particles by semi-quantitative mass spectrometry. The impact of yeast LSU r-proteins rpL25, rpL2, rpL43, and rpL21 on the composition of intermediate to late nuclear LSU precursors was analyzed in more detail. Effects of these proteins on the assembly states of other r-proteins and on the transient LSU precursor association of several ribosome biogenesis factors, including Nog2, Rsa4 and Nop53, are discussed. PMID:23874617

  17. Ribosomal protein alterations in thiostrepton- and Micrococcin-resistant mutants of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Wienen, B; Ehrlich, R; Stöffler-Meilicke, M; Stöffler, G; Smith, I; Weiss, D; Vince, R; Pestka, S

    1979-08-25

    Ribosomal proteins of parental thiostrepton- and micrococcin-sensitive Bacillus subtilis cysA14 and thiostrepton-and micrococcin-resistant mutants were compared. Several electrophoretic and immunochemical techniques showed unambiguously that BS-L11 was not present on 50 S ribosomal subunits from the six thiostrepton-resistant mutants. Protein BS-L11 reappeared in all six revertants from thiostrepton resistance to thiostrepton sensitivity. No definitive protein alteration could be ascribed to the mutation from micrococcin sensitivity to resistance. It was also demonstrated that B. subtilis protein BS-L11 is homologous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L11. The finding that ribosomes from thiostrepton-resistant mutants do not contain protein L11 suggests that L11 not only is involved in binding of thiostrepton, but also, when mutationally altered, confers resistance to this antibiotic. Although the ribosomes of these strains do not contain protein L11, all thiostrepton-resistant mutants showed the same viability as the parental strain. Thus protein L11 cannot be obligatory for the structure and function of the ribosome.

  18. The ribosomal protein genes and Minute loci of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Marygold, Steven J; Roote, John; Reuter, Gunter; Lambertsson, Andrew; Ashburner, Michael; Millburn, Gillian H; Harrison, Paul M; Yu, Zhan; Kenmochi, Naoya; Kaufman, Thomas C; Leevers, Sally J; Cook, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Background Mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to cause an array of cellular and developmental defects in a variety of organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster, disruption of RP genes can result in the 'Minute' syndrome of dominant, haploinsufficient phenotypes, which include prolonged development, short and thin bristles, and poor fertility and viability. While more than 50 Minute loci have been defined genetically, only 15 have so far been characterized molecularly and shown to correspond to RP genes. Results We combined bioinformatic and genetic approaches to conduct a systematic analysis of the relationship between RP genes and Minute loci. First, we identified 88 genes encoding 79 different cytoplasmic RPs (CRPs) and 75 genes encoding distinct mitochondrial RPs (MRPs). Interestingly, nine CRP genes are present as duplicates and, while all appear to be functional, one member of each gene pair has relatively limited expression. Next, we defined 65 discrete Minute loci by genetic criteria. Of these, 64 correspond to, or very likely correspond to, CRP genes; the single non-CRP-encoding Minute gene encodes a translation initiation factor subunit. Significantly, MRP genes and more than 20 CRP genes do not correspond to Minute loci. Conclusion This work answers a longstanding question about the molecular nature of Minute loci and suggests that Minute phenotypes arise from suboptimal protein synthesis resulting from reduced levels of cytoribosomes. Furthermore, by identifying the majority of haplolethal and haplosterile loci at the molecular level, our data will directly benefit efforts to attain complete deletion coverage of the D. melanogaster genome. PMID:17927810

  19. Cloning and characterization of a gene from Rhizobium melilotii 2011 coding for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Schnier, J; Thamm, S; Lurz, R; Hussain, A; Faist, G; Dobrinski, B

    1988-01-01

    A 7 kb chromosomal DNA fragment from R. melilotii was cloned, which complemented temperature-sensitivity of an E. coli amber mutant in rpsA, the gene for ribosomal protein S1 (ES1). From complementation and maxicell analysis a 58 kd protein was identified as the homolog of protein S1 (RS1). DNA sequence analysis of the R. melilotii rpsA gene identified a protein of 568 amino acids, which showed 47% identical amino acid homology to protein S1 from E. coli. The RS1 protein lacked the two Cys residues which had been reported to play an important role for the function of ES1. Two repeats containing Shine-Dalgarno sequences were identified upstream of the structural gene. Binding studies with RNA polymerase from E. coli and Pseudomonas putida located one RNA-polymerase binding site close to the RS1 gene and another one several hundred basepairs upstream. One possible promoter was also identified by DNA sequence comparison with the corresponding E. coli promoter. Images PMID:3368316

  20. Specific Role for Yeast Homologs of the Diamond Blackfan Anemia-associated Rps19 Protein in Ribosome Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Léger-Silvestre, Isabelle; Caffrey, Jacqueline Marie; Dawaliby, Rosy; Alvarez-Arias, Diana Alehandrovna; Gas, Nicole; Bertolone, Salvatore J; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Ellis, Steven Robert

    2005-11-18

    Approximately 25% of cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia, a severe hypoplastic anemia, are linked to heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding ribosomal protein S19 that result in haploinsufficiency for this protein. Here we show that deletion of either of the two genes encoding Rps19 in yeast severely affects the production of 40 S ribosomal subunits. Rps19 is an essential protein that is strictly required for maturation of the 3'-end of 18 S rRNA. Depletion of Rps19 results in the accumulation of aberrant pre-40 S particles retained in the nucleus that fail to associate with pre-ribosomal factors involved in late maturation steps, including Enp1, Tsr1, and Rio2. When introduced in yeast Rps19, amino acid substitutions found in Diamond Blackfan anemia patients induce defects in the processing of the pre-rRNA similar to those observed in cells under-expressing Rps19. These results uncover a pivotal role of Rps19 in the assembly and maturation of the pre-40 S particles and demonstrate for the first time the effect of Diamond Blackfan anemia-associated mutations on the function of Rps19, strongly connecting the pathology to ribosome biogenesis.

  1. The ribosome and its role in protein folding: looking through a magnifying glass.

    PubMed

    Javed, Abid; Christodoulou, John; Cabrita, Lisa D; Orlova, Elena V

    2017-06-01

    Protein folding, a process that underpins cellular activity, begins co-translationally on the ribosome. During translation, a newly synthesized polypeptide chain enters the ribosomal exit tunnel and actively interacts with the ribosome elements - the r-proteins and rRNA that line the tunnel - prior to emerging into the cellular milieu. While understanding of the structure and function of the ribosome has advanced significantly, little is known about the process of folding of the emerging nascent chain (NC). Advances in cryo-electron microscopy are enabling visualization of NCs within the exit tunnel, allowing early glimpses of the interplay between the NC and the ribosome. Once it has emerged from the exit tunnel into the cytosol, the NC (still attached to its parent ribosome) can acquire a range of conformations, which can be characterized by NMR spectroscopy. Using experimental restraints within molecular-dynamics simulations, the ensemble of NC structures can be described. In order to delineate the process of co-translational protein folding, a hybrid structural biology approach is foreseeable, potentially offering a complete atomic description of protein folding as it occurs on the ribosome.

  2. YsxC, an essential protein in Staphylococcus aureus crucial for ribosome assembly/stability.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Elizabeth L; García-Lara, Jorge; Foster, Simon J

    2009-12-18

    Bacterial growth and division requires a core set of essential proteins, several of which are still of unknown function. They are also attractive targets for the development of new antibiotics. YsxC is a member of a family of GTPases highly conserved across eubacteria with a possible ribosome associated function. Here, we demonstrate by the creation of a conditional lethal mutant that ysxC is apparently essential for growth in S. aureus. To begin to elucidate YsxC function, a translational fusion of YsxC to the CBP-ProteinA tag in the staphylococcal chromosome was made, enabling Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) of YsxC-interacting partners. These included the ribosomal proteins S2, S10 and L17, as well as the beta' subunit of the RNA polymerase. YsxC was then shown to copurify with ribosomes as an accessory protein specifically localizing to the 50 S subunit. YsxC depletion led to a decrease in the presence of mature ribosomes, indicating a role in ribosome assembly and/or stability in S. aureus. In this study we demonstrate that YsxC of S. aureus localizes to the ribosomes, is crucial for ribosomal stability and is apparently essential for the life of S. aureus.

  3. Isolation of a 5S RNA-Protein Complex from Mammalian Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Blobel, Günter

    1971-01-01

    5S RNA is removed from the large ribosomal subunit of both rat liver and rabbit reticulocyte ribosomes by treatment with EDTA to remove magnesium ions. The RNA is removed not as a naked molecule, but in association with a single ribosomal protein (molecular weight about 35,000) as a ribonucleoprotein, sedimenting at about 7 S. Conditions for the exclusive removal of the 5S RNA-protein complex have been established. Both ribosomal subunits undergo distinct changes in their sedimentation rate, concomitant with the loss of their biological activity, when sedimented into sucrose gradients containing high concentrations of monovalent ions and low concentrations of magnesium. Under these conditions the large subunit loses 5S RNA, the 5S RNA-associated protein, and several more proteins. Images PMID:5001943

  4. Giant panda ribosomal protein S14: cDNA, genomic sequence cloning, sequence analysis, and overexpression.

    PubMed

    Wu, G-F; Hou, Y-L; Hou, W-R; Song, Y; Zhang, T

    2010-10-13

    RPS14 is a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit encoded by the RPS14 gene and is required for its maturation. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS14 were cloned successfully from the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using RT-PCR technology and touchdown-PCR, respectively; they were both sequenced and analyzed. The length of the cloned cDNA fragment was 492 bp; it contained an open-reading frame of 456 bp, encoding 151 amino acids. The length of the genomic sequence is 3421 bp; it contains four exons and three introns. Alignment analysis indicates that the nucleotide sequence shares a high degree of homology with those of Homo sapiens, Bos taurus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Gallus gallus, Xenopus laevis, and Danio rerio (93.64, 83.37, 92.54, 91.89, 87.28, 84.21, and 84.87%, respectively). Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the giant panda with those of these other species revealed that the RPS14 of giant panda is highly homologous with those of B. taurus, R. norvegicus and D. rerio (85.99, 99.34 and 99.34%, respectively), and is 100% identical with the others. This degree of conservation of RPS14 suggests evolutionary selection. Topology prediction shows that there are two N-glycosylation sites, three protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, two casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, four N-myristoylation sites, two amidation sites, and one ribosomal protein S11 signature in the RPS14 protein of the giant panda. The RPS14 gene can be readily expressed in Escherichia coli. When it was fused with the N-terminally His-tagged protein, it gave rise to accumulation of an expected 22-kDa polypeptide, in good agreement with the predicted molecular weight. The expression product obtained can be purified for studies of its function.

  5. YaeJ is a novel ribosome-associated protein in Escherichia coli that can hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on stalled ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Handa, Yoshihiro; Inaho, Noriyuki; Nameki, Nobukazu

    2011-03-01

    In bacteria, ribosomes often become stalled and are released by a trans-translation process mediated by transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In the absence of tmRNA, however, there is evidence that stalled ribosomes are released from non-stop mRNAs. Here, we show a novel ribosome rescue system mediated by a small basic protein, YaeJ, from Escherichia coli, which is similar in sequence and structure to the catalytic domain 3 of polypeptide chain release factor (RF). In vitro translation experiments using the E. coli-based reconstituted cell-free protein synthesis system revealed that YaeJ can hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on ribosomes stalled by both non-stop mRNAs and mRNAs containing rare codon clusters that extend downstream from the P-site and prevent Ala-tmRNA•SmpB from entering the empty A-site. In addition, YaeJ had no effect on translation of a normal mRNA with a stop codon. These results suggested a novel tmRNA-independent rescue system for stalled ribosomes in E. coli. YaeJ was almost exclusively found in the 70S ribosome and polysome fractions after sucrose density gradient sedimentation, but was virtually undetectable in soluble fractions. The C-terminal basic residue-rich extension was also found to be required for ribosome binding. These findings suggest that YaeJ functions as a ribosome-attached rescue device for stalled ribosomes.

  6. The N-terminal extension of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L20 is important for ribosome assembly, but dispensable for translational feedback control.

    PubMed

    Guillier, Maude; Allemand, Frédéric; Graffe, Monique; Raibaud, Sophie; Dardel, Frédéric; Springer, Mathias; Chiaruttini, Claude

    2005-05-01

    The Escherichia coli autoregulatory ribosomal protein L20 consists of two structurally distinct domains. The C-terminal domain is globular and sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit whereas the N-terminal domain has an extended shape and penetrates deep into the RNA-rich core of the subunit. Many other ribosomal proteins have analogous internal or terminal extensions. However, the biological functions of these extended domains remain obscure. Here we show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is important for ribosome assembly in vivo. Indeed, a truncated version of L20 without its N-terminal tail is unable to complement the deletion of rplT, the gene encoding L20. In addition, this L20 truncation confers a lethal-dominant phenotype, suggesting that the N-terminal domain is essential for cell growth because it could be required for ribosome assembly. Supporting this hypothesis, partial deletions of the N-terminal tail of the protein are shown to cause a slow-growth phenotype due to altered ribosome assembly in vivo as large amounts of intermediate 40S ribosomal particles accumulate. In addition to being a ribosomal protein, L20 also acts as an autogenous repressor. Using L20 truncations, we also show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is dispensable for autogenous control.

  7. Characterization of mesosomes of Micrococcus luteus: isolation and properties of mesosomal ribosomes, and localization of penicillin-binding proteins in mesosomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, N; Masuda, K; Kawata, T

    1987-01-01

    Mesosomes were isolated and purified from Micrococcus luteus under hypertonic conditions throughout preparation processes. The purified mesosomal preparation was composed of closed tubules and vesicles. Electron-dense ribosome-like particles were observed within the isolated mesosomal vesicles by electron microscopy. The ribosome-like particles were isolated from the purified mesosomes by a procedure involving solubilization of the membranes with detergents followed by centrifugation on a linear density gradient of sucrose. The isolated particles have a sedimentation coefficient of 70S in the presence of 10 mM Mg2+, when Mg2+ concentration was lowered to 0.1 mM, the particles were dissociated into two sub-particles of 30S and 50S. The 70S particles had the same appearance as cytoplasmic 70S ribosome particles upon observations of negatively stained preparations. These findings indicate that mesosomal tubules contain ribosomes. The isolated mesosomal ribosomes had the ability for protein synthesis when polyuridylic acid-directed polyphenylalanine synthesis was assayed. The sensitivity of mesosomal ribosomes to inhibitors, chloramphenicol and streptomycin, for protein synthesis was significantly lower than that of both cytoplasmic and cytoplasmic membrane-bound ribosomes. In addition, three penicillin-binding proteins were detected in the mesosomal membranes. One of these was localized predominantly in the mesosomal membranes and the other two were distributed almost equally in both mesosomal and cytoplasmic membranes.

  8. Archaeal ribosomal stalk protein interacts with translation factors in a nucleotide-independent manner via its conserved C terminus

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Naoko; Honda, Takayoshi; Baba, Kentaro; Naganuma, Takao; Tanzawa, Takehito; Arisaka, Fumio; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Protein synthesis on the ribosome requires translational GTPase factors to bind to the ribosome in the GTP-bound form, take individual actions that are coupled with GTP hydrolysis, and dissociate, usually in the GDP-bound form. The multiple copies of the flexible ribosomal stalk protein play an important role in these processes. Using biochemical approaches and the stalk protein from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus horikoshii, we here provide evidence that the conserved C terminus of the stalk protein aP1 binds directly to domain I of the elongation factor aEF-2, irrespective of whether aEF-2 is bound to GTP or GDP. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that four hydrophobic amino acids at the C terminus of aP1, Leu-100, 103, 106, and Phe-107, are crucial for the direct binding. P1 was also found to bind to the initiation factor aIF5B, as well as aEF-1α, but not aIF2γ, via its C terminus. Moreover, analytical ultracentrifugation and gel mobility shift analyses showed that a heptameric complex of aP1 and aP0, aP0(aP1)2(aP1)2(aP1)2, can bind multiple aEF-2 molecules simultaneously, which suggests that individual copies of the stalk protein are accessible to the factor. The functional significance of the C terminus of the stalk protein was also shown using the eukaryotic proteins P1/P2 and P0. It is likely that the conserved C terminus of the stalk proteins of archaea and eukaryotes can bind to translation factors both before and after GTP hydrolysis. This consistent binding ability of the stalk protein may contribute to maintaining high concentrations of translation factors around the ribosome, thus promoting translational efficiency. PMID:22355137

  9. Conditionally lethal ribosomal protein mutants: characterization of a locus required for modification of 50S subunit proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kushner, S R; Maples, V F; Champney, W S

    1977-01-01

    Mutagenized P1 bacteriophage were used to transduce a marker (aroE) adjacent to the cluster or ribosomal protein genes located at 72 min on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Linked temperature-sensitive transductants were isolated and characterized. A mutant unable to grow at 44 degrees was found to be defective in protein synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. At the restrictive temperature mutant cells lost all polyribosomes. Analysis of the ribosomal proteins revealed alterations in at least four 50S subunit proteins. The mutation (called rimE1, ribosomal protein modification) mapped between rpsE and aroE. It is suggested that the rimE locus is the structural gene for an activity that modifies a selected number of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:322127

  10. Nuclear-encoded chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 of Nicotiana tabacum: characterization of mature protein and isolation and sequence analysis of cDNA clones encoding its cytoplasmic precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, G A; Thomas, F J; McCreery, T P; Bourque, D P

    1992-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Petite Havana) leaves was used to prepare a cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11. Recombinant phage containing cDNAs coding for chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 were identified and sequenced. Mature tobacco L12 protein has 44% amino acid identity with ribosomal protein L7/L12 of Escherichia coli. The longest L12 cDNA (733 nucleotides) codes for a 13,823 molecular weight polypeptide with a transit peptide of 53 amino acids and a mature protein of 133 amino acids. The transit peptide and mature protein share 43% and 79% amino acid identity, respectively, with corresponding regions of spinach chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. The predicted amino terminus of the mature protein was confirmed by partial sequence analysis of HPLC-purified tobacco chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. A single L12 mRNA of about 0.8 kb was detected by hybridization of L12 cDNA to poly(A)+ and total leaf RNA. Hybridization patterns of restriction fragments of tobacco genomic DNA probed with the L12 cDNA suggested the existence of more than one gene for ribosomal protein L12. Characterization of a second cDNA with an identical L12 coding sequence but a different 3'-noncoding sequence provided evidence that at least two L12 genes are expressed in tobacco. Images PMID:1542565

  11. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 mediates compensatory renal hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinxian; Chen, Jianchun; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2015-03-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying renal hypertrophy and progressive nephron damage remains poorly understood. Here we generated congenic ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) knock-in mice expressing nonphosphorylatable rpS6 and found that uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy was significantly blunted in these knock-in mice. Uninephrectomy-induced increases in cyclin D1 and decreases in cyclin E in the remaining kidney were attenuated in the knock-in mice compared with their wild-type littermates. Uninephrectomy induced rpS6 phosphorylation in the wild-type mice; however, no rpS6 phosphorylation was detected in uninephrectomized or sham-operated knock-in mice. Nonetheless, uninephrectomy stimulated comparable 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in both knock-in and wild-type mice, indicating that mTORC1 was still activated in the knock-in mice. Moreover, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin prevented both rpS6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, significantly blunted uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy in wild-type mice, but did not prevent residual renal hypertrophy despite inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in uninephrectomized knock-in mice. Thus, both genetic and pharmacological approaches unequivocally demonstrate that phosphorylated rpS6 is a downstream effector of the mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway mediating renal hypertrophy. Hence, rpS6 phosphorylation facilitates the increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in cyclin E1 that underlie the hypertrophic nature of uninephrectomy-induced kidney growth.

  12. Structural basis for the interaction of protein S1 with the Escherichia coli ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Arenz, Stefan; Coudevylle, Nicolas; Temmel, Hannes; Wilson, Daniel N.; Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Moll, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the multi-domain protein S1 is essential for translation initiation, as it recruits the mRNA and facilitates its localization in the decoding centre. In sharp contrast to its functional importance, S1 is still lacking from the high-resolution structures available for Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus ribosomes and thus the molecular mechanism governing the S1–ribosome interaction has still remained elusive. Here, we present the structure of the N-terminal S1 domain D1 when bound to the ribosome at atomic resolution by using a combination of NMR, X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Together with biochemical assays, the structure reveals that S1 is anchored to the ribosome primarily via a stabilizing π-stacking interaction within the short but conserved N-terminal segment that is flexibly connected to domain D1. This interaction is further stabilized by salt bridges involving the zinc binding pocket of protein S2. Overall, this work provides one hitherto enigmatic piece in the ′ribosome puzzle′, namely the detailed molecular insight into the topology of the S1–ribosome interface. Moreover, our data suggest novel mechanisms that have the potential to modulate protein synthesis in response to environmental cues by changing the affinity of S1 for the ribosome. PMID:25510494

  13. The human Shwachman-Diamond syndrome protein, SBDS, associates with ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Ganapathi, Karthik A; Austin, Karyn M; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha; Malsch, Maggie M; Reed, Robin; Shimamura, Akiko

    2007-09-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, exocrine pancreatic dysfunction, and leukemia predisposition. Mutations in the SBDS gene are identified in most patients with SDS. SBDS encodes a highly conserved protein of unknown function. Data from SBDS orthologs suggest that SBDS may play a role in ribosome biogenesis or RNA processing. Human SBDS is enriched in the nucleolus, the major cellular site of ribosome biogenesis. Here we report that SBDS nucleolar localization is dependent on active rRNA transcription. Cells from patients with SDS or Diamond-Blackfan anemia are hypersensitive to low doses of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of rRNA transcription. The addition of wild-type SBDS complements the actinomycin D hypersensitivity of SDS patient cells. SBDS migrates together with the 60S large ribosomal subunit in sucrose gradients and coprecipitates with 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Loss of SBDS is not associated with a discrete block in rRNA maturation or with decreased levels of the 60S ribosomal subunit. SBDS forms a protein complex with nucleophosmin, a multifunctional protein implicated in ribosome biogenesis and leukemogenesis. Our studies support the addition of SDS to the growing list of human bone marrow failure syndromes involving the ribosome.

  14. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  15. A Coordinated Proteomic Approach for Identifying Proteins that Interact with the E. coli Ribosomal Protein S12

    PubMed Central

    Strader, Michael Brad; Hervey, William Judson; Costantino, Nina; Fujigaki, Suwako; Chen, Cai Yun; Akal-Strader, Ayca; Ihunnah, Chibueze A.; Makusky, Anthony J.; Court, Donald L.; Markey, Sanford P.; Kowalak, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial ribosomal protein S12 contains a universally conserved D88 residue on a loop region thought to be critically involved in translation due to its proximal location to the A site of the 30S subunit. While D88 mutants are lethal this residue has been found to be post-translationally modified to β-methylthioaspartic acid, a post-translational modification (PTM) identified in S12 orthologs from several phylogenetically distinct bacteria. In a previous report focused on characterizing this PTM, our results provided evidence that this conserved loop region might be involved in forming proteins-protein interactions (1). To follow-up on this study, the D88 containing loop was probed to identify candidate binders employing a two-step complementary affinity purification strategy. The first involved an endogenously expressed S12 protein containing a C-terminal tag for capturing S12 binding partners. The second strategy utilized a synthetic biotinylated peptide representing the D88 conserved loop region for capturing S12 loop interaction partners. Captured proteins from both approaches were detected by utilizing SDS-PAGE and one-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The results presented in this report revealed proteins that form direct interactions with the 30S subunit and elucidated which are likely to interact with S12. In addition, we provide evidence that two proteins involved in regulating ribosome and/or mRNA transcript levels under stress conditions, RNase R and Hfq, form direct interactions with the S12 conserved loop suggesting that it is likely part of a protein binding interface. PMID:23305560

  16. Sequence, overproduction and purification of Vibrio proteolyticus ribosomal protein L18 for in vitro and in vivo studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setterquist, R. A.; Smith, G. K.; Oakley, T. H.; Lee, Y. H.; Fox, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    A strategy suggested by comparative genomic studies was used to amplify the entire Vibrio proteolyticus (Vp) gene for ribosomal protein L18. Vp L18 and its flanking regions were sequenced and compared with the deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of other known L18 proteins. A 26-aa residue segment at the carboxy terminus contains many strongly conserved residues and may be critical for the L18 interaction with 5S rRNA. This approach should allow rapid characterization of L18 from large numbers of bacteria. Both Vp L18 and Escherichia coli (Ec) L18 were overproduced and purified using a T7 expression vector which fuses an N-terminal peptide segment (His-tag) containing 6 histidine residues to the recombinant protein. The purified fusion proteins, Vp His::L18 and Ec His::L18, were both found to bind to either the Vp 5S or Ec 5S rRNAs in vitro. Vp His::L18 protein was also shown to incorporate into Ec ribosomes in vivo. This His-tag strategy likely will have general applicability for the study of ribosomal proteins in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Sequence, overproduction and purification of Vibrio proteolyticus ribosomal protein L18 for in vitro and in vivo studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setterquist, R. A.; Smith, G. K.; Oakley, T. H.; Lee, Y. H.; Fox, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    A strategy suggested by comparative genomic studies was used to amplify the entire Vibrio proteolyticus (Vp) gene for ribosomal protein L18. Vp L18 and its flanking regions were sequenced and compared with the deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of other known L18 proteins. A 26-aa residue segment at the carboxy terminus contains many strongly conserved residues and may be critical for the L18 interaction with 5S rRNA. This approach should allow rapid characterization of L18 from large numbers of bacteria. Both Vp L18 and Escherichia coli (Ec) L18 were overproduced and purified using a T7 expression vector which fuses an N-terminal peptide segment (His-tag) containing 6 histidine residues to the recombinant protein. The purified fusion proteins, Vp His::L18 and Ec His::L18, were both found to bind to either the Vp 5S or Ec 5S rRNAs in vitro. Vp His::L18 protein was also shown to incorporate into Ec ribosomes in vivo. This His-tag strategy likely will have general applicability for the study of ribosomal proteins in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Molecular basis for protection of ribosomal protein L4 from cellular degradation

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Ferdinand M.; Hoelz, André

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires the nuclear import of ∼80 nascent ribosomal proteins and the elimination of excess amounts by the cellular degradation machinery. Assembly chaperones recognize nascent unassembled ribosomal proteins and transport them together with karyopherins to their nuclear destination. We report the crystal structure of ribosomal protein L4 (RpL4) bound to its dedicated assembly chaperone of L4 (Acl4), revealing extensive interactions sequestering 70 exposed residues of the extended RpL4 loop. The observed molecular recognition fundamentally differs from canonical promiscuous chaperone–substrate interactions. We demonstrate that the eukaryote-specific RpL4 extension harbours overlapping binding sites for Acl4 and the nuclear transport factor Kap104, facilitating its continuous protection from the cellular degradation machinery. Thus, Acl4 serves a dual function to facilitate nuclear import and simultaneously protect unassembled RpL4 from the cellular degradation machinery. PMID:28148929

  19. Fragile X mental retardation protein regulates translation by binding directly to the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eileen; Sharma, Manjuli R; Shi, Xinying; Agrawal, Rajendra K; Joseph, Simpson

    2014-05-08

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited mental retardation, and it is caused by loss of function of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that is involved in the translational regulation of several neuronal mRNAs. However, the precise mechanism of translational inhibition by FMRP is unknown. Here, we show that FMRP inhibits translation by binding directly to the L5 protein on the 80S ribosome. Furthermore, cryoelectron microscopic reconstruction of the 80S ribosome⋅FMRP complex shows that FMRP binds within the intersubunit space of the ribosome such that it would preclude the binding of tRNA and translation elongation factors on the ribosome. These findings suggest that FMRP inhibits translation by blocking the essential components of the translational machinery from binding to the ribosome.

  20. Involvement of ribosomal protein L6 in assembly of functional 50S ribosomal subunit in Escherichia coli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shigeno, Yuta; Uchiumi, Toshio; Nomura, Takaomi

    2016-04-22

    Ribosomal protein L6, an essential component of the large (50S) subunit, primarily binds to helix 97 of 23S rRNA and locates near the sarcin/ricin loop of helix 95 that directly interacts with GTPase translation factors. Although L6 is believed to play important roles in factor-dependent ribosomal function, crucial biochemical evidence for this hypothesis has not been obtained. We constructed and characterized an Escherichia coli mutant bearing a chromosomal L6 gene (rplF) disruption and carrying a plasmid with an arabinose-inducible L6 gene. Although this ΔL6 mutant grew more slowly than its wild-type parent, it proliferated in the presence of arabinose. Interestingly, cell growth in the absence of arabinose was biphasic. Early growth lasted only a few generations (LI-phase) and was followed by a suspension of growth for several hours (S-phase). This suspension was followed by a second growth phase (LII-phase). Cells harvested at both LI- and S-phases contained ribosomes with reduced factor-dependent GTPase activity and accumulated 50S subunit precursors (45S particles). The 45S particles completely lacked L6. Complete 50S subunits containing L6 were observed in all growth phases regardless of the L6-depleted condition, implying that the ΔL6 mutant escaped death because of a leaky expression of L6 from the complementing plasmid. We conclude that L6 is essential for the assembly of functional 50S subunits at the late stage. We thus established conditions for the isolation of L6-depleted 50S subunits, which are essential to study the role of L6 in translation. - Highlights: • We constructed an in vivo functional assay system for Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L6. • Growth of an E. coli ΔL6 mutant was biphasic when L6 levels were depleted. • The ΔL6 mutant accumulated 50S ribosomal subunit precursors that sedimented at 45S. • L6 is a key player in the late stage of E. coli 50S subunit assembly.

  1. Knock-out of the plastid ribosomal protein L11 in Arabidopsis: effects on mRNA translation and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pesaresi, P; Varotto, C; Meurer, J; Jahns, P; Salamini, F; Leister, D

    2001-08-01

    The prpl11-1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana was identified among a collection of T-DNA tagged lines on the basis of a decrease in the effective quantum yield of photosystem II. The mutation responsible was localized to Prpl11, a single-copy nuclear gene that encodes PRPL11, a component of the large subunit of the plastid ribosome. The amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis PRPL11 is very similar to those of L11 proteins from spinach and prokaryotes. In the prpl11-1 mutant, photosensitivity and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters are significantly altered owing to changes in the levels of thylakoid protein complexes and stromal proteins. The abundance of most plastome transcripts examined, such as those of genes coding for the photosystem II core complex and RbcL, is not decreased. Plastid ribosomal RNA accumulates in wild-type amounts, and the assembly of plastid polysomes on the transcripts of the rbcL, psbA and psbE genes remains mainly unchanged in mutant plants, indicating that lack of PRPL11 affects neither the abundance of plastid ribosomes nor their assembly into polysomes. However, in vivo translation assays demonstrate that the rate of translation of the large subunit of Rubisco (RbcL) is significantly reduced in prpl11-1 plastids. Our data suggest a major role for PRPL11 in plastid ribosome activity per se, consistent with its location near the GTPase-binding centre of the chloroplast 50S ribosomal subunit. Additional effects of the mutation, including the pale green colour of the leaves and a drastic reduction in growth rate under greenhouse conditions, are compatible with reduced levels of protein synthesis in plastids.

  2. Identification of antituberculosis agents that target ribosomal protein interactions using a yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhu, Yuanjun; Zhang, Jing; Li, Yongzhen; Liu, Xiao; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Shishan; You, Xue-Fu; Xiao, Chunling; Hong, Bin; Wang, Yanchang; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Si, Shuyi

    2012-10-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis kills about 2 million people annually and antibiotic resistance is a cause of increased mortality. Therefore, development of new antituberculosis drugs is urgent for the control of widespread tuberculosis infections. For this purpose, we performed an innovative screen to identify new agents that disrupt the function of ribosomes in M. tuberculosis. Two bacterial ribosomal proteins L12 and L10 interact with each other and constitute the stalk of the 50S ribosomal subunit, which recruits initiation and elongation factors (EFs) during translation. Therefore, the L12-L10 interaction should be essential for ribosomal function and protein synthesis. We established a yeast two-hybrid system to identify small molecules that block the interaction between L12 and L10 proteins from M. tuberculosis. Using this system, we identified two compounds T766 and T054 that show strong bactericidal activity against tuberculosis but with low toxicity to mice and other bacterial strains. Moreover, using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay, we have demonstrated that these compounds bind specifically to L12 to disrupt L12-L10 interaction. Overproduction of L12 protein, but not L10, lowers the antibacterial activity of T766 and T054, indicating that the ribosome is likely the cellular target. Therefore, our data demonstrate that this yeast two-hybrid system is a useful tool to identify unique antituberculosis agents targeting the ribosomal protein L12-L10 interaction.

  3. Nuclear import of dimerized ribosomal protein Rps3 in complex with its chaperone Yar1

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Gantenbein, Nadine; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Murat, Guillaume; Bergler, Helmut; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    After their cytoplasmic synthesis, ribosomal proteins need to be transported into the nucleus, where they assemble with ribosomal RNA into pre-ribosomal particles. Due to their physicochemical properties, they need protection from aggregation on this path. Newly synthesized ribosomal protein Rps3 forms a dimer that is associated with one molecule of its specific chaperone Yar1. Here we report that redundant pathways contribute to the nuclear import of Rps3, with the classical importin α/β pathway (Kap60/Kap95 in yeast) constituting a main import route. The Kap60/Kap95 heterodimer mediates efficient nuclear import of Rps3 by recognition of an N-terminal monopartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). This Rps3-NLS is located directly adjacent to the Yar1-binding site and, upon binding of Kap60 to Rps3, Yar1 is displaced from the ribosomal protein in vitro. While Yar1 does not directly interact with Kap60 in vitro, affinity purifications of Yar1 and Rps3, however, revealed that Kap60 is present in the Rps3/Yar1 complex in vivo. Indeed we could reconstitute such a protein complex containing Rps3 and both Yar1 and Kap60 in vitro. Our data suggest that binding of Yar1 to one N-domain and binding of Kap60 to the second N-domain of dimerized Rps3 orchestrates import and protection of the ribosomal protein. PMID:27819319

  4. Novel mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 that confer erythromycin resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Sephorah; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice

    2007-11-01

    L4 and L22, proteins of the large ribosomal subunit, contain globular surface domains and elongated 'tentacles' that reach into the core of the large subunit to form part of the lining of the peptide exit tunnel. Mutations in the tentacles of L4 and L22 confer macrolide resistance in a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. In Escherichia coli, a Lys-to-Glu mutation in L4 and a three-amino-acid deletion in the L22 had been reported. To learn more about the roles of the tentacles in ribosome assembly and function, we isolated additional erythromycin-resistant E. coli mutants. Eight new mutations mapped in L4, all within the tentacle. Two new mutations were identified in L22; one mapped outside the tentacle. Insertion mutations were found in both genes. All of the mutants grew slower than the parent, and they all showed reduced in vivo rates of peptide-chain elongation and increased levels of precursor 23S rRNA. Large insertions in L4 and L22 resulted in very slow growth and accumulation of abnormal ribosomal subunits. Our results highlight the important role of L4 and L22 in ribosome function and assembly, and indicate that a variety of changes in these proteins can mediate macrolide resistance.

  5. Novel mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 that confer erythromycin resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Sephorah; Fitzpatrick, Megan; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice

    2007-01-01

    L4 and L22, proteins of the large ribosomal subunit, contain globular surface domains and elongated ‘tentacles’ that reach into the core of the large subunit to form part of the lining of the peptide exit tunnel. Mutations in the tentacles of L4 and L22 confer macrolide resistance in a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. In Escherichia coli, a Lys-to-Glu mutation in L4 and a three-amino-acid deletion in the L22 had been reported. To learn more about the roles of the tentacles in ribosome assembly and function, we isolated additional erythromycin-resistant E. coli mutants. Eight new mutations mapped in L4, all within the tentacle. Two new mutations were identified in L22; one mapped outside the tentacle. Insertion mutations were found in both genes. All of the mutants grew slower than the parent, and they all showed reduced in vivo rates of peptide-chain elongation and increased levels of precursor 23S rRNA. Large insertions in L4 and L22 resulted in very slow growth and accumulation of abnormal ribosomal subunits. Our results highlight the important role of L4 and L22 in ribosome function and assembly, and indicate that a variety of changes in these proteins can mediate macrolide resistance. PMID:17956547

  6. Regulatory elements of Caenorhabditis elegans ribosomal protein genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are essential, tightly regulated, and highly expressed during embryonic development and cell growth. Even though their protein sequences are strongly conserved, their mechanism of regulation is not conserved across yeast, Drosophila, and vertebrates. A recent investigation of genomic sequences conserved across both nematode species and associated with different gene groups indicated the existence of several elements in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs, providing a new insight regarding the regulation of these genes in C. elegans. Results In this study, we performed an in-depth examination of C. elegans RPG regulation and found nine highly conserved motifs in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs using the motif discovery algorithm DME. Four motifs were partially similar to transcription factor binding sites from C. elegans, Drosophila, yeast, and human. One pair of these motifs was found to co-occur in the upstream regions of 250 transcripts including 22 RPGs. The distance between the two motifs displayed a complex frequency pattern that was related to their relative orientation. We tested the impact of three of these motifs on the expression of rpl-2 using a series of reporter gene constructs and showed that all three motifs are necessary to maintain the high natural expression level of this gene. One of the motifs was similar to the binding site of an orthologue of POP-1, and we showed that RNAi knockdown of pop-1 impacts the expression of rpl-2. We further determined the transcription start site of rpl-2 by 5’ RACE and found that the motifs lie 40–90 bases upstream of the start site. We also found evidence that a noncoding RNA, contained within the outron of rpl-2, is co-transcribed with rpl-2 and cleaved during trans-splicing. Conclusions Our results indicate that C. elegans RPGs are regulated by a complex novel series of regulatory elements that is evolutionarily distinct from those of all other species

  7. Promoter architecture and transcriptional regulation of Abf1-dependent ribosomal protein genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina; Dieci, Giorgio

    2016-07-27

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosomal protein gene (RPG) promoters display binding sites for either Rap1 or Abf1 transcription factors. Unlike Rap1-associated promoters, the small cohort of Abf1-dependent RPGs (Abf1-RPGs) has not been extensively investigated. We show that RPL3, RPL4B, RPP1A, RPS22B and RPS28A/B share a common promoter architecture, with an Abf1 site upstream of a conserved element matching the sequence recognized by Fhl1, a transcription factor which together with Ifh1 orchestrates Rap1-associated RPG regulation. Abf1 and Fhl1 promoter association was confirmed by ChIP and/or gel retardation assays. Mutational analysis revealed a more severe requirement of Abf1 than Fhl1 binding sites for RPG transcription. In the case of RPS22B an unusual Tbf1 binding site promoted both RPS22B and intron-hosted SNR44 expression. Abf1-RPG down-regulation upon TOR pathway inhibition was much attenuated at defective mutant promoters unable to bind Abf1. TORC1 inactivation caused the expected reduction of Ifh1 occupancy at RPS22B and RPL3 promoters, but unexpectedly it entailed largely increased Abf1 association with Abf1-RPG promoters. We present evidence that Abf1 recruitment upon nutritional stress, also observed for representative ribosome biogenesis genes, favours RPG transcriptional rescue upon nutrient replenishment, thus pointing to nutrient-regulated Abf1 dynamics at promoters as a novel mechanism in ribosome biogenesis control. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Identification, characterization and structure analysis of a type I ribosome-inactivating protein from Sapium sebiferum (Euphorbiaceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ying; Mao, Yingji; Jin, Shan; Hou, Jinyan; Du, Hua; Yang, Minglei; Wu, Lifang

    2015-08-07

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are N-glycosidases (EC3.2.2.22) that universally inactivate the ribosome, thereby inhibiting protein biosynthesis. In this study, a novel type I RIPs named SEBIN was identified in Sapium sebiferum. Nuclear acid depurine experiment showed that SEBIN had rRNA N-Glycosidase activity. Further experiment indicated that SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development as well as resulted in worm cell apoptosis. This is the first report to evaluate RIPs toxicity using C. elegans. We proposed that SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner besides traditional protein synthesis inhibition approach. The predicted 3D structure was modeled using threading and ab initio modeling, and the r-RNA binding residue of SEBIN was identified through the protein-ligand docking approach. It showed the amino acid residues, Glu195, Asn81, Ala82, Tyr83, Glu164, Ser163, Ile159 and Arg167, played critical roles in catalytic process. Our results provided the theoretical foundation of structure–function relationships between enzymatic properties, toxicity and structural characterization of SEBIN. - Graphical abstract: Superposition of main chains of ricin (cyan) and SEBIN (brown), and adenine binding site residues of SEBIN. - Highlights: • A Ribosome-inactivating proteins gene (SEBIN) was isolated from Sapium sebiferum. • SEBIN had DNase activity besides widely reported ribosome inactivation via N-glycosidases activity. • SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development in vivo. • SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner with the aid of mutant strains hus-1 and clk-2. • The possible active sites between SEBIN and the adenine of rRNA were predicted.

  9. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B.; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J.; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2014-01-01

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes. PMID:25349383

  10. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex.

    PubMed

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A P

    2014-11-11

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes.

  11. TSC1 Sets the Rate of Ribosome Export and Protein Synthesis through Nucleophosmin Translation

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Corey L.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Brady, Suzanne N.; Scheidenhelm, Danielle K.; Gutmann, David H.; Weber, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (B23) is a nucleolar phosphoprotein that has been implicated in numerous cellular processes. In particular, nucleophosmin interacts with nucleolar components of newly synthesized ribosomes to promote ribosome nuclear export. Nucleophosmin is a classic mitogen-induced protein, with changes in its expression correlating with growth factor stimulation. In this study, we examined the underlying mechanism of nucleophosmin induction and showed that hyperproliferative signals emanating from oncogenic H-RasV12 cause tremendous increases in nucleophosmin protein expression. Nucleophosmin protein accumulation was dependent on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation, as rapamycin completely prevented nucleophosmin induction. Consistent with this finding, genetic ablation of Tsc1, a major upstream inhibitor of mTOR, resulted in nucleophosmin protein induction through increased translation of existing nucleophosmin mRNAs. Increases in nucleophosmin protein accumulation were suppressed by reintroduction of TSC1. Induction of nucleophosmin through Tsc1 loss resulted in a greater pool of actively translating ribosomes in the cytoplasm, higher overall rates of protein synthesis, and increased cell proliferation, all of which were dependent on efficient nucleophosmin nuclear export. Nucleophosmin protein accumulation in the absence of Tsc1 promoted the nuclear export of maturing ribosome subunits, providing a mechanistic link between TSC1/mTOR signaling, nucleophosmin-mediated nuclear export of ribosome subunits, protein synthesis levels, and cell growth. PMID:17308101

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis of the Chlamydia trachomatis spc ribosomal protein gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, R; Gray, G J; Koehncke, N R; Gu, L J

    1992-01-01

    We identified and sequenced a segment of Chlamydia trachomatis chromosomal DNA that shows homology to the Escherichia coli spc and distal region of the S10 ribosomal protein (r-protein) operons. Its sequence revealed a high degree of nucleotide and operon context conservation with the E. coli r-protein genes. The C. trachomatis spec operon contains the r-protein genes for L14, L24, L5, S8, L6, L18, S5, L15, and Sec Y along with the genes for r-proteins L16, L29, and S17 of the S10 operon. The two operons are separated by a 16-bp intragenic region which contains no transcription signals. However, a putative promoter for the transcription of the spc operon was found 162 nucleotides upstream of the CtrL14e start site; it revealed significant homology to the E. coli consensus promoter sequences. Interestingly, our results indicate the absence of any structure resembling an EcoS8 regulatory target site on C. trachomatis spc mRNA in spite of significant amino acid identity between E. coli and C. trachomatis r-proteins. Also, the intrinsic aminoglycoside resistance in C. trachomatis is unlikely to be mediated by CtrL6e since E. coli expressing CtrL6e remained susceptible to gentamicin (MIC less than 0.5 micrograms/ml). Images PMID:1735714

  13. NAM9 nuclear suppressor of mitochondrial ochre mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for a protein homologous to S4 ribosomal proteins from chloroplasts, bacteria, and eucaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Boguta, M; Dmochowska, A; Borsuk, P; Wrobel, K; Gargouri, A; Lazowska, J; Slonimski, P P; Szczesniak, B; Kruszewska, A

    1992-01-01

    We report the genetic characterization, molecular cloning, and sequencing of a novel nuclear suppressor, the NAM9 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which acts on mutations of mitochondrial DNA. The strain NAM9-1 was isolated as a respiration-competent revertant of a mitochondrial mit mutant which carries the V25 ochre mutation in the oxi1 gene. Genetic characterization of the NAM9-1 mutation has shown that it is a nuclear dominant omnipotent suppressor alleviating several mutations in all four mitochondrial genes tested and has suggested its informational, and probably ribosomal, character. The NAM9 gene was cloned by transformation of the recipient oxi1-V25 mutant to respiration competence by using a gene bank from the NAM9-1 rho o strain. Orthogonal-field alternation gel electrophoresis analysis and genetic mapping localized the NAM9 gene on the right arm of chromosome XIV. Sequence analysis of the NAM9 gene showed that it encodes a basic protein of 485 amino acids with a presequence that could target the protein to the mitochondrial matrix. The N-terminal sequence of 200 amino acids of the deduced NAM9 product strongly resembles the S4 ribosomal proteins from chloroplasts and bacteria. Significant although less extensive similarity was found with ribosomal cytoplasmic proteins from lower eucaryotes, including S. cerevisiae. Chromosomal inactivation of the NAM9+ gene is not lethal to the cell but leads to respiration deficiency and loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity. We conclude that the NAM9 gene product is a mitochondrial ribosomal counterpart of S4 ribosomal proteins found in other systems and that the suppressor acts through decreasing the fidelity of translation. Images PMID:1729612

  14. Mapping of the RNA recognition site of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed Central

    Robert, F; Gagnon, M; Sans, D; Michnick, S; Brakier-Gingras, L

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein S7 initiates the folding of the 3' major domain of 16S ribosomal RNA by binding to its lower half. The X-ray structure of protein S7 from thermophilic bacteria was recently solved and found to be a modular structure, consisting of an alpha-helical domain with a beta-ribbon extension. To gain further insights into its interaction with rRNA, we cloned the S7 gene from Escherichia coli K12 into a pET expression vector and introduced 4 deletions and 12 amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. The binding of each mutant to the lower half of the 3' major domain of 16S rRNA was assessed by filtration on nitrocellulose membranes. Deletion of the N-terminal 17 residues or deletion of the B hairpins (residues 72-89) severely decreased S7 affinity for the rRNA. Truncation of the C-terminal portion (residues 138-178), which includes part of the terminal alpha-helix, significantly affected S7 binding, whereas a shorter truncation (residues 148-178) only marginally influenced its binding. Severe effects were also observed with several strategic point mutations located throughout the protein, including Q8A and F17G in the N-terminal region, and K35Q, G54S, K113Q, and M115G in loops connecting the alpha-helices. Our results are consistent with the occurrence of several sites of contact between S7 and the 16S rRNA, in line with its role in the folding of the 3' major domain. PMID:11105763

  15. Structural insights into the role of rRNA modifications in protein synthesis and ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Polikanov, Yury S; Melnikov, Sergey V; Söll, Dieter; Steitz, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    We report crystal structures of the Thermus thermophilus ribosome at 2.3- to 2.5-Å resolution, which have enabled modeling of rRNA modifications. The structures reveal contacts of modified nucleotides with mRNA and tRNAs or protein pY, and contacts within the ribosome interior stabilizing the functional fold of rRNA. Our work provides a resource to explore the roles of rRNA modifications and yields a more comprehensive atomic model of a bacterial ribosome.

  16. Fabrication and characteristics of MOSFET protein chip for detection of ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun-Yong; Kim, Min-Suk; Choi, Sie-Young

    2005-04-15

    A metal oxide silicon field effect transistor (MOSFET) protein chip for the easy detection of protein was fabricated and its characteristics were investigated. Generally, the drain current of the MOSFET is varied by the gate potential. It is expected that the formation of an antibody-antigen complex on the gate of MOSFET would lead to a detectable change in the charge distribution and thus, directly modulate the drain current of MOSFET. As such, the drain current of the MOSFET protein chip can be varied by ribosomal proteins absorbed by the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) immobilized on the gate (Au) surface, as ribosomal protein has positive charge, and these current variations then used as the response of the protein chip. The gate of MOSFET protein chip is not directly biased by an external voltage source, so called open gate or floating gate MOSFET, but rather chemically modified by immobilized molecular receptors called self-assembled monolayer (SAM). In our experiments, the current variation in the proposed protein chip was about 8% with a protein concentration of 0.7 mM. As the protein concentration increased, the drain current also gradually increased. In addition, there were some drift of the drain current in the device. It is considered that these drift might be caused by the drift from the MOSFET itself or protein absorption procedures that are relied on the facile attachment of thiol (-S) ligands to the gate (Au) surface. We verified the formation of SAM on the gold surface and the absorption of protein through the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurement.

  17. Dietary ascorbic acid normalizes ribosomal efficiency for collagen production in skin of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Schneir, M.; Imberman, M.; Ramamurthy, N.; Golub, L.

    1987-05-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the contribution of both ribosome amount and ribosomal efficiency to decreased collagen production in skin of diabetic rats and diabetic rats treated with dietary ascorbic acid. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were distributed equally into the following categories: non-diabetic controls; diabetics; ascorbic acid-treated diabetics. On day-20, all rats were injected with (/sup 3/H)proline and killed after 2 h. Absolute rate of collagen production, ribosome content, and ribosomal efficiency of collagen production were quantified. Also ribosomal efficiency was quantified for ribosomes in sucrose-gradient fractionated post-mitochondrial supernatants. The results indicate that decreased ribosomal efficiency was responsible for 70% of the decreased collagen production with 30% caused by decreased ribosome content, when measured for total skin or sucrose gradient-isolated ribosomes. At both levels of analysis, ascorbic acid treatment normalized ribosomal efficiency, indicating diabetes-mediated decreased ribosomal efficiency for collagen production is related to a co-translational event, such as procollagen underhydroxylation.

  18. Ribosomal analysis of rapid rates of protein synthesis in the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri.

    PubMed

    Pace, Douglas A; Maxson, Robert; Manahan, Donal T

    2010-02-01

    Previous research has shown that developing stages of the Antarctic sea urchin Sterechinus neumayeri have high rates of protein synthesis that are comparable to those of similar species living in much warmer waters. Direct measurements of the biosynthetic capacities of isolated ribosomes have not been reported for marine organisms living in the extreme-cold environment of Antarctica. Such measurements are required for a mechanistic understanding of how the critical and highly complex processes involved in protein synthesis are regulated in animals living in the coldest marine environment on Earth (< -1 degrees C). We tested the hypothesis that high rates of protein synthesis in the cold are a direct result of high biosynthetic capacities of ribosomes engaged in protein synthesis. Our results show that the rate at which ribosomes manufacture proteins (i.e., the peptide elongation rate) at -1 degrees C is surprisingly similar to rates measured in other sea urchin species at temperatures that are over 15 degrees C warmer. Average peptide elongation rates for a range of developmental stages of the Antarctic sea urchin were 0.36 codons s(-1) (+/- 0.05, SE). On the basis of subcellular rate determinations of ribosomal activity, we calculated stage-specific rates of protein synthesis for blastulae and gastrulae to be 3.7 and 6.5 ng protein h(-1), respectively. These findings support the conclusion that the high rates of biosynthesis previously reported for the Antarctic sea urchin are an outcome of high ribosomal activities.

  19. The structure and evolution of the ribosomal proteins encoded in the spc operon of the archaeon (Crenarchaeota) Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Yang, D; Kusser, I; Köpke, A K; Koop, B F; Matheson, A T

    1999-07-01

    The genes for nine ribosomal proteins, L24, L5, S14, S8, L6, L18, S5, L30, and L15, have been isolated and sequenced from the spc operon in the archaeon (Crenarchaeota) Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, and the putative amino acid sequence of the proteins coded by these genes has been determined. In addition, three other genes in the spc operon, coding for ribosomal proteins S4E, L32E, and L19E (equivalent to rat ribosomal proteins S4, L32, and L19), were sequenced and the structure of the putative proteins was determined. The order of the ribosomal protein genes in the spc operon of the Crenarchaeota kingdom of Archaea is identical to that present in the Euryarchaeota kingdom of Archaea and also identical to that found in bacteria, except for the genes for r-proteins S4E, L32E, and L19E, which are absent in bacteria. Although AUG is the initiation codon in most of the spc genes, GUG (val) and UUG (leu) are also used as initiation codons in S. acidocaldarius. Over 70% of the codons in the Sulfolobus spc operon have A or U in the third position, reflecting the low GC content of Sulfolobus DNA. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the archaeal r-proteins are a sister group of their eucaryotic counterparts but did not resolve the question of whether the Archaea is monophyletic, as suggested by the L6P, L15P, and L18P trees, or the question of whether the Crenarchaeota is separate from the Euryarchaeota and closer to the Eucarya, as suggested by the S8P, S5P, and L24P trees. In the case of the three Sulfolobus r-proteins that do not have a counterpart in the bacterial ribosome (S4E, L32E, and L19E), the archaeal r-proteins showed substantial identity to their eucaryotic equivalents, but in all cases the archaeal proteins formed a separate group from the eucaryotic proteins.

  20. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  1. Differential Phosphorylation of Ribosomal Proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana Plants during Day and Night

    PubMed Central

    Turkina, Maria V.; Klang Årstrand, Hanna; Vener, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    Protein synthesis in plants is characterized by increase in the translation rates for numerous proteins and central metabolic enzymes during the day phase of the photoperiod. The detailed molecular mechanisms of this diurnal regulation are unknown, while eukaryotic protein translation is mainly controlled at the level of ribosomal initiation complexes, which also involves multiple events of protein phosphorylation. We characterized the extent of protein phosphorylation in cytosolic ribosomes isolated from leaves of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana harvested during day or night. Proteomic analyses of preparations corresponding to both phases of the photoperiod detected phosphorylation at eight serine residues in the C-termini of six ribosomal proteins: S2-3, S6-1, S6-2, P0-2, P1 and L29-1. This included previously unknown phosphorylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 at Ser-231. Relative quantification of the phosphorylated peptides using stable isotope labeling and mass spectrometry revealed a 2.2 times increase in the day/night phosphorylation ratio at this site. Phosphorylation of the S6-1 and S6-2 variants of the same protein at Ser-240 increased by the factors of 4.2 and 1.8, respectively. The 1.6 increase in phosphorylation during the day was also found at Ser-58 of the 60S ribosomal protein L29-1. It is suggested that differential phosphorylation of the ribosomal proteins S6-1, S6-2 and L29-1 may contribute to modulation of the diurnal protein synthesis in plants. PMID:22195043

  2. SRY interacts with ribosomal proteins S7 and L13a in nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Sato, Youichi; Yano, Shojiro; Ewis, Ashraf A; Nakahori, Yutaka

    2011-05-01

    The SRY (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome) is essential for male development; however, the molecular mechanism by which the SRY induces testis development is still unclear. To elucidate the mechanism of testis development, we identified SRY-interacting proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system. We found two ribosomal proteins, RPS7 (ribosomal protein S7) and RPL13a (ribosomal protein L13a) that interact with the HMG (high-mobility group) box domain of SRY. Furthermore, we confirmed the intracellular distributions of RPS7, RPL13a and SRY and found that the three proteins were co-expressed in COS1 cells. SRY, RPS7 and RPL13a were co-localized in nuclear speckles. These findings suggest that SRY plays an important role in activities associated with nuclear speckles via an unknown mechanism.

  3. The NMR solution structure and function of RPA3313: a putative ribosomal transport protein from Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Catazaro, Jonathan; Lowe, Austin J; Cerny, Ronald L; Powers, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Protein function elucidation often relies heavily on amino acid sequence analysis and other bioinformatics approaches. The reliance is extended to structure homology modeling for ligand docking and protein-protein interaction mapping. However, sequence analysis of RPA3313 exposes a large, unannotated class of hypothetical proteins mostly from the Rhizobiales order. In the absence of sequence and structure information, further functional elucidation of this class of proteins has been significantly hindered. A high quality NMR structure of RPA3313 reveals that the protein forms a novel split ββαβ fold with a conserved ligand binding pocket between the first β-strand and the N-terminus of the α-helix. Conserved residue analysis and protein-protein interaction prediction analyses reveal multiple protein binding sites and conserved functional residues. Results of a mass spectrometry proteomic analysis strongly point toward interaction with the ribosome and its subunits. The combined structural and proteomic analyses suggest that RPA3313 by itself or in a larger complex may assist in the transportation of substrates to or from the ribosome for further processing. Proteins 2016; 85:93-102. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Dephosphorylation of ribosomal protein P0 in response to troglitazone-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Maniratanachote, Rawiwan; Minami, Keiichi; Katoh, Miki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2006-10-25

    Troglitazone (TRO)-induced cytotoxicity was investigated in HepG2 cells. The cells were exposed to TRO as well as rosiglitazone (RSG) at concentrations of 0, 25, 50 and 75 microM for 48 h. Total proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and visualized by silver staining. We focused on a protein spot at an approximate molecular weight of 35 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) of 5.7, which appeared only with the cytotoxic concentrations (50 and 75 microM) of TRO, but not with the low concentration (25 microM) of TRO or any concentrations of RSG. This protein spot was subjected to amino acid sequence analysis and identified as ribosomal protein P0 (P0). Interestingly, without any significant induction of its protein and mRNA, P0 was dephosphorylated depending on the concentration- and time-dependent manner of TRO-induced cytotoxicity. Pretreatment with a general caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD.fmk, prevented cleavage of caspase-3 but demonstrated a slight improvement of cytotoxicity induced by TRO. Thus, these effects could not prevent the dephosphorylation of P0. Our results strongly suggest that a post-translational modification, dephosphorylation, of P0 is associated with TRO-induced cytotoxicity.

  5. STUDIES ON THE FORMATION OF TRANSFER RIBONUCLEIC ACID-RIBOSOME COMPLEXES, XI. ANTIBIOTIC EFFECTS ON PHENYLALANYL-OLIGONUCLEOTIDE BINDING TO RIBOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Pestka, Sidney

    1969-01-01

    The effect of antibiotics on the binding of phenylalanyl-oligonucleotide to ribosomes has been examined. The results show that many classes of antibiotics can interfere with binding of the aminoacyl-oligonucleotide terminus of tRNA to ribosomes: chloramphenicol, sparsomycin, D-WIN-5094, vernamycin A, PA114A, streptogramin, amicetin, gougerotin, tylosin, and spiramycin III. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that these antibiotics inhibit protein synthesis by interfering with the binding of the aminoacyl-end of aminoacyl-tRNA to ribosomes. PMID:5261043

  6. Cotranslational Protein Folding within the Ribosome Tunnel Influences Trigger-Factor Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ku-Feng; Sun, Chia-Sui; Huang, Yi-Chen; Chan, Sunney I.; Koubek, Jiri; Wu, Tzong-Huah; Huang, Joseph J.-T.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, various folding zones within the ribosome tunnel have been identified and explored through x-ray, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and molecular biology studies. Here, we generated ribosome-bound nascent polypeptide complexes (RNCs) with different polyalanine (poly-A) inserts or signal peptides from membrane/secretory proteins to explore the influence of nascent chain compaction in the Escherichia coli ribosome tunnel on chaperone recruitment. By employing time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer and immunoblotting, we were able to show that the poly-A inserts embedded in the passage tunnel can form a compacted structure (presumably helix) and reduce the recruitment of Trigger Factor (TF) when the helical motif is located in the region near the tunnel exit. Similar experiments on nascent chains containing signal sequences that may form compacted structural motifs within the ribosome tunnel and lure the signal recognition particle (SRP) to the ribosome, provided additional evidence that short, compacted nascent chains interfere with TF binding. These findings shed light on the possible controlling mechanism of nascent chains within the tunnel that leads to chaperone recruitment, as well as the function of L23, the ribosomal protein that serves as docking sites for both TF and SRP, in cotranslational protein targeting. PMID:22735532

  7. A Novel Method to Evaluate Ribosomal Performance in Cell-Free Protein Synthesis Systems.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Noémie; Remes, Cristina; Ledesch, Ralph; Züchner, Tina; Höfig, Henning; Ritter, Ilona; Katranidis, Alexandros; Fitter, Jörg

    2017-04-24

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems were designed to produce proteins with a minimal set of purified components, thus offering the possibility to follow translation as well as protein folding. In order to characterize the performance of the ribosomes in such a system, it is crucial to separately quantify the two main components of productivity, namely the fraction of active ribosomes and the number of synthesizing cycles. Here, we provide a direct and highly reliable measure of ribosomal activity in any given CFPS system, introducing an enhanced-arrest peptide variant. We observe an almost complete stalling of ribosomes that produce GFPem (~95%), as determined by common centrifugation techniques and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Moreover, we thoroughly study the effect of different ribosomal modifications independently on activity and number of synthesizing cycles. Finally, employing two-colour coincidence detection and two-colour colocalisation microscopy, we demonstrate real-time access to key productivity parameters with minimal sample consumption on a single ribosome level.

  8. Listerin-dependent nascent protein ubiquitination relies on ribosome subunit dissociation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Sichen; von der Malsburg, Karina; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2013-06-06

    Quality control of defective mRNAs relies on their translation to detect the lesion. Aberrant proteins are therefore an obligate byproduct of mRNA surveillance and must be degraded to avoid disrupting protein homeostasis. These defective translation products are thought to be ubiquitinated at the ribosome, but the mechanism of ubiquitin ligase selectivity for these ribosomes is not clear. Here, we in vitro reconstitute ubiquitination of nascent proteins produced from aberrant mRNAs. Stalled 80S ribosome-nascent chain complexes are dissociated by the ribosome recycling factors Hbs1/Pelota/ABCE1 to a unique 60S-nascent chain-tRNA complex. The ubiquitin ligase Listerin preferentially recognizes 60S-nascent chains and triggers efficient nascent chain ubiquitination. Interfering with Hbs1 function stabilizes 80S complexes, precludes efficient Listerin recruitment, and reduces nascent chain ubiquitination. Thus, ribosome recycling factors control Listerin localization, explaining how translation products of mRNA surveillance are efficiently ubiquitinated while sparing translating ribosomes.

  9. The nuclear import of ribosomal proteins is regulated by mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Kazyken, Dubek; Kaz, Yelimbek; Kiyan, Vladimir; Zhylkibayev, Assylbek A.; Chen, Chien-Hung; Agarwal, Nitin K.; Sarbassov, Dos D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central component of the essential signaling pathway that regulates cell growth and proliferation by controlling anabolic processes in cells. mTOR exists in two distinct mTOR complexes known as mTORC1 and mTORC2 that reside mostly in cytoplasm. In our study, the biochemical characterization of mTOR led to discovery of its novel localization on nuclear envelope where it associates with a critical regulator of nuclear import Ran Binding Protein 2 (RanBP2). We show that association of mTOR with RanBP2 is dependent on the mTOR kinase activity that regulates the nuclear import of ribosomal proteins. The mTOR kinase inhibitors within thirty minutes caused a substantial decrease of ribosomal proteins in the nuclear but not cytoplasmic fraction. Detection of a nuclear accumulation of the GFP-tagged ribosomal protein rpL7a also indicated its dependence on the mTOR kinase activity. The nuclear abundance of ribosomal proteins was not affected by inhibition of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) by rapamycin or deficiency of mTORC2, suggesting a distinctive role of the nuclear envelope mTOR complex in the nuclear import. Thus, we identified that mTOR in association with RanBP2 mediates the active nuclear import of ribosomal proteins. PMID:25294810

  10. Transfer RNA-mediated regulation of ribosome dynamics during protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Jingyi; Richard, Arianne C.; Bronson, Jonathan E.; Gonzalez, & Ruben L.

    2011-01-01

    Translocation of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) through the ribosome during protein synthesis involves large-scale structural rearrangements of the ribosome and the ribosome-bound tRNAs that are accompanied by extensive and dynamic remodeling of tRNA-ribosome interactions. The contributions that rearranging individual tRNA-ribosome interactions make to directing tRNA movements during translocation, however, remain largely unknown. To address this question, we have used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to characterize the dynamics of ribosomal pre-translocation (PRE) complex analogs carrying either wild-type or systematically mutagenized tRNAs. Our data reveal how specific tRNA-ribosome interactions regulate the rate with which the PRE complex rearranges into a critical, on-pathway translocation intermediate and how these interactions control the stability of the resulting configuration. More interestingly, our results suggest that the conformational flexibility of the tRNA molecule itself plays a crucial role in directing the structural dynamics of the PRE complex during translocation. PMID:21857664

  11. Dosage Sensitivity of RPL9 and Concerted Evolution of Ribosomal Protein Genes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Devis, Deborah; Firth, Sue M.; Liang, Zhe; Byrne, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome in higher eukaryotes is a large macromolecular complex composed of four rRNAs and eighty different ribosomal proteins. In plants, each ribosomal protein is encoded by multiple genes. Duplicate genes within a family are often necessary to provide a threshold dose of a ribosomal protein but in some instances appear to have non-redundant functions. Here, we addressed whether divergent members of the RPL9 gene family are dosage sensitive or whether these genes have non-overlapping functions. The RPL9 family in Arabidopsis thaliana comprises two nearly identical members, RPL9B and RPL9C, and a more divergent member, RPL9D. Mutations in RPL9C and RPL9D genes lead to delayed growth early in development, and loss of both genes is embryo lethal, indicating that these are dosage-sensitive and redundant genes. Phylogenetic analysis of RPL9 as well as RPL4, RPL5, RPL27a, RPL36a, and RPS6 family genes in the Brassicaceae indicated that multicopy ribosomal protein genes have been largely retained following whole genome duplication. However, these gene families also show instances of tandem duplication, small scale deletion, and evidence of gene conversion. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of RPL9 genes in angiosperm species showed that genes within a species are more closely related to each other than to RPL9 genes in other species, suggesting ribosomal protein genes undergo convergent evolution. Our analysis indicates that ribosomal protein gene retention following whole genome duplication contributes to the number of genes in a family. However, small scale rearrangements influence copy number and likely drive concerted evolution of these dosage-sensitive genes. PMID:26734020

  12. Ribosomal Synthesis of Macrocyclic Peptides in Vitro and in Vivo Mediated by Genetically Encoded Amino-Thiol Unnatural Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Frost, John R.; Jacob, Nicholas T.; Papa, Louis J.; Owens, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile method for orchestrating the formation of side-chain-to-tail cyclic peptides from ribosomally derived polypeptide precursors is reported. Upon ribosomal incorporation into intein-containing precursor proteins, designer unnatural amino acids bearing side-chain 1,3- or 1,2-aminothiol functionalities are able to promote the cyclization of a downstream target peptide sequence via a C-terminal ligation/ring contraction mechanism. Using this approach, peptide macrocycles of variable size and composition could be generated in a pH-triggered manner in vitro, or directly in living bacterial cells. This methodology furnishes a new platform for the creation and screening of genetically encoded libraries of conformationally constrained peptides. This strategy was applied to identify and isolate a low micromolar streptavidin binder (KD = 1.1 µM) from a library of cyclic peptides produced in E. coli, thereby illustrating its potential toward aiding the discovery of functional peptide macrocycles. PMID:25933125

  13. An N-terminal fragment of yeast ribosomal protein L3 inhibits the cytotoxicity of pokeweed antiviral protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Di, Rong; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2014-04-11

    We have previously shown that ribosomal protein L3 is required for pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a type I ribosome inactivating protein, to bind to ribosomes and depurinate the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) in yeast. Co-expression of the N-terminal 99 amino acids of yeast L3 (L3Δ99) with PAP in transgenic tobacco plants completely abolished the toxicity of PAP. In this study, we investigated the interaction between PAP and L3Δ99 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast cells co-transformed with PAP and L3Δ99 showed markedly reduced growth inhibition and reduced rRNA depurination by PAP, compared to cells transformed with PAP alone. Co-transformation of yeast with PAP and L3Δ21 corresponding to the highly conserved N-terminal 21 amino acids of L3Δ99, reduced the cytotoxicity of PAP. PAP mRNA and protein levels were elevated and L3Δ99 or L3Δ21 mRNA and protein levels were reduced in yeast co-transformed with PAP and L3Δ99 or with PAP and L3Δ21, respectively. PAP interacted with L3Δ21 in yeast cells in vivo and by Biacore analysis in vitro, suggesting that the interaction between L3Δ21 and PAP may inhibit PAP-mediated depurination of the SRL, leading to a reduction in the cytotoxicity of PAP.

  14. Evidence for compensatory evolution of ribosomal proteins in response to rapid divergence of mitochondrial rRNA.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Felipe S; Burton, Ronald S

    2013-02-01

    Rapid evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) places intrinsic selective pressures on many nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial functions. Mitochondrial ribosomes, for example, are composed of mtDNA-encoded ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and a set of more than 60 nuclear-encoded ribosomal proteins (mRP) distinct from the cytosolic RPs (cRP). We hypothesized that the rapid divergence of mt-rRNA would result in rapid evolution of mRPs relative to cRPs, which respond to slowly evolving nuclear-encoded rRNA. In comparisons of rates of nonsynonymous and synonymous substitutions between a pair of divergent populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus, we found that mRPs showed elevated levels of amino acid changes relative to cRPs. This pattern was equally strong at the interspecific level, between three pairs of sister species (Nasonia vitripennis vs. N. longicornis, Drosophila melanogaster vs. D. simulans, and Saccharomyces cerevisae vs. S. paradoxus). This high rate of mRP evolution may result in intergenomic incompatibilities between taxonomic lineages, and such incompatibilities could lead to dysfunction of mitochondrial ribosomes and the loss of fitness observed among interpopulation hybrids in T. californicus and interspecific hybrids in other species.

  15. Assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 recruit 5S rRNA and ribosomal proteins rpL5 and rpL11 into nascent ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyu; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Tang, Lan; Guo, Yurong; Oeffinger, Marlene; Rout, Michael P.; Hiley, Shawna L.; Hughes, Timothy; Woolford, John L.

    2007-01-01

    More than 170 proteins are necessary for assembly of ribosomes in eukaryotes. However, cofactors that function with each of these proteins, substrates on which they act, and the precise functions of assembly factors—e.g., recruiting other molecules into preribosomes or triggering structural rearrangements of pre-rRNPs—remain mostly unknown. Here we investigated the recruitment of two ribosomal proteins and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) into nascent ribosomes. We identified a ribonucleoprotein neighborhood in preribosomes that contains two yeast ribosome assembly factors, Rpf2 and Rrs1, two ribosomal proteins, rpL5 and rpL11, and 5S rRNA. Interactions between each of these four proteins have been confirmed by binding assays in vitro. These molecules assemble into 90S preribosomal particles containing 35S rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Rpf2 and Rrs1 are required for recruiting rpL5, rpL11, and 5S rRNA into preribosomes. In the absence of association of these molecules with pre-rRNPs, processing of 27SB pre-rRNA is blocked. Consequently, the abortive 66S pre-rRNPs are prematurely released from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, and cannot be exported to the cytoplasm. PMID:17938242

  16. Assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 recruit 5S rRNA and ribosomal proteins rpL5 and rpL11 into nascent ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyu; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Tang, Lan; Guo, Yurong; Oeffinger, Marlene; Rout, Michael P; Hiley, Shawna L; Hughes, Timothy; Woolford, John L

    2007-10-15

    More than 170 proteins are necessary for assembly of ribosomes in eukaryotes. However, cofactors that function with each of these proteins, substrates on which they act, and the precise functions of assembly factors--e.g., recruiting other molecules into preribosomes or triggering structural rearrangements of pre-rRNPs--remain mostly unknown. Here we investigated the recruitment of two ribosomal proteins and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) into nascent ribosomes. We identified a ribonucleoprotein neighborhood in preribosomes that contains two yeast ribosome assembly factors, Rpf2 and Rrs1, two ribosomal proteins, rpL5 and rpL11, and 5S rRNA. Interactions between each of these four proteins have been confirmed by binding assays in vitro. These molecules assemble into 90S preribosomal particles containing 35S rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Rpf2 and Rrs1 are required for recruiting rpL5, rpL11, and 5S rRNA into preribosomes. In the absence of association of these molecules with pre-rRNPs, processing of 27SB pre-rRNA is blocked. Consequently, the abortive 66S pre-rRNPs are prematurely released from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, and cannot be exported to the cytoplasm.

  17. Combined Effect of the Cfr Methyltransferase and Ribosomal Protein L3 Mutations on Resistance to Ribosome-Targeting Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Pakula, Kevin K; Hansen, Lykke H; Vester, Birte

    2017-09-01

    Several groups of antibiotics inhibit bacterial growth by binding to bacterial ribosomes. Mutations in ribosomal protein L3 have been associated with resistance to linezolid and tiamulin, which both bind at the peptidyl transferase center in the ribosome. Resistance to these and other antibiotics also occurs through methylation of 23S rRNA at position A2503 by the methyltransferase Cfr. The mutations in L3 and the cfr gene have been found together in clinical isolates, raising the question of whether they have a combined effect on antibiotic resistance or growth. We transformed a plasmid-borne cfr gene into a uL3-depleted Escherichia coli strain containing either wild-type L3 or L3 with one of seven mutations, G147R, Q148F, N149S, N149D, N149R, Q150L, or T151P, expressed from plasmid-carried rplC genes. The L3 mutations are well tolerated, with small to moderate growth rate decreases. The presence of Cfr has a very minor influence on the growth rate. The resistance of the transformants to linezolid, tiamulin, florfenicol, and Synercid (a combination of quinupristin and dalfopristin [Q-D]) was measured by MIC assays. The resistance from Cfr was, in all cases, stronger than the effects of the L3 mutations, but various effects were obtained with the combinations of Cfr and L3 mutations ranging from a synergistic to an antagonistic effect. Linezolid and tiamulin susceptibility varied greatly among the L3 mutations, while no significant effects on florfenicol and Q-D susceptibility were seen. This study underscores the complex interplay between various resistance mechanisms and cross-resistance, even from antibiotics with overlapping binding sites. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo—that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  19. The Contributions of the Ribosome Biogenesis Protein Utp5/WDR43 to Craniofacial Development.

    PubMed

    Sondalle, S B; Baserga, S J; Yelick, P C

    2016-10-01

    Fairly recently, it was recognized that human ribosomopathies-developmental defects caused by mutations in ribosome biogenesis proteins-can exhibit tissue-specific defects rather than the expected global defects. This apparent anomaly-that seemingly ubiquitously expressed and required ribosomal proteins can have distinct functions in cell and tissue differentiation-has spurred new areas of research focused on better understanding translational mechanisms, biogenesis, and function in diverse cell types. This renewed appreciation for, and need to better understand, roles for ribosomal proteins in human development and disease has identified surprising similarities and differences in a variety of human ribosomopathies. Here, we discuss ribosomal protein functions in health and disease, focusing on the ribosome biogenesis protein Utp5/WDR43. New and exciting research in this field is anticipated to provide insight into a variety of previously understudied craniofacial dysostoses and result in significantly improved knowledge and understanding of roles for translational machinery in human craniofacial development and disease. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  20. Ribosome Profiling Reveals Pervasive Translation Outside of Annotated Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Brar, Gloria A.; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Harris, Michael S.; Talhouarne, Gaëlle J. S.; Jackson, Sarah E.; Wills, Mark R.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Ribosome profiling suggests that ribosomes occupy many regions of the transcriptome thought to be non-coding, including 5′ UTRs and lncRNAs. Apparent ribosome footprints outside of protein-coding regions raise the possibility of artifacts unrelated to translation, particularly when they occupy multiple, overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). Here we show hallmarks of translation in these footprints: co-purification with the large ribosomal subunit, response to drugs targeting elongation, trinucleotide periodicity, and initiation at early AUGs. We develop a metric for distinguishing between 80S footprints and nonribosomal sources using footprint size distributions, which validates the vast majority of footprints outside of coding regions. We present evidence for polypeptide production beyond annotated genes, including induction of immune responses following human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. Translation is pervasive on cytosolic transcripts outside of conserved reading frames, and direct detection of this expanded universe of translated products enables efforts to understand how cells manage and exploit its consequences. PMID:25159147

  1. Ribosome profiling reveals pervasive translation outside of annotated protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Ingolia, Nicholas T; Brar, Gloria A; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Harris, Michael S; Talhouarne, Gaëlle J S; Jackson, Sarah E; Wills, Mark R; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2014-09-11

    Ribosome profiling suggests that ribosomes occupy many regions of the transcriptome thought to be noncoding, including 5' UTRs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Apparent ribosome footprints outside of protein-coding regions raise the possibility of artifacts unrelated to translation, particularly when they occupy multiple, overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). Here, we show hallmarks of translation in these footprints: copurification with the large ribosomal subunit, response to drugs targeting elongation, trinucleotide periodicity, and initiation at early AUGs. We develop a metric for distinguishing between 80S footprints and nonribosomal sources using footprint size distributions, which validates the vast majority of footprints outside of coding regions. We present evidence for polypeptide production beyond annotated genes, including the induction of immune responses following human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. Translation is pervasive on cytosolic transcripts outside of conserved reading frames, and direct detection of this expanded universe of translated products enables efforts at understanding how cells manage and exploit its consequences.

  2. Peptide Chain Termination: Effect of Protein S on Ribosomal Binding of Release Factors

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J. L.; Caskey, C. T.

    1970-01-01

    The protein factor S, previously shown to stimulate polypeptide chain termination in bacterial extracts, has two effects upon the complex formed between ribosomes, release factor, and terminator (trinucleotide) codon: (1) in the absence of GTP or GDP, S stimulates formation of an [R·UAA·ribosome] intermediate, and (2) in the presence of GTP or GDP, S participates in dissociation of this intermediate. Factor S can stimulate fMet release from [fMet-tRNAf·AUG·ribosome] intermediates in either the presence or absence of GTP or GDP. A model is proposed which relates the in vitro effects of S ± GTP (or GDP) on fMet release to the effects of S ± GTP (or GDP) on the binding and dissociation of R factor from ribosomes. PMID:5289007

  3. Protein-RNA Dynamics in the Central Junction Control 30S Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kris Ann; Lamichhane, Rajan; Lamichhane, Tek; Rueda, David; Cunningham, Philip R

    2016-09-11

    Interactions between ribosomal proteins (rproteins) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) facilitate the formation of functional ribosomes. S15 is a central domain primary binding protein that has been shown to trigger a cascade of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, forming the functional structure of the central domain. Previous biochemical and structural studies in vitro have revealed that S15 binds a three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22, including nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754. All junction nucleotides except 653 are highly conserved among the Bacteria. To identify functionally important motifs within the junction, we subjected nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754 to saturation mutagenesis and selected and analyzed functional mutants. Only 64 mutants with greater than 10% ribosome function in vivo were isolated. S15 overexpression complemented mutations in the junction loop in each of the partially active mutants, although mutations that produced inactive ribosomes were not complemented by overexpression of S15. Single-molecule Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) was used to study the Mg(2+)- and S15-induced conformational dynamics of selected junction mutants. Comparison of the structural dynamics of these mutants with the wild type in the presence and absence of S15 revealed specific sequence and structural motifs in the central junction that are important in ribosome function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Specific N-terminal cleavage of ribosomal protein L27 in Staphylococcus aureus and related bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Erin A.; Caufield, J. Harry; Lyons, Charles E.; Manning, Keith A.; Dokland, Terje; Christie, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ribosomal protein L27 is a component of the eubacterial large ribosomal subunit that has been shown to play a critical role in substrate stabilization during protein synthesis. This function is mediated by the L27 N-terminus, which protrudes into the peptidyl transferase center. In this report we demonstrate that L27 in Staphylococcus aureus and other Firmicutes is encoded with an N-terminal extension that is not present in most Gram-negative organisms, and is absent from mature ribosomes. We have identified a cysteine protease, conserved among bacteria containing the L27 N-terminal extension, which performs post-translational cleavage of L27. Ribosomal biology in eubacteria has largely been studied in the Gram negative bacterium Escherichia coli; our findings indicate that there are aspects of the basic biology of the ribosome in S. aureus and other related bacteria that differ substantially from that of the E. coli ribosome. This research lays the foundation for the development of new therapeutic approaches that target this novel pathway. PMID:25388641

  5. Mutual protection of ribosomal proteins L5 and L11 from degradation is essential for p53 activation upon ribosomal biogenesis stress

    PubMed Central

    Bursać, Sladana; Brdovčak, Maja Cokarić; Pfannkuchen, Martin; Orsolić, Ines; Golomb, Lior; Zhu, Yan; Katz, Chen; Daftuar, Lilyn; Grabušić, Kristina; Vukelić, Iva; Filić, Vedrana; Oren, Moshe; Prives, Carol; Volarević, Siniša

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of ribosomal biogenesis can activate the p53 protein independently of DNA damage. The ability of ribosomal proteins L5, L11, L23, L26, or S7 to bind Mdm2 and inhibit its ubiquitin ligase activity has been suggested as a critical step in p53 activation under these conditions. Here, we report that L5 and L11 are particularly important for this response. Whereas several other newly synthesized ribosomal proteins are degraded by proteasomes upon inhibition of Pol I activity by actinomycin D, L5 and L11 accumulate in the ribosome-free fraction where they bind to Mdm2. This selective accumulation of free L5 and L11 is due to their mutual protection from proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, the endogenous, newly synthesized L5 and L11 continue to be imported into nucleoli even after nucleolar disruption and colocalize with Mdm2, p53, and promyelocytic leukemia protein. This suggests that the disrupted nucleoli may provide a platform for L5- and L11-dependent p53 activation, implying a role for the nucleolus in p53 activation by ribosomal biogenesis stress. These findings may have important implications with respect to understanding the pathogenesis of diseases caused by impaired ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23169665

  6. Efficacy of anti-ribosomal P protein antibody testing for diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hirohata, Shunsei; Kasama, Tsuyoshi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Takabayashi, Katsuhiko

    2014-11-01

    Anti-ribosomal P protein antibody (anti-P) is detected in a fraction of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, especially with lupus psychosis, lupus nephritis, and lupus hepatitis. However, it has been unclear whether anti-P testing is specific for SLE. The current studies were designed to examine the efficacy of serum anti-P testing in diagnosis of SLE. Multicenter retrospective study was performed with 102 SLE patients, 102 patients with non-SLE rheumatic diseases, and 100 normal healthy subjects, who gave informed consents. The diagnosis of SLE was confirmed according to the 1982 ACR revised criteria. Serum IgG anti-P was determined by ELISA using the C-terminal 22 amino-acids of ribosomal P protein conjugated to human serum albumin. The specificity and sensitivity of anti-P were compared with those of anti-DNA, anti-Sm, and anti-cardiolipin (CL) antibodies. Serum anti-P was positive in 38 of 102 SLE patients (37.3%), in 4 of 102 patients with non-SLE rheumatic diseases (3.9%), and in none of 100 normal subjects. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed that anti-P provided higher AUC (area under the curve) than anti-Sm or anti-CL. Consistently, the sensitivity of anti-P (37.3%) was superior to that of anti-Sm (27.5%) and anti-CL (24.5%), but inferior to that of anti-DNA (51.0%), whereas the specificity of anti-P (96.1%) was superior to that of anti-CL (86.3%) and comparable to that of anti-DNA (96.1%) and anti-Sm (96.1%). These results indicate that serum anti-P testing might be an effective measure in diagnosing SLE, providing better diagnostic efficiency than anti-Sm and anti-CL.

  7. Regulation of ribonuclease E activity by the L4 ribosomal protein of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharam; Chang, Ssu-Jean; Lin, Pei-Hsun; Averina, Olga V.; Kaberdin, Vladimir R.; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2009-01-01

    Whereas ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) are known primarily as components of the translational machinery, certain of these r-proteins have been found to also have extraribosomal functions. Here we report the novel ability of an r-protein, L4, to regulate RNA degradation in Escherichia coli. We show by affinity purification, immunoprecipitation analysis, and E. coli two-hybrid screening that L4 interacts with a site outside of the catalytic domain of RNase E to regulate the endoribonucleolytic functions of the enzyme, thus inhibiting RNase E-specific cleavage in vitro, stabilizing mRNAs targeted by RNase E in vivo, and controlling plasmid DNA replication by stabilizing an antisense regulatory RNA normally attacked by RNase E. Broader effects of the L4-RNase E interaction on E. coli transcripts were shown by DNA microarray analysis, which revealed changes in the abundance of 65 mRNAs encoding the stress response proteins HslO, Lon, CstA, YjiY, and YaeL, as well as proteins involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and transport, transcription/translation, and DNA/RNA synthesis. Analysis of mRNA stability showed that the half lives of stress-responsive transcripts were increased by ectopic expression of L4, which normally increases along with other r-proteins in E. coli under stress conditions, and also by inactivation of RNase E. Our finding that L4 can inhibit RNase E-dependent decay may account at least in part for the elevated production of stress-induced proteins during bacterial adaptation to adverse environments. PMID:19144914

  8. Yeast ribosomal proteins: XIII. Saccharomyces cerevisiae YL8A gene, interrupted with two introns, encodes a homolog of mammalian L7.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuta, K; Hashimoto, T; Otaka, E

    1992-01-01

    We isolated and sequenced a gene, YL8A, encoding ribosomal protein YL8 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is one of the two duplicated genes encoding YL8 and is located on chromosome VII while the other is on chromosome XVI. The haploid strains carrying disrupted YL8A grew more slowly than the parent strain. The open reading frame is interrupted with two introns. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals that yeast YL8 is a homolog of mammalian ribosomal protein L7, E.coli L30 and others. Images PMID:1549461

  9. Molecular scanning: combining random mutagenesis, ribosome display, and bioinformatic analysis for protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Darmanin-Sheehan, Alfredo; Finlay, William James Jonathan; Cunningham, Orla; Fennell, Brian Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Protein engineering techniques can facilitate the direct de-convolution of specific domains, regions, and particular amino acids that contribute to protein function. Many tools are available to aid this enterprise and herein we describe one such tool, a technique we term "Molecular Scanning" (MS). MS is analogous to previously described alanine scanning in that it samples potentially functional sequence space, but differs in that it uses Error-Prone polymerase chain reaction to randomly introduce all amino acids across the sequence space, as opposed to simply introducing alanine at each desired position. We commonly use MS in conjunction with ribosome-display, selecting for specific character traits (e.g., improved affinity) which allows us to sample functionally relevant diversity on a reasonably large scale. This approach is amenable to a variety of different mutational techniques and display technologies as dictated by user requirements or needs. In this chapter we present a general outline of the process as we have previously successfully applied it.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum-bound ribosomes reside in stable association with the translocon following termination of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Potter, Matthew D; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2002-06-28

    In current views, translation-coupled ribosome binding to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane is transient, with association occurring via the signal recognition particle pathway and dissociation occurring upon the termination of protein synthesis. Recent studies indicate, however, that ribosomal subunits remain membrane-bound following the termination of protein synthesis. To define the mechanism of post-termination ribosome association with the ER membrane, membrane-bound ribosomes were detergent-solubilized from tissue culture cells at different stages of the protein synthesis cycle, and the composition of the ribosome-associated membrane protein fraction was determined. We report that ribosomes reside in stable association with the Sec61alpha-translocon following the termination stage of protein synthesis. Additionally, in vitro experiments revealed that solubilized, gradient-purified ribosome-translocon complexes were able to initiate the translation of secretory and cytosolic proteins and were functional in assays of signal sequence recognition. Using this experimental system, synthesis of signal sequence-bearing polypeptides yielded a tight ribosome-translocon junction; synthesis of nascent polypeptides lacking a signal sequence resulted in a disruption of this junction. On the basis of these data, we propose that in situ, ribosomes reside in association with the translocon throughout the cycle of protein synthesis, with membrane release occurring upon translation of proteins lacking topogenic signals.

  11. Gene clusters for ribosomal proteins in the mitochondrial genome of a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, M; Oda, K; Yamato, K; Ohta, E; Nakamura, Y; Nozato, N; Akashi, K; Ohyama, K

    1992-01-01

    We detected 16 genes for ribosomal proteins in the complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA from a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha. The genes formed two major clusters, rps12-rps7 and rps10-rpl2-rps19-rps3-rpl16-rpl5- rps14-rps8- rpl6-rps13-rps11-rps1, very similar in organization to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein operons (str and S10-spc-alpha operons, respectively). In contrast, rps2 and rps4 genes were located separately in the liverwort mitochondrial genome (the latter was part of the alpha operon in E. coli). Furthermore, several ribosomal proteins encoded by the liverwort mitochondrial genome differed substantially in size from their counterparts in E. coli and liverwort chloroplast. PMID:1620617

  12. Pokeweed Antiviral Protein, a Ribosome Inactivating Protein: Activity, Inhibition and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Domashevskiy, Artem V.; Goss, Dixie J.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses employ an array of elaborate strategies to overcome plant defense mechanisms and must adapt to the requirements of the host translational systems. Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) from Phytolacca americana is a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) and is an RNA N-glycosidase that removes specific purine residues from the sarcin/ricin (S/R) loop of large rRNA, arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. PAP is thought to play an important role in the plant’s defense mechanism against foreign pathogens. This review focuses on the structure, function, and the relationship of PAP to other RIPs, discusses molecular aspects of PAP antiviral activity, the novel inhibition of this plant toxin by a virus counteraction—a peptide linked to the viral genome (VPg), and possible applications of RIP-conjugated immunotoxins in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25635465

  13. Nucleic acid vaccination of Brucella abortus ribosomal L7/L12 gene elicits immune response.

    PubMed

    Kurar, E; Splitter, G A

    1997-12-01

    Nucleic acid vaccines provide an exciting approach for antigen presentation to the immune system. As a test of this new methodology, the immune response to the in vivo-expressed Brucella abortus ribosomal L7/12 gene in the muscle cells of mice was examined. To accomplish this goal the eukaryotic expression systems pcDNA3 and p6 were used. Single intramuscular injection of the L7/L12 gene driven by the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (pcDNA3) or bovine MHC 1 promoter (p6) resulted in intracellular expression of the B. abortus L7/L12 immunodominant protein encoded by this gene. This application facilitated directed antigen presentation to the immune system and established specific antibody and T-cell responses compared with vector only (pcDNA3) negative controls and B. abortus S19 injected positive controls. Although pcDNA3-encoded L7/L12 gene-inoculated mice possessed significant protection, p6-L7/L12 did not engender significant protection against B. abortus S2308 infection compared to positive control mice. These data suggest a promising antigen-specific response, and L7/L12 nucleic acid vaccination may be an initial step in the development of genetically engineered candidate vaccines against brucellosis. This study for the first time focuses on DNA immunization of a gene from B. abortus.

  14. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V.; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5′-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5′ exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8SC and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8SC rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes. PMID:25995445

  15. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2015-07-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5'-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5' exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8S(C) and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8S(C) rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes.

  16. Ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation is controlled by TOR and modulated by PKA in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tahmeena; Köhler, Julia R

    2015-10-01

    TOR and PKA signaling pathways control eukaryotic cell growth and proliferation. TOR activity in model fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, responds principally to nutrients, e.g., nitrogen and phosphate sources, which are incorporated into the growing cell mass; PKA signaling responds to the availability of the cells' major energy source, glucose. In the fungal commensal and pathogen, Candida albicans, little is known of how these pathways interact. Here, the signal from phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (P-S6) was defined as a surrogate marker for TOR-dependent anabolic activity in C. albicans. Nutritional, pharmacologic and genetic modulation of TOR activity elicited corresponding changes in P-S6 levels. The P-S6 signal corresponded to translational activity of a GFP reporter protein. Contributions of four PKA pathway components to anabolic activation were then examined. In high glucose concentrations, only Tpk2 was required to upregulate P-S6 to physiologic levels, whereas all four tested components were required to downregulate P-S6 in low glucose. TOR was epistatic to PKA components with respect to P-S6. In many host niches inhabited by C. albicans, glucose is scarce, with protein being available as a nitrogen source. We speculate that PKA may modulate TOR-dependent cell growth to a rate sustainable by available energy sources, when monomers of anabolic processes, such as amino acids, are abundant. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Balsamin, a novel ribosome-inactivating protein from the seeds of Balsam apple Momordica balsamina.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Inderdeep; Yadav, Santosh K; Hariprasad, Gururao; Gupta, R C; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Batra, Janendra K; Puri, Munish

    2012-08-01

    Plant seeds, a rich source of proteins, are considered important for their application as functional ingredients in a food system. A novel ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP), balsamin was purified from the seeds of Balsam apple, Momordica balsamina. Balsamin was purified by ion exchange chromatography on CM Sepharose and gel filtration on superdex-75. It has a molecular weight of 28 kDa as shown by SDS-PAGE analysis. Balsamin inhibits protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate-based cell free translation assay with an IC(50) of 90.6 ng ml(-1). It has RNA N-glycosidase activity and releases a 400-base long fragment termed the Endo fragment from 28S rRNA in the same manner as does saporin-6 from Saponaria officinalis. The N-terminal sequence analysis of the first 12 amino acids of balsamin revealed that it shares 83% similarity with type I RIP α-MMC from Momordica charantia and 50% similarity with β-MMC (from Momordica charantia), bryodin I (from Bryonia dioica) and luffin a (from Luffa cylindrica). Balsamin was further characterized by mass spectrometry. CD spectroscopic studies indicate that secondary structure of balsamin contains helix (23.5%), β-strand (24.6%), turn (20%) and random coil (31.9%). Thus RIPs activity expressed in vegetables like Momordica sp. advocates its usage in diet.

  18. Ribosomal RNA and protein transcripts persist in the cysts of Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Sandeep; Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2014-06-01

    In most organisms rDNA transcription ceases under conditions of growth stress. However, we have earlier shown that pre-rRNA accumulates during encystation in Entamoeba invadens. We labeled newly-synthesized rRNA during encystation, with [methyl-(3)H] methionine in the presence of chitinase to enable uptake of isotope. Incorporation rate reduced after 24h, and then increased to reach levels comparable with normal cells. The label was rapidly chased to the ribosomal pellet in dividing cells, while at late stages of encystation the ratio of counts going to the pellet dropped 3-fold. The transcript levels of selected ribosomal protein genes also went down initially but went up again at later stages of encystation. This suggested that rRNA and ribosomal protein transcription may be coordinately regulated. Our data shows that encysting E. invadens cells accumulate transcripts of both the RNA and protein components of the ribosome, which may ensure rapid synthesis of new ribosomes when growth resumes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein Folding Activity of Ribosomal RNA Is a Selective Target of Two Unrelated Antiprion Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tribouillard-Tanvier, Déborah; Dos Reis, Suzana; Gug, Fabienne; Voisset, Cécile; Béringue, Vincent; Sabate, Raimon; Kikovska, Ema; Talarek, Nicolas; Bach, Stéphane; Huang, Chenhui; Desban, Nathalie; Saupe, Sven J.; Supattapone, Surachai; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Chédin, Stéphane; Vilette, Didier; Galons, Hervé; Sanyal, Suparna; Blondel, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background 6-Aminophenanthridine (6AP) and Guanabenz (GA, a drug currently in use for the treatment of hypertension) were isolated as antiprion drugs using a yeast-based assay. These structurally unrelated molecules are also active against mammalian prion in several cell-based assays and in vivo in a mouse model for prion-based diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the identification of cellular targets of these drugs. Using affinity chromatography matrices for both drugs, we demonstrate an RNA-dependent interaction of 6AP and GA with the ribosome. These specific interactions have no effect on the peptidyl transferase activity of the ribosome or on global translation. In contrast, 6AP and GA specifically inhibit the ribosomal RNA-mediated protein folding activity of the ribosome. Conclusion/Significance 6AP and GA are therefore the first compounds to selectively inhibit the protein folding activity of the ribosome. They thus constitute precious tools to study the yet largely unexplored biological role of this protein folding activity. PMID:18478094

  20. Recent advances in the uses and applications of ribosome-inactivating proteins from plants.

    PubMed

    Girbés, T; Ferreras, J M; Iglesias, R; Citores, L; De Torre, C; Carbajales, M L; Jiménez, P; De Benito, F M; Muñoz, R

    1996-06-01

    Plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are inhibitors present in all parts of plants that irreversibly inactivate eukaryotic ribosomes, thus impairing protein synthesis. RIPs are enzymes with N-glycosidase activity on the large rRNA. Their powerful inhibitory activity has been made use of advantageously to construct conjugates with suitable carriers targeted to altered specific cells. RIPs may be used to inhibit replication of both animal and plant viruses. The introduction of genes coding for RIPs into the genome of plants leads to an increase in resistance towards fungal pathogens and viruses. RIPs are important tools for the treatment of cancer and AIDS and for the protection of crop production.

  1. Proteins and Amino Acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  2. The effects of catabolic and anabolic steroids on amino acid incorporation by skeletal-muscle ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Gillian; White, A. M.; Worthington, Judy

    1968-01-01

    1. A method is described for the routine isolation of ribosomes from small quantities of skeletal muscle that have been homogenized with the Ultra-Turrax tissue disintegrator. 2. Ribosomes prepared by this method from rats receiving triamcinolone acetonide or rabbits receiving cortisone acetate show a marked fall in their ability to incorporate amino acids when compared with ribosomes from control animals. 3. This fall in activity can be partially prevented in rats by pretreating the animals with an anabolic steroid, steroid 36644-Ba. 4. Testosterone (5mg./kg.) administered to rabbits in conjunction with cortisone acetate is not effective in maintaining ribosomal activity. However, steroid 36644-Ba at one-tenth of an equiandrogenic dose (0·05mg./kg.) is extremely effective. 5. The results with ribosomes isolated from rabbits support the concept that steroid 36644-Ba and possibly all anabolic steroids have an ability to counteract the catabolic action of corticosteroids that is greater than their androgenic activity would suggest. PMID:5673936

  3. Adaptations required for mitochondrial import following mitochondrial to nucleus gene transfer of ribosomal protein S10.

    PubMed

    Murcha, Monika W; Rudhe, Charlotta; Elhafez, Dina; Adams, Keith L; Daley, Daniel O; Whelan, James

    2005-08-01

    The minimal requirements to support protein import into mitochondria were investigated in the context of the phenomenon of ongoing gene transfer from the mitochondrion to the nucleus in plants. Ribosomal protein 10 of the small subunit is encoded in the mitochondrion in soybean and many other angiosperms, whereas in several other species it is nuclear encoded and thus must be imported into the mitochondrial matrix to function. When encoded by the nuclear genome, it has adopted different strategies for mitochondrial targeting and import. In lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and carrot (Daucus carota), Rps10 independently gained different N-terminal extensions from other genes, following transfer to the nucleus. (The designation of Rps10 follows the following convention. The gene is indicated in italics. If encoded in the mitochondrion, it is rps10; if encoded in the nucleus, it is Rps10.) Here, we show that the N-terminal extensions of Rps10 in lettuce and carrot are both essential for mitochondrial import. In maize (Zea mays), Rps10 has not acquired an extension upon transfer but can be readily imported into mitochondria. Deletion analysis located the mitochondrial targeting region to the first 20 amino acids. Using site directed mutagenesis, we changed residues in the first 20 amino acids of the mitochondrial encoded soybean (Glycine max) rps10 to the corresponding amino acids in the nuclear encoded maize Rps10 until import was achieved. Changes were required that altered charge, hydrophobicity, predicted ability to form an amphipathic alpha-helix, and generation of a binding motif for the outer mitochondrial membrane receptor, translocase of the outer membrane 20. In addition to defining the changes required to achieve mitochondrial localization, the results demonstrate that even proteins that do not present barriers to import can require substantial changes to acquire a mitochondrial targeting signal.

  4. E. coli metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase-E binds to the ribosome: a unique moonlighting action revealed

    PubMed Central

    Shasmal, Manidip; Dey, Sandip; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that a high degree of regulation is involved in the protein synthesis machinery entailing more interacting regulatory factors. A multitude of proteins have been identified recently which show regulatory function upon binding to the ribosome. Here, we identify tight association of a metabolic protein aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase E (AdhE) with the E. coli 70S ribosome isolated from cell extract under low salt wash conditions. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the ribosome sample allows us to localize its position on the head of the small subunit, near the mRNA entrance. Our study demonstrates substantial RNA unwinding activity of AdhE which can account for the ability of ribosome to translate through downstream of at least certain mRNA helices. Thus far, in E. coli, no ribosome-associated factor has been identified that shows downstream mRNA helicase activity. Additionally, the cryo-EM map reveals interaction of another extracellular protein, outer membrane protein C (OmpC), with the ribosome at the peripheral solvent side of the 50S subunit. Our result also provides important insight into plausible functional role of OmpC upon ribosome binding. Visualization of the ribosome purified directly from the cell lysate unveils for the first time interactions of additional regulatory proteins with the ribosome. PMID:26822933

  5. Matching the crystallographic structure of ribosomal protein S7 to a three-dimensional model of the 16S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, I; Nakagawa, A; Hosaka, H; Wakatsuki, S; Mueller, F; Brimacombe, R

    1998-01-01

    Two recently published but independently derived structures, namely the X-ray crystallographic structure of ribosomal protein S7 and the "binding pocket" for this protein in a three-dimensional model of the 16S rRNA, have been correlated with one another. The known rRNA-protein interactions for S7 include a minimum binding site, a number of footprint sites, and two RNA-protein crosslink sites on the 16S rRNA, all of which form a compact group in the published 16S rRNA model (despite the fact that these interactions were not used as primary modeling constraints in building that model). The amino acids in protein S7 that are involved in the two crosslinks to 16S rRNA have also been determined in previous studies, and here we have used these sites to orient the crystallographic structure of S7 relative to its rRNA binding pocket. Some minor alterations were made to the rRNA model to improve the fit. In the resulting structure, the principal positively charged surface of the protein is in contact with the 16S rRNA, and all of the RNA-protein interaction data are satisfied. The quality of the fit gives added confidence as to the validity of the 16S rRNA model. Protein S7 is furthermore known to be crosslinked both to P site-bound tRNA and to mRNA at positions upstream of the P site codon; the matched S7-16S rRNA structure makes a prediction as to the location of this crosslink site within the protein molecule. PMID:9582096

  6. The E3 ubiquitin ligase and RNA-binding protein ZNF598 orchestrates ribosome quality control of premature polyadenylated mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Garzia, Aitor; Jafarnejad, Seyed Mehdi; Meyer, Cindy; Chapat, Clément; Gogakos, Tasos; Morozov, Pavel; Amiri, Mehdi; Shapiro, Maayan; Molina, Henrik; Tuschl, Thomas; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2017-01-01

    Cryptic polyadenylation within coding sequences (CDS) triggers ribosome-associated quality control (RQC), followed by degradation of the aberrant mRNA and polypeptide, ribosome disassembly and recycling. Although ribosomal subunit dissociation and nascent peptide degradation are well-understood, the molecular sensors of aberrant mRNAs and their mechanism of action remain unknown. We studied the Zinc Finger Protein 598 (ZNF598) using PAR-CLIP and revealed that it cross-links to tRNAs, mRNAs and rRNAs, thereby placing the protein on translating ribosomes. Cross-linked reads originating from AAA-decoding tRNALys(UUU) were 10-fold enriched over its cellular abundance, and poly-lysine encoded by poly(AAA) induced RQC in a ZNF598-dependent manner. Encounter with translated polyA segments by ZNF598 triggered ubiquitination of several ribosomal proteins, requiring the E2 ubiquitin ligase UBE2D3 to initiate RQC. Considering that human CDS are devoid of >4 consecutive AAA codons, sensing of prematurely placed polyA tails by a specialized RNA-binding protein is a novel nucleic-acid-based surveillance mechanism of RQC. PMID:28685749

  7. The E3 ubiquitin ligase and RNA-binding protein ZNF598 orchestrates ribosome quality control of premature polyadenylated mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Garzia, Aitor; Jafarnejad, Seyed Mehdi; Meyer, Cindy; Chapat, Clément; Gogakos, Tasos; Morozov, Pavel; Amiri, Mehdi; Shapiro, Maayan; Molina, Henrik; Tuschl, Thomas; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2017-07-07

    Cryptic polyadenylation within coding sequences (CDS) triggers ribosome-associated quality control (RQC), followed by degradation of the aberrant mRNA and polypeptide, ribosome disassembly and recycling. Although ribosomal subunit dissociation and nascent peptide degradation are well-understood, the molecular sensors of aberrant mRNAs and their mechanism of action remain unknown. We studied the Zinc Finger Protein 598 (ZNF598) using PAR-CLIP and revealed that it cross-links to tRNAs, mRNAs and rRNAs, thereby placing the protein on translating ribosomes. Cross-linked reads originating from AAA-decoding tRNA(Lys)(UUU) were 10-fold enriched over its cellular abundance, and poly-lysine encoded by poly(AAA) induced RQC in a ZNF598-dependent manner. Encounter with translated polyA segments by ZNF598 triggered ubiquitination of several ribosomal proteins, requiring the E2 ubiquitin ligase UBE2D3 to initiate RQC. Considering that human CDS are devoid of >4 consecutive AAA codons, sensing of prematurely placed polyA tails by a specialized RNA-binding protein is a novel nucleic-acid-based surveillance mechanism of RQC.

  8. Identification, characterization and structure analysis of a type I ribosome-inactivating protein from Sapium sebiferum (Euphorbiaceae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Mao, Yingji; Jin, Shan; Hou, Jinyan; Du, Hua; Yang, Minglei; Wu, Lifang

    2015-08-07

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are N-glycosidases (EC3.2.2.22) that universally inactivate the ribosome, thereby inhibiting protein biosynthesis. In this study, a novel type I RIPs named SEBIN was identified in Sapium sebiferum. Nuclear acid depurine experiment showed that SEBIN had rRNA N-Glycosidase activity. Further experiment indicated that SEBIN significantly inhibited Caenorhabditis elegans development as well as resulted in worm cell apoptosis. This is the first report to evaluate RIPs toxicity using C. elegans. We proposed that SEBIN may impaire C. elegans reproduction in a DNA-damage manner besides traditional protein synthesis inhibition approach. The predicted 3D structure was modeled using threading and ab initio modeling, and the r-RNA binding residue of SEBIN was identified through the protein-ligand docking approach. It showed the amino acid residues, Glu195, Asn81, Ala82, Tyr83, Glu164, Ser163, Ile159 and Arg167, played critical roles in catalytic process. Our results provided the theoretical foundation of structure-function relationships between enzymatic properties, toxicity and structural characterization of SEBIN.

  9. Comparison of mammalian mitochondrial ribosomal ribonucleic acid from different species.

    PubMed

    Mitra, R S; Bartoov, B; Monahan, J; Freeman, K B

    1972-08-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal RNA species from mouse L cells, rat liver, rat hepatoma, hamster BHK-21 cells and human KB cells were examined by electrophoresis on polyacrylamide-agarose gels and sedimentation in sucrose density gradients. The S(E) (electrophoretic mobility) and S values of mitochondrial rRNA of all species were highly dependent on temperature and ionic strength of the medium; the S(E) values increased and the S values decreased with an increase in temperature at a low ionic strength. At an ionic strength of 0.3 at 23-25 degrees C or an ionic strength of 0.01 at 3-4 degrees C the S and S(E) values were almost the same being about 16.2-18.0 and 12.3-13.6 for human and mouse mitochondrial rRNA. The molecular weights under these conditions were calculated to be 3.8x10(5)-4.3x10(5) and 5.9x10(5)-6.8x10(5), depending on the technique used. At 25 degrees C in buffers of low ionic strength mouse mitochondrial rRNA species had a lower electrophoretic mobility than those of human and hamster. Under these conditions the smaller mitochondrial rRNA species of hamster had a lower electrophoretic mobility than that of human but the larger component had an identical mobility. Mouse and rat mitochondrial rRNA species had identical electrophoretic mobilities. Complex differences between human and mouse mitochondrial rRNA species were observed on sedimentation in sucrose density gradients under various conditions of temperature and ionic strength. Mouse L-cell mitochondrial rRNA was eluted after cytoplasmic rRNA on a column of methylated albumin-kieselguhr.

  10. Time-Resolved Proteomics Extends Ribosome Profiling-Based Measurements of Protein Synthesis Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tzu-Yu; Huang, Hector H; Wheeler, Diamond; Xu, Yichen; Wells, James A; Song, Yun S; Wiita, Arun P

    2017-06-28

    Ribosome profiling is a widespread tool for studying translational dynamics in human cells. Its central assumption is that ribosome footprint density on a transcript quantitatively reflects protein synthesis. Here, we test this assumption using pulsed-SILAC (pSILAC) high-accuracy targeted proteomics. We focus on multiple myeloma cells exposed to bortezomib, a first-line chemotherapy and proteasome inhibitor. In the absence of drug effects, we found that direct measurement of protein synthesis by pSILAC correlated well with indirect measurement of synthesis from ribosome footprint density. This correlation, however, broke down under bortezomib-induced stress. By developing a statistical model integrating longitudinal proteomic and mRNA-sequencing measurements, we found that proteomics could directly detect global alterations in translational rate caused by bortezomib; these changes are not detectable by ribosomal profiling alone. Further, by incorporating pSILAC data into a gene expression model, we predict cell-stress specific proteome remodeling events. These results demonstrate that pSILAC provides an important complement to ribosome profiling in measuring proteome dynamics. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ribosomal Proteins and Human Diseases: Pathogenesis, Molecular Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Nag, Subhasree; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Ming-Hai; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Jianwei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes are essential components of the protein synthesis machinery. The process of ribosome biogenesis is well organized and tightly regulated. Recent studies have shown that ribosomal proteins (RPs) have extraribosomal functions that are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, DNA repair, and other cellular processes. The dysfunction of RPs has been linked to the development and progression of hematological, metabolic, and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Perturbation of ribosome biogenesis results in ribosomal stress, which triggers activation of the p53 signaling pathway through RPs-MDM2 interactions, resulting in p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. RPs also regulate cellular functions through p53-independent mechanisms. We herein review the recent advances in several forefronts of RP research, including the understanding of their biological features and roles in regulating cellular functions, maintaining cell homeostasis, and their involvement in the pathogenesis of human diseases. We also highlight the translational potential of this research for the identification of molecular biomarkers, and in the discovery and development of novel treatments for human diseases. PMID:25164622

  12. Ribosome-associated pentatricopeptide repeat proteins function as translational activators in mitochondria of trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Qian, Yu; Huang, Lan; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E.; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, eubacterial-type ribosomal proteins, polypeptides lacking discernible motifs and approximately 20 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) RNA binding proteins. Several PPRs also populate the polyadenylation complex; among these, KPAF1 and KPAF2 function as general mRNA 3′ adenylation/uridylation factors. The A/U-tail enables mRNA binding to the small ribosomal subunit and is essential for translation. The presence of A/U-tail also correlates with requirement for translation of certain mRNAs in mammalian and insect parasite stages. Here, we inquired whether additional PPRs activate translation of individual mRNAs. Proteomic analysis identified KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 as components of the small ribosomal subunit in mammalian and insect forms, but also revealed their association with the polyadenylation complex in the latter. RNAi knockdowns demonstrated essential functions of KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 in the actively respiring insect stage, but not in the mammalian stage. In the KRIPP1 knockdown, A/U-tailed mRNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 declined concomitantly with the de novo synthesis of this subunit whereas polyadenylation and translation of cyb mRNA were unaffected. In contrast, the KRIPP8 knockdown inhibited A/U-tailing and translation of both CO1 and cyb mRNAs. Our findings indicate that ribosome-associated PPRs may selectively activate mRNAs for translation. PMID:26713541

  13. A Possible Role of the Full-Length Nascent Protein in Post-Translational Ribosome Recycling.

    PubMed

    Das, Debasis; Samanta, Dibyendu; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Basu, Arunima; Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Jaydip; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Das Gupta, Chanchal

    2017-01-01

    Each cycle of translation initiation in bacterial cell requires free 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits originating from the post-translational dissociation of 70S ribosome from the previous cycle. Literature shows stable dissociation of 70S from model post-termination complexes by the concerted action of Ribosome Recycling Factor (RRF) and Elongation Factor G (EF-G) that interact with the rRNA bridge B2a/B2b joining 50S to 30S. In such experimental models, the role of full-length nascent protein was never considered seriously. We observed relatively slow release of full-length nascent protein from 50Sof post translation ribosome, and in that process, its toe prints on the rRNA in vivo and in in vitro translation with E.coli S30 extract. We reported earlier that a number of chemically unfolded proteins like bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), lysozyme, ovalbumin etc., when added to free 70Sin lieu of the full length nascent proteins, also interact with identical RNA regions of the 23S rRNA. Interestingly the rRNA nucleotides that slow down release of the C-terminus of full-length unfolded protein were found in close proximity to the B2a/B2b bridge. It indicated a potentially important chemical reaction conserved throughout the evolution. Here we set out to probe that conserved role of unfolded protein conformation in splitting the free or post-termination 70S. How both the RRF-EFG dependent and the plausible nascent protein-EFG dependent ribosome recycling pathways might be relevant in bacteria is discussed here.

  14. Recognition of Ribosomal Protein L11 by the Protein Trimethyltransferase PrmA

    SciTech Connect

    Demirci,H.; Gregory, S.; Dahlberg, A.; Jogl, G.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial ribosomal protein L11 is post-translationally trimethylated at multiple residues by a single methyltransferase, PrmA. Here, we describe four structures of PrmA from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus. Two apo-PrmA structures at 1.59 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution and a third with bound cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine at 1.75 {angstrom} each exhibit distinct relative positions of the substrate recognition and catalytic domains, revealing how PrmA can position the L11 substrate for multiple, consecutive side-chain methylation reactions. The fourth structure, the PrmA-L11 enzyme-substrate complex at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution, illustrates the highly specific interaction of the N-terminal domain with its substrate and places Lys39 in the PrmA active site. The presence of a unique flexible loop in the cofactor-binding site suggests how exchange of AdoMet with the reaction product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine can occur without necessitating the dissociation of PrmA from L11. Finally, the mode of interaction of PrmA with L11 explains its observed preference for L11 as substrate before its assembly into the 50S ribosomal subunit.

  15. NAD+-dependent Deacetylase SIRT3 Regulates Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis by Deacetylation of the Ribosomal Protein MRPL10*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongjie; Cimen, Huseyin; Han, Min-Joon; Shi, Tong; Deng, Jian-Hong; Koc, Hasan; Palacios, Orsolya M.; Montier, Laura; Bai, Yidong; Tong, Qiang; Koc, Emine C.

    2010-01-01

    A member of the sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases, SIRT3, is located in mammalian mitochondria and is important for regulation of mitochondrial metabolism, cell survival, and longevity. In this study, MRPL10 (mitochondrial ribosomal protein L10) was identified as the major acetylated protein in the mitochondrial ribosome. Ribosome-associated SIRT3 was found to be responsible for deacetylation of MRPL10 in an NAD+-dependent manner. We mapped the acetylated Lys residues by tandem mass spectrometry and determined the role of these residues in acetylation of MRPL10 by site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, we observed that the increased acetylation of MRPL10 led to an increase in translational activity of mitochondrial ribosomes in Sirt3−/− mice. In a similar manner, ectopic expression and knockdown of SIRT3 in C2C12 cells resulted in the suppression and enhancement of mitochondrial protein synthesis, respectively. Our findings constitute the first evidence for the regulation of mitochondrial protein synthesis by the reversible acetylation of the mitochondrial ribosome and characterize MRPL10 as a novel substrate of the NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SIRT3. PMID:20042612

  16. A search for O-polypeptidyl-ribonucleic acids in rabbit-reticulocyte ribosomes by electrophoresis in phenol–acetic acid–water systems

    PubMed Central

    Brattsten, Inger; Synge, R. L. M.; Watt, W. B.

    1965-01-01

    1. When solutions of `soluble' or transfer RNA (s-RNA) and of cytochrome c in phenol–acetic acid–water were mixed, intractable coacervates were formed. The addition to the solutions of various strong electrolytes prevented coacervation and allowed electrophoretic separation on filter paper. Protein migrates cationically, leaving RNA at or near the origin. The separation is aided by adsorption of RNA to the paper. Special arrangements were necessary to prevent contamination of the paper by ultraviolet-absorbing electrode-reaction products. 2. Binding of alkali-metal cations to RNA and some other associations were observed in such solvent systems. Possible effects of ionic association on mobilities are discussed. 3. Rabbit-reticulocyte ribosomes were subjected to electrophoresis as above, after their nascent-protein moiety had been labelled with [14C]valine in the intact cell. Most of the radioactivity migrated with the ribosomal protein; such protein as remained near the origin with the RNA had valine of lower specific radioactivity. 4. Molecular-sieve chromatography in phenol–acetic acid–water indicated that the nascent-protein moiety was not of markedly lower molecular weight than the average for the ribosomal proteins. 5. These results are very tentatively taken to mean that the nascent-protein moiety of ribosomes so prepared is not O-polypeptidyl-s-RNA. It is postulated that, in the course of adding each amino acid residue, the growing polypeptide chain is transferred from ester linkage with s-RNA to linkage with ribosomal protein through its carboxyl group, perhaps by ester linkage to an alcoholic group. The two types of intermediate, O-polypeptidyl-s-RNA and polypeptidyl-protein, would be found in different proportions, depending on the isolation procedure used. Some implications and possible tests of this hypothesis are discussed. ImagesFig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:5881657

  17. Tempo and mode of gene duplication in mammalian ribosomal protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Dharia, Asav P; Obla, Ajay; Gajdosik, Matthew D; Simon, Amanda; Nelson, Craig E

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication has been widely recognized as a major driver of evolutionary change and organismal complexity through the generation of multi-gene families. Therefore, understanding the forces that govern the evolution of gene families through the retention or loss of duplicated genes is fundamentally important in our efforts to study genome evolution. Previous work from our lab has shown that ribosomal protein (RP) genes constitute one of the largest classes of conserved duplicated genes in mammals. This result was surprising due to the fact that ribosomal protein genes evolve slowly and transcript levels are very tightly regulated. In our present study, we identified and characterized all RP duplicates in eight mammalian genomes in order to investigate the tempo and mode of ribosomal protein family evolution. We show that a sizable number of duplicates are transcriptionally active and are very highly conserved. Furthermore, we conclude that existing gene duplication models do not readily account for the preservation of a very large number of intact retroduplicated ribosomal protein (RT-RP) genes observed in mammalian genomes. We suggest that selection against dominant-negative mutations may underlie the unexpected retention and conservation of duplicated RP genes, and may shape the fate of newly duplicated genes, regardless of duplication mechanism.

  18. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome (PFAR) –– A Target for Antiprion Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Debapriya; Sanyal, Suparna

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting mammals. Prions are misfolded amyloid aggregates of the prion protein (PrP), which form when the alpha helical, soluble form of PrP converts to an aggregation-prone, beta sheet form. Thus, prions originate as protein folding problems. The discovery of yeast prion(s) and the development of a red-/white-colony based assay facilitated safe and high-throughput screening of antiprion compounds. With this assay three antiprion compounds; 6-aminophenanthridine (6AP), guanabenz acetate (GA), and imiquimod (IQ) have been identified. Biochemical and genetic studies reveal that these compounds target ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and inhibit specifically the protein folding activity of the ribosome (PFAR). The domain V of the 23S/25S/28S rRNA of the large ribosomal subunit constitutes the active site for PFAR. 6AP and GA inhibit PFAR by competition with the protein substrates for the common binding sites on the domain V rRNA. PFAR inhibition by these antiprion compounds opens up new possibilities for understanding prion formation, propagation and the role of the ribosome therein. In this review, we summarize and analyze the correlation between PFAR and prion processes using the antiprion compounds as tools. PMID:25341659

  19. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  20. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  1. Transcription by moonlight: structural basis of an extraribosomal activity of ribosomal protein S10.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Robert A

    2008-12-26

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Luo et al. (2008) show that S10 protein can function in the ribosome or the transcript elongation complex with minimal structural change, providing new insights into the roles of S10 and NusB in transcript elongation.

  2. Enhanced pest resistance of maize leaves expressing monocot crop plant derived ribosome inactivating protein and agglutinin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although many insect resistance genes have been identified, the number of studies examining their effects in combination using transgenic systems is limited. We introduced a construct into maize containing the coding sequence for maize ribosome inactivating protein (MRIP), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA...

  3. Tempo and Mode of Gene Duplication in Mammalian Ribosomal Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gajdosik, Matthew D.; Simon, Amanda; Nelson, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication has been widely recognized as a major driver of evolutionary change and organismal complexity through the generation of multi-gene families. Therefore, understanding the forces that govern the evolution of gene families through the retention or loss of duplicated genes is fundamentally important in our efforts to study genome evolution. Previous work from our lab has shown that ribosomal protein (RP) genes constitute one of the largest classes of conserved duplicated genes in mammals. This result was surprising due to the fact that ribosomal protein genes evolve slowly and transcript levels are very tightly regulated. In our present study, we identified and characterized all RP duplicates in eight mammalian genomes in order to investigate the tempo and mode of ribosomal protein family evolution. We show that a sizable number of duplicates are transcriptionally active and are very highly conserved. Furthermore, we conclude that existing gene duplication models do not readily account for the preservation of a very large number of intact retroduplicated ribosomal protein (RT-RP) genes observed in mammalian genomes. We suggest that selection against dominant-negative mutations may underlie the unexpected retention and conservation of duplicated RP genes, and may shape the fate of newly duplicated genes, regardless of duplication mechanism. PMID:25369106

  4. A conserved quality-control pathway that mediates degradation of unassembled ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Porras-Yakushi, Tanya R; Reitsma, Justin M; Huber, Ferdinand M; Sweredoski, Michael J; Hoelz, André; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Overproduced yeast ribosomal protein (RP) Rpl26 fails to assemble into ribosomes and is degraded in the nucleus/nucleolus by a ubiquitin-proteasome system quality control pathway comprising the E2 enzymes Ubc4/Ubc5 and the ubiquitin ligase Tom1. tom1 cells show reduced ubiquitination of multiple RPs, exceptional accumulation of detergent-insoluble proteins including multiple RPs, and hypersensitivity to imbalances in production of RPs and rRNA, indicative of a profound perturbation to proteostasis. Tom1 directly ubiquitinates unassembled RPs primarily via residues that are concealed in mature ribosomes. Together, these data point to an important role for Tom1 in normal physiology and prompt us to refer to this pathway as ERISQ, for excess ribosomal protein quality control. A similar pathway, mediated by the Tom1 homolog Huwe1, restricts accumulation of overexpressed hRpl26 in human cells. We propose that ERISQ is a key element of the quality control machinery that sustains protein homeostasis and cellular fitness in eukaryotes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19105.001 PMID:27552055

  5. A Possible Role of the Full-Length Nascent Protein in Post-Translational Ribosome Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debasis; Samanta, Dibyendu; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Basu, Arunima; Das, Anindita; Ghosh, Jaydip; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Das Gupta, Chanchal

    2017-01-01

    Each cycle of translation initiation in bacterial cell requires free 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits originating from the post-translational dissociation of 70S ribosome from the previous cycle. Literature shows stable dissociation of 70S from model post-termination complexes by the concerted action of Ribosome Recycling Factor (RRF) and Elongation Factor G (EF-G) that interact with the rRNA bridge B2a/B2b joining 50S to 30S. In such experimental models, the role of full-length nascent protein was never considered seriously. We observed relatively slow release of full-length nascent protein from 50Sof post translation ribosome, and in that process, its toe prints on the rRNA in vivo and in in vitro translation with E.coli S30 extract. We reported earlier that a number of chemically unfolded proteins like bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), lysozyme, ovalbumin etc., when added to free 70Sin lieu of the full length nascent proteins, also interact with identical RNA regions of the 23S rRNA. Interestingly the rRNA nucleotides that slow down release of the C-terminus of full-length unfolded protein were found in close proximity to the B2a/B2b bridge. It indicated a potentially important chemical reaction conserved throughout the evolution. Here we set out to probe that conserved role of unfolded protein conformation in splitting the free or post-termination 70S. How both the RRF-EFG dependent and the plausible nascent protein–EFG dependent ribosome recycling pathways might be relevant in bacteria is discussed here. PMID:28099529

  6. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding ribosome inactivating protein from Dianthus sinensis L.

    PubMed

    Cho, H J; Lee, S J; Kim, S; Kim, B D

    2000-04-30

    To isolate a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) gene, six plant species were surveyed for antiviral activity. Crude proteins extracted from these plants were tested for the antiviral activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Nicotiana glutinosa. All the plants, Spinacia oleracea, Amaranthus lividus, Dianthus superbus, Dianthus sinensis and Celosia cristata, with an exception of Oenanthe stolonifera, presented 70-90% inhibition of viral infectivity. In an attempt to search for the RIP gene from D. sinensis, partial cDNA was obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the poly(A)+ RNA from D. sinensis leaves. DNA gel blot analysis showed that D. sinensis has multi-copy RIP genes. The expression of RIP gene was investigated in the flower, leaf, root and stem of D. sinensis, and was found to be most abundant in the leaf. Using the partial cDNA as a probe, seven full-length cDNAs were isolated from a library prepared from D. sinensis leaves. They were divided into three groups on the basis of their nucleotide sequence homology. The three representative clones, cDsRIP1, cDsRIP2 and cDsRIP3 were completely sequenced. They all had an open reading frame of 882 bp. The cDsRIP2 showed 79% homology with dianthin 30 and saporin genes; 59% with PAP and Mirabilis antiviral protein MAP genes. From the analysis of deduced amino acid sequences, it was predicted that D. sinensis RIP cDNAs might have a putative signal peptide of 23 amino acid residues at their N-terminus. When the cDNA was expressed in E. coli, the bacteria was unable to grow upon IPTG induction, suggesting that expression of the gene renders toxicity to E. coli cells.

  7. Cryo-EM structure of the tetracycline resistance protein TetM in complex with a translating ribosome at 3.9-Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Arenz, Stefan; Nguyen, Fabian; Beckmann, Roland; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome protection proteins (RPPs) confer resistance to tetracycline by binding to the ribosome and chasing the drug from its binding site. Current models for RPP action are derived from 7.2- to 16-Å resolution structures of RPPs bound to vacant or nontranslating ribosomes. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the RPP TetM in complex with a translating ribosome at 3.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the contacts of TetM with the ribosome, including interaction between the conserved and functionally critical C-terminal extension of TetM with a unique splayed conformation of nucleotides A1492 and A1493 at the decoding center of the small subunit. The resolution enables us to unambiguously model the side chains of the amino acid residues comprising loop III in domain IV of TetM, revealing that the tyrosine residues Y506 and Y507 are not responsible for drug-release as suggested previously but rather for intrafactor contacts that appear to stabilize the conformation of loop III. Instead, Pro509 at the tip of loop III is located directly within the tetracycline binding site where it interacts with nucleotide C1054 of the 16S rRNA, such that RPP action uses Pro509, rather than Y506/Y507, to directly dislodge and release tetracycline from the ribosome. PMID:25870267

  8. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome by Tildipirosin Compared with Other Veterinary Macrolides

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal binding site. PMID:22926570

  9. Inhibition of protein synthesis on the ribosome by tildipirosin compared with other veterinary macrolides.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal binding site.

  10. Ribosomal protein L16 binds to the 3'-end of transfer RNA.

    PubMed

    Maimets, T; Remme, J; Villems, R

    1984-01-23

    Escherichia coli 50 S ribosomal subunits were reconstituted with and without protein L16 present. The latter particles, although active in puromycin reaction, were unable to use CACCA-Phe as an acceptor substrate. We also found that L16 interacts directly with this oligonucleotide and, in the complex with tRNA, protects its 3'-end from pancreatic ribonuclease digestion. We suggest that the role of L16 is in the fixation of the aminoacyl stem of tRNA to the ribosome at its A-site.

  11. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 are not required for ribosome assembly or L4-mediated autogenous control

    PubMed Central

    ZENGEL, JANICE M.; JERAULD, ADAM; WALKER, ANDRE; WAHL, MARKUS C.; LINDAHL, LASSE

    2003-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 both have a globular domain that sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit and an extended loop that penetrates its core. The tips of both loops contribute to the lining of the peptide exit tunnel and have been implicated in a gating mechanism that might regulate the exit of nascent peptides. Also, the extensions of L4 and L22 contact multiple domains of 23S rRNA, suggesting they might facilitate rRNA folding during ribosome assembly. To learn more about the roles of these extensions, we constructed derivatives of both proteins that lack most of their extended loops. Our analysis of ribosomes carrying L4 or L22 deletion proteins did not detect any significant difference in their sedimentation property or polysome distribution. Also, the role of L4 in autogenous control was not affected. We conclude that these extensions are not required for ribosome assembly or for L4-mediated autogenous control of the S10 operon. PMID:13130133

  12. The extended loops of ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 are not required for ribosome assembly or L4-mediated autogenous control.

    PubMed

    Zengel, Janice M; Jerauld, Adam; Walker, Andre; Wahl, Markus C; Lindahl, Lasse

    2003-10-01

    Ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 both have a globular domain that sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit and an extended loop that penetrates its core. The tips of both loops contribute to the lining of the peptide exit tunnel and have been implicated in a gating mechanism that might regulate the exit of nascent peptides. Also, the extensions of L4 and L22 contact multiple domains of 23S rRNA, suggesting they might facilitate rRNA folding during ribosome assembly. To learn more about the roles of these extensions, we constructed derivatives of both proteins that lack most of their extended loops. Our analysis of ribosomes carrying L4 or L22 deletion proteins did not detect any significant difference in their sedimentation property or polysome distribution. Also, the role of L4 in autogenous control was not affected. We conclude that these extensions are not required for ribosome assembly or for L4-mediated autogenous control of the S10 operon.

  13. A structural ensemble of a ribosome-nascent chain complex during cotranslational protein folding.

    PubMed

    Cabrita, Lisa D; Cassaignau, AnaÏs M E; Launay, Helene M M; Waudby, Christopher A; Wlodarski, Tomasz; Camilloni, Carlo; Karyadi, Maria-Evangelia; Robertson, Amy L; Wang, Xiaolin; Wentink, Anne S; Goodsell, Luke; Woolhead, Cheryl A; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Christodoulou, John

    2016-04-01

    Although detailed pictures of ribosome structures are emerging, little is known about the structural and cotranslational folding properties of nascent polypeptide chains at the atomic level. Here we used solution-state NMR spectroscopy to define a structural ensemble of a ribosome-nascent chain complex (RNC) formed during protein biosynthesis in Escherichia coli, in which a pair of immunoglobulin-like domains adopts a folded N-terminal domain (FLN5) and a disordered but compact C-terminal domain (FLN6). To study how FLN5 acquires its native structure cotranslationally, we progressively shortened the RNC constructs. We found that the ribosome modulates the folding process, because the complete sequence of FLN5 emerged well beyond the tunnel before acquiring native structure, whereas FLN5 in isolation folded spontaneously, even when truncated. This finding suggests that regulating structure acquisition during biosynthesis can reduce the probability of misfolding, particularly of homologous domains.

  14. Mammalian HCA66 protein is required for both ribosome synthesis and centriole duplication

    PubMed Central

    Gérus, Marie; Hoareau-Aveilla, Coralie; Kiss, Tamás; Caizergues-Ferrer, Michèle; Henry, Yves; Henras, Anthony K.

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome production, one of the most energy-consuming biosynthetic activities in living cells, is adjusted to growth conditions and coordinated with the cell cycle. Connections between ribosome synthesis and cell cycle progression have been described, but the underlying mechanisms remain only partially understood. The human HCA66 protein was recently characterized as a component of the centrosome, the major microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) in mammalian cells, and was shown to be required for centriole duplication and assembly of the mitotic spindle. We show here that HCA66 is also required for nucleolar steps of the maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit and therefore displays a dual function. Overexpression of a dominant negative version of HCA66, accumulating at the centrosome but absent from the nucleoli, alters centrosome function but has no effect on pre-rRNA processing, suggesting that HCA66 acts independently in each process. In yeast and HeLa cells, depletion of MTOC components does not impair ribosome synthesis. Hence our results suggest that both in yeast and human cells, assembly of a functional MTOC and ribosome synthesis are not closely connected processes. PMID:22434888

  15. Fluctuations in protein synthesis from a single RNA template: Stochastic kinetics of ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish; Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are polymerized by cyclic machines called ribosomes, which use their messenger RNA (mRNA) track also as the corresponding template, and the process is called translation. We explore, in depth and detail, the stochastic nature of the translation. We compute various distributions associated with the translation process; one of them—namely, the dwell time distribution—has been measured in recent single-ribosome experiments. The form of the distribution, which fits best with our simulation data, is consistent with that extracted from the experimental data. For our computations, we use a model that captures both the mechanochemistry of each individual ribosome and their steric interactions. We also demonstrate the effects of the sequence inhomogeneities of real genes on the fluctuations and noise in translation. Finally, inspired by recent advances in the experimental techniques of manipulating single ribosomes, we make theoretical predictions on the force-velocity relation for individual ribosomes. In principle, all our predictions can be tested by carrying out in vitro experiments.

  16. Structural differences between Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribosomal stalk proteins P1 and P2 support their functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Zurdo, J; González, C; Sanz, J M; Rico, M; Remacha, M; Ballesta, J P

    2000-08-01

    The eukaryotic acidic P1 and P2 proteins modulate the activity of the ribosomal stalk but playing distinct roles. The aim of this work was to analyze the structural features that are behind their different function. A structural characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisaie P1 alpha and P2 beta proteins was performed by circular dichroism, nuclear magnetic resonance, fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal denaturation, and protease sensitivity. The results confirm the low structure present in both proteins but reveal clear differences between them. P1 alpha shows a virtually unordered secondary structure with a residual helical content that disappears below 30 degrees C and a clear tendency to acquire secondary structure at low pH and in the presence of trifluoroethanol. In agreement with this higher disorder P1 alpha has a fully solvent-accessible tryptophan residue and, in contrast to P2 beta, is highly sensitive to protease degradation. An interaction between both proteins was observed, which induces an increase in the global secondary structure content of both proteins. Moreover, mixing of both proteins causes a shift of the P1 alpha tryptophan 40 signal, pointing to an involvement of this region in the interaction. This evidence directly proves an interaction between P1 alpha and P2 beta before ribosome binding and suggests a functional complementation between them. On a whole, the results provide structural support for the different functional roles played by the proteins of the two groups showing, at the same time, that relatively small structural differences between the two stalk acidic protein types can result in significant functional changes.

  17. YqjD is an inner membrane protein associated with stationary-phase ribosomes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideji; Maki, Yasushi; Furuike, Shou; Sakai, Akiko; Ueta, Masami; Wada, Akira

    2012-08-01

    Here, we provide evidence that YqjD, a hypothetical protein of Escherichia coli, is an inner membrane and ribosome binding protein. This protein is expressed during the stationary growth phase, and expression is regulated by stress response sigma factor RpoS. YqjD possesses a transmembrane motif in the C-terminal region and associates with 70S and 100S ribosomes at the N-terminal region. Interestingly, E. coli possesses two paralogous proteins of YqjD, ElaB and YgaM, which are expressed and bind to ribosomes in a similar manner to YqjD. Overexpression of YqjD leads to inhibition of cell growth. It has been suggested that YqjD loses ribosomal activity and localizes ribosomes to the membrane during the stationary phase.

  18. A Rab escort protein integrates the secretion system with TOR signaling and ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspal; Tyers, Mike

    2009-08-15

    The coupling of environmental conditions to cell growth and division is integral to cell fitness. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Sfp1 couples nutrient status to cell growth rate by controlling the expression of ribosome biogenesis (Ribi) and ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Sfp1 is localized to the nucleus in rich nutrients, but upon nutrient limitation or target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway inhibition by rapamycin, Sfp1 rapidly exits the nucleus, leading to repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. Through systematic cell-based screens we found that many components of the secretory system influence Sfp1 localization. Notably, the essential Rab escort protein Mrs6 exhibited a nutrient-sensitive interaction with Sfp1. Overexpression of Mrs6 prevented nuclear localization of Sfp1 in rich nutrients, whereas loss of Mrs6 resulted in nuclear Sfp1 localization in poor nutrients. These effects were specific to Sfp1 and independent of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, suggesting that Mrs6 lies in a distinct branch of TOR and ribosome biogenesis regulation. Rapamycin-resistant alleles of MRS6 were defective in the cytoplasmic retention of Sfp1, the control of cell size, and in the repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. The Sfp1-Mrs6 interaction is a nexus for growth regulation that links the secretory system and TOR-dependent nutrient signaling to ribosome biogenesis.

  19. Yeast ribosomal protein L10 helps coordinate tRNA movement through the large subunit

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Alexey N.; Meskauskas, Arturas; Roshwalb, Sara C.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast ribosomal protein L10 (E. coli L16) is located at the center of a topological nexus that connects many functional regions of the large subunit. This essential protein has previously been implicated in processes as diverse as ribosome biogenesis, translational fidelity and mRNA stability. Here, the inability to maintain the yeast Killer virus was used as a proxy for large subunit defects to identify a series of L10 mutants. These mapped to roughly four discrete regions of the protein. A detailed analysis of mutants located in the N-terminal ‘hook’ of L10, which inserts into the bulge of 25S rRNA helix 89, revealed strong effects on rRNA structure corresponding to the entire path taken by the tRNA 3′ end as it moves through the large subunit during the elongation cycle. The mutant-induced structural changes are wide-ranging, affecting ribosome biogenesis, elongation factor binding, drug resistance/hypersensitivity, translational fidelity and virus maintenance. The importance of L10 as a potential transducer of information through the ribosome, and of a possible role of its N-terminal domain in switching between the pre- and post-translocational states are discussed. PMID:18824477

  20. A Rab escort protein integrates the secretion system with TOR signaling and ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaspal; Tyers, Mike

    2009-01-01

    The coupling of environmental conditions to cell growth and division is integral to cell fitness. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Sfp1 couples nutrient status to cell growth rate by controlling the expression of ribosome biogenesis (Ribi) and ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Sfp1 is localized to the nucleus in rich nutrients, but upon nutrient limitation or target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway inhibition by rapamycin, Sfp1 rapidly exits the nucleus, leading to repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. Through systematic cell-based screens we found that many components of the secretory system influence Sfp1 localization. Notably, the essential Rab escort protein Mrs6 exhibited a nutrient-sensitive interaction with Sfp1. Overexpression of Mrs6 prevented nuclear localization of Sfp1 in rich nutrients, whereas loss of Mrs6 resulted in nuclear Sfp1 localization in poor nutrients. These effects were specific to Sfp1 and independent of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, suggesting that Mrs6 lies in a distinct branch of TOR and ribosome biogenesis regulation. Rapamycin-resistant alleles of MRS6 were defective in the cytoplasmic retention of Sfp1, the control of cell size, and in the repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. The Sfp1–Mrs6 interaction is a nexus for growth regulation that links the secretory system and TOR-dependent nutrient signaling to ribosome biogenesis. PMID:19684114

  1. Synthesis of ribosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, J R

    1989-01-01

    The assembly of a eucaryotic ribosome requires the synthesis of four ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules and more than 75 ribosomal proteins. It utilizes all three RNA polymerases; it requires the cooperation of the nucleus and the cytoplasm, the processing of RNA, and the specific interaction of RNA and protein molecules. It is carried out efficiently and is exquisitely sensitive to the needs of the cell. Our current understanding of this process in the genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed. The ribosomal RNA genes are arranged in a tandem array of 100 to 200 copies. This tandem array has led to unique ways of carrying out a number of functions. Replication is asymmetric and does not initiate from every autonomously replicating sequence. Recombination is suppressed. Transcription of the major ribosomal RNA appears to involve coupling between adjacent transcription units, which are separated by the 5S RNA transcription unit. Genes for many ribosomal proteins have been cloned and sequenced. Few are linked; most are duplicated; most have an intron. There is extensive homology between yeast ribosomal proteins and those of other species. Most, but not all, of the ribosomal protein genes have one or two sites that are essential for their transcription and that bind a common transcription factor. This factor binds also to many other places in the genome, including the telomeres. There is coordinated transcription of the ribosomal protein genes under a variety of conditions. However, the cell seems to possess no mechanism for regulating the transcription of individual ribosomal protein genes in response either to a deficiency or an excess of a particular ribosomal protein. A deficiency causes slow growth. Any excess ribosomal protein is degraded very rapidly, with a half-life of 1 to 5 min. Unlike most types of cells, yeast cells appear not to regulate the translation of ribosomal proteins. However, in the case of ribosomal protein L32

  2. Exploring human 40S ribosomal proteins binding to the 18S rRNA fragment containing major 3'-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Gopanenko, Alexander V; Malygin, Alexey A; Karpova, Galina G

    2015-02-01

    Association of ribosomal proteins with rRNA during assembly of ribosomal subunits is an intricate process, which is strictly regulated in vivo. As for the assembly in vitro, it was reported so far only for prokaryotic subunits. Bacterial ribosomal proteins are capable of selective binding to 16S rRNA as well as to its separate morphological domains. In this work, we explored binding of total protein of human 40S ribosomal subunit to the RNA transcript corresponding to the major 3'-domain of 18S rRNA. We showed that the resulting ribonucleoprotein particles contained almost all of the expected ribosomal proteins, whose binding sites are located in this 18S rRNA domain in the 40S subunit, together with several nonspecific proteins. The binding in solution was accompanied with aggregation of the RNA-protein complexes. Ribosomal proteins bound to the RNA transcript protected from chemical modification mostly those 18S rRNA nucleotides that are known to be involved in binding with the proteins in the 40S subunit and thereby demonstrated their ability to selectively bind to the rRNA in vitro. The possible implication of unstructured extensions of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in their nonspecific binding with rRNA and in subsequent aggregation of the resulting complexes is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W.; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI+] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI+]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI+] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27633137

  4. Automated Design of Synthetic Ribosome Binding Sites to Precisely Control Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Salis, Howard M.; Mirsky, Ethan A.; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial engineering often requires fine control over protein expression; for example, to connect genetic circuits 1-7 or control flux through a metabolic pathway 8-13. We have developed a predictive design method for synthetic ribosome binding sites that enables the rational control of a protein's production rate on a proportional scale. Experimental validation of over 100 predictions in Escherichia coli shows that the method is accurate to within a factor of 2.3 over a range of 100,000-fold. The design method also correctly predicts that reusing a ribosome binding site sequence in different genetic contexts can result in different protein expression levels. We demonstrate the method's utility by rationally optimizing a protein's expression level to connect a genetic sensor to a synthetic circuit. The proposed forward engineering approach will accelerate the construction and systematic optimization of large genetic systems. PMID:19801975

  5. Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein L10 Associates with Cyclin B1/Cdk1 Activity and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Bo; Wang, Ruo-Xi; Jiang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, En-dong; Tan, Jie-Qiong; Xu, Hui-Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal proteins are important for mitochondrial-encoded protein synthesis and mitochondrial function. In addition to their roles in mitoribosome assembly, several mitochondrial ribosome proteins are also implicated in cellular processes like cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial homeostasis regulation. Here, we demonstrate that MRPL10 regulates cyclin B1/Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) activity and mitochondrial protein synthesis in mammalian cells. In Drosophila, inactivation of mRpL10 (the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian MRPL10) in eyes results in abnormal eye development. Furthermore, expression of human cyclin B1 suppresses eye phenotypes and mitochondrial abnormality of mRpL10 knockdown Drosophila. This study identified that the physiological regulatory pathway of MRPL10 and providing new insights into the role of MRPL10 in growth control and mitochondrial function. PMID:27726420

  6. Structural basis for selectivity and toxicity of ribosomal antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Böttger, Erik C.; Springer, Burkhard; Prammananan, Therdsak; Kidan, Yishak; Sander, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Ribosomal antibiotics must discriminate between bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes to various extents. Despite major differences in bacterial and eukaryotic ribosome structure, a single nucleotide or amino acid determines the selectivity of drugs affecting protein synthesis. Analysis of resistance mutations in bacteria allows the prediction of whether cytoplasmic or mitochondrial ribosomes in eukaryotic cells will be sensitive to the drug. This has important implications for drug specificity and toxicity. Together with recent data on the structure of ribosomal subunits these data provide the basis for development of new ribosomal antibiotics by rationale drug design. PMID:11306553

  7. Peptide bond formation does not involve acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues.

    PubMed

    Bieling, Peter; Beringer, Malte; Adio, Sarah; Rodnina, Marina V

    2006-05-01

    Ribosomes catalyze the formation of peptide bonds between aminoacyl esters of transfer RNAs within a catalytic center composed of ribosomal RNA only. Here we show that the reaction of P-site formylmethionine (fMet)-tRNA(fMet) with a modified A-site tRNA substrate, Phelac-tRNA(Phe), in which the nucleophilic amino group is replaced with a hydroxyl group, does not show the pH dependence observed with small substrate analogs such as puromycin and hydroxypuromycin. This indicates that acid-base catalysis by ribosomal residues is not important in the reaction with the full-size substrate. Rather, the ribosome catalyzes peptide bond formation by positioning the tRNAs, or their 3' termini, through interactions with rRNA that induce and/or stabilize a pH-insensitive conformation of the active site and provide a preorganized environment facilitating the reaction. The rate of peptide bond formation with unmodified Phe-tRNA(Phe) is estimated to be >300 s(-1).

  8. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-06-09

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability.

  9. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability. PMID:26056817

  10. Mutations of ribosomal protein S5 suppress a defect in late-30S ribosomal subunit biogenesis caused by lack of the RbfA biogenesis factor

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Stefan; Bhatt, Monika J.; Tükenmez, Hasan; Farabaugh, Philip J.; Wikström, P. Mikael

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits requires assistance by maturation proteins that are not part of mature ribosomes. One such protein, RbfA, associates with the 30S ribosomal subunits. Loss of RbfA causes cold sensitivity and defects of the 30S subunit biogenesis and its overexpression partially suppresses the dominant cold sensitivity caused by a C23U mutation in the central pseudoknot of 16S rRNA, a structure essential for ribosome function. We have isolated suppressor mutations that restore partially the growth of an RbfA-lacking strain. Most of the strongest suppressor mutations alter one out of three distinct positions in the carboxy-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S5 (S5) in direct contact with helix 1 and helix 2 of the central pseudoknot. Their effect is to increase the translational capacity of the RbfA-lacking strain as evidenced by an increase in polysomes in the suppressed strains. Overexpression of RimP, a protein factor that along with RbfA regulates formation of the ribosome's central pseudoknot, was lethal to the RbfA-lacking strain but not to a wild-type strain and this lethality was suppressed by the alterations in S5. The S5 mutants alter translational fidelity but these changes do not explain consistently their effect on the RbfA-lacking strain. Our genetic results support a role for the region of S5 modified in the suppressors in the formation of the central pseudoknot in 16S rRNA. PMID:26089326

  11. Transcriptional control of two ribosome-inactivating protein genes expressed in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) embryos.

    PubMed

    Kawade, Kensuke; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2009-05-01

    SoRIP1 and SoRIP2 are ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP: EC 3.2.2.22) genes identified in spinach (Spinacia oleracea). They are differentially expressed in a development-dependent manner during spinach somatic embryogenesis. Here, we isolated genomic clones of SoRIP1 and SoRIP2. These two RIP genes have different genomic organization. Phylogenetic analysis of predicted amino acid sequences of RIPs in Caryophyllales plants revealed that they are divided into two major subfamilies, corresponding to SoRIP1 and SoRIP2. To gain further insight into the transcriptional control of SoRIP1 and SoRIP2, we obtained their 5'-flanking sequences by inverse PCR. Comparison of two 5'-flanking sequences revealed the characteristic cis elements in each region that confer differential transcriptional control. In the 5'-flanking region of SoRIP1, we found several motifs with functions related to embryonic development. The 5'-flanking region of SoRIP2 contains some defense-responsive motifs. Expression of SoRIP1 was detected in various tissues. In particular, SoRIP1 was highly expressed in the early immature fruits, and immunohistochemistry showed that SoRIP1 accumulated in the peripheral region of the immature embryo, with weaker expression in internal cells. During fruit development, the expression of SoRIP2 was low. However, the accumulation of SoRIP2 was conspicuous in the epidermis of the immature embryo. The expression of SoRIP2, but not SoRIP1, in leaves was induced by salicylic acid treatment. This differential transcriptional regulation of SoRIP1 and SoRIP2 suggests that the corresponding proteins may have different functions, one being related to embryonic development and the other to embryo defense.

  12. Partial purification of mitochondrial ribosomes from broad bean and identification of proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Maffey, L; Degand, H; Boutry, M

    1997-04-28

    An approach towards the identification at the protein level of the ribosomal proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome of broad bean (Vicia faba) has been developed. After Triton X-100 treatment of isolated mitochondria, a fraction enriched in mitochondrial ribosomes was obtained by successive centrifugation, first onto a sucrose cushion, and then in a sucrose gradient. Mitochondrial translation products were labelled in isolated mitochondria with [35S]methionine and added to the enriched mitochondrial ribosomal proteins before separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Six spots, identified both by Coomassie blue staining and autoradiography, were analysed by protein micro-sequencing. Two of these were shown to correspond to ribosomal proteins S10 and S12. We conclude that these two proteins are encoded by the mitochondrial genome of broad bean and that the method described here can be used to identify other proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome.

  13. Crystal structure of bacillus subtilis YdaF protein : a putative ribosomal N-acetyltransferase.

    SciTech Connect

    Brunzelle, J. S.; Wu, R.; Korolev, S. V.; Collart, F. R.; Joachimiak, A.; Anderson, W. F.; Biosciences Division; Northwestern Univ.; Saint Louis Univ. School of Medicine

    2004-12-01

    Comparative sequence analysis suggests that the ydaF gene encodes a protein (YdaF) that functions as an N-acetyltransferase, more specifically, a ribosomal N-acetyltransferase. Sequence analysis using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) suggests that YdaF belongs to a large family of proteins (199 proteins found in 88 unique species of bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes). YdaF also belongs to the COG1670, which includes the Escherichia coli RimL protein that is known to acetylate ribosomal protein L12. N-acetylation (NAT) has been found in all kingdoms. NAT enzymes catalyze the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) to a primary amino group. For example, NATs can acetylate the N-terminal {alpha}-amino group, the {epsilon}-amino group of lysine residues, aminoglycoside antibiotics, spermine/speridine, or arylalkylamines such as serotonin. The crystal structure of the alleged ribosomal NAT protein, YdaF, from Bacillus subtilis presented here was determined as a part of the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics. The structure maintains the conserved tertiary structure of other known NATs and a high sequence similarity in the presumed AcCoA binding pocket in spite of a very low overall level of sequence identity to other NATs of known structure.

  14. Increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 during meiotic maturation of Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, P J; Thomas, G; Maller, J L

    1982-01-01

    A single ribosomal protein (Mr, 32,000) becomes phosphorylated during progesterone-induced in vitro maturation of Xenopus laevis oocytes. The protein is identified as 40S ribosomal protein S6. Phosphorylation of S6 is monitored by incorporation of 32Pi and by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. S6 is minimally phosphorylated in unstimulated oocytes. After progesterone treatment, phosphorylation of S6 precedes germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and is maximal at the time when 50% of the oocytes have undergone GVBD. S6, when maximally phosphorylated, exists in derivatives that correspond to the most highly phosphorylated forms observed in other systems, and the increase in S6 phosphorylation occurs at approximately the same time as the increase in the overall protein synthesis rate reported to occur during oocyte maturation. S6 is also maximally phosphorylated in unfertilized eggs following maturation in vivo. Injection of a partially purified preparation of maturation-promoting factor into immature oocytes induces immediate phosphorylation of S6 and rapidly increases the rate of protein synthesis. Moreover, incubation of ribosomes with this factor and radiolabeled ATP results in labeling of S6. These findings suggest that S6 phosphorylation may be important in the control of protein synthesis during maturation and may also play a role in the mechanism of action of maturation-promoting factor. Images PMID:7045876

  15. The DEAD box protein Mrh4 functions in the assembly of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-11-05

    Proteins in a cell are universally synthesized by ribosomes. Mitochondria contain their own ribosomes, which specialize in the synthesis of a handful of proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation. The pathway of mitoribosomal biogenesis and factors involved are poorly characterized. An example is the DEAD box proteins, widely known to participate in the biogenesis of bacterial and cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes as either RNA helicases or RNA chaperones, whose mitochondrial counterparts remain completely unknown. Here, we have identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DEAD box protein Mrh4 as essential for large mitoribosome subunit biogenesis. Mrh4 interacts with the 21S rRNA, mitoribosome subassemblies, and fully assembled mitoribosomes. In the absence of Mrh4, the 21S rRNA is matured and forms part of a large on-pathway assembly intermediate missing proteins Mrpl16 and Mrpl39. We conclude that Mrh4 plays an essential role during the late stages of mitoribosome assembly by promoting remodeling of the 21S rRNA-protein interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Organization and nucleotide sequences of the Spiroplasma citri genes for ribosomal protein S2, elongation factor Ts, spiralin, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and an unidentified protein.

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, C; Saillard, C; Bové, J M

    1990-01-01

    The gene for spiralin, the major membrane protein of the helical mollicute Spiroplasma citri, was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 5-kilobase-pair (kbp) DNA fragment. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 5.0-kbp spiroplasmal DNA fragment was determined (GenBank accession no. M31161). The spiralin gene was identified by the size and amino acid composition of its translational product. Besides the spiralin gene, the spiroplasmal DNA fragment was found to contain five additional open reading frames (ORFs). The translational products of four of these ORFs were identified by their amino acid sequence homologies with known proteins: ribosomal protein S2, elongation factor Ts, phosphofructokinase, and pyruvate kinase, respectively encoded by the genes rpsB, tsf, pfk, and pyk. The product of the fifth ORF remains to be identified and was named protein X (X gene). The order of the above genes was tsf--X--spiralin gene--pfk--pyk. These genes were transcribed in one direction, while the gene for ribosomal protein S2 (rpsB) was transcribed in the opposite direction. Images PMID:2139649

  17. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins during meiotic saturation and following activation in starfish oocytes: Its relationship with changes of intracellular pH

    SciTech Connect

    Peaucellier, G.; Picard, A.; Robert, J.J. ); Capony, J.P.; Labbe, J.C. CNRS-CRBM, Montpellier ); Doree, M. INSERM, Montpellier CNRS-CRBM, Montpellier )

    1988-01-01

    An increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 has been shown to be correlated with an increase of intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) and with stimulation of protein synthesis in many systems. In this research changes in ribosome phosphorylation following hormone-induced meiotic maturation and fertilization or activation by ionophore A23187 were investigated in starfish oocytes. The hormone was found to stimulate the phosphorylation on serine residues of an M{sub r} 31,000 protein identified as S6, as well as that of an acidic M{sub r} 47,000 protein, presumably S1, on threonine residues. Phosphorylation of ribosomes was an early consequence of hormonal stimulation and did not decrease after completion of meiotic maturation. Fertilization or activation by ionophore of prophase-arrested oocytes also stimulated ribosome phosphorylation. The pH{sub i} did not change before germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) following hormone addition, but it increased before first polar body emission. It also increased following fertilization or activation by ionophore or the microinjection of Ca-EGTA. Phosphorylation of S6 was still observed following fertilization or induction of maturation when pH{sub i} was decreased by external application of acetate, a treatment which suppressed the emission of polar bodies. Protein synthesis increased in prophase-arrested oocytes after fertilization or activation.

  18. Ribosome engineering to promote new crystal forms

    SciTech Connect

    Selmer, Maria; Gao, Yong-Gui; Weixlbaumer, Albert; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2012-05-01

    Truncation of ribosomal protein L9 in T. thermophilus allows the generation of new crystal forms and the crystallization of ribosome–GTPase complexes. Crystallographic studies of the ribosome have provided molecular details of protein synthesis. However, the crystallization of functional complexes of ribosomes with GTPase translation factors proved to be elusive for a decade after the first ribosome structures were determined. Analysis of the packing in different 70S ribosome crystal forms revealed that regardless of the species or space group, a contact between ribosomal protein L9 from the large subunit and 16S rRNA in the shoulder of a neighbouring small subunit in the crystal lattice competes with the binding of GTPase elongation factors to this region of 16S rRNA. To prevent the formation of this preferred crystal contact, a mutant strain of Thermus thermophilus, HB8-MRCMSAW1, in which the ribosomal protein L9 gene has been truncated was constructed by homologous recombination. Mutant 70S ribosomes were used to crystallize and solve the structure of the ribosome with EF-G, GDP and fusidic acid in a previously unobserved crystal form. Subsequent work has shown the usefulness of this strain for crystallization of the ribosome with other GTPase factors.

  19. Structural basis for targeting the ribosomal protein S1 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by pyrazinamide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juanjuan; Liu, Yindi; Bi, Jing; Cai, Qixu; Liao, Xinli; Li, Wenqian; Guo, Chenyun; Zhang, Qian; Lin, Tianwei; Zhao, Yufen; Wang, Honghai; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xuelian; Lin, Donghai

    2015-03-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is a first-line drug for tuberculosis (TB) treatment and is responsible for shortening the duration of TB therapy. The mode of action of PZA remains elusive. RpsA, the ribosomal protein S1 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), was recently identified as a target of PZA based on its binding activity to pyrazinoic acid (POA), the active form of PZA. POA binding to RpsA led to the inhibition of trans-translation. However, the nature of the RpsA-POA interaction remains unknown. Key questions include why POA exhibits an exquisite specificity to RpsA of Mtb and how RpsA mutations confer PZA resistance. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of RpsA of Mtb and its complex with POA, as well as the corresponding domains of two RpsA variants that are associated with PZA resistance. Structural analysis reveals that POA binds to RpsA through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, mediated mainly by residues (Lys303, Phe307, Phe310 and Arg357) that are essential for tmRNA binding. Conformational changes induced by mutation or sequence variation at the C-terminus of RpsA abolish the POA binding activity. Our findings provide insights into the mode of action of PZA and molecular basis of PZA resistance associated with RpsA mutations.

  20. Thiazolyl Peptide Antibiotic Biosynthesis: A Cascade of Post-translational Modifications on Ribosomal Nascent Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Christopher T.; Acker, Michael G.; Bowers, Albert A.

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics of the thiocillin, GE2270A, and thiostrepton class, which block steps in bacterial protein synthesis, contain a trithiazolyl (tetrahydro)pyridine core that provides the architectural constraints for high affinity binding to either the 50 S ribosomal subunit or elongation factor Tu. These mature antibiotic scaffolds arise from a cascade of post-translational modifications on 50–60-residue prepeptide precursors that trim away the N-terminal leader sequences (∼40 residues) while the C-terminal 14–18 residues are converted into the mature scaffold. In the producing microbes, the genes encoding the prepeptide open reading frames are flanked in biosynthetic clusters by genes encoding post-translational modification enzymes that carry out lantibiotic-type dehydrations of Ser and Thr residues to dehydroamino acid side chains, cyclodehydration and oxidation of cysteines to thiazoles, and condensation of two dehydroalanine residues en route to the (tetrahydro)pyridine core. The trithiazolyl pyridine framework thus arises from post-translational modification of the peptide backbone of three Cys and two Ser residues of the prepeptide. PMID:20522549

  1. Dinoflagellate phylogeny revisited: Using ribosomal proteins to resolve deep branching dinoflagellate clades

    PubMed Central

    Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R.; Gornik, Sebastian G.; Concepcion, Gregory T.; Waller, Ross F.; Mendez, Gregory S.; Lippmeier, J. Casey; Delwiche, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    The alveolates are composed of three major lineages, the ciliates, dinoflagellates, and apicomplexans. Together these ‘protist’ taxa play key roles in primary production and ecology, as well as in illness of humans and other animals. The interface between the dinoflagellate and apicomplexan clades has been an area of recent discovery, blurring the distinction between these two clades. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis has yet to determine the position of basal dinoflagellate clades hence the deepest branches of the dinoflagellate tree currently remain unresolved. Large-scale mRNA sequencing was applied to 11 species of dinoflagellates, including strains of the syndinean genera Hematodinium and Amoebophrya, parasites of crustaceans and dinoflagellates, respectively, to optimize and update the dinoflagellate tree. From the transcriptome-scale data a total of 73 ribosomal protein-coding genes were selected for phylogeny. After individual gene orthology assessment, the genes were concatenated into a >15,000 amino acid alignment with 76 taxa from dinoflagellates, apicomplexans, ciliates, and the outgroup heterokonts. Overall the tree was well resolved and supported, when the data was subsampled with gblocks or constraint trees were tested with the approximately unbiased test. The deepest branches of the dinoflagellate tree can now be resolved with strong support, and provides a clearer view of the evolution of the distinctive traits of dinoflagellates. PMID:24135237

  2. Ordered phosphorylation of 40S ribosomal protein S6 after serum stimulation of quiescent 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Pérez, J; Thomas, G

    1983-01-01

    The amino acids and tryptic peptides that become phosphorylated in 40S ribosomal protein S6 after serum stimulation of quiescent 3T3 cells were examined by two-dimensional thin-layer electrophoresis. In the maximally phosphorylated form of the protein, most of the phosphate was incorporated into serine and a small amount, into threonine. Digestion of this form of the protein with trypsin revealed 10 major phosphopeptides. All 10 contained phosphoserine and 2 of the 10 also contained phosphothreonine. Next, the five forms of increasingly phosphorylated S6 were individually separated on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels or total S6 was isolated from cells that were stimulated for only a short time and their phosphotryptic maps were analyzed. The results showed that, as larger amounts of phosphate were added to S6, the phosphopeptides appeared in a specific order. Images PMID:6573662

  3. Depletion of ribosomal protein S19 causes a reduction of rRNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Juli, Giada; Gismondi, Angelo; Monteleone, Valentina; Caldarola, Sara; Iadevaia, Valentina; Aspesi, Anna; Dianzani, Irma; Proud, Christopher G.; Loreni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis plays key roles in cell growth by providing increased capacity for protein synthesis. It requires coordinated production of ribosomal proteins (RP) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA), including the processing of the latter. Here, we show that, the depletion of RPS19 causes a reduction of rRNA synthesis in cell lines of both erythroid and non-erythroid origin. A similar effect is observed upon depletion of RPS6 or RPL11. The deficiency of RPS19 does not alter the stability of rRNA, but instead leads to an inhibition of RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) activity. In fact, results of nuclear run-on assays and ChIP experiments show that association of Pol I with the rRNA gene is reduced in RPS19-depleted cells. The phosphorylation of three known regulators of Pol I, CDK2, AKT and AMPK, is altered during ribosomal stress and could be involved in the observed downregulation. Finally, RNA from patients with Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA), shows, on average, a lower level of 47S precursor. This indicates that inhibition of rRNA synthesis could be one of the molecular alterations at the basis of DBA. PMID:27734913

  4. GATA1 and PU.1 Bind to Ribosomal Protein Genes in Erythroid Cells: Implications for Ribosomopathies

    PubMed Central

    Amanatiadou, Elsa P.; Papadopoulos, Giorgio L.; Strouboulis, John; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S.

    2015-01-01

    The clear connection between ribosome biogenesis dysfunction and specific hematopoiesis-related disorders prompted us to examine the role of critical lineage-specific transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes during terminal erythroid differentiation. By applying EMSA and ChIP methodologies in mouse erythroleukemia cells we show that GATA1 and PU.1 bind in vitro and in vivo the proximal promoter region of the RPS19 gene which is frequently mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. Moreover, ChIPseq data analysis also demonstrates that several RP genes are enriched as potential GATA1 and PU.1 gene targets in mouse and human erythroid cells, with GATA1 binding showing an association with higher ribosomal protein gene expression levels during terminal erythroid differentiation in human and mouse. Our results suggest that RP gene expression and hence balanced ribosome biosynthesis may be specifically and selectively regulated by lineage specific transcription factors during hematopoiesis, a finding which may be clinically relevant to ribosomopathies. PMID:26447946

  5. Euglena gracilis chloroplast ribosomal protein operon: a new chloroplast gene for ribosomal protein L5 and description of a novel organelle intron category designated group III.

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, D A; Hallick, R B

    1989-01-01

    We describe the structure (3840 bp) of a novel Euglena gracilis chloroplast ribosomal protein operon that encodes the five genes rpl16-rpl14-rpl5-rps8-rpl36. The gene organization resembles the spc and the 3'-end of the S10 ribosomal protein operons of E. coli. The rpl5 is a new chloroplast gene not previously reported for any chloroplast genome to date and also not described as a nuclear-encoded, chloroplast protein gene. The operon contains at least 7 introns. We present evidence from primer extension analysis of chloroplast RNA for the correct in vivo splicing of five of the introns. Two of the introns within the rps8 gene flank an 8 bp exon, the smallest exon yet characterized in a chloroplast gene. Three introns resemble the classical group II introns of organelle genomes. The remaining 4 introns appear to be unique to the Euglena chloroplast DNA. They are uniform in size (95-109 nt), share common features with each other and are distinct from both group I and group II introns. We designate this new intron category as 'group III'. Images PMID:2477800

  6. Derivative of Extremophilic 50S Ribosomal Protein L35Ae as an Alternative Protein Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lomonosova, Anna V.; Ulitin, Andrei B.; Kazakov, Alexei S.; Mirzabekov, Tajib A.; Permyakov, Eugene A.

    2017-01-01

    Small antibody mimetics, or alternative binding proteins (ABPs), extend and complement antibody functionality with numerous applications in research, diagnostics and therapeutics. Given the superiority of ABPs, the last two decades have witnessed development of dozens of alternative protein scaffolds (APSs) for the design of ABPs. Proteins from extremophiles with their high structural stability are especially favorable for APS design. Here, a 10X mutant of the 50S ribosomal protein L35Ae from hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii has been probed as an APS. A phage display library of L35Ae 10X was generated by randomization of its three CDR-like loop regions (repertoire size of 2×108). Two L35Ae 10X variants specific to a model target, the hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL), were isolated from the resulting library using phage display. The affinity of these variants (L4 and L7) to HEL ranges from 0.10 μM to 1.6 μM, according to surface plasmon resonance data. While L4 has 1–2 orders of magnitude lower affinity to HEL homologue, bovine α-lactalbumin (BLA), L7 is equally specific to HEL and BLA. The reference L35Ae 10X is non-specific to both HEL and BLA. L4 and L7 are more resistant to denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride compared to the reference L35Ae 10X (mid-transition concentration is higher by 0.1–0.5 M). Chemical crosslinking experiments reveal an increased propensity of L4 and L7 to multimerization. Overall, the CDR-like loop regions of L35Ae 10X represent a proper interface for generation of functional ABPs. Hence, L35Ae is shown to extend the growing family of protein scaffolds dedicated to the design of novel binding proteins. PMID:28103321

  7. Involvement of the N Terminus of Ribosomal Protein L11 in Regulation of the RelA Protein of Escherichia coli†

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoming; Ishiguro, Edward E.

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid-deprived rplK (previously known as relC) mutants of Escherichia coli cannot activate (p)ppGpp synthetase I (RelA) and consequently exhibit relaxed phenotypes. The rplK gene encodes ribosomal protein L11, suggesting that L11 is involved in regulating the activity of RelA. To investigate the role of L11 in the stringent response, a derivative of rplK encoding L11 lacking the N-terminal 36 amino acids (designated ′L11) was constructed. Bacteria overexpressing ′L11 exhibited a relaxed phenotype, and this was associated with an inhibition of RelA-dependent (p)ppGpp synthesis during amino acid deprivation. In contrast, bacteria overexpressing normal L11 exhibited a typical stringent response. The overexpressed ′L11 was incorporated into ribosomes and had no effect on the ribosome-binding activity of RelA. By several methods (yeast two-hybrid, affinity blotting, and copurification), no direct interaction was observed between the C-terminal ribosome-binding domain of RelA and L11. To determine whether the proline-rich helix of L11 was involved in RelA regulation, the Pro-22 residue was replaced with Leu by site-directed mutagenesis. The overexpression of the Leu-22 mutant derivative of L11 resulted in a relaxed phenotype. These results indicate that the proline-rich helix in the N terminus of L11 is involved in regulating the activity of RelA. PMID:11673421

  8. Lagenin, a novel ribosome-inactivating protein with ribonucleolytic activity from bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) seeds.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2000-10-13

    The seeds of Lagenaria siceraria (Family Cucurbitaceae) were extracted with water and the extract was lyophilized. The lyophilized extract was chromatographed on a DEAE-cellulose column in 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.2). The unadsorbed fraction was applied to an Affi-gel Blue gel column previously equilibrated with the same buffer. After removal of unadsorbed materials, the adsorbed proteins were eluted with 1.5 M NaCl in the Tris-HCl buffer. After dialysis the adsorbed fraction was loaded on a CM-Sepharose CL-6B column which had been equilibrated with and was eluted with the same buffer. After elution of unadsorbed proteins, the column was eluted with a gradient of 0-1 M NaCl in 10 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.2). The fraction eluting at about 0.55 M NaCl, which represented pure ribosome inactivating protein (RIP), inhibited cell-free translation in a rabbit reticulocyte system with an IC50 of 0.21 nM and exerted ribonuclease activity on yeast tRNA with an activity of 45 U/mg. The RIP was designated lagenin. It possessed a molecular weight of 20 kDa, smaller than the range of 26-32 kDa reported for other RIPs. The N-terminal sequence of lagenin exhibited a lesser extent of similarity to those of other Cucurbitaceae RIPs, characterized by a deletion of the first three amino acid residues and a replacement of the 4th (Phe), 17th (Phe), 18th (Ile) and 22nd (Arg) residues which are invariant in other RIPs.

  9. Error-prone and error-restrictive mutations affecting ribosomal protein S12.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Deepali; Gregory, Steven T; O'Connor, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S12 plays a pivotal role in decoding functions on the ribosome. X-ray crystallographic analyses of ribosomal complexes have revealed that S12 is involved in the inspection of codon-anticodon pairings in the ribosomal A site, as well as in the succeeding domain rearrangements of the 30S subunit that are essential for accommodation of aminoacyl-tRNA. A role for S12 in tRNA selection is also well supported by classical genetic analyses; mutations affecting S12 are readily isolated in bacteria and organelles, since specific alterations in S12 confer resistance to the error-inducing antibiotic streptomycin, and the ribosomes from many such streptomycin-resistant S12 mutants display decreased levels of miscoding. However, substitutions that confer resistance to streptomycin likely represent a very distinct class of all possible S12 mutants. Until recently, the technical difficulties in generating random, unselectable mutations in essential genes in complex operons have generally precluded the analysis of other classes of S12 alterations. Using a recombineering approach, we have targeted the Escherichia coli rpsL gene, encoding S12, for random mutagenesis and screened the resulting mutants for effects on decoding fidelity. We have recovered over 40 different substitutions located throughout the S12 protein that alter the accuracy of translation without substantially affecting the sensitivity to streptomycin. Moreover, this collection includes mutants that promote miscoding, as well as those that restrict decoding errors. These results affirm the importance of S12 in decoding processes and indicate that alterations in this essential protein can have diverse effects on the accuracy of decoding.

  10. The ribosome as a missing link in prebiotic evolution II: Ribosomes encode ribosomal proteins that bind to common regions of their own mRNAs and rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Root-Bernstein, Meredith

    2016-05-21

    We have proposed that the ribosome may represent a missing link between prebiotic chemistries and the first cells. One of the predictions that follows from this hypothesis, which we test here, is that ribosomal RNA (rRNA) must have encoded the proteins necessary for ribosomal function. In other words, the rRNA also functioned pre-biotically as mRNA. Since these ribosome-binding proteins (rb-proteins) must bind to the rRNA, but the rRNA also functioned as mRNA, it follows that rb-proteins should bind to their own mRNA as well. This hypothesis can be contrasted to a "null" hypothesis in which rb-proteins evolved independently of the rRNA sequences and therefore there should be no necessary similarity between the rRNA to which rb-proteins bind and the mRNA that encodes the rb-protein. Five types of evidence reported here support the plausibility of the hypothesis that the mRNA encoding rb-proteins evolved from rRNA: (1) the ubiquity of rb-protein binding to their own mRNAs and autogenous control of their own translation; (2) the higher-than-expected incidence of Arginine-rich modules associated with RNA binding that occurs in rRNA-encoded proteins; (3) the fact that rRNA-binding regions of rb-proteins are homologous to their mRNA binding regions; (4) the higher than expected incidence of rb-protein sequences encoded in rRNA that are of a high degree of homology to their mRNA as compared with a random selection of other proteins; and (5) rRNA in modern prokaryotes and eukaryotes encodes functional proteins. None of these results can be explained by the null hypothesis that assumes independent evolution of rRNA and the mRNAs encoding ribosomal proteins. Also noteworthy is that very few proteins bind their own mRNAs that are not associated with ribosome function. Further tests of the hypothesis are suggested: (1) experimental testing of whether rRNA-encoded proteins bind to rRNA at their coding sites; (2) whether tRNA synthetases, which are also known to bind to their

  11. Adsorption mechanism of ribosomal protein L2 onto a silica surface: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Tosaka, Ryo; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Ohdomari, Iwao; Watanabe, Takanobu

    2010-06-15

    A large-scale molecular dynamics simulation was carried out in order to investigate the adsorption mechanism of ribosomal protein L2 (RPL2) onto a silica surface at various pH values. RPL2 is a constituent protein of the 50S large ribosomal subunit, and a recent experimental report showed that it adsorbs strongly to silica surfaces and that it can be used to immobilize proteins on silica surfaces. The simulation results show that RPL2, especially domains 1 (residues 1-60) and 3 (residues 203-273), adsorbed more tightly to the silica surface above pH 7. We found that a major driving force for the adsorption of RPL2 onto the silica surface is the electrostatic interaction and that the structural flexibility of domains 1 and 3 may further contribute to the high affinity.

  12. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and B